21 Burst results for "Wave Hill"

"wave hill" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

Radio Cherry Bombe

06:36 min | 3 months ago

"wave hill" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

"So I was working in the restaurants and I was running the banquets and various things and people started asking me if I could do events outside of where I was working. We were doing some off premise things at gracie mansion and some off premise catering events through the restaurants so. People ask me, and at the same time I was planning my wedding to Peter at up at Wave Hill and which is an off premise face and it was complicated and difficult in Brazil Isabell the famous Robert Isabell may he rest in peace was helping me as a favor and I said, well, someone should do this for people about weddings because I was already doing corporate events but I didn't realize that I actually did invent the industry but I thought I, did because I didn't know anyone who did people would. Ask me I do a couple of small events weddings and then I put an ad in new. York magazine in those days and I was the only add for party planner believe it or not. Now, there's about four thousand in issue I think and women's wear daily picked it up and ran a page on me and people started calling and I met two of the Rockefeller daughters hired me, and then through a friend I met Kevin Bacon and Kira and they hired me for the wedding which I think now is maybe. Thirty five years ago and I i. just it just started taking off and we Plan all sorts of events mostly social, a couple of corporate events. Of course, they'll never be another corporate event. Hopefully, they'll be social laments again. Mostly word of mouth and. You know you don't know what you don't know at the beginning. So you're brave enough to do anything stupidly. I love. Now in your bio, you call out the fact that you create these events with sanity and humor. What is it about event planning that you felt you had to call out sanity and humor not only my clients but many of my colleagues and certainly people who are just starting in the business. First of all, they either mistake themselves for the clients you know so they there's this whole sense that. They. Could be as obnoxious as clients could be to the other people who work for them and around them, which is not the case because we are the help and also that at the end of the day is a party. It's a celebration even if it's a marketing event, it's still it is not. We're not finding the cure for anything unfortunately were not changing the world maybe a little bit, but but this idea that the import and the pomposity and. The solemnity attached to it is is really in Congress for what it is. You know it's a party. So we do our very best. We try to make people happy we come up with all sorts of clever ideas that people haven't seen before or to make the guest feel special wanted especially now because we're doing events for ten fifteen, twenty people so that part is easy to make people feel special or easily how you and your fellow event planners doing today. Funny that you asked we were just I was just on his own call with the twenty people talking to the four seasons, hotels and properties, and we were all giving our advice as to what they should do I mean it's a rough year. I would be lying to say it is definitely a rough year. It's it's not a great year to be in the event business. We've done a couple of small events. We did a beautiful wedding two weeks ago. In Michigan, for former clients of mine who are getting married, we've done events for them before. Their parents are older than want to wait. Until next year. So we had thirty people in person, and then we livestream the ceremony for one hundred people and we sent everybody who was on the zoom. We sent them a big beautiful box with an invitation and a the ingredients for the couples signature drank including a half bottle of their Tito's freaks half bottle Tito's vodka Shaker the ingredients to make the certain kind Martini Martini glasses. So with the instructions to make drink than come sit on the zoom with us. So there was a sense they was Colorado is interactive. Got To watch the ceremony. It was very cool. Actually have you had to become a zoom expert? I'm trying I. Don't love it a to save as an expert would really be overblown but I am I am zooming constantly I just you know I. It's not my favorite. I must say, I can never get the angle right or maybe that's the way I look and I'm not willing to accept. It are the zoom components just pretty much every event you're planning today unless it's a dinner party for ten or twelve people which done a couple doing one in the Hamptons this weekend on the beach otherwise yeah. Live streaming it's complicated and it's not inexpensive. You. Need to cameras minimum because you have to. Let's say it's a ceremony you have to. Show the. Show the reactions around it and stream it yeah. I would say certainly for a wedding there's absolutely A livestream component and you mentioned the dinner parties. So how are you? How are you doing these in a way that's respectful and safe and in compliance with different state and city regulations? We don't do anything inside. It's all outside of its inside would be fifteen people are fewer but if it's outside, we're being very very careful if it's a pod people that. Didn't party this weekend they've all been together all summer. Otherwise we're doing testing beforehand and what we're all talking about in this call is some of my colleagues in California. They're doing testing on site. Now you've been through so many ups and downs in this industry. What advice do you have for event planners who maybe haven't seen as much as you have? I think you really have to decide as I've had to decide several times in this career. If this is really what you WanNa do, and if it's really what you WanNa do and you still love it and you still think you could make money at it because it's certainly not a hobby than I don't think you have a choice but to hang in there and. Read, a lot hone your skills during this Maybe look at a different way to go about things, and maybe this is also you know this isn't for everybody maybe this is the time to figure out you WANNA. Do something else which we all have a tendency particularly women I think. Once, we said that we're going to do something the shame in pivoting. Or decided that you don't WanNa do it is is enough to make us stay with saying that maybe we don't do anymore. Why do you think you've stayed with us for as long as you have every time I try to think about doing something else I can't think of anything and I've tried believe me that would..

Tito gracie mansion Robert Isabell York magazine Rockefeller Wave Hill Martini Martini Brazil Peter Congress Kevin Bacon Kira Michigan Colorado California
"wave hill" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:54 min | 4 months ago

"wave hill" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Rifles and explosive devices. Bar rejected Jerrold Nadler suggestion that the show force was meant to burnish the president's reputation in an election year. The novel Coronavirus is on fire in Florida, with the state reporting another 186 related deaths today, NPR's Greg Allen reports. Florida now has had more than 6000 deaths from the Corona virus at a hospital in Orlando, Florida Governor Rhonda Sanders said. Despite the record death toll emergency room statewide are now seeing fewer patients arrive with covert 19 symptoms. As you have fewer Edie visits as you have fewer covert positive patients in the hospital. We think and I'm pretty sure with what the good work they're doing. You'll see mortality decrease a CZ well, although it's second among states in the total number of Corona virus cases, Florida ranks behind New York, California and five other states in the number of deaths. Doctors don't have all the answers, but said they've learned a lot about how to treat patients since the disease first emerged. Greg Allen. NPR NEWS Miami Wall Street, The Dow closed down 205 points, a 26,379 The NASDAQ off 1 34 This is NPR. And you're listening to W. N. Y C in New York, Jamie Floyd. Most of the Bangladeshi New Yorkers who ran in the primary last month did not farewell. But as WN Y zero room, Venugopal reports, that's not the end of the story. Around 15 Bangladeshi candidates ran for state and local office, out of which 211 for judicial delegate another for district leader, One of the more high profile candidates was married Ubaida She's a hijab wearing Muslim who lost a state assembly member, Kathy Nolan in Queens. Still, she says, the socialist principles she ran on are resonating. People are now tired of capitalism. People are tired of the proprietors. People are losing their Guaranty off housing, One political organizer says Despite the losses, turnout from the Bangladeshi community was high, and several candidates are eyeing a run for the city Council next year. For over a century, the official seal of New York City has depicted a native American in a loincloth and a colonial Sattler holding a rope with what looks like a loop on the end. Now the seal is facing new scrutiny from some who say the image honors a racist past. A reporter asked Mayor de Blasio yesterday whether the seal is still relevant, the mayor said it deserves to be reviewed The kind of thing a commission should look at carefully and decide if it still makes sense for the 21st century. The city's side says the settler is a sailor and the item in his hand is a plummet. That's a tool used to measure the depth of water. Many people have demanded the removal of statues and other symbols that paid tribute to colonizers and Confederate figures amidst nationwide protests against racism. Above a garden in the Bronx that overlooks the Hudson is reopening its gardens this week for the first time since the start of the covert 19 pandemic Wave hills blooming summer flowers have already been an emotional sight for returning employees. Karen Meyerhoff is executive director and says she cried when she saw her favorite plants again. Coming back into my office looked like my window looks out on into a holly tree. It's all day long. I get to see birds popping around in Holly tree and just that knowledge of of nature doesn't stop for them. Wave, Hill is offering free admission to a limited number of visitors in order to maintain social distancing. The space is now open Thursdays through Sundays. He'd advisory in effect until 8 p.m. Tonight. A low in the mid seventies, currently 83 degrees at Wave Hill 88 degrees in Central Park. Support for NPR comes from W. N. Y C members and from tire AC offering entire decision guide and user reviews to help people find tires that fit their needs and driving conditions. Learn more.

New York City Florida NPR Greg Allen Kathy Nolan Holly tree Jerrold Nadler Karen Meyerhoff Wave Hill Governor Rhonda Sanders Hill Orlando president city Council Bar Mayor de Blasio Queens
Adrian Higgins of Washington Post

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

03:17 min | 5 months ago

Adrian Higgins of Washington Post

"I was so worried as a journalist. About what can I write about gardening and pandemic and I actually didn't even have to think about it because the garden is vast for climbed the for when you. have to isolate it I. I didn't fully understand quite how. Nahra Shing. Garden could be in. It was just. It was just a sort of a situation where I had to. To state the obvious, which is the gardens that just so healing and. Nourishing to people. Yeah, you emailed an exchange an email. We had the other day. You mentioned that great, Gardener and Garden Author David Culp had a sharp insight to that effect. You want to share that with everybody else what he said about. The new. Book Of cold a year at Brandy, wine cottage and I'm sure your. Your audience would love to hear directly from him, but. He shares in the book and with me that there were moments in his life where he had to. recuperate from some serious illnesses. And the impulse for. A passionate governor as we know is to. Keep T for us to be the nurse if the garden for us to keep. Looking after it and caring for it, and he said what he what he had to sort of consciously do when he was recuperating, and the garden was to allow the garden to give him some healing back, and it was ready, willing and able to do so so i. think that in itself is an incredible. Less than all of us that we have to, you know sometimes we just have to stop fretting about the weeds or the the wilted leaves or whatever. The lack of Mulch and and just sort of let the garden. You know come back to us. Just said that it reminded me of many years ago. Marco Stefan from Wave Hill who founded wave, started the gardens at wave, Hill in New York I. was moaning around this time of year when spring starts to turn to summer, and everything looks like hell. There's a lot of weeds and cutbacks to be done, and I was like. Oh it's horrible. My place looks horrible and I just can't get I can't get off the hook you know. I'm just on the hook all the time with it and I was moaning moaning, and he said Margaret you created the huck. Just EXHALE! So. It made me think of what you just. Help us, we don't just have to be the nursemaid as you just explained. I think it requires a mental shift because when you own a passionate gardener. You see it as a process is something that you're constantly doing? And we sort of just sit down and stall. And sort of see objectively the What we've created we, we come see what would create with arranged. Right.

Garden Nahra Shing Wave Hill David Culp Marco Stefan Margaret New York
Remembering Fallen Plants with Ken Druse  A Way to Garden With Margaret Roach June 1, 2020

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

07:52 min | 6 months ago

Remembering Fallen Plants with Ken Druse A Way to Garden With Margaret Roach June 1, 2020

"In your introduction you were talking about just turquoise labels yeah there's so many labels and I mean I can't even I can't even talk about it. I mean think and plant delights for example. Yes I think that. Half of the herbaceous plants I've planted or more have died. I have one oriental. Poppy and I've probably tried to grow. I duNno seven. Ten Oriental poppies out. And you know in those days. We were so intrigued with the latest thing the newest thing the untried and true thing so a lot of the things that we lost were not really weren't going to be good garden plants but some of them were right along and some of them just weren't tested yet in our areas and so on and so forth but we gave it ago we stretched. We pushed the limits and gave it a go. Think of we had that money back but we had the experience. We got the memories Hon. I remember going to the garden of John Kerry who who died recently crate gardener in Texas and His Garden Spin Open to the public for many many years. And it was called Pecker Wood. And now it's called the John Ferry Garden in honor of him and in one bed they had plants in this one area of this one bad things quite prominent but there were this. There was this aggregation of labels all stuck in the ground. Like soldiers tight together. You know like a pin cushion but giant right and it was hilarious and it was all the plants that were gone It was the memory of those plants. It was a graveyard mouse graveyard. Yeah the white labels all lined up look like tombstones. So let's talk about some of them. Actually you know what should I do poetic reading since we've already had some music so? I do a poetic. Reading is if if this is my favorite poem. I think ever it is. And it's by the Great. Jeffrey be Charlesworth. Also Sadly departed a great gardener garden. Quite near mind that I visited. I was lucky enough to visit. He was a leader in the North American Rock Gardens Society. Did you ever meet him? Yes I did wonderful. Yeah so he wrote this. This poem called. Why did my plant die? You're already laughing trod on it. Yeah so here's how it goes. You walked to close. You tried on it. You dropped a piece of sod on it. You hold it down you weeded it. You planted it the wrong way up. You grew it in a Yogurt Cup but you forgot to make a whole. The soggy compost took its toll. September storm November drought. It heaved in March. The roots popped out you watered. With urbicide you scattered bonemeal and wide attracting local omnivores who eight-year plant and stayed for more. She left it. Baking in the Sun while you departed at a run to find a spade perhaps a trowel. Meanwhile the plant threw in the towel. You planted it with crown. Too High. The soil washed off. That explains why to High Ph at hated line. Elastic needs a gentler climb. He left the root ball wrapped in plastic. You broke the routes. They're not elastic. You Walk to close you try to get you dropped a piece of sod on it. You splash the plant with more oil. You should do something to your soil too rich to poor such wretched health. Your Silas Clay. Soil is filth. Your plant was eaten by a slug. The growing point contained a bug. These aphids are controlled by aunts. Who Milk the juice. It kills the plants in early spring your gardens mud. You walked around. That's not much good with heat and light. You hurried it. You worry that you buried it. The poor plant missed the mountain air. No heat no summer mugs up there you over fed it ten ten ten forgot to water it again. You hit it sharply with the hose. You used a hand without arose. Perhaps you sprinkled from above. You should have talked to it with love. The nursery mailed it without roots. You killed it with those gardening boots you walked to close you trod on it. You dropped a piece of sod on it. I'm crying. I just love him. I just loved him and his books. Were the opinionated Gardner. Was that what his greatest book was. That was the name of it. You mentioned Rock Garden. Rock gardeners are really they? They like to be punished. They tried artists plants of all they have a high hardest group plants from seed. And yes. Oh My Gosh. I can't even keep Diana's alive more than one year right. Yeah yeah so so okay so. Let's yeah plant slightly over there Hon. No I was thinking about over the years. It's hard to remember because they're not here right. And so you know you're looking. You think what I but I was thinking and I remember. I had a collection of Oak Leaf. Hydrangea and my favorite. Was snowflake semi double double really and it was about six feet tall. And I discovered after hurricane Irene. That hydrangea corker Is Flood intolerant? I lost them all. Oh and just recently. I got a text from my friend. Heidi and it had a photograph of something blooming in it and it was my favorite Siberian Iris. Which is a kind of short one. Among summer sky from nine hundred thirty five and I had that plan for about forty years but when I planted here it got a little shady better also got four and I lost it and the thing about that is if you don't plants and it was hard for me. I got that from someone in from an old garden because it's not easy to well now it's a little easier to find that it wasn't then it all it sky blue and white just beautiful and now. I can get it back because I shared that plant. I was thinking about arose that grew for many years. It's a rambler kind of purple colored. Rambler you'll Shin Blau. I believe you say V. E. L. C. H. E. N. B. L. A. You may be awesome. Yeah and and he just it was just that and I can just see the place I mean I could see out the window the place where it stood all those years where grew all those years and I think I don't even know what I don't even know if I remember what befell it you know but I keep wondering like with your IRA why don't I have it again. Why didn't I replace it right away? says it was just so beautiful. It was a a feature in the flower garden at Wave Hill. That was the first place I had seen it in New York City and so I had gotten it because I was so enchanted by it there. So that's a plant. I don't know if I killed it. I don't I'M NOT GONNA

John Ferry Garden Rock Garden Poppy John Kerry North American Rock Gardens So Pecker Wood New York City Texas Rambler Silas Clay Jeffrey Hurricane Irene Shin Blau Wave Hill Gardner E. L. C. H. E. N. B. L. Oak Leaf Diana Heidi
A Conversation With Uli Lorimer of the Native Plant Trust

In Defense of Plants Podcast

08:45 min | 9 months ago

A Conversation With Uli Lorimer of the Native Plant Trust

"Early. Lur thank you so much for coming on the PODCAST. How about we start off with telling everyone a little bit about who you are. And what is you do? Sure thank you. Thank you for having me on. So I am currently the director for the culture for Garner the woods in Asami farm For Native Plant Trust and trusts was formerly known as New England. Wildflower Society But we recently rebranded and changed our name and so we are now nick plan. Trust still the same organization just to name right on. And have you always been playing person or is this something you kinda figured out later on Throughout your career education or life I think I'd like to think I've always been a plant person. I think I could trace my earliest influences back to my mother. And my grandmother who always had really amazing gardens My grandmother lived in Germany. And as a kid we used to visit quite a bit and I just really love being outside in the space and you know I didn't know it at the time that it would have such an influence on me and I grew up in Wilmington Delaware and we used to get along with gardens quite a bit and I so that was kind of like my backyard and almost two three times a month we would go visit and as a kid you kind of think of it as this place to kind of run around in the highlights were like the Koi pond you know not plants per se but definitely had an influence on me and then as I got older I began working some landscape nurseries and and kind of traditional and install crews in high school and then when I got to college I actually went to Ethica college believing that I wanted to get into sports medicine and I filled out my first semester utterly and spectacularly because I think I was probably just more excited to not be living at home anymore and not really not really mature enough to to know what I was doing and so then I came back to this idea that maybe you could make a career in horticulture and I went back to university of Delaware enrolled in the horticulture and botany program there and absolutely loved it and kind of set me on this path and I initially thought you know because of my experiences working landscaping. That's where I wanted to go that I wanted to be a landscaper that I wanna to have my own kind of Mon blow operation but having some exposure to some commercial and retail nurseries. I was kind of bored with the standard choice of plants. There's only like everybody was going the same one hundred plants and so I thought were can I learn about the greatest diversity of plants learn about where to get the really cool interesting things and then apply that to this design idea and so thought Public Gardens and Botanic Gardens where the obvious place and so I ended up at the national them in DC for year doing an internship there and then moved up to New York City and worked at Wave Hill for about five years as their woodland Gardner and you know this dream of being in commercial horticulture faded quickly as my eyes open to the you know the beauty and wonder of public arts and all of the amazing plants and things that in all the possibilities of working in that kind of context really was very attractive to me and you know the longer I stayed in public arden's a less interest ahead and going back to commercial horticulture and so that then sort of transitions in the way Phil was was Was the beginnings of focusing in narrowing down to work with native plants In that I was responsible for their woodland I spent a lot of time pulling invasive but didn't really have any concept of how to transition that into a functioning woodland garden And certainly not much of an understanding at that time of the college and and plank the plank community concept or even a real firm grasp of regionalism which is something that I think is really important and so had an opportunity. Then to switch over to Brooklyn Botanic Garden and was hired as their curator of Native Flora and spent fourteen years there in that role. And that's where my approach in my focus in my understanding Really sort of blossomed. And where you know my current ideas about trying to connect field botany with public horticulture really crystallized thanks in part In a large part to the fact that there was an act of Science Department at Brooklyn Botanic at the time and A group of really wonderful botanist and taxonomic who had the patience to mentor me and that and allowed me to approach this horticultural work in the sense of saying well if I can go see plants in the wild and a natural spaces then I can get all this kind of good cultural information about you know the conditions that they grow in what sort of plant associations communities to they exist in and the more. I began to do that the more. I was intrigued by these questions of patterns and processes on the landscape and then I realized that that understanding ends up being incredibly valuable for a gardeners to understand how plants may or may not behave in cultivation and kind of get a better sense of how to plan out You know on garden wide landscaped scale plantings that that really embody these ideas of ecological value and aesthetics and sense of place. And you know sort of taking that inspiration of of seeing natural communities in and trying to translate that in a way into a designed public art in context so that work was really fantastic and getting to work with with those botanists. And you know at the time. I was just amazed that there were people who could identify any scrap of a plant. That you can link to them that you know you. Could you could open up a leasing cronquist manual and say I want to see this plant and they'd be like okay next week. We're going to go to field trip and I can take to it just like blew my mind that like that level of detail and understanding was that out there and through that partnership and Mentorship I was exposed to the New Jersey. Pine Barrens By one of One of the directors of sides at the time there named Dr Gary Moore through grew up down there and you know arguably one of the most knowledgeable about pine barrens. They exist today and so that really kind of began. The love affair of that particular landscape and at Brooklyn Botanic Garden about at this stage may be about eight years ago. The card leadership undertook this process of expanding. The data plan collection and the decision was made to focus primarily on pine barrens habitats and coastal plain grasslands as these were really sun-loving communities that had suffered in a hundred year old woodland garden with closed. Canopy we also made the decision because of the background and expertise of the Science Department at the time that we would source all the plants from the wild we would collect seed from known locations as locally as possible and grow all those plants and put them together Into this you know expanded new collection and so that was something that I was fortunate. Enough to be very intimately involved in Seed collecting over five six years to target the about one hundred fifty species that were new to the collection that we wanted to grow and all of the sort of fun and frustrations and challenges. Go with Trying to find enough seed and timing of collections and then you know the challenges of unlocking some of the propagation issues for some of these plants that had not been you know they're not international nursery horticulture at the stage and so I kind of felt it was neat because we were pushing the boundaries of the kinds of things that you could grow in public gardens exposing the public to plants that they were unfamiliar with but that really charismatic and then also again trying to emphasize the value of preserving those plants and habitats in C- to as as being one of the core messages of this kind of garden so a really wonderful experience. And like I said it really kind of began to crystallize for me. The the approach of what I'd like to a larger sense call regionalism. Which is this idea of like deciding that you wanna work within the boundaries of eka regions or physiology physio graphic provinces and. That's what should motivate your decisions about. What kind of plants are appropriate for Native Plant Garden and with it? All the benefits of local adaptations genetic diversity and biodiversity and showing that there are lots of plants that you can welcome into your garden from the wild and have a garden that is ecologically functioning primarily and aesthetic and just good for for humans and for all forms of

Brooklyn Botanic Garden Director Native Plant Garden Science Department Botanic Gardens Asami Farm For Native Plant Tr LUR Germany Brooklyn Botanic Nick Plan Wilmington New Jersey Delaware New England University Of Delaware Native Flora New York City Ethica
"wave hill" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

09:07 min | 10 months ago

"wave hill" Discussed on Conversations

"This was what thirty years. Also since you two years later is and so as you're driving into wave hill did it look very different from from how you'd remembered no no it was just exactly the same and all the all the trees had grown. 'cause we planned all those trays and that all grown and the homestead in on the ad. Saad using exactly the same. And could you find people that you'd know in from when you were living there with Ralph? New Kids is what we went down to. Doug Arago fist and trying to find someone and I'd say you feel if an wife hill and I said no no go update his subway and up there we go and you know they'd be another group and I said why field and they said. Oh Mrs May Mrs Ralph. And that's what they used to call me. Oh jumped and you know Bob. Timea couldn't save for people. Hugging me does so funny funny and then we told me that. Emily had died and Algae and to go back to Doug Arago now to calculating to say there is to go so in back there in our fandom. The other girls and I've got as you know may with all the girls and learn the skills be she said you know may take around middle to see all the people and we had made room for her in the front of the vehicle so beatty had commonly wink visiting to all the different houses. Safe Fun and then we went to the store and in store in word got around that MRS had returned. And you know all is young painful coming up tying. Mrs You know you may me no me. Ena Remember me. Give me my name and you know you made I made turn to and it was just absolutely extraordinary so people that you don when you when our little baby is review. Rally extraordinarily incredible. What did you make of it? All how he was a marriage is after all is what connections has your family continued to have with wife. He'll well my grandson will was a jackaroo and he went up there. He knew nothing about the country and apparently Dick Smith Hoodfar the IB say that Ralph's grandson was working on the station and Dick Smith called in when he's flying character and cold in because he wanted to meet seeing Ralph's grandson and we'll be had to get out and bid to go and made only that not longer and what did. How did you grandson enjoy working at all? He loved it he loved us. Yes so bob has been your partner and all these later adventures. That you've had the out. Why do you say that Bob has nine lives? What kind of skype says he got into over the years but when when we I got to Narendra. He was manager this property and he had a lot of things to do. Here is looking after only start bulls and you had to fade them. Every morning. This particular morning he came back and he said. Oh feel petard. I said have gone pain in the chest heavier and he said yes I have. No Oh my God so I had to get on the phone and ring the hospital. They do new. Cj confirmed that he'd have a heart attack. How old was he when he had his first? Brush with death. Thea what happened with human snake when he was just a kid he had defamed the cows of the school and you went to get an armful of high and there was a sniper beat him on his stomach. King Brown and then he had to Run Home I'll dream waiting keeping and to get home to his father and his father in a Gash sucked it and took him in hospital and he was very sick but he survived because it was in fatty two or we stomach which was very lucky for him. And what else is Bob experienced between then and now I feel we should be checking on Bob Right now. A big concern but other what other brands is he had the danger I worked at the nursing home and what one often in our came home. Bob Said oriented this. This heffer has just had had had carved she had twins actually and wanted. God and the other one he said. Come up the child. Because she she wasn't very old Heifer and she had this little recap. We had had looks for the to the fence. And then Bob waiting to you know. Put THE COW and carve in another pedic and rainy winds near the calf. The cow attacked him. This is what they do going to be very careful with cows and calves and knocked him to the to the ground and pushed him into this. Steel fence was still fence. Every with this is all in front of your eyes is an arm on the other side of the fence and and he was struggling to get up and she barreled him again. And Danny Wendy Gin and blood was squirting out of his head and I'm trying you know I was so shocked. I rest to open the guide and as I guide there was it was Bob. The cow is Rodney Carney and thank God the Cowan Beck well. I had met a Baghdad and I had to rice back to the house and I gave him a scarf to hold on his head. I suspect to the House to get the The vehicle and come back and before that I got onto triple oh and they came out unfortunately the front gate which was a few com. Does away was locked because we'd had some rumbles around the place so that the ambulance had white. They're all drama. Rob Say with your scarf on his head and anyway we got him in that was dangling blood from his head also half thank goodness. The doctor on duty in emergency had done seven years at emergency role print after hospital. And so he did a wonderful job. So and saved Ralph's live. I mean I saved US live but He sort of putting back together. He does so much traveling around in in Your Beloved Caravan. But now you'll stationed pretty much. Waste Gundi does that caravan get any use these days the Oh yes well. It didn't gun windy because our won't apply bridge in town so I've found someone who would conley let me had caravan in the BECA because we're leaving there and so I'm sort of had three days in in caravans beach on cheese are not on Thursday. So you draw from from the farm lifting their lifting. They've six months here. Where whereabouts are you in bulb living? Now they will be out there between Maury Gunda windy the two years and when I discovered my book to be published. I decided that I'd go back to Strasbourg Holland to be closer to the city and also I thought sill my house on Sternberg on so I went back there and Bob is current to join me shortly so you leave life out in the outback for the ARL is State is is and what do you hope for the next phase of your life given all the adventures that you've had so far in work and in nursing in on farms. What do you hope for the next few years? Well Bob and I would like to sort of travel around Australia. Promoting my book a country news because we had such a wonderful time traveling with an outbreak news. And you know it's amazing. The number of people you meet who have connection with the territory and it's just it's absurd feminists so we'd like to do that again for we're pretty healthy. So how'd you make your eighties? Now Bob Bob Star Bob. Seven years younger than me. We is long as you keep a close eye on ball by thinking I think should get into anymore scrapes. You all have to look after. It's been really wonderful talking to you..

Bob Bob Star Mrs Ralph Doug Arago Bob Right Mrs You Mrs May Saad Dick Smith Rodney Carney Timea beatty skype Australia Maury Gunda Emily Danny Wendy Gin Cj partner Narendra
Garden Resolutions with Ken Druse

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

09:24 min | 11 months ago

Garden Resolutions with Ken Druse

"Not just approaching the end of the year but the end of a decade so we'd better make some hefty resolutions right. Yeah well I'm not sad to see that decade go a years ago I made a New Year's resolution and I've kept it and my new year's resolution solution was to not make New Year's resolutions. Okay so sorry. You're saying garden resolutions. Because I'm going to make some of the okay so do you. You want to start town by telling me some of yours and before I tell you some odd. I'll start with a real quick story a many years ago I I was at Helen's daughter Garden in western Massachusetts and was planting whips Magnolia whips and with some of her friends and they said Oh Helen. Why are you planting such small trees? She was you know Richard Dirt and I remember she was about seventy five years old and when she was ninety two sitting on a bench edged the shade of the trees. So I try to remind myself plant anyway as it crosses my mind. I'm not GonNa see this mature sure or maybe I won't have fruit in my lifetime just just planted so no stinking thinking as they would call it in self help program right right in writing none of that negativity and and the other thing is that if even if you don't literally get to sit under like Helen's daughter did someone will and so yeah. Plant it all right. So that's a good one for planted for kids planet for granted exactly exactly cut down too many trees anyway so plant plant trees like I thought about my resolutions on. They're almost all about what he plans so into what he plans. Now you you WanNa tell me one. I'll tell you one then you tell me what do well mine are a little more. You know complicated complicated. Like I really need therapy Because and I mentioned this very briefly at the end of the last visit to the show that you were on You know that I a I have. I have to acknowledge speaking of twelve step programs in self help a little mantras stuff you know. I'm powerless over. Dot Dot dot. I'm powerless over. Some of those early ground covers that I planted you know thirty years ago or whatever all these things ground I wrote a book about ground covers. We were all into ground. Covers the whole ground cover section and every catalogue and and a lot of and turn out to be thugs And so they spread a lot and that was a good thing. At least it felt like a good thing to a beginning Gardner but it's not a good thing and now I've got all these things that are romping farther and farther and they've far out Gone beyond their bounds and so the problem is and maybe other people listening. Have this problem to on a smaller. A big way in their cartons if they've been there even ten years or five years stuff. That's where it's not supposed to be. It's gone farther than you intended. And you know we can turn a blind eye and then suddenly you've got a mile of it and if you look at it all every instance of that in your whole garden. We need to divide this. I need to take that out and vote you get paralyzed. At least I do right so my resolution was to. I made it this past fall when I was doing clean up and I said you know what I had to help her that Dan you know what today. We're going to spend our four hours. We're going to pull out this one. One section of Lamia Stream It's sort of a Nedeli like being a very gated ground cover. We're going to do this one section and then this winter we're going to sit didn't have coffee someday and we're going to decide what ground cover plugs little baby plance to order native probably Shade Plants Ferns or whatever that are going to go in this section they're not gonNa Romp you know but one section so my resolution is one section time in and so clean it up and replanted wanted and then I can move onto the next because otherwise I'm all over the place and nothing gets finished. That's how I am. I think I don't think you're like that. I think you follow thirty better than follow through. I think you're marcus tedious than I am. Not As tidy as your because you have tourists and I don't have the mini tours. But you know you're saying to pull out the ground covers. I was with you and I was thinking. Well what is she gonNA put down chopped wood mulch or something but then you said you're going to plant plants. Yes I can think of no better ground. Cover Mulch mulch right. And so I'm thinking and I'm pondering it gives me because I did that section it's a big section in fall You know kind of prep didn't and I know that what will happen in spring. Is that some of the remainders that I didn't get tried to dig out the root of these things. But they'll sprout up here and there and I'm GonNa have to do one more smaller cleanup but I wanna be ready with a plant outdoor a number of plants to like a mosaic. And you know again it might be ferns it might be you know I love trillions. I love you know some girls because it's in a place under a shroud so it's A. It's it's semi sheets. It's bright shade but it's shade. It's definitely shade so I have to think about what. I'm going to put their have the winter to do that but I need to be ready in the spring so that that's my kind of resolution is give myself time. I have the time to order your plan to choose to order the plants. Not a super rush job and then I can move onto the next section once. I've good. Yeah so wish me luck. I took Lampien last balls. Yes we'll see and I'm sure I've already planted bulbs there so you know nature of horsa vacuum. And so do I. Yes yes yes yes yes yes so what about you another one. Well this is a very hard one for me You know our friend Marco if he doesn't like a slant it's out but I I have so much trouble letting or ground covers not so bad lambaste room Yorkshire but when it comes to in trees I've planted a whole lot of Doug Eastern dogwoods from the mountains of Mexico the Urbana which has fused brax have have lots saplings Eighty tall now right so sear. I hope to have some flowers some flowers and out of these eight trees that are very skinny too. Close together the ones. That don't have nice flowers or nice state. It's going to be a little are Bora side. Think of Markle. Yes and so. We used to people who don't know Marco is was the founding director of horticulture of Wave Hill the public garden in New New York City in in the Bronx and worked for many many years fifty two year old garden and he was probably the first forty years or thirty five year. Thirty five years. Something like that. Yeah Yeah so And he is and he says barrier dead and fast. Which means if you have a languishing plant that's looking to us? Miserable like stop op fussing over it start over you know making new make a fresh start. Oh you made me think of something no or give it away. Oh Oh new. Don't give it to me you don't give it to me. Okay Yeah Yeah So another thing that I've done I hate to say that I've done wrong or I've been bad but that's how I feel and so I just want to say that loud so I feel it makes me feel bad when then I haven't taken my own advice or the wisdom that I know from others. I haven't set a good example And I in really what it is is my garden is too big for me. You know it's two point three acres and it's you know it's a lot. It's really a lot too much manage and so stuff gets neglected. I'm getting ready for spring. Bring tourists your mentioned before all you know in April and early May the first ones are usually in the first or second week of May and I have to say. Hey you know we're not going to get to that area and so what happens. Is I close off that particular area and I do that a couple of years in a row and guess what you know. It's a mess and one of the things things I've noticed is that instead of because I'm again having the tourist instead of All my beds are in turf so my beds are within grass ask. They're surrounded by grass. There's no stone edge or metal edge Is that they're like islands. I guess is what I'm saying in turf and so the the easiest thing is just to cut a clean edge with your edging tool and put on your mouth. Well the thing is though. The bed gets an inch bigger and bigger in an inch Baker right because because because there might have been a plant that flopped over the edge and made the battle messy at the edge. So you cut it a little white. Well you do that for a few years without reselling reselling some grass seed right and re you know kindling that turf on the edge. You don't keep the bed the same shape and size it gets bigger. And then guess what happens to your pathways single-file loops between two beds. You know so I need to do turf stuff stuff and I hate. I hate growing grass. I hate it I just hate it But I need to do it. So that's my other thing for the coming Spring and actually in my in the northeast. The best area is mid August to mid to late September for turf repair but I need to do some spring this year

Oh Helen Marco Massachusetts Richard Dirt Gardner DAN Lampien Markle Mexico Founding Director Wave Hill Yorkshire New New York City Bronx
"wave hill" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

14:00 min | 1 year ago

"wave hill" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"A culture in wave hills history though the garden in the riverdale section of the Bronx in New York City was founded in nineteen sixty five. And I'm glad to welcome back to the show to ask some advice. Hi Louis Hello Margaret. How are you fine? Thank you happy winter. Oh my goodness came with a vengeance. It did So when the book came out I just WanNa remind people I didn't interview with its author the garden writer Tom. Christopher who's a friend of both of ours and we talked about some of the sorts of lessons of wave style of gardening. And I'd like to dig a little deeper into some of those with you and also some additional thoughts I've picked up on on my second read of the book of Nature Into Art. So maybe first of all most practically you know you guys are really frugal. I mean it's sounded gives Brazilian trillion trillion dollar budget or dislike. Go Out and do whatever you want. So maybe that's why but you collect an age leaves to make malls you compost of of course things from seed which takes a long time but sees the on the budget. I is your motivation. Purely ecological or in budget or budgetary or what. Well maybe I should start by saying. It's partly history because nineteen sixty five The garden really did have a tiny budget and for a a few years after Marco became the first director of Horticulture Genetics Marco Polo Stefan of the original director of order culture. Okay good good behalf. He had a really tiny budget. And I think it was partly by his nature and I think that it it it shows in the character of the garden. There's there are some kinds of being frugal. Really lend character to the garden and Forces you to grow things from from seed and really know the plants from the seedling up to a mature plant or collecting your own piece sticks for state gang and as you said your own mulch and compost. You really know what's in it. You know how to use it. You know what it's going to do. You're not going to the local box store and what they offer. You know all of a sudden changes. Is it something completely lately difference It has a lot of advantages So so it's not just sustainability so to speak or budgetary but it's it's it's organic in the sense of everything is of the place and of apiece. Yeah okay of course. Don't mind saying these days that it's also ecologically sustainable with their catchphrases that we've always done without having the catchphrase so so so So okay so one of the things is composting You must have I mean. I only have two Acre Gardner whatever little over two acres and my compost compost heap. Is this massive open pile. It's I don't know forty feet long and eight feet wide and very tall at the peak times of year. When there's lots of fresh material I I mean you're must just be you know football field? I don't even know but how old's and most close to that. Yeah so so. What is your method and are any insights or any anything you can share about that? Because I think that's something that people always compost hot or turn it a lot. You know what I mean. We don't come post it hot and media and from the beginning it was an open pile like yours and we weren't particularly careful full about it. We happen to have some rough terrain. It's not really accessible to the public. A with a generous amount of space to have a big pile so we had the luxury of just waiting waiting for it right to take a long time to break down but but space keeps you know shrinking even though our property is the same size. Is We develop a more at the garden. The garden of creeps out and gets a little bigger and our compost is getting squeezed and so we are just with a new assistant. Director director is getting a little more attention. And we've expanded what we collect. It's not just the garden clippings and believes in the chip would that we prune Now our the rest of our staff wave hill is more than just a garden. We have an arts program and education. Those departments want us to incorporate their a kitchen waste so we started doing that. And using Tumbler. Because we didn't want too much food wastes in our pile right in the city and and that's really kind of again focused on well. Are we really being as efficient as we could be. Could we make our compost pile a little meter meter. Maybe people even want to see it and we don't have to take them to a football sized place if we do a little more chopping and a little bit more turning and pay a just a little more attention to how we put it in the pile in other words. Yes yes yeah seeing the green and the Brown. Yeah and and the way you just said chopping The smaller remake the debris before we can Before we put it in I mean even just cutting it up. A little bit really really helps let alone shredding or something like that but but really really helps to speed obviously the decomposition and Yeah so that can that can be different. Yeah Yeah makes a big difference I've wondered about the tumblers. I've never tried one so interesting that you've you're using it with the food scraps as suppressive Yeah yes we still don't use any meter now of course protein or any of those things in it. It's not a closed system that could accept that but because because they're cooked vegetables that might attract vermin in the garden as we have been putting it in a tumbler and it doesn't take any extra space. Just uh-huh extra minutes every week to collecting give it a few turns. Yeah so one of the things that you do and Tom. Christopher the author of the Book Doc And I talked about this briefly And I wanted to know more about it is that you use some of your pruned. Uh when you're pruning you keep certain things in order to use them later as like steaks and other support mechanisms and I wondered if you could give me an example because I feel it made me feel like Oh my goodness. I've been squandering. My you know my my my brush pile all these years will. There are a few things that we don't put in the brush pile and and instead make into some bundles that we stuffed into a corner of the garage. or or I guess if I were doing it at home they'd go into the corner of the tool said did and and those are some tough perennials. which most people don't think of saving if you do if you do grow them let's be Deza and Baptista have such stiff durable stems that they make great supports four young things in the spring like sweet peas and Clement is just coming out of the ground and we use them in in the greenhouse occasionally to for the winter climbing vines that we display in the in the palm house? Also you don't need you too big heavy trellis type of or big steak. You use even some herbaceous things that have sturdy but but not woody not big big thick quickey. Yeah Oh interesting less baptist. Okay they're very fibrous and they're fairly straight so you can make them into a tidy bungle you have to store them for the winter and use them in the early spring for things that are tender in just coming up. Okay Sam when winter or toward the end of winter if we're doing pruning on on spy RIAs or or birches or some of the willows and not the not the bigger growing willows but the little willows like per currier Nina which we use as a hedge. They make very fine textured. Woody stems almost like the less pity's about a little bit stronger and entirety. They have short inner nodes and they're very branchy so they make good support for low perennials. Okay so okay so low perennials. So I'm in. It's it's the springtime everything's coming up out of the ground. All My perennials. I've cleaned up. And when do I put put this. What did they used to call it? Brushing up some of the brushing up as opposed to staking for more formal staking So give us some examples of some some implants and perennials. That might that people might know that that might benefit from this and you kind of put it around the perimeter of the of the clump or what. What's the idea usually around the perimeter but but sometimes in the center one of my favorites is shrub? Clements and Ryan made it a little bit esoteric but now now now there are some strictly strictly Shrub Plymouth and some that are just very low growing which is sort of sprawling. It doesn't really line and these kinds of stakes are great for that They're not strong enough for things like peonies which retrieved you need this dirtier steak for but I don't I don't know if if you're growing on that that's a good. That's a good example so something that would otherwise get kinda floppy You put this in when it's emerging and it provides like a an armature for it to Alexa help okay all right sales some stiffer things too like willows colored twig corners because they're flexible and imperfectly. Straight and you can make arches or a a street grid or a or a more traditional shaped trellis out of your own twigs. And what would you like a grid. The way like a pioneering sometimes uh-huh people might have seen it in the Garden Center has a grid of Metal On the top. If you made a grid for something what would you lash together with flake which you use wine or something or it would just be. Your twin is usually our first choice. Trying yeah okay. All right sometimes we get a little fancy ASEAN we we have some finer textured hemp twine. which is just a little more discreet if you want something that's going to show and you don't WanNa let's see all the time and the not right so we're GONNA get crafty? I better get crafty. I got again. I've got a recultivate my Martha Stewart. DNA that. I I used to have and the jute twine is is a bit easy to find a store so you around try. Yeah Yeah so so I said in the beginning that you grow a lot of things from seed and and I also do something through goal. which is I call? It serves shopping in in your own garden. which is sort of finding cell phones and using them but the thing that's frustrating about self zones is a lot of Bi annuals? Certain annuals do this. They might give you a lot of babies. But last year's plants don't always plant their babies where they paint pretty garden picture right like there exactly. There are a few things that seem to only want to grow in the paving cracks. And that's not very practical right. He edge of the bed. Yeah so one of your big ways that you garden there is that you you do these things but you add it. Don't you Redo End To help. Defeat the problem of them only seating into the paving cracks. Some of them we in the fall we do a little extra clean up so that there is clear ground and they fall in the middle of the bed and come up not just. I'm very at the very edge because some of these need need a little space and light and and if you're careful to do that they'll come up in the middle of the bed where you want them. Oh so you anticipate the self sours and give them a little extra open soil l. around where the seed heads. Oh and you don't load it up with Mulch at the end of the season Ryan to leave some bare ground for them out Out Boy what a what. What am I thinking? All these decades will melt but it doesn't it doesn't marry very well with things like lurks per down an Fox glove and poppies. They need a little bit of open space. So you can all the places where they're not growing but if you're cultivating them you need a little bit of open ground around right. That makes them easy. Then you may not have to move them you really do just did it out the extra one out a little bit. Yeah Right. Yeah Yeah I find biennial a number of animals like Angelica for instance Some of the biennial find you do so around a lot Things like Colangelo Alangelo so an annual You know they so like cry crazy amounts if you've ever if you ever have them the sort of a wide spectrum of the the ones that so just a few and you have to guard them and maybe moved the view and then there are the ones that just make thousands and the only job is editing. Them Out So for us. The ones that are so prolific. Are things like Parrilla yes after plex Jila. Yes and there's a new pink of flowered Queen Anne's lace. Oh yes it's it's it's not Ami Mejias it is it no. That's it's Kuroda it's oh Dhaka's corrode right right right right right right dour right. I don't know why I can't think of the I can't remember that. Yeah well the first year or two we grew it. It may just a few seedlings but by third year they were everywhere. So it's in that group of things that makes lots of seedlings and you have to be careful to edit a lot of amount nick Oshana. I'm I'm I'm like I've got the world national collection over here of Negoti on an sprang millions of seedlings and For being CANARIAN SIS..

director Christopher football Tom Ryan Marco Polo Stefan wave hills New York City Garden Center Louis writer Alexa Martha Stewart Ami Mejias nick Oshana Negoti Kuroda palm house Angelica
"wave hill" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

14:36 min | 1 year ago

"wave hill" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"In and grow we can look at Great Gardens as works of art being delighted purely by the visuals or we can dig a bit deeper as we tour these landscapes and look for clues on how to become great gardeners ourselves now a new book about wave hill all the world renowned public garden in New York City does just that it lets us feast on the design daring the color plays the garden pictures captured in its extravagant Traficant photography but at the same time it tells us how they were accomplished teaching us the tenets of the wave hill way of gardening that we can put into practice at home but I this message underwriting support from high mowing organic seeds the first independently owned farm-based seed company probably serving organic gardeners and farmers with one hundred drew percent organic and non. GMO vegetable herb and flower seeds high mowing seeds dot com slash away to garden. Tom Christopher a graduate of New York. Botanical Garden School of Professional Horticulture and longtime garden writer and friend wrote the new book and along the way even Tom with all his prior training enjoyed a sort of insiders advanced course in garden making and maintaining. He's here to share some of the many wave hill a-as gleaned along the way hi Tom Hart marker wonderful wonderful the book so much and I say that as someone who's been there many times of course and even used to live across the street for maybe ten years and and it brings it to life and we should credit of course your colleague the photographer who yes yes knock knock no yes and really the pictures and but the approach you took in teaching us as I said in the introduction not just going oh how beautiful beautiful but but really digging in so yeah so I for those who've never visited. Maybe just a little quick background about Wave Hill. Tell us what it is for. Those who don't know it's a really remarkable landscape. It's the just about the last country estate left in New York in the nineteen sixties and the family that owned it the Perkins for going to develop it and the neighborhood it got together and spoke to them and said you know can we preserve it so they donated it to the city and that was when after a couple of years of a sort of benign neglect they brought it or maybe not so benign they brought in Marcos Rojo and just around genus by anybody's standards and he created the gardens on this on this eighteen acre site overlooking the Hudson River so it open to the public in nineteen sixty sixty seven I think and it has these and when you say overlooking the Hudson River I mean it's breathtaking views. We you face the palisades across the river her and so it's just those unspoiled of you. You see as unspoiled. It's not a bunch of apartment buildings across the way or anything. No it was actually one of the real challenges of making a garden. There is the few could steal the show at any time to incorporate views into the garden and also at times direct. The visitors is away away from the few for a while so that's one of the lessons may be then. I think so how do you how to really make use of a few borrowed landscape. exactly. I'm there's a place place on the there's Arbor along the edge of the ridge overlooking the Palisades and they always in fall. I always make sure to include flat flowers and foliage recall the foliage colors across the river and establish link so it feels like the palisades just in part of a backdrop for the garden right so right to really tie in even the near view with that borrowed landscape farther away view Joe so let's dig into some of the other lessons you learned about gardening in the process of creating this book and I guess one that struck me from the even I think it was right in the introduction was the sort of overarching mantra of the gardeners and Marcus Donahue you mentioned too is the founding ending director of horticulture. He's no longer there but even the subsequent directors of horticulture including Louis Bauer. Who's there now great great? Gartner said the the the mantra is like plants. I right yeah absolutely it's it's very much you know the gardens arranged for well also based based on the needs of the plants and and very clever use of micro climates so we talked about that in a minute but I think the with the plants it's not just oh look tuck. Let's get that it has a pretty pink flower. It's not that at all. It's like shapes and tax all these different. Qualities of plants are taken into account. Yes you know Marco's background. Background was in art history and the history of architecture and there's a and he spoke to me. I was able to interview not just Louis Bauer the current director who is tremendously ASLI healthful and in creating this book but also with Marco and Marco said repeatedly that architecture came first and all our gardens that you'd start with the architecture of trees on the site and then the shrubs and even down to the form of plants and the color was something was it's funny because I'd always thought of color is sort of the defining characteristic of any garden but he said it was the second Eric Characteristic with him interesting interesting he talks about am not in the book but in general in person he talks about things like you need a blob over there. He'll say so some of it's not formal architectures speak but it's unpretentious person. All of the gardeners were which was one of the joys of working with uh-huh. Do you need a blob like a hunky shaped. You know down thing or you need. You need a an exclamation point. You know you need something. Kilometer vertical leroux horizontal or you know something spreading yeah yeah so you brought up another another one of the the sort of things that you learned before about micro climates you know speaking of plants and and that's an unusual lesson and and it's a hard lesson to learn from space until you're there for a while isn't it. I think it is it's you know we all talk about micro-climates climates but how many of them made really skillful use of them and they grow things at. Wave Hill for instance they can't grow at the New York Botanical Garden a few miles away that's because there's micro-climate that they've identified and they've made use of the breezes come from the river which keeps it somewhat drier in the summer uh-huh and then there's oh they pick a south facing slope imperfect drainage and they could credit-rating plants that aren't supposed to grow in New York City right right right and and when you say grow you mean even over winter them oh absolutely they're hardy and flourish right so so there's that river exposure exposure that may be part of it and some other examples I think so the the they grow those in and they grow those and then they grow a lot of tropicals and so forth but those I believe they bring in right. Shell to tropical since high the winter either in the greenhouses are semi Dormant Armand in class sports but when you see it in the act of growing season it's like there's this Mediterranean stuff and there's this tropical seven. You almost are fooled S. two where you are. That was one of the things they told me away. Fill the nearest city has the climate of you know Siberia in the wintertime but a lot like Sumatran this summer so we're not grow client tropical right so learning to read our spaces within our space is really really important to developing a plant. Palette that can be more daring than we might think at first if we just go by the OEM in zone five Biro. I'm in zone six. B or you know what I mean yeah for instance. I've always had trouble growing well. I took care of for ten years a garden on the Palestinians across our hell. I had tremendous trouble growing lavender offender. It was just too humid in the summer but they found a spot along the Western Wall of stone building on top of the slope so it was a drainage just really perfect lavender. Just those beautiful there. It looks like Provence. It's interesting yeah. I've never succeeded with it so yeah so other some of these other guys. I mean one of them that I remember reading about in the book. Doc is kind of like an they're different wishes either backtrack a second state. There's different gardens within this garden. It's not just one garden kardon right. Wave Hill is a series of and they're even more than rooms. They're really separate spaces. Yes whole separate experiences as sort of a series of inspirations really and so one of them is cold though wild garden right. That's possibly my favorite Gardner. It's it was one of the few burns at survived from the days before when you fill became public garden rock garden in the old days and then Marco and the gardeners redeveloped it as a wild garden meaning that they brought in plants from foothills and mountain size from all around the world and Krizan together in in this sort of cosmopolitan wild natural looking space but it's it's for this composition. It's very difficult to tricky to maintain so wild does not mean unmanaged no in fact that's that Eric Garner Joelene because people come in and they think she does nothing and in fact. It's very very difficult to maintain a garden at just the right degree of wildness it takes a lot lot of editing and a lot of care to keep it at the edge of wildness without going out of control right so a- and it has that spontaneity and spontaneity can't be forced yet yet you in a way you have to use the gardeners hand to edited a little bit and yet still have it look spontaneous and that's tough right it is stuff was a trick they've used and they use it in a lot of the other guards as well is a very enthusiastic excuse of volunteer seedlings they let some of the flowers go to seed right and they scatter their seat on the ground and the next spring they come up as volunteer seedlings and they let some of them grow up and some of them they pluck out and ended out but it is it means the gardens different every year and it gives it that feeling of spontaneity Addi. It's also useful as a horticultural technique because when the seats find find their own spot they tend to grow and grow where the conditions. They're just right for them so you get very vigorous. hardy grows from the plants so I'm sort of closing my eyes as we're talking. I'm thinking about the flower our garden another area on a kind of lower level near to the main entrance not on the while kind of up on a hill above parts of the the rest of the garden and the I think the flower garden which is a little bit more formal but still has this sp things things spilling out of the beds onto the path kind of feeling as well and I'm thinking that's the place were look for instance cell phones like larks per for instance might be yes. Yes and we're not the defending. Excuse me the digital US okay the Fox. Love are largely self sown right in in fact I even when they weed out some of them in the early spring they set them aside and pots and grow them on Clayton appears later in the summer that can pop them back in right so it's not not that I mean you were saying about how it's different cheer but the signature plants are always there from year to year and there's some new ones of course from time to time but but they're in different in concentration or undulations right I mean they're not the exact spots where they were. You know the changes every year which is one of the wonderful things about Pat Gardner way fill in general right I do love how there is that like the flower garden has paved paths pads and the beds are in a grid kind of but there is that a fusion that stuff sort of spilling out and touching the pavement and do you know what I mean yeah. It's you know very very formal loud and but a very informal planting within it's just very essential and luxuriant planting right it makes wonderful contrast with severe formal layout of garden right and it also is very different from when you walk up the path and then up the steps taps into the wild garden which doesn't have rectilinear beds at all correct no not at all. I mean they're just just follow and the contras of the garden right right yes so so I was that inspired maybe by William Robinson Vat and there's also I think garden near the cloisters for triumph park on on state garden that was one of the inspirations for two which is another those are wild garden in New York City not as beautiful. I don't think it's the way Hoegaarden okay so some other of these kind of a Ha's I mean and I I there. There's one about sort of in the book about native plants and that was a bit of a revelation. I I don't know I mean you can tell us what it was lies but it seemed like you were surprised almost a little bit too. I was really surprised as experience which is one of the wonderful parts about. I was always learning and always having my preconceptions challenge with the native plants. They decided that well a lot of people. Don't grow native plants because typically they're they're grown grown in a naturalized setting you know sort of simulation of a wild environment and a lot of people particularly you know in suburban areas don't..

Wave Hill New York City Botanical Garden School of Pro Marco New York Botanical Garden Louis Bauer New York Pat Gardner Hudson River director Tom Christopher Great Gardens Tom Hart Tom Traficant writer Provence Gartner Hoegaarden US
"wave hill" Discussed on Bodega Boys

Bodega Boys

05:06 min | 1 year ago

"wave hill" Discussed on Bodega Boys

"Hip hop. We are saying perfect verse zits on top of hip hop. You know what I'm saying is being held by the corpse with Percy p. Yeah you know what I'm saying? We're climbing Everest like we want to give up like carrots. One shows up. Months. Can't go any further. Mirrow. Wow. Keeping. Total of of the. Kuku booking. Top about ever since mad lion. He's until you take it easy. Anybody that ever worked for Novus records? It's like yes. Yes, I talked to the logo. It was a little nervous guy gets day with the vinyl cutting loves flats was perfect. I can't do the further. Who out of nowhere who shows up she'll version of Broadway Dion Bon. Oh, no friends. Oh. Just want to cry. What you just want to cloud when I do time when I. Hip hop retrospective. Forty people on your production staff died making this shit. Oh fuck. Fuck it worked at. We're going to call it. The kings of Ron right? Right, here, Nick is gonna smoke right by green. Boots. I forgot. Your body couldn't be me sorry scene even. Bless you. Every shoot them. They don't have both Muros on side. Dahbi boots agreeable. We gotta go five who died on my Everest. And because unites with dick, take the wall tack on ever. This is kgo their tag. A Buddha boys. Viral marketing my dick. How a how, how would that be in the graffiti world? If you tag on Everest God, I'll do what you be. Would you be the would you be the ultimate graffiti is probably probably this? And there's a lot of there's a lot of four four fathers to she. But my I is my with let's start small this tag on wave hill. Riverdale all let's get it. Let's get I wrote down on a class trip while nauseous. To wave one day because it was raining OD, and we're going back to school and scoop was stopped. And Chris Hayes is hot dog fueling, I live right here by can you think? Also because I was a kid. I heard overdose. I assume he lived in Venice mad rivers. Chris as. Boots. I wanna know chef boyardee backstory. Let's go was the poverty because he, he clearly raised to the top his ranks tagging, chef who was his rival, and I wanna see him like cook office for Julius wool eight, what were you going boy, RD? I'm going to make mitt knows pollen in. Listen to this innovation. I put it in a can now and get out of here are d-. No, no. Listen. To me, it's going to be no. No one ever put spaghetti O's and a candy thing. Talking guy, you study forever. No, no fuck you fuck, you know, fly for you. You know. Fucking guy. I'm going to take this anymore. I'm going to go to America. You know what, I'll see you it sixteen o'clock because we're using world time your ass mind, bro. Kill spill. Let me check my son dial. Okay. In five hours, I will do that. Well, you don't want to get out of here, and go to America, give everybody that I beat this fuck you out of our need this, I'm gonna throw away, Mike model Gondolo month two. The big pizza. Guy right there and Perello towards is all we know about strip data's and shots..

Chris Hayes Everest Nick Percy p America wave hill dick Dahbi Ron Muros Perello Mike Julius five hours one day
"wave hill" Discussed on Cultivating Place

Cultivating Place

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"wave hill" Discussed on Cultivating Place

"Certainly in New York. I mean, it was we were we have, you know, minus double digit wind chill today and so- standing in our palm house with South African bulbs, blooming or intellectual hall with some wonderful pictures of spring and summer is is really unnecessary scheme. It is bomb for sure. And so I wanna I wanna end up Louis with appealing to you and your personal history. And and work in this world and your own pathway of of learning and growing yourself, especially in this public gardening's fear where there is there is great accessibility. By anyone who wants to take advantage of it? Tell us a little bit about why to you personally. This is such an important thing in our world at this time. It it feels critical is a critical time for us to have a connection to the earth. Because as I've heard repeated in in so many different ways from different people. We protect what we love and the only way to get to love the plants and the earth that sustain is to to get to know them. And and so that's why I think more and more. I in my gardeners, and and the rest of the staff at wave hill, see our garden as a way to connect to people that is more and more important. It's not it's not just a scientific institution. It's not a it's it's not a didactic place. It is a place that allows people to take their time to take in things as slowly or as or as rapidly as they like, they can sit on the lawn for a whole day at a time and just watch the sky in the river go by and eventually, I think that has an effect escaping from the city, and if that gets them off their chair and wandering around the gardens than they have another level of of wandering about these incredible plants that that. Support us on this planet. Is there anything else you would like to add? Well, I grew up gardening and thought I would get away from it. But I just couldn't stop. Once the plants get us. They keep us. They do they definitely do. So I hope that happens to other people too. Once they walk around the garden, and are are enticed to to touching a plant or growing plant or trying to start one from seed rather than always turning to the nursery for a potted trae. Tray of of annuals for their window box that they form a deeper relationship and greater appreciation. Thank you very much for being a guest on the program today. It's been a pleasure speaking with you. You're very welcome. It was my pleasure to Louis Bauer is the senior director of horticulture at wave hill a public house in Gordon in New York City's the Bronx. He joined us today via Skype from wave hill to share more about the educational offerings and the importance of this kind of work by cultural institutions around the country. Wave hills in you will winter three part lecture series is underway. Now, as I mentioned, I find gardeners and naturalists to be remarkably ardent self directed. Lifelong learners and doers. How people learn and where and why their motivation to learn whether that be more about a particular subject a plant family or a whole new garden skill wherein. How? This is sparked is something I find fascinating some of us. Learn best, by example, as apprentices or students in practicum 's other of us learned by reading and research, and then trial and error still others of learned by teaching and others. Learn by listening and thinking, and then trying whatever way you learn best. I wanna encourage all of us to follow your internal inclinations and curiosities and dig in for yourselves attend the lecture check out that book from the library or attend that class at your local, nursery or botanical garden sign of for a symposium and gather with your planty people. It's a healthy dose of winter chlorophyll supplement we all benefit from what's your best learning method? And what do you have lined up in the way of continuing education this winter season? Let us know by sending us a note Coulter. Baiting place at g mail dot com. Or make a comment on the weekly social media posts.

Wave hills Louis Bauer senior director New York Gordon Coulter New York City Skype
"wave hill" Discussed on Cultivating Place

Cultivating Place

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"wave hill" Discussed on Cultivating Place

"Louis Bauer senior director of horticulture at wave hill in New York City's borough of the Bronx, welcome back. I know another aspect of your public outreach is an annual lecture series around this time of year every year tell us a little bit about this year's lecture series. And then we'll we'll talk about the history and kind of catalyst for that. Well, I have to say Martha who couldn't join us today wrote something wonderful about the lectures this year, and she wrote this ongoing series curated by wave hill, senior director of horticulture and the friends of horticulture committee is devoted to garden design and the meaning of our interactions with plants in the natural world, and and and beyond that she talks in her introduction to this year series about how a small and intimate garden like ours is in bedded in a much wider world. And that was what we intended the three speakers this year to to help. Explore. Okay. So tell us about those speakers while the first happened to awake ago. It was Colin Cabot, his father and mother founded stone crop and his mother spent time at this garden as a child. So he had deep roots in the history of the place, but because of the influence of gardens in his life in in his sort of second phase of life. He has taken on a project to reinvigorate a large farm in New Hampshire with a renewed active timber operation and iron working operation and fiber production and farming and livestock in traditional methods. So that people in the region have a place to go and see how pre industrial farming was carried out and and what its benefits were. I know the whole world can't go back in time. And and live that way, but he talked about the connections between. The influences of gardens on his life. And and what he hopes people gain from seeing this kind of farming and gardening that he's now carrying out in his personal time in New Hampshire. People people were very impressed. I bet. Yeah. I bet. The second lecture is Lisa Roper from Shanta clear. So you can see we're kind of circling our friends. Lisa Roper has been gardening. The dry garden at Shanta clear, which is a similar size and scope garden to wave hill for about twenty years, and she is going to tell us about how that garden has changed over the years. And and how it's connections to other gardens have shaped what it is nice and third we're having Coralie Thomas who was an intern here for years ago, then went to shan't Shanta clear and then earned a scholarship to work at great dick Stor in in England for a year and has since then been working. As a full-time Gardner at great, dick Stor. And so from from being a college student in Canada to being an intern at wave hill to Gardner in Philadelphia to a gardener in England. I think she is is is going to explain from. Young gardners perspective that the sort of learning curve and the transitions she has been through and the revelations she's seen in that short. But rich experience of the last five years and the date of the final lecture is. March twentieth. And the February talk is also on the twentieth. And do you have any sort of follow up components to the lectures that people could find online, or is it pretty much an in-person experience. Only it's been an in person experience only we have explored finding ways to to get parts of the lecture onto our website. But our website is due for a rebirth. But at the moment, it doesn't include video or or lecture clips yet. When you look at the the history give us a little bit of the history of the lecture series because it's a fairly well known and highly respected lecture series each year. And when when was the lecture series started as an idea, and when did it become an annual element to the to the gardens offerings while you're you're flatter our series of a bit because I have to say, we always feel as though it is it is a sort of tightly held community secret. You make it sound so much more respected, but it does have some history..

Lisa Roper New Hampshire senior director Shanta clear Martha dick Stor Louis Bauer New York City intern Gardner Colin Cabot England Coralie Thomas Philadelphia Canada twenty years five years
"wave hill" Discussed on Cultivating Place

Cultivating Place

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"wave hill" Discussed on Cultivating Place

"So it's strong. Nice. That's good to hear Louis Bauer is the senior director of horticulture at wave hill, the public house in Gordon in New York City's borough of the Bronx Hoon of thirty three cultural institutions owned by the city of New York and one of five public gardens in that group. Wave hill is in the midst of its annual winter lecture series, stay with us. We'll be right back after a break to hear more. This is cultivating place. I'm Jennifer jewel. We're back from a break in this first episode of a winter series exploring some of the ways we as Gordon IRS continue our own educations throughout our life. The way we gather learn and grow together today were speaking with.

wave hill New York City Gordon IRS Louis Bauer Jennifer jewel Gordon senior director
"wave hill" Discussed on Cultivating Place

Cultivating Place

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"wave hill" Discussed on Cultivating Place

"We hope hick. The interest of visitors. We do label some plants we're not a potential gardened, but we do have public programs that help people take a little deeper look at natives or at Alpine's or at learning how to do some garden tasks, but we have a very big neighbor called New York botanical garden miles away, and they have a very highly developed horticulture education program. So it's not that we're not interested, but we have found our niches to fill and actually there's a bit of new interest in offering a little more adult program aimed programs in horticulture that are. Still different from the New York botanical garden that that that we haven't tried in a little while part of that is is motivated by the fact that we have a book coming out soon about how we do and maintain our gardening here at wave hill. And and it reveals some of our techniques and some of the things that over history we have decided we should share with the public. And we're hoping that that might generate a little bit of a change in the offerings. We've had in horticultural education. When is the book coming out and who is publishing? It timber press is publishing it we expected to be out in the fall, they -ture into art the gardens of way of hill. Limit. I love it some of the school programs doing corporate horticultural education. They walk through the gardens, and they learn what gardeners. Do and what gardens mean for urban life or or for anyone's life for that matter? But I think we're about to to turn a little bit of new leaf on the things we offered for more sophisticated gardeners. Louis Bauer is the senior director of horticulture at wave hill. A public house in garden in New York City's borough of the Bronx. It's twenty eight acres of Gordon's in Woodland's are in education in themselves and the garden staff supplement the gardens educational opportunities with twice weekly guided tours with weekly Finley programs and with their annual winter lecture series underway now, we'll be right back to hear more. Stay with us..

New York City wave hill Woodland Louis Bauer Gordon senior director Finley twenty eight acres
"wave hill" Discussed on Cultivating Place

Cultivating Place

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"wave hill" Discussed on Cultivating Place

"It might be there were there was always something of the arts and environment and horticulture in the mix, but whether one was stronger than the other in what direction they might take took a number of of years to figure out and and I've seen the same struggle in some in some younger organization. So I I have have some firsthand knowledge seeing what that struggle is like it's not easy, but we have made a wonderful marriage between those three components of our mission now, and I'll be glad to talk more about that. If you're interested. Yes, very interested. I think that is such a wonderful historical. Lesson in many ways about the nature of the living dynamic of nonprofit getting started especially one that has a public mission, and is part of the developing life of of such an organization, especially if it's going to go on to thrive. I think you're right. And like a garden. There are so many things that influence what that direction takes exactly what kind of support emerges, and what its community what what it surrounding community is like and the political environment and all sorts of things come into play. And and they change a little over time. And so we change a little too. There were there were a couple of decades. When most of the arts component of of the organization was comprised of large. Well, known artists putting big sculptures in the landscape. But as the horticulture took hold and gained some reputation that phase of the art component of our mission shifted, and now, I think is in a really wonderful place where our curator's at wave hill have formed. Relationships and made connections with the artists in New York City, which of course. Is a pretty rich environment. And and they now focus on things that really match the nominal education in the horticulture components of wave hill. So it's not an imposition on the landscape. It's very sympathetic with it. We inform one another as head of horticulture. I can say that the artists are very respectful of things that do happen outside. They're not you'd Richard Serra giant steel sculptures. They're very thoughtful and provocative, and and we collaborate often. Yeah. Yeah. So talk about the evolution of the environmental education in horticulture program because I think this is also one of the important areas, especially with horticulture in in a changing natural and physical environment in our world. And in the increasing need for for good and accurate and im- inclusive educational outreach to to the public that all of our garden institutions, as we know them are are adapting and trying to respond to increasing need it. Feels like. There are two things that have been expecially successful in in our school education programs. One is the forest project, which came very early in our history. And so it has forty some years of experience teaching high school age students primarily and now some pre college students.

wave hill Richard Serra New York City
"wave hill" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"wave hill" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

"It's going under his, hey, you know, I use your buck slips, very sparingly, very respectful to expensive the each and every one of these are, so I I write in the margins on once you've already used, but I found a note about me on one of the one of them factor. Drew phone that talking about true. I may be was making a note. Let's see hollowing hunt with silly string. My hand is I need to go to a hand. Doctor and my pinkies getting screwed. I'm getting screwed up my my scar tissue. Whatever Jesus I mean. What did Jesus have transit's wave hill? This duper trends. Do patriots can enter contracting. That's what your guests had that. Because he was a carpenter. So I mean, I use when you're when you're a carpenter you use the palm of your hand like a hammer constantly, and what people don't really realize it would argue. This is an insight into the medical historians. Talk about this with Jesus his depictions think is holding describe to people what you're doing. He holds his hand up when Jesus hold his hands up. He the third fourth and fifth fingers sorta droop down three fingers are extended and that PO looks like looks like someone saying we're number three. Yeah. Or something right there. It's third down. Different. And. Medical stories have postulated that maybe he had do us. But I believe this is the first time somebody suggested that insight which that it's about the palm of the hand been used as a hammer, which is fascinating. Well, okay. So let me explain about carpentry. You do not realize obviously, you're not using your hand to drive in and nail. You have no idea. How often you've got, you know, you're you've got your window unit. It's like in in. You've framed out your window, your rough framing the window unit is like emplaced, you're like holding it up. There's a guy outside he's putting like shins in it. And he's got a level on it. And you go are we Plum, and he's like the top still the top needs to come out a little bit..

"wave hill" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"wave hill" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Command means listen israel listen listen deeply to one another principle number three always be humble and modest by striving to understand the point of view with which you disagree that was the wave hill the great jewish rabbi the great jewish leader and remains the first rule of conflict management listen to me i'll say it again always be humble and modest by striving to understand the point of view with which you disagree okay listen listen listen to that and tried to understand it principle number four never seek victory think about that every conversation we always liked to be right never ever seek to inflict defeat upon your opponents if you seek to inflict defeat on your opponents your opponents listen this is human psychology will then seek to retaliate by inflicting defeat on you the end result will be the even if you win today you're going to lose tomorrow and in the end everyone loses you'll lose you'll lose your done don't think in terms of victory and defeat think in terms of what's best for the jewish people okay number five if you show contempt for other jews they're they're gonna show contempt for you if you show respect for other jews there come to respect you few seek respect give respect and i'm telling you right now think about the people we meet and think about the people we engage how many times we don't engage the people that probably should be talking to don't be afraid of someone that's different than you number six this is very very important this gets to the heart of the matter because remember that the ultimate basis of jewish people really jewish people hood is called l a raven zambezia that all jews are responsible one for the other were all responsible for one another we may not agree on anything but we remain a single extended family that's why you're tuning into this radio show believe me there are many many different types of jews that are listening and hopefully jews as well and that's great for when it comes to our family we've got to make sure we stick together we might not agree on anything literally on anything but we're one one big extended family if you disagree with a friend tomorrow he or she may not may no longer be your friend but if you disagree with family member tomorrow that person is still part of your family being part of a family is what keeps us together we don't need to agree with each other but we do need to care about each other i'll say that again because rabbi sacks thought taught us we keep referring to that on many different episodes of our jewish community radio show but don't forget that we don't need to agree with each other but we do need to care about each other and the final principle number seven is god shows us as a people he didn't choose only the righteous he chose all of us it is as a people that we stand before god and it is as a people that we stand before the world the world doesn't make distinctions antisemites don't make distinctions we are united by a covenant of shared memory shared identity shared fate even if we have different perspectives on our faith let's hope that we work a little bit harder on each of these things we're going to see some incredible changes in our jewish community think about how strong we can all become if we just take a little bit more time to listen to the people we disagree with the rabbis the sages the great jewish leaders said that the tower was given to make peace in the world that's our bible make peace peace of the whole world how can we the jewish people the state of israel be at peace with the world if we are unable to live at peace with ourselves bear this in mind the next time you're tempted to walk away from some group of jews that you think has offended you we are each called on to make some effort sub gesture to listen to one another to give and forgive one another and to stay connected to stay together as an extended almost very very different family but stayed together that is the only ultimate kern that's the way we're going to fix this for the.

"wave hill" Discussed on Highly Questionable

Highly Questionable

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"wave hill" Discussed on Highly Questionable

"Will you from over here of course you need this at potential to be cool we've got a professional stunt woman on the set of whatever it is that they were doing on that professional sunset what do we have oh and he betterment oh okay oh okay if not take any precautions in us i'm going to flip over and this is going to be so cool events your garden moving if i don't fall down everything's okay i don't care i a pair bothering flipflop today how the unhelpful and if you wanna wave hill help you if you wanted to helping to know we were the motorcycle it's not the guy going to both she was bad but you know who is worse whose words tellus me tobin smacked wait a minute one big we're so specific oh topping from they i tell cutting off before i had never heard of this terrible they are legacy they legavillas air watch companies companies that hard as we know deep indoor motorcycle mild them find a leather bound that tubby smith ladies and gentlemen we only motorcycle video there's west who then that women and men bone was back rounded god coming up next on my cell steamy show oh if i had a chess like that an easy does is he does never chesslike that i do my where those kinds of deserts while steven adams and we are a leading authority on this watch steven adams here oh about some of that horya pets a technical foul against steven adams contro going for the hall.

steven adams
"wave hill" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:59 min | 3 years ago

"wave hill" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"The opposite direction on the federal government's role in the healthcare industry and in all of our life needs to be extremely limited that has to happen and that is not going to be easy whoo it's friday september 22nd nearly faint snick lamdong program whoa bill o'reilly the author of the new new york times best selling book killing england which is on sale right now joins us hello bill welcome to the program backing fired up today i am fired of there's a lot to be fired up a lot to be fired up on may let me let me go through some of the meal through some of the things that are above that have been happening this week let's start with the let's start with north korea and the president in front of the united nations have started just with north korea and what has happened with the sanctions first bill i quit a a pretty good sippy show a and work not offended by the aachen um nope doped elton john by towel records you eat i love the i'd love the outrage i wrote a column of a hill mary ah highbrow these days back you know that i do data due year highriding bribetaking guy that reach wished or wek wave hill anyway m column late basically saying the outrage from people like hillary clinton and john kerry walk obama uh trump and you know it meaning kim jong lohan and entirely at korea will get out black him out of uh it gets issued targeted by these people are outrage for eight you it they did absolutely nothing on north korea the most a day united's eight it under the obama administration which it ganers route battle look at the most there are all right now when you have a total failure in life in any in any bring or a total failure here's y y est criticize any may have a different point of view on how to solve a problem the answer is no it is it but these people they have word of the day back a he got out of asia so way so it so bill so bill i l look i've been talking about this for as long as you have been talking about i've been talking about this since the nineteen nineties and and bill clinton has been a failure of.

new york times north korea president united nations hillary clinton kim jong lohan obama administration asia bill clinton bill o'reilly john kerry
"wave hill" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"wave hill" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"For metro la and orange county seven he's to about 80 for the valleys mid80s for the i eat some low clouds and fog role in and again overnight lows in the fifties and sixties then tomorrow after the burn off were back to sunshine as little warmer mid70s at the beaches upper 70s for metro la upper 70s to mid80s for the valleys and near 90 for the inland empire it's 73 in fullerton 74 rancho santa mar green at seventy in palos verdes 77 in santa monica we lead local from kfi's 24hour newsroom i'm amy king akg is this your new here adherence just suspect foul wave hill castle yes i what you hear all of listen all of it the music the drums the instruments a year and imaginative doing it all by himself i know i saw on the today show is amazing that that's very cool in stable so 25000 people there is just one guy or the guitar i love your fan boy out over at sharon lately crime that's good power to the ugly people that's what i is not ugly in his heart such a mean girl things what you just said power to the ugly people jerry channel where life today a charges training camp just a quick mention the charges will pay for anyone who chooses one of various available chargers tattoos at the shamrocks so official club in west hollywood from now through one in the morning this is a angelina jolie is a tattoo artists i believe uh at shamrock social call yep that's a pretty amazing are you going to get one i am not going to get wound up i a few drinks first then decide which tattoo you are not a great piece of advice lets us sunrise here daughter these are good advice but speaking as hollywood one of the stories that we had covered last week a little bit was the story of ed book a prominent democratic donor and a 26yearold man who died of a fatal drug overdose apparently in his bathroom and it's not as i mean that's kind of a.

la palos verdes santa monica kfi shamrocks hollywood drug overdose orange county fullerton official ed 24hour
"wave hill" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"wave hill" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"This as a wave hill you've hill beautiful spot and then there are several old a stay out on long island that are now public gardens uh westbury yeah no a west wells westbury owed westbury yeah yup yes one of them and uh lots of others yeah so it's worth the trip planned to the hampton us the other one i was trying to plant i haven't been hunting sales yeah yeah so lots of opportunity there too so there's two major metropolitan areas with some suggestions their odds yet call them gardening mecca's yeah yeah on the philadelphia neck of the woods is another one yeah dc see and then forces in all up and down the west coast from top to bottom rate spots in philadelphia and i would argue that one you could easily make eight entire gardening vacation in philadelphia area oh yeah very actually very easily yet really wonderful spots both melissa and i are very familiar we have longwood gardens yeah which is a uh lavatory gutters ing spot yeah that's where we got our managers degree at some of our education education they'd hit the did educate us at that way but yeah you could fly to philadelphia and never have to drive more than forty five minutes probably not even that far unless you got stuck in traffic well now there's a forty thousand miles yazar added in his thirty miles are thirty gardens within thirty miles yeah there are thirty gardens and thirty miles of center city philadelphia zone and they're all worth visiting it is munda falls during the other thing i wanted to mentioned you melissa is you've probably heard that the des moines botanical garden has a titan arum by is a really cool plant ah ah ah martha titanium yes yes it is a very noble name it is nouri ugly smelling plan yes smells like death yes i very specific reason as pollinated by flies and they smell rotting meet they think they're going to get a meal but actually there just pollinating flour at thursday's there's a lot of plants that i might as as the flower is huge it will probably be what five foot tall at least well winner fivefoot maybe bigger yet when titan arum arum bulbs or i guess they're koram's tightly when they're when they're depending on how large the coarm is on in generally.

long island philadelphia munda falls koram longwood gardens melissa des moines nouri forty five minutes five foot fivefoot