19 Burst results for "Watson Sherlock"

"watson sherlock" Discussed on Thunder Radio

Thunder Radio

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"watson sherlock" Discussed on Thunder Radio

"Get the answer to last week's bring twister I remember it had to do with Columbo one of my favorite P. eyes okay very good let me refresh your memory Colombo was just starting his day when he was summoned to a crime scene of a well known eccentric painter Colombo arrived on the scene at the same time as a police upon entering the home the painter's wife appearing to hold back tears informs them this is a terrible suicide Columbo walks into the room where the deceased manta slumped dead in the chair with a bullet hole in his head a gun on the floor at his feet and a cassette recorder on the table Colombo picks up the recorder presses play and here's the following message I have committed greeted the grievous sins in my life and now I offer my soul to that great god above then the sound of a gunshot Colombo S. wife if anything had been touched or moved since finding the dead man no she replies Columbo turns and informs the police this isn't a suicide it's a murder how did he know my dear Watson Watson what you think your Sherlock are you talking to me come on your inner mixing your detectives number wasn't with Watson Sherlock Holmes Colombo whatever they were both brilliant well they're brilliant and the key to this twister is the wife's statement those tears were tears agree they were tears of freedom she killed the poor guy just to get his money she was a gold digger if nothing had been touched when Columbo push play on the tape recorder there would have been silence but there wasn't when he pushed play he heard the compassion and then the gunshot someone had to rewind that tape and I think it was the old white where are you reading is good although a bit carried away so did we have a correct answer beside mine no no one got it right actually no no one submitted an answer again and you know what these people need to go to our website I'm talk I start calming get any answer maybe we need to change the giveaway maybe maybe a car whole whole what are you not to have so many people calling we won't be able to the lines of burnout all right what do you suggest well you mineral Junker no how bout rather than one of our lousy shirts we offer gifts of debate something they won't be embarrassed to win and they want nobody will know where they want it actually okay okay let's see here on the advice of my brother then if you know the answer this brain work to this week's brain twist or suspect we don't send us your answer.

Columbo Colombo murder Watson Watson Watson Sherlock Holmes
"watson sherlock" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"watson sherlock" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Businesses. You got thirty seconds analyze with the Rams have to do to beat the patriots. So the Rams the Los Angeles Rams have three things they have to know turnovers on offense in the red zone. Score touchdowns play with a lot of confidence in the defense. Is that the play their Ps and qs and do whatever they did in the game plan. And and don't listen he plays. That'd be just fine. Okay. What are the patriots to be the patriots? That's a good answer. I like that one. When you see Brady what is Brady do better than you? I feel like. The knowledge of the game in this bench. Knowing what the defense is doing before, they even do it and nowhere to go. The ball before the ball is even snap. So he gets the line of scrimmage. You think he knows where everybody's going to be a great idea not hundred percent. But I think for sure he knows exactly where he's going with the ball from the film I've seen in Westwood OB. And the things that he told me about Tom, and and this seventeen eighteen years he's seen things. I think he pretty much know he's going with the Solbes O'Brien coach browser. Have you talked to Brady before you not rather season? Is it just after a game? After the game. But we testing offseason last year. When I when I first met him. Oh, you did. And what do you ask him? He's saying the his book, and we kinda just brief gonna just such based on are you on the TV twelve diet nine. It can make you Tom Brady. Would you eat that? Would you have that Brady? Probably not you still wouldn't I probably wouldn't ammo. I want to be my own always oh us four. DWI four. Okay. So it'd be the DWI all right? What's your nickname nickname? D Y Di four do for. You don't have a nickname nickname is. I don't think. So we got to come up with a nickname me with somebody. Somebody fans can do it. So DWI four is in. It sounds like d Ford and you don't want to be deported. The chiefs. Yes. Mclovin. I got one okay. About elementary. My dear Watson. Sherlock Holmes after he solved the crime and say elementary, my dear Watson. You know, you score a touchdown. And be like, oh that was elementary. My dear Watson..

Tom Brady patriots Los Angeles Rams Rams Watson Westwood OB chiefs Sherlock Holmes seventeen eighteen years hundred percent thirty seconds
Martian Meteorite

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 2 years ago

Martian Meteorite

"It's not elementary. But thanks to its own Watson Sherlock will perform fundamental scientific investigations on the surface of Mars, Susan avation now when an ultra violet light shines over certain carbon-based chemicals. They give off the same blow you see under a black light scientists use that glow to detect chemicals that form in the presence of life. A laser instrument called Sherlock will be the first to use those same forensic techniques. On Mars Sherlock will photograph the rocks. It targets then use a high precision laser to illuminate rock features as fine as a human hair before mapping the chemicals. It detects. But that level of precision requires a calibration target to help tweak the laser settings so Sherlock, we'll have a companion on the Mars twenty twenty Rover. An actual piece of Mars. Not any meteorite will work for this mission. The sample needs to be solid enough to avoid flaking and must possess. Certain chemical features to test sherlock's sensitivity. S A us zero zero eight is just right. So NASA will be sending a Martian meteorite home for innovation. Now. I'm Jennifer Colin animation. Now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA and is distributed by w HR V.

Watson Sherlock Susan Avation Nasa Jennifer Colin National Institute Of Aerospac Flaking
"watson sherlock" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

06:46 min | 2 years ago

"watson sherlock" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Basically there's something going on that so atrocious and so bad when people see it they commit suicide. It drives them to suicide. So basically drives everybody to try to survive with blindfolds on. Yeah. What do you look at takes user that what you're looking at takes the form of your worst fears and you're done young. You're gone. That is dicey. And I'm excited because I hope it doesn't end like that the quiet place movie. I watched that with the kids I thought that was going to be absolutely fantabulous. But it wasn't as terribles awful. The rotten tomatoes actually given that a see what are they given that the sixty eight percent. I bet. Certified fresh get certified fresh rotten tomatoes. I go by because it's an aggregate of different reviews and speaking of which. Rotten tomatoes. The new Sherlock Holmes movie. If your homes in Watson. Yes. This is a will Ferrell flick. So basically the stars of stepbrothers are now playing Dr Watson Sherlock, Holmes. Before I came in today, the rotten tomatoes aggregate score ready for this zero. It is that bad of a movie it has jumped up though, it's a juggernaut this one a juggernaut six. It has gotten a six not certified fresh. It has gotten a six vice is guiding obviously vice is sixty four so it's okay. It's not really, you know jumping out there. But here's the deal though, there have been movies, and and I'm calling shenanigans on the Holmes and Watson went I'm calling shenanigans. And here's what I'm doing. Because it was conversation. I was having rob hunter a few weeks ago. We're on rotten tomatoes looking up different movies. And there were some that had like ones into that were moderate flex there. Okay. We don't want anything. Great. You know, like the last drastic part movies. Like, okay. If you if you want to go, and if you wanna watch a popcorn movie, that's it like the Meg. Don movie, I enjoyed it. I watched the dang thing twice like if you're rages. Go be entertaining watching movies stop being a snob about shelf and just watch a movie and be entertained. We'll wealfare funny, man. So I don't understand how zero could be an aggregate score of reviews across the land is it as it opened on Christmas day in the previews before it opened up. It had that you had to get some laugh at it one or two it's got it's got a naked gun feel to it. And so what we find out is a lot of these reviews are and I'm not gonna say Russian box because every stop blaming Russia for everything. Their butts. These are just these these are things are going in vote in review in voting review and just do without hundreds of times over they do it either take down a movie or hyper movie. So when I said, the the conversation I got into with rob hunter, b basically became what in the world with the world of everybody calling something that they don't agree with fake news. And every time something goes wrong or doesn't go someone's way, they blame it on Russia's or Russians were they say that they were hacked. And then you can't even go see a movie entrust what you're looking at online because you don't know if it's a these are real human beings that are reviewing them. It ain't going to yelp in the like and all of that. We're in a world where you have to go in verified that the person that's reviewing it is actually a verified reviewer. And then what made them verify, you know, just what do you believe? And how do you believe that? So here's my my movie going at vice for you this holiday season as more movies are going to be released top box office right now is aquaman. Mary Poppins returns. Bumblebee Spiderman into the spiders, which I heard was a fantastic animated movie. I didn't know what was going to be animated. But it's a fantastic animated movie. The grinches garbage. The mule. I don't even know what that is. Ralph breaks the that. I'm excited to see that with the kids in Mary Queen of Scots. What is with these period pieces? I don't get anyway. Mulas the Clint Eastwood movie where he's running drugs. Oh, that's what I want to see that. Oh, good. Yeah. I didn't know that was called the mule. Everyone heard that right. Okay. Good. You weren't just talking. Sometimes. I don't know if those are the voices in my head or not losses. What it is. Okay. Yes. So Clint Eastwood so definitely want to go see that movie. And it's got sixty four percent. But an animated flick is at ninety seven and in bumblebees at ninety three. So it gives me a little bit of hope. But for the most part. Here's my advice. Did simple just see a movie that you think hey that might be good and just suspend disbelief grab some popcorn be entertained. Stop being snobby about it. Just go have some fun. You know, I think meals a true story is fantastic based on a true story. Okay. So that's cool. And there's an in Bumblebee is definitely a true story and aquaman true story. I wanted. Here's the deal. Okay. So, but but definitely check out the trailers and see if it's your baggage aquaman. I was excited about because I actually liked the Justice league. I thought it was a good movie. There are people Pooh poohing on that all day long any roster. You like it. He okay. Didn't like it. Okay. I thought it was a decent show maybe because wonder woman's in its everybody can pound sand. All right. So he was kind. He was kind of a bad. And I was like, okay. I wanna go see the movie I saw the trailer. I I don't think you can take me kicking and screaming to this movie. I mean, it took just the the trailer looks like a seven minute trailer took like eight different terms and with big red aliens and stuff like that. What lasers are shooting. Come on. I mean, I know we're dealing with people who talk underwater and mermen and all that. But I mean do come on. I draw a line at lasers, I guess. But I love that man, Holmes and Watson zero zero I you have to call shenanigans on that I bring that up and I'm going to check out that bird box. I think this weekend. Yeah. I'm I'm, but I'm kind of scared to watch the scary movie. 'cause I hope this is the one that gets me back in the game. Yeah. Good scary movies out there a university. A university is claiming that asking a woman out on a date, violates something I'll tell you what that is after we get look at east side west side, traffic, here's leap out. Yeah. We got a crash, Mike. It's all one zero one westbound.

Sherlock Holmes Dr Watson Sherlock aquaman Clint Eastwood rob hunter Russia Watson yelp Justice league Ferrell Mary Poppins Mary Queen Ralph Mike sixty eight percent sixty four percent seven minute
"watson sherlock" Discussed on 550 KFYI

550 KFYI

06:42 min | 2 years ago

"watson sherlock" Discussed on 550 KFYI

"Something going on that so atrocious and so bad when people see it they commit suicide. It drives them to suicide. So basically drives everybody to try to survive with blindfolds on. Yeah. What do you look at it takes user that he's looking at takes the form of your worst fears and you're done young. You're gone that is dicey. And I'm excited because I hope it doesn't end like that the quiet place movie. I watched that with the kids, and I thought that was going to be absolutely fantabulous. But it wasn't as terrible as awful. But rod tomatoes actually, given that a see what are they given that sixty eight percent. I bet. Certified fresh, you get it also certified fresh rotten tomatoes. I go by because it's an aggregate of different reviews and speaking of which. Rotten tomatoes. The new Sherlock Holmes movie. If your homes in Watson. Yes. This is a welfare Affleck. So basically the stars of stepbrothers are now playing Dr Watson Sherlock, Holmes. Before I came in today, the rotten tomatoes aggregate score ready for this. Zero. It is that bad of a movie it has jumped up though, it's a juggernaut this one a juggernaut six. It has gotten a six not certified fresh. It has gotten a six vice guiding obviously vice is sixty four so it's okay. It's not really, you know jumping out there. But here's the deal though, there have been movies in and I'm calling shenanigans on the Holmes and Watson, I'm calling shenanigans. And here's why I'm doing because it was conversation. I was having rob hunter a few weeks ago when we're on rotten tomatoes looking up different movies. And there were some that had like ones into that were moderate flex there. Okay. We don't want anything great. You know, like the last drastic park movie. It's like, okay. If you if you want to go, and if you want to watch a popcorn movie, that's it like the Meg. Michael the Don movie, I enjoyed it. I watched the dang thing twice. Like if is. It'd be entertaining watching movies stop being a snob about shelf and just watch moving be entertained. Will Ferrell's a funny, man. So I don't understand how zero could be an aggregate score of reviews across the land is it as it opened on Christmas day in the previous before it opened up had that you had to get some laugh at it one or two it's got a it's got a naked gun feel to it. And so what we find out is a lot of these reviews are and I'm not gonna say Russian box because every stop blaming Russia for everything. Their bots. These are these these are things are going in vote in review and voting review. And just do it thousands of times over they do it either take down a movie or hyper movie. So when I said that the conversation I got into with rob hunter, BA basically became what in the world with the world of everybody calling something that they don't agree with fake news. And every time something goes wrong, or it go someone's way, they blame it on Russia's or Russians were they say that they were hacked. And then you can't even go see a movie entrust what you're looking at online because you don't know if it's these are real human beings that are reviewing it ain't going to yelp in the like and all of that we're in a world where you have to go in verified that the person that's reviewing it is actually a verified reviewer. And then what bought made them verify, you know, just what do you believe? And how do you believe that? So here's my my moviegoing advice for you this holiday season as more movies are going to be released top box office right now is aquaman. Mary Poppins returns. Bumblebee Spiderman into the spiders, which I heard was a fantastic animated movie. I didn't know what was going to be animated. But it's a fantastic animated movie. The grinches garbage. The mule. I don't even know what that is. Ralph breaks the internet. I'm excited to see that with the kids in Mary Queen of Scots. What is with these period pieces? I don't get anyway. Mulas the Clint Eastwood movie where he's running drugs. Oh, that's what I want to see that. Oh, good gear. I didn't know that was called the MU everyone heard that. Right. Okay. Good. You weren't just talking. Sometimes. I don't know if those are the voices in my head or not what it is. Okay. Yes. So Clint Eastwood so definitely want to go see that movie. And it's got sixty four percent. But an animated flick is at ninety seven and in bumblebees at ninety three. So it gives me a little bit of hope. But for the most part, here's my advice. It's simple just see a movie that you think hey that might be good and just suspend disbelief grab some popcorn be entertained. Stop being snobby about it. Just go have some fun. I think meals a true story is fantastic based on a true story. Okay. So that's cool. And there's an in Bumblebee is definitely a true story and aquaman true story. I wanted. Here's the deal. Okay. So, but but definitely check out the trailers and see what's your baggage t aquaman. I was excited about because I actually liked the Justice league. I thought it was a good movie. There are people Pooh poohing on that all day long any roster. You like it. He okay. Didn't like it. Okay. I thought it was a decent show maybe because wonder woman's in its everybody can pound sand. All right. So aquaman was in. He was kind. He was kind of a bad. And I was like, okay. I wanna go see the Akron movie. I saw the trailer. I I don't think you can take me kicking and screaming to this movie. I mean, it took just the trailer. Looks like a seven minute trailer took like eight different turns in it with big red aliens and stuff like that got lasers are shooting. Come on. I mean, I know we're dealing with people that talk underwater and mermen and all that. But I mean do come on I draw line at lasers, I guess. But how about that man, Holmes and Watson zero zero you have to call shenanigans on that Sooners. I bring that up and I'm going to check out that bird box. I think this weekend. Yeah. I'm but I'm kind of scared to watch the scary movie. 'cause I hope this is the one that gets me back in the game. Yeah. Scary movies out there a university. A university is claiming that asking a woman out on a date, violates something I'll tell you what that is after we get to look at east side west side, traffic,.

Sherlock Holmes aquaman Dr Watson Sherlock Russia Clint Eastwood rob hunter Watson Will Ferrell yelp Affleck Mary Poppins Justice league Michael Mary Queen Ralph Sooners Akron sixty eight percent
"watson sherlock" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

04:35 min | 2 years ago

"watson sherlock" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Left side has the Ted has the five going for the quarter. Fifteen yard touchdown. Ron Shawn Watson yet. They can do that to you what? Shawn Watson, and they can do this to you as well. They're down at eight for the titans from their twenty. Mario to in. The God gets the snap. Mario with a little time. In the fall is not. Out. Fighting inside the eleven there's a scrum. Who's got it ball was knocked out down and its fourth down to keep it JJ watch HA watt on top of that. They finally got to Berry's Thomas working last night too. He had a couple of CDs. Here's what I'm getting at. When you look at that roster. When you look at those resumes. That's an impressive team. But they don't get nearly the run that you'd expect from an eight and three team. And it wasn't that long ago that Bill O'Brien was on the hot seat now is in the so-called captured seed in that division. I mean, you wanna play smashmouth man ball Houston can do that you on both sides of the ball. They don't just hit. They hit hard. You wanna put a video game numbers? They can do that too. So to answer the badgers question, the haters what they're everywhere still, and if it's not haters, then it's doubters because despite ripping off eight nine row there stills this collective show me something when it comes to the Texans held the colts are getting more run than the Texans. And there are two games back of Houston in the AFC south so fair or not not a whole lot of people are buying in on this team. You know, why is that is it because their offense as explosive as it was last night is inconsistent. Sure. Suffering a points the way you might want or the way you might expect for the defense like that. You don't need to put up forty every single night is it because they never quite delivering the. Playoffs. Maybe is it because they started Owen three. And they look like they were going to implode maybe, but they're eight and owes since starting three. So it shouldn't be that. They find a way to win. They've done at eight straight times. Not always pretty not always impressive. But eight no is and yet eight and three and the haters, and the doubters are everywhere what I'm getting at is. They deserve a hell of a lot more credit than they're getting right now that is a lot more than they're getting right now. Eight in a row, and that was a down that they put on a team that punked the patriots not long ago. So come in here at Texas fans and say, you're not getting any love you are for me. Maybe not from anybody else. But you're getting it for me, one eight hundred six three six eight six eight six more on Alabama later on also and had to think about it now because I generally start Tuesday with a recap of Monday night football. That's what I did. However, I could have easily started with the Jaguars. You know, have started this show with a lot of takes on the Jags their implosion is complete and brilliant. It's amazing lots to get to regarding the Jags. Some quick reaction to the story off the very top. Dear Rome, damn to Shawn Watson, Sherlock solid last night. Remember when he was the next great QB seems like ages ago signed Pat, Mahomes overshadowing everyone Casey New Hampshire war Gruden getting fatter. Yes. Stress eats while watching the chiefs tape this week. Again, what a guy ways does not matter to me in less. It's an athlete and it's impacting performance. What a guy ways does not matter to me in less. He's a fighter and can't make white. I don't care if gruden's gaining weight or losing weight. I only care about the product on the field, which is pretty horrible. Roam the Texans being eight and three feel like the raptors being the top seed in the NBA. Sure, the record looks like, but no one's going to respect the team that has a dinosaur as a mascot in the play offs. It's cute Houston. But just remember this is the same team that war Letterman's jackets on the field before getting stomped by the pats guys, not buying either. Essentially, that's the guy that I'm talking to John at Huntington beach. They've won eight zero. And there's still the sense of really. But show me something do something that matters. And I'm here to say winning eight or on the NFL matters, especially when you start on three. Poetry wall. Tweets Romi, can you pass along a message for me? Please tell Deontay I am no longer eating through a straw signed that cold, cocked mascot. I could probably pass that along..

titans Ron Shawn Watson Houston Mario Bill O'Brien Gruden Thomas Jags Romi NFL patriots John AFC Huntington beach badgers Owen Rome NBA Texas colts
Sending a Meteorite Home

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 3 years ago

Sending a Meteorite Home

"It's not element Trie. But thanks to its own Watson Sherlock will perform fundamental scientific investigations on the surface of Mars, Susan avation now when an ultra violet light shines over certain carbon-based chemicals. They give off the same blow you see under a black light scientists use that glow to detect chemicals that form in the presence of life. A laser instrument called Sherlock will be the first to use those same forensic techniques. On Mars Sherlock will photograph the rocks. It targets then use a high precision laser to illuminate rock features as fine as a human hair before mapping the chemicals. It detects. But that level of precision requires a calibration target to help tweak the laser settings so Sherlock, we'll have a companion on the Mars twenty twenty Rover. An actual piece of Mars. Not any meteorite will work for this mission. The sample needs to be solid enough to avoid flaking and must possess. Certain chemical features to test sherlock's sensitivity. S A us zero zero eight is just right. So NASA will be sending a Martian meteorite home for innovation. Now. I'm Jennifer colon innovation now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA and is distributed by w HR V.

Watson Sherlock Susan Avation Nasa Jennifer Colon Flaking National Institute Of Aerospac
"watson sherlock" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

15:15 min | 3 years ago

"watson sherlock" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"AM six forty. Welcome back to coast to coast AM on October third eighteen forty nine Edgar Allan Poe was found on the streets of Baltimore delirious and in great distress and in need of immediate assistance. According to the man who found him he was taken to the Washington college hospital where he died early on the morning of October seventh Paul was never coherent long enough to explain how he came to be in his dire condition and wearing clothes that were not his own. Some sources say Poe's final words were quote. It's all over now. Right. Eddie is no more referring to his tombstone others say his last words were Lord help my poor soul. We're going to delve into the life and times of America's master of mystery and the Macab Kevin j Hayes is emeritus professor of English at the university of central Oklahoma. He's the author of several books about American, literature and culture include. Reading Edgar Allan Poe. He lives and writes in Toledo, Ohio. Kevin welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Good. Thank you for having me. Why for you is Edgar Allan Poe such an amazing writer. Why are you? Why do you write about him? Why are you? So enamored of him. Well, one thing I really like about po- as an ultimate craftsman. I mean, he was someone when when he wrote a short story he believed that every word counted. And not only that every word counted. But also that the position of every workout, and this was a kind of craftsmanship that brought to the writing of short stories that the no one had ever really done before. How much of his his his is interest in the Macab and horror stems from the tragedy in his early. Life is his is his mother died. His father abandoned him his mother died. I think of tuberculosis later, he had a cousin who who died of tuberculosis. How much of that influenced his writing? Well, I think it had a big influence on on his writing. Although in my opinion, I think it's been over emphasized. I wanna thank you for mentioning my my book at growl. And that's a that's a little bit of a poll that I wrote, but why structured differently than most other Margrethe's because if you if you structure it strict chronological way, you have to start off with pole, and then his mother dying. And then he, you know, he gets gets taken in by the foster family, and and I just didn't want to start with that same story over and over again. And so I started with with some short stories, and then I did a flashback to his early days. And so that was kind of my way of saying that his this emphasis on his mother's death. Has been overemphasized. But on the other hand, I mean, he did say in his critical writings that the death of a beautiful woman is is the most appropriate subject for poetry. Yes. That is one of his famous quotes, and his I I know, you know, he didn't or you think that maybe some of the tragedies life is over emphasized, but one particularly profound and poignant moment, his cousin Virginia Clem who violate counts had this beautiful voice and one day she singing for Edgar Allan Poe, and she begins to cough in this tiny drop of blood appears on her lip. And that was the first sign of the debris kilos which would make her an invalid, and eventually take your life was that not sort of a period when he really started to drink heavily. Well, I mean, it was an in terms of his. In terms of his personal habits. The different thing than than his writing. I think now he's he's writing was already pretty well developed by the time that the. His wife Virginia showed signs of tuberculosis. But he he was really I mean her really. Make him distraught. And he did start start drinking more after that. The one of my favorite works are poems by Paul. I'm sure many feel the same way is the raven. Which I think first appeared in New York newspaper, but but where did that with the inspiration for that come from? It came from came from pose mind. I mean, that's that's the first thing that comes to my mind. Of course, it's more complicated than that. But it really makes use of a lot of motifs that were part of kind of dark literature all already by that time. And in terms of his his verse form, I mean, he bought the form of the poem from a poem. By Elizabeth pair, brownie. Oh that I didn't know tell me more about that. Well that may be about as. As much as I know about an opponent, follow bear Browning. Because one of the things that he tried to do in his poetry was to come up with new verse forms and to try different. Way of structuring individual lines in different ways of. Organizing his stanzas and rhyme schemes to make his work as original as possible. And that was always an emphasis with him is to try and trying to do something that no one else had done before trying to be original. Now was that was the pub on upon the publication of that poll. I mean that was that was later in life had he to that point achieves any sort of commercial success. What would they commercial success because he never never really was able to live very well and on his writings now he did have some success earlier than that. Now, the raven came on eighteen forty five now earlier about five years earlier or no not a couple of years earlier. He published short story called the gold bug. And that that story won an award for him. And that was really his biggest his biggest success up until that point until the raven. And then when the raven when he published the raven that was a big success. He he said that the bird beat the bug. The bird beat the bug. Indeed. This a famous incident. When he was in New York, he had a a noisy public feud with with Henry Wadsworth longfellow. What was that about? Well. He always was born in Boston. I don't know you just by pure chance because his parents were actors, and that's where they were performing at that time. But he always resented it. And he always kind of looked down his nose at the Boston Brahmins, the literary leader Boston and his his animosity toward longfellow was fell into that same that same animosity. But he he picked up fight with longfellow in the pages of the Broadway journal, which is the magazine he was editing at that time. And I'm not sure how much they're really was behind it. I think Paul was. But someone who recognize the controversy sells newspapers magazines, and you know, he he picked this fight with longfellow. Mainly as just to kind of disturb controversy. It's he's been he's been cited as as really the the the founder, I guess of the of the genre called detective fiction. Tell me tell me more about that give me an example of of detective fiction by Paul. Well, he did a story called the murders in the room more, which is considered the first detective story. And if you read that story, and then you go on and read Sherlock Holmes or exit Christie, and you'll see an amazing coincidence of all the so many different motifs that we now consider as part of detective fiction are already there present in the murders in the room, Mark. So we have the the eccentric consulting detective until he's not a part of the police force, but he often consults with the police force. And you know, he's he has the sidekick just like Dr Watson Sherlock Holmes had Dr Watson. And you know, there's the in in the story itself is a is a sealed room. Mystery which would become another famous motif of of this and also to that post detective Monsieur Japan is someone who's who's fascinated with the crime scene. It looks for a tiny little clues in pieces of evidence in the crime scene. And and try to didn't terp what they mean. And so virtually every major motif of the detectors onerous president in that one story. We often think of PO depiction of PO is, you know, those the bag is kind of that wild. Look somebody even use the word a little bit creepy looking. But that's really not who he was. I understand. He was quite the sportsman quite the athlete. Yes. He wasn't very good athlete. And there's this story about him swimming for like four miles in the James river. And then he was also a good runner too. And he up I mean, he had to walk. Oh, walk for a walk for transportation. But but also I mean kept them kept in thin and wiry now where things that I wrote a little article a few years ago about pose the daguerreotype images, the there the first successful photographic process. And I argue anyways, very very carefully shaped his public image to to project this. I mean, so if he looks creepy in those pictures, I mean, it was a deliberate intent one of the things that was kind of big pseudoscience at that time was phonology and the idea that the shape of your skull in the bumps on your head can determine your. Your personality. And so one of the tenants of of phonology was that a big forehead was a sign of genius. And so you look at the pictures of Paul, and he's got this big forehead while I think that he he deliberately posed for the camera to emphasize his forehead. He was also very interested in cryptography. You mentioned the gold bug earlier the incorporated a lot of sort of ciphers as an essential part of the story. Where did he where did he get that interest in in in cryptography, and what kind of cypher city employees in the gold? Buck. I'm not exactly sure where he I picked up the interest in cryptography. But it's it's not doesn't surprise me that they did because how was fascinated with with interpreting signs now it's in in cryptography is a pretty basic way of doing that. Because you have. Individual typographic characters that symbolize other other letters. And you it's it's the. Person's responsibility to figure out what those things mean. Now, something that even before he wrote the gold bug post was fascinated with those kinds of puzzles, and when he was working on one magazine challenged readers to send in ciphers, and he'd try to figure them out. And he did I mean, if he pretty much figured out all the ones that people send him, but they were sending him so many that he just had to quit doing it because it was taking too much time. But even the other aspects of of the culture of his interests. I think that the interpretation of signs was something that he was very much fascinated with phonology is one. I mean, he was also interested in handwriting. What a person's handwriting men, and and even things like clothing, and and the way that they walked I mean, he would interpret all those things and and see how how the external self is a reflection of the internal self. His another set of misconception is that he had deep psychological issues, and that he was a raging alcoholic that was sort of all born out of another few. We mentioned the the the other feud with longfellow, but yet another feud with another rival that that sort of spawned a lot of these exaggerated stories tell me about that. Well, there was a there was this guy named Rufus Griswold and Griswold published a book called the poets and poetry of America. And this was a kind of of of early American, poet and. He gave a copy of it and said, okay. Could you write a nice review for me posted? Oh, I'd be glad to review in Poges. This gave the book. I mean, it was just gave it a very cutting review. And you know Griswold was was very disappointed by that. And part of what you know, what was going on there is that there's this. Yeah. You kind of just good old boy network back then in one author would review another one and you'd say good things about him. And he'd say good things about you in. You know, every everyone would sell more books and PO was I had a scrupulous integrity when it came to reviewing books, and if you read a he read a book that was a bad book. He would he would say it was a bad book in in the reviews and even as a revere, he became known as the Tomahawk man, I just for he's cutting reviews. Well, anyway, and so that ever since he gave grizzled a bad review for his book. I mean, there was this animosity between those two and then after Paul's death Griswold published a obituary of him, and it's called the he didn't he signed it Ludwig. So he didn't sign his own name to it. But it was this terrible review. It said what a drunken propogate the poll was in that he used to walk around downtown streets mumbling to himself and..

Paul Edgar Allan Poe longfellow tuberculosis Rufus Griswold Virginia Clem New York America Kevin j Hayes Ohio university of central Oklahoma Boston Eddie Toledo Washington college hospital emeritus professor of English Margrethe Baltimore Macab
"watson sherlock" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

15:35 min | 3 years ago

"watson sherlock" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Keyword free bottle. Welcome back to coast to coast AM on October third eighteen forty nine Edgar Allan Poe was found on the streets of Baltimore delirious and in great distress and in need of immediate assistance. According to the man who found him he was taken to the Washington college hospital where he died early on the morning of October. Seventh hole was never coherent long enough to explain how he came to be in his dire condition and wearing clothes that were not his own. Some sources say POS. Final words were quote. It's all over now. Right. Eddie is no more referring to his tombstone. Others say his last words were Lord help my poor soul regarding to delve into the life and times of America's master of mystery and the Macab Kevin j Hayes is emeritus professor of English at the university of central Oklahoma. He's the author of several books about American literature in. Culture, including Edgar Allan Poe. He lives and writes in Toledo, Ohio. Kevin welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Good. Thank you for having me. Why for you is Edgar Allan Poe such an amazing writer. Why are you? Why do you write about him? Why are you? So enamored of him. Well, one thing I really like about poll as he was an ultimate craftsman. I mean, he was someone when he wrote a short story he believed that every word counted. And not only that every word counted. But also that the position of every word counted. And this was a kind of craftsmanship that Paul brought to the writing of short stories that the no one had ever really done before. Now, how much of his his his is interest in the macabre and horror stems from the tragedy in his early life. His his his his mother died. His father abandoned him is mother died. I think of tuberculosis later, he had a cousin who who died of tuberculosis. How much of that influenced his writing? Well, I think it had a big influence on on his writing. Although in my opinion, I think it's been over emphasized. I wanna thank you for mentioning my my book at growl in pole. That's a it's a little a poll that I wrote, but why structured it differently than most other biographies because if you if you structure it. Strict chronological way, you have to start off with Paul and then his mother dying. And then he, you know, he gets gets taken in by the foster family, and and you know, I just didn't want to start with that same story over and over again. And so I started with with some short stories, and then I did a flashback to his his early days. And so that was kind of my way of saying that his this emphasis on his mother's death has been overemphasized. But on the other hand, I mean, he did say in his critical writings that the death of a beautiful woman is is the most appropriate subject for poetry. Yes. That is one of his famous quotes, and his I know, you know, he didn't or you think that maybe some of the tragedies life is over emphasized, but one particularly profound and poignant moment his cousin Virginia Clem who bile accounts had this beautiful voice and one day. She singing for Edgar Allan Poe, and she begins to cough in this tiny drop of blood appears on her lip. And that was the first sign of the debris kilos which would make her an invalid and eventually take your life. But was that not sort of a period when he really started to drink heavily? Well, I mean, it was an in terms of his. In terms of his personal habits are the different thing than than his writing. I think now his his writing was already pretty well developed by the time that. His wife Virginia showed signs of tuberculosis. But he he was really I mean her death, really. Made him distraught. And he did start start drinking more after that. The one of my favorite works are poems by Paul. I'm sure many feel the same way is the raven. Which I think first appeared in New York newspaper, but but where did that with the inspiration for that come from? It came from came from pose mind. That's that's the first answer that comes to my mind. Of course, it's more complicated than that. But it really makes use of a lot of motifs that were part of you kind of dark literature all already by that time. And in terms of his his verse form, I mean, he he bought the form of the poem from a poem by Elizabeth Fehr, brownie. Oh, I didn't know tell me more about that. Well that may be about as. As much as I know about an opponent, right actually, follow Browning. Because one of the things that he tried to do in his poetry was to come up with new verse forms and to try different. Way of structuring individual lines in different ways of. Organizing his stanzas in rhyme schemes to make his work originally as possible that was always an emphasis with him is to try and trying to do something that no one else had done before trying to be original. Now was that was the pub on upon the publication of that poem. I mean that was that was later in life had he to that point achieved any sort of commercial success. Well, I wouldn't say commercial success because he never never really was able to live very well on on his writings now he did have some success earlier than that and other even came on eighteen forty five now earlier about five years earlier or no not a couple of years earlier. He published a short story called the gold bug. And that that story won a an award him. And that was really his biggest his biggest success up until that point until the raven. And then when the raven when he published the raven and that was a big success. He he said that the bird beat the bug. The bird beat the bug. Indeed this a famous incident. When he was in New York, he had a a noisy public feud with with Henry Wadsworth longfellow. What was that about? Well. He always I was born in Boston. I know Milton just by pure chance because his parents were actors, and that's where they were performing at that time. But he always resented it. And he always kind of looked down his nose at the Boston Brahmins, the literary leader Boston and his animosity toward longfellow was fell into that same that same animosity. But he he picked a fight with longfellow in the pages of the Broadway journal, which was the magazine he was editing at that time. And I'm not sure how much they're really was behind it. I think Paul was. But someone who recognize the controversy sells newspapers magazines, and you know, he he picked this fight with longfellow. Mainly as just to kind of stir up controversy. It's he's been he's been cited as as really the the. The founder, I guess of the of the genre called detective fiction. Tell me tell me more about that give me an example of of detective fiction by Paul. Well, he did a story called the murders in the room more, which is considered the first detective story. And if you read that story, and then you going and read truck homes or exit Christie and you'll see an amazing coincidence of all the so many of the different motifs that we now consider as part of detective fiction are already there president in the murders in the room more. So we have the the eccentric consulting detective until he's not a part of the police force, but he often consults with the police force. And you know, he's he has a sidekick just like Dr Watson Sherlock Holmes had Dr Watson. And you know, there's the in the story itself is is sealed room mystery, which would become another famous motif of of this and also to. That police detective Monsieur Japan is someone who's who's fascinated with the crime scene and looks for a tiny little clues in pieces of evidence in the crime scene and tries to didn't terp what they mean. And so virtually every major motif of the detectors on RAs president in that one story. You know, we often think of PLO it'll depiction of POE is those the bag is and kind of that wild look somebody even use the word a little bit creepy looking. But that's really not who he was. I I understand. He was quite the sportsman quite the athlete. Yes. He wasn't very good athlete. And there's this story about him swimming for like four miles in the James river. And then he was also a good runner too. And he I mean he had to walk walk walk for transportation. But but also I mean kept them kept in thin and wiry now one of the things that I wrote a little article a few years ago about pose the daguerreotype images. Are there the first successful photographic process? And is I argue anyways, I'm very very carefully shaped his public image to to project this. I mean, so he looks creepy in those pictures. I mean, it was a deliberate intent one of the things that was this kind of big pseudoscience at that time was phonology and the idea that the the shape of your skull and the bumps on your head. How can determine your? Your personality. And so one of the tenets of phonology was that a big forehead was a sign of of what a genius. And so, you know, you look at the pictures of PO and he's got this big forehead while I think that he he deliberately posed for the camera to emphasize his forehead. He was also very interested in cryptography. You mentioned the gold bug earlier the incorporated a lot of sort of ciphers as an essential part of the story. Where did he where did he get that interest in in in cryptography, and what kind of ciphers city employees in the Goldbach? I'm not exactly sure where he he I picked up the interest in cryptography. But it's it's not doesn't surprise me did because I was fascinated with with interpreting signs now, it's in cryptography is a pretty basic way of doing that. Because you have. Know individual typographic characters that symbolize other other letters, and you it's it's the. A person's responsibility to figure out what those things mean. Now, something that even before he wrote the gold bug post was fascinated with those kinds of puzzles, and when he was working on one magazine challenged readers to send in ciphers, and he'd try to figure them out. And he he did. I mean, he he pretty much figured out all the ones that people send him, but they were sending him so many that he just had to quit doing it. Because it was taking too much time. But even on other aspects of of the culture of his interests. I think that the interpretation of science was something that he was very much fascinated with phonology is one. I mean, he was also interested in handwriting, and what a person's handwriting met, and and even things like clothing and the way that they walked I mean, he would interpret all those things and see how how the external self is a reflection of the internal self. His another set of misconception is that he had. It deep psychological issues, and that he was sort of a raging alcoholic that was sort of all born out of another few. We mentioned the the feud with longfellow, but yet another feud with another rival that that sort of spawned a lot of these exaggerated stories tell me about that. Well, there was a there was this guy named Rufus Griswold and Griswold published a book called the poets and poetry of America. And this was a kind of intolerance of of early American, poet and. He gave a copy of it and said, okay. Could you write a nice review for me posted? Oh, I'd be glad to have you in this gave the book. I mean, it was just gave it a very cutting review. And you know Griswold was was very disappointed by that. And part of what you know, what was going on there is that there's this. Yeah. Kind of just good old boy network back then in one author would review another one and you'd say good things about him. And he said good things about you. And you know, every everyone would sell more books and PO was I had a scrupulous integrity when it came to reviewing books. And if you read a he he read a book that was a bad book. He would he would say it was a bad book in in the reviews, and even as a reviewer he became known as the Tomahawk man, I just for he's cutting reviews. Well, anyway, and so that ever since he gave Brazil a bad review for his book. I mean, there was this animosity between those two and then after Paul's death Griswold published a obituary of him, and it's called the he didn't he signed it Ludwig. So he didn't sign his own name to it. But it was this terrible review. It said what a drunken inappropriate the poll was and that he used to walk around downtown streets mumbling to himself in and. Say, you know, this this obituary, which was later incorporated into a collected edition of Poe's works really shaped Poe's reputation for for decades to come. Poet, Charles Dickens..

Edgar Allan Poe Paul longfellow tuberculosis Rufus Griswold Virginia Clem New York America Kevin j Hayes Ohio university of central Oklahoma Boston Eddie Washington college hospital Toledo emeritus professor of English Baltimore Charles Dickens Henry Wadsworth longfellow
"watson sherlock" Discussed on KSRO

KSRO

15:03 min | 3 years ago

"watson sherlock" Discussed on KSRO

"Welcome back to coast to coast AM on October third eighteen forty nine Edgar Allan Poe was found on the streets of Baltimore delirious and in great distress and in need of immediate assistance. According to the man who found him he was taken to the Washington college hospital where he died early on the morning of October. Seventh pole was never coherent long enough to explain how he came to be in his dire condition and wearing clothes that were not zone. Some sources say POS. Final words were quote. It's all over now. Right. Eddie is no more referring to his tombstone. Others say his last words were Lord help my poor soul going to delve into the life and times of America's master of mystery and the Macab Kevin j Hayes is emeritus professor of English at the university of central Oklahoma. His the author of several books about American literature and. Culture, including Edgar Allan Poe. He lives in writes in Toledo, Ohio. Kevin welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Good. Thank you for having me. Why for you is Edgar Allan Poe such an amazing writer. Why are you? Why do you write about him? Why are you? So enamored of him. Well, one thing I really like about poll is he was an ultimate craftsman. I mean, he was someone when when he wrote a short story he believed that every word counted. And not only that every word counted. But also that the position of every word counted. And this was a kind of craftsmanship that poll brought to the writing of short stories that the no one had ever really done before. Now, how much of his his his is interest in the macabre and whore stems from the tragedy in his early life is his his his mother died. His father abandoned him his mother died. I think of tuberculosis later, he had a cousin who who died of tuberculosis. How much of that influenced his writing? Well, I think it had a big influence on on his writing. Although in my opinion, I think it's been over emphasized. I want to thank you for mentioning my my book at growl. And a it's a little biography of poll that I wrote, but why structured it differently than most other biographies because if you if you structure it. Strict chronological way, you have to start off with pole and that his mother dying. And then he, you know, he gets gets taken in by the foster family, and and I just didn't want to start with that same story over and over again. And so I started with with some short stories, and then I did a flashback to his his early days. And so that was kind of my way of saying that his this emphasis on his mother's death has been overemphasized. But on the other hand, I mean, he did say in his critical writings that, you know, the death of a beautiful woman is is the most appropriate subject for poetry. Yes. That is one of his famous quotes, and his I know, you know, he didn't think that maybe some of the tragedies. Life is over emphasized, but one particularly profound and poignant moment, his cousin Virginia Clem who violate counts had this beautiful voice and one day she singing for Edgar Allan Poe, and she begins to cough in this tiny drop of blood appears on her lip. And that was the first sign of the debris kilos which would make her an invalid and eventually take your life. But was that not sort of a period when he really started to drink heavily? Well, I mean, it was in in terms of his. In terms of his personal habits. Are the different thing than his writing? I think now his his writing was already pretty well developed by the time that. His wife Virginia showed signs of tuberculosis. But he he was really I mean her death, really. Make him distraught. And he did start start drinking more after that. The one of my favorite works are poems by Paul. I'm sure many feel the same way is the raven. Which I think first appeared in a in a New York newspaper, but but where did that with the inspiration for that come from? It came from came from pose mind. I mean, that's that's the first thing that comes to my mind. Of course, it's more complicated than that. But it really makes use of a lot of motifs that were part of kind of dark literature already by that time. And in terms of his his verse form, I mean, he he bought the form of the poem from a poem by Elizabeth Barrett. Browning? Oh that I didn't know tell me more about that. Well that may be a father's. As much as I know about an opponent, right actually, follow bear, brownie. Because one of the things that he tried to do in his poetry was to come up with new verse forms and to try different. Way of structuring individual lines in different ways of. Organizing stanzas in rhyme schemes to make his work as original as possible. And that was always an emphasis with him is to try and hot trying to do something that no one else had done before trying to be original. Now was that was the public upon the publication of that poll? I mean that was that was later in life had he to that point achieved any sort of commercial success. What would they commercial success because he never never really was able to live very well on on his writings now he did have some success earlier than that. Now, the raven came on eighteen forty five now earlier about five years earlier or no not a couple of years earlier. He published a short story called the gold bug. And that that story won an award for him. And that was really his biggest his biggest success up until that point until the raven. And then when the raven when he published the raven that was a big success. He he said that the bird beat the bug. The bird beat the bug. Indeed. There's a famous incident. When he was in New York, he had a a noisy public feud with with Henry Wadsworth longfellow. What was that about? Well. Poa? He always was born in Boston. And that was Bill just by pure chance because his parents were actors, and that's where they were performing at that time. But he always resented it. And he always kind of looked down his nose at the Boston Brahmins the literary alita Boston and his his animosity toward longfellow fell into that same that same animosity. But he he picked a fight with longfellow in the pages of the Broadway journal, which was the magazine that he was editing at that time, and I'm not sure how much they're really was behind it. I think Paul was. But someone who recognize the controversy sells newspapers magazines, and you know, he he picked this fight with longfellow. Mainly it is just to kind of disturb controversy. It's he's been he's been cited as as really the the. The founder of the of the genre called detective fiction. Tell me tell me more about giving an example of of detective fiction by Paul. Well, he did a story called the murders in the room more, which is considered the first detective story. And if you read that story, and then he gone and read Sherlock Holmes or exit Christie, and you'll see an amazing Quincy of all the so many of the different motifs that we now consider as part of detective fiction are already there present in the murders in the room more. So we have the the eccentric consulting detective until he's not a part of the police force. But he often consult with the police force. And you know, he's he has a sidekick just like Dr Watson Sherlock Holmes had Dr Watson. And you know, there's the in the story itself is a is a sealed room mystery, which would become another famous motif of the of the camera. And also to that pose detective Monsieur Japan is someone who's who's fascinated with the crime scene and looks for a tiny little clues in pieces of evidence in the crime scene and tries to interpret what they mean. And so virtually every major motif of the detectors on RAs president in that one story. You know, we often think of the depiction of PO is, you know, those the bag is kind of that wild look. Somebody even use the word a little bit creepy looking. But that's really not who he was. I understand. He was quite the sportsman quite the athlete. Yes. He wasn't very good athlete. And there's this story about him swimming for like four miles in the James river. And then he was also a good runner too. And he I mean he had to walk walk walk for transportation. But but also I mean kept them kept in thin and wiry now one of the things that I wrote a little article a few years ago about pose the daguerreotype images are there the first successful photographic process. And I argue anyways, very very carefully shaped his public image to to project this. I mean, so he looks creepy in those pictures, I mean, it was a deliberate intent now one of the things that was know this kind of big pseudoscience at that time was for -nology and the idea that the shape of your skull and the bumps on your head. How can determine your? Your personality. And so one of the tenants of phonology was that a big forehead was a sign of poetic genius. And so, you know, you look at the pictures of Paul, and he's got this big forehead while I think that he'd he deliberately posed for the camera to to emphasize his forehead. He was also very interested in cryptography. You mentioned the gold bug earlier the incorporated a lot of ciphers as as an essential part of the story. Where did he where did he get that interest in in in cryptography, and what kind of cypher city employees in the Goldbach? I'm not exactly sure where he he I picked up the interest in cryptography. But it's it's not doesn't surprise me. Because who was fascinated with with interpreting signs now, it's in in cryptography is a pretty basic way of doing that because you have carrying individual typographic characters that symbolize other other letters, and you it's it's the. A person's responsibility to figure out what those things mean. Now, something that even before he wrote the gold bug post was fascinated with those kinds of puzzles, and when he was working on one magazine challenged readers to send in ciphers, and he'd try to figure them out. And he did he pretty much figured out all the ones that people send him, but. They were sending him so many that he just had to quit doing it because it was taking too much time. But even the other aspects of of the culture of his interests. I think that the interpretation of signs was something that he was very much fascinated with for knowledge is one I mean is also interested in handwriting and what person's handwriting met, and and even things like clothing, and and the way that they walked I mean, he would. Interpret all those things and see how how external self is a reflection of the internal self. His another set of misconception is that. He had it. Oh, deep psychological issues that he was a raging alcoholic that was sort of all born out of another few. We mentioned the the other feud with longfellow, but yet another feud with another rival that that sort of spawned a lot of these exaggerated stories tell me about that. Well, there was a there was this guy named Rufus Griswold and Griswold published a book called the poets and poetry of America. And this was a kind of intolerance of of early American poets and. He gave a copy of it and said, okay. Could you write a nice for review for me posted? Oh, I'd be glad to review it in this gave the book. I mean, it was just gave it a very cutting review and Griswold was was very disappointed by that. And part of what you know, what was going on there is that there's this. Yeah. You kind of just good old boy network back then in one author would review another one and you'd say good things about him. And he'd say good things about you. And and, you know, every everyone would sell more books and PO was I had a scrupulous integrity when it came to reviewing books, and if he read a he read a book that was a bad book. He would he would say was a bad book in in the reviews, and even as a reviewer he became known as the Tomahawk man, I just for he's cutting reviews. Well, anyways. And so that ever since he gave Griswold a bad review for his book. I mean, there was this animosity between those two and then after Paul's death at Griswold published a victory of him. And it's called the he didn't he signed it Ludwig. So he didn't sign his own name to it. But it was this terrible review. It said what a drunken propogate the poll wasn't that he used to walk around downtown streets..

Edgar Allan Poe Paul longfellow Rufus Griswold tuberculosis Virginia Clem New York America Kevin j Hayes Ohio university of central Oklahoma Eddie Washington college hospital Toledo Elizabeth Barrett emeritus professor of English Baltimore Boston Henry Wadsworth longfellow
"watson sherlock" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

15:42 min | 3 years ago

"watson sherlock" Discussed on WLAC

"App. Welcome back to coast to coast AM on October third eighteen forty nine Edgar Allan Poe was found on the streets of Baltimore delirious and in great distress and in need of immediate assistance. According to the man who found him he was taken to the Washington college hospital where he died early on the morning of October. Seventh pole was never coherent long enough to explain how he came to be in his dire condition and wearing clothes that were not his own. Some sources say Poe's final words were quote. It's all over now. Right. Eddie is no more referring to his tombstone. Other say his last words were Lord help my poor soul. We're going to delve into the life and times of America's master of mystery and the macabre Kevin j Hayes is emeritus professor of English at the university of central Oklahoma. His the author of several books about American, literature and culture, including Edgar. Allan poe. He lives in writes in Toledo, Ohio. Kevin welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Good. Thank you for having me. Why for you is Edgar Allan Poe such an amazing writer. Why are you? Why do you write about him? Why are you? So enamored of him. One thing. I really like about he was at an ultimate craftsman. I mean, he was someone when when he wrote a short story he believed that every word counted. And not only that every word counted. But also that the position of every word counted. And this was a kind of craftsmanship that whole brought to the writing of short stories that no one had ever really done before. Now how much of his his his is. Interest in the macabre and horror stems from the tragedy in his early life. His his his his mother died. His father abandoned him his mother died. I think of tuberculosis later, he had a cousin who who died of tuberculosis. How much of that influenced his writing? Well, I think it had a big influence on on his writing. Although in my opinion, I think it's been over emphasized. I wanna thank you for mentioning my my book at grail in pole. That's a it's a little biography of poll that I wrote, but why structured differently than most other biographies because if you if you structure it strict chronological way, you have to start off with Paul and his mother dying. And then he, you know, he gets gets taken in by the foster family, and and you know, I just didn't want to start with that same story over and over again. And so I started with with some short stories, and then I did a flashback to his his early days. And so that was kind of my way of saying that his this emphasis on his mother's death. You know has been overemphasized. But on the other hand, I mean, he did say in his critical writings that, you know, the death of a beautiful woman is is the most appropriate subject for poetry. Yes. That is one of his famous quotes, and his I know, you know, he didn't think that maybe some of the tragedies. Life is over emphasized, but one particularly profound and poignant moment his cousin Virginia clam who violate counts had this beautiful voice and one day. She singing for Edgar Allan Poe, and she begins to cough in this tiny drop of blood appears on her lip. And that was the first sign of the debris lsus which would make her an invalid, and eventually take your life was that not sort of a period when he really started to drink heavily. Well, I mean, it was in terms of his. In terms of his personal habits are the different thing than than his his writing. I think now his his writing was already pretty ball developed by the time that the. His wife Virginia showed signs of tuberculosis. But he he was really I mean her death, really. Made him distraught. And he did start start drinking more after that. The one of my favorite workshop poems by Paul. I'm sure many feel the same way is the raven. Which I think first appeared in a in a New York newspaper, but but where did that with the inspiration for that come from? It came from came from posed mind. I mean, that's that's the first thing that comes to my mind. Of course, it's more complicated than that. But it really makes use of a lot of motifs that were part of. Kind of dark literature all already by that time. And in terms of his his verse form, I mean, he bought the form of the poem from a poem by Elizabeth Fehr, brownie. Oh that I didn't know tell me more about that. Well, that may be about it. As much as I know about an opponent, follow Elizabeth Barrett Browning because one of the things that he tried to do in his poetry was to come up with new verse forms and to try different. Way of structuring individual lines in different ways of. Organizing his stanzas in rhyme schemes to make his work as original as possible. And that was always an emphasis with him is to try and trying to do something that no one else has done before trying to be original. Now was that was the pub on the upon the publication of that poem. I mean that was that was later in life had he to that point achieved any sort of commercial success. Well, I would say commercial success because he never had never really I was able to live very well and on his writings now he did have some success earlier than that. Now, the raven came on eighteen forty five now earlier about five years earlier or no not a couple of years earlier. He published short story called the gold bug. And that that story won an award for him. And that was really his biggest his biggest success up until that point until the raven. And then won the raven when he published the raven and that was a big success. He he said that the bird beat the bug. The bird beat the bug. Indeed. This a famous incident. When he was in New York, he had a a noisy public feud with with Henry Wadsworth longfellow. What was that about? Well. He always was born in Boston. I don't know, you know, just by pure chance because his parents were actors, and that's where they were performing at that time. But he always resented it. And he always kind of looked down his nose at the Boston Brahmins, the literary leader Boston and his his animosity toward longfellow fell into that same would that same animosity. But he he picked a fight with longfellow in the pages of the Broadway journal, which is the magazine that he was editing at that time, and I'm not sure how much they're really was behind it. I think Paul was. But someone who recognize the controversy sells newspapers magazines, and you know, he he picked this fight with longfellow. Mainly as just to kind of dister up controversy. It's he's been he's been cited as as really the the the founder, I guess of the of the genre called detective fiction. Tell me tell me more about give me an example of of detective fiction by how well he did a story called the murders in the room more, which is considered the first detective story. And if you read that story, and then he and read truck homes or exit Christie and you'll see an amazing coincidence of all of the so many of the different motifs that we now consider as part of detective fiction are already there president in the murders in the room more. So we have the the eccentric consulting detective until he's not a part of the police force, but he often consults with the police force. And you know, he's he has a sidekick. Just like Dr Watson Sherlock Holmes had Dr Watson. And you know, there's the in in the story as a is a sealed room mystery, which would become another famous motif of of the and also to that police detective do. Is someone who's who's fascinated with the crime scene and looks for a tiny little clues in pieces of evidence in the crime scene, and and tries to didn't terp what they mean? And so virtually every major motif of the detectors genres president in that one story. We often think of PO depiction of PO is that the baggy is kind of that wild look. Somebody even use the word a little bit creepy looking. But that's really not who he was. I I understand. He was quite the sportsman quite the athlete. Yes. He wasn't very good athlete. And there's this story about him swimming for like four miles in the James river. And then he was also a good runner too. And he I mean he had to walk a walk for a walk for transportation. But but also I mean kept them kept in thin and wiry. Now, one of the things that I wrote a little article a few years ago about pose the daguerreotype images. Are there the first successful photographic process? And I argue anyways, very very carefully shaped his public image to to project this. I mean, so if he looks creepy in those pictures, I mean, it was a deliberate intent. One of the things that was kind of big pseudoscience at that time was for -nology and the idea that the the shape of your skull and the bumps on your head can determine your. Your personality. And so one of the tenants of phonology was that a big forehead was a sign of a poetic genius. And so, you know, you look at the pictures of PLO, and he's got this big forehead. Why I think that he deliberately posed for the camera to emphasize his forehead. He was also very interested in cryptography. You mentioned the gold bug earlier the incorporated a lot of sort of ciphers as an essential part of the story. Where did he where did he get that interest in in in cryptography, and what kind of cypher city employees in the Goldbach? I'm not exactly sure where he he I picked up the interest in cryptography. But it's it's not doesn't surprise me that they did because I was fascinated with what's interpreting signs. Now, it's in cryptography is a pretty basic way of doing that. Because you have. Individual typographic characters that symbolize other other letters. And it's it's the. A person's responsibility to figure out what those things mean. Now, something that even before he wrote, the gold bug poets was fascinated with those kinds of puzzles, and when he was working on one magazine challenged readers to send in ciphers, and he'd try to figure them out. And he he did he pretty much figured out all the ones that people send him, but. They were sending him so many that he just had to quit doing it. Because it was taking up too much time. But even on other aspects of of the culture of his interests. I think that the interpretation of signs was something that he was very much fascinated with phonology is one. I mean is also interested in handwriting, and what about person's handwriting men, and and even things like clothing, and and the way that they walked I mean, he would interpret all those things and see how how. External self is a reflection of the internal self. His another set of misconception is that he had. It. Oh, deep psychological issues, and that he was a raging alcoholic that was sort of all born out of another few. We mentioned the the the other feud with longfellow, but yet another feud with another rival that that sort of spawned a lot of these exaggerated stories tell me about that. Well, there was a guy named Rufus Griswold and Griswold published a book called the poets and poetry of America. And this was a kind of anthology of of American poets and. He gave a copy of it and said, okay. Could you write nice for review for me impulsive? Oh, I'd be glad to review it. And this gave the book. I mean, it was just gave it a very cutting review. And you know Griswold was was very disappointed by that. And part of what was going on there is that there's this. Yeah. Just good old boy network back then in one author would review another one you'd say good things about him. And he'd say good things about you. And and, you know, everyone, everyone would sell more books and poems. I had a scrupulous integrity when it came to her doing books, and if he read a he he read a book that was a bad book. He would he would say it was a bad book in in the reviews, and even as a reviewer he became known as the Tomahawk man, I just for he's cutting reviews. Well, anyways. And so that ever since he gave grizzled a bad review for his book. I mean, there was this animosity between those two and then after Paul's death Griswold published a obituary of him, and it's called the he didn't he signed it Ludwig. So he didn't sign his own name to it. But it was this terrible review. It said what a drunken propogate the poll wasn't that? He used to walk around downtown streets mumbling to himself in and say, you know, this this obituary, which was later incorporated into a collected edition of Poe's works really shaped Poe's reputation for for decades to come. Poet, Charles Dickens. The great Charles Dickens were were were pen pals of a sort, I guess how did they meet, and what kind of a friendship did they have a relationship? I think police jealous of dickens sticking hugely popular..

Edgar Allan Poe Paul longfellow tuberculosis Rufus Griswold New York Charles Dickens America president Kevin j Hayes university of central Oklahoma Ohio Eddie Washington college hospital Boston Elizabeth Barrett Browning Toledo emeritus professor of English Baltimore
"watson sherlock" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

15:14 min | 3 years ago

"watson sherlock" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"AM six forty. More stimulating talk. Welcome back to coast to coast AM on October third eighteen forty nine Edgar Allan Poe was found on the streets of Baltimore delirious and in great distress and in need of immediate assistance. According to the man who found him he was taken to the Washington college hospital where he died early on the morning of October. Seventh hole was never coherent long enough to explain how he came to be in his dire condition and wearing clothes that were not his own. Some sources say POS. Final words were quote. It's all over now. Right. Eddie is no more referring to his tombstone others say his last words were Lord help my poor soul. We're going to delve into the life and times of America's master of mystery in the Macab, Kevin j Hayes is emeritus professor of English at the university of central Oklahoma. His the author of several books about American literature and culture, including Edgar Allan Poe. Oh, he lives in writes in Toledo, Ohio. Kevin welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Good. Thank you for having me. Why for you is Edgar Allan Poe such an amazing writer. Why are you? Why do you write about him? Why are you? So enamored of him. Well, one thing I really like about as he was an ultimate craftsman. I mean, he was someone when when he wrote a short story he believed that every word counted. And not only that every word counted. But also that the position of every word counted. And this was a kind of craftsmanship that poll brought to the writing of short stories that the no one had ever really done before. How much of his his his is. Interest in the Macab and horror stems from the tragedy in his early life. His his his mother died. His father abandoned him his mother died. I think of tuberculosis later, he had a cousin who who died of tuberculosis. How much of that influenced his writing? Well, I think it had a big influence on on his writing. Although in my opinion, I think it's been over emphasized. I want to thank you for mentioning my my book at grail, and that's a it's a little Barbara fee of a poll that I wrote, but why structured differently than most other biographies because if you if you structure it. Strict chronological way, you have to start off with pole, and then his mother dying. And then he, you know, he gets gets taken in by the foster family, and and I just didn't want to start with that same story over and over again. And so I started with with some short stories, and then I did a flashback to his his early days. And so that was kind of by way of saying that his this emphasis on his mother's death has been overemphasized. But on the other hand, I mean, he did say in his critical writings that, you know, the death of a beautiful woman is is the most appropriate subject for poetry. Yes. That is one of his famous quotes and his I know you didn't or you think that maybe some of the tragedies. Life is over emphasized, but one particularly profound and poignant moment his cousin Virginia clam who vile accounts had this beautiful voice and one day. She singing for Edgar Allan Poe, and she begins to cough in this tiny drop of blood appears on her lip. And that was the first sign of the debris kilos which would make her an invalid and eventually take your life. But was that not sort of a period when he really started to drink heavily? Well, I mean, it was an in terms of his. In terms of his personal habits. The different thing than than his writing. I think now his his writing was already pretty well developed by the time that that his wife Virginia showed signs of tuberculosis. But he he was really I mean her death, really. Made him distraught. And he did start start drinking more after that. The one of my favorite works are poems by Paul. I'm sure many feel the same way is the raven. Which I think first appeared in New York newspaper, but but where did that with the inspiration for that come from? It came from came from posed mind. I mean, that's that's the first thing that comes to my mind. Of course, it's more complicated than that. But it really makes use of a lot of motifs that were part of. Kind of dark literature already by that time. And in terms of his verse form, I mean, he he bought the form of the poem from a poem by the pair, brownie. Oh, tell me more about that. Well that may be about as. As much as I know about Napoleon, right actually, follow Elizabeth Barrett Browning because one of the things that he tried to do in his poetry was to come up with new verse forms and to try different. Way of structuring individual lines in different ways of. Organizing his stanzas and rhyme schemes to make his work as original as possible. And that was always an emphasis with him is to try and trying to do something that no one else had done before trying to be original. Now was that was the public on upon the publication of that poll? I mean that was that was later in life had he to that point achieved any sort of commercial success. Say commercial success because he never never really I was able to live very well on on his writings now he did have some success earlier than that. Now other raven came on eighteen forty five now earlier about five years early or no not a couple of years earlier. He published a short story called the gold bug. And that that story won a an award for him. And that was really his biggest his biggest success up until that point until the raven. And then when the raven when he published the raven that was a big success. He he said that the bird beat the bug. The bird beat the bug. Indeed. There's a famous incident. When he was in New York, he had a a noisy public feud with with Henry Wadsworth longfellow. What was that about? Well. He always I was born in Boston. That was built just by pure chance because his parents were actors, and that's where they were performing at that time. But he always resented it. And he always kind of looked down his nose at the Boston Brahmins, the the literary leader Boston and his his animosity toward longfellow was fell into that. Same. Would that same animosity? But he he picked a fight with longfellow in the pages of the Broadway journal, which was the magazine that he was at that time. And I'm not sure how much they're really was behind it. I think Paul was. But someone who recognize the controversy sells newspapers magazines, and you know, he picked this fight with longfellow mainly is just to kind of disturb controversy. It's he's been he's been cited as as really the the the founder, I guess of the of the John recalled detective fiction. Tell me tell me more about that give me an example of of detective fiction by Paul. Well, he did a story called the murders in the room more, which is considered the first detective story. And if you read that story, and then you gone and read shock homes or exit Christie and you'll see an amazing coincidence of all the so many of the different motifs that we now consider as part of detective fiction are already there president in the murders in the room more. So we have the the eccentric consulting detective until you're not a part of the police force, but he often consults with the police force. And you know, he's he has a sidekick just like Dr Watson Sherlock Holmes had Dr Watson. And you know, there's the in. The story itself is a is a sealed room. Mystery which would become another famous motif of of this and also to that post detective Monsieur Japan is someone who's who's fascinated with the crime scene and looks for a tiny little clues in pieces of evidence from the crime scene and and tries to interpret what they mean? And so virtually every major motif of the detectors on RAs president in that one story. We often think of PO the depiction of you know, those the bag is kind of that wild look. Somebody to even use the word a little bit creepy looking. But that's really not who he was. I understand. He was quite the sportsman quite the athlete. Yes. He wasn't very good athlete. Then there's this story about him swimming for like four miles in the James river. And then he was also a good runner too. And he I mean he had to walk walk walk for transportation. But but also I mean kept them kept in thin and wiry now one of the things that I wrote a little article a few years ago about pose the daguerreotype images opposed there the first successful photographic process. And I argue anyways, very very carefully shaped his public image to to project this. I mean, so if he looks creepy in those pictures, I mean, it was a deliberate intent now one of the things that was in this kind of big pseudoscience at that time was phonology and the idea that the shape of your skull and the bumps on your head can determine your. Your personality. And so one of the tenants of phonology was that a big forehead was a sign of genius. And so, you know, you look at the pictures oppo. And he's got this big forehead while I think that he he deliberately posed for the camera to to emphasize his forehead. He was also very interested in cryptography. You mentioned the gold bug earlier the incorporated a lot of sort of ciphers as as an essential part of the story. Where did he where did he get that interest in in in cryptography, and what kind of cypher city employees in the Goldbach? I'm not exactly sure where he I picked up the interest in cryptography. But it's it's not doesn't surprise me. Because I was fascinated with with interpreting signs now, it's in cryptography is pretty basic way of doing that. Because you have. Cal individual typographic characters that symbolize other other letters. And you it's it's the. A person's responsibility to figure out what those things mean. Now, something that even before he wrote the gold bug post was fascinated with those kinds of puzzles, and when he was working on one magazine challenged readers to send in ciphers, and he'd try to figure them out. And he he did. I mean, he he pretty much figured out all the ones that people send him, but they were sending him so many that he just had to quit doing it. Because it was taking up too much time. But even the other aspects of of the culture of his interests. I think that the interpretation of signs was something that he was very much fascinated with phonology is one. I mean, there's also interested in handwriting and what a person's handwriting met, and and even things like clothing, and and the way that they walked in. He would interpret all those things and and see how how. External self is a reflection of the internal self. His another set of misconception is that. He had it. Oh, deep psychological issues, and that he was sort of a raging alcoholic that was sort of all born out of another few. We mentioned the the the other feud with longfellow, but yet another feud with another rival that that sort of spawned a lot of these exaggerated stories tell me about that. Well, there was a there was this guy named Rufus Griswold and Griswold published a book called the poets and poetry of America. And this is a kind of anthology of of early American poets and. He gave a copy of it and said, okay. Could you write a nice for review for me posted? Oh, I'd be glad to review it in this gave the book. I mean, it was just gave it a very cutting review. And you know Griswold was was very disappointed by that. And in part of what you know, what was going on there is that there's this. Yeah. You come. Just good old boy network back then in one author would review another one and you'd say good things about him. And he'd say good things about you. And and you know, every everyone would sell more books and PO was I had a scrupulous integrity when it came to reviewing books. And if you read a he he read a book that was a bad book. He would he would say it was a bad book in in the reviews and even as a revere, he became known as the Tomahawk man, I just four he's cutting reviews. Well, anyway, and so that ever since he gave bristled a bad review for his book. I mean, there was this animosity between those two and then after Paul's death Griswold published a obituary of him, and it's called the he didn't he signed it Ludwig. So he didn't sign his own name to it. But it was this terrible review. It said what a drunken propogate the poll wasn't that? He used to walk around downtown streets mumbling to himself and..

Edgar Allan Poe Paul longfellow tuberculosis Rufus Griswold Macab New York America Kevin j Hayes Boston university of central Oklahoma Ohio Eddie Washington college hospital Toledo president emeritus professor of English Baltimore Henry Wadsworth longfellow
"watson sherlock" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

15:36 min | 3 years ago

"watson sherlock" Discussed on WTVN

"Welcome back to coast to coast AM on October third eighteen forty nine Edgar Allan Poe was found on the streets of Baltimore delirious and in great distress and in need of immediate assistance. According to the man who found him he was taken to the Washington college hospital where he died early on the morning of October seventh Paul was never coherent long enough to explain how he came to be in his dire condition and wearing clothes that were not his own. Some sources say Poe's final words were quote. It's all over now. Right. Eddie is no more referring to his tombstone others say his last words were Lord helped my poor soul. We're going to delve into the life and times of America's master of mystery and the Macab Kevin j Hayes is emeritus professor of English at the university of central Oklahoma. He is the author of several books about American, literature and. Culture, including Edgar Allan Poe. He lives and writes in Toledo, Ohio. Kevin welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Good. Thank you for having me. Why for you is Edgar Allan Poe such an amazing writer. Why are you? Why do you write about him? Why are you? So enamored of him. Well, one thing I really like about as is an ultimate craftsman. I mean, he was someone when when he wrote a short story he believed that every word counted. And not only that every word counted. But also that the position of every word counted. And this was a kind of craftsmanship that Paul brought to the writing of short stories that the no one had ever really done before. How much of his his his is. Interest in the macabre and horror stems from the tragedy in his early life. His his his mother died is father abandoned him. His mother died. I think of tuberculosis later, he had a cousin who who died of tuberculosis. How much of that influenced his writing? Well, I think it had a big influence on on his writing. Although in my opinion, I think it's been over emphasized. I wanna thank you for mentioning my my book at growl. And that's a that's a little bit of a poll that I wrote, but why structured differently than most other biographies because if you if you structure it strict chronological way, you have to start off with pole, and then his mother dying. And then he, you know, he gets gets taken in by the foster family, and and you know, I just didn't want to start with that same story over and over again. And so I started with some short stories, and then I did a flashback to his early days. And so that was kind of my way of saying that his this emphasis on his mother's death. You know has been overemphasized. But on the other hand, I mean, he did say in his critical writings that, you know, the death of a beautiful woman is is the most. Appropriate subject for poetry. Yes. That is one of his famous quotes, and his I know, you know, he didn't you think that maybe some of the tragedies life is over emphasized, but one particularly profound and poignant moment. His cousin Virginia clam who violate accounts had this beautiful voice and one day. She singing for Edgar Allan Poe, and she begins to cough in this tiny drop of blood appears on her lip. And that was the first sign of the Burki losses, which would make her an invalid eventually take her life. But was that not sort of a period when he really started to drink heavily? Well, I mean, it was in in terms of his. In terms of his personal habits are different thing than than his is writing. I think now his his writing was already pretty well developed by the time that the. His wife Virginia showed signs of tuberculosis. But he he was really I mean her death, really. Made him distraught. And he did start start drinking more after that. The one of my favorite workshop poems by Paul. I'm sure many feel the same way is the raven. Which I think first appeared in a in a New York newspaper, but but where did that with the inspiration for that come from? It came from came from pose mind. I mean, that's that's the first thing that comes to my mind. Of course, it's more complicated than that. But it really makes use of a lot of motifs that were part of kind of dark literature all already by that time. And in terms of his his verse form, I mean, he he bought the form of the poem from a poem by Elizabeth Fehr Browning. Oh, I didn't know tell me more about that. Well that may be about is. As much as I know about an opponent, right actually, follow Lisbeth bear Browning. Because one of the things that he tried to do in his poetry was to come up with new verse forms and to try different. Way of structuring individual lines in different ways of. Organizing his stanzas in rhyme schemes to make his work as original as possible. And that was always an emphasis with him is to try and trying to do something that no one else had done before trying to be original. Now was that was the pub on upon the publication of that poll. I mean that was that was later in life had he to that point achieves any sort of commercial success. Well, I would say commercial success because he never never really I was able to live very long on his writings now he did have some success earlier than that. Now. Other even came on eighteen forty five now earlier about five years earlier or no. Couple of years earlier. He published short story called the gold bug. And that that story won an award for him. And that was really his biggest his biggest success up until that point until the raven. And then when the raven when he published the raven that was a big success. He he said that the the bird beat the bug. The bird beat the bug. Indeed. There's a famous incident. When he was in New York, he had a a noisy public feud with with Henry Wadsworth longfellow. What was that about? Well, he always was born in Boston. I don't know you just by pure chance because his parents were actors, and that's where they were performing at that time. But he always resented it. And he always kind of looked down his nose at the Boston Brahmins, the literary leader Boston and his his animosity toward longfellow was fell into that same that same animosity. But he he picked a fight with longfellow in the pages of the Broadway journal, which was the magazine he was editing at that time. And I'm not sure how much they're really was behind it. I think Paul was. But someone who recognize the controversy sells newspapers magazines, and you know, he he picked this fight with longfellow. Mainly as just to kind of disturb controversy. It's he's been he's been cited as as really the the the founder, I guess of the of the genre called detective fiction. Tell me tell me more about an example of of detective fiction by Paul. Well, he did a story called the murders in the room more, which is considered the first detective story. And if you read that story, and then ego and read Sherlock Holmes or exit Christie, and you'll see mazing coincidence of all the years, so many of the different motifs that we now consider as part of detective fiction are already there president in the murders in the room more. So we have the the eccentric consulting detective until he's not a part of the police force, but he often consults with the police force. And you know, he's he has the sidekick just like Dr Watson Sherlock Holmes had Dr Watson. And you know, there's the in in the story itself is a is a sealed room. Mystery which would become another famous motif of the of the and also to that post detective Monsieur do pan is someone who's who's fascinated with the crime scene. It looks for a tiny little clues in pieces of evidence in the crime scene and and tries to didn't terp what they mean. And so virtually every major motif of the detectors on RAs president in that one story. We often think of PO depiction of Paul is, you know, those that the bag is kind of that wild look. Some might even use the word a little bit creepy looking. But that's really not who he was. I understand. He was quite the sportsman quite the athlete. Yes. He wasn't very good athlete. Then there's this story about him swimming for like four miles in the James river. And then he was also a good runner too. And he I mean he had to walk. Oh, walk for walk for transportation. But but also I mean kept them kept in thin and wiry now one of the things that I wrote a little article a few years ago about pose the daguerreotype images there the first successful photographic process. And I argue anyways, very very carefully shaped his public image to project this. I mean, so if he looks creepy in those pictures, I mean, it was a deliberate intent and one of the things that was kind of big pseudoscience at that time was phonology and the idea that the the shape of your skull and the bumps on your head can determine your. Your personality. And so one of the tenants of phonology was that a big forehead was a sign of a poetic genius. And so you look at the pictures of Paul, and he's got this big forehead while I think that he he deliberately posed for the camera to to emphasize his forehead. He was also very interested in cryptography. You mentioned the gold bug earlier the incorporated a lot of sort of ciphers as as an essential part of the story. Where did he where did he get that interest in in in cryptography, and what kind of cypher city employees in the gold? Buck. I'm not exactly sure where he I picked up the interest in cryptography. But it's it's not doesn't surprise me that they did because I was fascinated with what's interpreting signs now. It's in cryptography is a pretty basic way of doing that. Because you have. Cal individual typographic characters that symbolize other other letters. And you it's it's the. A person's responsibility to figure out what those things mean. Now, something that even before he wrote the gold bug post was fascinated with those kinds of puzzles, and when he was working on one magazine challenged readers to send in ciphers, and he'd try to figure them out. And he he did. I mean, if he pretty much figured out all the ones that people send him, but they were sending him so many that he just had to quit doing it. Because it was taking up too much time. But even the other aspects of of the culture of his interests. I think that the interpretation of signs was something that he was very much fascinated with phonology is one. I mean, he was also interested in handwriting, and what a person's handwriting met, and and even things like clothing, and and the way that they walked I mean, he would interpret all those things and see how how. External self is a reflection of the internal self. His another set of misconception is that. He had it. Oh, deep psychological issues, and that he was sort of a raging alcoholic that was sort of all born out of another few. We mentioned the the the other feud with longfellow, but yet another feud with another rival that that sort of spawned a lot of these exaggerated stories tell me about that. Well, there was there was this guy named Rufus Griswold and Griswold published a book called the poets and poetry of America. And this was a kind of anthology of of early American poets and. He gave a copy of it and said, okay. Could you write a nice for review for me posted? Oh, I'd be glad to review it in just this gave the book. I mean, it was just gave it a very cutting review and Griswold was was very disappointed by that. And part of what you know, what was going on there is that there's this. Yeah. You kind of just good old boy network back then in in, you know, one author would review another one and you'd say good things about him. And he'd say good things about you. And and, you know, every everyone would sell more books and Paul was had a scrupulous integrity when it came to reviewing books, and if he read a he he read a book that was a bad book. He would he would say it was a bad book in in the reviews, and even as a reviewer he became known as the Tomahawk man, I just for he's cutting reviews. Well, anyway, and so that ever since he made gave Griswold a bad review for his book. I mean, there was this animosity between those two and then after Paul's death of chriswell published a obituary of him, and it's called the he didn't he signed it Ludwig. So he didn't sign his own name to it. But it was this terrible review. It said what a drunken profligate that Paul wasn't that. He used to walk around downtown streets mumbling to himself and. So, you know, this this obituary, which was later incorporated into a collected edition of Poe's works really shaped Poe's reputation for for decades to come. Poet, Charles Dickens. The great Charles Dickens were were were pen pals of a sort, I guess how did they meet, and what kind of a friendship did they have a relationship? I think police jealous of dickens sticking hugely popular..

Paul Edgar Allan Poe longfellow Rufus Griswold tuberculosis New York America Charles Dickens Kevin j Hayes university of central Oklahoma Ohio Eddie Toledo Washington college hospital Boston emeritus professor of English Baltimore writer Lisbeth bear Browning
"watson sherlock" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

15:45 min | 3 years ago

"watson sherlock" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Katie SM. Welcome back to coast to coast AM on October eighteen forty nine Edgar Allan Poe was found on the streets of Baltimore delirious and in great distress and in need of immediate assistance. According to the man who found him he was taken to the Washington college hospital where he died early on the morning of October. Seventh pole was never coherent long enough to explain how he came to be in his dire condition and wearing clothes that were not his own. Some sources say POS. Final words were quote. It's all over now. Right. Eddie is no more referring to his tombstone others say his last words were Lord helped my poor soul. We're going to delve into the life and times of America's master of mystery and the macabre Kevin j Hayes is America's professor of English at the university of central Oklahoma. His the author of several books about American literature and. Culture, including Edgar Allan Poe. He lives in writes in Toledo, Ohio. Kevin welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Good. Thank you for having me. Why for you is Edgar Allan Poe such an amazing writer. Why are you? Why do you write about him? Why are you? So enamored of him. Well, one thing I really like about is. He was an ultimate craftsman. I mean, he was someone when he wrote a short story he believed that every word counted. And not only that every word counted. But also that the position of every word counted. And this was a kind of craftsmanship that whole brought to the writing of short stories that that no one had ever really done before. Now how much of his his his is. Interest in the macabre and horror stems from the tragedy in his early life. His his his his mother died. His father abandoned him his mother died. I think of tuberculosis later, he had a cousin who who died of tuberculosis. How much of that influenced his writing? Well, I think it had a big influence on on his writing. Although in my opinion, I think it's been over emphasized. I wanna thank you for mentioning my my book at growl. And it's a little biography of a poll that I wrote, but why structured differently than most other biographies because if you if you structure it strict chronological way, you have to start off with pole, and then his mother dying. And then he, you know, he gets gets taken in by the foster family, and and you know, I just didn't want to start with that same story over and over again. And so I started with with some short stories, and then I did a flashback to his early days. And so that was kind of my way of saying that his this emphasis on his mother's death. You know, hasn't been overemphasized. But on the other hand, I mean, he did say in his critical writings that, you know, the death of a beautiful woman is is the most. Appropriate subject for poetry. Yes. That is one of his famous quotes and his I know he didn't think that maybe some of the tragedies. Life is over emphasized, but one particularly profound and poignant moment his cousin Virginia clam bile accounts. Had this beautiful voice and one day. She singing for Edgar Allan Poe, and she begins to cough in this tiny drop of blood appears on her lip. And that was the first sign of the debris kilos which would make her an invalid and eventually take your life. But was that not sort of a period when he really started to drink heavily? Well, I mean, it was an in terms of his. In terms of his personal habits are the different thing than than his writing. I think now his his writing was already pretty well developed by the time that. His wife Virginia showed signs of tuberculosis. But he he was really I mean her death, really. Made him distraught. And he did start to start drinking more after that. The one of my favorite workshop poems by Paul. I'm sure many feel the same way is the raven. Which I think first appeared in New York newspaper, but but where did that with the inspiration for that come from? It came from came from pose mind. I mean, that's that's the first thing that comes to my mind. Of course, it's more complicated than that. But it really makes use of a lot of motifs that were part of. Kind of dark literature already by that time and in terms of his his birth forum. I mean, he he bought the form of the poem from a poem by Elizabeth Fehr, brownie. Oh, I didn't know tell me more about that. Well that may be about as. As much as I know about Napoleon, right actually, follow Browning. Because one of the things that he tried to do in his poetry was to come up with new verse forms and to try different. Way of structuring individual lines in different ways of. Organizing his stanzas and rhyme schemes to make his work original as possible. And that was always an emphasis with him is to try and trying to do something that no one else had done before trying to be original. Now was that was the public on upon the publication of that poll? I mean that was that was later in life had he to that point achieved any sort of commercial success. Well, I would say commercial success because he never never really I was able to live very well on on his writings now he did have some success earlier than that and other even came on eighteen forty five now earlier about five years earlier or no. Couple of years earlier. He published a short story called the gold bug. And that that story won a an award for him. And that was really his biggest his biggest success up until that point until the raven. And then when the raven when he published the raven and that was a big success. He he said that the bird beat the bug. The bird beat the bug. Indeed. There's a famous incident. When he was in New York, he had a a noisy public feud with with Henry Wadsworth longfellow. What was that about? Well. He always born in Boston. And that was built just by pure chance because his parents were actors, and that's where they were performing at that time. But he always resented it. And he always kind of looked down his nose at the Boston Brahmin. Instead, the literary leader Boston and his animosity toward longfellow was fell into that. Same would that same animosity? But he he picked a fight with longfellow in the pages of the Broadway journal, which was the magazine he was editing at that time. And I'm not sure how much they're really was behind it. I think Paul was someone who recognize the controversy sells newspapers magazines, and you know, he he picked this fight with longfellow. Mainly as just to kind of disturb controversy. It's he's been he's been cited as as really the the the founder of the of the John recalled detective fiction. Tell me tell me more about that give me an example of detective fiction by Paul. Well, he did a story called the murders in the room more, which is considered the first detective story. And if you read that story, and then you going in read truck homes or exit Christie and you'll see an amazing coincidence of all of the so many of the different motifs that we now consider as part of detective fiction are already there president in the murders in the remark. So we have the the eccentric consulting detective until he's not a part of the police force, but he often consults with the police force. And you know, he's he has a sidekick just like Dr Watson Sherlock, Holmes, Dr Watson. And you know, there's the in in the story itself is a is a sealed room. Mystery which would become another famous motif of of the and also to that post detective, your Japan is someone who's who's fascinated with the crime scene and looks a tiny little clues in pieces of evidence from the crime scene, and and try to didn't terp what they mean. And so virtually every major motif of the detectors genres president in that one story. We often think of PO the depiction of PO is those the bag is kind of that wild look. Somebody even use the word a little bit creepy looking. But that's really not who he was. I understand. He was quite the sportsman quite the athlete. Yes. He wasn't very good athlete. And there's this story about him swimming for like four miles in James river. And then he was also a good runner too. And he I mean he had to walk. Oh, walk for walk for transportation. But but also I mean kept them kept in thin and wiry. Now one thing that I wrote a little article a few years ago about pose the daguerreotype images are there. The first successful photographic process and poll, I argue anyways, very very carefully shaped his public image to to project this. I mean, so if he looks creepy in those pictures, I mean, it was a deliberate intent now one of the things that was in this kind of big pseudoscience at that time was for -nology and the idea that the shape of your skull and the bumps on your head can determine your. Your personality. And so one of the tenants of phonology was that a big forehead was a sign of of what a genius. And so, you know, you look at the pictures of PO and he's got this big forehead while I think that he he deliberately posed for the camera to to emphasize his forehead. He was also very interested in cryptography. You mentioned the gold bug earlier the incorporated a lot of sort of ciphers as as an essential part of the story. Where did he where did he get that interest in in in cryptography, and what kind of cypher city employees in the Goldbach? I'm not exactly sure where he I picked up the interest in cryptography. But it's it's not doesn't surprise me that they did because I was fascinated with what's interpreting signs now. It's in cryptography is a pretty basic way of doing that. Because you have. Carrie individual typographic characters that symbolize other other letters. And you it's it's the. A person's responsibility to figure out what those things mean. Now, something that even before he wrote the gold bug post was fascinated with those kinds of puzzles, and when he was working on one magazine challenged readers to send in ciphers, and he'd try to figure them out. And he he did. I mean, if he pretty much figured out all the ones that people send him, but they were sending him so many that he just had to quit doing it. Because it was taking too much time. But even the other aspects of of the culture and all of his interests. I think that the interpretation of science was something that he was very much fascinated with phonology is one. I mean, it was also interested in handwriting, and what a person's handwriting met, and and even things like clothing, and and the way that they walked I mean, he would interpret all those things and and see how how external self is a reflection of the internal self. His another set of misconception is that he had. Deep psychological issues, and that he was a raging alcoholic that was sort of all born out of another few. We mentioned that the feud with longfellow, but yet another feud with another rival that that sort of spawned a lot of these exaggerated stories tell me about that. Well, there was there was this guy named Rufus Griswold and Griswold published a book called the poets and poetry of America. And this was a kind of anthology of of early American poets and. He gave a copy of it and said, okay. Could you write a nice review for me posted? Oh, I'd be glad to review it. And this escape the book. I mean, it was just gave it a very cutting review. And you know Griswold was was very disappointed by that. And part of what you know, what was going on there is that there's this. Yeah. You kind of just good old boy network back then in in, you know, one author would review another one and you'd say good things about him. And he'd say good things about you. And and you know, every everyone would sell more books and poems. I had a scrupulous integrity when it came to reviewing books. And if you read a he he read a book that was a bad book. He would he would say it was a bad book in in the reviews, and even as a reviewer he became known as the Tomahawk man, I just for he's cutting reviews. Well, anyway, and so that ever since he may gave bristled a bad review for his book. I mean, there was this animosity between those two and then after Paul's death Griswold published a obituary of him, and it's called the he didn't he signed it Ludwig. So he didn't sign his own name to it. But it was this terrible review. It said what a drunken propogate the poll wasn't that? He used to walk around downtown streets mumbling to himself in. So, you know, this this obituary, which was later corporated into a collected edition of Poe's works really shaped Poe's reputation for for decades to come. Poet, Charles Dickens. The great Charles Dickens were were were pen pals of a sort, I guess how did they meet, and what kind of a friendship that they have a relationship. I think police jealous of dickens sticking hugely popular..

Edgar Allan Poe Paul longfellow Rufus Griswold tuberculosis America Charles Dickens New York Kevin j Hayes university of central Oklahoma Ohio Boston Katie SM Eddie Washington college hospital Toledo Baltimore professor of English writer
"watson sherlock" Discussed on  News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

15:44 min | 3 years ago

"watson sherlock" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"A M K E X. Welcome back to coast to coast AM on October third eighteen forty nine Edgar Allan Poe was found on the streets of Baltimore delirious and in great distress and in need of immediate assistance. According to the man who found him he was taken to the Washington college hospital where he died early on the morning of October. Seventh pole was never coherent long enough to explain how he came to be in his dire condition and wearing clothes that were not his own. Some sources say Poe's final words were quote. It's all over now. Right. Eddie is no more referring to his tombstone others say his last words were Lord help my poor soul. We're going to delve into the life and times of America's master of mystery and the Macab Kevin j Hayes is emeritus professor of English at the university of central Oklahoma. His the author of several books about American literature and culture, including. Edgar Allan Poe. He lives and writes in Toledo, Ohio. Kevin welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Good. Thank you for having me. Why for you is Edgar Allan Poe such an amazing writer. Why are you? Why do you write about him? Why are you? So enamored of him. Well, one thing I really like about is. He was an ultimate craftsman. I mean, he was someone when when he wrote a short story he believed that every word counted. And not only that every word counted. But also that the position of every word counted. And this was a kind of craftsmanship that brought to the writing of short stories that the no one had ever really done before. How much of his his his is. Interest in the Macab and horror stems from the tragedy in his early life. His his his his mother died. His father abandoned him his mother died. I think of tuberculosis later, he had a cousin who who died of tuberculosis. How much of that influenced his writing? Well, I think it had a big influence on on his writing. Although in my opinion, I think it's been overemphasized. I wanna thank you for mentioning my my book at ground pole. That's a that's a little boxy of a poll that I wrote, but why structured it differently than most other biographies because if you if you structure it stint strict chronological way, you have to start off with pole, and then his mother dying. And then he, you know, he gets gets taken in by the foster family, and and you know, I just didn't want to start with that same story over and over again. And so I started with with some short stories, and then I did a flashback to his early days. And so that was kind of my way of saying that his this emphasis on his mother's death has been overemphasized. But on the other hand, I mean, he did say in his critical writings that the death of a beautiful woman is is the most. Appropriate subject for poetry. Yes. That is one of his famous quotes, and his I I know, you know, he didn't or you think that maybe some of the tragedies life is over emphasized, but one particularly profound and poignant moment his cousin Virginia clam who. Viola counts had this beautiful voice and one day. She singing for Edgar Allan Poe, and she begins to cough in this tiny drop of blood appears on her lip. And that was the first sign of the debris kilos which would make her an invalid and eventually take her life. But was that not sort of a period when he really started to drink heavily? Well, I mean, it was in in terms of his. In terms of his personal habits are different thing than than his writing. I think now his his writing was already pretty well developed by the time that the. His wife Virginia showed signs of tuberculosis. But he he was really I mean her death, really. Made him distraught. And he did start start drinking more after that. The one of my favorite works are poems by Paul. I'm sure many feel the same way is the raven. Which I think I appeared in a New York newspaper, but but where did that with the inspiration for that come from? It came from came from pose mind. I mean, that's that's the first answer that comes to my mind. Of course, it's more complicated than that. But it really makes use of a lot of motifs that were part of kind of dark literature already by that time in terms of. His his verse forum. I mean, he he bought the form of the poem from a poem. By Elizabeth pair Browning. Oh that I didn't know tell me more about that. Well that may be about as. As much as I know about it. Now voted right actually, follow Elizabeth Barrett Browning because one of the things that he tried to do in his poetry was to come up with new verse forms and to try different. Way of structuring individual lines in different ways of. Organizing his stanzas in rhyme schemes to make his work as a regional as possible. And that was always an emphasis with him is to try and trying to do something that no one else had done before trying to be original. Now was that was the pub on upon the publication of that poll. I mean that was that was later in life had he to that point achieved any sort of commercial success. Well, I would say commercial success because he never never really was able to live very well on on his writings now he did have some success earlier than that and other even came on eighteen forty five now earlier about five years earlier or no. Couple of years earlier. He published short story called the gold bug. And that that story won an award for him. And that was really his biggest his biggest success up until that point until the raven. And then when the raven when he published the raven that was a big success. He he said that the bird beat the bug. The bird beat the bug. Indeed. This is a famous incident. When he was in New York, he had a a noisy public feud with with Henry Wadsworth longfellow. What was that about? Well. He always was born in Boston. I don't know, you know, just by pure chance because his parents were actors, and that's where they were performing at that time. But he always resented it. And he always kind of looked down his nose at the Boston Brahmin instead of the literary leader Boston and his his animosity toward longfellow was fell into that same that same animosity. But he he picked a fight with longfellow in the pages of the Broadway journal, which is the magazine that he was editing at that time, and I'm not sure how much they're really was behind it. I think Paul was someone who recognize the controversy sells newspapers magazines, and you know, he picked this fight with longfellow. Mainly as just to kind of disturb controversy. It's he's been he's been cited as as really the the the founder, I guess of the of the John recalled detective fiction. Tell me tell me more about an example of of detective fiction by Paul. Well, he did a story called the murders in the room more, which is considered the first detective story. And if you read that story and then eagle in read Sherlock Holmes or exit Christie, and you'll see amazing coincidence of all the years, so many of the different motifs that we now consider as part of detective fiction are already there president in the murders in the room more. So we have the the eccentric consulting detective until he's not a part of the police force, but he often consults with the police force. And you know, he's he has a sidekick just like Dr Watson Sherlock Holmes had Dr Watson. And you know, there's the in the story itself is is a sealed room. Mystery which would become another famous motif of of this and also to that post detective Japan is someone who's who's fascinated with the crime scene and looks for a tiny little clues in pieces of evidence in the crime scene, and and tries to didn't terp what they mean. And so virtually every major motif of the detectors onerous president in that one story. You know, we often think of PLO it'll depiction of PLO is those that the baggy is kind of that wild look. Somebody to even use the word a little bit creepy looking. But that's really not who he was. I understand. He was quite the sportsman quite the athlete. Yes. He wasn't very good athlete. Then there's the story about him swimming for like four miles in the James river. And then he was also a good runner too. And he I mean he had to walk. Oh, walk for a walk for transportation. But but also I mean kept them kept in thin and wiry now one of the things that I wrote a little article appears ago about pose the daguerreotype images there. The first successful photographic process and poll, I argue anyways, very very carefully shaped his public image to to project this. I mean, so if he looks creepy in those pictures, I mean, it was a deliberate intent one of the things that was kind of big pseudoscience at that time was phonology and the idea that the the shape of your skull in the bumps on your head can determine your. Your personality. And so one of the tenants of phonology was that a big forehead was a sign of a poetic genius. And so, you know, you look at the pictures of PLO, and he's got this big forehead while I think that he he deliberately posed for the camera to emphasize his forehead. He was also very interested in cryptography. You mentioned the gold bug earlier the incorporated a lot of sort of ciphers as as an essential part of the story. Where did he where did he get that interest in in in cryptography, and what kind of cypher city employees in the gold? Buck. I'm not exactly sure where he he I picked up the interest in cryptography. But it's it's not doesn't surprise me that they did because who was fascinated with with interpreting signs. Now, it's in in cryptography is a pretty basic way of doing that. Because you have. Carrie, you know, individual typographic characters that symbolize other other letters, and you it's it's the. A person's responsibility to figure out what those things mean. Now, something that even before he wrote, the gold bug post was fascinated with those kinds of puzzles, and when he was working on one magazine challenged readers to send in ciphers, and he'd try to figure out and he he did. I mean, if he pretty much figured out all the ones that people send him, but they were sending him so many that he had to quit doing it. Because it was taking too much time. But even then other aspects of of the culture of his interests. I think that the interpretation of signs was something that he was very much fascinated with phonology is one. I mean, it was also interested in handwriting, and what a person's handwriting met, and and even things like clothing, and and the way that they walked I mean, he would interpret all those things and see how how external self is a reflection of the internal self. His another set of misconception is that he had. It. Oh, deep psychological issues, and that he was sort of a raging alcoholic that was sort of all born out of another few. We mentioned the the the other feud with longfellow, but yet another feud with another rival that that sort of spawned a lot of these exaggerated stories tell me about that. Well, there was a there was this guy named Rufus Griswold and Griswold published a book called the poets and poetry of America. And this was a kind of of of American poets and. He gave a copy of it and said, okay. Could you write a nicer review for me? Oh, I'd be glad to review it in just this gave the book. I mean, it was just gave it a very cutting review and Griswold was was very disappointed by that. And part of what you know, what was going on there is that there's this. Yeah. You kind of just. Good old boy network back then in you know, one author would review another one and you'd say good things about him. And he'd say good things about you. And and, you know, every everyone would sell more books and Paul was I a scrupulous integrity when it came to doing books, and if he read a he he read a book that was a bad book. He would he would say it was a bad book in in the reviews, and even as a reviewer he became known as the Tomahawk man, I just four he's cutting reviews. Well, anyways. And so that ever since he gave Griswold a bad review for his book. I mean, there was this animosity between those two and then after Paul's death of chriswell published a obituary of him, and it's called the he didn't he signed it Ludwig. So he didn't sign his own name to it. But it was this terrible review. It said what a drunken profligate the poll wasn't that? He used to walk around downtown streets mumbling to soften and. So, you know, this this obituary, which was later incorporated into a collected edition of post works really safe Poe's reputation for for decades to come. Poet, Charles Dickens. The great Charles Dickens were were were pen pals of a sort, I guess how did they meet, and what kind of a friendship did they have a relationship? I think police jealous of dickens 'cause sticking hugely popular..

Edgar Allan Poe Paul longfellow Rufus Griswold PLO tuberculosis Elizabeth Barrett Browning Charles Dickens New York America Kevin j Hayes university of central Oklahoma Boston Ohio Eddie Washington college hospital Toledo emeritus professor of English Baltimore
"watson sherlock" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

15:00 min | 3 years ago

"watson sherlock" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Welcome back to coast to coast AM on October third eighteen forty nine Edgar Allan Poe was found on the streets of Baltimore delirious and in great distress and in need of immediate assistance. According to the man who found him he was taken to the Washington college hospital where he died early on the morning of October. Seventh hole was never coherent long enough to explain how he came to be in his dire condition and wearing clothes that were not his own. Some sources say Poe's final words were quote. It's all over now. Right. Eddie is no more referring to his tombstone. Others say his last words were Lord help my poor soul. We're going to delve into the life and times of America's master of mystery in the Macab, Kevin j Hayes is emeritus professor of English at the university of central Oklahoma. He's the author of several books about American, literature and culture, including Edgar Allan Poe. He lives in writes in Toledo, Ohio. Kevin welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Good. Thank you for having me. Why for you is Edgar Allan Poe such an amazing writer. Why are you? Why do you write about him? Why are you? So enamored of him. Well, one thing I really like about as he was an ultimate craftsman. I mean, he was someone when when he wrote a sort story he believed that every word counted and not only that every word counted. But also that the position of every word counted. And this was a kind of craftsmanship that poll brought to the writing of short stories that the no one had ever really done before. Now how much of his his his is. Interest in the macabre and horror stems from the tragedy in his early. Life is his is his mother died. His father abandoned him his mother died. I think of tuberculosis later, he had a cousin who who died of tuberculosis. How much of that influenced his writing? Well, I I think it had a big influence on on his writing. Although in my opinion, I think it's been over emphasized. I want to thank you for mentioning my my book at growl in pole. That's a it's a little a poll that I wrote, but why structured it differently than most other biographies because if you if you structure it strict chronological way, you have to start off with then his mother dying. And then he, you know, he gets gets taken in by the foster family, and and I just didn't want to start with that same story over and over again. And so I started with with some short stories, and then I did a flashback to his his early days. And so that was kind of by way of saying that his this emphasis on his mother's death. You know has been overemphasized. But on the other hand, I mean, he did say in his critical writings that, you know, the death of a beautiful woman is is the most. Appropriate subject for poetry. Yes. That is one of his famous quotes, and his I know, you know, he didn't think that he may maybe some of the tragedies. Life is over emphasized, but one particularly profound and poignant moment. His cousin Virginia clam who by all accounts. Had this beautiful voice and one day. She singing for Edgar Allan Poe, and she begins to cough in this tiny drop of blood appears under lip and that was the first sign of the debris kilos which would make her an invalid and eventually take your life. But was that not sort of a period when he really started to drink heavily? Well, I mean, it was an in terms of his. In terms of his personal habits are the different thing than than his is writing. I think now his his writing was already pretty well developed by the time that that. His wife Virginia showed signs of tuberculosis. But he he was really I mean her death, really. Made him distraught. And he did start to start drinking more after that. The one of my favorite works are poems by Paul, and I'm sure many feel the same way is the raven. Which I think first appeared in a in a New York newspaper, but but where did that with the inspiration for that come from? It came from came from posed mind. I mean, that's that's the first thing that comes to my mind. Of course, it's more complicated than that. But it really makes use of a lot of motif that were part of kind of dark literature all already by that time. And in terms of his his verse form, I mean, he he bought the form of the poem from a poem by the pair, brownie. Oh, I didn't know tell me more about that. Well, that may be a bothers. As much as I know about. Now voted follow Browning. Because one of the things that he tried to do in his poetry was to come up with new verse forms and to try different. Way of structuring individual lines in different ways of. Organizing stanzas in rhyme schemes to make his work as original as possible. And that was always an emphasis with him is to try and trying to do something that no one else had done before trying to be original. Now was that was the public on the upon the publication of that poll? I mean that was that was later in life had he to that point achieves any sort of commercial success. Well, I would say commercial success because he never never really was able to live very well on his writings now he did have some success earlier than that. Now, the raven came on eighteen forty five now earlier about five years early or no. A couple of years earlier. He published short story called the gold bug. And that that story won a an award for him. And that was really his biggest his biggest success up until that point until the raven. And then when the raven when he published the raven and that was a big success. He he said that the bird beat the bug. The bird beat the bug. Indeed. There's a famous incident. When he was in New York, he had a a noisy public feud with with Henry Wadsworth longfellow. What was that about? Well. He always born in Boston. I don't know you're just by pure chance because his parents were actors, and that's where they were performing at that time. But he always resented it. And he always kind of looked down his nose at the Boston Brahmins, the literary leader Boston and his his animosity toward longfellow was fell into that same that same animosity. But he he picked a fight with longfellow in the pages of the Broadway journal, which was the magazine he was editing at that time. And I'm not sure how much they're really was behind it. I think Paul was. But someone who recognize the controversy sells newspapers magazines, and you know, he he picked this fight with longfellow. Mainly as just to kind of disturb controversy. It's he's been he's been cited as as really the the the founder, I guess of the of the genre called detective fiction. Tell me tell me more about that give me an example of of detective fiction by Paul. Well, he did a story called the murders in the room more, which is considered the first detective story. And if you read that story, and then ego and read Sherlock Holmes or exit Christie, and you'll see an amazing coincidence of all the years, so many of the different motifs that we now consider as part of detective fiction are already there president in the murders in the room more. So we have the the eccentric consulting detective until he's not a part of the police force, but he often consults with the police force. And you know, he's he has a sidekick just like Dr Watson Sherlock Holmes had Dr Watson. And you know, there's the in in the story itself is a is a sealed room mystery, which would become another famous motif of of this. And also to that pose detective Mischer Japan is someone who's. Was fascinated with the crime scene and looks for a tiny little clues in pieces of evidence in the crime scene. And and try to interpret what they mean? And so virtually every major motif of detectors on RAs president in that one story. You know, we often think of PO the depiction of PLO as those that the bag is and kind of that wild look. Some might even use the word a little bit creepy looking. But that's really not who he was. I understand. He was quite the sportsman quite the athlete. Yes. He wasn't very good athlete. And there's this story about him swimming for like four miles in the James river. And then he was also a good runner too. And he I mean he had to walk. Oh, walk FRA walk for transportation. But but also I mean, it kept them kept in thin and wiry. Now, one of the things that I wrote a little article a few years ago about pose that daguerreotype images of there. The first successful photographic process. And I argue anyways, very very carefully shaped his public image to project this. I mean, so if he looks creepy in those pictures, I mean, it was a deliberate intent one of the things that was kind of big pseudoscience at that time was phonology and the idea that the the shape of your skull and the bumps on your head. How can determine your? Your personality. And so one of the tenants of for knowledge was that a big forehead was a sign of poetic genius. And so, you know, you look at the pictures of PO and he's got this big forehead while I think he'd he deliberately posed for the camera to emphasize his forehead. He was also very interested in cryptography. You mentioned the gold bug earlier the incorporated a lot of sort of ciphers as an essential part of the story. Where did he where did he get that interest in in in cryptography, and what kind of cypher city employees in the Goldbach? I'm not exactly sure where he he I picked up the interest in cryptography. But it's it's not doesn't surprise me. Because oh was fascinated with what's interpreting signs? Now, it's in cryptography is pretty basic way of doing that. Because you have. Individual typographic characters that symbolize other other letters. And it's it's the. A person's responsibility to figure out what those things mean. Now, something that even before he wrote the gold bug post was fascinated with those kinds of puzzles, and when he was working on one magazine challenged readers to send in ciphers, and he'd try to figure them out. And he he did. I mean, if he pretty much figured out all the ones that people send him, but. They were sending him so many that he just had to quit doing it. Because it was taking too much time. But even the other aspects of of the culture of his interests. I think that the interpretation of signs was something that he was very much fascinated with for -nology is one. I mean, he was also interested in handwriting, and what a person's handwriting men, and and even things like clothing, and and the way that they walked I mean, he would interpret all those things and see how how external self is a reflection of the internal self. His another set of misconception is that he had. Deep psychological issues, and that he was sort of a raging alcoholic that was sort of all born out of another few. We mentioned the the the the other feud with longfellow, but yet another feud with another rival that that sort of spawned a lot of these exaggerated stories tell me about that. Well, there was a there was this guy named Rufus Griswold and Griswold published a book called the poets and poetry of America. And this was a kind of anthology of of early American, poet and. He gave a copy of it and said, okay. Could you write a nice review for me posted? Oh, I'd be glad to review it. And this gave the book. I mean, it was just gave it a very cutting review, and you know, Griswold was was very disappointed by that. And in part of what you know, what was going on there is that there's this. Yeah. Kind of just good old boy network back then in one author would review another one and you'd say good things about him. And he'd say good things about you. And and you know, every everyone would sell more books and PO was I had a scrupulous integrity when it came to reviewing books. And if you read a book, he read a book that was a bad book. He would he would say it was a bad book in in the reviews, and even as a reviewer he became known as that the Tomahawk man, I just for his cutting reviews. Well, anyway, and so that ever since he made gave Griswold a bad review for his book. I mean, there was this animosity between those two and then after Paul's death Griswold published a of him, and it's called the he didn't he signed it Ludwig. So he didn't sign his own name to it. But it was this terrible review. It said what a drunken propogate the poll wasn't that? He.

Edgar Allan Poe Paul longfellow Rufus Griswold tuberculosis New York America Kevin j Hayes Boston university of central Oklahoma Ohio Eddie Washington college hospital Toledo emeritus professor of English Baltimore writer president Henry Wadsworth longfellow
"watson sherlock" Discussed on Fictional

Fictional

04:23 min | 3 years ago

"watson sherlock" Discussed on Fictional

"Wherever you listen. All right. Now back to the show. Schlaug opened. His eyes is surroundings blurring into view. He was stirring directly into Irene's face. He searched for clock minutes out for just two minutes. Wow. Those guys were good. Of course, the whole performance had been commissioned by Sherlock and the guys who remained outside throwing punches and getting arrested where apparently really committed to their art still. It had achieved what it was supposed to Sherlock was now inside the targets house. Hiring smiled. He was alive. Good. The last thing she needed was a murder in front of her house. She thinks the clergyman for rescuing her if not for him, her blood might have been on the ground out there. Sherlock for his part wasn't really acting. He was stunned. He had never seen someone so beautiful for a moment. He lost all presence of mind, but only for a moment, he was still shellac homes and he still had a job to do. He had come here because she was voluntarily going to show him where she had the photograph. Sherlock swallowed hard faintly equipped out that he needed air and water. Please. Irene nodded through the window behind the couch for the cabbie had laid Sherlock. She rushed to the other side of the room to a pitcher of water outside what's in her the window open the window. He was standing under as he'd counted to ten, he let the smoke bomb. When the countless finished, he tossed it in an issue up a ten count of zone, Sherlock all the smoke bomb, hit the ground right in front of his couch. He dropped one arm down and tap it. So role behind nearby curtain smoke instantly billowed out and outside the window Sherlock heard the cry fire inside the house, a glass shattered Cyrenaica. Notice of the smoke within ten minutes. Sherlock was walking alongside Watson, coughing, smoke with the splitting headache, a smile plastered across his face. Irene had showed him the location of the photo. How'd you do it? They're happy, asked how you did it. So please, how'd you do it Watson managed as he supported as limping friend after Sherlock asked him if that was really so hard to say. He explained it to Watson when someone's house is burning their each for their most valuable thing apparent will reach for their child, a woman black million king with an irreplaceable photo will reach for said, irreplaceable photo, and she did there was a recess behind a sliding panel just above the right bell, pull it was beautifully hidden with no way. Anyone was ever gonna find it without Irene showing them. But Irene had showed them after she retrieved, the photograph began running toward the door, Sherlock struggle from the couch and over to the curtain he called out to Irene that it was a false alarm, a smoke bomb. It must be kids outside. He watched her still coughing as she rushed back to the hiding place and took the photo into the recess as discreetly as possible before fleeing from the. Herself. At that point Sherlock stood slightly wobbly after his multiple head injuries and what cord the wall. He made it halfway when the cabbie came back inside shock tip is hat and coughed out a thank you before leaving the smoke will clear out, but they would send word to the king in the morning, their quest was nearly complete. Good night Mr.. Sherlock Holmes, good night to you to Watson Sherlock says they turn the corner to Baker street. What are you talking about? What's replied? Didn't you just say good night to me? No one. Do I ever call you Mr.? Sherlock Holmes and also that was a child that kid that's running away there. Do I sound like a child to you? Sherlock chugged only some. You know what? It wasn't relevant if wasn't Watson than who was it? The detective squinted down the dimly lit street to the slim us who had nearly disappeared in the haze..

Watson Sherlock Irene Sherlock Holmes Schlaug murder Cyrenaica ten minutes two minutes
"watson sherlock" Discussed on Fictional

Fictional

04:45 min | 3 years ago

"watson sherlock" Discussed on Fictional

"That wasn't something one left to a lackey even if he was account by now. Short was green board since he already knew all of this. He urged the visitor to please get on with it. Sherlock shut his eyes and sat back the king said about five years ago, he made the acquaintance of a well-known adventurous by the name of Irene Adler. Watson Sherlock said without opening his eyes, but out of sheer habit. What was. Already on the way to sherlock's files. He found the one on Adler who hadn't escaped the attention of the great detective. He snatched the file from Watson and refreshed himself on the details Adler born in New Jersey in eighteen fifty eight retired from the opera of war Saul living in London. Okay. So the king became entangled with this young woman wrote her some compromising letters and now he wanted to get those letters back, correct? Yes. And wait, how did you know that the king asked? What's role does is ball Sherlock rolled on? Was there a secret marriage? What? No, no legal papers are significant. None. Okay, so what's the problem here? The problem is she's blackmailing me the king said, and what leg does she have to stand on? Besides none of these legs. She has nothing to prove their authentically. What about the writing the king asked? Oh, you mean the forgery? Sherlock replied, it's on my private note paper. You were robbery cently correct. Sherlock asked shed in his eyes. Again, my privacy will a beautiful imitation, but an imitation than the less my photograph the king continued not quite finishing the sentence before Sherlock erupted bought the detective said before opening his eyes. Wait Sherlock pursed his lips and nodded. You took a picture with her. Didn't you maybe in by maybe I mean yes and buy. Yes. I mean that single photograph validates the explicit letters, stationary and seal show face palmed I was only crowned prince then I was twenty five. Now I'm king and I'm thirty. I know better Sherlock looked at the Cape and the free boots. Yeah, sure. All right. This was an easy one. He needed to get those back at all costs. Whatever she was asking. He needed to pay it. The cure replied that she didn't want anything for it. Even tried to rob her four times. He ransacked her house twice diverted her luggage, while she traveled. And then one more time they boarded a train and went through her stuff while she slept nothing Sherlock laughed. Well, he was in trouble if she didn't want money for it. What did she want? The king said, simply that it was to ruin him. You know, he may have made some promises that he might not have kept and then you know abandoned her. He didn't know if that was a related anyway. She resurfaced when news broke of his very public, very politically important engagement to the daughter of the king of Scandinavia. Wait, is that an actual position Shalah cast now skinny navy's general. Region consisting of several countries saying the king of skin and Avia is like saying the king of Africa anyway, the princess's pre straight-laced. And for some reason, she wouldn't be cool with photographic evidence of her future husband having a long-term secret affair women, my right Sherlock groaned. Oh, Kay. How did he know she didn't already release the photo the king laughed? Well, he was still engaged. Also. She said that she was going to release it to the press. On the day. His engagement was announced three days from now. Sherlock shrugged. He never met anyone. He could outsmart. It was just getting the photo back, right? If he got the photo, the letters were just a bonus. He had some of the stuff to do, but he should be able to knock this out in three days time the king thanked him instead to leave Sherlock remained in his chair sitting as for the payment. The king laughed. Oh, sure. Of course he wasn't used to talking about money. Yeah, they can have whatever they want. It'd Sherlock blinked and sat forward in his chair, whatever they wanted. The king shrugged be. I mean, within reason like up to a province of his kingdom, the yeah carte blanche shall gasped and turn to Watson Watson, that means blank check. I know what it means Sherlock as for prison payment. The king was used to carrying cash on hand. So he wasn't really sure if you brought enough..

Watson Sherlock Watson Watson Irene Adler New Jersey Saul forgery robbery Avia London Scandinavia Shalah Africa Kay three days five years
"watson sherlock" Discussed on Fictional

Fictional

01:44 min | 4 years ago

"watson sherlock" Discussed on Fictional

"We are devil ridden our town is devil ridden the vicar sobbed and sherlock swill pal the next morning watson and heard the carriage approach during this morning shave and watched as sherlock went to greet the approaching vicar the say men who had come with trigonis the other day seen as conversations with good news generally don't begin with the stranger spitting tears running down your coat shot broke free from the vickers embrace and took a step back come on how many times we have to go over this it's not devils the detective said what's going on mortar much guinness the guy tart yesterday the last surviving member of the chicken his family died last night exactly how sister had the baker said and resumed his very onesided hug was sherlock key fitness into your carriage sherlock asked abruptly the vicar wiped his nose and nodded watson sherlock culliver shoulder breakfast asked wait we have a date with the debt guy watson ensure arrived for the doctor or even the police which each that response time if you ever managed time travel back to 1800s britain try and it needed emergency response team someone a cracked open a window which made the remarks when better it was stuffy made all the worse by the lamp still smoking on the table trigonis sat at the table very much dead escorts was or contorted in the chair stiffened mid turn putin at the window short noted that he appeared to have gotten dressed in hurry the vicar pointed out that your guinness's demise had come now last night but early this morning shocks face lit up with an idea.

baker putin vickers watson sherlock britain