35 Burst results for "Weber"

"weber" Discussed on My Worst Investment Ever Podcast

My Worst Investment Ever Podcast

05:55 min | Last month

"weber" Discussed on My Worst Investment Ever Podcast

"Andrew i am. I am so excited to be here. Thank you so much. Yes it's my pleasure to have you. You know you have a lot of energy. And i love your energy and i love what you're doing and i've been listening to your podcasts. A bit and trying to understand more about you. What you're doing and i want to introduce you to the audience so judy weber is a women's business. Strategist and scaling expert. Helping six figure. Female ceos take their business to the next level with strategy systems and simplicity. Her global client base consists of outstanding professionals experts coaches consultants and creatives a formal trial lawyer and c. suite executives turned serial entrepreneur. Judy overcame a lot to get to where she is today. A small town girl from humble means she did what others thought was impossible as she pursued her dreams without apology featured on fox. Abc nbc and cbs. Women seek judy out to learn how to think like a c. e. o. And scale to seven figures. My goodness judy was you. Take a minute and filling for their tidbits about your life. Oh my goodness well. How much time do we have. No i do want to just mention about some of the things i overcame. You know this is going to lead into the worst investment. Ever but the idea that. We're i come from people like me. Didn't go law school. People like me didn't even go to college and people like me is poor folk where you know six kids in a house with one bathroom and you know just the basics of life. But i didn't know. I was poor until i grew up. So that's just a little bit of a little bit of a story about some of the things. I had to overcome with that. You know that's inspiring on. I know all the listeners out there you know. We're all faced with our challenges. I think one of the lessons. I learned in my life at a young age. Was that the challenges. We face are relative. Everybody has challenge. And i look at some people and i think my god. How did they not break under that pressure. And then i look at someone else i say. How did they break under that pressure right. I know exactly what to me absolutely. And so i think the the point that i would just make the listeners out there you are struggling with your own challenges in you know what what i get from. What judy told us is that you can overcome..

judy weber judy Andrew Judy nbc cbs Abc fox
"weber" Discussed on Beyond the Wheel

Beyond the Wheel

04:05 min | 2 months ago

"weber" Discussed on Beyond the Wheel

"Never had a bad experience with a weber grill while traveling across the country so that really caught our attention that they were all quality. No matter what state we were in what campground we were in so when we bought our house we we bought just recently awebber spirit to and i've wondered. Does you think the success of weber is based on that somebody trying and somebody's friend having one they tried they see how great is. Do you think it's a lot of word of mouth. Is what has created weber to be such a success. it absolutely has an in word of mouth marketing. Is you know it's invaluable from our standpoint but for us it starts with you know you put a quality product on the market and then you stand behind. Our customer service is bar none the best in industry if not globally. We set the standard for that. And people know you by awebber. You're going to get a great quality grill that we stand behind end. The customer service is going to be there and word of mouth with how that travels is it exponential. I mean we. We rely on it and we pride ourselves on it and it's helped us create such great customer base but also fans like we were talking a little bit grow about collecting watters. We have people that are like that we have them all over the world that cannot collect vintage colors and all the different colors produced in all over the place. And that's the fun part. I remember growing up in the seventies and eighties. My father always had. I think it was a black weber. Kettle grill does weber stone. Make the kettle style. Grills we do and we've made that keto grill. And what the only difference that you would see from the seventies and eighties. Because i'm the same i. My dad had the same. Grille is we changed. The bull handles on it. So back in the late seventies. I think nineteen eighty was last year. We did it but our handles or may actually made on a metal warm. So you'd have a glove on and you move the grill around or you know that kinda stopping. It transitioned away from that. But we're the same exact shape as we were in the late seventies early eighties. I actually have a nineteen eighty cuddle because not to show my age. But that was the executive i was so i was like i need to have one of those you know just to have because that's the thing with collectors. It's called berthier cattle. Oh okay that kind of walked me right into a question. So that change going away from those metal handles..

weber weber stone watters
Episode 53 Part 1 Our Relationship with Planned Parenthood Ft Amanda Weber - burst 02

The Manic Pixie Weirdo

02:58 min | 2 months ago

Episode 53 Part 1 Our Relationship with Planned Parenthood Ft Amanda Weber - burst 02

"Like two. You kind of have the two extreme perspectives. And so for you to be able to come together and be able to say like, okay, so this is what this is what I found through my journey and experience with this object matter. I think that's really really wonderful. Yeah, the interesting thing is, is I could absolutely argue both points. You know, I know the talking points of both sides so well. I was actually I would go speak at the capitol in Sacramento California on behalf of Planned Parenthood and speak to the news outlets and speak to the representatives and stuff there. And then later, I ended up being a kind of social media coordinator for Abby. So I was responding to people on her social media platforms and stuff. And helping her with her outreach, not because I was pro life or not because I was opposed to abortion. But I could very much respond as she would, because I knew exactly what the talking points and the important points were. And. Her stances and her things have very much changed over time. But at the time when I volunteered at Planned Parenthood, I am not gonna lie. I hated the pro life movement. I mean, vehemently hated the pro life movement, partially because Planned Parenthood kind of set that in my mind that these were the bad guys. These were the people trying to take our rights away, and they were trying to ruin my life and all this. So I had this very strong narrative in my mind of what these people were, but also because I had a personal experience. And this is something I haven't talked about publicly, but I had this personal experience where I found myself in an unplanned pregnancy shortly after my mom passed away. And I panicked and I didn't know what to do and I didn't want to have an abortion and I reached out to the pro life movement to the people that had been protesting at my clinic for all this time and saying, we love you and we care about you and will help you no matter what. And I reached out, and I said, look, this is a situation I'm in. And here I am, you know, playing Paradise court putting her tail between her legs, saying I need your help. And it seemed on the surface. It's okay, we're going to take you to the crisis pregnancy centers and we're going to help you, but it was really, we're going to give you diapers and formula and you can figure out the hell out on your own. And that was very disheartening because here I am a person that just lost her mom. I'm on my own. I have no money. I have nothing to speak up. I'm literally scraping by month month and they're going, well, we'll give you some diapers and formula. And I just had the worst taste in my mouth about the entire movement because I thought that that's what they were, you know, or these people that were love you and we're going to take you under our wing. Oh, no, you're too much trouble. You're too needy. You have too many needs. And Abby was the first person that I came across that wasn't like that that she very much when I end up getting pregnant with my son said, what

Viral Human Anxiety Depression Mental Health Peace Hope Love Relationships Abby Sacramento Paradise Court California
A highlight from Episode 53 Part 1 Our Relationship with Planned Parenthood Ft Amanda Weber

The Manic Pixie Weirdo

01:56 min | 2 months ago

A highlight from Episode 53 Part 1 Our Relationship with Planned Parenthood Ft Amanda Weber

"We are creating as a society, it's become very much an us versus them mentality. And when you're stuck in that, when you're stuck in these are my beliefs and no one and nothing could ever swing me from those beliefs, you missed a really amazing opportunity to learn and to grow. And for me, learning different things and learning different perspectives helped me step away from the narrative that I was being given by whatever people, you know, by the representatives, like my state representatives or Planned Parenthood themselves or fellow volunteers, I could step away and say, but that's not what I believe that's not what I agree with. Let me formulate my own feelings and opinions instead of just parroting what I'm told. And that nowadays, I think, is more useful than ever and more needed than ever because we're so afraid that if we listen to another person or give even thought to another person's experience or opinion, then we're in some way, betraying our own, and that's just simply not true. Yes, I completely agree. The other thing that I find sometimes hard to do, especially when talking about difficult subjects like this is I will open myself up to because I am pretty adamantly pro choice. As far as like my abortion stance is concerned, I have mixed feelings about Planned Parenthood, just in general. And I think that's probably true for a lot of people, just like the organization itself. As a stand-alone like organization, but I have found myself where I where I'm somebody who I want to understand both sides. I want to understand what are all the points.

Viral Human Anxiety Depression Mental Health Peace Hope Love Relationships
What Is Link Rot?

Reset

01:27 min | 3 months ago

What Is Link Rot?

"What exactly is link. Rot so link. Rod is an umbrella term. For what happens when you're surfing the web and you click on a link and the content that opens up on the other end either is completely gone or it has changed in a way that you weren't expecting a lot of users of the weber familiar with that dreaded four four page not found error and. That's the prime example of link up in a lot of ways it's part of the design of the internet. One of the most powerful things about the web is that it's a place where the most up-to-date information can exist and where content creators can be in control of what they're putting out into the world. It allows people to be constantly improving their websites and changing the way that they have users navigate their websites. There's also things like new internet protocols that happened that changed the way website works which can break links. Sometimes people sell the domains that they manage or they just stop paying them which causes them to go down. There's all sorts of reasons and again it's kind of just a inevitable part of the internet a lot of ways. Our team talks a lot about the dilemma of the internet. Being that like the thing that you want to disappear like that really embarrassing photos that you took in two thousand four is always gonna stick around and be somewhere on the web but the thing that you actually need is going to be lost forever

ROD
Coping With the Reality of Climate Change

Environment: NPR

02:12 min | 4 months ago

Coping With the Reality of Climate Change

"The un said that it is unequivocal that humans have warmed the earth in that the scale of the changes is unprecedented and the predictions are dire more drought or fires heatwaves. If we don't change our ways and is not the first time we've heard it. Though the evidence linking human behavior to climate change is now stronger so that got us wondering how does such overwhelming news effect us in our desire to do something about it. We're joined now by dr elke weber professor of psychology at princeton university and she also contributed to the un's latest climate report. Welcome to the program. Thank you so much for having me. Increasingly people are dealing directly with the results of climate change. Right record heat across the country. How do people respond when they're confronted with the sort of bigness of the issue of climate. Change what kinds of emotions can that out. It can be incredibly overwhelming especially among younger people. And so there's no question that climate anxiety has gone drastically up i- contemplation about sort of what kind of world full of and and what kind of world we we might leave to our children and grandchildren so it's very debilitating symptoms that oftentimes have to be treated with medication or psychotherapy from psychologists point of view. How can the threat of climate change be communicated in a way that reaches people that also convinces them to act so we have a study in the field for the last year and a half. We've been following five thousand americans across the political spectrum on issues related to covert but then also in parallel on climate change and as you know both covert and climate. Change are highly politicized in this country. But what we find. Is that when you see. People who have personally experienced is a covert symptoms or extreme weather events. They are equally concerned about the issue and equally willing to take action regardless of the politics for better or worse effect that we're seeing climate change hitting all now hopefully as a way of bridging the current gulf to political ideology because people want to protect their loved ones and when they see dangerous in the front step to actually much more to do something about it.

Dr Elke Weber UN Princeton University
Tellez Delivers Again as Brewers Edge Giants 2-1 in 10

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 4 months ago

Tellez Delivers Again as Brewers Edge Giants 2-1 in 10

"Routed to let's came through with the game winning RBI single in the tenth inning as the brewers defeated the giants two to one in a battle of two first place teams to leads down places late game heroics no wonder to strike mode just trying to fight off and start going down the line and got the job done so you know I was I was pretty cool it was a pitcher's duel delight is both starters Corbin Burnes and Logan Weber both sharp burns allowing just four hits through seven innings while Webb gave up just three over six with nine strikeouts Brandon belt and I have a site you'll Garcia account for the other runs in the game with home runs before to Liz came through in the extra frame I'm David Shuster

Corbin Burnes Logan Weber Brewers Giants Brandon Belt Webb Garcia LIZ David Shuster
"weber" Discussed on The .NET Core Podcast

The .NET Core Podcast

04:30 min | 4 months ago

"weber" Discussed on The .NET Core Podcast

"I. I'm getting how this fits together now right. Because for us sequel databases like ernie might elliott. Mike sequel was the way to go the only way that we love that was we built a sequel database right. I feel like grown-ups sometimes develop as a bit complacent with that technology. Oil use dot net j. query or dot net and react and sequel database. Must the application. Don't move on will look. We've already discussed right You'll you'll particular problem domain. There's a it doesn't fit nicely with standard sequel tables and graph databases just seems to fit a little unless someone unless you will someone on your team had spent the time to look into graph databases. You've never known that right. Yeah caught us by surprise. I think we relate to the party Had already been around for a couple of years when we discovered them so we were kind of living on the iraq. I would happily admit that. So we only got away of graph database. I think in two thousand fifteen or sixteen. I'm but to my defense. I should say that Cloud providers offering a gremlin. Api orrick Api whatsoever Have only been around a lot longer. I think the the kasey be offering a has been introduced in two thousand seventeen think. Neptune is around kind of like for the same time and there's others but yet the theme the theory has been around. I think like two thousand twelve for think about project i think. Take the process of two thousand nine but only gaining momentum I think with the Availability of cloud database providers because You might wanna you might choose to set them up themselves. In deploy though service yourself Best offerings for that as well. But i think the cloud provide us being available as a really big factor in growth in that regard when it comes to graph databases and their acceptance..

ernie might elliott Mike sequel iraq
Torrential Downpour Continues in China's 'Once-in-5,000-Year Rainstorm'

All Things Considered

02:07 min | 4 months ago

Torrential Downpour Continues in China's 'Once-in-5,000-Year Rainstorm'

"Rains are pummeling central China in Henan Province, a year's worth of water. Some two ft fell on the provincial capital Zhangzhou in just three days this week, and it is still coming down. Flights are suspended so far, the government says 25 people have died. NPR China Affairs correspondent John Roach has more. The water fell hard and fast in Zhangzhou, a city of more than 12 million, and the sewers couldn't keep up. In this video posted online, a group of men pull a woman to safety as they battle waist high brown water pouring down the street like a swollen river. According to state media. 12 of the dead drowned when the subway system flooded. State broadcaster CCTV interviewed a man caught underground when water poured in part of the people around us were clenching the railings next to the tunnel. There were about a dozen of us crawling together. The water level rose through our shooter's several of us Han there including me and the child. The two of us almost gave up because we were exhausted. Do Liang Chen is an expert on China's climate at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden. He says the city should have reacted more quickly. But I was surprised anyway that this time the subway were still operating, he says several factors set off what some Chinese scientists are calling a once in 5000 year event. There's a typhoon approaching the Chinese coast. It's hundreds of miles from Kunin, but already bringing water from the sea over land. Is also persistent high pressure over the Pacific that's pushing wind from the sea toward China and the topography of the region has what he calls a channeling effect. And Jen says this Chinese rainstorm has something in common with the rain that's been hammering Europe leaving more than 120 people dead there. What a Weber in general in the atmosphere is increasing. Because of global warming and more water in the air means more rainfall a lot more. In some cases, China has a good system. In terms of the early warning, Chen says China appears better prepared than Europe for this kind of

Zhangzhou Henan Province John Roach China Liang Chen University Of Gothenburg NPR Chinese Coast Kunin Cctv Government Sweden Pacific JEN Weber Europe Chen
Montreal Canadiens' Shea Weber Could Miss Next Season Because of Injuries

The Ray & Dregs Hockey Podcast

01:09 min | 5 months ago

Montreal Canadiens' Shea Weber Could Miss Next Season Because of Injuries

"But then you look at shea weber. I thought he was tremendous in the playoffs in particular in the stanley cup final. I mean brayden. Point was ready to lose his mind in that series because every time he looked up he saw this mountain of a human being shea weber and there's a laundry list right of of injuries. It's the foot it's the knees it's the ankle. It's the hands. I mean on and on and on it goes so it's a developing story. We don't know that shea weber is packing news at five more years left and a lot of money on the table. You know could be placed on long-term injury for potentially the entire season twenty one twenty two well. The national hockey league has to dive into that. So we're going to revisit this in many headlines to come here on the ranger eggs podcast. But it's it's a sad one isn't it because four. Is it just the body of every player that that gets to that point in his career where the body just can't do it

Shea Weber Brayden Point National Hockey League
Canadiens Beat Lightning 3-2 in OT, Avoid Stanley Cup Sweep

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 5 months ago

Canadiens Beat Lightning 3-2 in OT, Avoid Stanley Cup Sweep

"Josh Anderson scored his second of the game in extra minutes and the Canadians avoided lightning sweep Monday night taking game four by a three two score that has managed to shut down the lightning's power play unit during a four minute my interests as the captain Shea Weber late in the game for high sticking penalty carried over in overtime and Tampa Bay only managed four shots Anderson's first period goal marked the first time the Canadian strike first in both territory in the series we didn't want to end it tonight in front of our fans you know we we expect to go to camp tomorrow I think everybody in the locker room death the difference in this one Carey price returning to superb form blocking thirty two of thirty four shots the lightning will look to win the final on Wednesday night in Tampa L. A. Larry here in Montreal

Josh Anderson Shea Weber Tampa Bay Anderson Carey L. A. Larry Tampa Montreal
The Real Inglorious Basterds: Operation Greenup

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

02:13 min | 5 months ago

The Real Inglorious Basterds: Operation Greenup

"Operation green up an operation carried out by a special group of men many of called the real life. Inglorious bastards a reference to the two thousand nine quentin tarantino film in which group. Us jewish soldiers plot to assassinate high up nazi leaders operation. Green up. wasn't exactly like the hollywood blockbuster known was catching nazis and carbon swastikas of their foreheads. Hitler doesn't get submachine gun down burning theater that also gets blown up. Gotta love tarantino's over the top devos's otheir was no assassination plan but a lot of daring cinematic. Incredibly courageous moments did go down. There was a cast of characters that feel more like hollywood creations in real people. Sometimes it was an amazing high risk high stakes operation that did truly involves jewish men risking their lives parachuting in behind enemy lines to quote. Kill some nazis. They may not have been pulling off executions in the woods but they did help give the allies valuable intel that saved a whole bunch of lives short version of their story. Is this two jewish refugees. The united states living in brooklyn frederick mayor twenty-three hans wynberg twenty to end up in the office of strategic services the os forerunner to the cia and parachute deep behind nazi lines into the austrian province of tyrol in february of nineteen forty-five their mission to compile reports on german rail. Traffic over the brenner pass between italy and austria. And make sure. The germans don't have a secret alpine fortress and intel. They could glean there would help shape. The allies plans for a final world war two showdown with nazi germany. A third man also pairs you then with them. Franz weber there mark lieutenant. Who had belatedly come to his sentences about the tyrannical antisemitic sociopathic nature of adolf hitler and his war operation. Green up ended up bringing the allies important information shattered some troublesome propaganda. The germans had concentrated a large number of men and weapons in the south could have extended world war. Two's bloodshed by months leading to possibly tens of thousands of additional deaths. Not only that. But after being captured and tortured by gestapo agents in refusing to give any intel frederick mayor also negotiated the peaceful surrender of innsbruck the tyrolian provincial capital to the us seventh army on may third nineteen forty-five saving even more lives.

Hollywood Hans Wynberg Quentin Tarantino Devos Tarantino Intel Hitler Office Of Strategic Services Franz Weber Mark Lieutenant United States Tyrol Brooklyn CIA Austria Italy Adolf Hitler Germany
Canadiens Return to Cup Final After 3-2 OT Win Over Vegas

AP News Radio

00:29 sec | 5 months ago

Canadiens Return to Cup Final After 3-2 OT Win Over Vegas

"Archery likens overtime goal gave the Montreal Canadiens a three two win over the Vegas golden knights in game six of bell centre look at it took a failed to go past a minute thirty nine into the extra frame depositing the deciding marker over the shoulder of golden knights netminder robin letter biggest defenseman Alec Martinez of the game to overtime scoring the tying goal early in the third period Shea Weber and Cole Caufield scored the other had schools as much real advances to the final for the first time since they last hosted the Cup nineteen ninety three I'm John lottery

Vegas Golden Knights Montreal Canadiens Robin Letter Bell Centre Archery Alec Martinez Golden Knights Cole Caufield Shea Weber John Lottery
California Secretary of State Confirms Newsom Recall Election

Bloomberg Law

00:18 sec | 5 months ago

California Secretary of State Confirms Newsom Recall Election

"Gavin Newsom is officially headed for a recall election. Secretary of state Shirley Weber says only 43 people withdrew their names from the recall petition. She says there were more than 1.7 million verified signatures more than enough to meet the threshold for a recall election. The White

Secretary Of State Shirley Web Gavin Newsom
PRO TALK With Designer Christi Weber

The Fine Homebuilding Podcast

02:16 min | 6 months ago

PRO TALK With Designer Christi Weber

"Thank you very much for being on the show today. Thanks for having me. Patrick i appreciate it. Can you tell me what you do. At as director of design and lead designer for tedious custom construction. What does that mean well. We're in a little bit of a turns transition lately just kind of suffering. Something's around making some things for efficient and so that the head of design is a relatively new role for me but we're expanding our staff of designers so that basically means you know someone has to kind of see the grand vision for b. Be in charge and make sure everyone's getting their their needs. Men has has everything available that they need to do their work. So that's kind of my role there. But i'm also still doing my own design work so the only architectural type designer in our office. So i'm doing things like additions screen porches you know. Pop up books Whole house remodels in some new mahomes as file. So i've got a. I've got a full plate right now. Lots going on and we should be clear that you are not an architect studied architecture. And you're working on your licensing right. I sure am you had a lot of working women who had to take a break from your career to raise kids. I'm guessing yeah just one daughter and then she. She took up a lot of my time and wanted to be able to focus on her for us. You know early formative years especially in a now. She's a wonderful support to me. As i'm going through my my studies in my licensure exams. I'm glad you're getting a chance to do that. I think that's awesome. How far into the process are you. I'm exactly one six six tests. And i've gotten through the first one and it was a big moment for me just getting over that first hurdle I'm actually. I could plug the young architects boot camp right now for michael receipt. I've been participating in that and it's been really great It's a way that architecture licensure candidates can come together studied together. That's what we did in in school. We're always together always learning bouncing off each other it was never in a silo. So that's been really rewarding experience for me so far

Patrick Michael
Tips That Will Massively Improve Your Sales Webinars

The $100 MBA Show

02:10 min | 7 months ago

Tips That Will Massively Improve Your Sales Webinars

"Laura things a lot of people talk about is hell painful. It is to run a webinar and not make as many sales as you actually anticipate or hope to. I've learned the hard way time and time again. And tweak my saleswoman a presentation over and over to find out what really works and today i'm just gonna give it to you. I'm gonna give you the three things that if you do today in your next sales webinar. It's going to change your results. It's going to help you get more sales. This is what i found in my own experience. So let's jump right into it. The first tip is many of us when we run a sales webinar. We have the format of doing some sort of workshop training or coaching followed up with a demo or presentation or sales pitch of our product and then we have cuny. The problem is is that too many of us will say the women are sixteen minutes. We will maybe teach for forty five minutes get into our demo and pitch and because we don't have much time left to answer a few questions and we may even go over time and the webinar about an hour and fifteen minutes in this defeats. The purpose of a saleswoman are. The whole point of this was webinars to make sales. Okay so it needs to be your top priority. And i been guilty of this many times. And i actually didn't learn what i was doing wrong until i actually started asking feedback from people that attended my weber my My co hosts. If i did a partner webinar and they were just awesome. He told me that. Neil going to longer babies to content heavy and that was my fault because i come from teaching background. I just wanna give give give and teach teach teach. But i'm actually doing my customers a disservice because i'm not giving them enough time to learn about the product of the solution. That's gonna really help them and give them chances to ask questions about it. So what i found. Is that if you're going to run a sixty minute webinar. I find that the best breakdown is twenty five. Twenty fifteen now. This may feel a little bit uncomfortable but trust me twenty five minutes of content of workshop. This includes your introduction your backstory all that kind of stuff and given them great information

Laura Neil
The battle over the Line 3 oil pipeline expansion in Minnesota

Native America Calling

01:50 min | 8 months ago

The battle over the Line 3 oil pipeline expansion in Minnesota

"One of president biden's first moves office was to counsel the keystone. Xl pipeline indigenous. Environmental groups are calling on him to do the same for line. Three in northern minnesota lindsey weber reports. Tanya abed is a member of the mill x band of ojibway from east lake minnesota. When i spoke with her recently she was on day. Twenty one of thirty eight day hunger strike. She's protesting against the line. Three pipeline replacement project after years of undergoing minnesota's environmental review process. The canadian energy corporation and bridge began construction on the project. In december and bridge received its final permit from the minnesota pollution. Control agency at the end of twenty twenty. The pipeline replacement project will pass through two hundred lakes and streams seventy eight miles of wetlands and land belonging to the minnesota nisha knob people according to an eighteen fifty five treaty op says. She's protesting to uphold that law. Embryos has not has not received a permit from doj boy warrior society. They are lacking that and this right here right now. That's one on isn't illegal illegal. Construction the movement against line three ramped up as bridge started constructing the pipeline last year since then anti pipeline activists known as water protectors have held regular demonstrations. They've also been regularly arrested. Rbm been at a few incidents where people have been arrested. That's winona la duke. She's an indigenous activist from the white earth band of ojibway. She's also a founder of the environmental organization. Honor the earth. She's facing six separate charges for participating in direct actions and protests. Over one hundred and seventy water protectors have been arrested. The duke says it's unjust.

Minnesota President Biden Lindsey Weber Tanya Abed East Lake Doj Boy Warrior Society White Earth Band Of Ojibway Environmental Organization
The Single Fastest Way to Grow Your Email Marketing List with Adam Robinson

Entrepreneur on FIRE

04:54 min | 9 months ago

The Single Fastest Way to Grow Your Email Marketing List with Adam Robinson

"What is the single fast way to grow your email marketing. Less breaking down force get emails. I can promise you is the single fastest way to grow your email marketing list. And here's what it does. So we've all set up pop up forms on our website. Some of us have gone even more sophisticated than that and done correggio stations with options and stuff like that no matter what. If you have the best pop up in the world you're going to capture three four maybe five percent of your anonymous website visitors in convert them to people who are on your email list and from that point you can indoctrinate them in one them up and you know the success from that point is in your hands. I have a method in. It's through a technology called identity resolution that there's this really elite group of enterprise marketers. That's aware of this. And what i wanted to do was basically give it to the world. what identity re resolution can do is. We can identify up to thirty five percent of your anonymous traffic. That's more than one out of three of the visitors that come to your website and we can pass you their email address their first and last name even their postal record so that you can legally in the united states market to them which is just phenomenally powerful considering that before this you were converting probably ninety percent less of those people and for the kicker it's around ten percent of the cost of actually acquiring an update on facebook so let's talk specifics because fire nation. Okay that's sounds good. How does this sounds like matching. Sounds like black magic but how specifically does actually work like walk us through this process will tell you exactly how it works so. There's no reason that you should know. This didn't find out until i became totally obsessed with the idea that this was possible. Which i learned through i own an email marketing company like convert kidder weber. Whatever and i heard of this. And i was just like this. Can't be real. How does this work. It's probably the same thing. You're thinking right now so turns out that there is something going on in the advertising network called d. de identifying of people right and basically what that does is it. It is a way to with no personally identifiable information. Follow us all around the internet so that we can then be grouped into audiences in sold to advertisers so that advertising can be shown to us by interest so as a sort of did that will make sense first of all like. There's this stuff happening on the background. And one of the ways it's done is it will take an email address on my email addresses. Adam at getty meals dot com. It'll convert it into this language called. Md five right in the thing about md. Five is that when you go from adam at getty meals dot com to the md five encrypted version of it you can never unencrypted as a human being right but what's interesting about md. Five is adam at getty meals dot com encrypts. The same way every single time right. So i'm going back to how this actually works. I just wanted to give a quick lecture on on that. I so there's two parts of this one is the identity part and we're part of a cookie pool. What cookie pool is is a bunch of email marketing companies. Like the one that i own robe league convert kit. Whoever in order to enhance their revenues we sell click in open data to these vendors. And what they'll do with. It is when i get an email newsletter from. Let's say mailchimp. If i open it or click on it. It knows my email address in it puts a cookie in my browser with that email address encrypted in it right without even knowing and this is compliant with all the privacy policies. This is like how the internet works right. So i very innocently. Look at this pair of shoes. In a newsletter i click on it and i now have a cookie in my browser that has this identifier it. Now what we do is we just wait for that cookie to come around to our customers website. In when we see that cookie we see that. Md five email address. Right so it's it's encrypted and we don't know what it is looking at it with the naked eye. The beautiful thing about md five is if on the other side of it. You had a database of every single email in the usa. You can convert all those two md fives and then just do a look up in unscrambling.

Kidder Weber Adam USA Facebook
Why The 90's Was The Decade Of The SuperCar

Past Gas

05:37 min | 9 months ago

Why The 90's Was The Decade Of The SuperCar

"To pass gas. I'm your host known sites trying to always by james pump. Frey hello there. Everyone it is i james and not an pasta and joe weber. What's up wink wink nation. I'm here for you. And i am fired up and as as the boys have been Saying we are talking about ninety supercars today on this episode. We were talking before we started. Recording i think like we're a little bias as far as the nineties. Being the greatest time for supercars that's like saying like the nineties is the best time for cartoons. Yes because that's when joe and i grew up at least win win. Did you grow knowing how old a year you're six years six years old Yeah i mean born in ninety three so like my k- yeah you're the first time when you realize supercars where thing was in the nineties. I sure i heard third eye blind on the radio is what you're saying about three eleven. Her three eleven to okay got it. So like like the diablo's the labor gyn machines. Those are big big parts of your formative years for sure. Yeah now supercars are a lot more prevalent. Yeah i feel like within the last ten years like it's blew up again. But i feel like the nineties really set the president the president the president and showed what was possible and kind of like blew the whole supercar thing out of the water because we had just come out of the malays era and people were like. I want something fast and flashy and purple and green are really cool right now so. Let's just make cars like debt for sure. And i think you know from the sixties to the eighties like cars. That would be considered supercars today. I mean there are just called sports cars you know. Yeah 'cause they were. They were really fast. Yeah not the ninety s great supercars because it literally defined that genre. That's when he started seeing like dance materials carbon fiber the. That's it that's it really for me only carbon-fiber that's the only qualifier. I think we should just get right into it. Yeah let's go. let's go so so. How did we get to the nineties. Being the definitive era of supercars the term supercar itself isn't really official it. Roughly describes a high performance. Luxury or exotic. Sports car generally a two seater with at least an eight cylinder engine. Although that'll probably change here the trend towards these vehicles started as far back as the sixties when detroit started shoehorning big block. v8's into sedans and turning the results loose on the american public and of course we know those as muscle cars across the atlantic european manufacturers were also busy refining. their lightweight. sports cars what. These smaller cars lacked in displacement and seating they made up for easily in handling and driveability as a sixties turned into the seventies. Those massive motors became liabilities with the looming gas crisis and clean air act of nineteen seventy then the second oil crisis in nineteen seventy nine. The industry yet again. An american cars continued to get smaller and more efficient manufacturers in the. Us knew they had to do something. So they're carburetors. Were replaced by fuel injection and distributors being swapped for coil packs. But we weren't there yet after all the one thousand nine hundred. Five corvette made her on the same horse. Power as a well-equipped twenty twenty. Camry the so-called malays era when autos reached a low point of reliability and performance was in full swing. New emissions equipment was starving the motors of their power. And even in the instances where these new cars had style. The eighty-five corvette being a prime example was under. The hood didn't match up that being said the eighties were still an impressive decade for supercars. Just not in the united states. American consumers still reeling from the death of the muscle car scene started looking abroad for inspiring performance. Every decade is a reaction to the one that came before in the eighties shoved back. The seventies with an absolute explosion of high performance supercars a handful of imported performance. Cars like the lamborghini coon tash for testarossa and the lotus esprit were blowing enthusiasts minds and with the stock market. Looking like pikes peak. There were selling faster than cocaine in wall. Street bathrooms by the nineties. A lot of that pesky emissions tech that was thrust on manufacturers was starting to get smarter as we're onboard computers and fuel injectors the progressing technology let engines breathe better and pass their gases in ways. That didn't starve the performance. Nice if you if you like stories like this check out. Our podcast passed gas. Celebrities enrich folks. Were having a hard time justifying spending big bucks on stiff bucket seats and jarring track suspension setups and manufacturers took the hint burr example lamborghini spent the late eighties upgrading. The coon tauch into the diablo. The coon tosh is often derided for having a borderline unusable only tight interior that overheats quickly so they lengthened diablo to improve the comfort ability in the cabin. The word is this comfort. Yeah right after ability never heard of that. Is that a diablo right there. This is a blow right here and it's purple too. Yeah that's the blister. That i had

James Pump Joe Weber Frey James JOE Detroit Motors United States Esprit Lotus Lamborghini
Nigeria is at risk of becoming a failed state

The BreakPoint Podcast

04:23 min | 9 months ago

Nigeria is at risk of becoming a failed state

"Just the last few weeks to mass kidnappings took place both at schools in northwestern nigeria and the first unidentified gunmen attacked a boarding school. Killing one student and kidnapping forty two others a week later. Thirty eight of those. That were a ducted. Were rescued presumably by government forces. But the day before that rescue unknown gunmen kidnapped over three hundred girls from a boarding school in a nearby state on tuesday. The ap reported that two hundred and seventy were released now. It's not clear whether these kidnappings were driven by ideology ransom money. Though of course motive doesn't make much of a difference to those who are kidnapped or their families not dimension in places like northwestern area and profit are not mutually exclusive motives. Win hostages are released by boko. Haram and other extremist. It's almost always because some ransom has been paid and regardless of motivation. The average nigerian especially the average nigerian christian lives in constant threat for their personal safety. Nigeria's inability to guarantee the basic safety of its citizens now has observers asking whether or not this country is on the verge of becoming a failed state. That's the official term for a state where the government is no longer really in control. It's a label. Most often applied to countries like yemen or somalia where basic institutions are virtually non-existent. At least when it comes to protecting the christian population and institutions. They're nigeria's government hardly seems like they are in control because groups like boko haram and fulani militants operate with a defacto immunity in nigeria. Their actions against christians. There are given defacto legitimacy. If the government's blind eye is not intentional. It's fair to ask. Whether or not the government's authority even can extend beyond abu nigeria's capital city. German max weber famously defined a state as a human community that successfully claims the monopoly on the legitimate use of physical force within a given territory using even that most basic standard nigeria is clearly failing groups like icon have documented the violence in the northern part of the country where christians are killed wounded assaulted and abducted with regularity sometimes daily regularity by boko haram and fulani militants and nigeria is not the only country on the world watch for christian persecution that is also characterized as a fragile or even a failed state seven of the top ten countries on the open doors list also ranked high on the fragile states list which is produced by the fund for peace nigeria ranks ninth on the world watch list and ranks fourteenth on the fragile states index and this pattern makes both political and biblical sense a state that cannot effectively restrain or punish perpetrators of violence is in no position to protect the religious freedoms of its citizens as the apostle paul told the rahman's government is instituted by god in order to execute wrath on the wrongdoer that's why we're to obey the government including paying our taxes not because the government somehow morally praiseworthy. I mean rome certainly wasn't but because it has a god ordained role in keeping the peace and paul urged timothy pray for kings and all who are in high positions so that we citizens may lead a quiet peaceable life godly and respectable in every way but around the world many of our brothers and sisters don't even have that option of living the kind of quiet and peaceable lives that we hear take for granted and yet so many of our brothers and sisters around the world still manage to live in a godly and dignified way which is a powerful testimony to the legitimacy and the vitality of their faith as we pray for persecuted christians in nigeria and elsewhere we should also pray for the stability of their nations even for their government leaders. We should pray that they would have the courage. And the capacity to end insurgencies like boko haram and whenever possible. We should ask our nation and it's leaders to intervene or at least assist in squelching the chaos because without national stability. Our brothers and sisters around the world are kind of like sitting ducks at the mercy of those who wish to do them harm and they have no hope of living quiet and peaceable lives

Nigeria Boko Haram Abu Nigeria Haram Fund For Peace Nigeria AP Max Weber Yemen Rahman's Government Somalia Government Paul Timothy Rome
Chris Kennedy and David Weber discuss their new book, "Into The Light"

Read Between the Lines

05:55 min | 9 months ago

Chris Kennedy and David Weber discuss their new book, "Into The Light"

"Today i'm interviewing david weber. Chris kennedy there. How are you doing today. I'm doing fine. Except i think a another dominion another another dimension on timing but aside from that all is good excellent So can you tell me about your books about our collaborative books because we only have one of those. Yes i know that you have. You have more books outside of that too. So if you'd like to talk a little bit those two okay. Chris sure Although i'm i have a few traditionally published works i'm predominantly an independent author publisher I've got about thirty books on my own as well as forty published short stories Almost all of those are science. Fiction and fantasy Also published over two hundred other books through the various imprints of christianity publishing at Unlike the pusher you were just talking to. I am simply a supplier. i Have let sixty seventy Traditionally published books out I guess the two that people know me for our the honor harrington series with bain books and the Safe hold series with tour But i also have some fantasy scattered through their primarily military science fiction. Although i actually think of it almost as political science fiction because i spend so much time in the nuts and bolts of the politics of my various liberate. Worlds right so actually. Can you talk a little bit about military science fiction. You said political science fiction. Because i before starting your book no idea that this was a genre and i know how is not notice but well into the light actually bins jonynas just just Just oil yeah. Yeah the only other thing. I've got that really came close to that i think is In theory born in which i Pair a female commando with The last surviving. Greek fury but Military science fiction is science fiction which is primarily in which the conflict is primarily centered around A military conflict not simply social dynamics or or philosophical You actually have people shooting each other pretty much In terms of it The reason that i said Political science fiction is that there's military science fiction. There's what i think of as militaristic science fiction tony bain actually coined that term for me. Militaristic science fiction is written by people who just went to write something. A lot of people get shot. I mean it's at is written by people who frequently don't understand how the military works at all in real life How politics impact The military so when i'm writing military science fiction i try to give the political background that is driving these people to do something as inherently Not saying as shooting other human beings if you follow what i'm saying. Yeah i typically just stay with the military side I generally don't get into the politics as much However with twenty years of being a naval aviator i do have a a decent idea of how military's work out. Show off help. Okay and well in david does too. I mean he's done so much research on military things that i'm sure he knows you know a a wide variety of military's that that i've never looked at so in. They're they're all pretty much the same under the skin in a lot of ways. Somebody just sent me a a pay stub from a roman legionnaire. That they absurd. I saw that. No i saw that thing. Yes they excavated at. What's left of the pay slip of a roman legionnaire from the from israel in And it's all about what he had to pay the quartermaster. For food and everything else. It turns out that he got paid. He paid the quartermaster and he was flat broke again. Some things don't change a lot okay so you were talking a little bit about it already. But what is your collaboration process. Look like in like there's different perspectives in this book's one of you gravitate more towards the perspectives or Okay i do collaborations with quite a i. I am somebody who is in one. Its comfortable doing collaborations and in another sense. Not i am not. I am not comfortable doing a collaboration in which somebody says okay. I'm going to put my name on the book. You write it I'm going to be involved in collaboration. I'm going to be hands on which chris found out i expected to. I mean it was your your you know your series to start with And i'm i'm kind of the the squatter in it so i. I knew that you would have many ideas for where the series was going to go and what it was gonna look like And i came in welling came in willing to work within that framework.

David Weber Chris Kennedy Tony Bain Bain Harrington Chris David Israel
"weber" Discussed on The Ben and Ashley I Almost Famous Podcast

The Ben and Ashley I Almost Famous Podcast

12:22 min | 1 year ago

"weber" Discussed on The Ben and Ashley I Almost Famous Podcast

"What people's reaction going to be this and is this going to be criticized or is this going to be accepted in that part kind of stocks and I have not necessarily enjoyed that and at some point you just have to literally a simple issues not read the comments. I remember Becca she. She gave me a one when this all when my first podcast with her She gave me a little lanyard. And it just said don't read the comments and like US probably like the best advice as well and it's you know when when when I realized that All that stuff. In my opinion it's fake and it's not real because not once not and I can. I can honestly say not once in real life through all my flight should be now in public. Anyone I've met on the street. Have I ever heard one negative comment ever but you see on social media or on the Internet? Are All this this stuff? That's fake. It's not real life. You know social media. It's not it's not your real life people just get so consumed in it. That's where all that negativity in that trashes but the real life. It's all great and like when I finally realized that it was a huge weight lifted off my shoulders and allowed me to be so much happier. Continue to build that tough skin and just realize like actually matters and the human interactions. I have on a daily basis. Those are great and amazing. I appreciate those so much. I'm not GonNa let the little stuff gets me at all. The I've one final thing and then just going GonNa dive into some of the details of your experience and your season and kind of the the ways to lead you to the end and then I want to close his podcast with getting back to kind of you personally. Where your APP and how. You're doing all that up. But before I third Ashley to kind of dig into your seasoning your experience there has been though I remember sitting in your shoes during my time. And you know you can relate in in some ways from our experience right did. It wasn't always pretty. There was confusion chaos. We get all you know. We're on it and we think. Oh this is worked out for how it was supposed to work out for me and it feels like there. Every loosened has been tied. And everything's clean and then you get off of an you realize that like maybe. The public doesn't agree fully and like there's some heat now luckily back in my day. Social media wasn't as prevalent. And so now your whole story of what you've done since the show is being displayed but would I be mistaken to say they're still even though you feel like you're doing well even though you feel like there's been praised to your face which I'm sure there is that there is there's a little anxiety In your life like a little pain if our listeners could like really get an understand exactly why you have a little fear. Can you explain that to them before we start step forward just so they know where Peter Weber is at? And why you're feeling the way you are. Yeah no listen. I mean what you said obviously was in. It's been great in person. Having so much positivity But Yeah I can one hundred percent admit that I've definitely had a ton of anxiety in a ton of stress Just again just being thrust into Kinda the spotlight so much in having everybody just analyze every move and then having so much so many critics as well like I'm just I'm a human being and I said I'm I'm not an entertainer. I'm not a professional dater. I'm a pilot that signed up for this show opened. It would work. I was lucky enough to to be blessed. The tend to go on and be the bachelor to and It's that part. Hasn't us and like it? Just it's I don't know for me personally. I've never been someone that's been able to. I've never used my time to like talk. Negatively about anyone or go cast negative judgement on that person or whatever it may be but I know some people do a lot of people do do that and yeah that that's the hurt. It does It it takes a little bit to get used to a lot of it to get used to and Has Definitely caused some anxiety but Again I I just do my absolute best I my number one thing is all about gratitude gratitude gratitude and if I can focus on that more than anything else I'm gonNA put myself through. You know the Tough Times. I want to bring you back as the peer. You are today too big turning points on the show. So what would you tell Peter on night one now? That's good Let's see I mean I was great. I speaking is I I. I don't think I would. I would change anything from night. One of how went You know pry to calm down a little bit and not be so quick because I was so nervous going into that first night for just knowing that all the women were just as nervous as you just to honestly I. There's nothing really ever change from that first night. Just get excited for this journey. I there's a lot of things I would say later on in the season but the first night I wouldn't have much advice. What point do you start giving yourself face? I would have given myself advice starting with like the pool party stuff like after out. What episode that was but In regards to just kind of really being influenced by a you know the house in general and just I think for me I went into it just because the person I am. You know just being someone that yeah I I like to give people the benefit of the doubt and and and and I have those tendencies of being a people pleaser to not worry so much about that and just really really do what I needed to do for myself and like the Pool Party and the latest stuff and I remember that was like the first like part of the journey from your house. I don't know if I handled that the right way like. I should've just focused myself been a little bit more selfish not not taking so many opinions in in doing what I needed to do. I have one I I'm going to be so mad at myself if I don't ask this Peter because there was like my we you know obviously watch seasons we critique everything as part of the podcast and I say why did Peter do that or what was he thinking. One of my biggest critiques of you was I have never seen an. And this is me selfishly. I had just have to ask you as a fan of you know. And then it's going to go back to Ashley to actually get to the heart of things. This is really derailing us. How in the world did you? How in the world did you kiss girls in front of other girls? I like that was when you say Pool Party. I'm thinking about a scene where like you're kissing girl knew other people could see it like that was when I was like. Oh Peter like that Yeah good question I am. I don't I don't I'll be honest. I don't know if like in the going back to that Pool Party. I don't know if I actually knew that people saw me being affectionate with other women I was not for sure was not doing that on purpose. There was one time. I think really the only time actually of of the season where I was like. Oh that was really. Awkward and uncomfortable was Was in the football date. In in Cleveland. I was walking back when she and I remember and We just have like we're just talking. Having it was off camera stuff the game was over and I just was like so just kind of like focused just with with her and I knew that I had nine other eight other women right but I was just focused with her and we were just being affection just like Q. And gave her a kiss like going into the locker room but all the women were there and then right after. I did that and like why'd I do that? That was that was weird. That was uncomfortable but I don't know I guess just to kind of explain it for me. I was some that. Try my absolute best to like. I said get lost with each woman individually when I was with them and whether that was too much or disrespectful at times I can see the criticism. I can understand that but that was me. And that's what I was. GonNa to do for it to hopefully worked for me. I couldn't. I don't know how I was going to be able to just like sometimes act like they were my want my only girl and then sometimes. I'm dating a bunch of women like I had to fully commit to each relationship when I was with that person. And that's what I try to do from night. One through the end and that was pretty obvious which in a way sounds like a great plan. Then you get called the kissing. Bandit and just it's it's crazy. I don't know if I told you I really 'cause I really am the guy that like. I usually Kinda shy kissing and like I don't go for it right away I really. I thought there was a chance. I wasn't gonNA kiss anyone. The first night to be completely honest and then Savannah came and I loved it. I loved her going all out for it. Did the blindfold thing planted the kiss and that kind of like broke the seal for me and I was just like well. Okay but then. Didn't you eliminate her night one sedan? No Oh okay. That's right. That's right now. She was the girl that would last a long time but we never really got to know her. Yeah I guess yeah. She was really sweet girl a lot but yeah I really was planning on doing nothing and then so much for that. Hey thanks Peter. I just had to get that out there because it was like my one biggest confusion was like what in the world is he. Doing that feels dangerous. Definitely did not advise him to do that. But That makes sense I can. I can get behind you just trying to be an intentional with each relationship and try to make it as normal as possible so Ashley. I'm sorry that was definitely GonNa Tangent. I had to get it out back to you okay. So let's put Peter. Today back to after that top three rose ceremony when he comes up to you and says I really don't want you sleeping with anyone else. I'm not sure if this is going to be okay with my moral code if you do and I'm going to have to reevaluate everything. If you do in that moment did you think. Oh is this girl virgin or did you just think that she was kind of giving you a request? Because she was that into like did the thought of her virginity. Come into play at all. Okay so for that. I remember I thought there was a chance that that Mattie was virgin I remember it was in. Where was I was a driving from a location? I think it was it was in Chile in Santiago and I I remember talking about her with my producers and I asked him I do you guys think this and they couldn't give me anything You know because obviously they can't But I kept asking. That was the first time that it was on my mind and then ever talked about it again really until it kind of came up that night but honestly I didn't I didn't know maybe there is a chance by. I truly didn't know until it tells you told me in Australia at that dinner. I knew that she was obviously very very strong. Interfaith in that would have made sense but I did not know for sure. I know I asked you this with access Hollywood but honestly Peter. You're a whole different. Peter now and you were like six or seven weeks ago. Would it have made a difference? Would it have made a difference if matty had at that moment? Said I want you to not sleep with anyone because I am a virgin and yeah would that have changed your mind about sleeping with anyone else. Can you say that even for sure? Yes it would have. I say for sure I think definitely had a little bit more gravity with everything I would've I would've had more gravity so there's a chance that you may not have slept at the other women in that case. Yeah but but again not there would gather for sure would have been a stronger chance but again it. Kinda all goes back to my biggest struggle was explained with the kissing stuff like I when I was with each individual woman. I try my best to just be so intentional with them and lost with them and You know I I would have definitely struggled with that like in life..

Peter Weber Ashley Pool Party Becca Chile Cleveland Santiago matty football Australia Hollywood Savannah Mattie
"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

"Be sort of the scale the number of these that we want. Yeah we don't need some of them may be. I think maybe if they're in the water I would call. But if they're terrestrial orbs certainly I love. Yeah because correct me if I'm wrong. But sort of allowing collaborations or bringing in community would've orbs ruling on. You know you have to You know because if there's like rocks and stuff yeah and it's hard to kind of keep it in a straight line so heavy all that water totally too. Many people were were looking track. Macy's Day parade. I mean isn't it? I wonder what did I mean? You Know Big budget parade. When I hit him play here. It was very quiet. Play and there was this ice machine that was coming and then every five minutes or so you just hear like ice just crashing mopus to play. You didn't hear was Walter. Emily between the rooms. Some beautiful on my God scorgeous tax. Yeah sounds very like gentle. It was super gentle quiet play and there was always be like someone who is bored the audience and someone who is just like crying like. I love this church so we we have this sort of ORB takeover of the entire old brick botanical garden. It's an orb takeover and I think it's called.

Macy Emily Walter
"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

"Soho. That is two stories tall with a lovely second floor. Menagerie mezzanine where we are sitting and it overlooks kind of a crowded room of used books. And it's one of my favorite Spaces in the city. People use it for events. I did a play here once and about ten years ago. I held auditions here for play that I was hosting and I had people come in and just sit across the table from me read poetry and I've always had it be this kind of stomping grounds kind of meeting. Place watering hole. I had a lot of writing meetings here for Ding Dong. It's the ocean. And it kind of is my Go-to for for more to meet people. I love bookstores. There are so few of them left in this town. That are real. But they're the they're great. Three lives is is a one. That's holding on strong. Where's that on? Arles no West Tenth Street and I saw the owner run outside in the middle of the night and bury a book in the sidewalk when they were doing construction. And I asked like a week later. I saw him during the daytime and I said what are you doing in the middle of the night with a book and he said Oh my God. You're the only person who saw that. Probably we were secretly burying a copy of Gertrude. Stein's three lives for luck and I think it gave them a lot because they're still there whereas the other neighborhood bookstore there were closed down and I just love browsing a bookstore. I'm always trying to get rid of books at home because they create clutter and I like to use the library but for retail experience. Nothing's better than sterling through the stacks. You take an old Torah and you have to bury it lying. This sort of the personification of books books if you like are one of the few art objects that we really personify it. Can we say the name where we are renting? We should housing works. Who Yeah and cafe. Gotcha an actually one time. I was that.

Ding Dong Arles Gertrude Stein Soho.
"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

13:37 min | 2 years ago

"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

"Weber here. Our guest today is unaccountable on Vietnam Montas. She's a Mexican interdisciplinary artist and educator based based in Brooklyn her work has traveled internationally in North America Latin America Europe Asia and Africa on invited me to her guest room in Flatbush for our cozy conversation. Before we get to Ana. I want to introduce you to Mr Claude Walter. pettus one of the trustees of the cozy zone foundation I traveled to his vacation home outside of Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming. Where we truly far out exchange Mr Peto CIRRUS? Thank you so much for for having me in this this beautiful beautiful place. Well well it is beautiful. You are sure darn right about that. I make sure to keep it beautiful. Can you tell us all your your line of work. Well at the moment Imus Thomas spaceship dealer and that is something that my family line has been engaged with for well we could say decades but one might also say centuries. Wow My tell you've been involved with space travel for centuries space travel we you might say of a loaded term however space dealership. It's not as exciting as it sounds. You see people really these days as are looking mainly for something presentational. They're looking for something they can keep in a safe place to impress. Whoever they want to impress us? Who is walking to their men should to their wealthy mansion? They're looking to hoard the the space items for the purposes of people who are asking. Let's say that we here in my vacation home near Yellowstone National Park. I have I I've always had a heart connection to Wyoming. Don't ask me why I I've been I've been I've lived in Greece. I've lived in Ireland and My heart has somehow along with my sweetheart landed in Wyoming what is out there among the stars is what reminds us of our connectivity and are connected nece because my family it has had such a long history with space innovation technology and intelligence. I have a certain ability to to charge my ideas with space waves intelligence vibrations. Those doesn't matter what you call it but my point being being is that I'm when people like you come and I can instantly sense right away whether there's somebody that I want to spend time with regard let alone money on a mon- money is UC. Money is not what people think it is. Money is invisible. It's it's it it is so intangible and it's not as Before money there is time. Let's put it this way and there is energy so when I'm in the presence of someone like you I immediately want to sense. Is this someone who has was a project which my ideas can touch because migrate gift. And I'm going to test you on this later to see if you're worthy of the of of this I I'm teasing okay. Time said the same tone as everything of course. I'm standing by if we do need to do a test. I'll do that and you know. Oh any whatever you you think migrate gift in my first great gift. Is that any project that my ideas touch is electrified and empowered. Wow and this has to do with my family's history with space innovation technology also. Yes I know. It has a lot of baggage today. Hey but astrology. Wow well a serious. I'm so curious about the origins like your family's first relationship with space stuff like centuries ago I mean we don't know the sun revolved around the earth. Like what what what did your. How did your family start to get into the space industry while stories are a little bit mixed? But if you go way way way way back between when you I know my family line goes back to between Greece and When when the Greeks and the Egyptians were traveling back and forth and exchanging different sort of what are now considered to be Oh cult my ancestors were different sorts of prophets What would today he called Prophets? What was in the day in back then considered very run of the mill work? Where a very patient scholarly work where they would take long scrolls calls and they would predict when the next eclipses? We're going to be and they would project hundreds of years into the future so at a certain point in my family started becoming very hush hush about this and I'm now releasing the stigma. I am now okay. We are in two thousand and twenty. I'm going to come clean Being as wealthy as I am as well to do I'm going to be. I'm going to wear my resources is on my sleeve and I'm going to say it to my family was able to predict things like when the royalty when the king would die why you mentioned that dealing spaceships isn't as glamorous as it sounds to me. It sounds extremely glamorous like you you see rocket ships. It's amazing you you see Elon. Musk with SPACEX. That feels really incredible but to you you're you're you seem unimpressed. The label is prestigious. The label is who romantic spaceship dealer. Oh what a character right in a way. It's true because I'm the real deal I'm I'm I sometimes say I'm real dealer alert hat right. I thought it was pretty good. It's in my blood but when you get down to the brass tacks paperwork it's a most people thinking that money is something that isn't really a lot of people thinking that That a machine is something that it isn't really in my research bound you that you began your career actually In support of your. Your wife's artistry. Is that correct. Oh yes that was my passion for years and years and years and years and also hers as well of course my wife was. You see my wife On Ace piece she wrote Romance Novels And she was a big superstar romance novel writer. You would not believe the readership levels. I mean any any titles I would have heard of. The first tidal was a port love. Okay Yep snakes of the supreme cream body and that is actually What my agency might literary agency came to be known as we were able to find a way to connect the reader's experience of a romance novel to a satellite that I'm cast down the beams of a certain interstellar experience. Let's put it that way. Because to put it any more bluntly would again get us into a little bit of trouble within reason this experience would cause an awareness of the person's primordial morial erotic body in a way that was unprecedented. You were were kind enough to fly me to this undisclosed location near your yellowstone in Wyoming. Because you said that you had a project that you were interested in in funding on behalf of the COSIES Foundation. I'm aware pair of your this wrote row chester contemporary art. Center there call for different proposals. You slid me the dossier and so not only. Is it the row Chester Community Arts Center. But it's in collaboration with the National Susan B. Anthony Museum Susan B. Anthony is a symbol or a figure that is a messenger towards the young people of today. It could say she's a kind of a demonic figure. She's she's a messenger for the youngsters. Today of what it means can want to say the to the listeners. Your your beckoning with this beautiful crystal wand. Can you tell me a little bit about the meaning of this. It looks like it's maybe amethyst and emerald rolled and malachite or something like that. Yeah you're on the right about ear only correct about one of those malachite. There are things that I think the world is doing with billions of dollars that are not the right way to instruct the public about the relationship between engagement wealth and death. One of the ways this is happening is the fossil fuel industry. Should you know that in recent history. Sorry thirty five billion dollars have been given to the fossil fuel industry. Wow Are you saying. The United States government gives thirty five billion dollars to to the fossil fuel industry annually. Yes Oh my goodness considering how you've come into my vacation home and and conversed what is greatest. Gift electrifying ideas. Yes you chrome space. Yes perfect very. Are we good considering who you are. I am going to give it strong consideration because I moved by your presence here today. I don't normally get moved in this form. I'm going to reach into space into the reaches of my key news to see if this is just flow of redirection from that that despicable fossil fuel industry into your project. Thank you so much. It's Nice to have company Al Ana welcome to your Co Zone. Thank you welcome to my co season. Where are we right now? We are in our guest room. It's just a place where I can chill. There is a day bed and pink curtains. You've prepared quite a beautiful spread for us. And what what did you prepare for us. It's rainy outside so I thought some tea it would be nice. I have some Jasmine tea and a little spread of cheese and berries. This is your guest room. Do you have guests here often. We do actually yes I. I don't know like when people come to New York and now they know that we have an extra room. They they stay with us and we like it and Joey having guests my brother lived here for six months so this was my brother's room. How big is your family? It's it's really big. Well my my dad also on my that side. My Dad has twelve twelth brothers and sisters his the thirteenth They have some of them. have ten kids six kids like there's people that all right don now I have at my age. I am a great aren't already because my family stat be so at least how many how many brothers or sisters have just just one brother one sister. Okay so you are. Your parents took took it easy to say but by yeah but call since I have millions millions of cousins. How long have you been in New York? Five years I lived in green point before. What was that like? That was fun. Small tiny tiny apartment lot of hipsters. And and then it started changing a lot and Yeah and I was Priced out I guess yeah. Did your family come and visit you in green point just on my mom claim also my brother and sister were there and we had friends that lived a block away and they I think they owned that building it it they sunk clear and they had them they have a huge guest in the basement. And that's where my brother and sister state I myself am an only child and I really really wish I had brothers others insist bear witness to my experience and sort of reflect back my parents behavior and make me feel like I'm not alone and not not insane i. Yeah I've heard that before. I don't know what is to be an only children. I always dreamed uh of.

Wyoming Yellowstone National Park Greece New York North America Latin America Eu Vietnam Montas Brooklyn Imus Thomas Weber Mr Claude Walter. UC Flatbush SPACEX Susan B. Anthony row chester contemporary art row Chester Community Arts Cen United States Ireland National Susan B. Anthony Muse COSIES Foundation
"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

"I can get there without like. Maybe he drifted off there. So so what do you think so so we came up with the project. Cook Circle Mount Mount Circle. Mountain that I I think it sounds like a beautiful thing. I remember to crops which I I like crops. They you know similar family to Berry's so I feel a kinship with that And I like I like circles circles and spinning and I I just I feel so lucky to be able to to to really dedicate these funds to you but In honor of Timmy. Who's WHO's just been such a beautiful? So Yeah Timmy is no longer wearing a shirt. Yeah no sometimes he likes to take it off to do his work and of course you know more connected to the key right. Yes that makes sense opening opening channels channels. He's He's oiled up. It's all part of. I think you'd find that most most acupuncture masters would would also also be wearing oil so you so you're going to release the two point six two million dollars for Cook Circle Mountain. Take it just just thank you so much and Miss Steinbeck. Thank you thank you thank you. Timmy yes thank you. He's wearing a very sort sort of skimpy. I wouldn't call it a pants under underpants winter in New York now is what used to be short. Yes yes I have one one final ask just just to consider. It's a small thing but so cozy zone. It's a podcast. I and I recently started a patron for it where you give a monthly donations of five dollars a to become a cosies zone own member and that means you get early access to episodes you get access to exclusive member only content and of course all of your donations go to supporting the artists featured in the podcast and the all the production costs everything that goes into it so I was wondering Ms Steinbeck would. Would you become a cozy zone member of my patriot. That's that's so sweet but I actually don't I don't I don't deal L. in cash gifts so I know what do you mean I mean I. I'm to donate money to the arts and and end but I I generally When I like to get to give to give vim berries so maybe maybe I can sense? Send a few Barry Bushels. I think you sure yeah I I do love berries. That would be nice. You're sure you can't just do. It's like sixty dollars a year. It's just five dollars a month. It's it's it's it's really not where my heart is. It's I like to give and berries but no by Timmy. I think maybe it's time to see the the gentleman Ab- Ben Ben Joe Ben. Ben Ben Ben is fine and maybe you can see ben an out okay. Okay well Ms Steinbeck. Thank you so much for your time. Thank you for your support and thank you for being a trustee cozine awesome foundation by now by now unle cozy zone. With Ben Weber is produced and edited by me Ben Weber Danny. Townsend broke our theme music. Johanna Campbell case designed the logo. A big thank you to drew Peterson. Listen Beecher's cheese shop and John Campbell case special thanks to Cozy Zone Foundation. Trustee Ms Victoria Steinbeck even though she didn't join Patriot on but but you can visit. WWW dot patriots dot com slash Ben Weber projects follow me on instagram at Ben Weber projects and on the web at www ww dot ben Weber projects dot com. Subscribe to Cozy Zone on Apple podcasts. Or wherever you catch your pods stitcher or spotify and write a review. It is the also nice. Thank you so much for listening. May All your zones because e beautiful.

Ab- Ben Ben Joe Ben Trustee Ms Victoria Steinbeck Timmy Ben Weber Cook Circle Mount Mount Circle Ben Weber Danny Cozy Zone Foundation Cook Circle Mountain Patriot trustee spotify Barry Bushels Johanna Campbell Berry New York John Campbell Apple Townsend Peterson Beecher
"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

06:03 min | 2 years ago

"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

"Itself like melt the snow and a pattern that actually makes the earth a work of art. Absolutely I definitely have. Ah Yes so definitely like. It's there's some coding with like strategic snow melting. And some sort of meaning. I'm not sure what kind the design we would but we should think about it so we got we got eleven minutes right now. It's not particularly fun what we're doing like it's very like sort of dry and like here whereas like well. Yeah or just like a little just a little dry and sterile like yes. The Sun warms your face. The sign of the witch. Jen We will. I do like this history of crops. I like this building the structures playing playing with different things. You know I'm thinking about like stonehenge things. This might help us anymore. I got it. The artwork should be designed around be equally intriguing from all angles take. The artwork must improve not detract from the safety of the site. Shore became here at work must not create a disorienting situation or causing distraction for drivers and since the artwork should be scaled to the attention of appropriate approaching drivers but should not be so detailed that it requires a close up. Right said I say so. It's a driving thing interesting. Okay okay well my God Well okay so so I. It makes me think that we cover a structure with plants. We got four minutes. It's okay so we've got to think of thing and we gotta come up with a name for minutes. It's funny you saying that reminds me of the mountains that they built and governors island. If you've been there air yeah yeah yeah you know with the sly. These man Made Mountain guides. Yes and you climb them and you can scale them in different ways and it's it's it's funny because it's like such an idea of building mountains feel so foreign justice human achievement. Yeah like they're so whimsical like is there a bit of whimsy to be had in in the creation of whatever this structures that can be engaged with from all sides that is i. I do love mountains. Let's go with mountain. Yeah definitely some sort of mountainous structure. Do you climate to get a certain experience. A town like can us look bad. Definitely the town in the whole town in a new way absolutely. I think there is a lot to play with in terms of this mountain thing. I Yeah I mean we could. You know we'll have to do it in a responsible height right so that what is the thing did can't like block block their view or deter drivers experience while sides it's what if the structure somehow moved or spun slowly like made a revolution and and somehow each side of the mountain showcase to seize like agricultural seasons are sort of. I don't there that's nice. It's it's actually a big sort of Rotunda. Yes absolutely it actually spins in a circle lutely spinning so okay so maybe Like title we got. We got less than a minute okay. So Mountain Revolution Revolution. So that's that's that's one title twenty four at one twenty eight twenty four hours one spin at one hundred twenty eight. Th Avenue Gordon. One Hundred Twenty eight twenty four at one twenty. Okay okay now day. Mount turn. Mount Spin Out Swirl K. Colorado state motto nothing without Providence Interesting Cook Circle That's interesting It could be cooked mountain. I could I could get there that I like and maybe cooked Circle Mouser Mountain Cook cirque amount. Why not why not Cook Circle Mountain Nick? Wonderful any final final sentiments from the Zona cozy which has now become more robust. Yeah now the concept of ecozone I find so interesting because it can mean so many things like I think of it as a creatives on breath but I yeah over the years have. I don't know if you think of it this way and some people a lot of people don't but I find myself gravitating towards public places aces with a lot of activity. I don't know maybe it's the din of the sound or just catching little bits of people's conversation next to us or whatever but there's something about take being surrounded by life that makes you feel like you're kind of in touch with it. I every so often I do like to like retreat even be reclusive but when when an ideas germinating does feels better I always feel better being cozy czar mets somewhere somewhere amongst people. I don't know I I am not that way at all. I love to love to retreat. I love to be reclusive. I'm certainly like an introvert but also it also depends on what the thing is like. You know there's something there's something powerful about like asserting that we're the guys with Mike and Headphones in this space. You know like you know trying to figure out some some Art Thornton Colorado. It's amazing yeah. It feels dare. I say it Punk Rock punk rock subverting the idea of what you want a cheese shop in Manhattan Bard Manhattan analyst guests basic drew. I think you're incredible artists. I'm really grateful. I'm so grateful to be here with you and I know that you are an incredible artist. This is why we have so many opportunities to work together. which is amazing? I can't wait. I can't wait for the upcoming opportunities and I'll see you right after this Hi.

Cook Circle Mountain Nick Shore Circle Mouser Mountain Manhattan Colorado Jen governors island Art Thornton Colorado Mount turn analyst Mike
"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

09:00 min | 2 years ago

"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

"Morton. Colorado never heard of the online. There's a lot of beautiful pictures just absolutely termi delicious. Great Lovett thirty minutes on the clock. Let's let's make causes on foundation project or so. It is a rural place. So what do we want to look at. We WanNA maybe see Thornton in the past you know old Thornton we wanna see and maybe what what we would like what agriculture looked like community could look like. Yeah just a first band idea just like a like a little model house with different rooms sort of showing different print maybe areas of time. I see a field of wheat. Like what if you walked into this space and this is an indoor space and there was just a field of wheat with a Hopper House often hopper style house very striking or like like almost like. You're sort of like partying out in the field of bringing the harvest in kind of thing. There was an artist. Recently featured did the shares who did who planted a field of weed in Battery Park City. I there is a I believe it was a chef's table episode. I was watching about a guy who actually cooked southern style barbecue but it could be wrong. Who was who was really interested in diving into like how certain ingredients vegetable greetings? How how they got in the cuisine of the American cuisine? The reason why you're eating Okra is because because it found its way here three Okra is. It wasn't here like it had to be brought here. And what does that mean in my John. What are the actual social and political ramifications of a wire? Eating things are eating which is really that. I'd never thought it was like. I never thought of like the idea that that something I'm consuming for. Sustenance would like not not have been existed here already wondered like could you tell a history simply through or narrative simply through agriculture. I'm really liking this idea of like traveling through history based on agriculture. You know how they have like various labyrinths at like meditation centers. That you sort of walk and particularly good for your walking walking meditation and I wonder like I'm not exactly sure if this is like agriculturally permaculture sound but having like concentric circles or you you know some sort of as kind of thing of different crops that you know like there's like this subtle shift. It's interesting in some of these pictures I've seen what appears to be like corn silos silos that hold corn If you years ago Jonathan actually. We're lucky enough to make a show at the United States botanical gardens the immersive prominent show and it was such a beautiful gardens very manageable in terms of passing greenhouses. How you could see in DC? I read the national mom and and there. What was the main room called? I think they called it the jungle actually and they had like royal palms inside so the main greenhouse was quite large but it was enclosed enclosed in a way but conceptually and design wise is interesting because the idea behind the landscape architecture jungle was that it was an old. It was like an old the House that had been taken over by jungle. Like so there were there I inside the the shades of where the growth was happy to see old broken marble steps and broken banisters that you couldn't access by the public but you're like why is. Why are these old marble like banisters and stares here like you get? That wasn't US passage Rafer for pedestrians with they built the gardens to look like it looked like a jungle took a house back over. I wonder if there's like hearing about like nature overtaking architecture colonial architecture feels really. I don't know that's something I would could get behind. I would want to say that I would want I would want nature to sorta come back at us. You know. It's it's it's fun to think about and And also just is there a way that it provides close to the community and but also a a step maybe into the towns passed or the town's history or something along those lines. It's it it asks us to look at ourselves and also it's so funny because botanical panicle gardens or even agricultural general. I feel like when I see it. Look like it's so permanent and yet it's definitely not it. It grows its ephemeral. It dies re comes back. And so you know I think I think the horticulturalist and botanist security curry actual living spaces. What does that you know? Could you recreate the garden space depending on year a year or theme right of course so I'm also. I'm looking at the history of Thornton on Wikipedia and thirteen. It's as thornton consisted solely of farmland until from Nineteen fifty-three when Sam Hoffman purchased a lot of Washington street about seven miles. North of Denver. The town he laid out was the first fully planned community. The Dean Adams County and the first offer full municipal services from a single tax levy including a recreation service and free trash pickup named in honor of former Colorado Governor Dan Thornton I'm also looking at Colorado agriculture so we have cattle and calves corn wheat hay eighth and dairy dominate as the centennial state's leading agricultural commodities So we also have bison ostriches E-mu sunflowers hours grapes and Mushrooms at the armory. There's restoration happening across the room. Because it's a historic landmark restoring rooms but one by one and the Architectural firm that's in charge of the restoration is basically they're thinking behind it is. It's really lovely. Actually they're trying to get the rooms back to. They're not adding things to them. They're getting them back to the time where they're in their most sort of gilded age gory which that sort of thing always strikes me as really the powerful where you're like we walk into space told like this is we tried to get it. This is what it would have been like if you walked in eighteen. Whatever yeah have you ever have you ever been out to the water mill L. Center out in water mill? Never have it's It's the Robert Wilson Site for creativity and it's essential like his home. I think But even the way the building is late. I believe it's an old like post officer sorting post office that he converted into his creative space and also at home but even the way at the on the building and it structures are laid out and the way that they planted you know that this sort of agriculture around like we were we were taking a tour of it up to some years ago and they're so the front of the building faces duties so the sun. If you're certain times a year meant the Sun will come up right through. The centre of of strange like chasm cut through the middle of the building in the Sun will come coming up right through it. Lakes and leaving the building laid out it has to do with the way the earth spins and where we are in proximity. It's really awesome. I was like wow wow. This wasn't just like let's put some stuff around and make beautiful place. It was like the whole house and structure and all of its existing surrounding foliage and and other structures feel like they're speaking to the earth in some way and this wasn't random that they were just put up this like this is facing this way because of this and you'll see they were literally times you'll see in about ten minutes of son is gonNA come down and all of these windows will be flooded with light straight straight across because you know in order to maximize on the twilight our and rehearsal and that feels like a really creative our. I think that sounds actually useful for for what we're doing here. Is doing lesson last year about memorials. But I found myself showing the students. Some of the most like sort sort of memorials that they wouldn't have seen the one in northern Norway and has something to do with like. I WanNa say like witch trials. It's bizarre Structure Long structure like out northern Norway. It's very there's a flame burning their eternally in a chair. I was like if we were building. The structure in this sort of circular roundabout roundabout could. It is thornton like place that gets a lot of snow if if the surface of it is you know reflective. I was by myself like in the winter months. You walk past the building high reflective surfaces in the sun hits. You feel it warm. Your face could would the reflective surface of the structure.

Governor Dan Thornton Norway Hopper House Morton. Colorado Lovett Colorado DC Battery Park City Denver Jonathan Rafer United States officer Robert Wilson Dean Adams County Sam Hoffman L. Center
"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

09:19 min | 2 years ago

"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

"One person because you have this wonderful ability to make it feel like you're the you're the only person in the room that you make me feel like I'm the only person so like what if there was a show where where truly the is member is the only person that room and you are following following your with Ben. Whoever that character is it's it's kind of interesting thank you? That's why I love that. It's it's it's interesting and it's very generous. That's so nice. I love that I love that so much. Thank you for me. I think that drew magic power I I perceive is your ability to be down to earth and humble and grounded in these extremely extremely impressive situations like you work at the Park Avenue Armory which for me is an extraordinarily imposing and like stage. First of all I mean it's this gigantic drill hall that is filled with these like unbelievably high budget pieces pieces of theater. And you do projects there and the way that you talk about the projects that you do there is just like it. Sounds so mundane. This is just another place place to work. There is no difference between like a small little basement of a synagogue. And this like unbelievable. Oh you regal place. It's funny I I appreciate so much. Say It's funny. I think over the years I think it's been somewhat conscious of like trying to Maybe has something to do with making Peter for young people like. There's no I don't feel compelled to be thrust forward to be the first person to speak or even naming lights I I actually I find so much joy in like creating a situation a theatrical situation and then sort of sliding back into the shadows I was once at a place like this. It wasn't this place where I was sitting there. We're having a doing some work like writing or something and a couple of next to me was talking about the show the trust side pictures and they didn't know I was a part of it They were talking about it up in a way and they're talking about this other show he made. This is bizarre and then once with some colleagues of ours. Someone congratulated a colleague colleague on the show. They were in. But congratulations so beautiful on unaware that I had project letter written in the show and I was like this is awesome. Like it's. It's really fun to set up situation to let other people feel successful because into right. There's there's something selfless about it inherently anyway. Somebody said you can't. You can't immerse people bull in a contemporary setting because they're already immersed in like I can't create an immersive theatre show set in two thousand nineteen because we already living twenty nineteen and Mike. That's really interesting. So what does that mean does that mean and I immediately thought about it in terms of generational timeframes. So like what's the how. How how far do you have to go back to truly provide an escape from our reality to another world like a currently I think of like the one thousand nine hundred and you could make a theater show? That's like all stranger stranger. Things is a good example. Of how much like so wrapped up in it yet. Like if that Sean come out. Maybe ten years ago or fifteen years ago would we have been so interested of viewer to like take over the art world like what what is your. What is the rain of Drew Peterson? Look like I was talking to our dear friend Jonathan about this the other day. Who is Jonathan Schmidt Chapman? If you're listening to this who will actually be here later and he says such incredible mine in Hawaii Realm. I'm and I often thinking about things in theatre for young people or or even what. I've been calling Makita for all audiences because when we go I think a good show for young people or piece of culture for young people works for an adult to like. It's not like oh well thanks for the little kid but you know I don't. I'm not interested in that town for a summer. Every two years or every year is is completely taken over by new commissioned progressive artistry that might have a life beyond that festival some of it it might but much of it is completely an experiment at the commissioning whims of the artistic programmatic team of the festival. Holtz city town surrounds itself with and advocates for it. And I've been Manchester Catholic three times with the armory which has been wonderful wonderful and lovely and I've seen some crazy things and stuff. That's completely wonderful and Hair blows was your hair back and some that you're like what is is this like how. How did somebody pay pay for this? What is it and I just there's something so attractive about in an ideal world wouldn't it be fascinating. If many not even in New York I think of all the beauty and charm of like these up near upstate. New York towns like Hudson or beginner dinner Kingston where you have these old industry buildings. That are derelict. And you see what if you could have a festival of the most emergent work in the country that might not live on in this remote place that people had to go to not quite like burning man but like that. It's it's like if you were going to. Let's call it the Kingston Festival you knew you were going to see people really be challenging themselves to make some of the most emergent artistry in the field and I think that also comes out of the white trustees psychic was born of what this real call to arms for like what is what is high quality united states-based artistry for Young People look like I don't mean to get patriotic about it. There is something interesting about that to me. Like what does it mean to be an American making art now well and for young people and what is it that place. What is its place in the global a global stage? I really interested in that. So it's you know it's it's it's funny. It's like not even world domination. The war at home lies within like carving a progressive identity and culture making for young people. It feels like farm-to-table theatre for young people like if you could create the stone barns of meter for young people somewhere far are we. The people had to go to seek it out that seems so enticing and sexy and attracted to me it feels even if it wasn't good like people would come in. I don't know what that was is but like people are trying things. I love that I think that's so sweet. Speaking of commissions and commissioning new work work at drew. I love our conversation so far but we also have an opportunity here to work together to commission a new you work of public art with funds from Cozy Zone Foundation. We've been given an extraordinary budget by one of the trustees. This is a two point six two million dollar budget to create a piece of public art uh-huh and this comes from the daily income of three New York area bridges and tunnels so that that's nine hundred ridden forty four thousand dollars taken in from the George Washington Bridge every day. We got one point one four million dollars taken in from the Verrazano narrows is bridge every day and clocking in at five hundred forty thousand dollars from the hugh l Carey tunnel formerly the battery tunnel. Rookie Battery Yeah. Yeah Very Nice. So so with a whopping two point six two million dollars I've been given a dossier here actually We can take a look at so. I'm seeing a A design proposal a call for artists roundabout at one twenty Eighth Avenue and Cook Circle City of Horton Colorado. And it's the details of this cohesiveness between the landscape and the artwork Creativity reflecting the history of Eastlake community and embody the values of agricultural history agrarian lifestyle and wildlife so seems to be a commission around artistic mission around the town that's really bridging content and form to the location where it's made and particularly in this town. Now what are you seeing in terms of this site. Looks like it's like a roundabout it. It's definitely in a roundabout sort of looks almost like Columbus Circle type looking looking thing where highway in another road to sort of major thoroughfares converge. Ground Sixty five feet in diameter No height restriction to this proposal on nicer curious more pictures it looks like a fairly rural area. Looks like farmland and fields. I'm seeing railroads. Little fields of plants. Churches an old sort of mid-century buildings and businesses it's like Americana our economy. It's most beautiful perfect.

New York Park Avenue Armory Jonathan Schmidt Chapman Drew Peterson Ben Verrazano narrows Eastlake Kingston Festival Makita Peter Cozy Zone Foundation Holtz city Mike Hawaii Realm Sean George Washington Bridge Manchester Catholic hugh l Carey tunnel Kingston Horton Colorado
"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

08:08 min | 2 years ago

"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

"And there was a punk show at the local like Grech Center and all of the orphans that was the name of our punk Pammy orphans happened to be in town down the Jersey shore and we were like. Hey can we played four songs between the other bands going on and then there so the orphans jump up on other people's instruments play four songs in these guys. These guys who ran a record label in Westchester Pennsylvania called creep records. You WanNa come record on our label and so we like these little. Oh kids on a record label where they recorded to tape in their basement recording studio but it was a dump it like a punk house amazing and we cut a seven inch vinyl so I still have it as a I remember we were going to record the first time and as a snow day and none of a stroke. We were too young to drive. We were like we're not gonNA. It'd be able to record the album today because nobody can drive to the to the recording studio because we were too young to drive. In the second time we recorded I was still so young. I had poison ivy on my arms from being in the woods so I love getting into making things was this funding negotiation with me and three other young men trying to figure out out how to make a ban and play songs in our basement which was actually really an interesting exercising collaboration and like you do music and so you like the amount of discipline it takes and Mike how immediately formative is when something sounds good and stuff. I wouldn't try. I don't know how like theater I was always. I guess a funny theatrical goal second child is interesting but slowly found my way to theater but I still do love. Music can do music. And it's amazing but I think the discipline of music and also like the collaborative you've nature and diy nature starting Punk van with your little. Your friends and your brother is so I got credit a ton of my creates into those moments and some of it was so ridiculous in bad I was reading about it the other day someone had written some article about the orphans. Apparently our first show the first time we ever played an official officials show after our second song show is broken up by the police cops came show up which like as a fourteen year old kid even like cops coming into the yard of the basement of everywhere anywhere like being like get. Get the hell out of here. You know I was like Oh yeah like I was like. That's really funny so I guess from early on sort of like this maker of bazaar or guard weird things that slightly dangerous things like at any amendments that the authorities could come in and say this is a fire hazard My creative life to that. Those moments being in the basement of a western suburbs of Philadelphia like punk rock music. Second what plants. I played the Bass Guitar on Bass Guitar. And then when my older brother Eric went off to college he left his electric guitar. So I just picked it up because it was there and then my younger Chrissy Chrissy in all this time to pick up the drums drum set at the house. If suddenly when these instruments are laying around you just play them or you let me let me play and see what happens in so i. I took Bass Guitar lessons but then self taught on guitar and the drums and the Mandolin and so now like I got a lap steal not long ago. I'm playing with that so but I feel like primarily guitar drums Bass Guitar to be my real I can. I can do really well on those session. Guy Like someone holding down like great. You played a band you guys songs. Now I'll come in and it's great I I'm not being part of the rhythm section because it's important but it's also like people nobody wants to be the Bass Guitar player and so you got to find a good bass guitar player. It's hard to fine so it's a lot of fun why implants why orphans God so the implants. I fully know the answer to that. which is a little embarrassing? We here we you were fourteen year old kids. who were boys going to an all boys school being like this'll be funny? The implants and it was that was it. I think that the orphans. I seem to recall at the orphans. Name came out of my parents subscribe to Newsweek magazine at the time and one of the articles made a cover article came through. And there's something about you know Blah Blah. They'll orphans by an article on Air Eric. My older brother. That's kind of an interesting name. We're like Dennis Pretty Cool and so of course our punk rock the OH and orphans has sort of two slashes and a better like angry eyebrows and an unhappy sort of be upside on ABC's slash slash. It's like looks like a pissed off base so that was the ban And we got many of the. Eric wrote a lot of the lyrics for the songs Based on like Newsweek articles is a big city was angry about thinking about in the mid nineties grunge days and I remember there was a song that we have called big brother bigger mother where it's about a drug tests that you could conduct on your kids by with a coffee you could wipe it across their desk and it would shaw a certain color if they were smoking pot the time so we have a song big brother bigger her mother about bad. It's fun and it's like fun. Angry angsty youthful punk rock in the days of grunge like right when it was sup- we we hit it. The right time on context was big. How do you know a piece? These days is working. I still don't quite understand where ideas come from. I compared like artistry me and content and project ideas I think compared ideas to like sicknesses straight. Like the like. They're these are these things that come up in sort of effect affect you they. They don't go away. You can't sweat you can't is a fever you can't sweat out so you and I think that's a sign of a really good idea because it keeps keeps haunting it keeps it. Might it might be in remission for a little while and then it comes back but it keeps haunting you until you think sort of you've should have shaped the demons out of it nothing ever like fully autobiographical yet. There's a ton of me inside of it but like stitching the strange the big fish kind of abstract shadows of pieces way. It's interesting I dream about making a solo show about all these sort sort of bizarre twists and turns in my life. There's so much fear for me. I think around really talking about who I am in art. It's funny I now. I'm thinking about like the Ben Weber. Show you know what that is and also like I so appreciate and I love that you're interest in like sort of subverting form and messing with form and and you know and it's funny when I when I think of you I think of this blake. Foundational support in terms of creative project. Comes to mind. Even though you might not always feel that way. But like I feel like that Ben Weber is like we bring ben onto a project he's like consistently sisterly. He's he's going to be that represent good ideas and produce great work in great ideas and thoughts and content artistry and it's amazing and and you know but also how captivating and inviting you are as a person are era. You remind me of like the warmness of home so if if I was making the Ben Waiver show I would. I would like I could see. I'd heard about a show something like this before where the show is actually like and you can stop me at any point. This is an interesting. No thank you please please continue. I like I like it was a show where you go to Ben. I'm using the word because maybe it's not you. Maybe it is someone salmon playing someone like you or maybe as the character's names banner maybe not maybe if there were saying this is a theater piece but like we go to a house home and you ring the doorbell and one audience member at a time and then let's you and essentially you move throughout his spaces at various iterations possibly of his life or maybe his adult life like an you. The show is this you realize like you. You're going through your relationship with Ben Throughout media series of years or a series of moments. But it's only for.

Ben Weber Eric Grech Center Westchester Pennsylvania Newsweek Chrissy Chrissy Air Eric Philadelphia official Mike fever Dennis ABC shaw
"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

"Yeah it's <hes> <Speech_Male> it's a site you <Speech_Male> can become a member <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> you you <Speech_Male> give monthly <Speech_Male> donation sustaining <Speech_Male> donations <Speech_Male> to a creator <Speech_Male> of of a project. <Speech_Male> How do you spell <Speech_Male> that? And that is <Speech_Male> P. A. <Speech_Male> T. R. <Speech_Male> E. O. N. <Speech_Male> DOT <SpeakerChange> COM <Speech_Male> PATRIOT <Speech_Male> DOT COM as <Speech_Male> well. <Speech_Male> What what <Speech_Male> do you need <SpeakerChange> a <Speech_Male> billion dollars? <Speech_Male> No actually <Speech_Male> just the <Speech_Male> donation nation <Speech_Male> to become a cozy <Speech_Male> zone member. <Speech_Male> That means you get <Speech_Male> early. Access <Speech_Male> to episodes <Speech_Male> you get amazing <Speech_Male> exclusive <Speech_Male> content and <Speech_Male> all of that is yours for <Speech_Male> only <SpeakerChange> five dollars <Speech_Male> a month. <Speech_Male> I'm sorry <Speech_Male> how much that is five <Speech_Male> dollars <Speech_Male> a month. Oh <Speech_Male> my dear Benjamin. <Speech_Male> I'm so sorry <Speech_Male> the minimum <Speech_Male> transaction <Speech_Male> that I ever <Speech_Male> Do his fifty <Speech_Male> million <Speech_Male> dollars <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> okay. Is <Speech_Male> there a fifty <Speech_Male> million <SpeakerChange> dollar <Speech_Male> membership <Speech_Male> level. No <Speech_Male> just <SpeakerChange> just five five <Speech_Male> dollars. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> There's there's no <Speech_Male> possible way I can do <Speech_Male> that. I'm so sorry <Speech_Male> I I barely <Speech_Male> even comprehend <Speech_Male> what that means <Speech_Male> five dollars. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Five fingers <Speech_Male> five <SpeakerChange> dollars. <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> can't do it. I won't <Speech_Male> do it <Speech_Male> really yes. <Speech_Male> I absolutely <Speech_Male> cannot do that. <Silence> <Advertisement> Please <Silence> no <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> okay well <Speech_Male> thanks. Thanks <Speech_Male> for the <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> nine point. Nine five billion <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> you are very <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement>

"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

"Chosen location. I'm touching my face there's contours there's a portrait A. Hey there's a bust. Their sculpture face resin carbon capture. Recycling alchemy me. I wonder yes. alchemy is an exciting concept. I really like catalyzing. We have mirror. ooh may be about ancestor alchemy. Ancestor alchemy that that seems Arkansas. ANCESTOR ALCHEMY AAA. That's it's pretty cutesy. Why don't we? I feel like the Arkansas is implied. Why don't we call all it ancestor? alchemy I have six minutes to spare. Were going to call our spire that collects waste from the air from the land from the water and transforms it into a sculptural portrait. Diptych Diptych one of your face your compatriots face your family space It can be. You can have one face in there you can have up to. Let's say ten faces or yeah why not ten faces and each of these faces is is then matched with a face from any point in Arkansas. History an important person who has influenced inst- the space influenced little rock We could probably come up with so many thousands of people. I also imagine that if we can capture your face if you come and visit you or sort of in the system were constantly asked to look into the eyes of our ancestors and reckon with them and realized that we living our lives now we have similar consciousness us to the folks who were living in the past. Please consider for my proposal. The project ancestor alchemy. Thank you do my goodness what the process and Esther Alchemy. Yeah so Dr Poo. Gosh what do you think. Well pretty impressive project. I enjoy the interactive portion of it. I I like that. It is a stately the work of art on its own and that participants walk away with their own their own self portrait and they learn something is well about the history of the people of the land of Arkansas. I enjoy that it. It takes carbon out of the the air that is a very Responsible thing that art can do and that you have to not only reckon with people from the past but also reckon with all of the trash great. Thank you so much yeah. That's that's really really kind as I grant you the entire nine point nine five billion dollars for your project online. Goodness thank you. Thank you so much Dr. Gosh that's that's really wonderful. I'm so excited to get started That that's really really wonderful. You're welcome you earned it with your wonderful idea and esther alchemy. That's so so wonderful. Thank you listen you know I I wanted to also let you know about a another thing that I'm working on is yes so I recently started a a Patriot fan for The cozy zone podcast Adriaan..

Esther Alchemy Arkansas Dr Poo Patriot
"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

14:18 min | 2 years ago

"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

"Thank you Dr Gosh only so Okay sewer opening up the dossier here Okay so we have Sculpture at the river market market which is in the city of Little Rock. Arkansas Riverfront Park grand entrance sculpture The call for are proposals. Reads the new sculpture. Placement is a seventy five foot in diameter circle at the base of the junction bridge. The area presently presently is landscaped. This area should be considered a blank canvas for your proposal. The junction bridge is directly to the north of the site. And the buttress. The bridge is on a rock formation. That is little rock's namesake to the East is r renovated amphitheater and to the West is an open air history. Three pavilion with a small stage attached to it to the south is an area that is presently being redesigned. As a new proposed entrance to the Riverfront Park that proposed sites should should be and will be the focal point of the newly redesigned entrance into the Riverfront Park from Clinton Avenue that propose sculpture should be bold in its appearance and act. Ah Attraction to bring people into the park it will be a magnet luring people into the park and also help them become acclimated to using all the other amenities in the park. Especially the Vogel Schwartz Sculpture Garden. The design of the sculpture and the utilization of space can take on any characteristic that your mind can can construct it can be intimate bold or traditional. There is no preconceived idea about how this space can be enhanced. We look forward to your ideas on how to utilize the space. Please think outside the box when you submit your proposal. If you have any questions about the space please contact me directly. And that's from Dean Kouris. MD Eh. The budget is nine point. Nine five billion dollars the projected two thousand seventeen. US Budget for the NSA thirty minutes on the clock. And here we go okay. So I'm looking at this site photo. There is this A seventy five foot diameter circle that is landscaped. Looks like we have wood chips. We have little bushes. We may have maybe have one main tree. This landscape is as a blank canvas. Maybe we could completely remove this. The Circle is surrounded by this nice sidewalk which looked superfund I can imagine myself as a little little kids sort of running through there I actually. I did a little bit of research. I'm curious just because I'm in sort of a decolonizing mood and About who the First nations the indigenous folks in Arkansas were and so yeah I brought up this web page and we have the Kado Indians. The chickasaw Indians the osage Indians the qual- Indians and the TUNICA Indians. All were in Arkansas Arkansas. And apparently they were all driven out. I I wonder if there's a way to honor These tribes that that seems very important and also knowing a sort of my own. You know European background. I don't know necessarily if I have the Gravitas to call Ryan these first nations these indigenous tribes. But it's definitely worth acknowledging and I feel like some sort of vig knowledge about the original stewards of the land would be really important. My first image is of this big severe Because the the call for proposals says that it will be a magnet luring people into the park and also help them become acclimated to using all the other amenities. I'm picturing this literally this magnetic sphere or there's a series of concentric spheres that perhaps a can be magnetized raised in different ways. There's like shifting magnetic fields that attract maybe ball bearings or like iron filings nine links that form different things that would actually be really beautiful If we could create these contained electromagnetic fields of that could create like shapes shapes out of metal filings like. I'm thinking about who has disturbed my slumber. The the panther in Aladdin and the original animated aided Aladdin but instead of like sander magical sand it would be iron filings. So that's that's an option there but I wonder too if there's some sort of of scientific study that we could do things that I would really like would be some sort of playground kind of thing like swing set or for an obstacle course or or something of that nature some something really delightful and fun to draw people in and perhaps as they're playing being there could be some sort of dyke tactic offering. I also wonder if there would be some sort of utilitarian purpose to the sculpture may be some sort of a harvesting water from the air or maybe some sort of Pollution cleaning thing. That would be nice if there were some sort of Cleansing you know Like environmentally the cleansing process. That would actually be pretty cool. Maybe a beacon for removing carbon from the atmosphere that actually it feels pretty exciting. Like I've just been thinking about these fires that are happening in Australia Fires that are happening in California feels like the world is on fire and so it feels really important to filter particulates out of the air and also actually what would be really nice is to then have these particulates. The maybe the actual harvested particulates to be then fabricated in real time into some sort of sculpture. Great Okay this is feeling good and this is feeling also extremely expensive and complicated. which is I think what we're going for? So let's say we have this large spire right in the middle of this landscaped landscaped a seventy five foot diameter place personally I don't care for the landscaping that is currently featured in this little rotunda in a circle. So let's let's just say we're we're gonNA clear that maybe will will uproot all of them and lovingly transferred them to someplace else. Then we're going to to make this beautiful. Modern or even futuristic spire in this spire is a mechanism that removes carbon and other sort of harmful articulate from the air. It actually would be really sweet. To maybe invite people are invite the public to then Suggest some sort of shape that then this spire. There's also also a part of the spire that can create this filtered or you fabricate the filtered carbon into a particular shape. I'm thinking of these like injection mold old machines at the zoo. You know you could like put in. I don't know what dollar or something like that and it would In real time sort of create this injection plastic plastic mold of like a gorilla or an alligator. I think they had the see. No evil hear no evil speak no evil monkeys at the Malky County Zoo which was really. He's sweet I think I got a bunch of them. I'm thinking of some sort of smaller scale injection mold process but instead of plastic it would actually be carbon particulates and other pollutants in the air. That would be nice. Some sort of like acrylic resin covering to really make sure that this this was safe and it it would probably have to be like a ballistic grade covering just so that really there would be no way for it to break and this this carbon was sequestered in a really good way. Perhaps the carbon is formed into the shapes of faces. Pieces of important Arkansas. People were talking. You know way prehistoric. People were talking indigenous edginess. People were talking European colonizers. We're talking about civil rights people. This antenna spits out little carbon pollutant busts of these. Perhaps thousands of people in Arkansas history. That seems reasonable. And there's a directory of all of these Arkansas people. It's good to look in the faces of the people who've come before four. Why don't we have maybe a diptych of a bust? It also would be nice perhaps to have your own face preserved in this pollutant thing. I also wonder I wonder if there would be some intake for garbage or plastics that this could be a place where you could also deposit plastics and other challenging to recycle things and then it would also make these Art Busts out of it. That feels important so not you know. Of course there would be this passive system of creating pollutants from the air perhaps even compost that there would be different containers where people from the community could bring paper burn plastic and and metal and glass and this machine would break all of these materials down and maybe even would or any kind of garbage. Frankly any any material but we have so much money. I think that we could probably have the technology to analyze. Whatever material was was put into the system system it could be from the air it could be gas? It could be a liquid could be a solid and then the machine cadillac or it album is is these materials into some sort of colleg. Abol are making material that could be a three D. printed. ooh wouldn't it be nice to have your face staring at her looking at another face. Ace from Arkansas history. So that your experiences put into context from these human ancestors. I really liked this idea. I I think that's nice. So it's aspire around the spire all of these receptacles for different types of I. Guess maybe let's say four more receptacles for any kind of waste material. Let's not do let's not do Human excrement I feel like our that. That feels feels like a bit much. And also violates various decency laws. I'm sure but we could. You know there there would be some sort of sign age around meal. Socially acceptable materials would be there. But we can be I. I'm sure it really does run. The gamut maybe maybe it's fine. Maybe like dog dog poop and cat litter and vomit. And all this stuff like I guess you know why discriminate you know this is all part of our world Certainly we wouldn't want. I wonder also to the sewage thing feels a little rough and it opens up pretty big can of worms. I wouldn't want to encourage that and it feels disrespectful. Also let us just say that. Perhaps sewage is not a part of it. Great Okay So. So let's so we have the spire and we have this ballistic resin and we have these recycled materials and we have three D. printing. And we have these these busts if these these faces of of yourself and or your family or your compatriots whoever you're coming with looking At paired with staring at looking in the eyes of people from Arkansas history okay We could have face to face that's That is title. We could have inspire. These are pretty nerdy and Dorky but were just starting the bidding here. We could have recycle. We could have looking at looking to the past. We could have face hit facing facing history face in your face garbage face. Carbon capture face face capture gaze staring contests. I am not thrilled with any of these particular ideas I Have Little over ten minutes to come up with a title which feels like a extraordinarily leisurely time Which makes me think that perhaps a half hour for a solo person for me is is quite a long time but of course For Your listening pleasure we can. We can edit this down so we know that it's a real life half hour but You know in podcast land ended. It'll probably be much shorter. And it probably isn't the most fun to listen to me him. And haw about all of these different names we have this roster of people that we will include it would be really nice also to have some sort. Take away about the people's Histories It would be nice to have your own name. And the date inscribed arrived on it probably etched into the the resin some point there would probably be a little blurb a name blurb a date and on both sides in some sort.

Arkansas Little Rock Arkansas Riverfront Park Riverfront Park First nations Vogel Schwartz Sculpture Garde Aladdin MD chickasaw Indians US NSA Dean Kouris TUNICA Indians Kado Indians Malky County Zoo California Ryan
"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

09:59 min | 2 years ago

"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

"I seek out the finest creative folks I know. And we sweetly sink into that guests sanctified spot an actual place on earth a cozy zone where we talk about art and feelings and where all that stuff it comes from. And if you're a connoisseur of the classic Cozy Zones Holy Fa Jolie. Do we have some delightful new schtick for you. At the the end of each episode I would allude to this imaginary Charitable Organization the Cosies Zone Foundation and proclaimed that this foundation has granted me and my guest unlimited funds to create and realize a collaborative project inspired by who we are and the conversation we just had in this cozy zone revival. I'm striving to get much more clear and more specific. I actually want to introduce you to the trustees who make the cozy zone foundation possible and I want them to set a definitive budget number for these projects. So the original original elements of this podcast. We have our vulnerable conversations. We have our site specific cosies zones. All of that is is going fine. We're going to keep keep that Jamin. Are you nearly finished with your preamble. Oh yes absolutely. Oh my goodness I almost forgot forgot here with me right now I have a trustee of the cozy zone foundation sitting with me on my couch. Right right next to me Hey thank you so much for. Your patients cozy zone friends. It is my esteemed honor to introduce you to Dr Vincent. Pu Gosh he is an orthopedic. Surgeon an investor and beloved trustee of the Cosies Zone Foundation. Thank you so much for being here. Dr Poo Gosh yes. It's a pleasure to be here. Your Room is very messy at all this stuff on the walls doesn't make it easy since to me and But I I'm happy to be here. Of course I'm always happy to to support the arts with my extreme wealth that I- garnered from Orthopedic Surgery and a As well as my investments wonderful thank you thank you Dr. Gosh can you. Can you tell us a little bit about how you I guess. Acquired your wealth and came to be a trustee of the Cozy Zone Foundation. Yes well certainly so as you may be aware of being northop. Edict surgeon is the highest paid type of surgery in the United States. That is why I got into it. Of course it is helpful to He'll people's skeletal. Get a little systems and muscular systems and their spine and all of the things associated with those body systems. However I I believe that it is not worth pursuing something in life Unless you are compensated royally for it. So I sought out this practice of medicine and Made a lot of money that way I. He was always a bachelor as romantic. entanglements seem to cause someone to him ridge fines of course and so I wanted to create my own kingdom of sorts and In my dealings in High Society I was lucky enough to run into a young man who oh you may have heard of Warren Buffett. Yes you know. I I know Warren Buffett. What is his his His company's unease compelled what is the Berkshire Hathaway Holdings Company. As I'm sure you know it began with several textile companies and and grew from there and yes. I met Warren at a beautiful cocktail party I believe in Chicago. And we struck up a conversation about fine Likulia's sir herbal liqueur chartreuse and He invited me to his ranch and I remember going to his ranch and seeing this enormous inclusion where he was raising a very specific type of love of animals something he called a speed boat speed goes speed goes up like Zen like a speedboat. No it's a goat. That's very fast. It's a that's bred to be extremely fast. I leaned up against the fence and watched Mr Buffet. Warren of course caused zooming around. On these these these leak goat creatures and loan Oli toppled off one of the speed beat. Goats cranked his neck and a horrendous way and. Luckily I could utilize my off-peak surgery skills back in He has of course a private surgery room on the is a state and we rushed him over there. I went into surgery and and certainly shortly saved a large portion of his mobility Warren. Being very grateful for my surgical Acumen Acumen invited me to invest some of my orthopedic surgery money in his investment holdings and well. Let's just say that at my wealth grew exponentially year after year. That's that's wonderful full story Dr. Gosh it's really really incredible so as we as we discussed. I believe I discussed with your assistant. Assistant a traditionally the CO zone foundation. Which you are trustee of disburses funds for creative projects and I was curious Sirius? Xm What the amount of the fund yet out. I'll disclose to you the amount of the funds. Your directive from from me was to find some amount of money that exists in the world that that makes me feel icky and then I would then match that amount of money instead of going to this iggy purpose towards public art which I must tell you is most certainly the most noble of pursuits in all the world. Certainly yes author. Orthopedic Surgery is a fine practice however creating art creating some sort of universal universal expression is absolutely just the most moving noble out say even divine pursuit. And this is why I am here today in your disgusting apartment. It's quite sinful that you wouldn't have cleaned up a little bit before I found that the Projected budget that the US ask government provides to the our national security association the NSA and this of course is the organization that is created to do surveillance on United States. Citizens is nine point leaned. Nine five billion dollars is the projected amount in twenty seventeen which I find disgusting. We all to serve our own private lives our own. Freedom of expression are our choices not being constantly watched by the state and so it. Is this figure that I would like to then shows back with you match with my own funds in order for you to create a project that you will find in this dossier that's incredible. Wow nine point nine five. A billion dollars the twenty seventeen. NSA budget yes that's correct. Wow thank you so much and okay. So you're you're you're handing me this dossier and to Dr Poo. Gosh I just want to let you know how this is GonNa work. I am going to put thirty minutes on timer for myself and then I just with my own sort of mind will devise a creative response to whatever project you have chosen for me in this dossier. I mean you're going to be right here so you'll listen to it and then after after I've I've completed it you'll decide whether or not to Finally release these funds and you can maybe give me some critical feedback also about the project as you are. The trustee who is is is commissioning this particular project..

trustee Cozy Zone Foundation Warren Buffett Cosies Zone Foundation Dr Poo United States CO zone foundation Orthopedic Surgery Charitable Organization surgical Acumen Acumen Berkshire Hathaway Holdings Co Dr Vincent Chicago Mr Buffet Likulia Oli High Society NSA
"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

"I'm so Hello dear ones. Welcome back to cozy zone with Ben Weber. It's me Ben. Weber wishing you a nourishing rushing and triumphant twenty twenty and a kick ass beginning of a brand new decade. I'm speaking to you on January first. Twenty twenty. I'm here on my by couch in the reckoning room at my apartment if you're tuning in for the first time are you in for heart. Pounding beautifully soothing and profoundly roundly inspiring experience goes his own goes like this..