36 Burst results for "Web Services"

Amazon Executive, Andy Jassy, Will Take Over the CEO Role

Cyber Security Headlines

00:28 sec | 2 weeks ago

Amazon Executive, Andy Jassy, Will Take Over the CEO Role

"Andy jesse to take over as amazon. Ceo on july fifth. The ceo of amazon web services had already been named as his successor to amazon ceo. Jeff bezos and now. We know the date that he steps into the new role. Bezos will remain executive chair of amazon's board and remains a massive shareholder. The date marks twenty-seventh years. Since amazon was incorporated jesse joined amazon and the late nineties and began leading the team that would become. Aws in two thousand and

Amazon Andy Jesse Jeff Bezos Bezos Jesse
Fresh update on "web services" discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

01:56 min | 17 hrs ago

Fresh update on "web services" discussed on Masters in Business

"And it's not going to online that. And it just means that shopping online for food and for everything else is going to be more convenient, and that is probably frightening for offline competitors. Supermarkets. The other thing everything is doing is creating physical retail stores. So that's still capturing 90% of all of all retail people shopping, an actual stores and Amazon itself, stamping out these Amazon fresh grocery stores, so it had a productive pandemic. Early in the book, You talk about sort of the 20 tens low point for Amazon, which was October 2014. They had kind of stumbled with the Amazon phone and Lot of the big growth engines were just starting to ramp up. I have to ask who is possibly worse at assessing competitors. Then Microsoft. Steve Balmer. Is there anybody who is I mean, if this guy this guy missed everything from the iPhone to the iPod To and and he was dissing Amazon in 2014 like they don't make a profit who nobody's interested in those guys. I mean, I love your usage of him. What attracted you to using him as the the Patsy? I think I call him the contrarian indicator. But let me give a little bit of a defense of Steve Balmer in late 2014. He wasn't alone. Right? There were. There were investors like David Einhorn, who we're adding Amazon to the to the bubble stock basket. Analysts were were mixed at the time. There was a lot of speculation about the underlying profitability of Amazon Web services, which the company was disguising on an income statement, right And yet you have to understand that Amazon is deliberately opaque and you know, in a way that it's sort of surprising. The SEC or other regulatory authorities haven't been more aggressive in getting the company to reveal more. But it is. It doesn't want the world to know how profitable business Amazon Web services is right. And it's not showing private disguising its profits. Honest income statement by investing in more data centers, more fulfillment centers expansion. At that point, the expansion in India begins and it's spending. You know a billion dollars a year at that point on prime video, So no one has any idea because Bezos is sitting there at the craft table, make a new bets and bomber just happens to be a bit of a loud mouth and expressed it in exactly the wrong time because you can go back and march the exact moment. When Amazon has to finally reveal AWS financials and the thing starts to take off. It's interesting that it was such a strategic advantage to not discuss. Amazon Web servers for so long, and they were able to get away with that, because of, um it wasn't more than 10% of the revenues. Is that was that the rationale for hiding that I think that's right that they could another business. Another CEO is going to want to show that off. It's going to want to impress investors, particularly because if you look at the stock performance In 2014. My recollection is that the stock went down and you know, or at least it was embattled And you know another CEO is going to say, Well, it's going to like cater to their own ego and to their recruitment needs of the company into the image and want to release that the bases across The 10 years of this of aws growth, You know, he thinks long term he thinks competitively. He didn't want to tip off competitors to how good of a business this was, and he kept it hidden. I mean, that takes a little bit of a remarkable active CEO of patients and bravery to do that, but they felt like they had a gold mine there. They wanted to mine it for whatever it was worth. 2014. Oh, no, this was this was not a, uh, a good year. They were down 22% for the full year and you're right the bottom while there was a low over the summer in May And then there was Another low in October. But, yeah, that doesn't surprise me that that bomber nailed the bottom. But a lot of people were pretty skeptical in an otherwise pretty decent year for the market, right, right. And when you look back at 2014, it's so remarkable that, um There were such skepticism because that that is the year that Amazon introduces Alexa. It is the year that they start preparing to introduce the financials of AWS, Um I think I think that might have been the first year that Amazon studios original start to come out, so they're placing a lot of bets there and to the public markets and to investors. Everything looks kind of dire, but it's really the beginning of probably the the the most impressive wealth creation, maybe even in the history of business. Coming up. We continue our conversation with Brad Stone, author of Amazon Unbound discussing Amazon's not so rare failures..

David Einhorn Steve Balmer Brad Stone 2014 Microsoft 90% October 2014 Amazon October AWS iPhone 22% India Ipod 10 Years Bezos Late 2014 SEC MAY Amazon Web Services
Interview With Tim Jefferson Of Barracuda Networks

7 Layers

02:25 min | 2 months ago

Interview With Tim Jefferson Of Barracuda Networks

"Alright listeners. i'm here with barracuda networks. Is tim jefferson to talk about cloud. Security hello tim. How're you great connor. Thanks so Just to get right into it. What would you say. Your history is with cut security while my introduction to cloud security was back in Two thousand fifteen. I the opportunity of joining amazon web services in its early days back when it was only a four billion dollar business in was part of the original team that was tasked with working with the security ecosystem and helping them that are understand how their value propositions could apply to public cloud customers in particular airbase environments so there is a big pivot that a lot of the scared ecosystem partners had to do to. You know how their current solutions that were typically built for data centers needed to evolve and kind of re architect and rethink around what value they can bring the public cloud and ultimately how they had architect solution to be Well architect for those types of environments so that tend to be a big pivot for a lot of customers so it was great to see the industry evolve you know from the very mature data center. Well established commercial solutions in how they pivoted to the startups. That took specific Look almost from scratch around what they can do uniquely. And that's where some of the very first cloud security posture management tools kind of popped up way back in two thousand fifteen. So yeah it's been great to see the industry of wall during that period. Yeah so it seems that you were well educated on how to secure the cloud and you're also doing some educating to the companies that we're using. Aws yes it was journeys eighty s platform evolved. And you know those. Those platform solutions became more mature. A lot of them kept adding incremental security capabilities which again created more friction and opportunity at the same time for a lot of the ice vs s are called independent software vendors to kind of rethink what value they can bring to customers ultimately how they can leverage some of those native services and the telemetry that comes with them to bring you unique security value

Tim Jefferson Barracuda Networks Connor TIM Amazon
Azure and .NET with Labrina Loving

The .NET Core Podcast

07:59 min | 3 months ago

Azure and .NET with Labrina Loving

"We're gonna be talking dot net and the cloud and a very aware as we've regarding the so we're recording this nineteen of november twenty twenty. Don't that five is not very long. It's been out for about a week or two week. Old week-old excellent. I mean the have been the they release candidates but this is like the official as he is here so i'm likely going to end because obviously because of the time cast pop machine whibley. We're recording this in advance of time. So there's likely going to be time. Tony said hey. So when dot net call superseded by don't at five so please bear that in mind everyone who's listening we're regarding this couple months ahead of time but So festival before we talk about anything right. You've set yourself you've been in this this whole this industry for for almost twenty years right to vote for me. I'm you know. That's that's i mean for anyone. That's a long time right. That's that's a whole bunch of innovation that has happened since then like twenty years ago with talking about dot net was like an intranet based technology for inside of the business and now it runs a huge portion of the web. You've got as you. all suppose azure. I'm not sure how. What the official brennan nell right or wrong way okay. So we've got as your as you that that whole thing. And that's that's running dot net presumably or you can ruin your dot net thing on it and and we've gone from like i say we've gone from small web services to scaled micro services and video games and consoles all running dot net. You can never internet on fridge which is just blows my mind. I've gotta got a bunch of raspberry pies somewhere around here that are controlling my bet soon. I just bought a house. So we're excited about you. Know making our whole house smart enabled so i'm excited to start using dot net korir on a bunch of raspberry pies and the you know controlling controlling how long my stepdaughter gets to use the internet. So it's gonna be fun. It's brilliant is one of these technologies the just scales almost everywhere. Are you talked about the raspberry. Pi oko another respite. Pi four hundreds pien inside of a keyboard Is one big folk kit. And i've been using that to do sorts of crazy don net things of the past weekend. I'm teaching roberta. Who's not a developer code with it so it was like. Hey come on what i do. And he's just just the keyboard and while he came over before they Before the unfortuna- say over in the uk. We've had like a lockdown so nobody can go anywhere and so he came over a few days before that and we couldn't get a moment times we staying here for the duration so by the time you're listening to this. Hopefully he's going home. I thought to keep me busy. Teach him to wrestle. Code is totally all right. That's that's fun but then so if we're looking at almost twenty years in the industry what a in your opinion. Some of these innovations that have really changed the game. I mean we talked about chaperone being collaborative bringing everyone together. Dot net clearly has changed a whole bunch of stuff. Is it purely a microsoft thing you thinking or is it just a his aesthetic. I think for me. I i love tech but i also love the people in tack and i think for me. What's with what i've loved. That's change is sort of how we work together. So i remember when i first started in tak started a working for this We built the first installation of of of this insurance company allstate s- Their first online web presence So we built their i kind of web application and bad took hundreds and hundreds of people and it was all these very very very siloed teams. Right there is a huge team of leg database administrators. I have no idea what they did. There is a huge infrastructure team. And i have no idea i i mean i got a chance to like talk to some of them. But there's a huge infrastructure team. There is a huge Devops will be call them the the bill guys but the cuge build than a team and there was all these teams That came together to build this amazing web application but we were all really really really siloed. I felt like and It was such a very everything was so very very very specialized whereas you flash forward today and I feel like the development team and You know infrastructure engineers and Site reliability engineers while there there's different fancy titles for everyone but that teams like shrunk significantly and and and you know we all work really really well together. it's not kind of this like staunchy kind of separation of people it's it's a much more collaborative team. We work much closer together Because i think the tools and technologies have evolved in such a way that everyone can kind of sort of work together much better. So i think that part's been super super exciting. And because of that we were able to get you know it's it's more satisfying you can see applications getting released. You know all the time. I mean you get huge. Companies like netflix. They're releasing features like every day. So it's really exciting to see the pace and end the change of how like software and how technology evolves and then. I also think Just be the the amount of information and of you know how to get Involved in tak It's come to a place where i'm excited that so many people like you're talking about your brother. You're literally decision whom how to code and so literally you know a cup. After lockdown he can apply at microsoft and get a job at burnside. Apply to microsoft. So i i love this. I love this. I love because of i came from. I originally from chicago came from you. Know modest modest family and a lot of people around me or modest living. And so i really loved that technology has started to become a equalizer providing a lot more people opportunities To be able to code be able to change and thereby getting great jobs and then they're thereby kind of really changing their lives so it's not. I love seeing really kind of technology for all encoding for all This whole push for that. That's what's really got me like super excited about this industry now.

Whibley Brennan Nell Pien Tony Roberta Allstate Microsoft UK Netflix Chicago
Parler Files New Lawsuit Against Amazon

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:39 sec | 3 months ago

Parler Files New Lawsuit Against Amazon

"Is suing amazon again. Social media company parlor dropped its federal antitrust lawsuit against amazon amazon web services but then filed a separate one in washington. State court alleging breach of contract and defamation. This coming nearly a month after the app went dark. When many service providers pulled back support following the capital riot accusing parlour of failing to police violent content relating to the attack by supporters of then president trump lilian woo parlor says it lost tens of millions of current and possible future users along with ad revenue though it did return online and mid february with a new web

Amazon State Court Lilian Woo Parlor Washington
Lawsuit accuses Amazon of racial discrimination

The Paul W. Smith Show

00:42 sec | 3 months ago

Lawsuit accuses Amazon of racial discrimination

"Tak giant Amazon is being sued for racial and gender discrimination boxes. Timur Gotti has that story. Carla Newman says the discrimination began even before she was hired with Amazon Web services. As she was given a lower position than the one she applied and was qualified for the lawsuit claims. Newman was soon given the responsibilities of the higher position but wasn't officially promoted or given a raise for two years. Lawyers say what human experience is part of a larger pattern of what black and other minority workers go through an Amazon. They know there isn't a black person in the company's top leadership team. Newman also says she was sexually harassed on a business trip on another co worker. One said she looked like a gorilla. No comment from

Timur Gotti Carla Newman Amazon Newman
Interview With Ilya Gelfenbeyn

The Voicebot Podcast

04:43 min | 3 months ago

Interview With Ilya Gelfenbeyn

"Yulia gif bain. Welcome to the voice. Podcast hey breath how are you. I've really i'm really good. It's great to finally get on the bike. We've been talking about this for at least two months. So i'm happy that we're able to arrange the the funny thing is in the interim we seem to have spent a lot of time on clubhouse together so maybe we could have just done this year like two weeks ago. Yeah yeah spending a lotta time there all right so i think there's a there's a lot of story to be told here because you've you've been in the industry for a while but i think there's an interesting i that i wanted to start with. I wanna talk about speak to it. Maybe maybe your journey in voice day. I started before that. Because i i know that you study computational linguistics as an undergraduate but what i draw you to the idea of of using speech technology and actually building an assistant. Yeah so i would say like initially it was not about speech was about like chat bots and chat right so i started to work on some like chat bots dick like question answering systems back university as you mentioned yelich. All i was doing the computational linguistics relatively randomly so i was like interested in an internship in it company and the a guy who was like my manager there. He was a computational linguists so He had some interesting like thanks for us to do to research. Soviet play with chad bots. So i remember. I think like i published my first article question answering systems back in two thousand towards southern three and then later maybe in two thousand seven i was also working on the project related to chat bots. We created a platform where users could create their own chat bots like mostly for fun Trades they're like our cars teach them to Like teach them different things And then place them to like blogs Social networks websites and see how they shot to like their friends read logs and and Correct them so and later Like when the star to speak to There was this kind of state where got relatively good quality of speech recognition. Then mostly available. Either roy door or some commercial solutions like like from nuance. You've got a mobile devices that our full enough and Kevin good interfaces such as like iphones and androids and There was like this tendency of Api's of like web services so mehan co-founders. We basically thought that if we combine all of this right open api is and and smartphones and voice. We could get A voice personal assistant. That will understand what you are asking about support station and then like connect to a those. Api's and get an answer for you or like have an action Down for you. So this is how this idea of speak to appeared and what year the little. Yeah the end of two thousand ten and to ten okay. So that's around the same time that the siri app. I came out and ios correct. Yes yes yes frankly. We didn't know about siri when we started to sing about the same main difference was that we started with. Hr bought right so we'll just because of our experience chat bots before idea was that won't i. We create a bot that you can talk to about anything and it supports conversation just question answer and then starts like injection different services to you know. Let's add the weather. Let's add local storage and so on but initially we would say you know you can just talk to talk to it Speak to about anything and by the way to also help like multiple different requests

Yulia Gif Bain Chad Bots Mehan Co ROY Kevin Siri
Conversation AI for Businesses with Sat Ramphal of XiByte

Voice in Canada

06:05 min | 4 months ago

Conversation AI for Businesses with Sat Ramphal of XiByte

"Good afternoon everyone or good evening. My name is around fall. I am a born and raised flirty in here in tampa florida. We also just want won the super bowl yesterday so But not the height of the topic. Here so i come from a background of great entrepreneurial spirit and entrepreneurial experience I am now in my fourth company. I'm twenty seven years old. And i have a great past life of kind of the whole entrepreneurship through kind of the experiences and components that will lead us to build Currently building and in what we're doing now is something that i think it's truly phenomenal. And it's going to kind of change. The way entrepreneurship is kind of dealt with from. Start so something that really excited about. We have a mission to help reduce entrepreneurship failures right. Three percent in the united states in four years. So we're really on target. How achieve that mission and you know kind of a little bit about what we built. We built this conversational bought. Her is maya at what maya does is. She helps facilitate administrative tasks and navigate company operations using the power of voice mazing. Yeah go ahead you go. I was to say okay so this is great. This is great so you are helping to how we businesses to carry out some of these tasks so go ahead. Yeah explained a little bit more. What does this. What's what's the deal with what you've got here yes so me. Coming from an entrepreneurial background i had one successful company had to failures and i were talking about this failures more than eighteen on the wall. Because it's what's led to current situation current field all of the things that led us to our failed components of that led that failure. We realize it came with where we spent our time and founders and first time entrepreneurs and young startup companies spent over seventy five percent of their time doing administrative tasks that they kind of love innovation behind. They leave growing the company behind. Which is the most important thing when building company the administrative tasks are not and those administrative tasks range from you know like incorporating or business. Bank accounts Web services. You know those are just really basic things for the go to accounting tax and and things like that capital and things like that. So that's stops. That's what we're looking to help. Eradicate and with that first time founders and entrepreneurs they spend a ton of time in rnd trying to figure out who to deploy these tasks to and how to deploy so. That's also something that we're helping to eradicate and how helping radically that is. We have a very large partner network. That helps integrate into our system. So it creates seamless connectivity to these partners tell getting that done and it kind of fill traits each business with the six point algorithm that helps identify them where to go. And why and tastic. So can you get into this sort of six point algorithm and in some of the information about some of the partners that you work with. How does that work. Yes so really. And truly the kind of the basic formats. The algorithm is broken down into six components dot com suggest certain things and that's industry budget size stage location and traits. And that's how we're able to suggest certain partners certain tasks to be done based on the stages that you're inning company industry location size stage by etc etc and these partners that we select select partner. That's integrated our to help accelerate and carry out entrepreneurship business operations efficiently and with the right budget. And we're help tying those partners to the right pretty much business user our platform right on so now. Can you tell us practically what this looks like. Say business as okay. i wanna use. I want to use what you've created. I wanna use maya. What does that look like for them. How is set up in practically. How is that going to help them. Save time and what is it gonna do for them. Yes so you know if if you're kinda starting off for business we'll look kinda. Let me start that. We're a current product is right now. We are still in our startup phases of the organization so our product actually fifteen percent complete and with that being said most of our values provided towards companies aviation and getting into running operations. So that's where we're currently that. So right now with us to come in they would come in kind of at that stage and my would just kind of figure out where they're at in their businesses can of components. They have already have going on with that. Six point algorithm and then. She's gonna suggest certain things that that business should do to carry out to help. Kind of increase the entrepreneurship Accelerate the business growth into a live in vine into a live running environment. So can you give us some some of the some examples on how that would work. Yes so this is a college students in college. I have this great idea to build a fintech app But all i know is how to bill that gap all. I knows how to code and develop. So i've come up and join up maya. She's she's available on the app store so he can download. Hershey developed bill blind desktop version. And you would sock sign up to my mile. And then you know maya would then figure out again where you're at and then just just like that the task for just begin sedan suggest what you need to do. All you got to do is give permission for that task to be done. She will go ahead and run the task with a partner and then bring the completed details back so that you really don't have to be involved so for example i am again at the asian state. Hey maya corporate business might already gonna know what state you're in. She actually pretty much. What kind of status that you want to complete Secret llc f talk to attorney. She'll kind of Link with one of our connected partner attorneys that we have the rock lawyer or in that type of situation there and then she'll go carry out the task again. Bring it back completed and then you pretty much see your articles inc right inside the platform and then you can just carry a while of going on you just carry on and while task is in motion more can can be completed. It's both on demand and suggestive

Super Bowl Tampa Florida United States Hershey App Store Secret Llc Maya
Parler, a Social Network That Attracted Trump Fans, Returns Online

All Things Considered

00:54 sec | 4 months ago

Parler, a Social Network That Attracted Trump Fans, Returns Online

"Alternative Social network popular with far right conservatives and extremists has returned to the Internet. NPR's Shana Bond reports. The site was forced off line in January after the Capitol insurrection parlor says it's re launch site is built on quote sustainable independent technology and that it's not reliant on big tech. Parlor advertises itself is a free speech network. With few rules. It's attracted supporters of former President Donald Trump. But after the Capitol attack, Amazon Web services stopped hosting parlor and Apple and Google booted it from their APP stores. The tech companies, which are NPR financial supporters said parlor failed to remove posts encouraging violence. For now, Parlor says only current users can use its platform new members conjoined next week. It's also looking for a new chief executive. Its last CEO, was fired after clashing with conservative donor Rebecca Mercer over how the site should be run. Shannon

Shana Bond Capitol Insurrection Parlor NPR Donald Trump Amazon Apple Parlor Google Rebecca Mercer Shannon
Jeff Bezos steps down as Amazon CEO

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:21 min | 4 months ago

Jeff Bezos steps down as Amazon CEO

"Amazon's founder and ceo. Jeff bezos announced this week that he is going to become executive chairman of the company and the new ceo will be andy jesse. Currently the head of amazon web services amazon is twenty six years old. and obviously it's massive and has ideas to do everything from package delivery to television production too smart. Microwaves to artificial intelligence. And obviously it's huge an incredibly profitable cloud business amazon's ambition and reach is legendary but with betas taking on a new role. Could that change. It's a topic for quality assurance where we take a look at big tech story. Stone is a senior executive editor for bloomberg. He's written one book on amazon and has another one coming out this spring. I asked him if amazon might start to focus more on the gold. Mine of its cloud amazon actually has kind of two of those gold mines. You mentioned one. aws the other one is advertising. And it's been this kind of quiet force gobbling up market share in online advertising. And you know for the last ten years. It's investors have been wholly on board with amazon not returning that money to shareholders not showing you know a big profit although they've been getting better in that regard but investing and inventing new things to the extent that its shareholders continue to allow that to happen amazon. Continue to do it now. jeff bezos. He's going to continue to be active in the big decisions and working on new projects and executive chairman. There's a role that carry some meaning. He's still going to be andy jesse's boss in many ways andy jesse seems formed in the same mould as jeff visas and yet. There are real critiques about the company's treatment of its workers it's wages its approach to climate not even with and i trust. Do we have a sense of whether jazzy might be more responsive to some of those critiques. Right are we going to see a softer gentler amazon. Like a tim. Cook to steve jobs. That's right and in some respects. Maybe chelsea's is while he's sort of cleaved from jeff bezos rib and a lot of ways. He's also different. I mean he's more politically active at the same time amazon. Aws under andy. Jesse sold its face. Recognition software to law enforcement agencies and only paused for a year. When the blm movement became very loud and vocal. So i don't suspect it. I much change particularly with a very loud voice on the board with a lot of sentiment changing. Is that not a good thing. Should jesse be more open to change. Will shareholders have less tolerance for business. As usual i think they're gonna have to start listening more to the voices not only of their frontline employees in the warehouses who do have some real grievances particularly amid the pandemic but to the contractor workforce almost kind of invisible constituency who tries to amazon vans and drop software packages like a lot of companies amazon kind of indulgence itself of this contractor workforce where the healthcare protections fifteen dollar an hour wage protections don't exist and so i think yes i mean they're going to increasingly if they want to get to that next level of growth. Have to listen to some of these concerns brad. Stone is a senior executive editor for bloomberg

Amazon Andy Jesse Jeff Bezos Bloomberg Stone Steve Jobs Jeff Chelsea BLM Cook Jesse Andy Brad
Jeff Bezos to step down as Amazon CEO, Andy Jassy to take over in Q3

WSJ Tech News Briefing

01:17 min | 4 months ago

Jeff Bezos to step down as Amazon CEO, Andy Jassy to take over in Q3

"Earlier. This week amazon said that. Andy jesse would be taking over as ceo from founder. Jeff bezos jazz. He's been the chief architect evangelist for the company's cloud computing arm amazon web service says ever since it launched in two thousand six. He helped build. Aws from an untested idea to a multibillion dollar business. Jesse's promotion is a sign that the company will be continuing. Its focus on. The cloud while amazon has strong position in the market are reporter. Aaron says cloud computing is becoming more competitive for many years. Amazon was really the only game in town. They pioneered this model of a cloud infrastructure platform player and there have been other players that tried to jump on board and lots of failed and really over the past few years. I'd say past four or five. We've seen microsoft really starting to grow quickly in that regard under sajjan adela. When he took over in two thousand fourteen he really refocused and put the company into serve cloud i mode and has really started paid dividends over the past few years and is now catching up to amazon. Quite a bed. We also see google nut growing as rapidly as as microsoft but certainly a viable player. Here

Amazon Andy Jesse Jeff Bezos Jesse Sajjan Adela Aaron Microsoft Google
Jeff Bezos to step down as Amazon CEO

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:51 sec | 4 months ago

Jeff Bezos to step down as Amazon CEO

"Down as leader of one of the world's biggest tech companies, Jeff Bezos has announced he's planning to step down as CEO of Amazon, the multi billion dollar tech company he started back in 1995 protocols. Tom Krens, it says move didn't come as a huge shock to the tech community. This has been, you know, something that has been telegraphed for for a few years now crash, it says Bezos helped Amazon become a dominant force in the Commerce. What he has accomplished over these years is is really remarkable In terms of pioneering e commerce, which is a thing we take for granted. Based on those will transition to executive chair of the third quarter of 2021 Andy Jassy will take over a CEO later in the year. He currently runs Amazon Web services. Jesse in his own right has accomplished quite a bit with the WS, which you know, took the idea of cloud computing and made it a reality with

Tom Krens Amazon Jeff Bezos Bezos Andy Jassy Jesse
Amazon stock rose 2% in Wednesday's premarket

Bloomberg Surveillance

01:05 min | 4 months ago

Amazon stock rose 2% in Wednesday's premarket

"Stepping down as CEO of Amazon, ushering in a new New time for the e commerce and tech giant equity futures. They point to a mixed opening. With the tech heavy NASDAQ leading the way in positive territory. Volatility pulls back the vics is just above. 24 right here. Treasury yields they push higher with a 10 year at 1.12% on the commodities front. Deputy I inches higher north of $55 a barrel Bitcoin. Higher once again now $36,600 per coin. Let's call it. Let's get some more color on the premarket equity trading with Bloomberg stocks editor Dave Wilson David he looking at well, since you mentioned Amazon, Paul, we must will start their shares her up 2% Aziz. The management transition begins at the online retailer basis is going to be succeeded by Andy Jassy, who runs the Cloud computer unit. Amazon Web services. Bezos will be executive chairman should point out to Amazon's fourth quarter results, beat analyst average estimates and Bloomberg survey.

Amazon Bloomberg Stocks Dave Wilson David Treasury Andy Jassy Aziz Paul Bezos Bloomberg
Jeff Bezos Is Stepping Down as CEO Of Amazon but Staying On as Executive Chairman

Yahoo Finance Market Minute

00:12 sec | 4 months ago

Jeff Bezos Is Stepping Down as CEO Of Amazon but Staying On as Executive Chairman

"Jeff bezos is stepping down as ceo. The ecommerce giant. Andy jesse ahead of amazon's web services will become. Ceo vessels will stay on as executive chairman of the board

Andy Jesse Jeff Bezos Amazon
Seattle-based Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos may step down without stepping away

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:33 sec | 4 months ago

Seattle-based Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos may step down without stepping away

"Down and receives Jolin Kent has more After more than 25 years and billions and sales Jeff Bezos is leaving his post to CEO this summer, handing the reins of the massive disruptor he built to Andy Jassy, the current head of Amazon Web services. All our retail giant announced that CEO and founder Jeff Bases will transition into the role of executive chair he founded Amazon in 1994 and grew it into today's massive online Padma worth more than $1.6 trillion. In statement, The Miami

Jolin Kent Andy Jassy Jeff Bezos Jeff Bases Amazon Miami
Rise above the cloud: Amazon's new chief executive

The Economist: The Intelligence

04:33 min | 4 months ago

Rise above the cloud: Amazon's new chief executive

"Thank you for standing by good day. Everyone and welcome to the amazon dot com hugh thousand and twenty financial results yesterday as it does. Every three months amazon held an earnings call it detailed a record quarter. The firm reported more than one hundred billion dollars in sales for the first time then came another disclosure today. We announced our founder and ceo. Jeff jesus will transition to the role of executive chair in the third quarter of this year. Jeff bezos at one time. The richest man in the world will step away from the helm of the company. He founded we'll mostly. I will reiterate that jeff is not leaving. He is getting a new job. He's going to be executive chair of board super important. Rolled order super. His successor will be andy jesse. A twenty year amazon veteran and head of amazon web services the company's enormous cloud computing arm since its founding. Mr bezos has insisted amazon continued to act like a feisty startup and he reiterated his catchphrase in a letter announcing the transition saying it remains day. One in fact it's day nine. Thousand seven hundred or so company has a goodly handful of challenges. That weren't around on day. One were the news. That jeff bezos is stepping back from day to day management. Amazon is a complete surprise. Patrick fouls the economists business affairs editor before the pandemic taken a backseat role. Then he returned to day to day management to deal with the huge surge in business the amazon sore during twenty twenty. He had two successes on the table. One of whom signaled he would leave the company so it was all set up for management transition but the exact timing of that wasn't clear until we've just had an how did amazon whether the the huge surge in business that the challenges that the twenty twenty brought well it's obviously been at the absolute halt of the digital surge. We've seen in the economy in two ways. First of all the e commerce machine. It runs both selling it so in product directly and doing logistics for other firms seen an enormous boom and business but also critically it's cloud thing business is behind a lot of the digital services we've been using from zoom to streaming services on the tv. So it's been absolutely central really to the economists response to the lockdown pandemic. He's about to say that. Mr basis is going out on a high note. I think he is in several ways. I mean you can judge by the financial performance of the company and its valuation which is close to an all time high. I think you can judge it by a also the social contribution. The foams made i mean. It's very controversial business. People were accused of being monopoly of exploiting workers and so on. But i think you can say that over the last year it's also showing that it's really an essential part of many people's lives and i'm sure. Jeff bezos will be thinking about last as he talks his departure but the say threats out there for amazon regulators. Continue to scrutinize it more than ever yesterday. The ftc one of these regulators reached a settlement with amazon for sixty million dollars. It'd been accused of believable more shortchanging drivers over tips and this continual pushback on labor regulation conditions of workers and there's also actually some nascent signs of competition from big firms like walmart which are finally getting their act together on digital. Well you mentioned that regulatory scrutiny which is also been directed at the likes of google and apple mr base is was one of the last founders to still be leading the tech giant he founded. I mean how significant is it to you that he's stepping aside here us right. The big five tech companies in america the have come to dominate its stock market and to some degree. Corners of its economy is now only one founder. Left in the hot seat mark zuckerberg and he's in a very hot seat indeed given facebook's problems so it does feel like it marks. Perhaps in you era when these huge companies have reached a point of dominance and yet some of the big questions that that has created remain unanswered will government. Break them up will. New competitors eventually arise and will be able to keep the same spirit of dynamism the propelled them to the success going for decades to come.

Amazon Jeff Bezos Jeff Jesus Andy Jesse Mr Bezos Jeff Patrick FTC Walmart Mark Zuckerberg Apple Google America Facebook
Jeff Bezos stepping down as Amazon CEO

KIRO Nights

00:24 sec | 4 months ago

Jeff Bezos stepping down as Amazon CEO

"Details from business reporter Jason Brooks. Amazon boss Jeff Bezos is stepping down as CEO from the company he founded in 1994, and we'll transition into the role of executive chair Andy Jassy, who currently runs Amazon Web services will take over for basis as CEO. Basil says he'll focus on and initiatives. This is CBS News

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Jeff Bezos stepping down as Amazon CEO, transitioning to executive chair role

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:28 sec | 4 months ago

Jeff Bezos stepping down as Amazon CEO, transitioning to executive chair role

"Jeff Bezos is going out a winner. He's stepping down as CEO. We'll take the title of executive chairman later this year. The current head of Amazon Web services Andy Jassy, will move into the CEO spot. Amazon reports more than $100 billion in sales during the fourth quarter, beating estimates and it expects another $100 billion quarter this quarter. As the pandemic continues to drive more shopping online. Google

Andy Jassy Jeff Bezos Amazon Google
Google Giving Up on Games? - Stadia strategy shifts

All About Android

05:23 min | 4 months ago

Google Giving Up on Games? - Stadia strategy shifts

"Google announced yesterday that it's going to be shuttering. Its in-house game development studio Which they first formed one year ago. It was called stadium games and entertainment. They did all this hiring for brought in all these big names to create essentially create exclusive. First party stadia games to be there in the library in combination with all the other titles that everybody recognizes And google announced yesterday that we're not gonna do that anymore. And i feel like there's a lot to dive into here at the same time. We saw twitter. That you were going wild with this stuff and we were just really entertained by by your thoughts on this so Thought it was a perfect time to bring you on to talk a little bit about stadia. And i'm just curious like right off the top. You've had a day to kind of think about this. What does this say about stadia that they're getting rid of this because it's easy to go into the realm of. Oh google just likes to kill all of its its things before it ever had a chance or whatever. Do you think that's what we're looking at here. Is this different. I think with anything. Google quote unquote kills you. Have you have two sides of the story here. You have the consumer facing side which is often that google gets rid of something that people used And then you have the internal side. Where oftentimes google ends up taking pieces of that thing and applying them somewhere else where they make sense You can look at google wave for example a really really really weird product. That probably didn't make sense for the mass market. But that certain people used and loved and that google took some ideas from an incorporated into google inbox which was then at the thing that people really loved in us and then incorporated those things from inbox into g mail. So google has a way of kind of devouring itself And it's projects. Like that. And i think that is unfortunately what's happening with stadium here It's unfortunate for consumers because it means that stadia as a subscription cloud streaming service. I agree with sean hollister at the verge and what he said. The days are numbered. Now this service won't live on definitely so google says it's still invest in sadia. There will still be third party game releases you know with. Other developers will continue to make games compatible stadia They didn't say if they expected to produce pace of adoption or if they expected to continue to meet their target of four hundred games and what three years or something like that. I forget what the exact timeframe so don't don't quote me. They're quoting myself. i guess. But it's yeah it's dud. i'm. I've said things online and they're having consequences So i think that really the thing that kind of hit the ball About this was the announcement that there was something. Downside games entertainment stadia. Sorry and that was their in house game studio. That is big news. I agree that it's important. But they sort of. I wouldn't say they hit the lead necessarily but they waited a couple of paragraphs to be like and by the way we're looking at say business model and we might kind of take that in a different direction. Maybe who knows And they kind of left with that. They didn't get much more specific other than the say. They wanted to share the stadia platform with partners. So what that to me means a being intentionally vague about it Be that it means. Whatever they're doing does not mean a positive change impact for people who subscribe to stadia. That's they're saying the opposite they're saying that other companies are going to benefit for bid from stadia more than subscribers. Likely well and to me. That's you know. I think everybody else ought for this after a little while to. It's an admission that they want to take stadia and turn it into a be. Your beat ee. Like cloud gaming business where stadia As as a little company inside. Google sells this service. This ability to stream your games to game publishers and developers who can you stadium platform and their hardware resources. Just as you would. Aws amazon web services to stream games to gamers. where google is just the intermediary. It's really just. It's an isp for video games essentially Not not in a lot of senses but insensitive. The service provider here. So i think that's where most people have decided. This is where stadium headed. And i think the reasons for that. You've got a few good ones one. It seemed inevitable if you look at the streaming space Our our senior editor ryan. Hey how to post about this today if you look at the streaming space things initially started basically content. Clearing-houses like netflix switch. Gobbled up all the rights to everything Gave you the right to play it back but over time. Netflix's understood you know these studios and these These tv companies. They are starting to understand how to do what we do which is stream video and streaming video became so easy and so scales service. These companies started climbing back. The rights their content. Because they're like. Hey why would. I put my show on netflix. If i'm cbs. And i can charge people ten dollars a month to watch all every star trek ever So the industry has like very provable. Moved in this direction in the last five or so years. Especially i think what google is doing is foreshadowing that Essentially like all cartoons ization to use a very Poor term of art of video game streaming

Google Sean Hollister Sadia Twitter Netflix Amazon Ryan CBS
"web services" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence in Industry

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

09:22 min | 1 year ago

"web services" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence in Industry

"So Carlos I wanted to start off by talking about supporting existing business initiatives existing strategy with AI capabilities. There's probably me a right and wrong way for an enterprise do that too now. Consider a layer that into their strategy. What do you see as sort of a proper way to think through that? Maybe a framework for going through that process what I would say is that is fundamentally changing business. Not because it is injecting deligence but actually because these injecting predictions or inferences. I think that he's a better way to look at how. Ai Gets baked into the business on the business processes the fact that Uganda US corporate data to draw insights. You now have empirical formations Mason's that you can represent knowledge with and then that knowledge all of a sudden becomes available to people throughout the organization by providing fighting these predictions or these inferences it allows people to operate in much More precise manner in the inverse is actually a way to bring the knowledge that is scarred from the past on that accelerate the dying to productivity for employees indeed to start welcome made a functional that before require process of education but the experience Yep now all of a sudden we can go press that by using AI. Yeah I think that's that is the big promise. That's definitely the the focus of the show. It sounds like your frame though is not to to kind of go into an enterprise setting and say. Hey you know is changing because it's bringing in intelligence but you kind of had to specific smaller terms. Do you think that making it more. Granular like that. Saying things. Like inference inference. Like Hey we're we're bringing inference into business. Makes it less open ended than a term like intelligence which sounds like it can do everything. Is that why you use that language. Or what's your choice voice there when I tried to be very realistic in the projects and not position. Ai As something to replace human intelligence. We're talking about different concepts. Actually unfortunately we use the same word but little bit like saying that the wing of an airplane similar to the wing of birth is not it is not we. We were just the inspired by the birds wings on an airplane but they don't do the same thing so he's something similar with visual intelligence. The inferences aren't really mathematical expressions are derived from a lot of empirical data. That is actually what we're doing. It has this magical effect right but it's actually applied mathematics and the inferences. What they as we? These assisted with the process or altogether amazing humas with we now call superpower CICI's away Oh fell saying look actually generating highly skilled workers because they are actually being provided with the with inferences. So that he's I think it keeps you stink. Bomb God asks will be made okay explaining it in that way and then there are going to be some cases where maybe A. B. Certain jobs can and in the future probably will be replaced by A. It doesn't mean anybody's trying to be a bad person but as you're saying you know there's many cases where it's simply enhancing in people and bringing kind of maybe again not using the word intelligence bring inference into the enterprise process. I guess the the question that I have around the theme of this month around. Ai Strategy Energy is how you kind of bring Ai. So a lot of these concepts even what you're speaking about with me here. This idea of intelligence versus inference of sort of where. Ai is valuable sometimes. Sometimes even those basic ideas are new to the C. Suite when you are working with a company that's considering where a fits into their existing Strategy how do you bring in teach those kind of lessons headed you find the fit for where I can find value within an enterprise setting where we're not everybody. It's expert at A. There's definitely a cultural change of custody driven at in companies that want to adopt a it is not enough to you. Just basically say okay. We're going to get the become more proactive by by using AI. There's a big change involves in making meetings meetings about day dow rather than about opinions. This is a key difference. You're actually feel very clearly when a company has decided that it would be data driven able to go on sale. Get I think but prior were they actually say here is in analyses that we have brought to. That show is that we have a problem with X.. You know these Charney would be basket. Size would be obesity fitness and so on and then the decision makers actually started to think about. When is it a given workflow and we find that? We have some tasks that we'd wipe policy and decision boys in that workflow in those decision points. Do we have they that. In the called Bunny Oregon. We acquired a outside of the company that will be used to provide inferences and help those decisions and this is the key part way or that. They decided this coming day. Say up yet. We have this day that may spread around different silos. That in soccer Sunday it could be used in a tool provide Russian army models that can be triggered then helped to make those decisions more precise sizemore relevant or this is the way that I encourage executives to look for the low hanging improved on the start to see successful adoption of machinery. Got It okay so we can actually dive into this a little bit and I like this kind of incremental approach right. I mean this idea to to some degree I mean. There's all kinds of different ways that we can take stabs at at strategy at different levels but one of them is what you're articulating here. which is let's take a look at some of our business functions? Let's take a look at some of the workflows within those business functions and then let's ask if there's steps in those workflows that I guess like what you said here where we really are. Are you making a judgment in some way shape or form. And maybe there's a way with with data we have data that we don't have to sort of leverage ai to speed that up is this. Is this a process success that is sometimes done systematically in other words do executives. Often come together do you. Would you recommend that executives come together think through a lot of different workflows and functions is at one time and find kind of wear those sweet spots are across the whole business or do you see this more being done in kind of isolation within the compliance department will do something like this or for deep somewhere in the back side of the e commerce branch of a big retailer. They'll do something like that. Steve would you recommend it be done more more high level business wide or that be the wrong approach is normally more business why normally it depends on the maturity of the companies. The the early adopters have already removed the two models where they embed that science teams in the lines of business on it is normal to have a centralized data operations team mm-hmm that behaves as they supplier inside of the company so they build out data lakes they take care of the extraction and streaming streaming. There's normally a lot of fast associated with creating a single source of truth such as they've been organization the identification than there's some times format the core processes. They are that nobody belong On these would be what I what what is known as data ops then ah the data consumers in mature company stand to be embedded in the lines of business Sunday half science teams. But if you don't have the consolidated are made available and other common the mandate way out you break down the data silos you explain to the data producers that they it belongs to the corporation and not the divisions and then there's an ecosystem creative around the corporate data at begins to drive value the companies. He's got a little bit less Sure in the adoption astronaut name when they started the centralize project way they are. They look at what our competitive players in in our space are in a male on the triangle defined projects projects that have High backed wear the data are available and there is expertise that can be either Freddie acquired or contracted the dual that will the first projects. These tend to be statistically based in other words say they they dumped with the structure of Beta is a normal for machinery adoption. Start from a Markian or production process. Okay this is this is kind of interesting. So you're drawing the distinction between the the more sophisticated in less sophisticated companies. I think a lot of our audience will be interested in that when you mentioned how the less sophisticated and and I certainly don't mean at any insulting.

"web services" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

05:01 min | 3 years ago

"web services" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"Hand so in other words you just give it the seven cards you're playing five card stud or something right you give it give it your your set of cards and it will tell you oh you have a pair or you have a full house or you have a flush or something like that and so someone wrote some really great code to do that on get hub but it's in go to go at you've written you know your whole poker back end service in java right also you know you can do things like swig and things like that but it gets it gets ugly really quick like trying to call one language from another i mean i've done it before it's not pretty like you really don't wanna do that and so what you automate what you wanna do is rap that you know poker hand evaluator in some type of service or some type of service and then have you know your java call into that even though it's on the same machine hydra java code call access your local host port port seventy or something and passes poker hands and get back some scores that might be easier than either having java go through j and i talk to go which is a nightmare or rewriting this entire open source library in another language right right absolutely so that's that's quering challenge kind of reusing soccer functionality right everywhere so in some cases things work out you might find the library that you want in your language but when you pull things off you know web servers you can consume it kind of anywhere there is that additional overhead of running service typically small in the long run the more interesting aspect it'd be very extroverted when you build a web servers and you have it operate you know pretty reliably and robustly then you can actually really larger and larger pieces of your software pretty easily you know that this piece is going to stay this way and you have abstracted out all of its internal concerns maybe you know next time you we want to actually do the right thing in java but the things that depend on that web service only talk shitty read so you can really change the internals of your website service and write it in a new way if you want to make it more performance than any other language but as the interface is set initiative you don't have to you know cause disruption in in pieces of software that consume that service release is like i feel like it sits nicer cleaner abstraction for building you know larger pieces of functionality and are seeing that with you know kind of organizations adopting things like micro says are billy using smaller peers together rather than is going completely off in a big pieces of software manala take packages if you yeah yeah totally makes sense cool yeah thanks again for coming on the show fascinating oh let me give you chance to tell everyone you know what's what's how can they get to the website also was social networks you're kind of most active on so that they want to get started where it's where should they go for that show think yes soviet get bosman dot com so super easy to think about you know get in both actually the first to issue if he you will will will use so you think of that and it's get postman dot com and that's actually important also kind of comes from stuff and we're on return were that's where we are most active my today's eighty five eight five three characters and we are at postman client for official twitter he knows eight five yeah wow three letter twitter handle is pretty cool stick with these services very early on sweeter yeah very cool all right well thank you again and yeah people people to reach you it's only three letters on twitter folks if you have any questions for having go for it go thanks a lot thank you so much congestion thank you so much patrick intro music is akzo by viner pilot programming throwdown is distributed under a creative commons attribution share alike two point oh license you're free to share copy distribute transmit the work to remix adapt to work but you must provide attribution to patrick and i and share like in kind

"web services" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

05:06 min | 3 years ago

"web services" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"Midsize companies cool makes sense and so he's your engineer in the cities are you you're in like a highrise and so mark or something like that yeah so be decently moved to new office and it's on mark street on second and in market okay we literally started in the basement nfo he will be starting working place then you moved one level of the second floor and now we are on the eleventh floor so yeah i suppose minutes been growing we kind of moving up literally yeah very cool well this is really fascinating i as i said i made a fool of myself building a website a while back and i still have learned a lot over the years but one of the biggest things i learned is to rely heavily on services and allows the developer really focus on the bigger picture which is tied to whatever they're they're trying to build and would however they're trying to improve whatever product space or human condition or whatever they're focused on and this is another great tool and the really nice thing about about this service product you're built is that it sounds very acceptable anyone can really get started using it people a lot of people are now using web services for anything a lot of these things like member patrick member what was it called the thing that was kind of i wanna see like cope chorba or something like that that is a thing yes but there were these like other before web services really took over there was yes so was one of them and there was other ones where yeah rpc's yeah i mean issued call like gr and thrift and he's kind of things put them in that category although they're still around but but now pretty much everything has moved on to web services and so there's probably a bunch of people out there who have built your web services to as an accessory to an app that they're working on or website that they're working on and they could plug right into post van four free and and make sure that what they're building is kind of solid which is which is really cool yeah thank you get you to use case we be started like actually we have a stronger and of hypotheses or we're going to start seeing from talking to our users that a lot of ways in which they're primarily developing trevon through web services you have lots of interesting api's available now that you can just kind of drop in and call and you don't have to think about like will detail you know you can for example you stripe and you can get like a very powerful payments platform working for you you can you know 'cause you can call it louis s three api and then you can get a very powerful like storage paean and really happy because really small and kind of so much for you so what we can start seeing was that you know the way you will offer of course you have all of these other ways in which you can be writing code and compiling core and kind of you know building the motivational application but that applications always either going to be using may might be composed of api's so yeah you know we're pretty excited about this this whole thing because first of all it's very accessible you know you have to use i mean these are all bill officially is pretty easy for you to use any language any framework and which way that you want to use it and it's super easy to get started you know you don't have to like download thousands of dependencies or in understand very complicated language maybe like car about or something like that like and that's really kind of helping this whole ecosystem grow very quickly any conference that you can go to every company has an api out that and it's going to becoming more of a quiz it that you know you have a so that developers can build some something more interesting and they just don't have people who are users of your product on just have to depend on yeah you know just what you provide the box so yeah it's great to be developer bill burr cool stuff one thing that i really didn't understand early on as a developer was how to really combine languages right so for example you might find is really great library on get hub some open source library for let's say you're making poker app and you find a really great library for telling you the.

engineer
"web services" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

04:33 min | 3 years ago

"web services" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"Working with your web service and all of this stuff is also free up till a particular point so you can make for example one thousand calls through both monitors in a month and then after month this will renew so this is typically good for in a smaller project proof of concept things and if you want to go if you to access more of this stuff than you can become a pro user forsman and that you know is is that dollars per user per month and you get a lot more of these add wants to and for our enterprise product which is more towards in larger companies the prices higher foreign for developers yet you would be on throw who also so if someone wants to some in their dorm room and they've built something which returns basketball scores or something like that they can use postman totally free i mean they're probably not gonna hit the thousand where limit definitely not right away and and it would be set for a while with just a three package and then all of a sudden they're site because more popular than dot com than the infrastructure in place and they can scale up yeah i mean i'm guessing if you are at that level then probably paying for other things a lot more than the proposal but yeah you know you can use it for as long as you want for lots of interesting stuff you can build that's interesting things postman for free we have now more than five million users across job now postman is used in a lot of innercity courses as part of you know vote camps and in programming classes and stuff and we are actively supporting that so it's very exciting for us to see the product of being used in essentially helping developers learn about api's and services cool yeah that's super super bowl so tell us a little bit about the company so what's it like you're working at postman where you located what your office like are you hiring these kinds of things there's a lot of people listening out there who are either looking for a job or they're they're any university which means royal certainly gonna be looking for a job the next few years and give them kind of taste of what it's like to work at postmen and whatever tune is our show think yes so we started as as a startup in forty and growing pretty rapidly and since then we have an office in san francisco and be have an office in bangalore and be hiding for a lot of different roles be have kind of marketing and customer success teams here in san francisco we have our developer evangelists here as well engineering team is in bangalore as eliza designed and i think nami are more than fifty people so tell people really quick what the developer vangelis lot of people might not know what that is show yes so developer eventless for us not traditionally developed vangelis basically try to even or they tried to kind of explain companies technology to other developers they build interesting use cases for for let's say that technology the company has built on its own but they are also talk about you know open source tools and technologies and how things can affect together and their job essentially is to make inter developers make the best use of competence that are available in the developer ecosystem so it's it's a lot of education it's a lot of teaching some a lot of courting as well where you'll probably building plug ins or integrations with different technologies to straight and of new goal use cases you might be presenting conferences or meet ups that's what are developmentally stew they can you know organiz meet up and tell people about interesting things that they do with postman so it's a very it's i say it's literally kind of new role for divider of startup ecosystem companies like i guess the bigger companies like microsoft and google have have more professional programs but you know now you can actually work as a developer list and a lot of startups and.

"web services" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

03:22 min | 3 years ago

"web services" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"Kind of go is people have a development environment trans on your system so you're writing code in your id and you have all of this configured on your local system so you said you basically are developing on local host and then you have a staging environment where your team is kind of working together and deploying an apology or of services and putting them together in one place and that that kind of acts as a check before you go to production and finally the prussian environment which is what your users seeing so in postman actually we have a pretty cool feature call at moments that helps you take out parts of your requests and convert them to rebels and you define those variables in these environments so you could have a development environment a staging environment and a production environment and each of these environments will have different values for the variables you said so you you can set like if you said the staging environment and postman all the calls that you are sending in postman will now go to the staging right or if you're running a monitor and you said then mama's production all the costs will go to the production environment so both kind of makes it easy for you to kind of of work across different environments and this is that the because set up that we have seen in t stace thing in some cases it's it's more extensive i think i've seen like environments where there are like seven different kinds of like stages but but yeah we saw that any built into feature literally environments in postman all right so what about like in terms of the product what sort of the like what's the pricing how does postman actually work from us of product perspective or business development perspective each arch per endpoint or how does that work so postman is free for everybody to download and use for making calls so there is notice fiction on the number of calls that you can send because it kind of runs as an application on your machine and you make the cause and your network right so you can just download postmen and use it as much as you want source or is it is it does that work so all the core competence of postman are open source the application itself like the desktop application is not open source but the run time and the collection format a bunch of decays are all open source got it so kind of going above from that you can sign up for an account with postmen and that's also three and using that you hit access to a mortared wants features postman like building mocks overs so you can build a mocks over and stimulator similar the behavior of digress buddy simply which is basically like sending api colander turning affects response so you get that one to sign up you can generate a documentation page through postman which will run in your browser it's not tied to the app anymore you can set up these monitors and you know we make cause for you to make sure everything.

"web services" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

04:41 min | 3 years ago

"web services" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"You have no sanitation on what are user will enter and let's say you know you have like a sign up form and you're asking for somebody's name okay and somebody endorsing a bunch of jolla script in that and what you have on the next page is that this name is going to be displayed after somebody submerged the phone right so somebody put some javascript gordon that this goes to do your web service and you're like you know i love my users trust us this into the data and when you go to the next page you pick up the same value and in some ways this thing can be crafted in a way that this piece of in the space of data will execute the browser right and what happens is i think this is scott accessors pack where precise rip dan dantec yet right so what when when does java script executes in a depending on what the way it's crafted it can reveal some sensitive information to the attacker oh i see i see so basically like so yes you have a spot in your html for the person's name and you're just going to take the name out of the database and just drop it in that spot in the webpage maybe it's the top right or something like that and when someone's done is they've made their name you know start java script you know look at all the cookies convert them playing text send them to my server in russia and java script that's the person's username and then land lay filling displayed on the top right boom that actually actually it's cool yeah that that sounds pretty sounds pretty dangerous yeah i think a lot of that posted could probably help with a lot of that because my guess is you could do some checks to make sure that data's if the person says yeah maybe you could go into detail on how that works i people give you a spec and then you find is there's a way for you to violate that spent like how do people use posted and to do to verify that validation is correct so the way it works in postman is you you would write a validation script for this so when is a pretty flexible tool be don't like it's not specifically birth for this use case but we kind of bill give you the interface to send a pi calls and then you have this run time that nfl executes these validations once you're gonna receive response so and then you can you can automate the process oh i see so you have like a post in automatic requests we're every day at two am someone tries to make username called you know get all cookies and in every day that request fails and one day doesn't fail we get an email saying hey somebody you know mid the site insecure yes so in a nutshell could kind of work like that you would have to go to a bunch of steps like it would build a collection you would write your web service call and then you would test for this specific thing you would run it manually and then you would automate as part of your test suite and then you can set up a pulse on monitor which will run the test against your service so in the future letter you make some somebody makes a mistake somebody comment something out and the steps kinda fails then you're gonna get an email saying that hey you know something something's wrong with your service and evaluation that you set in place is not work anymore the we've kind of built the products that it doesn't have to come to a point where you deploy something wrong in production read you can catch it either manually or if you're doing your automation suite you're running traditionally so typically you would catch early on and you know in the most out of course you know you can set up a monitor and the monitor would have to make sense you have like a canary version of your web service and postman's only person using that and he finds some error than it it won't you know roll your canarian to the production version exactly right so the way we have seen systems to or web service deployments to.

one day
"web services" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

04:54 min | 3 years ago

"web services" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"Your web service with the username that's thirteen megabytes long or something like that what are what is the defense against that so i mean i guess the first rule that you have to follow is don't rely on client site testing so don't expect that you know the jarvis corp the test that you have on the client side or in your up is going to prevent it you have to write checks on the side so in yourself accord typically this features in terms of you know sanitizers that run before you actually process any data that comes from user so one rule that you know you could follow as just don't trust us data the moment you kind of you know put a form out there and there is a field in which somebody can put something just expect that there is going to be something malicious and then you check for how you're processing the data the moment it kind of hits your server and it goes to your application framework you'd want to make sure that you sanitize it i'm sure that answer libraries available to help you do that so just like the way you don't have to all your own crypto library you can use something that sellable the open source world and use it to sanitize data and finally when you work with us import you you you kind of make sure that you have checked for sunday's things so a lot of this can be automated some of this is just basic kind of of agnes that you might want to have making sure that any any interface that you expose to the outside world will probably be hit with in militias data and once worked as a new chart out how data's gonna flowing through your service kind of processing systems you can take actions against her in some cases in a just just op the library or another cases just kind of you know make sure you have some basic checks make sense is there like my guess is there's probably i don't know much about h e protocol but it probably has knacks them i guess i guess packet size or a request size built in so someone couldn't put in like four hundred megabyte username or something like that at some point i guess the protocol itself would stop that right yeah i think the protocol prevents it prevent that sort of stuff against like query parameters you are all characters where things can get a little herry is when you have a request parties request bodies could be arbitrary large and i think that before overflow tax and things like that so if you have like in in most servers the silver will process requests and might just ignore the body altogether so you don't have to worry about that and it would have those checks which are protocol driven for what is coming in as an import on credit parameters headers though you can't do something malicious with that i'm sure when it comes to bodies i think i don't think the protocol specifies higher limit feature request where people like have you know this this crazy file that need to applaud and said we are not a memory to process that request i guess the protocol allows for arbitrary lots of c so early on in the server while you're reading this tcp stream at a really low level you say okay you know either the header says that this body's going to be a gigabyte so i just forget about it or you know of red ten megabytes there's no way easier name is even close to that so i just dropped the rest of the packet and close request or something yeah i guess i guess these checks would be built in about your engine x which i'm guessing would be the more common options you're using several levin yeah i guess the several requests sizes not something you've seen a problem because people like notre ling of their own servers the tricky part is always in user input validation like that's the one that trips up a lot of people like you know a non sanitized import or something like an excess attack where people put in like jolla script and you can store the jobs they're in your database and you render it as it is back into the page that can essentially revered cookies so with more can you dive in detail on that that that went over my head so make username that is java script and then when the server can you run up on me yeah sure so basically let's say you have.

four hundred megabyte thirteen megabytes ten megabytes
"web services" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

04:08 min | 3 years ago

"web services" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"Out there you're mobile or web developer you haven't used gremlins you should check it out it's really really fun used it a lot on web i know it exists on mobile but i haven't tried it there but but for web there's gremlins dodge as and it would it will do it will literally do random things on your website so in other words it will click on random places in your website it will just type keys it will click and type keys and click somewhere else and just like it has no rhyme or reason and which you'll find is that it it will break your website like you is you have sort of a sumptious in mind of how your websites going to flow and then this thing just doesn't care like it was just type anywhere it will type in the search bar and then while you have you know the prefixed searched coming up it will try to log in and in you'll you'll your website will just fail in spectacular he's using thing you can do for web which is particularly sinister and a lot of people don't even bother protecting us but you know on the web there's really nothing stopping someone from clicking buttons are hidden or just because you have a button hidden hidden is really just a little notation in html that button is still there the code is still there and people can click buttons that are visible and so this gremlin thing has an option where you can turn on which gets really aggressive it will try to you know une hype things and click them and most websites break with that is there something similar in postmen were just does like basically on monte carlo and just tries all sorts of crazy api calls and sees if it can it can crash the endpoint so it's not kind of prebaked but you can build that in bozeman so postman spent has a runtime burton that is basically built on top of jealousy and what you can do actually is attach jealous crypt calls javascript script jess scripts before and after your api calls so think of it as a sequence of stuff you know i one script ron's than you make api call and then than than another script runs descript which we call task group can essentially analyze the response that is returned from that web service so it's basal what a postman collection were which is the thing that stores all the stuff can do is just help you scrip any scenario so you can do things like go one after the other or ukwa change the flow of how the collection will be run and going like random directions or you can inject in like different kinds of data into the observer's so one of the most common based gonna break observers is to inject very large strings into the pi call right anyone type that stuff manually you can just write that in the script that transport web service call and you know you can generate fake data or that are interesting attacks that you can do for the service which you know would probably want you'd want to make the emmett some sensitive data for example so you can do all of that postman using the scripting runtime that that stat and it's built on jarvis corp so it's gonna pretty simple and easy to use so you can do lots of interesting things that man yeah you could run it as a monkey kinda thing too yeah oh yeah this other word for that kevin how how how do you prevent something like that i mean let's say you know so on the browser you can log in with easier password right and the browser maybe type in a really long these their name check on the browser some java script runs on the browser says hey you can't be this long but someone can easily just bypass that and they can make a call directly to.

web developer
"web services" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

03:59 min | 3 years ago

"web services" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"If you if you don't if you think of this of any of production in maybe if you're featured on hacker news somebody might be trying to get into your service and might not have the best of intentions yada may also it's it's yes really important to this just in general use libraries and to look at sort of the standard way of doing things i built a a website of really longtime ago and i did this authentication type thing with the one i just described which is like very primitive but i put the token in the as a query parameter like i put it in the url and so what happened is people went to my website and they said oh this is really cool and they copied the euro and senate to their friend and they know that they're actually sending their friend the token so when their friend went to the website their friend all the sudden it was logged in as as that person as an example of just had no idea what i was doing and it's something just completely insecure and so yeah you definitely wants to you know use a lot of these like off to and things like that i mean they've gone through and i remember when i integrated off too i thought oh this is really strange that they're sort of having me jump through all these hoops but then in hindsight it was oh yeah that's because when you don't do this other people just get everyone else's password so when it comes to security and this is true for everything even if you need to encrypt you know a chunk of data and memory or something like that you know use lip sodium us live crypto or g crypt don't write your own a blowfish or your own encryption algorithm and just anything with respect to security it's so so important to use off the shelf products posted probably integrates with almost all of them yeah that's right actually postman can help you do the opposite like it can help you break into stuff or you can can help you test for whether you are you know making a common mistake so kind of going after example that you mentioned that you know you if you put something inside the query parameter you know it's it's going to be copied it's more visible there and we know people copy and senator people and of course that's a breach of kind of security one of the more interesting things and this is something that we've seen in production scenarios where people will put something inside nation behavior and they'll take that okay this is not seen by the user right they only see the u r l so maybe i'm safe like that and they will put some sensitive to day she had her and you know your issue beheaded can be inspected by crumbs network inspector or we have an extension call the postman interceptor which can capture calls and send it off to postman and it kind of captures entire she packard which is basically your web service call and you can see the entire set of things that are being sent the from the soul and if if you're api security is not proper than you can actually extract kind of you know paying from the header a lot of interesting as i think i've seen people used your stuff but you can use postman for just you know basic sanity check on but your servers returning something sensitive which you don't intend to and yeah it can reveal some surprises sometimes i mean you could have a list of postman you know fake accounts on your website and if if the postman service logs in somebody else you know nothing's going horribly wrong yeah yeah absolutely what about like so you know if.

"web services" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"web services" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"Observers and you're using a language framework like slim for php or a i guess it'll be andrea something than it will automatically do it for you but this can elect consuming the service becomes harder venue are doing it outside of the browser so if you are kind of writing your own api client and you wanna make a call to that server typically sober support a token mechanism or they would support one of these authorization or authentication protocols like what one basic all at for what to the lot of these available and what the what the help you do is kind of provide a scheme through which you can say that okay i'm valid user of this particular api call and there are some optimization you can make with these systems so let's say you're using what to you would have to be registered with the service and then you're going to get a one kind of token and then you're gonna exchange the stoking wait another token and then finally you you are in in an environment where you can make 'cause but it's your responsibility to kind of keep the token unlike the cookie mechanism where the browser does it for you in this case he would have to keep the dopamine and manage the state of the token and in some cases might say that oh can is not valid anymore more complex indication schemes manager but in some cases like basic you know you can essentially generate a token and senate for a successful api call until like the password changes so when you move from building web services for browsers.

dopamine senate
"web services" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

02:48 min | 3 years ago

"web services" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"That has like millions of users the setup philby much more sophisticated in its complexity but if you're a developer or your startup starting out this this would take you through a long way i make sense unlike like when you have actual website there's there's this concept or there's this technology called cookies which basically means you you sign some information on the browser vincent encrypted data goes the server and basically the the server has the i'm trying to figure out a way to explain is really quickly but let's just say the server has access to some data on the server can pass that to the browser and the browser doesn't actually really know what it is so but the browser can pass it back to the server and the server can decrypt it and say okay this is sort of some state information right and so through the cookies the server can so for example if you were to i don't know if this actually patrick union crack me on this but i mean if someone was to actually take the cookies off of your computer they could probably log in as you on a website because that cookie is sort of you know when it gets to the servers telling the server that the service is gonna unpack that cookie and then realize okay this person has already logged in you know five minutes ago and so they're out than ticketed right and so what is is there you know when you're building web services is there a concept of state and and how does that work do you still do cookies in a web service or or is it done through some kind of token or something like that yeah so cookies are still used in in other negation mechanisms in beppe services in in my view they don't give the best expedience to the developer because your web service is going to be consumed outside the browser so what essentially can happen in this interaction is that the server basically expects that okay another some piece of identify under identifying information when a call comes sent to me right and when when a service is being called a browser a lot of this can be hidden behind the scene the cookie mechanism takes care of it and wherever if you're using an existing language framework a lot of them care of this for your so if you have of.

developer five minutes
"web services" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

04:53 min | 3 years ago

"web services" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"It's in a way it's it's it's it's a first world problem it's like imagine you have some web service that's part of some product and all of a sudden feature number one on hacker news and your web servers just crashes down to the ground like how how do you sort of handle that so i i mean you know that's i would say if you get featured on hacker news and your services getting popular you know it's it's kind of a good problem to have and you know in some ways you can preempt that by low testing your service or in kind of just making or simulating that scenario yourself so that's what we commend to like a lot of people you know without really you know waiting for that i think you would want to some level of simulation before your deploy i in in my experience in what we have seen that as a service becomes kind of more than more mature you kind of led the service with the different tools and they help you kind of you know taken that lower distributed across different servers and make sure that the in a non the lord is kind of not on like one specific sewer it happens overtime but in a let's say you start with a very simple application maybe taking the doctor example that you had the right so in the initial phase in a one force in sending service and you know it it grows for the bed of you hundred people using the service in most scenarios you you'll be fine you know like whatever you set up on aws is going to be good enough to take that lord but as your user starts kind of growing you would probably want to make sure that it's not just one you know one sword that sticking that lord you might want to put a load balancer before and instead of deploying your service on once over your diplo in multiple service and what a lord unser does for you is kind of distribution the lord according to an algorithm and it makes sure that your service doesn't go down right takes the service needed to a particular sunday dickson an api caught that comes into your service and distributor reported over the summer desert's job and response if the civil gets full you know it would send it to another server and it kind of goes on so it really helps you can add more sellers and load balances to like very simple job of outing so they they will they can take a lot of requests load balancers something that you have to really probably it's probably generic right so he's probably you can just use something open source or or something karsli available and it would probably handle almost every use case or or do you have to write something yourself no most of the things that are available you know lots of lots of options actually will load balancers i think he had a bluest has something peterbilt and if you don't wanna use that i don't remember exactly what technology we use but yeah you can get something people from aws or you can pick up something from the open source world and and you said you don't have to write a load balancer yourself got it that makes sense you talked a little bit about simulating events like simulating your what happens if identify user base and things like that can you dive into more detail there like how do you actually simulate it just seems like such a chaotic system right rea people all over the world trying to access something and then that volume of people kind of double like how you're kind of simulate how you prepare for something like that so i can kind of expand it from the perspective of postman we looked at solving this problem we know while building the product so you know both men led to send like a request one at a time right so you built your service and you're sending sending requests one at a time what postman let you do or another to also let you can do is automate this sending process it's a what you wanna do is kind of write out a scenario so in most cases you're users will be going through a certain floors in your application right off in your web service they might be hitting like in a few calls in particular sequence and the way most developer stuff is that they're going to hit them one after the other and they be like you know that.

"web services" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

04:48 min | 3 years ago

"web services" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"Of that so you know let's say i built some web service i spin up aws node and i have some web service i built an express or one of these frameworks right how can i make sure that's reliable right i mean the machine could die people could pass crazy things my web service it's totally exposed on the internet so after accept all sorts of requests that might be crazy how do you build a reliable web services all that uncertainty so yeah i guess that's that's a broad question depends on the extent of you know how big the services i've seen gennifer own set of services go from like a very simple things to relax things but i guess let me start with the typical developer workflow right so one of the first things that i kind of absorbed was the ability to acquire the service and noise behavior as a developer so you know you're writing code in your deploying code onto aws and you kind of want to check whether the pi works has expected so you know you can create with tools like was mun as your service becomes more mature you would probably want to write more automated tests for you know you can check it of course you know every now and then but you can't be sure that when you're not checking in is working as expected so you could you know bill some automated around and there are a whole lot of ways in which you can kind of do that folks can write unit tests that are integration tests lots of different options available here and you know once you have once you know that okay the most of this stuff is working i've checked it manually and have checked it in an automated way and i've deployed to production and my services working out that you can monitor that service for correctness you know and whether it's performing a up the up to speculations so you can have an external monitor setup to pay your service and let you know whether things are working as expected end i guess on the notion of liability there are lots of internal instrumentation that you could do but in the service to unite if you're imitating logs from the service and that is something that you can process and check for on the side and you know make sure that everything's working as expected the way i can see it as that it can go through different stages and the status kind of depend on innovator you are in the development life cycle in the early stages you'd probably be more ad hoc kind of playing with the service yourself and as you go more than more towards you know putting that service out in front of users and it starts getting used you are you're tend to use more automated tools for that got it it's kind of like service kind of works like it it makes this request so for example going back to the doctor go example it every day at two am it doesn't query doesn't maybe i call quarrying the word dog and then on the back end your instrument instrumentation that maybe there's some way to know hey this is this is a test query and so when you pass that flag it starts you're keeping track of a lot more than it would otherwise and it says it make sure hey did you did you get did anything get returned back maybe if there's no results or never actually returned anything because it crashed or something like that then it would send an email to some developer and say hey you know the the dog query failed today person would know rather than having to wait until they get in a reports from real people who are trying to use it yep that's that's that's how you should actually do it because you have to get up in the middle of the night and have have had those experiences so yeah always tend towards our mission that makes sense what about what about throughput like know what happens when someone you know has just one machine that servicing requests that all of a sudden they start hitting one thousand ten thousand qpr's or something like that you kind of walk people through that serve nightmare scenario and how they can sort of recover from that.

"web services" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

04:15 min | 3 years ago

"web services" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"Write a script data from you know whatever it was written into the document in that esteem document and you'll try to build a bill something to to get that now it's much easier you know you just kind of get the right if you are and want to have that it ended structure format you can you know build applications or just you know use it in very interesting ways a lot of public data like for example you want to see all of the penalties from hockey team well there nhl has their database and they have a website so you can go to what the euro's off hand but you could go to nhl's website and you can put in you can actually you know in your browser type in you know certain query and you'll get back of data and so you know if you look at all of these apps they give you up to date scores on on sports events and things like that most of them are using this api the census has api and so there's a treasure trove of information that you can get up so why how did this end up sort of getting tied together with with hdp as a protocol in other words like why did this evolve and not something completely different that would return the same data right yeah that's a really good question so an phone the onto the bit later or at least i thought about the answer brit later after postman took off so in earlier i think of couple of decades back there was this whole notion of like web services so you had things like soul protocols and the whole idea was that okay when we want to transfer data kinda from one point to another v would build a sort of call and this is the way thanks to each other does pretty were bows and pretty complex and that it took off i guess within the enterprise but don't really take off so much in within the wider developer community what i saw and what i myself used were was like things like frameworks for php python you know whenever you'd be building an application and you had to get some data from the user you'd have a web form you know show up on the web page and then the data will be transferred to your server using a post issued ep call so i guess they were but they were mostly in the background now i think a few key things happen that helped the api's kind of grow on officedepot be so the first one i feel that was pretty significant was the introduction of you know kind of the iphone and the rise of spark phones in general so developers can start thinking was that i have to build an application forced for the browser and now for ah device and i wanna make sure that i do have less work and let me standardize on whatever framework amusing but i'm gonna make sure that this data gets sent off in a way that you know my smartphone can consume so i think that was one bit and then along with that i felt it what what really helped solidify this was ajax bed you would basically query the sober to some in page update your application and you would do do it over external should request that of course as people thought about the name the name was kind of all wrong technology was built on on w she right so what i think slowly started happening was people really wanted to like interact interactive applications for the web and kind of more feature shop for the smartphone and you know of developers typically take the most pragmatic approach as if they can together as a whole as a community and they will again you know we have these building blocks of elbow we have these books available jason data format is pretty easy to use that that kind of became the.

one bit
"web services" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

03:57 min | 3 years ago

"web services" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"Test accents yeah so you a lot of people i mean even my grandmother when she hears atp she knows is internet and web pages of most people have like a basic concept of i go to h e p google dot com i get the search the search box right so you know what is sort of the difference between type in google dot com and the kind of web services that you're talking about right i mean they have atp in common but but yeah they're kind of very different surveys or experiences right yeah i'd say from a user experience standpoint they are different you browse websites using your browser whether it be chrome or safari or internet explorer for api's you know what we are seeing is essentially what used to be done kind of in a very complicated way a few years back can also now be done on top of issue tippy so let underlying technologies the same in one case it helps you you know of produce websites and in other cases it helps you connect obligations together which is what kind of be called you aps so he had underlying stuff like the building blocks the same but the way you use it is pretty different and i guess we can dig into that in more detail as we go through the talk but one of the most interesting things that we have seen as that because of these two you know things being on the same technology stack in art has kind of led to the adoption of api's unit has made the adoption in a much faster over the years yeah that makes sense yeah you can even there's a lot of different websites actually give you give anyone access to sort of the more programmatic or is the api of their site so for example you can go to duck duck go dot com which is a search engine and you'll get the box and you can type in the box you know whatever you want search for dog and you'll get a bunch of links to dogs and it'll look you know they'll render that webpage in a way where it kind of makes sense pretty easy to navigate right but you can actually do i think it's as simple as just api dot dot go dot com and then to put a little question mark hugh equals dog so if you type that you are l you're going to get something very different you're gonna get what's called jason which is was a java script object notation i think jason is its own language and you're going to get just it looks like just a bunch of source code what that is that's data that's been structured in a certain way it's not gonna look pretty it's not gonna like anything like the duck go landing page you're used to and that's because it's not really meant for humans to read it's it's a way for computers to our let's say computer clients to go and make calls the duct to go and then for programmers to get data in a way that they can easily interpret and then they choose to do whatever they want with that yeah absolutely and that's that's setting one of the most interesting things about you know things like you know you once you can get that data in that format you can kind of do lots of cool things like i remember going back you know when you had to kind of get data out of upside you tried probably right like a scraper or you.

"web services" Discussed on Too Embarrassed to Ask

Too Embarrassed to Ask

01:51 min | 4 years ago

"web services" Discussed on Too Embarrassed to Ask

"Global computer that no one controls so it is essentially a global computer like an amazon web services but that is amazon web services is centralised a theory is a global computer where i can write a piece of code and deploy at and it can run over this network and it can run in a highly secure way in a tamperproof way and the data is entirely tamperproof insecure so it is a global computer on that known controls as decentralise virtual machine and so for a lot of different applications that is incredibly valuable and that is why it has seen such a surge in interest is because it's use cases are really conceptually as broad as these cases of a computer so it's a think of it as like you know it's a it's a global computer that known controls and i'm just like you know in some ways the web is this global information network of pig people originally thought of as like this this global database of information and content that no one controls it's obviously quite different but similar but as an environment to run software code sets a little bit about earlier theory miss next next question is from kevin swent case went on twitter since bitcoin transactions don't scale and cost slash transactions are have i think its's round four dollars under four dollars how does this ever work as a medium of exchange yes so the scaling issues of is a big one and there are lots of different technical ways to scale bitcoin and they're being worked on and i'm not too concerned about that specifically i think what what under lies that though is a is a bigger philosophical debate if you will about.

web services virtual machine twitter amazon kevin swent four dollars
"web services" Discussed on Deal of the Week

Deal of the Week

01:44 min | 4 years ago

"web services" Discussed on Deal of the Week

"That very profitable for that company and revenue they're still getting a a big chunk of their revenue from their retail business but then also from from their web services as well things like video we have no idea what they're what is happening there but jeff phases likes to think that if you can get if we hit if amazon can get you stock on their video then that will increase the revenue on everything else on his website it's all kind of increasing this value proposition of being a prime member and and and what just how big are we talking these days of you do what what what percentage do know of all retail does amazon control and then maybe nikola if you know that also for walmart i mean those that we were those are the two dominant players i mean amazon brings in a hundred and thirty six billion dollars in revenue dinu one billion of that is retail so the rest is everything else aws prime on thirdparty cellars that kind of thing walmart is half a trillion dollars in revenue all round the world i'm you know all that is an almost all of that is and retail they're still the biggest retailer that exists but when you then you take a look at what's lately my favorite chart which nick knows which is the percentage of growth in ecommerce fifty percent of that growth is coming just on amazon alone so that's why despite those numbers amazon's market captors 420 lied billion and walmart is two hundred twenty three billion people think amazon have a as a better chance of getting into brick and mortar retail than walmart does have eight getting into ecommerce.

retail business web services amazon nikola walmart thirdparty cellars nick jeff thirty six billion dollars trillion dollars fifty percent