36 Burst results for "Weber"

Fresh update on "weber" discussed on Bloomberg Businessweek

Bloomberg Businessweek

03:28 min | 14 hrs ago

Fresh update on "weber" discussed on Bloomberg Businessweek

"And and it's really interesting to see that evolution because we've we've talked about it a lot like you said with the social media companies. A lot of conservatives are concerned about too much. Cutting off of people who have accounts. A lot of people on the Democratic side are concerned about the hosting of illegal activity and people who are inciting violence and And the balance is really what is it? Is an issue here. So looking Valley companies have a reputation for being really mission driven, and I think a lot of employees have had a personal reckoning over the last few years. Is it ethical to work for Facebook? Is it ethical to work for Google if they're working with the Defense Department on No, uh Putting people in cases of the border. There have been a lot of of new debates about what it means. If you work for a company that has certain requires certain vendors, certain contracts and host certain voices. And so we have seen employees the almost the more forceful voice against their leaders and even the government because the government can't can't really Be clear about what they want everyone days in check power, but they don't necessarily have a clear direction of what would be a good resolution. Whereas employees they're mostly they're mostly liberal. They're well educated, and they're saying Hey, I don't want to work for a place that support something like this, and we saw an open water from Twitter employees to Jack Dorsey asking for bigger ban on Trump. They had previously only been home for 12 hours, and now that he's permanently banned And we've seen we've seen Amazon employees right to their employer about parlor. It's saying, Why're we hosting parlor? We should We should take them off. And I think that that power should not be underestimated because of how hard it is to recruit Silicon Valley. The best talent Well and what's to stop. I don't know. Like I don't know whether there's oranges to oranges, apples to apples, but another company from saying, I don't like. Well, I guess companies do that, right if they don't wanna work with the supplier, or if they don't want to work with something, they have that opportunity to do it. Sarah, I'm just trying to Understand the differences or not differences from another company. Kind of banning something. You know whether they don't sell to a certain customer. They do that all the time, right? Well, sometimes who? Okay a few years ago Cos We're happy to just work within the bounds of the law. There are sanctions against Iran. We won't sell to around. But that was like you know is it's illegal. We won't do it. And that was how Facebook and Twitter thought about content a lot in the early days, you know, remove his little as possible. All right, Tim. Safe to say, social media really rethinking some of its playbook. We saw that this week, right? No, no doubt about it. Yeah, That's right. I mean, I've really surprised to see big moves from the biggest tech companies essentially deep platform in the President. Really remarkable, All right, that was Bloomberg News technology reporter Sour friar. She joined us along with Bloomberg Business Week. Editor Joe Weber still to come as social media banned the president, the U. S. Has voted to impeach him for historic second time We'll hear from a top aide to former Democratic Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada and the author of Kill Switch, The Rise of the Modern Senate and the Crippling of American Democracy. Timely Book. You're Listening to Bloomberg Business Week..

Facebook Twitter Bloomberg Jack Dorsey Sour Friar Joe Weber President Trump Bloomberg News Google Defense Department Silicon Valley Harry Reid Democratic Majority TIM Nevada Iran Sarah Donald Trump Amazon
Has the Internet Permanently Changed How We Speak?

Wild Wild Tech

05:14 min | 4 d ago

Has the Internet Permanently Changed How We Speak?

"We'll come back to wild wild tech a show about the strange frankenstein's monster of technology and culture shambling through our lives. I'm josh rivera. And i'm doing erika weber. I am the frankenstein and joshua is the monster. Let me paint you a picture jordan. It's the early nineteen eighty s. we're in calgary alberta. It's cold because this is calgary and a man named wayne pearson. Is typing three letters online for the first time l. I think you're familiar with this. Wouldn't rate yes. It clearly means lots of love joshua. It's like it's laugh out loud right. Yeah i mean this one's everywhere right with a few exceptions like you just said like everyone gets it. It's an example of what we might call like. Internet speak which can be a phrase acronym or a word that was either born or popularized on the internet. Do you have any favorites. A oh laughing my ass off or ass for you over there what else. I never really liked raffle because it sounded too fluffy. Yeah funny funny thing about raffle ruffles. Actually fallen out of popularity. No one really use it anymore. Probably because they feel the same way you do so your your taste maker good. Everyone should listen to me more. I have a friend who just types wrecked r. e. t. all caps when someone gets there s handed to them but like only in a very minor inconsequential way. It feels a little stupid talking about this stuff right. But i also think it's fun i mean we're both riders and language is kind of easy to take for granted. It just sort of like works and you don't really appreciate for the thousands of miracles that it takes to make it work so talking to a link and we've got to here today just reminds you of how much magic there is and how we speak to one another. There are very obvious differences in the way we speak and like sometimes it's fun. Pack that but before we go any further we should because this is an english language podcast or naturally going to discuss english and because language is also culture. It's worth noting. A big part of how. The internet influence language comes from cultures borrowing from one another sometimes in ways that are not particularly great or well-considered. We're mostly focusing on the tech angle. Here as the cultural one is enough to fuel an entire podcast. Yeah much as. I would like to pitch that podcast. Personally you'd be better off going to listen to the allusion est within a by helen saltzman. She talks about this kind of thing. All the time and you know talks about the conflict between loving the english language and also knowing that it has committed atrocities so today. I'm going to introduce you to two of my favorite interviews so far. The first is someone who has around fifty years of experience in linguistics and comes from your side of the jordan. Well i'm david crystal academically. I'm honorary professor of linguistics at the university of banja. Here in north wales. Also really. I spend most of my time at home especially lockdown writing books about language in linguistics and the english language gender close aspects of the internet to. He's here to give us an understanding of how the internet has impacted our language and the ways. It has actually happened before but first he starts with something. That's a little bit surprising. For all the words we don't know and rapidly growing lexicon. The internet's impact on the english. Language is actually quite small. Not because there isn't a lot of change but because the english language is so vast. Let's just stay with english for the moment over the past twenty years. I'm sure the internet has added several thousand new words and phrases to the english language. But heck the english language has over a million words each many more than that nobody knows. How many so an extra few thousand isn't a big deal. As far as vocabulary is concerned and then grandma. Oh well as far as i can tell the grammatical constructions. We will using back in one thousand nine hundred ninety just before the win. Came in exactly the same as the grammatical constructions. You and i are using right now. According to professor crystal this has had a side effect. I'm sure you've seen before. Those who treat changes in the language as a sign of cultural decay. So i went to see a show by susie. Dent she does dictionary kona on a countdown. I don't know if any of this is meaningful to you countdown. british television program with word challenges and number challenges and she does the dictionary corner anyway. She did this show about language and she talked about how people are often very concerned about it. Changing her thing was the word. Mischievous people often pronounces mischievous because they think it rhymes with devious. But it's actually mischievous more people probably say mischievous that. It will probably just change the word that kind of thing. Yeah and this is one of the things that professor crystal talked about length. The languages nature change. It's not inherently good or bad. it's just change.

Josh Rivera Erika Weber Wayne Pearson Joshua Calgary Helen Saltzman Frankenstein University Of Banja Alberta David Crystal North Wales Jordan Susie Dent Professor Crystal
Alex Padilla to become California's first Latino senator, replacing Harris

KCBS Radio Morning News

04:45 min | 3 weeks ago

Alex Padilla to become California's first Latino senator, replacing Harris

"Going. Secretary Alex Padilla now heads to Washington, D C. To replace Vice President elect Kamila Harris and become California's first Latino senator. Questions still remain over how Padilla will be received in D. C. And for more, we turn now to the KCBS Ring Central news Line and talk with Christopher. Cattle. Lago National political reporter at Political Good to have you with us, Christopher Nice to be here. Thank you. So, how much pressure do you think the governor was under to appoint a Latino to replace Kamila Harris? I think he was under huge pressure. Just generally. He he was replacing a multiracial woman, and Kamila Harris, a black woman. And there was a lot of groups out there who felt that not only should he replace Harris with a woman but a black woman in particular because she was the only black woman in the U. S Senate, and that number will not go from 1 to 0. But there was also tremendous pressure. Even before Harris ran, you'll remember in 20. 15 when she started her campaign to replace Barbara Boxer for the state to elect its first Latino senator, Um, back then, there were calls for folks like former L. A Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa to run even the happier for Sarah, who by now nominated to be the Health and human services director to potentially run Kevin De Leone ended up running against Dianne Feinstein and 2018 and lost in the other Senate seat. So there was a lot of competing pressure for Gavin Newsom and what we saw yesterday. Clearly there was no accident in him almost packaging these two Thies two appointments together, which you saw for the U. S. Senate and Alex Padilla and then surely Weber. To replace Padilla as secretary of state, a state wide position. Surely Weber is chair of the Black caucus in the state and also Was a long time professor PhD from San Diego State who's done a lot of focus on police reform another racial justice issues in the state, so You know, do some. I know people talk for weeks and weeks about appointing Padilla. He was He was kind of the obvious pick someone who is allied with new some years ago, but he waited clearly so he could make these two um, appointments in tandem s so that people could see kind of the full context of both of them and not just look at one of the other. What? What about the comments from San Francisco Mayor London Braid. Initially she called this a real blow to the African American community. You think she was angry at video? She angry Governor Newsome. Yeah. Both. I think she speaks for folks both in the state and nationally who Who really did genuinely want to see that seat. Uh um, uh, C representation. Um, of Ah, Black woman like common. Harris continue in that Senate seat. There. Also a lot of people as I mentioned who wanted to see a woman in that seat. Um and I think She? It's complex. She does reflect some of the groups out there some of the people out there even some of the people who are praising kind of the tandem. Nature of these pics were disappointed, maybe not in such sharp terms of London Bridge, But groups and other folks out there were disappointed that Newsome did not appoint a black woman to serve in the Senate. Well, this all got announced and Harris is term expires in two years, and Padilla has already launched a Senate campaign account asking for donations. So it appears that He wants to stick around for a while, and he's already raising money. Yeah, The thing that we know about the Senate races these days and really any races, you have to capitalize on the 1st 2024 hours 48 hours first week when people are paying attention, the senior name in the news These races in California don't typically command a kind of TV time. And so he's trying to get a raise as much money as you can. And in the short period, the short window where folks are really tuning in. And we've seen comments. And I know you didn't mention this but from folks like Ro Khanna Progressive, who was the national co chaired for Bernie Sanders, who are expressing disappointment, not not in, uh in the in Padilla. On the fact that he's a Latino, which they celebrate, but in the fact that they think that his politics or to moderate and that's just that he's got to raise a lot of money because he could he could certainly face eh Progressive challenger in two years in the state, and you know he'll only have two years to really make his mark and get his name out there before before his challenge.

Kamila Harris Padilla Senate Secretary Alex Padilla Vice President Elect Kamila Ha Christopher Nice Harris Kevin De Leone Alex Padilla Weber Antonio Villaraigosa Barbara Boxer Governor Newsome Dianne Feinstein Gavin Newsom Christopher Health And Human Services U. California Washington
Alex Padilla to replace Kamala Harris in Senate, becoming California's first Latino senator

Pacifica Evening News

00:18 sec | 3 weeks ago

Alex Padilla to replace Kamala Harris in Senate, becoming California's first Latino senator

"California Governor Gavin Newsom picks Secretary of State Alex Idea to fill the rest of the Senate term of Kamila Harris. He'll become the first Latino to service a California senator Newsome quickly pivots to select Assemblywoman Shirley Weber to replace India as the state's first black secretary of state

Governor Gavin Newsom Secretary Of State Alex Idea Kamila Harris California Senate Shirley Weber Newsome India
Special Report: Electoral College formally votes for President-elect Joe Biden

John Howell

01:06 min | Last month

Special Report: Electoral College formally votes for President-elect Joe Biden

"Tonight. The Electoral College has Formally validated Joe Biden's victory in the 2020 presidential election. Let's get the latest in this ABC News Special reports. Joe Biden is now officially the president elect Kamila Harris, the vice president elect in the past hour after California's electors met Awarded all 55 of their votes. Harris's state push them over the 270 votes needed to cement the victory in the election. State Assembly member Shirley Weber, a Democrat, presided, but Joseph R. Biden of Delaware eyes 55. Knows zero It was a symbolic moment. Normally, the electoral college voting is just a formality. This year it seals a win for Biden. But President Trump's teams is a fight is not over and that they will appeal to Congress to overturn the results. That's highly unlikely Prospect ABC Is Alex still in Los Angeles, electors have been meeting in state capitals across the nation to vote. Was heavy security and Lansing, Michigan after officials cited a credible threat, but none materialized and very few protesters votes officially tallied in Congress. January 6th.

Joe Biden Kamila Harris Shirley Weber Electoral College Abc News President Trump State Assembly Harris Delaware California Biden Congress ABC Alex Los Angeles Lansing Michigan
Los Angeles sheriff says deputies can conceal their names during protests

KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

01:00 min | Last month

Los Angeles sheriff says deputies can conceal their names during protests

"Online appeared to show some deputies covering up their names with tape. The name things are gonna be covered, and they're gonna be replaced with a badge number and identifying number. And that will comply with state law. Sheriff Alex Villanueva come. Protesters were actually using the deputies names to then go docks, then blast their home address on social media show up at their house is the summer protesters showed up at home and Cavenagh believed to be the residents of the deputy who fatally shot and dress Guardado. Vin Weber says his own home address has been posted on flyers and freeway banners. We're gonna Prosecute people. The law doesn't contain any exception for officers to completely obscure their name or their badge number. You see Irvine Law school professor Susan Seger. In our society. We hold our police accountable. We want to know what they're doing, and we don't want a secret Police force going out and arresting people Secret says Posting an officer's home address for the purpose of protest does not qualify. A cyber stalking Claudia Pesky Takeo Next 10 70 news radio. Olympic gold medalist and U. C L. A

Alex Villanueva Cavenagh Guardado Vin Weber Irvine Law School Susan Seger Claudia Pesky Takeo
Pat Quinn, Ice Bucket Challenge co-founder, has died at age 37

Always in Fashion with Mark Weber

00:28 sec | 2 months ago

Pat Quinn, Ice Bucket Challenge co-founder, has died at age 37

"Co founder of the ice bucket Challenge for a less died this morning at age 37 he better Amy O Tropic lateral sclerosis, often called Lou Gehrig's disease since diagnosis in 2013, the ice bucket video challenge taking social media by storm in summer. 2014. Quinn, talking with Fox News radio in 2015 is great for the A L s community. We really needed a new sense of fight new sense of hope. So far, the challenge raising more than $250 million Worldwide.

Tropic Lateral Sclerosis Lou Gehrig AMY Diagnosis Quinn Fox News
Shooting at Wisconsin mall leaves 8 injured

Guy Benson

00:37 sec | 2 months ago

Shooting at Wisconsin mall leaves 8 injured

"Wisconsin of issued a shelter in place order to residents because of a possibly armed man. They surrounded the medical building and closed off a nearby highway could be the man wanted for a shooting Friday at at a a mall mall in in Wauwatosa, Wauwatosa, Wisconsin, Wisconsin, that that left left eight eight people people injured. injured. One One thing thing that that chief chief very very Weber Weber pointed pointed to to them. them. The The good good news news is is that that there there are are no no fatalities. fatalities. Seven Seven injured injured adults adults and and one one injured injured teenager teenager were were transported transported to to the the hospital hospital by by while while we we toast toast the the fire fire department. department. Extent Extent of of their their injuries injuries is is unknown unknown at at this this time time that that she she described described the the shooter shooter as as a a white white male male in in his his twenties and thirties plucks is Mike Tobin reports. Police now believe the shooting was not a random act but resulted from a fight of some kind Friday saw

Wisconsin Wauwatosa Weber Weber Mike Tobin
Shooting at Wisconsin mall leaves 8 injured

Mark Levin

00:34 sec | 2 months ago

Shooting at Wisconsin mall leaves 8 injured

"Several people are injured during a mall shooting west of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, I man character Fox news while we toast to police chief, Very Weber gave no motive for the attack. Seven injured adults and one injured teenager were transported to the hospital by while we toast the fire department. Extent of their injuries is unknown. At this time, the Mayfair mall is closed until further notice. It remains an active crime scene. Police say the shooter no longer is out the scene. The same mall in Wauwatosa was the target of sporadic protests Earlier in the year after a black teen was shot by a black police officer. Americans

Very Weber Mayfair Mall Fox News Milwaukee Wisconsin Wauwatosa
As Trump makes baseless fraud allegations, Republicans back his refusal to concede

All Things Considered

01:09 min | 2 months ago

As Trump makes baseless fraud allegations, Republicans back his refusal to concede

"In dozens of states from both political parties say there is no evidence that fraud or other violations Played a role in President Trump's defeat. But Republican lawmakers and candidates are following Trump's lead and refusing to concede and that includes Republicans in California. KCR W's Tara Katrina has the run down. Throughout the state Republicans are echoing Trump's refusal and promoting untrue allegations of voting irregularities. They include representatives Tom McClintock of Elk Grove, Douglas, Alfa Oroville and Devin Nunes of two Larry same goes for minority leader of the California state Senate, Shannon Grove. And the top ranking Republican in Congress Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy of Bakersfield. Closer to home. Some field candidates are trying to sow doubt too. Carol Webber didn't really have a fighting chance at his run for California's 37th District congressional seat. The Republican was up against popular Democrat incumbent Karen Bass in a very blue part of Los Angeles. At last count, Weber lost by more than 72% points, but even he has refused to concede, citing baseless claims. In this case,

Donald Trump Tara Katrina Devin Nunes Shannon Grove California Tom Mcclintock Oroville Elk Grove Carol Webber Republicans Kevin Mccarthy Douglas Larry Bakersfield Senate Congress Karen Bass Weber Los Angeles
Magician Calen Morelli on 'The Piano Card Project'

The Insider

06:23 min | 2 months ago

Magician Calen Morelli on 'The Piano Card Project'

"Yesterday burst onto the magic scene with smash hit. Releases had a huge magic prank show and then went onto consult for the biggest magicians. Tv shows in the world. It's kayla morale kevin. How is money this evening this afternoon. Whatever i mid day in las vegas and it's it's great okay. What's your origin story. You've got twenty one seconds. Origin story is my parents. were religious. Didn't let me do magic. When i found magic at ten found it when i was in high school Became very popular. Unlike most magicians in high school. My dad went bankrupt. We moved into my the basement of my grandma's house. When i was just graduated high school and in those six months i started taking magic extremely serious and i created pretty much all of the content that put me onto the scene in those six months in a basement and then i just continued with a lot of work from there and stuff happens six months. Meanwhile let's dive straighten. I want to talk about your creative process. Now let's take new release the piano project when antitax start. What was the journey like. And how did you end up where you ended up where it's not as as sexy as i would like it to be but sexy man. I'm not overly honest person. this. Let's see i- i created it during my time in london when i was working on dynamo's season three that hired me to come out there and we had I think our seeing in blake and their team had worked on the first episode and then they hired me to come. In and create all the magic for the last three episodes. So that was a huge work load Shell has like seventy five effects in a few months. Like for tv magic like like. Let's be real. This was i like when people say that. They've consulted and worked. I respect a very short list of people like Garcia blake rico. Michael weber like many many people that are excellent and kim have. I've seen work under fire like okay. I'm like these people can handle it. And yeah i think that this this whole dynamo thing was just like whoa. That was a that was a crash course in magic and i. I was so crazy at that point. And that's this is coming up to the piano cardi question but there was a point when i was just for fun week. Creating an extra hundred ideas day on top of the hour. I would write down a list. The one of the guys that work for dynamo challenge me. He's like he likes to do comedy do gersh. So we're like yo. Maybe we just push ourselves and we write down a list of hundred ideas a day for seven days in a row so on top of the eight hour workday with dynamo and we were going out to open mic night. Just for fun and london and try and shit out Yeah i like seven hundred ideas down in a week just one week with dynamo and that was even that was just for myself so like you can see like the level of of obsession that i have for this art and the piano card was just it. It probably took three minutes to create at one time. And i was just like i literally. There was two times when i was going over analyzing flap cards and there was the the borderless flap and the piano card concept that i Figured out like around two thousand eleven two thousand twelve thousand and thirteen. I saw in that span. I i really don't remember the month or year but yeah I don't hundred percent remember if it went into dynamo's show or not. I think it might have been a quick clip but yeah so it just. I ended up putting it online on youtube. Because i had a youtube back then That was just popping off. And i was just like getting into it and it was wild because like the youtube like out when i was getting to the end of the gig with dynamo. My youtube had landed me a pilot with mtv but they spent money on a pilot. That wasn't even on wasn't even supposed to air but this guy saad dress code. The old president of mtv was a fan of me because he saw dress code from syria. Lebanon and he was like this dude. I like his magic. I think he's cool so he found me on youtube and he saw like making content and he saw potential so we ended up making a pilot. Right after that. And like everything just like snowballed from there but I put it on my youtube the piano card concept and then i ended up deleting my youtube so all those videos are gone. I deleted them back in. Like two thousand sixteen. Maybe it was like right. After i put out the sun we cops Video and that like exploded. It exploded past i could comprehend. Because like that was like a level that was like a level of lake There's like worldwide viral hits and then there's like worldwide viral hits that stick around and like people talk about and this was one that like people would recognize me when i went out at a bar. Oh well like. I sat next to like a girl on the plane and she was like you look familiar and i'm just like this is dumb. This is not real. this is not real life. Stop it

Garcia Blake Michael Weber Youtube Gersh Kayla London Kevin Las Vegas Cardi Blake Rico KIM Dynamo Saad Dress MTV
A record number of women will serve in Congress

Bloomberg Businessweek

01:42 min | 2 months ago

A record number of women will serve in Congress

"Of uncertainty followed Tuesday's vote. One thing definitely stood out, and that is a record number of GOP women who have been voted into congressional seats. Let's get into it. With our own Rebecca Greenfield. She wrote the story. She leads diversity coverage here at Bloomberg. She joins us on the phone, as does Bloomberg BusinessWeek editor Jill Weber. She he's on the Axis line in Brooklyn. So let's set it off. Set it up with you. I mean, there's obviously we're focusing on the outcome. But there again a lot of moving parts to this tons of other storylines and the blue wave. There was so much anticipation of And it remains to be determined if that will end up taking it out. Maybe, but regardless of that there was something of a red fortress. And the most dramatic part to me with this note that you know Rebecca hit in her story about the number of GOP women in Congress actually reaching a record. How significant was that, Rebecca? Because, you know, the other thing that you're saying here is that they had very little GOP official support. Yeah, I would say was, you know many way I don't want to overstate what happened. Republicans. The men will have 32 members heading to converse, at least as of me right now, Alfa enough that they're a record number of women heading to Congress this year, which I think The huge storyline in the mid term, But nobody seems to be backing out now, so there is a record number of women both party like together the parties, But yet the GOP just have much left gender diversity is on the Democrats. D'oh. Andi, so their record breaking number as much smaller, but they didn't break the record that cycle, and I do think that is notable.

Rebecca Greenfield GOP Jill Weber Businessweek Rebecca Bloomberg Brooklyn Congress Alfa Andi
Starting your first online business

The $100 MBA Show

05:19 min | 3 months ago

Starting your first online business

"Welcome to the very first lesson of start your first online business. This is entrepreneurship went one business basics first congratulations for taking action. You've chosen to take the first step in making your independent business idea a reality, and you'll see that reaching for guidance expertise and advice is one of the most important proactive steps you can take any stage of building a business. But especially important at the beginning I'm Omar host of the one hundred dollars show small business podcasts and Co founder and CEO of Weber Ninja. A completely self funded independent software company operating since two thousand fourteen. I imagine right now you're in a similar place I was about a decade ago I had a regular job once I was a fulltime teacher I was doing fine but I wasn't satisfied. Conventional implement does pay the bills but it didn't give me the freedom, the autonomy and the power over my future that I really craved. So like you, I decided to find out what it takes to create your own future by building a business. I still remember the feeling of taking those tiny steps building my business one piece at a time. I was doing it on the side while I worked my regular job I remember the day. First dollar profit and the feeling that came with it. Knowing that even though it's just a dollar wasn't like any other dollar I've. I made that dollar on my own terms it's such a satisfying feeling and I, knew it was the beginning of a new lifestyle one that would ultimately be defined by own choices not the whims of a company or a supervisor but fondly as I remember it now, there was a ton of things I wish I knew back then I had to learn a lot of things the hard way. Now, I'm here to share those things with you. As you begin your own journey to freedom independence and a life of your own making. No doubt about it choosing entrepreneurship was one of the best decisions of my life it just changed how I worked. It changed how I live in every other aspect for the better it was a complete shift in outlook lifestyle and even personality. If you stick with entrepreneurship won't just discover a new way of making a living. You actually find out who you really are. I know that may sound dramatic, but it's true. Once you take the wheel of your own life you're responsible for all the decisions. Most of US leave to our employer or a manager you discover a whole new side of yourself that can only thrive with the freedom entrepreneurship brings you'll be tested in new ways you'll develop new abilities and you'll even uncover new talents that might surprise you. You'll reevaluate your definition of work success failure. End Choice. You'll learn things that no other way of earning a living can teach you and you'll be grateful you had the courage to forge your own destiny with this choice. This lesson is about the basics of running your own business. What you can realistically expect to happen. And most importantly, the mindset you need to adopt in order to persevere as an entrepreneur what are things I'm known for is staying it like it is. So that way you're prepared to be successful, you know what to expect. That's why I believe mindset is the foundation of everything before you do anything else. The best thing you can do to set up yourself for success is to adopt an entrepreneurial mindset, and that mindset is very, very different from the mindset required to succeed in a conventional job. Let me clarify what I mean by this and why it's so important. Right. Now, I'm assuming you have an expertise or maybe a product idea for your business There's something that you might be into your passionate about you're good at, and you could take it and use it as the basis of your business. But whatever your expertise is, now it won't be enough. Let me see that again, eight won't be enough no matter how good you are at your think whether it's photography or software development or baking, or whatever it is that expertise is not enough to run a business. Successfully entrepreneurship is its own skillset. One that every successful entrepreneur has to develop in addition to the skills they've acquired in their field. The good news anyone can learn the skills of entrepreneurship even though most people don't. And most businesses fail because of this, they fail because not that their ideas now good or the product is not great. It's because they don't develop the skill of entrepreneurship and the truth is that's one of the biggest differences between people with businesses and people with business ideas. It's about learning and developing the skills of an entrepreneur with the same effort and patients and did occasion you put into developing the skills you already have everyone wants to know how to turn their passion into a business. But the truth is that you have to turn business into your passion to like any skill said, the entrepreneurial skills is best developed by experience. You probably won't be great at business on your first day on your first try just like no teacher doctor or lawyer or electricity is an expert on their first day on the job,

United States Weber Ninja Co Founder Supervisor CEO
Police chief: No reason to fire Wisconsin officer who killed teen

America's Morning News

01:31 min | 3 months ago

Police chief: No reason to fire Wisconsin officer who killed teen

"The chief of police chief of Ah Milwaukee suburb. That scene protests and unrest since an officer was cleared of criminal wrongdoing in the fatal shooting of a black teenager says he sees no reason why the officer should be fired. Wauwatosa Police chief Barry Webber's that in a news conference Monday that he disagrees with an independent Investigators report that Officer Joseph MENSA should be fired because he has shot and killed three people in just five years on the force, and he's Too great of a risk to shoot somebody else. Just immense, has been cleared by the district attorney in three different cases. There's been no reason up to this point and none that I can see that he should be removed from the force. He's acted legally and lawfully. In all previous actions that I'm aware of. We saw what happened in Kenosha. We saw what happened in Portland and boodle in other places. It was our determination to make sure that none of those, uh things happens. Tosa. We arrested people that had Molotov cocktails in their backpacks, and we found a Molotov cocktail at the base of the city hall Sign. So that's just an example of what we were taking seriously. What actually came about the good news is we have no loss of life. Very few injuries at all. None serious and the property damage was minimal. Prosecutors last week cleared MENSA in February's fatal shooting of 17 year old Alvin Cole, the Cole family attorney, rejecting the position of Weber, the chief and said it shows that He should be fired, too.

Officer Joseph Mensa Officer Alvin Cole Barry Webber Ah Milwaukee Wauwatosa Police Kenosha Portland Attorney Weber
Police chief: No reason to fire Wisconsin officer who killed teen

Pacifica Evening News

00:51 sec | 3 months ago

Police chief: No reason to fire Wisconsin officer who killed teen

"Chief of a Milwaukee suburb that has seen protests and unrest since an officer was cleared of criminal wrongdoing in the fatal shooting of a black teenager. Says he sees no reason why the officers should be fired while it was. The police chief, Very Weber said during an online news conference today that he disagrees with an independent investigators report. That Officer Joseph Menthe should be fired because he has shot and killed three people during his five years on the force. And is too great a risk to shoot someone else. Prosecutors last week clear dementia in February's fatal shooting of 17 year old Alvin Cole. The decision set off five nights of protests

Officer Joseph Menthe Officer Alvin Cole Weber Milwaukee
Police chief: No reason to fire Wisconsin officer who killed teen

WBZ Afternoon News

00:56 sec | 3 months ago

Police chief: No reason to fire Wisconsin officer who killed teen

"Chief of the Milwaukee suburb, says that he sees no reason to fire an officer who was cleared of criminal wrongdoing in the fatal shooting of a black teenager. Back in February. Wauwatosa, Wisconsin has been experiencing protests and unrest since Officer Joseph MENSA was cleared police and fire there. The commission is considering firing the officer anyway. But police chief Barry Weber says no decision has been made at this time. That way would just be speculating as to what might happen with what the decisions are ultimately are, so we'll just have to wait to see what that turns out to be the right now, as the mayor said. Status is the same and independent investigator did recommend that meant to be fired because that he has shot and killed three people during his five years on the force, and therefore They say he presented a risks that he might shoot someone else.

Officer Officer Joseph Mensa Investigator Barry Weber Wauwatosa Milwaukee Wisconsin
Curfew in effect for Wauwatosa; National Guard activated

The Fix-It Show with Tom Feiza

01:26 min | 3 months ago

Curfew in effect for Wauwatosa; National Guard activated

"So fired by law enforcement around 76 in north just after eight PM. What does the police say? Protesters were throwing bottles at them, prompting their response. What does the police chief Barry Weber says they will continue to ask for voluntary compliance for the city's overnight curfew throughout the weekend. In a video message, Weber says officers have been instructed to consider any violations. On case by case situations where we tell our officers is a group that is voluntarily walking back to their car, and that is okay, let's go. People are 70 behavior that is unlawful or disorderly. Then we give them instructions numerous times to leave the area. They're provided sufficient opportunity to follow those instructions. Otherwise they're subject to arrest. The curfew will run from seven PM through six AM tonight and Sunday night. The arrest of Alvin Cole's mother and her several sisters during Thursday's protest in Tosa has led to a differing of opinions as to why it occurred tells the police say the arrests were for violating the city's curfew. Mayor Dennis McBride tells Wisconsin's afternoon news that is what law enforcement will do through the weekend. They're not getting beaten. They're not getting injured place are acting. That's ah, a lot of restraint. Cole's family attorney, Kimberly Motley claims police actions violated her client's civil rights to peacefully protest and we intend to find them. Accountable as much as we legally possibly can. To the full extent of the law, Rusty Mellberg, w T. M J knew

Barry Weber Alvin Cole Tosa Kimberly Motley Dennis Mcbride Rusty Mellberg Wisconsin Attorney T. M J
How Do You Turn Your YouTube Viewers into Email Subscribers? + Free Ride Friday

The $100 MBA Show

06:02 min | 3 months ago

How Do You Turn Your YouTube Viewers into Email Subscribers? + Free Ride Friday

"You is great for exposure. It's great for you to grow your audience on Youtube and it's designed that way you to really want you to stay on Youtube. This is why it's so incredibly hard to get people off Youtube and onto your website and onto your email list, you're gonNA need a strategy that I'm GonNa give you today. Let's start with the fact that when people watch your videos on Youtube, they're trying to gain some information trying to learn something they're trying to understand something and you provide that value through a video. As we know a ten minute video is going to be as comprehensive as possible it's not going to cover everything they need to know on a certain topic said example, I have a youtube channel that reviews the latest cars on the market. It's like a car buyers guide channel right I'm reviewing all the latest you know SUV's ing electric cars and all the kinds of things. So you know. What kind of car to buy and most videos on Youtube at ten minutes long that's what the algorithm prefers and that's great. Because most people watching a video, you know they want to allocate that time to a youtube video but many people that watch your videos want more they want to go in depth especially if they like your video and you can offer more, this is an opportunity when people want more. If you'll want something from you, they're willing to do something extra. So, what we're going to do is that we're an offer them something extra into link where they're going to submit their name and email very quickly, very easily in exchange for something more. So let's go back to the car review example. Let's say I'm reviewing the brand new Volkswagen Gulf I'M GONNA shoot a video for this video. Right. I'm going to be shooting a lots of video I'm going to be doing some editing when I'm shooting for this video I need to understand. That I'm going to be shooting for two edits one for Youtube one for my optin. Now, you might be thinking well, that's double the work. Well, not really because you're basically shoot the abridged version and then you're gonNA basically a shoot, the more detailed full length version. Let's say you're bridge version is ten minutes and you're fulling is about twenty-five knowing this in advance will allow you to release shoe for the detailed version and then just edit al or edit down a version. To ten minutes for Youtube. Now, when you're shooting you WANNA shoot a clip that mentions you have a more in-depth detailed video review in this case. So says, welcome to my video on reviewing the new of Volkswagen Golf, what you're watching is my brief abridged version. But if you really love this car, I want to see every detail avid detailed review and you can check it out at the link that's shown above when I say above Youtube has something called external annotations is in. The advanced settings at basically you can make an annotation on top of the video that links to a page and explain what page you're going to send him to see. You could literally just have them click something right on the page could also add the link in the description convention. The link is also the description. If you want access to my exclusive in-depth review, see get the traffic at the views on Youtube for your bridge version but people that really love what you. Do and want more and want to get more details about your review. They're going to click on that link. Now, what I love about this instantly, this is a qualifier won't people on your email list actually interested are hardcore fans that really want to get more information want to hear from you and your newsletter WanNa see your offers that you Give me want to sell your merch. So where do you send them? Well, you're going to send them to a registration page. For an on demand Webinar this is simple easy way for you to collect email addresses in exchange for content shameless plug our software webinar. Ninja makes it super simple for you to create an Automated Webinar you just upload your video or you can even link a video from Youtube. If you wish in create an automated on demand Webinar that they can watch now instantly once they give their name and email address in about ten seconds, it's eggs that little time. It's super super. Simple once you create it, you'll get a link that you can use in. When they hit that link, they're going to get a registration page explaining what the video has. You can sell them on that video or you can make a very simple registration page where just click a button the put their name and email address or any other details you want to collect and the instant access to that detailed video that long form video they get the video, they get extra exclusive content. You get the email subscriber on your list. Now, if you use webinars shameless plug again, your emails that you collect will automatically migrate to any email marketing service provider using with. A Weber or active campaign or infusion soft or use them all, and we even connect with Zappia. So we connect over a thousand APS just in case to get you covered or to make sure you're covered. So it's very, very simple. But the point here is that were offering something extra in exchange for name and email, and this is very, very simple and very low risk. Ask for somebody WHO's really in love with their content on Youtube, and what you're doing here is that every time you create a piece of content, you're creating the long firm and then just editing down for Youtube. So you can just basically use youtube as an attraction model they're watching their bridge version they're going to want more wha- other details and you can even alluded to it. In your video and you're shooting and he'd be like, Hey, we're reviewing this car, and now we're talking about the interior and here's The infotainment sis section I'm going through the screens I can't go through everything right now. But if you want a detailed review I, talk about all the functions in the payment system in my detail the re check out the link in the description or in the annotation above. So cool right so easy for you to be able to give more value. And collect email addresses.

Youtube Wanna Volkswagen Golf Weber Zappia
New Law Mandates California To Study The Issue Of Reparations For Slaves' Descendants

All Things Considered

04:28 min | 3 months ago

New Law Mandates California To Study The Issue Of Reparations For Slaves' Descendants

"This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Elsa Chang in January. 18 65 As the Civil war staggered into its final months, the US made a promise. It would take for 100,000 acres of confiscated southern lands stretching from South Carolina to Florida and redistribute it to formerly enslaved black people in 40 acre parcels. Well, that order did not last long. Within the year, Lincoln's replacement president, Andrew Johnson, broke that promise and handed the land back to plantation owners. That was the nation's first systematic attempt to provide reparations for slavery. More recently, the late Michigan congressman John Conyers, tried and failed for nearly three decades. Yet Congress to consider the same issue. Now California has taken Conyers bill and used it as an inspiration for a new bill signed into law last week. It is the first state law of its kind. California Assemblywoman Shirley Weber is the author of that Bill, and she joins us Now. Welcome. Thank you. It's good to be here. Good to have you So what this new law does is basically set up a task force to study the issue of reparations for the descendants of enslaved people and To make further recommendations from there. Tell me what are you hoping to see? Come out of this task force. Well, I think they're a couple of things we hope will happen. Obviously, we hope there will be a number of recommendations on what the state needs to do in order to repair the damage that's been done. But hopefully in addition to that, we will have robust conversations about the really deep and long and pervasive impact of slavery and racism in California and across the nation. I talked to too many people who tell me I'm not a slave holder. I didn't I didn't own any slaves. What does that mean to me? Well, you may not have owned them, but the impact of your forefathers owning them. As what is the impact of the various laws and limitations placed upon African Americans That made it difficult, if not impossible, for them to compete educationally and economically and socially still has its lingering impact, and we see that in the streets today, we'll give us some concrete examples of what form Might these reparations take Well, you know, it could be like it is a Georgetown where those folks who was slaves that landed Georgetown, every descendant of those individuals now could have access and free education of Georgetown. We could look at the issue of loans and grants for people starting businesses, and we have businesses that are suffering and sometimes failing in this pandemic. Because of our let the lack of support and financing that made it almost difficult, if not impossible, for them to own land and only businesses. We need to look at housing patterns. California had some very, very racist housing patterns that existed. But they're they're number of things that need to exist and to indicate that is tremendous amount of damage was done and puts California on the hook as well, because he basically California was a free state, right. A lot of people don't think of California as a slave state, but exactly what role California did play when it came to slavery. Well, we had one of most racist governors who talked about removing all black people from state of California free or slaves. We created laws that prevented them from being able to testify in court against white person. We had lots of things embedded in our land ownership that prevents folks from buying or selling homes to African Americans. All of those things are important, as they began to say, is this wide African Americans continue to struggle have the least amount of wealth amassed have low homeownership, all those kinds of things that even after generations and generations of struggle. We still find that these things prevail. And even though a few sneak through the vast majority do not Now let me ask you dealing with the legacy of slavery is an issue that this entire country needs to reckon with. So there are a lot of people say, Let's look to a federal solution. How would you respond to that? Well, we have We lived for federal solution for 30 to 40 years. At this point, it's just not happening at the federal level. And so after waiting, we said, You know what California could do this? And I've governor said, You know what we can lead the way and that we think will motivate others to do. Likewise, California state Assemblywoman Shirley Weber was the author of a new state law to study reparations for slavery. Thank you very much, thank you for the opportunity.

California Assemblywoman Shirley Weber John Conyers NPR Mary Louise Kelly United States South Carolina Georgetown Congress Lincoln Andrew Johnson Michigan Florida President Trump Bill Elsa Chang
"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

01:39 min | 11 months ago

"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

"Be sort of the scale the number of these that we want. Yeah we don't need some of them may be. I think maybe if they're in the water I would call. But if they're terrestrial orbs certainly I love. Yeah because correct me if I'm wrong. But sort of allowing collaborations or bringing in community would've orbs ruling on. You know you have to You know because if there's like rocks and stuff yeah and it's hard to kind of keep it in a straight line so heavy all that water totally too. Many people were were looking track. Macy's Day parade. I mean isn't it? I wonder what did I mean? You Know Big budget parade. When I hit him play here. It was very quiet. Play and there was this ice machine that was coming and then every five minutes or so you just hear like ice just crashing mopus to play. You didn't hear was Walter. Emily between the rooms. Some beautiful on my God scorgeous tax. Yeah sounds very like gentle. It was super gentle quiet play and there was always be like someone who is bored the audience and someone who is just like crying like. I love this church so we we have this sort of ORB takeover of the entire old brick botanical garden. It's an orb takeover and I think it's called.

Macy Emily Walter
"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

02:29 min | 11 months ago

"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

"Soho. That is two stories tall with a lovely second floor. Menagerie mezzanine where we are sitting and it overlooks kind of a crowded room of used books. And it's one of my favorite Spaces in the city. People use it for events. I did a play here once and about ten years ago. I held auditions here for play that I was hosting and I had people come in and just sit across the table from me read poetry and I've always had it be this kind of stomping grounds kind of meeting. Place watering hole. I had a lot of writing meetings here for Ding Dong. It's the ocean. And it kind of is my Go-to for for more to meet people. I love bookstores. There are so few of them left in this town. That are real. But they're the they're great. Three lives is is a one. That's holding on strong. Where's that on? Arles no West Tenth Street and I saw the owner run outside in the middle of the night and bury a book in the sidewalk when they were doing construction. And I asked like a week later. I saw him during the daytime and I said what are you doing in the middle of the night with a book and he said Oh my God. You're the only person who saw that. Probably we were secretly burying a copy of Gertrude. Stein's three lives for luck and I think it gave them a lot because they're still there whereas the other neighborhood bookstore there were closed down and I just love browsing a bookstore. I'm always trying to get rid of books at home because they create clutter and I like to use the library but for retail experience. Nothing's better than sterling through the stacks. You take an old Torah and you have to bury it lying. This sort of the personification of books books if you like are one of the few art objects that we really personify it. Can we say the name where we are renting? We should housing works. Who Yeah and cafe. Gotcha an actually one time. I was that.

Ding Dong Arles Gertrude Stein Soho.
"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

13:37 min | 1 year ago

"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

"Weber here. Our guest today is unaccountable on Vietnam Montas. She's a Mexican interdisciplinary artist and educator based based in Brooklyn her work has traveled internationally in North America Latin America Europe Asia and Africa on invited me to her guest room in Flatbush for our cozy conversation. Before we get to Ana. I want to introduce you to Mr Claude Walter. pettus one of the trustees of the cozy zone foundation I traveled to his vacation home outside of Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming. Where we truly far out exchange Mr Peto CIRRUS? Thank you so much for for having me in this this beautiful beautiful place. Well well it is beautiful. You are sure darn right about that. I make sure to keep it beautiful. Can you tell us all your your line of work. Well at the moment Imus Thomas spaceship dealer and that is something that my family line has been engaged with for well we could say decades but one might also say centuries. Wow My tell you've been involved with space travel for centuries space travel we you might say of a loaded term however space dealership. It's not as exciting as it sounds. You see people really these days as are looking mainly for something presentational. They're looking for something they can keep in a safe place to impress. Whoever they want to impress us? Who is walking to their men should to their wealthy mansion? They're looking to hoard the the space items for the purposes of people who are asking. Let's say that we here in my vacation home near Yellowstone National Park. I have I I've always had a heart connection to Wyoming. Don't ask me why I I've been I've been I've lived in Greece. I've lived in Ireland and My heart has somehow along with my sweetheart landed in Wyoming what is out there among the stars is what reminds us of our connectivity and are connected nece because my family it has had such a long history with space innovation technology and intelligence. I have a certain ability to to charge my ideas with space waves intelligence vibrations. Those doesn't matter what you call it but my point being being is that I'm when people like you come and I can instantly sense right away whether there's somebody that I want to spend time with regard let alone money on a mon- money is UC. Money is not what people think it is. Money is invisible. It's it's it it is so intangible and it's not as Before money there is time. Let's put it this way and there is energy so when I'm in the presence of someone like you I immediately want to sense. Is this someone who has was a project which my ideas can touch because migrate gift. And I'm going to test you on this later to see if you're worthy of the of of this I I'm teasing okay. Time said the same tone as everything of course. I'm standing by if we do need to do a test. I'll do that and you know. Oh any whatever you you think migrate gift in my first great gift. Is that any project that my ideas touch is electrified and empowered. Wow and this has to do with my family's history with space innovation technology also. Yes I know. It has a lot of baggage today. Hey but astrology. Wow well a serious. I'm so curious about the origins like your family's first relationship with space stuff like centuries ago I mean we don't know the sun revolved around the earth. Like what what what did your. How did your family start to get into the space industry while stories are a little bit mixed? But if you go way way way way back between when you I know my family line goes back to between Greece and When when the Greeks and the Egyptians were traveling back and forth and exchanging different sort of what are now considered to be Oh cult my ancestors were different sorts of prophets What would today he called Prophets? What was in the day in back then considered very run of the mill work? Where a very patient scholarly work where they would take long scrolls calls and they would predict when the next eclipses? We're going to be and they would project hundreds of years into the future so at a certain point in my family started becoming very hush hush about this and I'm now releasing the stigma. I am now okay. We are in two thousand and twenty. I'm going to come clean Being as wealthy as I am as well to do I'm going to be. I'm going to wear my resources is on my sleeve and I'm going to say it to my family was able to predict things like when the royalty when the king would die why you mentioned that dealing spaceships isn't as glamorous as it sounds to me. It sounds extremely glamorous like you you see rocket ships. It's amazing you you see Elon. Musk with SPACEX. That feels really incredible but to you you're you're you seem unimpressed. The label is prestigious. The label is who romantic spaceship dealer. Oh what a character right in a way. It's true because I'm the real deal I'm I'm I sometimes say I'm real dealer alert hat right. I thought it was pretty good. It's in my blood but when you get down to the brass tacks paperwork it's a most people thinking that money is something that isn't really a lot of people thinking that That a machine is something that it isn't really in my research bound you that you began your career actually In support of your. Your wife's artistry. Is that correct. Oh yes that was my passion for years and years and years and years and also hers as well of course my wife was. You see my wife On Ace piece she wrote Romance Novels And she was a big superstar romance novel writer. You would not believe the readership levels. I mean any any titles I would have heard of. The first tidal was a port love. Okay Yep snakes of the supreme cream body and that is actually What my agency might literary agency came to be known as we were able to find a way to connect the reader's experience of a romance novel to a satellite that I'm cast down the beams of a certain interstellar experience. Let's put it that way. Because to put it any more bluntly would again get us into a little bit of trouble within reason this experience would cause an awareness of the person's primordial morial erotic body in a way that was unprecedented. You were were kind enough to fly me to this undisclosed location near your yellowstone in Wyoming. Because you said that you had a project that you were interested in in funding on behalf of the COSIES Foundation. I'm aware pair of your this wrote row chester contemporary art. Center there call for different proposals. You slid me the dossier and so not only. Is it the row Chester Community Arts Center. But it's in collaboration with the National Susan B. Anthony Museum Susan B. Anthony is a symbol or a figure that is a messenger towards the young people of today. It could say she's a kind of a demonic figure. She's she's a messenger for the youngsters. Today of what it means can want to say the to the listeners. Your your beckoning with this beautiful crystal wand. Can you tell me a little bit about the meaning of this. It looks like it's maybe amethyst and emerald rolled and malachite or something like that. Yeah you're on the right about ear only correct about one of those malachite. There are things that I think the world is doing with billions of dollars that are not the right way to instruct the public about the relationship between engagement wealth and death. One of the ways this is happening is the fossil fuel industry. Should you know that in recent history. Sorry thirty five billion dollars have been given to the fossil fuel industry. Wow Are you saying. The United States government gives thirty five billion dollars to to the fossil fuel industry annually. Yes Oh my goodness considering how you've come into my vacation home and and conversed what is greatest. Gift electrifying ideas. Yes you chrome space. Yes perfect very. Are we good considering who you are. I am going to give it strong consideration because I moved by your presence here today. I don't normally get moved in this form. I'm going to reach into space into the reaches of my key news to see if this is just flow of redirection from that that despicable fossil fuel industry into your project. Thank you so much. It's Nice to have company Al Ana welcome to your Co Zone. Thank you welcome to my co season. Where are we right now? We are in our guest room. It's just a place where I can chill. There is a day bed and pink curtains. You've prepared quite a beautiful spread for us. And what what did you prepare for us. It's rainy outside so I thought some tea it would be nice. I have some Jasmine tea and a little spread of cheese and berries. This is your guest room. Do you have guests here often. We do actually yes I. I don't know like when people come to New York and now they know that we have an extra room. They they stay with us and we like it and Joey having guests my brother lived here for six months so this was my brother's room. How big is your family? It's it's really big. Well my my dad also on my that side. My Dad has twelve twelth brothers and sisters his the thirteenth They have some of them. have ten kids six kids like there's people that all right don now I have at my age. I am a great aren't already because my family stat be so at least how many how many brothers or sisters have just just one brother one sister. Okay so you are. Your parents took took it easy to say but by yeah but call since I have millions millions of cousins. How long have you been in New York? Five years I lived in green point before. What was that like? That was fun. Small tiny tiny apartment lot of hipsters. And and then it started changing a lot and Yeah and I was Priced out I guess yeah. Did your family come and visit you in green point just on my mom claim also my brother and sister were there and we had friends that lived a block away and they I think they owned that building it it they sunk clear and they had them they have a huge guest in the basement. And that's where my brother and sister state I myself am an only child and I really really wish I had brothers others insist bear witness to my experience and sort of reflect back my parents behavior and make me feel like I'm not alone and not not insane i. Yeah I've heard that before. I don't know what is to be an only children. I always dreamed uh of.

Wyoming Yellowstone National Park Greece New York North America Latin America Eu Vietnam Montas Brooklyn Imus Thomas Weber Mr Claude Walter. UC Flatbush SPACEX Susan B. Anthony row chester contemporary art row Chester Community Arts Cen United States Ireland National Susan B. Anthony Muse COSIES Foundation
"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

"I can get there without like. Maybe he drifted off there. So so what do you think so so we came up with the project. Cook Circle Mount Mount Circle. Mountain that I I think it sounds like a beautiful thing. I remember to crops which I I like crops. They you know similar family to Berry's so I feel a kinship with that And I like I like circles circles and spinning and I I just I feel so lucky to be able to to to really dedicate these funds to you but In honor of Timmy. Who's WHO's just been such a beautiful? So Yeah Timmy is no longer wearing a shirt. Yeah no sometimes he likes to take it off to do his work and of course you know more connected to the key right. Yes that makes sense opening opening channels channels. He's He's oiled up. It's all part of. I think you'd find that most most acupuncture masters would would also also be wearing oil so you so you're going to release the two point six two million dollars for Cook Circle Mountain. Take it just just thank you so much and Miss Steinbeck. Thank you thank you thank you. Timmy yes thank you. He's wearing a very sort sort of skimpy. I wouldn't call it a pants under underpants winter in New York now is what used to be short. Yes yes I have one one final ask just just to consider. It's a small thing but so cozy zone. It's a podcast. I and I recently started a patron for it where you give a monthly donations of five dollars a to become a cosies zone own member and that means you get early access to episodes you get access to exclusive member only content and of course all of your donations go to supporting the artists featured in the podcast and the all the production costs everything that goes into it so I was wondering Ms Steinbeck would. Would you become a cozy zone member of my patriot. That's that's so sweet but I actually don't I don't I don't deal L. in cash gifts so I know what do you mean I mean I. I'm to donate money to the arts and and end but I I generally When I like to get to give to give vim berries so maybe maybe I can sense? Send a few Barry Bushels. I think you sure yeah I I do love berries. That would be nice. You're sure you can't just do. It's like sixty dollars a year. It's just five dollars a month. It's it's it's it's really not where my heart is. It's I like to give and berries but no by Timmy. I think maybe it's time to see the the gentleman Ab- Ben Ben Joe Ben. Ben Ben Ben is fine and maybe you can see ben an out okay. Okay well Ms Steinbeck. Thank you so much for your time. Thank you for your support and thank you for being a trustee cozine awesome foundation by now by now unle cozy zone. With Ben Weber is produced and edited by me Ben Weber Danny. Townsend broke our theme music. Johanna Campbell case designed the logo. A big thank you to drew Peterson. Listen Beecher's cheese shop and John Campbell case special thanks to Cozy Zone Foundation. Trustee Ms Victoria Steinbeck even though she didn't join Patriot on but but you can visit. WWW dot patriots dot com slash Ben Weber projects follow me on instagram at Ben Weber projects and on the web at www ww dot ben Weber projects dot com. Subscribe to Cozy Zone on Apple podcasts. Or wherever you catch your pods stitcher or spotify and write a review. It is the also nice. Thank you so much for listening. May All your zones because e beautiful.

Ab- Ben Ben Joe Ben Trustee Ms Victoria Steinbeck Timmy Ben Weber Cook Circle Mount Mount Circle Ben Weber Danny Cozy Zone Foundation Cook Circle Mountain Patriot trustee spotify Barry Bushels Johanna Campbell Berry New York John Campbell Apple Townsend Peterson Beecher
"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

09:00 min | 1 year ago

"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

"Morton. Colorado never heard of the online. There's a lot of beautiful pictures just absolutely termi delicious. Great Lovett thirty minutes on the clock. Let's let's make causes on foundation project or so. It is a rural place. So what do we want to look at. We WanNA maybe see Thornton in the past you know old Thornton we wanna see and maybe what what we would like what agriculture looked like community could look like. Yeah just a first band idea just like a like a little model house with different rooms sort of showing different print maybe areas of time. I see a field of wheat. Like what if you walked into this space and this is an indoor space and there was just a field of wheat with a Hopper House often hopper style house very striking or like like almost like. You're sort of like partying out in the field of bringing the harvest in kind of thing. There was an artist. Recently featured did the shares who did who planted a field of weed in Battery Park City. I there is a I believe it was a chef's table episode. I was watching about a guy who actually cooked southern style barbecue but it could be wrong. Who was who was really interested in diving into like how certain ingredients vegetable greetings? How how they got in the cuisine of the American cuisine? The reason why you're eating Okra is because because it found its way here three Okra is. It wasn't here like it had to be brought here. And what does that mean in my John. What are the actual social and political ramifications of a wire? Eating things are eating which is really that. I'd never thought it was like. I never thought of like the idea that that something I'm consuming for. Sustenance would like not not have been existed here already wondered like could you tell a history simply through or narrative simply through agriculture. I'm really liking this idea of like traveling through history based on agriculture. You know how they have like various labyrinths at like meditation centers. That you sort of walk and particularly good for your walking walking meditation and I wonder like I'm not exactly sure if this is like agriculturally permaculture sound but having like concentric circles or you you know some sort of as kind of thing of different crops that you know like there's like this subtle shift. It's interesting in some of these pictures I've seen what appears to be like corn silos silos that hold corn If you years ago Jonathan actually. We're lucky enough to make a show at the United States botanical gardens the immersive prominent show and it was such a beautiful gardens very manageable in terms of passing greenhouses. How you could see in DC? I read the national mom and and there. What was the main room called? I think they called it the jungle actually and they had like royal palms inside so the main greenhouse was quite large but it was enclosed enclosed in a way but conceptually and design wise is interesting because the idea behind the landscape architecture jungle was that it was an old. It was like an old the House that had been taken over by jungle. Like so there were there I inside the the shades of where the growth was happy to see old broken marble steps and broken banisters that you couldn't access by the public but you're like why is. Why are these old marble like banisters and stares here like you get? That wasn't US passage Rafer for pedestrians with they built the gardens to look like it looked like a jungle took a house back over. I wonder if there's like hearing about like nature overtaking architecture colonial architecture feels really. I don't know that's something I would could get behind. I would want to say that I would want I would want nature to sorta come back at us. You know. It's it's it's fun to think about and And also just is there a way that it provides close to the community and but also a a step maybe into the towns passed or the town's history or something along those lines. It's it it asks us to look at ourselves and also it's so funny because botanical panicle gardens or even agricultural general. I feel like when I see it. Look like it's so permanent and yet it's definitely not it. It grows its ephemeral. It dies re comes back. And so you know I think I think the horticulturalist and botanist security curry actual living spaces. What does that you know? Could you recreate the garden space depending on year a year or theme right of course so I'm also. I'm looking at the history of Thornton on Wikipedia and thirteen. It's as thornton consisted solely of farmland until from Nineteen fifty-three when Sam Hoffman purchased a lot of Washington street about seven miles. North of Denver. The town he laid out was the first fully planned community. The Dean Adams County and the first offer full municipal services from a single tax levy including a recreation service and free trash pickup named in honor of former Colorado Governor Dan Thornton I'm also looking at Colorado agriculture so we have cattle and calves corn wheat hay eighth and dairy dominate as the centennial state's leading agricultural commodities So we also have bison ostriches E-mu sunflowers hours grapes and Mushrooms at the armory. There's restoration happening across the room. Because it's a historic landmark restoring rooms but one by one and the Architectural firm that's in charge of the restoration is basically they're thinking behind it is. It's really lovely. Actually they're trying to get the rooms back to. They're not adding things to them. They're getting them back to the time where they're in their most sort of gilded age gory which that sort of thing always strikes me as really the powerful where you're like we walk into space told like this is we tried to get it. This is what it would have been like if you walked in eighteen. Whatever yeah have you ever have you ever been out to the water mill L. Center out in water mill? Never have it's It's the Robert Wilson Site for creativity and it's essential like his home. I think But even the way the building is late. I believe it's an old like post officer sorting post office that he converted into his creative space and also at home but even the way at the on the building and it structures are laid out and the way that they planted you know that this sort of agriculture around like we were we were taking a tour of it up to some years ago and they're so the front of the building faces duties so the sun. If you're certain times a year meant the Sun will come up right through. The centre of of strange like chasm cut through the middle of the building in the Sun will come coming up right through it. Lakes and leaving the building laid out it has to do with the way the earth spins and where we are in proximity. It's really awesome. I was like wow wow. This wasn't just like let's put some stuff around and make beautiful place. It was like the whole house and structure and all of its existing surrounding foliage and and other structures feel like they're speaking to the earth in some way and this wasn't random that they were just put up this like this is facing this way because of this and you'll see they were literally times you'll see in about ten minutes of son is gonNA come down and all of these windows will be flooded with light straight straight across because you know in order to maximize on the twilight our and rehearsal and that feels like a really creative our. I think that sounds actually useful for for what we're doing here. Is doing lesson last year about memorials. But I found myself showing the students. Some of the most like sort sort of memorials that they wouldn't have seen the one in northern Norway and has something to do with like. I WanNa say like witch trials. It's bizarre Structure Long structure like out northern Norway. It's very there's a flame burning their eternally in a chair. I was like if we were building. The structure in this sort of circular roundabout roundabout could. It is thornton like place that gets a lot of snow if if the surface of it is you know reflective. I was by myself like in the winter months. You walk past the building high reflective surfaces in the sun hits. You feel it warm. Your face could would the reflective surface of the structure.

Governor Dan Thornton Norway Hopper House Morton. Colorado Lovett Colorado DC Battery Park City Denver Jonathan Rafer United States officer Robert Wilson Dean Adams County Sam Hoffman L. Center
"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

"I'm so Hello dear ones. Welcome back to cozy zone with Ben Weber. It's me Ben. Weber wishing you a nourishing rushing and triumphant twenty twenty and a kick ass beginning of a brand new decade. I'm speaking to you on January first. Twenty twenty. I'm here on my by couch in the reckoning room at my apartment if you're tuning in for the first time are you in for heart. Pounding beautifully soothing and profoundly roundly inspiring experience goes his own goes like this..

"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

11:59 min | 2 years ago

"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

"This to you but I really like hitchcock films. Did I just blow your mind. Now let's start getting lots of people but I like them because they're so like phony. Yeah like completely constructed now he I don't I I don't I think he I don't know how I mean. I do know some how created. I don't know where it falls on the line of neurosis. In a way I think all completely neurotic in their way but I still enjoy them. And there's kind of like us the sort of feeling of safety in this fabricated gated artifice. And and like we're like old kind of old style acting like I really like Bette Davis because somehow like she's completely like over the top and you can see that she's act. Yes there's no question about it but there's actually like real human emotion and truth behind. Yes but she's letting in you know the whole time that it's not real whereas now there's this whole movement of like waiting for Guffman she's like less is more kind of acting tings on the looking at the camera and I'm not thinking that you'll chain of like really like this is really relaxing. Yeah there's like that movie weekend. They came out. I like Gay Romance people who love. It's like a great movie but like you could attach electrodes to the genitals of those actors and their faces would not move because they're just just so real still barely caught. Cognizant Yep so that kind of thing like actually makes me careers and so because like actually compared to like Medea Davis. They're the ones who were lying because they are acting but the pretending that they are bright and so I like acting is behaving realistically in false situation. Or whatever her circumstances but but it's still make believe and so I like seeing the make believe because it's reminding you that it's fabricated needed that there can be truth in that sort of application so this is a long winded way of saying that with our cozy zone zillions I would create an like an old old style like sound stage and that we would make like films filmed stories. Yes no also known as movies yes but only on the sound stage using like rear projection and You know back painted backdrop as yellow. That sort of the thing I really. I really like that. I feel quite close to that. Is something that you were saying a lot. That felt really true to me. Is You had a lot of language. A Lot. Like burping up your neurosis and meditation is like sitting with the queasiness and the nausea and like for me like my like many in many years like most of the years of my childhood was like me rendering the stress that I was experiencing from the outside world into like physical sick nick like in my gut and so like that I feel like for meat like my bid is like in this film story land like this is epic sound stage that I think I mean. I'm picturing like synthetic Deke New York like this. This huge huge thing that like is constantly moving and and morphing around these these crazy people who are acting you know is big as hard as they can but there has to be like. I don't know I really want. If there's a way to bring in like nausea or like physical illness like like things stomach stomach issues make put it on a boat. Great like but by the boat that has to be in the sound stage. Yeah their tanks. Thanks shirt like lifeboat. Yeah I don't really going boats. Yeah I don't really. I think I might have gotten seasick. See sick before I did get sick on ride. Once at an amusement park I had eaten a lot of the museum. The museum the Commute Amusement Park junk foods and then got on what was called. The casino is like a roulette wheel and then it Kinda like goes side to side and up and down in a big circle and vomited unto the room and it hit like everybody. Oh yes so. I felt bad about that for about five minutes. Yeah I wonder maybe like I just. I wanted to just sort of put that out there that like I'm thinking about like nausea. The image I also had is sort of like this runway kind of thing. Where like there's like? It's a very very long like point. Eight to point B. and the actors are sort of constantly moving along. This one line sort of everything is kind of happening like people are kind of like Russian Ark Style to like like people are pulling the sets and getting everything ready while they're just sort of like like barreling down this very long path. I like that idea. Yeah it's also evokes like the ride ride at Epcot Center. It's like I think it's I mean. I went like twenty years ago. But it's weird geodesic dome thing and you're basically are like in a little cart that goes you know elliptically up ver- side and in your passing different vignettes that I love that and I think also what I heard from what your idea was is like these are kind of like fantasy fantasy spaces right so like you would go to the sears and sit in the living room to sort of get access to this world. You didn't necessarily have access to yeah totally and that like as in designed per se to do that in. I guess it's supposed opposed to want. Make you WANNA buy the thing right. And I I actually think like a boat the ocean like I I did not. I was not an ocean. I'm not an ocean. Guy Like Nazi no no. I lived in Great Lake. It was not salty salty. Water really like gives me the creeps and like I think about sharks awesome really freaked out by the ocean so I feel like some sort of some sort of access to like ocean in a simulated way would be really nourishing and healing healing for me in this project. Good but yeah so I think it sounds like really. The project is crafting. This this enormous sound stage that we could play with various types of of filmed story. Yeah there there are lots of good stories out there. I often work with like adaptation. Feel like I don't have any good ideas in. Interestingly arrestingly like like the Cincinnati the key connect Game New York and Adaptation Tation Charlie Kaufman. Yes I I like him. A Lot But this This film and I just made is we're editing and doing in post production we call it and he industry. It's called who knows and it's based on this gay feed them up. Assault short story called Who knows he say? I think the French and it's it's about this man. Who's he's like a misanthropic millionaire and he goes on quite a bit about why he doesn't like people but he likes his beautiful will things in one night he comes home from the opera and finds all of his furniture is come to life and runs out of his house? He's obviously alarmed of course And then he can't find the furniture and he can't tell anyone what he really saw he says it's a burglary and and then he kind of goes on this quest to find his furniture which ends up leading to his cracking up so my my dream is to make a triptych of films that are all questions. So we've done. Who knows and I found a story called? What was it and then one called? Was She mad. These sort of like macab tales of insanity and confused reality him that growing up the son of an occultist. I've always been like. Is this really the happenings. Yeah what's going on so so I think I think this project is like A. It's a studio yeah it. It's an epic like cocoa zone project products reductions. Yeah but we can. We can come up with any sort of name that that suits us and now that is our task so to name this. I believe believed we can say it's a studio filmed story studio. Yeah Film Filmed Story Studio Films Stories Studio. Maybe no well this this is the first time twister. Got Some. Yeah Aspen Institute as an I love that word any other any other name ideas. If it's hard you know. It's like training the band or Oh yeah private studio. Oh I mean an Improv team team. Let's everything's taken. I was even writing working on a script. Where are it takes place? One of it takes place in like a marketing company trying to invent a marketing company name. It's it's impossible. They're all taken. I know I'm going to call it supremacy. It's like such a ridiculous thing supremacy marketing. She's so the film studios are probably mostly taken. It's all it's all taken so it's hard but maybe filmed stories zoomed yet. I I don't think that's taken filmed stories studio. F S S. Fss that's nice because then like you people like people in the know. You're just sort of do this in their ear. Yeah it's like Oh that's many. I love that so yeah film. Stories Studio projects of the Kazan Foundation by Kevin Townley and Ben Weber. Can't wait me neither Kevin Thank you so much thank you. We'll maybe we'll do it again sometime. I I would love that all right well. I'll see you right after this. Okay bye bye intimately finding our own Z.. And Ben Interviews friend. It's awkward and then Dan occasionally. It's a lovely thing to be nosy. And somebody's what is good. So please snuggle a beautiful. A UH-HUH.

nausea Bette Davis Guffman Epcot Center Medea Davis Commute Amusement Park Great Lake sears Aspen Institute New York Ben Interviews Cincinnati Charlie Kaufman Kazan Foundation Dan burglary Assault Kevin Townley Ben Weber
"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

09:47 min | 2 years ago

"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

"It's not very flattering to our ego but I mean the ego doesn't really exist anyway. Is like some idea we made up and so to me. It's a greatly gratifying. Because when it's like that that strangulation that like Boa constrictor approach to getting the creativity out. It's just like the feel like an obstructed bowel or something and there's no need for it but in my experience it's sort of like the question then arises like okay like well. WHO's doing this? The where's it coming from men who knows I mean. I think that's the question that people have been asking for Ebbs and there doesn't have to be an answer. There's also this great essay that again in that show. Jim Trunk a road or was probably a talk and he talks about like he being an artist as a way of identifying yourself and he's kind of pooh-poohed it he's like if you had to write on your like CV Levy or whatever what your occupation was it's more dignified to write businesswoman or housewife than it is to rate artist because in his point of view. Is that being an artist isn't sending you do. Sometimes it's a way of living life and that that's why I also think doc Robert Olen Butler thing it's like saying like oh how I moving through the world what I know it. s what interests me. It's all my artwork. It's all a part of this creative process and so it's not like a credential or an occupation even it's a way of living your life and and so that you then stop creating these illusory lines of demarcation in your life this is my creative live life and everything else and so then in theory at them not. This is not what I do by the way but I aspire to but like you know you you would keep your house in the same way that you would you know. Treat your creative practice and did you would also treat like your relationships as a creative practice but not from the sense of like what happened so I just throw a paint honor. They get crazy but by authentically Moving through your life in this in this way I mean that's something that I aspire to I I really really loved that and it feels so timely like I. I'm always so grateful and amazed the people who you know. Let me do ecozone with them. Like it's always like just the perfect take time and like I don't know you're sharing so much like I am. I am like learning a lot if I feel very very moved and inspired. Ah I just want to say thanks. Oh my yeah in the middle of this it does make me WanNa like now when people ask me what I do to say that I'm a business woman woman. When I started dealing with like depression or in astrological educate terms my Saturn return and in my drinking kind of got a little bit out of control and I had a bad break up that I I was sort of like obsessing over and plotting elaborate revenge schemes and someone I I just kind of like got to this point? Lean of like a cute self perpetuated suffering that. I didn't know how to like. Get Out of it and so I just like for some reason. Google like like meditation. I was like that's the thing people do seem to be any escaping this so what. I don't even know what this means. My Dad meditated. My Mom's spoke in tongues so I was like well. You know I'm GonNa Google Meditation and heartbreak but gold and a book. It came up called the wisdom of broken heart by a woman named Susan Piper and at the time my friend Ellen Baker and I were doing this variety show called the talent show and it's like a themed talent variety show so we repick like I don't know whatever things were like in this case we picked heartbreak is at the end so so I had read the book and actually got a lot out of it and it's actually the book is actually about using. I'm like romantic heartbreak as a spiritual path like not as separate but as a path into this kind of heartbroken. Quality that we we're talking about before that is it's giving you like express train a Selo ride into that raw place. That many people spend many years of meditating eating trying to access. And this is like putting you right down in the hotbed of it in the center of the volcano. So the idea is that through meditation. Practice you can steady and stabilize your mind while staying in broken open vulnerable place. That's we're trying to do so. I emailed this woman. Ah I found her website. I was like I don't know I read your book of doing this show. I don't know if you live in New York. Would you come in the interview. And she was like I live in Boston but yeah all oh come. So she drove down. See let me interview her and then she was like well. How's your meditation practice? I don't really have one. I don't know what that is. She was okay well. I'm going to be your meditation teacher. Then we can check in on the phone and so and so. That was really how I got into this whole thing so so I went to a couple of retreats at their symbolic center and then I was like laid off from work at the time so I had a lot of free time and So I just got really involved in the curriculum there symbolic center and it showed me that. It was already kind of like like how I thought but heading which happened to be Buddhism it was like someone else sorted all of this out for me And so it was through my meditation practice that I saw that. I had a drinking problem because whenever whenever we're sitting get in touch with this queasy Nado caffeine or this restlessness and so sitting down in like not getting up just sitting with that. He started to fill familiarize myself with that on the cushion but then in life when I start to feel like remember my ex. That's why I was like well on the cushion. I remember my axe. I don't like jump out the window though I might want to so in life. I'm starting to notice that when I think of my ex I'm like going for a drink and so I'm just connecting the dots. I mean at any idiot outside of my head was like yeah we kind of Qatada. That's pretty obvious but for me it was like really singing it that created then this could see like I was not only hurting myself. I was hurting my friends saying nasty things. I was Cau- apologized the next day. All the time like my thirties grip. It's pathetic so I became we. I found a sense of revulsion for this behavior. And so then I was like I gotta get my shit together. All Right Kevin. So I want to let you know that I I'm actually the development assistant for an extremely well endowed foundation. It's called the cozy zone foundation and they They have billions and and billions and billions of dollars in their endowment and the purpose of the foundation is to fund collaborative art projects And they're they spare no expense. So you know the the call is you know. Artists can dream as big as they want essentially unlimited funds funds for these projects. And I'm really happy to say that I have the opportunity to invite you to create a project with me Tabula. Yeah and I just have to say like I know like I'm GonNa go back and listen to this and like think about like how I can in in rich my own creative life like this. This has been such a soothing nourishing exciting time together there and I just I am filled with so much gratitude and I'm so excited to like jam with you and figure out like what what is the Kevin Townley Ben Weber because his foundation nation project. I really like fake things. I really like. I don't know why it is but like as a child I loved hanging out in the fake living-rooms in rooms at sears or JC penney very satisfying to me. We moved around a lot and so I could imagine like what like. Oh real home. Tom Would look like even though these are all completely fabricated course and and I think I also really like old cinema because like I'm probably the only person who will say.

Robert Olen Butler Google Kevin Townley Ben Weber Jim Trunk JC penney Ellen Baker Selo Boston Susan Piper caffeine Cau Tom Qatada New York
"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

11:02 min | 2 years ago

"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

"Been teaching this Cotija devising theatre class at the new school. And we're talking today about James. Joyce were I mentioned this quote. He had which I am paraphrasing. There are three kinds of art. Who knows maybe they're not? Yeah I don't know this is what he said he's dead. He can't defend himself but he basically said if memory serves that There's pornography so any art that makes thanks. You want to possess it so if it's like a photo like you could say that all advertising is pornography any reality reality television show that makes you wish that you were like one of the real housewives is pornography anything or any painting anything that you're like. Oh I wish silence I my house porn even if it's a van Gogh then there is didactic art so some you know. Someone's like beating eating you over the head with their political youth through their play or film or whatever and then thirdly he said that there was like true art or genuine win art and the genuine are is something that stops your mind and you simply behold the thing on its terms as it is without like wanting to possess it without without feeling repulsed by it and you just allow it. You appreciate it in a way. So I think about that. And I think there's there's also this Tibetan meditation master named choke him trying for repechage. Who started the Shahala lineage of Buddhism and he he talked a lot about arts wasn't artist in fact more than a meditation master even spiritual leader? A lot of people think. He's like an artist artist. And he talked about like neurotic art and that we can use our creative have mediums as a way to like barf our own neurosis out onto the world or to you can try to like Lasso. People into our neurotic corral to corroborate and refi our own mental illness to use a phrase and so so that creativity can do that for solves like we can be whatever that might look like and but similarly creativity can also be a way of expressing the the pain or confusion of the human experience without pressing an agenda simply like presenting it. I mean I'm getting onto thin ice here because I'm not telling anybody what to do or not to do but it's something that I think about like when I like when I'm expressing this idea and my expert emily like sharing this idea because it's a rising from my sir conscious or whatever and is it a way of like exploring the human condition creating a dialogue with humanity or am I just trying to like convince other people that my craziness is actually sanity through my art. I mean this I imagine Agean the challenging sort of edge of that sore that you presented the Barf ing your neuroses around the world or last sewing people together I feel so close to that like I. They have like some stuff I wanna make like is execute exactly be categorized in that way but I also think like Mike. Sorry Inter no but like that's not to say that like show doing a piece of work that's like about murderer or you revenge schemes. Or whatever is like neurotic art right like we can. We have the full scope of human experience at our fingertips we should be able to explore and create based on whatever. Yeah but it's almost like seeing what our intention behind it. I don't necessarily think that sharing your specific personal anguish or confusion is barking your roses on some of its sharing your slice of the Pie with other people and you know whether people are in monogamous relationships are single or whatever everyone knows no is what the confusion of trying to like relate to another human being is and that to me is that neurotic like what would be an erotic is like structuring an entire story to like prove that this is like that your point of view is the right one I see and sometimes like we use art like even know what our point of view is. I think that's valid shown diddy and said that she writes to figure out what she thinks about things. Yeah and you know while they the result in her case is like very pointed in many ways doesn't seem like neurotic. It seems like clear cultivating clear seeing through contemplation reflection and having the courage to really go knee deep rail Lou deepen your own shit. Yeah that's very like genuinely reassuring like thank you when we pull on a thread. We don't know what it's connected wanted to. Yeah and we don't know what the results are going to be so to like say like I'm not GonNa like explore short story because so and so might right. Hypothetically be offended by the potential conversation is more to me and I do that. Not Too is more just like a way of not going there right because it's scary. It is scary. Can you talk about how you make stuff. Well one one writer that I. That's been really helpful for me. He's a man named Robert Olen Butler. He's Pulitzer Prize winner. Clunk mm-hmm award dropping. The he wrote this book called from where you dream. And it's about the creative writing process. And what he he's he's a teacher at FSU. I almost considered like going to college to study with him. But I'm not moving to Florida not for nobody anyway. So what he talks about in this book is that like when you're whatever ever that creative impulse is that when you are you might have like a lot of theory behind what you're doing a lot of like big ideas but then then when you're an artist you're medium cuts through the the cerebral theorizing. If if you're a dancer a painter musician. The medium inherently cuts through that sort of over intellectual leising icing like Miles Davis. He says might have a lot of theory behind what he's doing and why but when he gets on his horn it's just sound and let me evoke feelings. And what have you but but it's not an intellectual role experience writers however are kind of fucked because the tool that you're using is language and languages inherently intellectual and so it's very easy for writers is to get mired down in by that Intellectual Analytical Generalising abstracting mind that is actually designed to protect us from going to that queasy. Weird place that we want to avoid so his theory is that you basically that real creativity. Real art comes from what he calls like the white hot center of your being like also like your unconscious or from where you dream is. The title of the book is called and that our entire ego structure is designed to protect ourselves from that because for many of us he says unconscious is hell. It's painful and so we have to create techniques to basically trick the mind into a trance so that we can access this creative white-hot hot center which is also an dark place. We'll just roll with that so that we can right from that place so to me. That's a terrifying but also helpful. Because I tend to like get obsessed obsessed with like how many ideas. I don't know what my ideas are. And in fact he completely inveighs against using that word like he's like stop seeing an idea for a story. It's a way a of like intellectual. Izing what is going on. And he like some people find this a little snooty but he he kind of makes a distinction between entertainment and literature as art so like he might say like traditional mystery. Novelist might like completely completely scaffold. The whole thing work backwards. No like who did it and then you know do that. And he was like that's fine but that's entertainment. It's designed to have specific acidic effect on the audience. And what he's saying is that you don't need to do that. And he actually written in all genres weirdly. I I would love to ask him about about how he kraft suspense novel from this. Like weird subconscious land. But so he says that you're allowing allowing the creative force to lead the way and he says that what separates an artist from like a a a civilian layperson is that artists are always making connections between seemingly unrelated things On an unconscious level. Because what we're trying to do is make order out of the chaos of reality and so he has a couple of tools that he offers which I use for working on a project so one.

writer Joyce Pulitzer Prize James Robert Olen Butler FSU Intellectual Analytical Genera van Gogh Miles Davis Agean emily diddy Lou Florida Mike
"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

10:35 min | 2 years ago

"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

"It Kevin Townley Ben Weber. Welcome to your cozy zone. Thank you welcome to Mike Ozone thank you where. Where are we right now? Well we're back in the in the Public Lounge of the Marlton Hotel in the village. It's sort of like I. I don't know how you would even describe it. It's it's cozy but it kind of has like in the semi Victorian oppressive vibe whereas relaxed as we dare given the dictates of the furnishings. There's like a fire like tattered attard upholstery. Glass Table Tops plush curtains. It's a nice place where you can come and order a coffee. have some gluten free jam filled. Okay if you want. We could do that. I think I would love to do. Some work have meanings. Yeah spy the odd celebrity celebrity seen here Yoko Ono. Oh wow she comes a lot of cool do you. Do you chat her up. Well we have a couple of if I don't know I it'd be terrified I was born upstate. New York in a town called Circle Ville. Just outside of town uncalled bowl. Ville Circle Ville and Bowl Ville. Yeah like the like I strongly bull until a bunch of places. No one ever wanted to go to Purpose but if you find yourself raising a family there you just roll with it so I lived there until I was four. My Mom's like this is fucked. GimMe Outta this dump trump and her brother Michael Donovan had just moved to Boulder Colorado and this is like the early eighties so it was like a hotbed of like color healing healing and crystal therapy and like channeling animal spirits and actually. That's why he left his wife because she was channeling chipmunk. It's like this is too much even for Boulder Standards Anyway so on my God so my mom was committed Skoda Boulder so my dad just wanting to make my mom happy and did so we moved there and I was four and I just had this feeling that we had we had zig when we should his act I was like this. Doesn't seem mm-hmm right anyway. We lived there. My brother was born there and I lived there 'til I was seventeen and then I was like going. I'm going back to New York where I belong but not to circle in Manhattan. Yes where we are today. I met you. I think I met you at Meg. Griffiths and happy. Happy Anderson's wedding. I think we then maybe followed each other on the social media's and didn't didn't connect again no until like a few weeks ago. Yeah you came into the meditation craft. Yes I was teaching. Yes of all the meditation listen joints and Williamsburg. There might be a lot of them. Actually not sure it's just one. Yeah and I. I loved your class so much helping you know so as as I follow you on social media you know you are. I know that you are a man who exudes fabulousness And class okay. And so you know I'm a fan. I was a fan from afar. I've been teaching at this meditation studio for for a little over a year. Now a friend of mine started it. It's called mindful worm municipal. It's mindful with no vowels and so so I've been kind of getting in touch with myself as a creative person is that I think I think the place that real like the impulse to like create anything whatever it happens to be come such like vulnerable vulnerable queasy raw like timid place and it's very sweet in in a way it's like almost like you know after the kid has had is like a stick drawing like slammed by somebody who are like. Oh wait I just can't do anything all right so then the next time they try something like this this and and I think that as a rule we what what so how that ties into meditation practice I think is that when we start to like sit in place our attention on something other than like our discursive thinking like planning regretting and all that sort of stuff which spine no no nothing wrong with it we start to get in touch with this underlying queasiness Nisa. This feeling of like this is what's happened. WHO's driving the bus? There's like no and the answer is no one's driving the bus in a way and and so typically in our day to day lives when we start feeling queasy we try to do something to feel better like. It's like some kind of palliative whether it's like watching erotic video go running volunteer K- watch binge-watch something pick up a novel clip our nails whatever it happens to be. We're always trying to move away from that feeling and in meditation practice. It's actually just relaxing with feeling Mike. Shit it's willingly feeling uncomfortable absolutely. Yeah and by doing that you like you. Don't not feel uncomfortable. You just realize it's not that big of a deal right and so that you can then maybe dude do something if you like but that it comes from like a true who desire or inspiration to do that thing for it's sake rather than away then as a way of escaping your underlying dread of reality be I find that so challenging. I'm relatively new to meditation. I downloaded head. Space doing that and frequent mindful as much as possible. And it. Is that what you're describing sitting with that shitty feeling that discomfort is so so intense and so our yeah our entire like personalities. Many of us are constructed to protect us around from that our whole culture in many ways as designed to protect us from that reality of ground business which is the moment to moment undercurrent of of life it's like this subterranean Taurean Aquifer of dread and what's really interesting is like many. I feel close to a lot of the Sort of escapes that you mentioned like binge watching shows or you know you know consuming content of some kind and as sir. I imagine you identify as a creative person. Yeah what what are your art forms. Jesus well there's this whenever anyone asked what I do I like start to sweat first of all I feel ill okay and I don't. I'm going to I answer you by explaining my reaction because like and as a child. My father was like thrilled with my creativity and was very very supportive. I'm lucky in that way but like when people would be like. So what is Kevin Do. And he's like why don't you ask him. And then I completely like shut down like the portcullis comes crashing down. I'm like and he's like. Why don't you tell them what you do it on my? I don't do anything I don't exist. Well he sings any acts and he just drawing gotten award and it was like sixth grade. Nobody's doing great. And so like I like to dine but but my dad thinks he's like helping me so so anyway. I I sing drawing. I do sing a theater. Group called water. Well I've been involved with them for about ten years. Jesus Christ ten years. So I'm I'm an actor as well I've done some lots of theater some film and TV. And I've been some writing I was on an Improv team. For a number of years with Serta slot with Meg's team at the at the pet griffiths team and we were called Fancy Dragon Amazing after delicious role that you could have gotten at the Japanese restaurant below the pit at the time And I've dabbled in watercolor. I'm not good at it but you know I enjoyed doing that. So Re Writing Music. I was in a band for a lot of years called Bambi with some friends and So just just a lot a lot of things and so if I were to tell you what that meant I mean I would say like. I'm a creative person but I don't like get a a sense of myself as being an actor in fact that makes me WANNA throw out by myself or even being a writer. I worry about writing a lot. I'm Komo maybe I'm a worrier. I feel very close to that. I also worry so much about all the things and I'm working on the question that is that is percolating in my mind is is is a creative impulse. Part of these. These distractions that we use these soothing. Actions to to get away from these hard feelings. I think it can be but I also think it can be not. I think that I was thinking about. I.

Mike Ozone New York Kevin Townley Ben Weber Circle Ville Marlton Hotel Yoko Ono Michael Donovan Skoda Colorado Griffiths Kevin Do writer Bambi Williamsburg Taurean Aquifer Anderson Manhattan
"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

06:06 min | 2 years ago

"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

"I'm making <Speech_Male> right <Speech_Male> now. <Speech_Male> Something I'm actually <Speech_Male> finishing up. It's <Speech_Male> been in the works for <Speech_Male> for years. <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> let me start. We're <Speech_Male> back <Speech_Male> in twenty <Speech_Male> ten. <Speech_Male> I devised this <Speech_Male> system of <Speech_Male> performance. printmaking <Speech_Male> called smash <Speech_Male> type in which <Speech_Male> participant performers. <Speech_Male> Choose to embody <Speech_Male> a single <Speech_Male> letter of <Speech_Male> the alphabet and <Speech_Male> worked together <Silence> to print <Speech_Male> messages <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> using <Speech_Male> giant <Speech_Male> letter. <SpeakerChange> Stamps camps <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> skip forward <Speech_Male> Saturday. <Speech_Male> June twenty-seventh <Speech_Male> Twenty fifteen <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> my dear friends. <Speech_Male> Katie <Speech_Male> and Jenny <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Katie. The <Speech_Male> artists who <Speech_Male> drew my cracking <Speech_Male> egg. <Speech_Male> They held <Speech_Male> a love fest to celebrate <Speech_Male> their love <Silence> their community the <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> their state <Speech_Male> sanctioned relationship <Speech_Male> and as a gift <Speech_Male> to them I <Speech_Male> committed to creating <Speech_Male> a set <Speech_Male> of smash type. <Speech_Male> Love Fest. <Speech_Male> Glitter paddles paddles <Speech_Male> and so these <Speech_Male> are wooden <Speech_Male> fraternity <Speech_Male> panels <Speech_Male> covered in three <Speech_Male> layers of mud <Speech_Male> podge <Speech_Male> and silver <Speech_Male> glitter <Speech_Male> finished with <Speech_Male> black <Speech_Male> gaff tape along <Speech_Male> the edges and the handle <Speech_Male> for this <Speech_Male> leathery <Speech_Male> glittery <Speech_Male> effect <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> I- cut <Speech_Male> out foam <Speech_Male> letters <Speech_Male> in the <Speech_Male> typeface <Speech_Male> called Alba. <Speech_Male> which <Speech_Male> is this <Speech_Male> the same type faced <Speech_Male> featured in <Speech_Male> tattoos shared <Speech_Male> By them <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> the idea is that <Speech_Male> there are thirteen <Speech_Male> panels <Speech_Male> to letters on each <Speech_Male> side. And that <Speech_Male> if you possessed <Speech_Male> one of these panels <Speech_Male> you could relief elif <Speech_Male> whack <Speech_Male> someone <Speech_Male> the ass <Speech_Male> or <Speech_Male> or wherever <Speech_Male> really at probably <Speech_Male> the ASS. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> You could stamp <Speech_Male> your <Speech_Male> letter onto them. <Speech_Male> You could presumably <Speech_Male> stamp <Speech_Male> your letter in <Speech_Male> the lower back <Speech_Male> if you <Speech_Male> have some <Speech_Male> sort of <Speech_Male> tramp <Speech_Male> desires <Speech_Male> a but really <Speech_Male> it's it's mainly <Speech_Male> to receive <Speech_Male> punishment <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> in a delicious <Speech_Male> way <Speech_Male> via <Speech_Male> these fraternity <Speech_Male> paddles so <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> today. <Silence> <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> have been <Speech_Male> preparing these <Speech_Male> thirteen <Speech_Male> paddles that are all <Speech_Male> finished <Speech_Male> to be shipped shipped <Speech_Male> out to <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> a whole bunch of <Speech_Male> their beloved. <Speech_Male> 's We're <Speech_Male> we're actually GONNA <Silence> do this <Speech_Male> on Tuesday. <Speech_Male> We're going <Speech_Male> to ship them all out. We're <Speech_Male> having a shipping <Speech_Male> party and <Silence> thus <Speech_Male> <Silence> closes <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> a chapter <Silence> <Silence> in <Speech_Male> <Silence> me <Speech_Male> trying <Speech_Male> to make some art <Speech_Male> so stay <Speech_Male> tuned <Speech_Male> for that. I'm <Speech_Male> really excited. I'm <Speech_Male> proud <Speech_Male> and <SpeakerChange> <Silence> here. It is <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> on the record <Silence> now. <Speech_Male> ECOZONE <Speech_Male> of course is <Speech_Male> a place to dream <Speech_Male> and to make <Speech_Male> art and something. <Speech_Male> I wanted <SpeakerChange> to <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> offer <Speech_Male> to you <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> dear listeners. <Speech_Male> Cozy zone is <Speech_Male> is some sort <Speech_Male> of performance <Speech_Male> a live <Speech_Male> performance in real <Speech_Male> time or at least <Speech_Male> live <Speech_Male> in the fact that it is <Speech_Male> happening now <Speech_Male> and will be forever <Speech_Male> captured on <Speech_Male> the Internet. Please <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> enjoy <Silence> this <Silence> moment <Speech_Male> of love. <Silence> PODCAST <Speech_Male> <Silence> performance <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Speech_Music_Male> a <Speech_Music_Male> try <Silence> <Silence> <Speech_Male> to <SpeakerChange> find <Speech_Male> mys- he <Speech_Male> said <Silence> <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Music_Male> colli <Silence> and <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> into my <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> softest <Silence> <Silence> deep <Speech_Male> <Music> I <Speech_Music_Male> try <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> to find my sadness. <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> I cried <Speech_Male> in into <Speech_Male> this empty. Replace <Speech_Male> seeking <Speech_Male> it. <Speech_Music_Male> I spy <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> little bowl the <Speech_Male> figure digging <Speech_Male> it. <Speech_Male> I tried <Speech_Male> thing just <Speech_Male> to know her. 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"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

"Thanks Hey.

"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

"Uh-huh You're listening to cozy zone with Ben Weber the cozy EST podcast on the planet. This episode fifty five Daniel Goldman Goldman at collectively lakefront recorded December. Twenty Fourth Twenty Sixteen in Milwaukee Wisconsin. Daniel has been my friend since kindergarten. He's a Damon Runyon Foundation postdoctoral fellow at Johns Hopkins University holding a PhD from the University of California at Berkeley Berkeley. His current research involves ribes zooms protein translation and the life cycle of Messenger are a Daniel likes boating cooking Lindy Lindy Hop and jazz music. He is family and I am honored to share his cozy zone episode. Fifty five is best enjoyed at your favorite coffee shop with a warm drink in dear childhood friend cosies own friends. Treat yourself to Daniel Goldman..

"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

10:10 min | 4 years ago

"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

"Oh baby welcome episode of Cozy Zone. Thank you thank you thank you. Thank you for listening and liking and commenting and facebook and instagram ing. Today I have made another cozy zone for you and this one is also extra special. Jonathan Marbly at Johnnie Marbles on Twitter J. O. N. Y. M. A. R. B. L. E. S.. Comedian collaborator friend and actor from the hit shows from all those hit shows like house of cards cards broad city inside Amy Schumer manuscripts don't burn and foul core is my guest this week and you're about to hear the world. The premiere of a condensed cosies zone edited for the most efficient cozy consumption. Dear ones enjoy episode fifty four John Marbly in Madison Square Park. This is my first interview post Election Day. Yeah Johnny my to. Oh yeah this woman has new balance shoes older controversial. That's right that's right. Yeah that's right right you know. They really just shouldn't get stepped in it pun intended. They really shouldn us. They oh they extend that new balance uh-huh boy stepped up. Yeah what shape are your creative impulses taking John Honestly. Yeah nothing right now come on come on. There's gotta be something you were telling me you were telling me Your about your visit to pirates today l.. I wrote a letter to Hillary Clinton. Thank you letter. Yeah I mean it was very creative though is very You don't think so. No no I just poured it what did poured out. I told her little story take and I told her. I told right at look forward to hopefully having Darwin Day and teacher about. That's really sweet. Sweet that's so sweet because you know I don't know if anyone has ever tried to write a president but the second you sit down and do it you WanNa impress them of course but after after after trying to do this for a while I thought you know. What am I gonNA impress? Like what are the odds of these. Maybe yeah so then I just wrote a card. It's it's nice. It's I think it's a really nice gesture probably feels good for you. What am I gonNa Knock your socks off? And she's going to be like Bill Bell. You come in here Chelsea. Everyone Kids son-in-law company they're all around on this compound in the same place at the David to you had to see this letter from a guy thirty three year old liberal New York. We haven't heard from them right. Yeah look at this letter I. The following is creative impulses. This guy he doesn't give a shit. I think. Shit what people think about him. Tempered Suites John Officially. Welcome you to your cozy zone. Thank you can you tell us about where we are right now. We're in Madison Square Park in New York City. Zip Code is one zero. Zero one zero were facing east one on the West Room of the park. Broadway's behind US Madison's in front of us. The Empire State building is almost directly to our left the purple tonight. Yeah which means something. Yeah I don't know what can someone look that up real fast call it. Call us the phone for five two. That's it added. I've been getting a lot of not a lot to people have written me me facebook messages. Oh that's nice. Yeah which is really nice. I get those sometimes. Yeah Esp- specifically around the PODCAST. So that's like my big media impact right as a two to three facebook messages. That's fantastic and it feels really good at some. It's like two hundred percent. More communication patients usually receive. I always ask for it but You know I don't know I I. There's a lot. There's a lot of growth that I feel like needs to happen right now. for myself for personally nationally internationally spiritually sure I I'm I'm a big fan up shake shack which is directly directly across from us. BEAUT- it's one of the most beautiful burger restaurants in the world. Maybe a man this this particular location. Yeah in the park. There's all these twinkle lights. We're surrounded by buildings. I've had many memorable nights in this park telling me what would happen Hero Cup with an ex girlfriend girlfriend over the phone up up over there wherever you calling to Can you say yeah. I mean who would. WHO's uh-huh connecting the dots freak stocker who? Yeah I don't know you're right. Yeah no not Atlanta targeted. Barely successful character to get the. They wouldn't even cover one wall with with clippings you'd still have a stall small stake on his desk. You wouldn't even have cost. Put It on the wall. There's no dots to connect. Yeah okay so we're in Washington DC. I believe timely. Yeah Oh yeah right. Yeah that's where it all. It was a political break-up. I believe in now. Yeah I did it I think after I used to work around here. Nice to walk into the park and breathe look at the pigeons my favorite parks in the city. I'd say her Bryant in Madison Madison Square are both surrounded by tall buildings out there. Such aggressive oases yes. There's no mistaking. Yeah Yeah Yeah Central. I don't like the rambling Central Park. where it Trixie when thinking you're in the wilderness? Because I don't like the Wilderness. Really know you. You're an bourbon man. I'm an urban man. That's outside in Britain public. Yeah we're not getting lost. People are going to keep eyes on us the whole time. Yeah we'RE NOT GONNA get disappeared. No no not yet not yet John I wanna I wanNA Extend my gratitude to you for the evening. We shared a belief about a week ago. We went to French French roast with our BRESCA whose whose birthday it is today. Wow that's very very thoughtful. That's very true. Happy Birthday Brett happy. Vertebra this is going to air. Nowhere near your birthday. But no in this moment we were thinking of you and that that is captured now for Internet perpetuity Rudy. But so John You and I and Brett created a most excellent piece of Joan Joan Theater Downtown Theater comedic downtown theater. That really you know really really Pushed the boundaries of what art is. What like how how language works and how language and thought a dance together you know and it was about? It was about evil CEOS who lived in the middle of the earth and who who held the world for ransom. They call themselves foul core And so anyway we got together and Yeah with the French Rosta free. Some Tuesday's maybe Tuesdays at like eleven thirty pm and we would eat. To course uh-huh decadent writing press ever been. A part of the joy was a joy I think it was the writing process I mean steak sandwich. Steak Frites course. Yeah and the The product was very You know you know it was. It was fun. I'm proud. We did it I am too. It's one of my It's one of the most often cited things is I've created. I would say by me. Oh that's that's really sweet because it was just really went for something and It achieved that I I would say for the twelve people that were there. Yeah yeah and it was cool to do something at the bowery poetry club. Yeah which I think is gone now. It well it's changed. Its chain so away. Yeah people say that about us that we've changed you know it's hard to say who's even you're right. I don't know who's paying attention. Yeah I don't know if they're saying that guy that one guy that one guy years going to connect with us the Jason. Yeah Yeah Falco was a great experience I thought we spent more interest writing and producing the show. Oh Yeah Oh yeah possibly absolutely. I'm surprised like I look a little Middle Eastern. I was about to say but like no one ever bothers me. You don't look enough. Yeah I know except on nine eleven. I flew eleven this year this year. Nine eleven two thousand sixteen and they were like Sir. We need to WHO Touch your penis really. Oh yeah they were like they were the You we can't there's some there's some blockage around your penis we're GonNa need to touch it. Oh good for you. Thank you that blockages eight more inches. A pipe former in. You don't know you're dealing with fears swayed by your suede shoes in patterned patterned socks. No no your footwear is impressive thanks yeah and playful and whimsical and a lot of fun. I've noticed.

facebook Madison Square Park John Marbly Amy Schumer John You Hillary Clinton Jonathan Marbly Madison Madison Square Twitter Johnny Brett John David president New York City Washington DC Joan Joan Theater Downtown The New York
"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

11:59 min | 4 years ago

"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

"So your mom's graduated from Applied Applied Theatre Grad School. They got their M. as they moved to La and they got engaged to be married. And so- Julia came to visit me and in Nicolette lead and October two thousand fourteen and at breakfast during the final morning of her trip. Julia asked me if I would consider being the known sperm donor. If and when she ian sage wanted to start a family. Oh my wow oof lots lots of things flooded into my mind. In that moment I was so flattered. This is I mean truly profound come on. Hey you're very handsome and sweet. Can I have your number so I can call you and use your genetic material to create a loving family. I think you're so fundamentally great that we WANNA make a being thing that resembles you that's amazing that is so sweet so uplifting and validating I was so I'm touched but I was also so frightened. Would I be responsible for this child forever. What I want to take responsibility ability for this child? How would I deal with my inevitable complicated overwhelming feelings? And what did it mean for my own family plans. How would my sweetie Nicolette? Colette feel about it. How would she be affected? What would my parents think? Would I be able to handle the way that my life would profoundly shift. So he said I think about it. Ten months past sage and Julia got married. August Twenty Ninth Twenty fifteen eighteen Nicolette and I were invited to be the bud honey at their wedding These are the folks who are responsible for rejoicing the bride and bride according according to ancient Jewish tradition we were the goofy master and mistress of ceremonies during the wedding meal inviting family and friends to come forward and entertain tain the bride's. It was a most beautiful wedding and we danced our butts off And I think it was at the wedding really wants bearing witness to the love of sage Julia amongst their community. Their family both blood and chosen that. I decided without a doubt that I was. Who's going to give your mom's my sperm cut to boxing day December Twenty Fifteen Nicolette and I drive to alight from mm Sandiego? We're where we are visiting family and friends say Julia Nicolette and I have a big lunch and talk about sperm donation. Logistics and feelings. The moms have been doing a lot of research on the legal implications of creating queer family as well as the necessary choreography of an at home insemination nation. I learn a lot and I talk about my feelings and and talk about maybe the kind of communication I would be hoping for and just sort of get everyone. Ready for the deluge of feelings. That are definitely going to come after lunch. I meet up with my friend Max. You can hear him in. Episode Nineteen of course zone with Ben Weber and who at the time is living at Sydney Australia but is in town visiting his family. Nicholas ex is in town so so she meets up with him. Max and I hike around the griffiths observatory and really bro out. We've big big talks about family and love and Star Wars. The Force Awakens we land at the Dresden Room and have a spirited conversation has always about politics in the evening. We all meet up with our friend Rami. WHO's an episode? Twenty seven of cozy with Ben Weber at a Los feeless Mexican restaurant. I am brimming with joy being altogether together with this incredible chosen family over the next few months. Your Mom's and I put together a loving kindness contract a document that states aren't tensions. Both state sanctioned. Sage and Julia will be your legal parents. I will not and emotional. Your Mom's think I'm great. I think your mom's great. Here's a little excerpt from our our contract. Sage and Julia who are married have asked Ben Weber to be a known donor owner as they attempt to start a family. The couple met Ben in Graduate School in Twenty Ten and the three have been good friends ever since sage and Julius and Ben a kind heart a creative thinker and a fierce ally in his relationship with his partner Nicolette. Ben has demonstrated an ability to communicate with respect expect and generosity and to work through challenging emotions with loving kindness Benz humor integrity and artistic spirit. Or just some of the reasons that at sage and Julia care for him and have asked him to be part of this process. Ben has agreed to assist sage and Julia because he deeply loves and respects them as individuals. And they're loving partnership both sage and Julia possessed the ideal qualities of loving nurturing and overall oh exemplary parents. Sage is deeply attuned to the physical emotional and spiritual wellbeing of everyone in her path she. She is grounded graceful generous and strong bringing light and love to anywhere she is present. Julia possesses does an exquisite mind and formidable courage. She encounters life's challenges with wisdom and grace and bundles up her loved ones with her. Bright Heart in their partnership. Ben has observed the ways in which they cultivate the best in each other they build bond based on love and support fueled by beauty laughter community and hope for a better world. There's no doubt in Ben's mind that sage Julia would make exceptional parents. He will proudly take part of the process to bring life into the world under their parental care in preparation. I got a thorough doctor's doctor's examination STI tests and worked on keeping my body free of intoxicants. All right. We're we're at may twenty sixteen A week before I'm to fly away. I see Mike Elbows one man show sperm hood at Dixon Place. Mike is a Brooklyn based writer and performer. WHO shares his story of being a sperm donor to his dear lesbian friends? A few things struck me about the performance. Mike takes us into his deep emotional world throughout the whole process unleashing insights about doubts and insecurities about love and romance and relationships in his own life life next. His process took a very long time. He would go to the fertility clinic month after month for years without success only until the team took a relaxing trip. Upstate without the clinical setting up a clinic did the pregnancy happen was was so moved by seeing this story dramatized before my eyes and left feeling glycine and relieved but also bracing myself for a very a long process filled with complicated emotions. Okay May Twentieth Twenty Sixteen Insemination Emma Nation weekend comes right before I get in my cab and head to the airport. nicolette sweetly poses for some pictures to inspire the whole process us. They are awesome beloved artifact from your origin story. MIRA as I'm sitting on the plane I realize I'm not exactly sure how the insemination is going to go as you will learn someday not too soon there are nearly infinite ways to get sperm into position to meet eat an egg. Would your mom's be looking for a direct deposit as depicted in the spike Lee film. She hates me. Probably not but anything is possible. Where would would I be? Where would they be? I been abstaining from making any deposits for the last seventy two hours so my generally busy mind is is a touch more graphic than usual as soon as I arrived in. La Your Mom's gave me my very clear briefing my battle station. The bathroom might target that Cute Little Mason Jar. Lovingly sterilize in boiling water on the stove might equipment My macbook air and a generous helping of coconut oil just to keep everything smooth breath. After I had hit the target I was to knock on the bedroom door where it would be intercepted by Julia. Who would then deliver the payload to sage age using a feeding syringe at this point or at rather at that point? I was to leave the premises as quickly as possible. So that your mom's could engage in some special grownup magic. Once semination had occurred. I would then make my way back to your mom's house and story a very clear procedure excellent boundaries boundaries. I was ready to dance so we eat a delicious meal at home. We watch bring it on which is weird. cheerleading movie and Go to bed the next day we go to the neighborhood credit union to get our loving kindness contract and our California statutory forms for assisted. Reproduction notarized notarized we sit down with kind notary public who nearly turns US away because we're not all credit union members. And what exactly are you looking to get notarized today we we give her our best blushing cute queer family maker faces and slide the forms in front of her and give her some insistent eyebrows. I see let me see what I can do. She says our hero notary notarize documents. Hurry we stopped at a CVS to pick up our little feeding syringe enj- that would be our key insemination tool we cool our heels at Barnes. Dale are park. A beautiful greenspace on a los villas hilltop framed by airy classical structures. I does a little reckon with the chatter in my mind. The little and sit quietly Komo your mom's do some reading then it's go time. We get back to the house. Light some candles and put on some vinyl stevie wonder's his original music query him insemination session. Number one goes swimmingly. I make my deposit handed off to Julia. I screwed out of the House. I head to the Los Villas Branch library and do some podcast. Editing episode forty-seven Spencer Lot in. What feels like no time at all the MOMS James Comey back? We go to the getty to see Robert Mapplethorpe the perfect medium the flowers and the nudes and the extreme in bondage. It was the perfect pairing to our day. We drive to Venice to have tacos Margaritas. The next day Sunday I get the the day off. Hang out with my friend. Rami we get a delicious delicious lunch at Mess Hall and go on a gorgeous hike Monday morning as time. I'm for another insemination session. I hit my target. Make the hand off and scurry out of the House. This time I had to a cute little cafe called alcove again. I've brought on my podcasting stuff with me because I I'm finding that staying busy with creative work soothes me. Alcove doesn't have WIFI. So of course. I I feel a bit trapped so I venture to another to hip cafe brew Coffee Bar in and try to think about something other than the possibility of my little swimmers. Creating another human being that will have a life and consciousness and emotions will feel pain and joy.

Julia Nicolette Ben Weber ian sage Sage La Rami Mike Elbows Applied Applied Theatre Grad S Colette US Dresden Room James Comey Robert Mapplethorpe Nicholas Max Venice Los feeless griffiths observatory
"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

11:53 min | 4 years ago

"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

"Am Pacific Time. A baby was born to my sweet darling friends sage and Julia Julia. She entered the world at nine pounds and was twenty one inches long. She has ten fingers and ten toes and a radiant radiant beautiful chubby face. Oh my her name is Mira Eleanor. I'm MIRA welcome. Come Baby Zone IRS. I'm sharing the birth of this baby with you because it is in fact the most important moment of my life thus far I gave my sperm to sage and Julia so that this baby could exist I am the biological dialogical father of Mira. Eleanor but I am not her parent MIRA to extraordinary moms. Who got very helpful? Assist from me me but as you can imagine i. I'm sitting here in my my cozy Brooklyn bedroom having a huge assortment of feelings and so my sweet zone. I'm harnessing my public processing platform of the cozy EST podcast on the planet to share with view. What is going on in my heart? Mind in terms of this baby. I wrote a little letter to MIRA that I will share with you today. Even if you're not a six day L. A. based baby you'll probably enjoy. It should be a little something in there for everyone so everyone thank you so much for listening to this very special l. very earnest very vulnerable episode of Cozy Zone with Ben Weber. Here's my letter. Dear Mira Eleanor. Hello baby welcome to this life. I'm so happy you're here. I want to introduce myself off. My name is Ben Weber. I'm a huge fan of your mom's I have a hit podcast. Cozy zone with Ben Weber. That's me It's the cozy EST podcast on the planet. A podcast probably don't know what that is but it's it's like a radio show on the Internet Okay I supposed does have to explain radio show in Internet. You know what you're GONNA YOU'RE GONNA get it. You're going to get the hang of it. I know you will. Okay so who am I. I'm a guy who really loves loves art. I love making it and talking about it I work at a theater for kids and families in New York City and place called Times Square. Which I'll introduce to you someday? But it's a big bright loud disgusting center of the world I love making people laugh at something. I have big plans to make you laugh for so many years Mera get ready. I Love Love I love Romance. I love a woman named Nicolette. She's she's on episode. One of Cho's own with Ben Weber. I live with Nicolette in Brooklyn New York. I also love a woman named Jen. I'm really really looking forward to talking with you about love when you're a little older because it's wonderful and complicated and there's a lot to say and frankly I'm I'm still wrapping my mind wind around the whole thing as why tell you this you're probably thinking Oh okay. I'm a newborn baby her ray. Wow while the whole world is exciting being in its own new and everyone excited that I'm here and they're sending me gifts and Ben Weber from cozy zone is making a special podcast episode. Because that's what always happens when there's a newborn baby. Yeah that's that's what the universe is and I totally get that point of view. I understand that I can. I can really understand what you're thinking that But it's really important for me to say that you're not just any sweet chubby gorgeous baby I gave your mom's mice sperm so you could exist okay so it actually feels quite important to explain all this to break it down. Okay so What does this mean? All living things have a genetic code called DNA or deoxyribonucleic acid and that DNA contains all of the information nation for how that living thing is put together life which as far as we know as human beings. That's what we are we are. We are human beings only exist here on our planet earth okay. So we're we're on the third planet from the Sun. The Sun is a star. Are we exist in the cosmos which is is beyond our ability really to to comprehend. We're just sort of learning about it So life you know we. Life is very rare and precious And so on our planet over over hundreds of millions of years different types of life from from super tiny single celled organisms. Which you actually were at one point To fish they are little things that swim in the ocean into dinosaurs unite. You and I are going to talk a lot about dinosaurs. Promise to monkeys. And we're we're definitely GONNA make some monkey noises. Oh Yeah can you make some monkey noises. Mira you're you're young but we'll get there. Don't worry so okay. All all of this life has developed different strategies to pass along their particular particular. DNA so that life can continue. Okay so when I say I gave your mom's my sperm. It means you have half of my DNA and half of your mom sages DNA. So technically biologically. You could say that I am your father but but I mentioned that we are human beings and human beings have a special quality That we call consciousness okay so consciousness is the ability to know with our our brains that we are alive and that we we have thoughts and we are aware of our position as thinking feeling beings in the world and that is very unique to life on earth. Okay so as far as we know we are the only creatures with consciousness and that and as humans woman's we also have something called language so you're experiencing spoken language right now you're already forming the connections and your brain you'll need to produce a language which of your own and there's also written language and you're GonNa Learn all about the alphabet and you'll be able to read some day and it's going to be great and so you're GonNa have a lot of language okay. So because of consciousness and the complexity of emotions and social networks and the imperfect way that we convey a meaning through language. Saying that. I'm your father isn't quite right. That's not exactly who I am to you. I I am something to you. I WanNa be something to you. It's very important that I am something. Maybe not your father okay So really really. I'm right now. I'm grappling with this question. Who Am I to you? Okay let me let you in on my who am I to you journey here. Okay okay So at the beginning of this whole process I was calling myself. Boasts spunk. Olha which is funny a little noddy. Sperm what. I gave your mom's Tom Uncle family role. That might play in your life. Okay spunk is also another word. For sperm traditionally an uncle and aunt the sibling of your parents parents also inspired by what author activist S Bear Bergman calls. His donor family members sparkle and the offspring of a sparkles sparkling. But you know now that you're here I I'm not really feeling sparkle. It's not not really a laughing matter and into it's just wasn't working. I read an article A therapist gave me about donor families of this kind kind and That gave me the phrase donor. Dad which I really liked the The young one couldn't really say donor dads so so They would say doughnut. Oh Not Dad which is very cute But again as I mentioned before Dan is is a little heavy and fraught. And I'm not your dad even though I'm really in the market to be a truly benevolent presence in your life. So I've been talking with your moms and doing a lot of thinking myself and I I'd like to try something out with you now. This doesn't have to be forever but as of now I would like to be your donor. Dude what do you think for me. Donor dude it makes me smile. It makes me think about the movie. the big Lebowski. That will watch some day when you're a little older it's sweet wheat to think of myself as someone's dude like Mira Dude. I'm your donor dude. What do you think we'll try it out so for now? I'm I'm your donor. Dude Mira I gotta tell you though your origin story it is. It is epic get cozy. Let me let me delay on this this epoch story of how you came to be in the world so I met your mom's in Applied Theatre Grad School in New York City. Okay and I think you're going to be one of the rare human beings on the planet who will always know what applied theatre is for those of you. Who Don't it is an umbrella? The term referring to a performing arts practices that are used for things other than entertainment including education. Social Justice this and community building But for you Mira it's going to be part of of the basic colors and numbers. I animal sounds and Circle Games and tableau and Augusta baugh shapes and food. An the antidepressant pedagogy a good life mirror so I I became close to your mom Julia. She is very wise and funny Eh and fierce. She's from Chicago. I'm from Milwaukee. We know some of the same people. So we have this sort of mid Western connection. You know now And and she really has like this profound spirit of a community organizer whenever I spent time with her. She's she's doing something she's on the move you you know. She's doing something in the name of justice like mapping out a march ruder. Editing protests. Copy your folding leaflets. She's she reminds me of like a young ruth. Bader Peter Ginsberg with curly hair she's She's incredible and your mom. Julia fell in love with your mom sage. Who was a dear colleague colleague that I admired deeply but from a bit more of a distance? Get your mom. Sage is like ferry royalty. You know she's like Sticky Stackhouse Sir. I played by Anna. Pack win from televisions. True blood. We're also going to watch that. I hope I got to ask permission from your MOM's if we can watch true blood it's a little violent a little sexy it's about vampires you don't need to know about vampires quite yet but okay so sage. Though she possesses these profound powers of healing hand empathy and gentle leadership that seemed to flow directly from the spirit world. Sage when you around her. It's like she is glowing or maybe like she is kindling the light from inside you. She's she's a magical person.

Mira Ben Weber Julia Julia Mira Eleanor MIRA Brooklyn Mira Dude New York City Sage Nicolette IRS S Bear Bergman Bader Peter Ginsberg L. A. Jen Times Square Milwaukee Chicago Tom Uncle Anna
"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

03:12 min | 4 years ago

"weber" Discussed on COZY ZONE with Ben Weber

"Uh-huh The council way not though we got doorway thing though way the thing that way thing not a thing the law. uh-huh the dog. Oh ooh EH in Now Now a way Oh I love only oh hello. Hello Dearest cozy zone friends over here. Six days ago in Los Angeles California on February twenty-second twenty seventeen seventeen at ten thirty six..