35 Burst results for "Web Apps"

The Future of Robotic Process Automation

Future of Tech

02:07 min | Last week

The Future of Robotic Process Automation

"So i'd like to welcome you now. Officially to new chapter of our new episodes of a future of tech. And i believe you know the first thing. We're going to speak about the aarp as or robotic process automation and probably some other stuff. Maybe we should start with you. Introducing the topic and the field. And what is it. All about your short manhattan. Thank you very much indeed for For inviting me shine a robotic process automation. So it's not robotic. It doesn't doesn't do a with prices at least not until fairly recently. So it's very poorly Described by his name names created by analyst. Phil fasht and blue prison. Who are the inventors of Biggers a bush from Fledgling leaves In the uk and result phenomenal job of creating essentially creating a category. A software catholic. What is all day all is It allows organizations and people to move information through between systems. So you can think of it. Like an excel macro but a an excel macro that can deal with any two pieces of software. So that could be everything fom mainframe green screen. Applications rut way to through to the latest Web apps and everything in between so Business persons management bpm e. l. p. and planning crm customer relationship management office documents emails. Pdf documents Pay pa able to read understand a deal with all those in exactly the same way that you or i do achievements.

Phil Fasht Aarp Biggers Manhattan Bush UK
TPA Open Source Software Security with Jennifer Fernick

Down the Security Rabbithole Podcast

08:34 min | 2 months ago

TPA Open Source Software Security with Jennifer Fernick

"Let's do a little background on you. Give us the thirty second overview of who you are and in what brings you here. Share name's stanford for nick. I'm the global head of research at nc secret which is a large cyber security consulting firm prior to this iran a security team at a large bank. I've been doing security for a very long time long before. I realized that it was an actual industry in profession and grew up through Do undergrad and my masters was in systems engineering. And then he's a phd student in cryptography. So my main focus area has historically been progress. But of course it's expanded to much more recently Currently i run a security team that has several hundred researchers at antique group. So you are in fact. One of those jokingly jobs and i always talk about in crypto. There's like five people the world qualified to talk about it. You probably one of those five hundred. If we're going to talk about post quantum crypto. Maybe i was really interested in. Public key crypto systems in how quantum computers could be used to break them. So that's specific staff of probably. Although less over time i guess as i've stepped into maybe a broader a broader role within. I need to get back on the show to talk about. Post quantum crypto kaz. Admittedly tell you. I have absolutely so little knowledge in that stays. It's not even funny all right so you we wanted to get this conversation. Getting kicked off around Around open source You've done some work in this in this area. Tell us a little bit about de get started their shirt so Of course at nc group we do like of security research and some of this is the more traditional vulnerability research so about a year and a half ago. Maybe there were a bunch of people that were getting very interested in figuring out. How do we better secure of open-source ecosystem because we know that there's been this sort of lacombe. Ole finding of random security bugs sometimes super inconsequential on super small projects. Sometimes absolutely massive about things like heart bleed so so like across time There's been there's been an uncovering in a very patchy way of vulnerabilities within open source software. So we were interested in really finding a way to coordinate impulse together and figure out what are some strategic steps forward in open source software security cool all right so look there. There has been so much raging debate And i use that word. Because it's almost like the windows versus lennox versus mac discussion. These days right turns into like a pseudo religious argument oval open source versus commercial software. Which one's better which one's more secure in insecurities Everyone goes and even if you had an app. Even for those of us have spurs one way or the other. You wait five minutes. And there's there's proof to the contrary so a you mentioned heart bleed right like then there's bash bog that forget the name of it but i mean if it had its own logo and i think we even made a theme song for crying out loud like it got it. It's gotten a little absurd. Yeah people are spending too much time marketing. Their bugs navy. But but you know we we open ourselves stuff was such a. I guess a revelation or wakeup call for a lot of us because there was this there was this belief that somehow open source. Stuff is you know. can infallible. Like all right. There's so many people looking at it and you know it's being reviewed in real time. It's the community. Always like their community has the opportunity to bug on either. We didn't or or there's something wrong with that argument. Yeah there's this tragedy of the comments thing that happens around open source software where we assume that just because someone can look at it. Someone has And we also assume that if someone's looking at it they are not an adversary and totally wanna do a responsible coordinated disclosure which is not often or not necessarily always the case so the i think hardly really opened our eyes to the impact that these bugs can have. I mean if you think about it. This was wet like spring. Twenty fourteen that this came out in public Showed us what the risk really looks like in practice you know. There was a single critical vulnerability found within an individual open source project that was maintained by only a few volunteers recall correctly. Like maybe one person was working on it. Fulltime and this was like the underlying infrastructure for like a non trivial portion of the entire internet yet and it compromises security of. I think it was like seventeen or somewhere. Unplug percent of all of the web servers on the internet. And it's like. I think this really shows us how like important. These software systems are and how many dependencies trace back to open source software. So when people are having this debate what is more secure open source or proprietary software. Obviously there's trade offs right. Proprietary can't necessarily have everyone look at the source but you're at least guaranteeing that someone probably is looking at the source an all of these other things but i mean it's it almost becomes a moot point to me because whether you make a case for proprietary software being more secure or open source software being more secure weather proprietary or open source. There's often dependencies upon core pieces of infrastructure that are open source so finding a way to secure these things matters and out of like what came with heart lead. The lennox foundation started like the core infrastructure initiative which put millions of dollars into helping secure open source software. So really open necessarily just kind of the next phase of of that work effort will be good excellent point because this is something that the scene repeatedly because a lot of the the foundations of nobody writes all their libraries right. I mean only the insane Scratch even when. I was the world's worst developer a million years ago. There would still be things you would include you do from other y- find something like okay. I need to know how to do. X y and z. Like i have no idea how to write. I'm gonna go find a l and include that. I can bring in pop that in want to use somebody else's optimized i don't have threat from scratch. Brilliant web apps are the greatest way to see this in action because there's just tons of frameworks plug ins and whatever and a lot of that stuff is open source maintained by the community and then we find out that there are a event julia every once in a while we find a massive bugs in in some of these things and then we gotta go hunting and got to realize that A lot of the commercial products out there have been source things inside them. That are vulnerable that it will like okay. So how do we fix this now. Yeah and like those transitive. Dependencies can often go many layers deep lake sometimes depending on something. That's depending on something. That's depending on open source library. Which itself is depending on some other open source component and often it can go many layers steve unlike just understanding those transitive dependencies where that risk comes into any product. Yet open source or commercial is very hard. It's something that Organizations don't necessarily do The organizations that rely upon these critical things don't always finds them or study them at the depth that you might expect that they would. So there's a definite need for folks that are interested in doing security research in working with open source maintainers to really come together and pull in the same direction. Otherwise we just have this infinite like finding of random bugs but if you think about. I don't know the statistics that ucla seve owner vulnerability databases. There's tens of thousands of vulnerabilities disclosed every year. That gets vs. There's way more than that that are being disclosed. That maybe don't tv's there's even more than that that are being found in not patched and there's probably even more than that being created input into existence so when we think about just the massive stale at which there exist 'vulnerability in sourcing beyond Clearly something needs to change in in the ways that we develop software in the ways that we secure software throat like this. Dlc in in what happens when we integrate these at risk components. So

Nc Group Nick Iran Lennox Foundation Navy Julia Steve Ucla
"web apps" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

Talk Python To Me

04:57 min | 2 months ago

"web apps" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

"Right because deployment of web application often means deployment of web application plus database server plus backups of database server. Plus all all the sudden it goes from twenty percent to ninety percent heart or whatever right or you go to hosted re like okay. Why still got a backup that thing potentially in you know there's just you've got potential migrations. I don't know there's a lot of stuff going on and if you can say well until you actually get much traffic you can just say. Here's the db file in the light connection on the one machine that i have and you backup that file every now and that might be a good story if the alternative is it's too much for me to get my app out in definitely especially if it's a blog or a content site like a shell catalogue words all read only and maybe using admin to manage the content on it. If it's only one person using yemen you're not gonna have concurrent rights which is the thing about sequel light and so it's never going to be an issue an east false. It's a read read only workloads. It's fast it's fast enough. It's yeah it's very fast. Yeah you can use. There's no server for people who don't understand are not totally wear like it comes with python in it runs in process. There's no other server to set in connect to so carl did not at one point. Because i was saying. Oh you know sequel light. And he was so. I have to give credit to carlton for there are some endlessly. He's the secret about sequel light. It's got a writer headlock by a well moat. Which means the actually. You've got a good chance of being able to do kind of concurrent rights to django zoar emma's got retry value. Which if you set that you know in a little bit higher if it gets database locked it will try again in the second and then you know you can go quite long way enabling these things and then when you finally in actually get a database was locked terror then you can think you know what i think. It's time we moved to post. Yeah in my world. I'm running magi. B-best the database and it. It doesn't make sense to consider running on sequel light. But i can remember back when i first started deployment. Okay well i gotta learn lennox. I gotta learn in. I go micro whiskey like what other deployment like. How do i have to learn running my database on these things. There's just there was a lot. And i can definitely see if you could say. Here's an intermediate step to get it out and get it going and then just change the connection string at some point over to a separate server. I think that's a really good path. It's a little bit like you know. Roths- equal versus django models is the timing because i've had a thread emailing with a reader who doesn't quite was has something in mind and he's like i model is the scheme all out in sequel and sequel is easy to learn the basics and really hard at scale while jane legal. You really really really should resist doing that. Unless you're way better programmer than i am whereas before you would have to learn tons of same thing with deployment you can get a lot of way there by trusting someone who says them until you need it bother the same thing with database stuff like okay do some basics equal Understand a little bit of relations. But that's the power of the django orem is that it will handle so much of this for you and if you think you need custom unless you know if you have any doubts you shouldn't do it in the migration side that's a huge part of a challenge if you maintain it yourself. Yeah i mean. I was andrew. Andrew was responsible for the in most of a lot of acing stuff. Now nice i. We're getting short on time. But i do want to just really quickly cover one more thing servers up and running feels like it works. I watched it all day. It was fine. I wanna walk away from my desk. I want to know that it's probably still fine and to me like carlton. you already talked her out. One thing there's some really great monitoring services that you integrate at the api level like plug in a library to your code century. Being one of them they're really great. They sponsored the show while the thanks for that as well. But i i used century on your. They're great and i. I've got century running on my apps and every now and then i'll get an email and a lot at this point where i first integrated that type of service. I got a lot of. Oh i didn't know that was happening. Oh crap i'm gonna have to fix that of logging and stuff right. Yeah yeah absolutely. And once i kind of now. It's more like well. Somebody tried to send like some binary hacky thing that broke the euro parsing. But it's not really a problem. It's just right but having that thing there is is really important. I think yes absolutely absolutely century or just say reason not to use it. Even the free plan young have not at the free tier. Once you run out. You can decide whether or not you want to pay for it but you at least can get us some kind of insight into the errors that are happening. The other thing i found over his prometheus takes teeny bit of setting up again. You can get yourself a rows behind you can play with that locally and it's not you could put it on your mac or you put on your windows machine. It will run but get rows be. Pi aren't the device permits.'. Good fund is a dashboard. That goes with it fauna and then they do a log thing laki which you know you have to configure it yourself but it teaches you about your application. You have to say okay..

Andrew twenty percent mac python windows carlton ninety percent andrew carl first one machine one person second one one point one more django One thing prometheus euro parsing
"web apps" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

Talk Python To Me

03:12 min | 2 months ago

"web apps" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

"We're gonna talk about specifically Deployments on gangland we can go on and on about obviously all the intricacies of django. But i think suffice to say. I'm an educator on the on the board. In carlton's a fellow he's he makes the releases happen including three two alpha. Which just dropped today. And i guess you mentioned. Lts that's confusing to non django people so since having ellos carlton chango has a pretty rapid release cycle where it's every nine months or so so. There is three zero three one. Three two. This december i think carlton is four zero ev. One of those is a long term service release so that will last two and a half years so that is a three years. Yeah it's it's on. There's a link on the project site so that's a way that so django doesn't really have. It's rare to have breaking changes these days but the lts designed to help people who can't keep up with that cycle. Stay up to date that. We have a lot of podcasts and opinions about why should always stay up to date and it's worth it because that's one of the most things you because as carlton mentioned there's bug fixes constantly so it'll be three one three one two. They'll be three to go three to a month later or so. I'm a big advocate of you. Know if you possibly can get ladies major release so you hang out. Historically the longtime released was really the lts release was really important because there were breaking changes right in each major version of jangle. There were new things and it was difficult to. But that's not the case anymore. It's really easy to update so. I'm a big advocate of that. Now and then when i talked to fellow people in the django community. They're like well. You know. I work in the real world. And you can't keep up the ladies major budget so for those folks than you know. The lts is a really good option. Because it's once every three years you know it's coming you get six month window of overlap of supports. The old lts gets six months of security release after the release of the new lts. That's your window to update. Well i think that running and maintaining software built upon frameworks like django. It falls into two categories for me if falls into. Here's something that we have a team or at least somebody dedicated to owning this project and we care about its ongoing life and then we have the ones that are the oath. Please don't touch it and the oh please don't touch it is we've long since stopped developing that maybe the person who developed it left. But it's still important and we don't want to break it. It's working right now but if you touch it new break it you've now adopted it. You know what i mean like. It's that thing that just like if you break the build. Yes but but worse. 'cause it's legacy build so to me i feel like that. Please don't touch it. Side the lts make perfect sense for them. Yeah in tiny entirely the way. I like to think of it is. Is this a thing that you feasibly going to add new features to and if you feasibly going to add new features to then you should be on the latest matrix version. Because it's only once every eight months you need to allocate a day or two to keep up to fix download the new version. Run the test suite. See the deprecation warnings. Fix deprecation mornings. You know maybe you have to wait a couple of weeks for dependency to update and and then you can push board. And that's once every eight month that process and if you're adding new features if it's a live project ideally be there. Yeah there's something which you just need to keep running for the long run. You could do that much less frequently.

carlton thursday three years three years ago Twitter jason today three books first time first one first three janu twitter Django Three point git hub seven jiang One django
Deploying and running Django web apps in 2021

Talk Python To Me

03:12 min | 2 months ago

Deploying and running Django web apps in 2021

"We're gonna talk about specifically Deployments on gangland we can go on and on about obviously all the intricacies of django. But i think suffice to say. I'm an educator on the on the board. In carlton's a fellow he's he makes the releases happen including three two alpha. Which just dropped today. And i guess you mentioned. Lts that's confusing to non django people so since having ellos carlton chango has a pretty rapid release cycle where it's every nine months or so so. There is three zero three one. Three two. This december i think carlton is four zero ev. One of those is a long term service release so that will last two and a half years so that is a three years. Yeah it's it's on. There's a link on the project site so that's a way that so django doesn't really have. It's rare to have breaking changes these days but the lts designed to help people who can't keep up with that cycle. Stay up to date that. We have a lot of podcasts and opinions about why should always stay up to date and it's worth it because that's one of the most things you because as carlton mentioned there's bug fixes constantly so it'll be three one three one two. They'll be three to go three to a month later or so. I'm a big advocate of you. Know if you possibly can get ladies major release so you hang out. Historically the longtime released was really the lts release was really important because there were breaking changes right in each major version of jangle. There were new things and it was difficult to. But that's not the case anymore. It's really easy to update so. I'm a big advocate of that. Now and then when i talked to fellow people in the django community. They're like well. You know. I work in the real world. And you can't keep up the ladies major budget so for those folks than you know. The lts is a really good option. Because it's once every three years you know it's coming you get six month window of overlap of supports. The old lts gets six months of security release after the release of the new lts. That's your window to update. Well i think that running and maintaining software built upon frameworks like django. It falls into two categories for me if falls into. Here's something that we have a team or at least somebody dedicated to owning this project and we care about its ongoing life and then we have the ones that are the oath. Please don't touch it and the oh please don't touch it is we've long since stopped developing that maybe the person who developed it left. But it's still important and we don't want to break it. It's working right now but if you touch it new break it you've now adopted it. You know what i mean like. It's that thing that just like if you break the build. Yes but but worse. 'cause it's legacy build so to me i feel like that. Please don't touch it. Side the lts make perfect sense for them. Yeah in tiny entirely the way. I like to think of it is. Is this a thing that you feasibly going to add new features to and if you feasibly going to add new features to then you should be on the latest matrix version. Because it's only once every eight months you need to allocate a day or two to keep up to fix download the new version. Run the test suite. See the deprecation warnings. Fix deprecation mornings. You know maybe you have to wait a couple of weeks for dependency to update and and then you can push board. And that's once every eight month that process and if you're adding new features if it's a live project ideally be there. Yeah there's something which you just need to keep running for the long run. You could do that much less frequently.

Carlton Carlton Chango Django
Microsoft plans to replace Outlook for Mac with web-based version

Daily Tech News Show

00:50 sec | 3 months ago

Microsoft plans to replace Outlook for Mac with web-based version

"Well. According to a leaked test build obtained by windows. Central microsoft is building a new outlook app to replace the bilton mail and calendar apps on windows ten as well as the mac. Os client and out. Leib outlook web access versions code-named product monarch project monarch rather and one outlook. The app is designed for large screen experiences so the aim is to offer the same. Ui and design on all platforms though. It's supposedly similar to the current outlook web app window central clan that will be a universal web app with a smaller footprint and accessible to all outlook users whether or not there for your business users and it will integrate with the os for notifications and also offline storage. The new version of might launch in preview by the end of this year and then released on mac and windows in twenty twenty two so not right around the corner but interesting nonetheless.

Microsoft MAC
"web apps" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

04:40 min | 4 months ago

"web apps" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"App reengaged by the os that gives you things like push notifications installed you should be able to have an icon on your home or launch screen. No need for an app store and lincoln meaning progressive. Web apps should be zero friction and easy to share now. There's no standard for pwa's but google has championed them. Google's developers page distills. Pwa's down into three points. One reliable it loads instantly doesn't show you four or as they call it the down a sor to it's fast responding to user interactions the way a native app would as google says no janke scrolling and three. It's engaging feel like a natural app with an immersive user experience in other words. Not just a tab now. Those three points. Don't address cross browser compatibility but microsoft mentioned that in its page on. Pwa's on md n. Microsoft describes pwa's as using modern web. Api is along with traditional progressive enhancement strategy to create cross platform web applications. These apps work everywhere and provides several features that give them the same user experience advantages as native apps. All right so we know what they should be able to do to get there. You need companies to support them. Google has supported twa since russell their employees proposed it in two thousand fifteen windows added support for pwa's in february twenty eighteen and in march of that same year ios added it to safari eleven point. Three at last count firefox chrome safari and edge browsers all support it as many other browsers. Okay so we have a definition of what progressive web apps are and who supports them. High come work. Pwa's need a few things. A typical website doesn't have to include one is a manifest. This is essentially a jason file. That defines things about the look of the app like the name the icon for the home screen background colors and whether to show the browser you i or takeover full screen. Pwa's also generally includes some kind of offline functionality which can be achieved by saving the javascript in the css for faster. Load time on up to saving almost everything. The app does pwa's also needs something called service workers. Now these are little waiters that run around the not. Actually there different kinds of service worker. But it's not far off service. Workers create a layer between the app and the network cash new content and.

google janke Pwa Microsoft app store lincoln twa md
Scale Your Data Science Teams With Machine Learning Operations Principles

The Python Podcast.__init__

05:22 min | 5 months ago

Scale Your Data Science Teams With Machine Learning Operations Principles

"With the concept of machine learning and being able to use things like deep learning but there's also the term operational mel that has been floating around lately. And that's one of the things that you're focusing on with your company at tectonic and with your prior work on michelangelo at uber wondering if you can just start by describing what is encompassed by that term when somebody says operational emel having operational we think of it as you know. Machine learning built into production or customer facing application and refers to not just the machine learning algorithm but really the about treating the l. system is a complete operational data application and so a common distinction that can be helpful as this notion of analytic machine learning where a lot of use cases where mo exist in. The enterprise today is really for kind of internal consumption so you might have your analytical data sets in your warehouse and building machinery models that are used to power internal analyses deliver insights or even like internal off forecasts or something like that and really focused on powering kind of human decision making human actions. And that's really like analytical machine learning that we think of as quite different from operational machine learning that is really driving production automated decisions in action in your product. You know an example of this like fraud detection system real time pricing algorithm personalization system. You know product recommendations add bidding stuff like that and these operational machine. Learning systems tend to be battle-tested and fully production is the power use case that need decisions now not in a report next week kind of thing and tend to be really high stakes and affect the bottom line so there's syria software engineering projects that need a different level of care and production ization than like a standard mel project. You might work on kind of in the lab bird to do some one off analysis within a company. There's a fairly robust set of tooling available for traditional application delivery for somebody who wants to put a web app into production or be able to automate deployment of cloud resources. I'm wondering what the complications are. And the additional difficulties are for people who want to be able to bring these intensive applications and real time machine learning workloads into production and some of the complexities and challenges that exist on that path. There's a lot of differences but ultimately we should be using those tools right and the tricky thing is that people just aren't because these applications are not just code our writing. But they're artifacts from some data that we have so that's what model right it's artifact from running some code. On on some data but also live data pipelines the power these models and they need to be monitored in a different way when the production and so the kind of artifacts that were deploying to production are slightly different than standard software engineering projects. But secondly there's a a totally different like set of people who are involved. In different skill sets involved in building and deploying these projects we have sometimes analysts but very frequently data scientists who come from a very broad range of skill sets. Who are coming up with these models coming up at the features that power these models and the production ization process for these models but also the feature pipelines are. These models are like different the feature pipelines aspect of something that is worth calling out and i had another conversation with somebody on my other podcasts talking about some the concepts of feature engineering and feature stores and wondering if you could discuss a bit more about the level of importance of that capability for operationalizing machine learning and some of the ways that the definition of features impact the capability of the model particularly once it gets to production but for the teams who are trying to iterative on an experiment on building a model that is going to be useful for their particular goals to kind of recap features what are features. They are the signals in power. Your machine learning that are inputs to your machine learning models right so if i'm making Five a recommend our system you know an important feature might be has. This user purchased an item from this vertical before or something like that and so these signals are really like the critical pieces of input that power our machine learning models but also affect these machinery models. Performance and so feature engineering is the process of coming up with these signals. And then there's this element of putting these signals into production which is a completely separate challenge and so the concept of a feature store has risen and it kind of came from stuff that we developed at when we built the michelangelo platform. We came up with the notion of a feature store which is really kind of like a central hub for the definitions transformations and the data. That power these feature pipelines and all of the infrastructure to serve as features in production so that has become

Michelangelo MEL Syria
Vaughan Shanks Pitches the Cydarm Soc Incident Management Platform

Risky Business

05:03 min | 6 months ago

Vaughan Shanks Pitches the Cydarm Soc Incident Management Platform

"So it is a case management platform it's a web APP. It's typically deployed into a security operation center and it just helps you keep track of all of the activities that people working on. So this is like highs management software essentially for specifically for talk is that right? Exactly, it's case management for security operations. Okay. What sort of things do you use the software to do like about doing real deep deep dives on incidents because a lot of the time when we think of like response software, we think forensic. So whatever this isn't really that isn't no this is. An ailing people to collaborate better and a K pot of that. We noticed that often the way the white people do security operations using generic ticketing systems, and there are pine to us. They require extensive customization to do anything close to. What we would be regarded as best practice and You know the the data entry is often a complaint pine I'm so we've aimed to make an experience that's really easy to use and is already set up to security operations. I can sorry this is really designed to replace like Jira in the sock. Yes. We we do often generic atheist platforms and yet this is a big step up from that. Okay. In what sense right? So if I upgrade from a generic ticketing platform and I get myself side on what is getting me that those platforms I'm can't give me so. We have a built in workflow that is based off the computer security incident handling God from this. In fact, we steal all of our best moves from the computer security instant handling God. It's the best advice. We could find a way not to tell people how to do their job we just by us, but best practice as out as out benchmark Yep. So you steal the workflows and create some yeah krantz. Can Software? I haven't spoken to anyone about this but I think you know imitation is the sincerest form of flattery and I think would probably be glad to know that someone out there is hitting their advice. Yeah. Well, I mean I think they put out this advice so that people like you will do things like this. Can you give us an example of like A typical sort of incident that's commonly handled through this platform and what the collaboration component looks like. Right? Because I'm thinking what sort of collaboration do you really need outside the Salk? Why? Why do you need a you know an actual platform to handle that So what we've is that many of our customers not only have internal tailfin if it's small internal team, I'm thinking they might have managed service provider that that gives them out of our support and depending on the nitrogen incident if something escalates and and there's people involved and there's conjecture about insider threats or other sensitive data coming out of the system, you don't necessarily want all of that data to be available to everyone who's who's collaborating, but you still need to have a tight look you need to be able to collaborate without much hassle so. We've we've used I access control to enable collaboration. Okay. So this is this allows for the discussion of sensitive incidence because quite often. In the case of a major incident, people will spin up their own slack. That's sort of the way that the. Slack specific to that incident but this is more for the work. Day. Incidence. The incidents of all shapes and sizes and can I say I very careful using slack for incident response it does still local copies of your information on every device that is logging into that channel. So that is why to make sure your sensitive response dieters scattered around many many. It's a good way to make sure your sensitive daughter is in as many places as humanly. Possible. Exactly, and certainly, those baynes among some instances of wears slack has slack as a useful vector for an attacker if you WANNA move laterally. Maybe. Having a rummage through someone's slack files is probably a good way to start getting ideas about. Passwords or other things you could connect to yeah. Yeah. Yes I think slack for incident response is you know it's a default it's a default option people use because it's it's easy and it's got a nice user experience. So the question we ask you what if you could take over the rig of a case management platform which sounds very serious. But make it as easy to use as something like slack. Do you actually have a chat function in the in the platform? Not really a chat function. It looks a little more like like using a conversation in twitter old Lincoln it's more like a threat in that sense. Yeah. That makes a Lotta sense right? So it's Malaysia DMZ but everything would be cataloged logged and it's it's it's sort of like sounds a little bit more serious than slack but a little less serious than. Help me out. Then what? Out To. Throw too many vandals under the bus. But there there is some some shockers out there just just stuff like. Why are you recording notes in notepad? All will case management system is is kind of awful. I only use it once a day from force to.

Lincoln Salk Twitter Baynes Malaysia
8th-Generation iPad: First Impressions

The 3:59

06:13 min | 7 months ago

8th-Generation iPad: First Impressions

"The eighth generation IPAD may not be the sexiest new tablet on the block with the starring price of three, hundred, twenty, nine dollars. It might be the one you're most likely to buy. So Is it worth? I'm Roger Chang and this is your daily charge with me is our IPAD expert Scott Stein welcome Scott. So Scott we had you on right after that September apple than to show your impressions of all the announcements and the eighth Jan. ipad was not the most exciting product mentioned. You know we spent a little time talking about it but. You spent a few weeks with it. Has, your. Opinion Changed, are you what are you feeling about it now I think it's fine. I think it is not surprising IPAD. This is an IPAD that reminds me of last year's ipads because it practically is last year's ipads the the IPAD air twenty nineteen and the IPAD mini in two thousand nineteen had the same chip the IPAD air in this at the same Ram. It's basically that for less. There are some trade offs here that are tiny, but the IPAD air was more expensive. Now, that's now that's an all on the apple store. The IPAD mini is, but it's a tiny bump up in price. So you know three, hundred, twenty, nine dollars. This gets in at a much more affordable proposition, the the IPAD air that's coming. which is who knows when it probably in a couple of weeks is more expensive at starts at six hundred dollars. So it looks nicer. It looks like a less expensive pro. But I think when you're talking about almost doubling the price that. That really gets into a different territory for people. Yeah. Definitely. Anthony Twenty nine starting at three, twenty nine. It's obviously the most affordable option for someone looking for an IPAD. Ultimately for you who should be looking at this IPAD is primary option I. think if you just think of an I had something to have lying around check my email to look at shows to have one for your kid. This is that one if you don't care about step up bells and whistles, you don't want like a fancier toy. Not to call ipads toys I think they're very useful but I think that there is a point at which if you try to push an IPAD to become your everyday computer, you're going to have what you call pain points. You know you're going to have these difficulties that increase as you try to throw it out more. And I go to my laptop all the time because I need to. So that's the thing about the pro. He's got a lot of upsides that could be interesting, but you really have to map out whether that makes sense for you and if you WANNA think of it as like a fun thing for you but IPAD is totally perfect doing all that other stuff that being said. You know you got to bump up from the thirty two gigs of storage I think. That is too low an amount. For for what you'd be paying for this if you want it to last. Year's, and then you're talking about four twenty, nine Ri-, which slightly changes the equation a bit. He does you talked about our kids using this and a lot of kids obviously doing remote learning right now I've got a friend of mine who know he told me when he offered his kid a Mac, a choice between a Mac and ipad actually chose the IPAD. But isn't that really geared for remote learning for Education I think the older you get it's it's very nonsuited for it. You know we have a seven year old and eleven year old seven year old uses an ipad that we have around that. We use for remote learning it suitable. I think it's great. For eleven year old uses a chromebook and I think that's what you absolutely need for the types of. Work assignments you're doing your editing stuff, etc. Now ipads work with track pads, and so there's like on the entry level ipad they don't. It doesn't have this gets to accessories. Apple has beautiful but very expensive magic keyboard. That's like three hundred dollars. There are different accessories for this entry ipad. There's a Logitech Combo touch, which is still expensive one, hundred, fifty, dollar track pad keyboard I've been using with it. It's kind of like a surface with a kick stand. Type layout, but it's good for turning into a kind of a laptop but the point is that you can edit use a track pad. You'd be surprised at it can do more than you think, but some web apps some tools a google drive works well with it now but like some things don't. And you just don't know whether you get to that point where a problem especially with file storage file maintenance and chromebooks are weird too. But they're much more like web tool type based. Think the IPAD gets a little bit hotter with that. It, and then the I mean the big difference here as you said, it's identical lashes model. The big difference is the H. Wealth processor. How people differences that make you know I'm so used to seeing like. Standard. New I IPAD iphones. It doesn't feel particularly special, but I think it's necessary to get up to speed with. We're is going and we're going the processor was a couple of years old. It was feeling a little sluggish. They twelve is not like super zippy in comparison it's it's basically fine. It gets to the like very good fine point. So you know I could use an IPAD totally, but I think it's getting to the point where you might not be able to use it. So on the future and it gets to the point, I don't think you need to upgrade to this win -sarily. If you have an IPAD lying around, that's working fine you can probably keep using it. This is like you know between this last year's IPAD entry of like last year they did the. Works at Pencil works with the smart keyboard made the screen a bit bigger. It adds up to like one set of upgrades. But this thing still uses lightning. It still has a home button, the Basil's or kind of big. So for Split Screen APPs, it's not ideal. That's a the cameras a little less good than last year's IPAD air but that's not the problem. It's on the side ipad cameras on the side that kind of sucks because. You. Know if you're doing zooms and things like that your faces off center and I have not really sell for that and they should but I don't know how long it's GonNa take for an ipad to have a side. Mounted. Camera. To address this. So just F Y that's another thing now that we're doing everything over zooms in remote,

Apple Anthony Twenty Roger Chang Scott Stein Logitech RI Google
8th-generation iPad review

The 3:59

05:07 min | 7 months ago

8th-generation iPad review

"With me is our IPAD expert Scott Stein welcome Scott. So Scott we had you on right after that September apple than to show your impressions of all the announcements and the eighth Jan. ipad was not the most exciting product mentioned. You know we spent a little time talking about it but. You spent a few weeks with it. Has, your. Opinion Changed, are you what are you feeling about it now I think it's fine. I think it is not surprising IPAD. This is an IPAD that reminds me of last year's ipads because it practically is last year's ipads the the IPAD air twenty nineteen and the IPAD mini in two thousand nineteen had the same chip the IPAD air in this at the same Ram. It's basically that for less. There are some trade offs here that are tiny, but the IPAD air was more expensive. Now, that's now that's an all on the apple store. The IPAD mini is, but it's a tiny bump up in price. So you know three, hundred, twenty, nine dollars. This gets in at a much more affordable proposition, the the IPAD air that's coming. which is who knows when it probably in a couple of weeks is more expensive at starts at six hundred dollars. So it looks nicer. It looks like a less expensive pro. But I think when you're talking about almost doubling the price that. That really gets into a different territory for people. Yeah. Definitely. Anthony Twenty nine starting at three, twenty nine. It's obviously the most affordable option for someone looking for an IPAD. Ultimately for you who should be looking at this IPAD is primary option I. think if you just think of an I had something to have lying around check my email to look at shows to have one for your kid. This is that one if you don't care about step up bells and whistles, you don't want like a fancier toy. Not to call ipads toys I think they're very useful but I think that there is a point at which if you try to push an IPAD to become your everyday computer, you're going to have what you call pain points. You know you're going to have these difficulties that increase as you try to throw it out more. And I go to my laptop all the time because I need to. So that's the thing about the pro. He's got a lot of upsides that could be interesting, but you really have to map out whether that makes sense for you and if you WANNA think of it as like a fun thing for you but IPAD is totally perfect doing all that other stuff that being said. You know you got to bump up from the thirty two gigs of storage I think. That is too low an amount. For for what you'd be paying for this if you want it to last. Year's, and then you're talking about four twenty, nine Ri-, which slightly changes the equation a bit. He does you talked about our kids using this and a lot of kids obviously doing remote learning right now I've got a friend of mine who know he told me when he offered his kid a Mac, a choice between a Mac and ipad actually chose the IPAD. But isn't that really geared for remote learning for Education I think the older you get it's it's very nonsuited for it. You know we have a seven year old and eleven year old seven year old uses an ipad that we have around that. We use for remote learning it suitable. I think it's great. For eleven year old uses a chromebook and I think that's what you absolutely need for the types of. Work assignments you're doing your editing stuff, etc. Now ipads work with track pads, and so there's like on the entry level ipad they don't. It doesn't have this gets to accessories. Apple has beautiful but very expensive magic keyboard. That's like three hundred dollars. There are different accessories for this entry ipad. There's a Logitech Combo touch, which is still expensive one, hundred, fifty, dollar track pad keyboard I've been using with it. It's kind of like a surface with a kick stand. Type layout, but it's good for turning into a kind of a laptop but the point is that you can edit use a track pad. You'd be surprised at it can do more than you think, but some web apps some tools a google drive works well with it now but like some And you just don't know whether you get to that point where a problem especially with file storage file maintenance and chromebooks are weird too. But they're much more like web tool type based. Think the IPAD gets a little bit hotter with that. It, and then the I mean the big difference here as you said, it's identical lashes model. The big difference is the H. Wealth processor. How people differences that make you know I'm so used to seeing like. Standard. New I IPAD iphones. It doesn't feel particularly special, but I think it's necessary to get up to speed with. We're is going and we're going the processor was a couple of years old. It was feeling a little sluggish. They twelve is not like super zippy in comparison it's it's basically fine. It gets to the like very good fine point. So you know I could use an IPAD totally, but I think it's getting to the point where you might not be able to use it. So on the future and it gets to the point, I don't think you need to upgrade to this win -sarily. If you have an IPAD lying around, that's working fine you can probably keep using it.

Apple Scott Stein Anthony Twenty Logitech RI Google
A Look at AppGyver

No Code No Problem

01:28 min | 7 months ago

A Look at AppGyver

"I, want to talk about ap Gai ever hit on posted a screen shot on twitter earlier at guy ever in the image said, and I quote for all indie developers. Organizations. anyone else really with less than ten million dollars in revenue slash funding composer pro, which is builder is free for life. sars-like. Okay. That's pretty sweet. So, naturally, I had to jump in and see what they had to offer. They have a nice on boarding on the have a nice on boarding process in once I was very pleased actually. So the builder was nicely built with an array of forms lists, etc, and you can use at Gabar to make web APPS and mobile APPs with password fields, authentification search bars, and more. Something that I really liked about composer pro was how the responsiveness with simple and how you could choose between devices whether that be an Iphone X. are or an ipad mini or a web APP on to ensure that your application is always looking its best So yeah. So I, I really really really enjoyed it. It's Gives me a gives me a bubble VIBE, right but not so daunting as to bubble right so I think that it's definitely worth a shot if you're looking to build a web, APP. Or out and you WANNA try different builder have googlers composer pro is definitely a good choice.

Twitter Gabar
Amazon Luna cloud gaming service launches with support for iOS

Daily Tech News Show

02:25 min | 7 months ago

Amazon Luna cloud gaming service launches with support for iOS

"At the top of show that Amazon got around with Apple App Store with apples help. Let us explain we mentioned yesterday that Amazon launched a game streaming system called Luna and we have a few more details about how that works on. IOS as we told you yesterday. It comes through the browser Luna will be a progressive web app or pwa we've told you about those before it means you can install an icon off Luna on your home screen on iOS run it separately from the rest of your browser. You're not going to see your other tabs or anything. It'll act like its own app, and technically it could even work offline. But since I bought it online game streaming service, that's not really a feature that applies here. It can act pretty much like an app, but without being subject to Apple's App Store rules because it's really just a very robust website that you're saying. Going to your home screen in Apple's recent streaming game guidelines. Apple actually wrote quote. Of course, there is always the open internet and web browser apps to reach all users outside of the App Store. They pointed at that and they said you could just do that if you wanted to an Amazon said, okay, I guess we want to Luna head of engineering and Technology George sip elitists who works for Amazon package said that Amazon worked with Apple's Safari team to make sure quote some of the things that weren't there are there and that allowed us to do kind of get where we are today. So they not only cooperated with Apple Apple Safari team apparently like added some functionality for them with their Progressive web apps you'd think Apple was like try to force them into the App Store know they didn't Amazon also says they're working with apple on a game app and we'll ship one when quote we can come up with a good experience. So Amazon saying like those new guidelines about the native apps didn't really work with us yet, but we're still working we're talking dog. Apple we're not suing them like epic has The Verge is Sean Hollister. Also wonders when Google and video Microsoft might follow suit Google runs stadia in Chrome already Nvidia GeForce need webrtc version for the Chromebook and a Sean points out. Yes. There are issues to web apps like controller support questions lack of all the optimizations you can do on a native app. And of course cos if you're running a progressive web app, it has to run on webkit. You don't get a choice of browser, but Amazon was able to make it work by working with Apple.

Apple Amazon Luna Sean Hollister Google Head Of Engineering Nvidia Microsoft
Amazon announces new cloud gaming service called Luna

Kinda Funny Games Daily

02:50 min | 7 months ago

Amazon announces new cloud gaming service called Luna

"We have breaking news. Amazon has announced a cloud gaming service called Luna. I originally put Jeff Grubb's breaking tweets in here, but I have an article from the Verge but for Jeff Grubb Amazon just announced Luna on its device event stream like video like prime video it'll have gaming channels you can subscribe to the channel to get its new games as they launched day and date. It's controller works like state controller connects to Wifi to go direct to the server. I'm not clicking over to the Verge Amazon announced his new cloud gaming service called Luna. This is Andrew Webster. As Twenty Twenty abstract looks at twenty twenty hardware event today Amazon announced a cloud gaming platform called Luna. The news isn't too surprising. The service has been rumored since last year previously code a tempo while on Amazon made go game controller leaked out just ahead of today's event. It's not clear when Luna will launch widely, but it will initially be available PC, MAC fire, TV iphone and IPAD via web. APPS and an android version planned after launch. Amazon said that interested users in the US can request early access to the service starting today there's no word on international availability. The service will be available at an introductory price of five ninety nine a month during its early access phase, which gives subscribers the ability to play games cross two devices simultaneously in four. K. Sixty frames per second revolution for select titles. Naturally, powered by AWS Amazon's. Ubiquitous. Web Platform. Amazon. Says that more than one hundred games will be available at long and I'm sorry an launch titles like or include resonable seven control Panzer Dragoon a plague a plague sailing since the surge to Ukulele Grid. ABC Zoo in brothers a tale of two sons. Amazon says Moore tablets will be added over time. The company has also partnered with Ubisoft for a specific gaming channel. Here's how Amazon describes. Players who subscribed to this channel will access to their favorite ubisoft titles in up to four K. Revolution resolution, mobile gameplay, and access to new titles when the channel launches like assassins creed, Valhalla, far-cry six and immortals. Phoenix rising the same day they release. This is the first. This is the first of multiple Luna game channels development where customers can play games from their favorite publishers John Lewis. Luna will feature twitch integration quote inside Looney experienced players will see twitch streams for games in the service and from twitch, they'll be able to instantly start playing Luna Games. Amazon says Games can be played either with a mouse and keyboard or a Bluetooth Controller. Go along with I'm sorry. Throw period to go along with this. Amazon has announced its own Alexa enabled Luna Controller, which will cost forty, nine, ninety, nine during the early access period. Here's how it works. Luna Controller is Alexa enabled in connects directly to the cloud to effortlessly troll your game featuring a multiple antenna design that prioritizes uninterrupted Wi fi for lower latency gaming.

Amazon Luna Jeff Grubb Ubisoft Twenty Twenty Alexa Andrew Webster Panzer Dragoon United States Phoenix Abc Zoo WI John Lewis Moore Looney
Microsoft's 0-Day Folly

Security Now

06:10 min | 8 months ago

Microsoft's 0-Day Folly

"But. At some level if you can get a lot of them, that's aggregated value. It's it's not good. Speaking of not good. Last week's patch Tuesday. When when zd net subs up We've patch Tuesday saying Microsoft says attackers have used a windows zero day to spoof file signatures and another Roku Remote Code execution in the Internet explorer scripting engine to execute code on. USERS devices. We need to take a closer look and actually those two things are the subject of the podcast that we will get to because. It's just hard to believe what a closer look reveals. But we have a hundred and twenty new flaws. In Microsoft's software fixed last week making it the third largest patch bundle of all time topped only by each of the previous two months with good and July, weighing in with one hundred, twenty, nine and one, hundred, twenty, three fixes respectively. This month's bundle carried a bit more urgency than usual. Since one of those seventeen flaws which were classified critical was zero day underactive attack at the time of the updates and one of the remaining more than one hundred flaws rated as merely important was also a zero day being exploited in the wild and publicly disclosed. So not even secret. The first of the two is titled It's e Two, thousand twenty, thirteen, eighty scripting engine memory corruption vulnerability being scripting engine problem. We should not be surprised to learn that the source of the trouble is e eleven. It was reported by a researcher at Kaspersky lab, and since it could be invoked by a militias office document, the belief is that it was probably spotted being used in fishing campaign. Microsoft. Had this to say about it. They said in a web-based attacks scenario, an attacker could host a specially crafted website that is designed to exploit the vulnerability through I e and then. Convince a user to view the website. An attacker could also embed an activex control marked safe initialisation in an application or Microsoft Office document that hosts the I e. rendering engine. The attacker could also take advantage of compromised websites and websites that accept or host user provided content or advertisements. These websites could contain specially crafted content that could exploit owner ability in other words. Anything, that puts content. On a website that is able to evoke I e which we know they can. Can. Can do this. So keep this in mind when we get to the other end of this podcast because. It's unbelievable what the history of this is. So that remains a threat to anybody who hasn't yet applied last Tuesday's updates to their installation of windows ten. So obviously, it would be good to do that the second zero day despite being actively exploited in the wild and publicly known is only rated as important, which seems odd since it is CV twenty, twenty, fourteen, sixty, four and labeled someone innocuously as a windows spoofing vulnerability. Okay I suppose the scale of the problem should relate to what's being spoofed bugs description will catch your attention because it allows attackers to spook the identities of other companies when signing digitally signing an executable. Now, that's the way the press covered. We will get to the details a bit later and Microsoft's words. They said these spoofed signatures could allow an attacker to bypass security features. Intended to prevent improperly signed files from being loaded. Now, all of this is a bit of misdirection because the signatures are actually not being spoofed as we'll. We'll exp explain that later. So this too is not good but. Will cover the details at the end beyond those two day those two zero days. Five of the other critical bug fixes are for Microsoft's Windows Media Foundation, the multimedia framework and infrastructure, which has been used to render digital content ever since windows seven and since windows server two, thousand eight. In these cases successful exploitation would allow an attacker to install militias south ware manipulate data, or create new accounts. And among the rest because again, we had one hundred and twenty to choose from There's also twenty, two, thousand, ten, forty, six, another nasty one in the dot net framework affecting versions two point zero through four point eight. It's a remote code execution flaw. In the way dot net handles imports. An attacker could exploit this vulnerability to gain admin level control of the vulnerable system. This vulnerability would be exploited by uploading a specially crafted file to a web APP, which is, of course, not a heavy lift these days there's all kinds of Web APPs that are saying you know that that involve uploading user submitted stuff. This allows that to be exploited. So as always don't wait too long before

Microsoft ZD Kaspersky Lab Researcher Windows Media Foundation
Zeroqode - Bubble's certified partners

No Code No Problem

04:40 min | 8 months ago

Zeroqode - Bubble's certified partners

"I'm going to be talking about zero code so Z. E. R.. Hugh Od. I'm sure you've heard about them if you're in the space but if you haven't, they are sort of like an agency slash template builder for bubble and zero code is honestly a great resource to have I. Have Their link on my website. Now have the links in my description, but they're going to be throwing an event as well, and so some of the things that they offer. The. Offer templates plug INS locks native APPS BACK INS courses. And API tolls. So they're pretty encompassing in terms of what you would need for bubble. Or if you're just looking for somebody to build the APP for you, they also do that. So they do offer a a accustomed development service but like if you're looking to build an MVP or build, you know the Uber of this or the Product hunt for this or or something like that. Then definitely go on their website and go under templates and you can find any template. You could ever imagine already made for you where you can easily change the branding. So they have crowdfunding platforms marketplaces like. On a multipurpose pack who delivery like Uber Eats. Anything that you can imagine they have built in bubble and they're all pretty much less than three hundred bucks. So some one hundred summer to fifty summer three hundred but that's not bad at all compared to what you'd pay for traditional software developer to actually out a platform like Insta- cart for you so. They they really do have an awesome thing there and I've purchased myself three different. Pamphlets from them and you know I've used two of them on. Honestly they have some free ones as well. If you were just getting into bubble, I highly recommend if you're struggling learning the logic and how things are set up and like how you structure data in bubble I highly recommend going on finding one of their free templates that has some logic and stuff, and then going in kind of reverse engineering changing things and just playing with it because you will learn so much like. I thought I. Kind of knew it. I was doing in bubble, and then I bought my first template from zero code and went on and I was just like okay. So this is actually how you set up data and then this is actually how this works. So I can't even begin to stress how important it is. If you are just getting started, they'll get a free template from zero code and go play with it for two days and you'll be so much better and so much sharper with with bubble. So yeah, they were featured on on tech and they have an awesome story, their founders of Vlad and I believe it's live on leave on. They founded zero code and they're really doing awesome job if you're looking to start your own bubble agency. The help you set that up. Or they offer courses. So you can learn how to build web and Mobile? APPS without code. Native apps you can seamlessly convert your existing web app into native an Android APPS, and they also offer blocks for bubble. So blocks or ready made components that you can use to build your bubble APP much faster and I. think that is huge on any no platform. It's the have you know your own Component Library of cremated components. So that's awesome and then lastly plug instrumental you can an hands, your bubbles, apps functionality and you I and you x by using one of their plugging. So if you are using one of their templates, there's a decent chance that it comes with a plugin from them. That they've that they've made. So if you're looking for a great agency that's built out plenty of different tolls and stuff in. You want them to build your products for you. You can use their development and customization services, and so you just on their website and you get a quote and then you kind of and everything, and then they'll send you a quote. So like I said a great toll. If you are interested in bubble and you WANNA, be a bubble master, go play with their free templates, go by template for one hundred bucks and just reverse engineer it and start making really that's that's all I have to say but you can get get rentals like Airbnb gigs like fiver events like event bright social media scheduling freelancing like uproar slash fiber online learning like you to me like when I say they have. Everything covered they have everything covered. So great toll great resource go checkout zero code.

Hugh Od MVP Airbnb Vlad Software Developer Engineer
Big Tech, Antitrust, and Democracy

Exponent

04:59 min | 9 months ago

Big Tech, Antitrust, and Democracy

"I James. I'm doing. Okay. How are you? Good thanks. All Things considered I'm busy. Tell You I've complainer this on multiple guess at this point. But what's another one I feel like? Because no one is traveling or going anywhere what is usually the slowest months? August is just insane like stuff happening constantly it started off where it got very slow in March. I was walked down people don't know what to do and were nervous. I was over whelming sense of doom and the weird thing. Is Obviously, it's not that stuff has changed that much but we talked about this on the last episode people have adapted, and now they're like making up for lost I but they're just like news coming out everywhere right a no more so than in the capital. That's right. So last week last Wednesday the editor subcommittee of the Judiciary Committee in the House had a hearing with the four tuxedos Apple Google facebook and Amazon Microsoft was notable by its absence, but it was clearly a. Focus on consumer tech. In the reason I say that this was clear is not just because such. Adele wasn't there but it became pretty clear through the questioning that Tim. Cook was only they're Kinda wanted to say that they got all of them because they were not prepared to ask him questions at all. It's clear that all the work of the committee has been mostly focused on I would say first and foremost Amazon they had the most detailed stuff there they were pretty detail. About Google, they were somewhat detailed about facebook, but you could see sort of the quality of questionings really starting to come down there, and then they didn't even know what the percentages were in the APP store. You is kind of embarrassing. They would ask cook a question and let him just talk because they didn't know what to ask next wherever else interrupt because they wanted that points to make et Cetera et Cetera and I've thought that difference in the quality of questioning per company. was pretty striking. Yeah. It's interesting. The New York Times ran a tally of the questions and I thought that in itself was interesting and it looked pretty evenly spaced and then apple was dislike fifty percent of the other three frustrating in a way because obviously I've been sort of fixated on the APP store for literally since the beginning of attack relate what am I I set of articles back in two thousand thirteen was trying to understand what how is doing such a crappy job. Imagine the APP store and one of my conclusions there was there. So scarred from their near death experience in the nineties when they had to beg adobe and Microsoft to continue supporting the Max can remain viable and I wrote this is back in two thousand thirteen that they would never allow themselves to be in that position again and well. So interesting about that is the way that has manifested is that again, this is a long running things that they've really had kept productivity APPS. In particular, it's hard to make money. You can't charge upgrades is really important sort of business mile away. It's worked on other platforms white the internet which Tim Cook Pretends doesn't exist also testimony they jumped straight from brick and mortar to the APP store. There's no intervening period there where you could buy stuff on the Internet. It's funny because when you read his testimony, you don't notice until someone points out she's like Oh my word. Yeah. You just kinda skipped fifteen years of distribution. So I didn't watch it old but I did watch part of it, and the only thing that I can remember is someone was questioning him around he has complete control of which APPs and he's like I'll well, if the native APPs that's true except Web apps so think he's not to the Internet was like little buttons that you create insofar which by the way are totally handicap progressive lobster totally handicap on IOS in wipes away all their cookies and settings after a week in. Where are the interesting things about this is because apple was held captive by productivity APPs in the nineties all of their sort of onerous APP store terms in my estimation have mostly affected would be productivity APPs in your abyss situation where you get no great innovator of APPs on these platforms in part because much risk like maybe you're going to build something in apple's not gonNA prove it or there's no business model it and it just doesn't make sense to make a new sort of productivity after the most difficult in-depth after build from a physical. API's on the device or perspective and what actually has come to dominate are. All these network based APPS that are mostly API driven and what's interesting is because apple is not a social company I message notwithstanding that they kind of weren't paying attention to that and what happened was we talked about this China where we chat actually became the exact sort of dominant APP that I think the APP store was designed to limit. But because they weren't sort of paying attention, they ended up the exact same situation as a nineties is the apple as a company is much stronger than back. Then it's not even remotely comparable but the fact that we chat is more important than your phone is definitely the case you. Like Oh we trade the same well then why is it? We have a mini APP store for on purposes and no one else has allowed it like one of the most obvious examples of APPs not being treated the same and it's not true the same because we chat as more important than the IPHONE.

Apple Tim Cook Facebook Amazon Microsoft Google Judiciary Committee The New York Times Adele Editor Adobe China
Apple and Google are fighting over the future of the web

The 3:59

10:07 min | 9 months ago

Apple and Google are fighting over the future of the web

"Apple, Google, or who the biggest players in technology and fundamentally different ways of seeing where the Internet is going, and whoever wins out in this big conflict may have a huge impact on how we experienced the web broader. Chang and this is your charge. To break this down is see nets, reporter and resident giant Brain Stephen Shanklin welcome shank high, so Google and apple been rivals on many different levels for for many years. At what is this new battlefront? Look like well. This is basically a disagreement or a difference of opinion about where the web should go, and what the right balance is between Web APPS that run on the web in native APPs deployed into all the programming interfaces you'll see on an iphone or on windows or on Android so it's web versus native. Tunnel little bit about their respective positions. What's really informing? Why they're taking the positions, they are well. Google was born on the web and it is a huge fan of the web, and it's chrome. Browser dominates usage of the web so as you might expect. It's really a big fan of the web improving what the web can do. Make it as interactive as possible. Make It. As easy as possible to build advanced Web APPs that can do a lot of different things, basically Web APPs that powerful is native APPs apple on the other hand. It's obviously hugely successful with its iphone. In one of the reasons that's been successful as all the native APPs that run on the iphone and of course, apple gets a lot of money, not just from selling iphones, but also from taking its cut of. The fees that developers have to pay. Somebody buys something through Apple's APPs store, so apple is not. It doesn't disliked the web, but it has a bigger affinity for native APPs than Google does yes. Oh I use apps obviously on my phone. I browse the Internet to. Why should I care about this dispute? What really this boils down to sort of a difference of philosophy? Are you more of a fan of an open computing platform like the web or you more a fan of native APPs so that? That openness has a lot of advantages. If you decide to dump your windows laptop and moved to an IPAD, then that's going to be easier if the web is really at the center of your experience. If you're somebody who uses a lot of native APPS, you might like those on your iphone, but that might make it hard to switch to Android, because you're kind of walked into the apple iphone APPs on the other hand. Native APPs often are a lot more responsive a lot more powerful so. Baked often offering a better user experience, so it's about a difference in philosophy. What's more important to you? Each side certainly has its advantages and disadvantages. Yeah, one one way Google's trying China address this with their Web APPs. Is Something called progressive? Web APPs, which which are more fully featured talk about that. What what are what are they look like? And would we actually see some these progressive web? APPS pop up. Are here today Google? Helped coined the term and its aggressively pushing a bunch of technology that makes Progressive Web APPs better PWA's. You'll see that a lot in a tech circles, so yes as you said it's basically more of a packaged web. APP So right now you typically use your browser open A website do what you need to do on the website. If you're using progressive web APP, you might prompt that says hey. Do you want to save this to your home screen? Do you WanNa? Say this year start menu, and then you can save that as an APP you commend launched later without having to go through the browser, their wad of different features in Progressive Web. APPS that make them work faster. Make them work offline and generally improve the experience compared to a native APP. These are gradually. Increasing in power utility, there are a lot of companies like Uber in twitter and starbucks that have that liked them and have had pretty good success with them, so they're definitely increasing in importance I guess you can say it's basically the latest phase in improving the web web used to be this foundation for static documents studied with hyper links, and it got gradually more and more Interactive Progressive Web APPs the latest vanguard of that interactivity. Fred to a you set up. Up these two sides pretty nicely. What which side has more support backing? It depends on who you're asking about so web developers love power. They love features, and they love chrome, so the web developers no question they really like Google way of thinking in a lot of them. Don't like apples. Speed of improving its safari browser one of the big issues is that on iphones and IPADS? Safari is obviously not just the default browser, but also even if you're using chrome. It's apple's safari technology, so apple really controls. What's what goes on on an IPHONE or an IPAD? So the web developers really bristle about that. If you're talking about the average user Heidel really think most people know the difference mostly at this stage. If you're developing markets, places that don't have a many powerful devices, don't have very fast networks often, the web has a lot more urban advantage sometimes wetbacks to be much smaller and faster and easier to use than a native where you have to go through an APP store. Download a big head, the APP yet in. Terms of WHO's likely to win. Is there any kind of indication or still still too early I? Don't think either side is going to vanquish the other. I think the web is pretty healthy in is going to continue to be so I think native. APPS are not going to die, even for example, twitter is a fan, but if you load the twitter mobile, APP in some places, it'll say hey, have you? You tried our twitter native APP so it's not it's not really clear that one side of the other is going to actually prevail what the big question is which way it's going to tilt in the future and bats kind of uncertain what it looks to me at this stage is that the web developers and some people actually use the web like these advanced features, and there's pressure on apple two in. The features it builds into safari. Safaris team is growing. Apple has been adding some of these features. If not always as fast as Google would like also, there are a lot of allies that Google has like Intel and Microsoft, which is a very big powerful. Ally that are pushing this web direction so I think the web will steadily get more powerful, but native apps are certainly not going away. Okay, let me in the way you describe it with between absent browsers I think for a lot of folks. I tend to use more APPs on my phone. The expect you said the experiences, a bit more fully fleshed out likewise when I'm on my computer, I tend to use my browser a lot more rather than apps unless there's really specific program like. Is it just? Is it a matter of? Being a phone, the desktop experience, or has that plane the argument? There's definitely a difference between what happens on your laptop in what happens on your phone browsing on your phone? Even though apple actually helped pioneer mobile browsers with the first iphone way back in two thousand seven. It still is not as good as a native APP generally speaking. So that initial disadvantage I think really has persisted. A lot of people were trained to look for APPS in the APP store, not go to mobile websites that were broken or didn't work well or limited or just said for example you go to the yelp website, it says install the YELP APP. So you know there are a lot of disincentives to using the mobile web. Google's trying to reduce those, but there's still a huge gap then when you compare it to a laptop where a lot of people can just live in a web browser. Maybe they need photoshop or Microsoft Word or some other. Video or photo editor running on their laptop, but mostly the web is how a lot of us can get worked on the laptop. That dynamic I think. It's changing I think the web is getting more powerful on phones, but it's not clear to me that it's getting so much more powerful that it's really going to be the primary way we interact on our phones. I think especially for the APPS that you use a lot one to ten twenty times a day. Those are probably going to be native APPS for most people. I'm just trying to get a sense for our listeners. What what this actually means, if one side wins like what what is Apple's vision of the future look like versus Google's vision with feature well I think way it. Shakes out, it's not so much that one side of the other is going to win, it's that it's going to tilt one way or the other and I think in the apple do more priority on native apps spend more time in walled gardens silos I'm not sure what the right term is exactly, but basically more time on one companies platform where it's harder to switch out of that email service in that music streaming service in. In that collection of APPs The web vision. It's a bit more open loosey-goosey. You might have to do more vetting yourself. Is this service worth my money? Is this email service safe to use? So it's there's less hand holding, but it's more open so kind of a different one is one is arguably easier on the customer, but if you do want to make changes or control your destiny, it gets a bit harder. Shack this is the first in a series looking at this issue. What what else you have on tap this week are also gonna be looking at some of these security. Implications of Web APPs the more power you give to the web, the more the attack surface gets bigger, the more ways there are for a hackers to attack your browser and your entire phone and laptop, and we're going to be looking specifically at twitter, which as a pretty interesting story about why it made the choices it did. Did with its own web APP, so it's sort of a a look at how it sees the world. Obviously, twitter is a pretty important application right now as a native APP and web APP. We thought there'd be interesting example to look into their decision. Great thanks for joining me.

Apple Google Twitter Chang Reporter Stephen Shanklin Shack Fred
The Twitpocolypse

Let's Talk Bitcoin!

05:03 min | 9 months ago

The Twitpocolypse

"Some time ago about a year ago, or maybe two years ago, twitter introduced time based one time passwords google authenticated as most people know that mechanism where you have an authentic eater APP on a mobile device, and that gives you six digit codes to log in as to factor, which is much more secure than SMS SMS of course can be hijacked if your Sim Card is hijacked, so a lot of people were speculating all of these different methods of attack to me. It seems unlikely that accounts that are very familiar with some checking because. Because it happens a lot in crypto and has had a lot of high profile. Reporting would have SMS. It also seemed unlikely that even if they did that, someone was able to Sim Jack phones from big accounts across two different continents, at least because some of these accounts are china-based or singapore-based, some are europe-based. Some are a us-based that involve several different phone carriers in different countries all done within a matter of hours. It seemed to me very unlikely that I would be the case so assuming that they did have hardware two factor authentication. Or at least an authentic eater op, you can't really steal a password. That's not enough. So then, if the account security is likely to be quite secure, what are the other avenues someone can get in? The next most likely mechanism of attack would be API's so twitter has API's that allow various social media, aggregate or sites to post so that whole team of people can schedule and review and posts to multiple platforms similtaneously I. Use platforms like that, too. It allows me to work with a team of people and collaborate on what we post and schedule it out in advance. So. When you see a personal message from me, his personal, but when you see an with like I'm doing this video on Saturday, you know that's scheduled in advance and it's posted automatically. Are, not sitting there, attaching images and typing in Hashtags in real time. These services of course access the twitter API using off which is a nation protocol. It's the same protocol that's us when you log into a site using your google account and it redirects. You gets an encrypted challenge response message from uses that antedates into sight. And these gain full access the twitter time and presented in some of the site. You're probably familiar with things like hoot, sweet and buffer, sensible and various other sites like that now. These sites are not always as well secured. So that was my immediate suspicion. Because from there you can easily post the message, and if that site security isn't a strong with two factor, etc, I assumed. had been compromised than because there are only a handful of social media postings services eight. It was quite possible that all of these disparate companies were using the sang. Then the attack continued to escalate. One of the things that was noticeable was that the tweets that will come out? Were saying twitter web APP. Now when you have an off service that is posting remotely through the API. It has a clear identifier, says twitter for iphone, says hoot suite, it says some social media, posting or something like that. It doesn't say twitter web up. So my immediate suspicion was that this was a browser extension again much easier to compromise it. Browser extension that is a common single point of failure across all of these different accounts, and would have access to twitter web API to post on behalf or maybe sore credentials for users. There are a lot of sloppy browser extensions out there and then people started talking about the possibility of zero day browser exploit now. That'd be a very serious problem. Because Zero Browser, exploit effectively means that someone was compromising browsers through some click through mechanism, revolt, execution, or something like that and hijacking credentials from inside the browser secure store. That's a very serious. Because I would affect not just twitter, but then again it was only happening on twitter. And why would you use a zero day? Browser exploit that can be enormously powerful to hack only one site twitter, and then to use it to do this silly. Nigerian scam. I'm using the term Nigerian scam because Nigerians have anything to do with us, but because this type of scam originated with the Nigerian Prince Story, I mean it's a story, actually the we've seen repeat over and over and over again for two decades exactly I was reading through some kind of gaming coverage of this and many of them are likening it to scams that. That have been pulled in Yvonne Line, which is a popular sort of Laissez Faire, M., o. and ruined scape, also, which is really like a mostly for kids type of environment, and again like seven years ago. Apparently there was a rash of this type of give your money and I'll give you double back and again of course in crypto currency. We've seen this since.

Twitter Google Laissez Faire Yvonne Line
From Glassblower to Software Developer using Free Coding Resources with Michael Pimentel

Learn to Code with Me

46:03 min | 10 months ago

From Glassblower to Software Developer using Free Coding Resources with Michael Pimentel

"And we're back in today's episode. I speak with Michael, Pimentel. Michael Story is fascinating worked in the glassblowing industry specifically for film sets for nine years before he started teaching himself how to Code. And what makes him even more? Interesting is the fact that he doesn't have a college degree. Anti never went to a coding bootcamp. He is entirely self-taught. and. That is exactly what we're GONNA be talking about today. How he taught himself to code. WOW, working fulltime. How guys first job in tack and how he got more roles in the tech industry as time went on. If you tips for staying motivated while learning how to Code. This episode is for you enjoy. Hey. Michael. Thank you so much for coming on the show today. It will on six February I'm real excited to talk with you. You have like interesting. Self taught experience in. That's what I would like to dive into I. Could you share with us how you got started in software engineering? Absolutely so kind of Story kind of goes back to a few years ago when I was working for a company that made life for the film industry now working there as a manufacturer glassblowing really interesting work. Kind of working in a manufacturing type of shop warehouse, loud, working on a lay, that spun in a really hot environment I was there for a really long time and things just. Kinda didn't progress in terms of career. Wise and financially it was just really typical I live in California and California being one of the most expensive place live. It just wasn't sustainable. married and I have a child and that it just wasn't something that I could maintain so it kind of motivated me to start thinking I need to. Probably either go back to school or another another route career choice so i. can you know build to support and have a career that can provide general finance, support and everything like that, so it kind of led me to back to. My interest in computers and everything like that, so I started to do some online, searching and everything like that and it. Brought me to software development coding, you know some booming career choice that is really big right now and everything like that was like okay. Maybe I should go back to school for that, but at the time it really wasn't the best option I went acted. As a couple of glasses time, that's what I could afford at my community college, and then just got really difficult to maintain a full-time job and take one or two classes, and it got really expensive, because my wife was what was going to school in college and everything like that, so it was really difficult for us to support both less going especially you know. Not really knowing what I wanted to do. So I I did a lot of searching and I came across recode camp and recode camp. You know like when you get on their landing page. It's like learning one to code for free and always people learn this way and I was like wait three. This isn't make sense. This will usually scams off there. Start off Rian. Then you have to pay something and everything like that and you know to my surprise actually was free, and then so I started I jumped right in, and just started to go to the curriculum, and it sparked my interest and I was like. Wow, this is really cool. It's it kind of. Goes about in a way that. Gets you interested really quickly? You know with hd Mounsey assassin how you can get feedback on the webpage really quickly. Let's kind of how it started because I. Just I just couldn't go. That route was a canoe into school because it was just really expensive and I already had like a car loan, I couldn't get like student loan. It was just wasn't really practical. It's like cave. Do put myself some really extreme debt that I don't know if it's GonNa lead to something. That's GONNA pay in the end so I had to find another option and looked like learning to code on my own free resources when that resource beginning with recode camp was was the route I took. Awesome so I, want to backtrack a little bit to your. Your work before you got into coding, so you you okay? You said he was a manufacturing role. I haven't made notes that you were a glass blower which anti note that is for movies today shows. Definitely. What is it glasses? Sure okay, so a glass blower, typically like of someone like Google glass large usually someone that takes some raw material which consists of the materials, t make glass essentially depending on what what the? The. End Product is going to be different types of glass. Of course so basically you take them in you hit Heaton furnace, or with a really hot torture claim so that it becomes like in this malleable state, and then you shape it essentially so what I did there? We work on a leave, and we basically built like the light bulb globe. It's spun on a lathe and then you would really. Really hot with a hydrogen oxygen burners, two thousand degrees, and then you shape it based on certain dimensions so basically they would take that, and then we'd have a filament type that would basically you know, have some kind of chemical reaction than light up base off whatever the the fixture needed you know for the filming, so the specific light that they made there was an Hmo which is like a chemical. Name that I really don't know all the details into it, but it basically replicates the color of the sun so like if you see like on film sets, use those lights that kind of are the background that make everything look real, daytime and night-time filming. Those are the lights that we made when I worked there we're one of the few American companies still made them like with our hands, still as opposed to a machine meaning making them in a in a warehouse somewhere. But in a sense, essentially, that's what it was. We were just making them with a glassblowing. That's what I did while working there while I think nine or ten years. We Really, oh my goodness. Wow so start I'm surprised. It was that long because for people. Listening to this show were actually speaking through video so I can see you so I'm like. Wow doesn't look like he can hold a John. Young so young to have a job for that long. Then start another career. Okay? Wow, that awful. How did you get into that? Because that feels very niche, you're essentially making bulldogs. That camera crews in production crews are using on the sets of TV shows I mean. We were chatting before we recorded you live in California. I know like the entertainment industry is. In the movie industry in all of that is obviously very prominent out there is that kind of how that happened or It's interesting so actually the reason why I got into it is because my dad worked in that industry or like thirty years, and I had come out of working at John Juice and I was their. First job actually was working as a team member workup to insistent manager, and then eventually needed to make more money, because I got married at a really young so I. My dad ended up helping me getting the job there and you know I just ended up staying there for a really long time, but it's really how I got into. It was as my dad was in that industry longtime. He had connections and everything like that. Dot It. Did you go to a trade school or anything for glassblowing? No I actually just learned on the job. And still to this day is one of the most difficult things that I've ever done. Physically I for almost anything that can compare it to I think. Programming is its own challenge, but is like the hardest physical. Thing I've ever had to learn because it was like. If you don't do it right the first time, then you ruin it. So there's no going back and fixing it once. You kind of ruin it because the glass that we would work with you'd have to mix it with metals, and then once it's kind of melted to a certain point, you can't go back in extract those materials out of the glass, so it's Kinda ruined. If you don't do it, right is probably there really nerve, wracking or when I did that job. Yeah Wow, it also sounds like it could be dangerous if you're working as really like high temperatures. Absolutely I got burned really bad third degree burns I have degree burns like all my arm from it, but yeah, it was. It's definitely. Was I'm just curious. Did that have any role in your decision to look for a new job like I? Know you mentioned like the financial side, but were there other things, too? Yeah absolutely a that part being okay, so the big part, actually a aside from like the financial reasons that it just didn't pay that much. It was the work environments. It is in the Central Valley of California which in the summertime gets you know triple digits consistently and the warehouse that it is done is basically like a garage. It doesn't have an air condition. It doesn't have any of those things so the environment itself was. was just really really taxing. There's been a couple of times when I had gotten heat exhaustion, I got sent home because of it because like say it's one hundred, three, hundred ten, even outside inside that shop where you'd be working is a hundred twenty one hundred thirty degrees, and it was just unbearable is the if you've our to look back on some old twitter posts? I probably have pictures of like a thermometer in the area. And it's just like maxed out because it was just so hot, but yeah, that's that's probably WANNA be. A motivating factors to wanting to look for another job. It got to point where I was like. I need to get out of here. No matter what this job is just killing me physically, and you know a lot of other reasons you can imagine in an environment like that the people that you tend to work around kind of like really. Not The best work environment because you know on a lot of stress and you know tend not to get along very well when they're under a lot of stress is mentally and just everything that came along with that job, so it just became kind of like a hostile work environment as well so it was like a lot of. Factors that Kinda came into me like I have to get out of here you to find something else you know. Yeah well I mean that definitely makes sense. There's a few other people or one that is coming to mind that. We had on the show in a previous season. Whose name is Josh Camp? And he was a hope I. Stay this right a horse I think it's a horse fairer fairer, hope, number news right, but he would change the hooves on horses, which could also be really dangerous. Obviously, a horse kicks you and I believe it was an injury that ultimately led him to. You know look for other work in in what will link to that in the show notes for people listening now 'cause it. Was You know a few years back when we had on the show and any other episode, I believe it could have had a few where there was someone with a moron. Sick physically dangerous or physically labor job, and that's kind of what led them to to make a pretty big pivot because I can like working for you as a glass blower in those in that environment, physical Super Super Hot. It's totally different from working as a software engineer. And when you started coding, you mentioned using Free Co camp in other free resources. Were you still working fulltime as the glass blower and you are learning outside of that? Yes I was so I would I had a fulltime job there, and because of the heat I would work really really early hours I try to go in his earliest possible as three in the morning. Get off at noon or whatever it was Leonard Twelve so that time that I would get off of course I'd already so exhausted. Matt jobs so I have to go home and sleep a little bit and then. The thing with those interesting with that is. It was hard for me to be going having a fulltime job like that. Maybe some people can relate to that. You know like a maybe just a fulltime job in general is exhausting, but this job probably pushed it because of the environment itself the hostility behind it. That kind of gave me more motivation to be like you know what I'm really tired right now. And I'm not really motivated to to learn coding complete, foreign and difficult, but when I get off work the way I did time, so you know wanting to leave that place so bad that it was just that extra boost motivation for me to learn and study and just do everything I needed to do to succeed in it on just because it was just so bad. I got desperate. Really desperate I just remember that I tend to forget that, but then when I do remember I'm like wow, it helps me to be like really grateful. You know to where I am now, and it was really hard working fulltime job in learning, because I did learn while working there probably about a year and a half, maybe almost two years I was learning. And There was there were times when I would make huge progresses, but then. At the same time thinking like is this really possible? How do people get a job doing? It's like yeah. I can build a website, but there's more to it you like. Is this all I need to get a job type thing you know But Yeah! It was it was hard and I. Don't want to say like Oh yeah. It's super easy because it. Wasn't especially having to work fulltime job in it's all I could just you know. Take days off now and everything like that. I had to work. But yeah. It was difficult. So you were. Doing ice, you said for like one and a half two years where you were doing boom things at the same time. appleaday mentioned this earlier, but you. Free Co camp. Did you use any other resources or you mentioned Community College? Were you taking classes there? Yeah so additional to recode camp so the there's a lot of other things that I did that helped me so free code camp opened up at the time. I haven't camp while, but at the time had lake. Away that you would join and beat up and it was through facebook. It was like face, looking need groups or something, and it was like find a recode camp. Meet up because I. Guess they had like an umbrella. Recode camp meet ups that you can join, and you would basically type in your city in order find the nearest one that was that was organized and everything like that, so I found one in my city and it was you know a few people apartment that would meet up in so I joined that group and I reached out on their. Pre Cochem does a really good job with trying to connect people, so it's like hey, introduce yourself in post on there, so that people can no, no your journey Cetera so i. did that and I ended up meeting up with the organizers of that? Meet Up. We met at starbucks talked about you know everything on learning this and that where you and Rico camped up thing so eventually, I got more involved in that met more people that were learning as well and then now it. Kinda led to Terry member Oh the Mita. Dot Com meet up. There was also the recode. KEMP MEDIA DOT COM for our area that was attached to that facebook group. And, he was like yeah. I just started this. Meet up group, so we can kind of be more broad for people that don't have facebook. We can just Kinda grow up there and he was like you WanNa, help me with that because you know. He was maintaining full job as well, and he needed someone to Kinda. Fill in that gap where he couldn't. You know sounds like yeah. Sure I could definitely help with that, so I helped him. kind of on the organization's portion of that. meet up and like. Hey, let's try to meet. Kind of swap the weeks you know will be on a Saturday one week and then. I'll take the next every type of thing we'd be out of starbucks. And then someone posted on the meet up of feed. Like hey does a hack upon coming up, you guys should come reach out and you know I think it was free, and it was in our area, so I went to the hacker thon and myself in a couple of other people that were in that group, and then we ended up a or ended meeting a few other people at that meet up. That were real professional programmers. At the thoughts I introduced myself to them and everything like that met some really really nice. And probably the most helpful in kind person was actually the the organizer of that Agathon. When. I met him and everything like that. He gave me his contact information in and said Hey, we should get together sometime. I'm Cha and he was a professional programmer, running his own business and everything like that, so eventually I stayed in contact with him, and I met up with him, and I told him my journey and what I'm trying to do, super supportive of us all about helping people in my situation, you know like make connections, and even even help them with an internship and everything like that, and that's Kinda weird kicked off actually where it went from me trying to learn to me, actually making connections in potentially those connections leading to jobs. That was huge. Actually so this person that ran out. Pakistan also ran his on meet up. and His name was a little bit more. Mature he had a organized large meet ups and organised like a speakers where he would teach people how to get started with a new technology and all that stuff you know, so. This percent met up with them, and they're willing to like. Hey, you WANNA work on a project with. Wow real project like that's what I need to experience with a project, so I met with him or opt in some of the people that worked with him, and he ended up working with a lot of other guys that or just people in general men and women that were like kind of doing their own thing that a little bit more advanced as As programmers they're building girl websites starting their own software business in lake, a consulting and everything like that. That's where kind of took off. Is that connection? You know I to a upon met some people, and then it led to more people that we're kind of in the same boat as me, and if they are more advanced, they're willing to help me. By struggled with something and everything like that. It was really a douse like typical in me being successful. Yeah that is a great story and Other interviews I've been doing this season. We invite the guests on, and we think they have a really interesting transformation. Story is kind of like who I've been really Trying to get on the show this season and every single person that I've interviewed so far and there's been you know. Handful have all. Had this like really awesome Lake County. Component to their story and men like Kinda. Showing how supportive the tech community is in in various ways, and it sounds like you found that you know through this. Through connections through other connections with more experienced people in the field that helped catapult you forward in the they were able to help support you in various ways and maybe help if you're stuck as you said, build your first project and I think that's really cool I. Think it's really good for beginners to hear that because I know when I first started out in probably you, too. I would imagine it can be really intimidating and feel like very overwhelming, and you can feel really alone, and it's like it's almost. I haven't experienced like trying to break into other industries, but in a lot of ways I feel like even though texts seemed really intense in really hard I mean it is, but there's just such kind and helpful people like a friend, totally random side story, but she's not intact. She was trying to break into. The entertainment like film like Moodley TV shows. and. She had to work at an unpaid internship for like a year in really like claw her way up. She actually does really awesome. producing on really awesome documentaries now but. It was like really hard, very competitive very very. Very like you know and I feel like the tech community is so different from that like it's. People are Super Helpful yeah definitely. I've heard that as well. I'm not sure if it's if it's like the demand in this industry that were like trying to get into maybe people, maybe a logical gotten to it, and they kind of see you know all the hard work that. It takes. I, guess that they want to help other people as well or like coming from something like my background and everything like that. They kind of want to help people as well, but yeah, I noticed that as well as a lot of really helpful people, even before I started going through the ups and everything I joined twitter, and that's when I found like just like a free code cannot co Newbie A. PODCAST are their Hashtag in general dislike just to get help and everything like that, and when I when I reached out that way, just random people that were professionals judgment like hey. I think I'll struggling with. Like centering Adib or CSS, something something kind of silly. You know I needed help with it and some random person was like. Hey, Gimme, your hub Repo albeit with that was like. Wow, some random person that realize but more Santander worked at Microsoft or something like that and are willing to help I didn't even know this person but yeah, definitely noticed that about the industry's is a lot of willing people to help you regardless. Of Your background and everything like that. Yeah another guest I. Literally just had on the podcast said that she had so many breakthroughs. A CAITLIN for people listening to the show and in episode Caitlin. She was talking about how she had so many breakthroughs on twitter asking for help in people that she didn't even know. Offering to help her in various capacities, I feel like twitter is such a good. Well, it's funny. Because social media like every platform kind of has its own. Little like corner or whatever it could be really good for certain things and I feel like asking for help. Like in that way. Twitter is awesome because people will jump in people. It's almost like a forum, but it's not, but people are very like. Communicate unlike you know instagram or something, which is mostly about the photos and it's. It's not the same kind of. Environment just different. Anyway, it's it's interesting. Yeah so switching gears a tiny bit I would like to hear about how the new ended up getting your first full-time real position. Yeah absolutely. So it was when our meet up grew so when I met this person a friend. His name is nate a probably. Give him recognition there because east been so huge in my in my career as a friend and generally slow parental today we kind of joined are meet ups and we grew into this big. Meet Up. And it was like three hundred people. We grew to over three hundred people, and then we. He had connections with someone that was really involved in trying to grow the tech scene in the Central Valley of California. Washable, probably think though in California. It's like tech everywhere. Tech is huge, but that's really isolated towards like Silicon Valley Bay area, and when you go to the outskirts where I live, it's like farms and orchards in just really like farmland in. The outskirts of all the techie over the hill and there's all the big central. Silicon Valley everything like that, but out here it's it's completely different. There's still a lot of factories out here and everything like that, so tech isn't the big thing out here, so he was trying to person. He tried to basically bring tech out this way like hey companies. There's a talent out here as well so he was a part of that big that this big movement. That's still going on today so anyways. We ended up getting a space with his help, and he supported he. He got funding for it and we moved our meet up there. And, we were able to go reach out to the computer. Science professors ask some of the community colleges. They are able to come out. We reached out to people that talk computer science in the high schools I reach people on facebook I went out trying to like introduce myself to all these people, so we can grow all his these groups that are people better in software or coating to hey, come to this, Mita because we can all grow with the tech in the valley, so we had this large event whereas kicking off are merging of our beat ups, and we had I think. Over one hundred fifty people like almost two hundred people from professors in computer science to high school teachers in computer science to people, learning and everything like that so I went up there and I was speaking in front of it, and I was basically motivating other people that were in my position like hey. You guys? Should really you know? I was trying to leaning towards free code camp like if you guys want to learn to cope because those people that were like thinking about it, you know not really that much into it, so I kind of wanted to focus on those people because that's where they had the experience of coming from so was like. Hey, you know it's not that hard to get into it. There's some really really great resources that are free. That doesn't cost anything you know. MEET UPS like this a lot of great connections here and people willing to help you. If you're struggling every twenty five solves talking. They're all that and at that. Meet up was a few other. That worked at companies nearby when Consulting Agency the the banks have some of their software people out in the Central Valley as well and a couple of of the people that were there were friends with my friend, nate, a one that have basically helped me out and everything that always connections. He introduced me to one of guys there and he said Hey his company's hiring. I want you. I want to introduce you to Michael and this is after all is kind of getting already getting. Getting experience with building some projects and everything and my friend was like. Yeah, he knows what he's doing now. He he's employable. He's definitely has experience with building front, and back and software and everything so introduced me to a friend of his name of Josh and he worked for a company that basically did consulting for like probations, law enforcement software. They did software for E N NJ Gallo, a lot of big companies, so they're really established there around for like twenty years so I met with him. And then he was like where we're actually looking for someone. More junior developer is like Amir number. We eventually had coffee. Just Kinda. Talk and everything like that and we just hit it off. We kind of our personalities. Kind of you know He. We liked hanging out and everything like that, so that kind of started like a friendship, you know. We talked for about a year and. And you'd help you with stuff like that and I was like. Hey, and he's like our company is kind of in the middle of Lake, you know hiring, but they kinda. Put a freeze on that everything like that, so after about a year when I. When I met him, he finally called me up one day, and the funny story is that I was getting to a point. In in learning how to Code and currently working where I was almost ready to give up, because it felt like I was putting effort and then. I wasn't getting any any reward from like. If I was applying everywhere and I wouldn't get any kind of response to resume. I reached out to people to help with resume all these things. Did I did a lot? Maybe not everything that could have just because I didn't know, but I felt like I was getting any hits on my resume or If I. DID GET A call. It was like you know I didn't know how to do some kind of algorithm that I didn't learn or memorize or whatever it was, so I was getting really discouraged, almost going to be like. Maybe I do need to go to school at unity at degree. Maybe I need to just join a boot camp or or joint something that is going to make me be more appealing to employers so I was looking. and. Just kind of getting really discouraged at that time. But the funny thing is that I got a call for my friend Josh and he goes. Hey, we have this contract coming up. We need to hire a developer and I've been talking to my boss about you and we'd like to bring you on. He's like. Of course we'll interview you and everything like that and he's like. Are you interested in? He's like. Like I'm almost one hundred percent, sure they've we bring you on because you know like I know you and I know your work, and I can help you and everything like that and I was like. Are you kidding me? And when he told me that I was thrilled, I was actually really scared. Same time this is reality is like real software coding. In, part of me was going to say no like I do this. This is too much like the difference between working on side projects that you know like whatever no one's really going to care about versus working on software that people use so I. I got really scared. I even once. My wife and I was like I. Don't know if I can do this like I'm GonNa. Quit my job and I go do this and then I fail. I can't go back to that job. I can't do that, you know. This is a big decision. You know I've been here for nine years or whatever it was. So ultimately, my my wife convinced me and was like you need to do this. People don't get good things unless they take some kind of risk. Regardless, you should try you know. So I call it my friend. I told him I concerns and Josh was like you know you're just trying to scare yourself out of. It Dude so just take it from me. I'm going to be there to help you, so don't worry us to take this. Just, take it you know and I was like. Okay, let's set up the interview and everything like that and goes all right, so set the interview and. They hired me. And that was basically it I started there with no professional experience. It was all because of someone was willing to help me know again back to that. You know this industry is always really helpful people that are willing to take a chance on you and help me help you and everything, and and and of course there's a lot of challenges you know working in in actually writing real software and everything like that, but in the long run it really helped me in was just huge into getting my job, and then after that first job. Of course, my resume after that just everyone always cared to look at it. You know I I didn't have nearly as. Much difficulty looking for next role after that I think it's like once you get your first job regardless of its junior level, or whatever in in this industry it kind of goes downhill OCTA that you actually get considered. You know you'll get your resume looked at. You'll get that first interview and everything like that. Yeah Wow, so. How long did you work there at the first job? And then what what kind? You don't have to get like super detailed, but like what kind of work redoing essentially. There year, so I started off working on a back end actually of in node framework, or on the no runtime. Basically, the contract was migrating some. It's funny because I went from like barely learning it in writing mostly front end to writing some back in code and the PRI, the contract was basically taking some old enterprise services that were written in Java and then rewriting them on no gs lambda, so that that was what I was doing for like the first four months and after that contract and they moved on to another. Another project and it was more full stack. It was job script. It was using angular on the front end no on the back end and some sequel server, but I got the rightful stack of front end back in using Java javascript note and everything like that. It was really fun. 'cause I got to work on two different big projects there and I learned so much. That's where my whole stack experience kind of took off I got I got to learn so much and the people that I worked with worse huge. It was just I can't even express how thankful I am to people that I work with there and I still am friends with them. That helped me explained things a broke things down. And having been able to understand these other languages. Yeah Wow and I know you recently got a laid off due to cove in nineteen. was that from this same employer or was this another job you had gotten after leaving that company? Another story so I was there at that company for about a year, and then towards the end my wife and I found out. We're GONNA. Have Child and so I needed to. That company was great for it was actually a bump in salary than I currently made up. My Company the light, Bulb Company, but it's I still needed to. I needed to progress I needed to move on and grow my career, and financially so I started to look I started. You know I even asked my boss at the time. I was like Hey I have a child, the ways or any chance that I can move up or anything like that, and you give me feedback, and it was like yeah, definitely, in whatever amount of time so I took that and say okay, that's CREPE. should start looking in see by even get my resume considered now that experience so I started to look, and then I got hired at a start up in the bay area and Silicon Valley. And I was there for almost a year way so i. don't want I. Don't want to interrupt you, but was at working remotely or you move there. I actually had hybrid role, so I would go into the office like an hour and a half commute two days a week. And then worked from home the other days, but yeah, it was a there. I got a taste of the whole silicon valley. Feel of how software companies ran, and my skills went up even higher because of that environment, but yeah, so I was there for about a year and It was a startup that wasn't able to get another round of funding, so actually we all. They started laying people off. fortunately they didn't lay the soccer team like right away, but since we found that out, we started to look all the engineers that worked at that company, or like Oh they're not getting. Funding is a good chance. They're gonNA lay people off, so we all started looking and I got hired at the Credit Union and I. was there for about a year? or about a year exactly actually, and due to the pandemic and everything like that they started to kind of restructure, reorganize everything and effected a lot of teams, including my own team and We're a part of that layoffs will. But yeah, it was. It was kind of something that I. Could. Imagine obviously has affected a lot of people everywhere, and it feels like it's just one of those times. That no-one can have planned for, but yeah. I've been a part of that have been affected by that as well. Yes, so justice like for myself in the listeners, so you basically had three different jobs like intech at this point in each for about a year. Give or take, so you essentially now have like three years of like fulltime software engineering experience. And the most recent position that you've got furloughed related offer a Is that a credit union? And what were you doing there so? It's interesting. 'cause you've such like different experience like from like like a consulting firm to a tech startup to credit union like I imagined that the experiences at each one were quite different like the environment of in the way people work in south. Absolutely so. Go working at a credit union, it's a pretty large credit union and the way things are done there as opposed to the other companies that I worked at. Worse it significantly different so look the startup that I worked at. They were pretty large. Start up there actually around for ten years they had employed over three hundred people. The engineering team was fifty engineers people and. They operated like they were a big tech company and everything like that, so but at the same time I had the experience of being able to shift. To project same time like there's times when I was working on a mobile APP and one for one sprint I'd be working on a whole two weeks on a mobile APP, and then I'd be pivoted to work on their web APP, clients. Front end code, and then after that I'd be working on some hardware code completely different working on a proprietary algorithm that needs to be converted in red on a mobile APP. It was different stuff all the time, and it was really exciting, but also really nerve wracking because of the context, switching a lot and learning new languages at the same time. So that was I learned a lot by lot of the fast paced stuff at that start up, and then when I got to the Credit Union. There was a little bit more relaxed because those only one product that I worked on essentially. Korb, inking APP and there I had a team of eight engineers that were dedicated for this core banking APP. I got brought on as a senior engineer there, and then that that role kind of pivoted towards a lead developer. I was on that project for about four months. And then my a boss. Promoted to the lead developer of that team so essentially there was a lot different roles because for one it was one project, and it was a mobile APP. I had experience with mobile APP at the other company, but not to this extent, it was just a huge mobile APP. And the primary, the primary objective being handling with people's money was probably a significant factor to the change of of like a importance of the application that part probably. At a lot to the stress when I worked knowing that you're working on something that deals with people's money and five hundred thousand active members so that was a big learning experience. And I do. I learned a lot of new stuff learned new languages learned how to do a lot of things that you wouldn't typically do web development, but yeah, it was a lot of differences in structure, probably a lot of different departments that you have to work with before you can get approval in changing something like maybe typically and. Change some piece of code that would maybe look slightly different, because it just makes more sense while at the Credit Union. It wasn't that simple. You had to get a lot of approvals and a lot of test. Writing to make sure lingers securer in a rented to different avenues. You know which was different. Yeah, that yeah makes dealing with financial information. You know sensitive data, and all that would be quite different. I imagined so now that your you by the time episode airs, you could already be in a new job, but. Being active in your job search now. What kind of company aiming to work out? What do you want to stay in like? The financial industry are trying to go back to a startup or maybe a consulting firm that you get to work all these different projects. Yeah, what were you? What did you like the most I guess? Let's see. Probably a ideally would wouldn't stay in the financial industry just because. All the little differences in how delayed development can be due to all those hoops. You have to jump through, but probably most fun I had was. Working in consulting agency. Because working so many different things. Different projects everything like that, but a lot of them had their own pros and cons. You know in terms of like. What I would prefer probably something that is more established due to. More stability just because of everything. That's going on right now. I've heard a lot of people have lost their jobs regardless of the industry even in software I would probably prefer stability. If I could choose regardless of the industry but Yeah. It's probably it's probably more geared towards that. You know what I can find that it is more stable and everything like that. I do have a few other avenues in alert. You know companies that I'm going through right now so I am confident that something will end soon. That's probably the good part is that they're still a high demand for software engineers and everything like that, so there's a lot of good a good places that are hiring right now and everything like that. But. They do specific Yeah Yeah Gotcha so I'm. Kind of jumping around here, but I really wanted to ask this question, and it goes back to your glassblowing experience. I was wondering if there was anything from that or your position before a Jumba juice that you. Were able to transfer or in some way to you in your job, your new job as a software developer. Probably the thing that. I don't know if it helped me, but there's a few different things probably so working probably in an environment that required me to have a lot of perseverance, probably aided to my benefit, and in general and just work ethic. It helps me To be able to deal with probably stresses and deadlines Challenges in my current role because I dealt with that a lot on any. Of can can relate to that. Is You know working in a place like that or just any kind of work that requires them to give a little bit extra is required, just laken. Succeed or do well their job. It probably just helps helped with those areas in work ethic to work hard enduro ally and everything like that but also know what I want going forward, and what I don't want in a career or or next role. Also of a big part of that. Working at that company helped me in was. Probably having difficult conversations with my employer I had a lot of those at that company and it prepared me to be able to deal with those difficult situations. A lot better at all night, other roles a and what I mean, my difficult situations, probably dealing with difficult people another one being having a conversation with your superiors about compensation You know asking for what you feel like. You deserve and everything like that I've had a lot of those, and they didn't go so well at that company that I feel really confident and know how to approach those types of people or Whenever those conversations need to happen, you know. It can be difficult for a lot of people, but I think have so much experience with it that it's. It's kind of more fluid and how to do in the right way. It's aided a lot in that in in my career going forward. Yeah that makes sense and like. I, I can only imagine like the stressors you deal with being in an environment with the glassblowing like Super Hot. You said you were sent home from heat exhaustion, the stress like literally the physical danger bringing yourself. It's like working from home as a software engineer or star office in Silicon. Valley is like the stress level would be so much less like the. They compare Cinderella the stressors you're dealing with compared to maybe like the ones at the other place. Yeah, like whole other scar accord whole other thing, right? We are like running at time and there's one last question I want to ask before we wrap this out and it's just if you could share any like final advice to people listening right now. Who are just starting out? Maybe they were where you were like. You know four or five years ago. Whenever whenever you got your start. What advice would you give them? All. Let's see so I. Think for one perseverence when things feel like it's difficult, it may be difficult at first, but the more and more you do it in the more and more you practice. You'll eventually understand it some complicated things that I. That I could not have imagined when I first started of doing I'm able to thoroughly explain. They seem like almost simple. Now I think the more and more you do it. The the more natural feel, and it'll be really simple. Just just keep on doing it and things easier. also in your journey and learning. It's really important to try to reach out to people to make connections go to meet UPS ask questions. Because those are going to be the areas where where you're gonNA find a connection that can help you find that career and ultimately successful in in this career field. But those are probably the two biggest ones is. Now I know it's hard at first, but it gets easier, and it gets fun on the challenges they start to face. Get really exciting, and it's really rewarding. Ultimately you know all hard work will pay off as long as you just keep to it. And it will pay off so yeah, awesome, great advice in a great way to end this interview. Thank you so much again for coming on. Where can people find you online? Yeah absolutely. Probably a mitre twitter, a twitter handle is mit p. j are eight eight. Or my website is just a my name, my first name Michael or implemental. Dial my personal, Mitchell my last name.

Twitter California Michael Story Credit Union Josh Camp Facebook Central Valley Software Engineer Silicon Valley Mita Starbucks Hostile Work Environment Mounsey Google Pakistan End Product
Weglot - Make your Website Multilingual in Minutes

No Code No Problem

04:09 min | 10 months ago

Weglot - Make your Website Multilingual in Minutes

"Today I'm going. Be covering a really awesome toll. We Lot W. E. E. G. L. O. T.. And we lot allows you to make your website or websites multi-lingual in minutes, so I had to try it out whenever I whenever I got on their side of had to try it out on the podcast website, and they were not lying. It actually took me about four minutes to allow visitors to toggle between English and Spanish. So what I love about legal is that integrates with whatever. Whatever tech you're using and USE UNSTUCK DOT com for my podcast website, so there wasn't a direct integration, and you know it's still only took me a few minutes integrate i. just had the copy. They gave me like a snippet of the code there and had a copy and paste html header tag so like I said took me four minutes maximum before actually saw it and use And we bought solves many issues that startups in companies face so from a marketing perspective it allows you to easily reach other demographics and an example. Perfect example of this actually saw this morning is a tweet from India. Hackers about how someone doubled their growth by translating their product into different languages. This person they. They had said that struggling to grow. They're trying to enroll channels They were like okay. Let's translate and they literally doubled their growth by translating their product in different languages. So that just goes to show like. If you have a product or you want more traffic on your website, the trend translating it may be the way to go. And then from a developer perspective, they don't have to translate the entire website so. And it's also like not tying you to. To the developer, so at a previous certify work that we hired someone, just translate everything in the Japanese so. was, for cryptocurrencies startup right and it took I. think it took about three months and you know it costs us a few thousand dollars to pay this person to do our website blogs all that stuff, and why would i? Why would someone do this one net? Why would you hire someone whenever you can do it instantly with we got? It's a no brainer so and after speaking with the guys that we got. It is very clear that they focused on the on boarding journey right minimizing the required time to actually see the main value of the product killed. They did a great job, and they really made sure users can translate their website in less than five minutes signing up so whenever I got on and I did it. And I copy and paste each authors test button there. Oppressed test took maybe a minute and thirty seconds, and then it said yet it's good to go, and then I went on my website in right there in the bottom right hand corner was the button and I clicked on it, and I made my website in Spanish so though I cannot speak Spanish It's really cool, so and I actually have ten point. Four percent of my website traffic over the last couple of months has been from Spain, so it was great to see. And add a Spanish translation to my website so I'm I can be more appealing to the Spanish native speakers. So they really did a great job there and we got is used by fifty thousand websites all over the world small businesses, big names, but the main use cases include ECOMMERCE stores marketing. Websites internal Web APPs, and really anything that you want you know I did it for a podcast website, so if you WANNA see the actual product action, check out my website at no code podcast Arco and you'll you know you'll see it there in the bottom right hand corner English you just click on that and needed to Spanish. And that's another thing. They did really well. Is that button in the bottom right hand corner? Like I didn't customize it at all, and they did a really good job of making sure that you know you can see it, but it's also not a nuisance. It's very aesthetic and it. It's not something where you see it and you're like. Oh, I. Don't want that on my website. You know it's they did a really good job of of doing that. In a way that allow people to still have a really acidic and that small button not removed from that,

Developer W. E. E. G. L. O. T India Spain
"web apps" Discussed on Microsoft Cloud IT Pro Podcast

Microsoft Cloud IT Pro Podcast

10:02 min | 1 year ago

"web apps" Discussed on Microsoft Cloud IT Pro Podcast

"Like that along the way but if you can find a ways to land in like a Lennox web APP in a standard service tear the Standard Service Tier starts at about seventy dollars a month and you can scale up to ten instances within those in even if you go to like the premium tier you get into the premium tier at least here in the US East US an east us to. It's seventy three bucks a month to start the premium tier and things like that can scale up to thirty instances they support auto scale accustomed to means a cell. You can do all the things you need to do within their potentially to stand up those workloads and get them to where they need to be. Got So in this case like we looked and we said okay. What's a good target service plan size just based on performance characteristics of existing APPs because we were actually kind of leaving a bunch of compute on the table inside those existing Aka notes that they were kind of sized up a little bit further than they needed to be but even if we had downsize them cost would have been a thing particularly factored in storage? And everything else so we just started out kind of simple and said hey. Can we run it in a standard plan? Could I run it in an S. one if I severely restricted the ram like like an s? One APP service is one core and one point. Seven five gigs of Ram. But again it's only seventy bucks a month so if I can running inside of that for the core to eighty I seventy all of a sudden. I've got a bunch of flexibility and I can do some other things there because now your web. Apps are naturally highly available. You're not having to go. Make sure you have to Adams and configure all that for your availability. It's all just built right into the APP service. It's supported within the APP service. Yes so there's this concept of instances that you can run so effectively. How many scale units? Or what is your horizontal scale? Look like within the APP service. So by Default. Usually run with one instance. But you can go in and change that configuration and say I always want to run with two instances or three instances and then maybe have things like scale rules based on CPU or some other metric that you're going to target auto scale and in the case of these service plans right being able to scale to ten instances or thirty fifty depending on your your service. How do the resources compare them when you're talking like Vm's because obviously you can also go out and get a VM? That has a Gig of Ram and a single core in his really cheap but then those resources are also having to go to the underlying Os when you do this in the Web APPs. Are you getting essentially the same amount of resources figure? You're still getting like a car in a Gig Ram. But then it's dedicated one hundred percent to your web application into those micro services it's not having to share those resources with some underlying Os. Well I mean there's an underlying Os so you're picking whether you're on windows or Lennox you're just saying you don't WanNa have to worry about patching the underlying vm. There so kind of the way it works in Ayrshire Web APPs. Have you ever heard of a Yes all right. So and ACU is an Asher compute unit. Just for those. That aren't familiar with it. And they're meant to be a way to baseline or compare. Cpu performance across these different size in series. Right so when I come out and say okay a fee three and you go what the Heck Saddam to s V three and how do I compare that to? Ds One V two. You would potentially do that through something like ac US along the way they started as zero. Actually it's a little bit easier to starting a family so a ones are one core to one So it's a one to one relationship and the ACU the Ayrshire compute unit is one hundred. So now you've got a nice solid whole number that you can work off of there so when you go to pick your service plan and what your unit of computers like if I went in and selected and s two in the standard series while an s to align core? So it's two cores and it's three and a half gigs of Ram. Then you go like all right. Well what does that really equate to in CPU performance because two cores in a D series versus in a series? They're actually going to have kind of some different metrics to them so that I can walk in and I can say okay. Well An S. is two hundred total. Acu It's an a-series compute equivalent like I know where I've landed in there and I can start to figure out what I'm getting from my money with the features that are offered to me or if I go into the premium tier where I can do. Maybe like isolated networking and some other things you know those are going to be like DVD to series equivalents. And you start to get into all the way up to like eight x metrics like you can do like eight hundred and forty total. Cpu Fourteen memory in a p three V two so it gives you a little bit of a baseline and kind of a way to figure it out so if you looked at say like in this case the node pool or you knew you were running. I asked her Apache or whatever it is on a VM. And you know what kind of Vm? You're on now. You can play with it a little bit and seized like. Hey who would I actually be able to step down from a D series to a-series which potentially has some significant savings for me am I really. Cpu bound or M. I. Memory constrained disc constrained. What's the constraint for my application as you stand it up got it okay? So you have all of that. You've figured out how those resources Elaine. How are you going to go from one to the other? But now you actually have to move those micro services or those containers. What do you have to think about them? As you take these micro services that maybe running an AK ass and you want to push them into one of these APP service plans as it just like a lift shaft have reconfiguration asked to go on there. 'cause I honestly completely miss this and I had no idea you could actually make her services and service plans now so specifically containers right. We're we're talking about taking containerize applications. That are already containerized. Bring them over. So like in the case of AK ASS running the docker container run time kind of moby already. You know we should be able to natively come over to a service like Web APPs for containers running on Lenox. Which already has the doctor runtime as well and standard container up container up the same way so you could always you micro service hosting right. Just deploy a web APP as the run times or kind of the server. Side or static. Frameworks wherever you had going into. Azure Web APPs. That was fine but the nice thing here is. We're just lifting a container and getting it to where it needs to be so there's a couple of things like in particular case that ended up being kind of interesting so if you think about standing up a cluster. So it's a container orchestrator. So it's bringing things to you like service discovery they're certainly networking components to it. So if I'm deploying a micro service on a cluster how does traffic from the outside hit an IP and how does it not hit that Ip and then be routed all the way to that back end service specifically to micro service a versus micro service be so that all happens with other services or load balancers that you might deploy and typically you want some kind of ingress controller? Where maybe you can have more play within the routing of that traffic you might not always want like just a standard kind of load balancer service in there so for this one. It was an existing implementation of traffic. So it's just a way to I stand up websites and do the routing and things like that within that cluster. But that meant that traffic was going away when we came over to the other side so in Aka the way everything was set up is there was a brute. Url so you know there was MS cloud pro podcast dot com and that was kind of the homepage. And then the API were all stored in virtual directories or virtual routes underneath there. So you would have like slash one slash API to slash API three. So everything was in the same canonical and fully qualified domain name and when we went to Azure Web APPs. Will that changed a little bit because we can't run multiple containers in. We can't run like a whole Container Group in Ayrshire Web APPs got inside these same web app so what was five or six containers that we're all effectively the same website from routing perspective and actually became five or six separate websites on the other side so there was some reconfiguration that needed to be done there right like things like okay so dynamic configuration for which. Api in point we talked to where there was only one. You are L. Now there needed to be you know one distinct like environment variable that we could set for each is so that you could still talk to the right place and grabbed the right thing but the really cool thing there is because it's all just containers so we can go change the code. We can spend it up. We can create a container image and we can spin that up very quickly within Azure Web APPs and it turns out that with Azure Web APPs. It's potentially even a little bit easier for us to do to the deployment so something like that dynamic configuration where it was all running inside either a native Kuban Eddie's deployment or in this case everything was being deployed with Helmet Helm Charts and dynamic values for environment variables and things like that in Ayrshire Web APPs. You've got native just APP SETTINGS. There's configuration per web APP. And all you have to do is go. Set.

ACU US Container Group AK ASS Ayrshire Adams Saddam Kuban Eddie Elaine Lenox moby
"web apps" Discussed on Front End Happy Hour

Front End Happy Hour

03:42 min | 2 years ago

"web apps" Discussed on Front End Happy Hour

"I don't think one is better than the other. I think you need to evaluate it based on what it is that you're trying to do. But the web is getting more and more capable of doing a lot of the things that web is done. And I mean, the reality is from a business standpoint, it's a heck of a lot easier to hire somebody who knows web technologies than it is to hire somebody who knows swift or knows Java or what have you in his novel or whatever. One into that point having someone even if you do have that on your team is like knowing swift knowing Java or knowing Kotla n- or like it's just like one or the other. It's like you wanna ship need of, okay, well, you need this still set across Jeff multiple languages at that point. So and not only do you need to address building the team and kind of being tainted that team maintaining products, but like dealing with. Turnover in dealing with like all all of the kind of things that we don't often talk about when we talk about building a product ripe, but that are real business concerns. If you can build it all in one platform and focus on that and focus all of your energy and your money around that, and it can meet all of your needs than by wooden do that. I've always actually thought we'd be further along in the web in the sense that we almost eat apps, but we're not there yet because like you said, there are still API's it. Yes, the web is not gonna. You don't have access to yet, but I think more and more were getting closer and closer to that in it. It's pretty exciting and I think progressive web apps. That's why we're doing this up sodas it. It's exciting. There's a lot there and Amion. We've talked about service workers. We've talked about, you know what a progressive web op is, but like what is the big deal? We've kind of talked about real little bit here, but like why is so important to like what we're doing? Is it impacting the industry so much? I mean, we're really realizing Steve Jobs, vision of only having web apps, right? That was the. Yeah. Which is really funny because I don't know if apple would be as super stoked on the progressive web apps as much as I mean, they're not the apps. I mean, they're not well, I'm sure they're trying to figure out how to do it to some degree. I don't know. It goes on inside their but or or inside the Google play store. But I imagine they've got to be thinking about, like, how do we bring as into our stores like it seem because it's it's a great alternative discovery mechanism. Like it's not the only one and I mean, I, I think it's cool that the company that I worked for happens to be looking into like, hey, could we install from search results? That's kind of an interesting idea. Like what? What are some other ways that we can create to enable better distribution and discovery and these sorts of things for the people who were working really hard to build cool things on the web apple funding was the last person, the last major browser under safari to Dopp source workers. And the conspiracy theory is, and I probably believe. True because the app store for apple makes them so much money. It's a large chunk of apples revenue. They were very hesitant to enable any technology that would divert revenue densely from going. There could cannibalize that, sir. Yeah, because I can give it a press to have with my manifests and I built it to work with internet. I built an app that associate home screen and you open it and you would not know that it was running in a browser because the header said it and everything you'd think it's a native app. And I mean, it's not just so there's the app store itself and the discovery in the the potentially purchasing of apps in the app store. But the peace that we don't often think about is like the NF purchase model. Right? And so if you have an app that sells digital goods within an app store, you have to pay them certain thirty percent. It depends on on the on the app store that we're talking about, began apple..

apple Steve Jobs Amion Google Dopp thirty percent
"web apps" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

03:32 min | 2 years ago

"web apps" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"Web components, which is another sort of in the progressive web apps space of modern web capabilities. Basically, those allow you to create your own HTML components as the word says, script tags that can be used anywhere, right, and hadn't truly get that cross platform experience. What that allows us to do then is to start supporting all of the other Java scrip- frameworks with, are you? I controls out of the box so angular when we'll still, and that'll be a huge focus for for a still going forward. But now that opens us up to what we were kind of missing before, which is whatever Java scrip- framework is in vogue at the moment, perhaps react view. But I also has come out since this podcast. It's been recorded, right? Yeah, we can support all of that right away. So it's, you know, we're very excited for that to drop and will still allow you to use all of basically again. So you have that convergence for end users of getting different features and across platforms and moving between different devices. But now for developers, you also don't have to compromise on what framework you wanna use from an inorganic. A lot of those other. You know, realistically, yes, I'm biased, but our competitors are focused on more of the direct native. And you know, I o s Android specifically sure. But we've been just getting to this great spot where we can compete on all different types of platforms, desktop, mobile, and browsers, and things like that. And all of these platforms are totally on board like there is no complaining from apple, or I mean is is safari going to be the engine on an iphone that runs progressive web apps? Yes, yes. Yeah. They they admittedly over over the past two years apples definitely been a little slower to to adapt and updates affari. Yes, support the HMO five features that we really need for the best experience. Android typically been, you know, a handful of steps ahead, but they chrome, you mean? Yeah, excuse me chrome and comes from a place at kind of understand it's it's competition of they want to direct users to the app store in collect Aymen's, get their thirty percent. I get all that kind of thing. But you know, the reality is that's gonna cheek, an Android is the number one platform, right? So they really are, you know, Android goes in this direction. There. You know, maybe for the first time they have to follow someone's lead. Well, and that's, and that's really speaks to the power of with this is going to lead to is there so much friction these days, and you don't really see people wanting to fill up their phone with with native apps. You know, you have to go to whatever an app store may be scanning QR code or something. But I think I remember seeing somewhere that most users across the world only installed one to two apps a month. If that it's probably less. So just being a magin being able to provide a simple web link that can then be quickly downloaded a lot SM. You know, lots Mahler size download works off line can be updated seamlessly and provides a better user experience..

Java apple Mahler Aymen thirty percent two years
"web apps" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

03:32 min | 2 years ago

"web apps" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"Web components, which is another sort of in the progressive web apps space of modern web capabilities. Basically, those allow you to create your own HTML components as the word says, script tags that can be used anywhere, right, and hadn't truly get that cross platform experience. What that allows us to do then is to start supporting all of the other Java scrip- frameworks with, are you? I controls out of the box so angular when we'll still, and that'll be a huge focus for for a still going forward. But now that opens us up to what we were kind of missing before, which is whatever Java scrip- framework is in vogue at the moment, perhaps react view. But I also has come out since this podcast. It's been recorded, right? Yeah, we can support all of that right away. So it's, you know, we're very excited for that to drop and will still allow you to use all of basically again. So you have that convergence for end users of getting different features and across platforms and moving between different devices. But now for developers, you also don't have to compromise on what framework you wanna use from an inorganic. A lot of those other. You know, realistically, yes, I'm biased, but our competitors are focused on more of the direct native. And you know, I o s Android specifically sure. But we've been just getting to this great spot where we can compete on all different types of platforms, desktop, mobile, and browsers, and things like that. And all of these platforms are totally on board like there is no complaining from apple, or I mean is is safari going to be the engine on an iphone that runs progressive web apps? Yes, yes. Yeah. They they admittedly over over the past two years apples definitely been a little slower to to adapt and updates affari. Yes, support the HMO five features that we really need for the best experience. Android typically been, you know, a handful of steps ahead, but they chrome, you mean? Yeah, excuse me chrome and comes from a place at kind of understand it's it's competition of they want to direct users to the app store in collect Aymen's, get their thirty percent. I get all that kind of thing. But you know, the reality is that's gonna cheek, an Android is the number one platform, right? So they really are, you know, Android goes in this direction. There. You know, maybe for the first time they have to follow someone's lead. Well, and that's, and that's really speaks to the power of with this is going to lead to is there so much friction these days, and you don't really see people wanting to fill up their phone with with native apps. You know, you have to go to whatever an app store may be scanning QR code or something. But I think I remember seeing somewhere that most users across the world only installed one to two apps a month. If that it's probably less. So just being a magin being able to provide a simple web link that can then be quickly downloaded a lot SM. You know, lots Mahler size download works off line can be updated seamlessly and provides a better user experience..

Java apple Mahler Aymen thirty percent two years
"web apps" Discussed on Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"web apps" Discussed on Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats

"Call in my youtube video about progressive web apps and i was like on that i just could not get it so got it so this is basically if you have a page that's similar or duplicate of another page multiple routes to that same page or multiple you are ells right i don't know like i i can't think of a reason why i would do this off hand i don't know if you have something that you've done this for i know wordpress allows you have different euro so you could do like ford slash like query string p equals fifty four and that's like post fifty four but then you can also have permanence and wordpress like ford slash about wes and those two pages are the same pages and then there's there's a possibility of google crawling both of those pages in getting confused or docking you because you have duplicate content it's a big thing seo to make sure that if you ever have a route that might end up at the same place that your euros or again also if you were to update a euro and you kept the old one there you could say okay for purposes yeah then those will will tell it i've never done the myself i've only ever used them in wordpress because when i'm doing my own routes usually only way unless you have some old technical debt i think that's probably where that comes from word so basically what you're going to want to do here as you went to specify a canonical url with the rail canonical r e l canonical so that way you would just add those tags to the head of your page and that would just indicate that again this page is canonical i'm gonna keep saying that it's embedded in my brain.

wordpress wes ford google
"web apps" Discussed on Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"web apps" Discussed on Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats

"Of things that you should do to your application to make it a progressive web app so we're going to go through is kind of rattle through a bunch of the big ones and then for each of them will go into here's the idea how do you make that happen and then that will open up the things two different tack like responsive design and service workers and manifest files and some new web api etc etc so you want to kick us off with the first one yes so these are the baseline things visit the things that you sort of need like absolutely need to be considered a progressive web so the first one would be that your site is served over https as that you're using a valid as a seltzer typically it on your application now this is something you should be doing anyways so regardless if you're interested in progressive web apps if you know i feel like at this day and age you should just default to be wanting to add a no brainer yeah and now with let's encrypt it's free and a lot of services like dental fai or a lot of these new hosting are making it really easy like a one click sort of get your ssl certificate there's really no excuse to not be into it at this point so you're gonna wanna make sure that your site is served over a sheet tps using a 'sufficient and if you want to get one for free i highly recommend let's encrypt dot org i know west and i both us let's in crypt i should also say that the reason why we need a cell certificate is obviously because it's in crafted the traffic between it but also all of these new api that we're talking about accessing the user's webcam service workers cashing all of these new api's are only available on what's called a secure origin and insecure origin is an esa sell certificate website or local ho so if you just want to get into these things and the idea of getting a hud is a little daunting to you know that if you're running on local hosts that is considered a secure origin yeah well again these are you know sensitive those are you know using someone's sort of device.

"web apps" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"web apps" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"Native applications and then when it launches little launch without the browser cronje there's a good advantage there and that's what and business owners brand managers are really excited about because now they don't have to go through the app store to get that presence on the home screen and honestly you could do it before but it wasn't quite as sophisticated as it is now and so that's that's a key advantage but crawl you keep talking about service workers and that's the big dog in the room yeah so he asked though service workers are like a awesome and so here's the here's my story about my exposure to service workers i was at a velocity conference a few years ago sit in the the audience watching patrick mian he's the guy he create where pitch test do a presentation on service workers right before i got up on stage to do a presentation on my singlepage application stuff yeah and as i sat there and watched him present service workers i went everything i'm about to present is now a police phil while doubts in i didn't quite real i didn't i took me is taken me a while to truly realize the impact the something like service workers are going to have and when i mentioned at the beginning of the interview the i really believe the progressive web apps and service workers are going to cause us to stop using the frameworks the way we've been using them are totally believe that and i really believe we're going to eliminate singlepage apps and that's because service workers how some key features that developers need to start taking advantage of and we've we've been able to make websites work offline use an app cash but it's been a royal pain to work with men the way i got around it was i would have a simple cash manifests bile to naval my sites to work off line but i built a persistence module into my system that would pre essentially pre cash my entire application in local storage and then when index tv became ubiquitous migrated over.

app store patrick mian web apps
"web apps" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"web apps" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"A but i mean honest to the reality if you look at sites that are actually ranked in search engines threefourths of umbreit now give or take or hd 2 ps well googly suitably emailing any website that he can that's not each bs including run as radio saying we're it is stop indexing if you're not hd bs executive rather there are some things you need to do when you migrate but we will get into that but yes the key barriers are cost and technical implementation i think those have been eliminated thanks to some stuff like let's encrypt and you know i use aws they have free certificates and it takes it takes me thirty seconds to get one set up in most of that literally is waiting on an email from me click a link so does azure actually yeah they've they implemented a recently i haven't had a chance to play with their is yet though but they they didn't do that honestly that was one of the big reasons why has moved from measure to aws news the free certificates so because i wanted to do progress web apps them there's a lot of the ap eyes are now being gated behind hd gdp us so like delocation we've had that for ten years but now the browser starting to hide that behind you have to be hd tps before will let you use the cpi web rtc the media capture repair that kind of stuff also being gated so silk progressive web app has to be hd dps well you have the ah the other actually really simple things you gotta have a valid web manifests foul and really what this is just a a file was jason data that essentially has met at information about your site that describes the site to the browser and it's mainly used to create a good had to home screen experience so what most the browsers are doing is they've got a terrific which varies a little bit and they will automatically prompt somebody who visit your site on a decently regular basis to say hey add this to your home screen and when they do that it will look just like a native app on the home screen because you're icon connell sit there with.

aws connell search engines executive web apps thirty seconds ten years
"web apps" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"web apps" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"To include common you i components like the the floating out button or where the fab but whatever stands ford road and that will circular button right and the cool things i see being done with that like that's just brilliant because it's it's a good use of the limited space we really have these days because mobil's dominating everything is far as consumers her in her face to to anything we built yeah you've got a thing phone that's where your customers are if you're facing the public anyway yeah you know actually was talking to an engineer at a major us retailer unarmed on us if i said the name everybody would recognize it and he would he told me that ninety five percent of their web traffic i mean the overall web traffic came from our phones while that's crazy not even android yeah usa did he just looked at me said desktop mobile tablet 95 percent of it it's it's iphone it's iphone while so immediate says a lot about his demographic as well as that's not the ifo doesn't dominate the market that large it definitely wasn't kmart i can tell you though it's it's really interesting you are to me one of the sort of hardcore thinkers around web development the being super practical and not faddish so when you make a move on something chris i stand up and take notice the the fact that you like progressive where bath i always thought they were interesting and we've talked to the christian hilemon's of the world stuff but the year sort of my cynic so when you like it unlike her what's it got going forward that you like and i think even before you answer that we ought to sort of backup and talk about progressive web apps again just with the elevator the speech about it and and then aware service workers fit in i i just want to get those two things defined right up front yeah man absolutely so to me progress a web apps are the right way to deliver web experiences and basically one of the things that we strived for when the iphone first came out.

mobil engineer iphone ifo web apps us android ninety five percent 95 percent
"web apps" Discussed on Hanselminutes

Hanselminutes

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"web apps" Discussed on Hanselminutes

"Com i see all kinds of bloomberg all kinds of websites with service workers out there that are that are registered is is something i should worry about or should i not sweated are they going to be well behaved they should they should be and your browser is pretty dependent on the browser they're pretty good about prompting you like how much um storage is happening some of them prompt you and some of them just max out when you're storage is lake um let's see like fire fox doesn't have a limit but it prompts the user when like fifty megs of data has been stored and you can clear your cash but they should behave brokers now sleep service workers aren't directly related to storing offline data though are they they're is this all part of like the toolbox that you use jamaica progressive by bob yeah and that is what they are mainly used for but it is basically having a job escaped file run independently um of your appa and be that intermediate between the network and your application so you can do other things like use the push api to do push notifications with your application law okay so adding only like push notifications which i'm no to sing a lot of websites are asking permission to send me notifications lately that seems like something that's really blown up in the last year yeah it's interesting because chrome in particular even has um it's own little push notification kind of thing where if you follow if you hit the certain pinpoints iq visit a site twice in two days early two times consecutively in two days that it will give you a little pop of this as do you want to add this to your home screened so it's all about their push for engaging the user more golkar's which we talked about reliable talking about engaging so this was the idea where a web a web apps shorts feeling like an app and i don't think of it as a web anymore it's just a gas it's a natural extension yeah and that's late interesting that's another big part of progressive web apps it's about push notification and like the home screen icons and also fourscreen views are.

golkar lake um jamaica bob web apps two days
"web apps" Discussed on Hanselminutes

Hanselminutes

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"web apps" Discussed on Hanselminutes

"It sounds like third solves will the fundamental problems that causes us to use apps like let's let's assume for the purposes of this discussion that you and i both agree that we'd rather right web pages and web apps man native apps because we are open web people right let's that's a fair but statement madl strategy for me okay good so if we say that then will say well you know i really have to use an app for this project because i wanna make it so people can post messages off line or uh i don't want to have duplicate messages or i you know i'm making a a customer service rep app in my customer service reps want to do their job on the train and they're constantly updating their things that sounds like an occasionally connected scenario clearly iranian app and then they they leave their off of java's ripped off the open web in there are now new writing native code because they didn't think it was possible yeah and so so you're asking what if they have both a native and the whereabout because they didn't realize it service were door capable of yes that's it i'm i think though i'm wondering are you saying that service workers will solve issues like background sink um being able to like throw messages into the index tb api and pretend that it's an outbox baby no one knows those things exist and those are fundamental aspects of being a progressive yes and that does exist and you can do that with service workers and that's the big um as one of the great things about being able to use the cash api m and s at cash storage api as well is that you're able to story these things and the service worker is basically sitting there waiting to see when the network is available so it can push the users interactions up so it's basically making javascript files to say.

web apps native code
"web apps" Discussed on Hanselminutes

Hanselminutes

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"web apps" Discussed on Hanselminutes

"Is it more about being pimple on a mobile device or is it about dealing with liqi networks or is it about push notification says it all those things are one of those things yes i like d all of the about it is like it is this kind of pie in the sky mentality of everybody has always been trying to figure out how to make web applications available offline and make it so that you can engage in your use there with their user using push notifications said this is what these progressive web apps are striving to do so there are some kind of like core concepts that especially like goal in particular adhere to but um it's basically there are things like progressiveness so you know it's in the name right and it's basically saying if a browser supports all the technologies that are made to do this application go ahead use it if they don't don't break anything like don't break somebody's app just because they don't your browser doesn't support it so that's the progressive part that's pretty important okay so let's making racists town because i think i know it's important but i am not not everyone who listens to the show has english as their first language so we should bring that were down so as i understand the word progressive to mean is the things that happen gradually or things that happen like in stages like step by step yeah like a build up radic a build up okay and then i remember that there was a a term that we would use probably fourteen years ago called progressive enhancement right which was yes dealing dealing with you know little improvement so it's like oh you support dumb jill location i'll use that so like almost like feature detection yeah and i've also heard it used armed with java's kept in particular how you want to make sure that if people had turned javascript off you were progressively making it so that they could still use your application so handling things if java's kept softened doing a progression a build up of things to make.

mobile device web applications web apps fourteen years
"web apps" Discussed on Hanselminutes

Hanselminutes

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"web apps" Discussed on Hanselminutes

"Hi this is scott handsome and this is another episode of hansol minutes and today i'm talking with tear amana sick from progress software how are you good how're you doing scott i'm getting there i'm trying to get my head around how fast the internet is moving just one i think i know something a new thing comes out and then i have to decide is that new saying something i already knew and they just made a new name for it or is it something else and i'm trying to get my brain around p w as progressive web apps and i'm hoping you can explain it to me yes standing at zefferelli moving a ludicrous speed but m hopefully progressive web apps one of the biggest thing about them and sat there progressive so it's not it's not something that you were hashtag go into full speed and just commit hard core it's something that you can progressively enhance on your back locations okay could i take one of my old applications of it's already out there and just decide them a call at progressive or do they have to have certain characteristics for they get that name i mean you could decide to cut progressive but there are stand to hit that you do want to kind of in here too so what i like to think about it is kind of a one line air for what progressive web apps are and it basically is taking your web application and using modern technologies like cash api 's and push ap eyes to make it more accessible and reliable and more engaging for users and could that sounds good but it also a little squishy weaken otago or technica.

progress software web apps zefferelli otago scott
"web apps" Discussed on Full Stack Radio

Full Stack Radio

01:56 min | 4 years ago

"web apps" Discussed on Full Stack Radio

"So that's like real quick like high level what turbo links is so for me the reason why i started looking at this was because while out oats ever saying that i've always been a big fan of like server side rendered views in routing um it's not that i'm fundamentally against easing javascript of course not a modern web apps they need jobs script and um to me it's it's more of the act architecture of at all i like my web apps to be mostly server side renner templates and i like the server to handle routing on them when needed i add in javascript components in for me most is that they these days that's use in view j s so i've always sort of resisted going full are singlepage appliqued spa right away and there is a bunch of reasons for that but i i think i would probably summarise it by saying that i think just in general server side rendered views and routing tends to just be a little bit simpler um it's simpler to to get up and running it simpler to the bug it's simpler test and while i get the argument that espy's or more performance because we can just returned these jason responses from an api and we don't need to do these fullpage refreshes also sorta know from experience that almost never is that performance like the prime release in my experience is not that performance problem isn't like my primary performance problem in my web apps sure the primary problems that i have generally are uh my code slow or my database queries are slow which is generally what it is so um i actually don't even really believe that like performance is the main reason why softer teams are attracted to fpgas.

web apps