4 Burst results for "Waterton Lakes National Park"

"waterton lakes national park" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

04:46 min | 2 years ago

"waterton lakes national park" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"The pyramid was at the heart of a city that existed for about five hundred years and the team has found evidence of human sacrifice in numerous sites around the city. This includes six pits containing human heads near one rampart gate, and there were multiple excavations of child sacrifices in central and South America. Excavators. Mexico found a child sacrifice at the foot of an Aztec temple. And what's now? Mexico City was probably a boy of eight or ten years old placed in a pit under a floor of the temple an excavation. In northern Peru has revealed what may be the world's largest child sacrifice at a burial site belonging to the empire. Art, an archaeology professor who was involved in this fine described it as quote, they were pasta. Offering the gods. The most important thing they had as society and the most important thing is children because they represent the future. Moving on from human sacrifice to burning things a forest fire in southern Alberta. Canada uncovered a massive number of artifacts from the blackfoot tribe in particular officials at Waterton lakes, national park said that without the vegetation that was previously. There. They had a once in a lifetime opportunity to study as many as two hundred fifty blackfoot camps, some of which date is far back as seventeen hundred but they had to do it all very quickly since vegetation covered everything back up as it. Regroup. One of the archaeologists on the team is Kevin black plume who has talked about the project as an opportunity to bring more awareness of indigenous history in August fire outside of Berlin, set off unexploded World War Two ammunition. That is still buried all around the forests in the area on top of that being. Terrifying on its own it hampered the firefighting effort, nobody knows where all of this ammunition is buried so firefighters had to sort of steer clear of areas where it seemed likely that there might be buried ammunition. That is terrifying. Prospect the national museum in Rio was destroyed by fire in September. And as a consequence it's collection of more than twenty million or two fax was also destroyed the two hundred year old museum had struggled in recent years and had fallen into disrepair in the months leading up to the fire. Museum officials had criticized the government for failing to allocate enough money to maintain an improve it in a tragic irony. The museum had just secured funding for an improvement project that included fire prevention not long before the fire fighting the fire was also made more difficult because two of the hydrants near the museum were dry when firefighters tried to use them. So they had to bring in water from a nearby lake. The national museum was Brazil's oldest historical and scientific museum and has also described as the nation's most important museum a lot of the collections that are now destroyed related to science and the natural world so things like minerals, fossils and meteorites, but many of the collections also related to history. There was for example, a twelve thousand year old skeleton known as Luzia which was the oldest skeleton ever found the Americas that collection, also included art, tools and other artifacts from Brazil's native peoples and seven hundred piece AGIP shin collection, including five mummies. In addition to all of that the museum itself was an important part of Brazil's national identity so from so many different angles. This is just a colossal and irreplaceable loss. Okay. Moving on from things. Get very choked up and sad something that makes me very happy, and that's a textiles including so the widespread assumption has been that ancient. Arctic peoples learned how to spin yarn from the Vikings. And this was an assumption because the whale and seal oils used in the yard made it nearly impossible to conclusively date the fibers themselves. However, now, researchers have figured out how to basically shampoo the oils out of the yarn without damaging the fibers themselves. And what they discovered is that there's a lot of yarn that dates back to between five hundred and a thousand years before Vikings ever arrived in the area. So the ancestors to the Inoue who were living in the area. Basically knew about spinning yarn before Vikings ever got there and might have actually taught the Vikings something about it a team from the university of Cambridge has discovered that in Britain, Europe and parts of western Asia. Spinning was not the first method for making thread splicing was in spinning a fluffy massive fibers is drawn out into thread using something like a spindle or staff or much later a spinning wheel look. Out sleeping.

scientific museum Vikings South America Mexico Brazil Aztec temple Mexico City Peru professor Waterton lakes Alberta Canada Inoue Rio AGIP national park Kevin black Luzia university of Cambridge
"waterton lakes national park" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

Quirks and Quarks

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"waterton lakes national park" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

"And with that, it's time for another quirks in quirks question. This week's question is inspired by the wildfires currently raging in beef, e Janice worn from Montreal asks, what is the impact of forest fires on wildlife, and here's the answer. Hi, my name's Dr. Todd Cherie, Iowa health specialist with parks, Canada, based on the western college of veterinary medicine in Africa, catoon. The impact of major force fires on wildlife can be fairly devastating from the short term, but long term impacts can actually be quite beneficial to some wildlife populations from larger ecosystem perspective. It's when we get wildfires of exceptional severity and rapid growth that animals can't escape that we see that are exceptional mortality events, and most of that is from smoke inhalation. There's a lot of toxic chemicals produced in. Lease oxygen deprivation and death in really fast moving wildfires. So most wildlife species are able to outrun or escape from a fire generally, but slow moving species like porcupines tortoises that don't have that ability to survive. Happily move onto the path of a fire are often once their victims of wildfires and are often found dead in the path of a rapidly moving wildfire. And some animals will have fairly severe burns to large parts of their body. If they can't get out of the way of rapidly moving wildfire, it's very difficult to try and treat those animals in the wild because you have to remove them to try and rehabilitate them, and that can take weeks or months. And it can often be very stressful for wild animal to go into captivity for that period of time. So a lot of the time, if if the injuries are too severe, we ended up having to euthanize. Those animals humanely. And we saw several impacts like that in Keno wildfire in Waterton lakes, national park in September, twenty seventeen. And there were several bears that we had to humanely euthanized after that fire that we're in very poor condition species such as woodpeckers often respond positively to forest fires because often increased food habitat for them in the form of insects and damaged trees provide nesting habitat for them. So in the long term, the impacts of fire can actually be beneficial for some wildlife populations. Dr, Todd, Sherry is a wildlife health specialist with parks, Canada at the western college of veterinary medicine in Saskatoon. Have you got a science question that we can answer Email us at quirks at CBC dot CA, or send it to us on Twitter or Facebook. All the links are online at CBC dot CA, slash quirks. That's it for this week's edition of quirks and quirks

Dr. Todd Cherie CBC Canada smoke inhalation Janice Montreal Waterton lakes Africa Twitter Iowa Facebook Sherry Saskatoon
"waterton lakes national park" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"waterton lakes national park" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"Up and take a look at the ice field because there's really nothing quite like it some of the the glaciers you can truly c a river of ice and you get the impression that this is a massive river come in downhill excellent while i was just there this made to the us side to glacier bay in a small boat when nice thing with a small boat is are allowed to overnight in glacier bay with the proper permit so we were sitting there in front of the most active glacier at the tail end of glacier bay and there was nobody else around was just aren't the park was all eire's in you get to see any of the glaciers actually cabingan against but they calved after returning the cameras often went back inside because with kohl so don't have any pictures of calving glaciers from there or from any uh any of the other glaciers that we visited it's it's a tough shot to get a specialist offtarget because you have to be ready that the fascinating thing for me about glacier bay is i didn't realize how knew it was how in not my lifetime but in my grandfather greatgrandfathers lifetime the glacier extended all the way out through what is glacier bay glacier be itself was all ice so fascinating it's it's relatively new okay so let's move back down now we're into the continental united states and and the other one is the second and there's only two shared sites with canada in this would be the glacier slash waterton barton national peace park so basically glacier national park in montana and waterton lakes national park in alberta are jointly a world heritage site and i've been to both waterton is much smaller than glacier um but much more accessible there's resorts and a lot more hotels that are available in it's much smaller but one or two lake is extremely beautiful and other boat rides it might be one of the most pleasant border experience as you'll ever have entering the united states because there's a boat and that takes you to the end of the lake and the end of lake is surrounded by mountains.

glacier bay eire kohl glacier bay glacier united states canada waterton barton national peace alberta waterton montana waterton lakes national park
"waterton lakes national park" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"waterton lakes national park" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"This is a cbc podcast was programmes brought to you by tangerine unfair bank fees got you down keep more of your hard earned money with the tangerine nofee daily checking account you'll pay fees to do your everyday banking and you'll get free tangerine email money transfers free unlimited debit purchases and free deposits germany after all we shouldn't have to pay unfair fees to use it become a climate answering dot c tangerine forward banking hello i'm carol off good evening i'm geoff douglas this is as it happens the podcast addition and tonight and endurance test in marathon after spending years building a small resort in the florida keys ted dominic went back today to see what was left of his labour of love in hurricane urmas way and is not much a stateless statesman in a state despite having is hata's citizenship revoked mikheil saakashvili has forced his way into ukraine and tonight he'll tell us what he's after and who's after him wedded glitz a couple in alberta spend their honeymoon trying to save family cottage before fleeing waterton lakes national park to escape the growing wildfires observations on observation nature chinese artist brings his debut feature to the toronto international film festival a fictional film created entirely from surveillance camera recordings leave of abbas sense it seemed virtually impossible that all four members of the swedish pop group would ever reunite for tour again but as soon as the holograms are ready it's a virtual certainty they'll hit the road and they're not just furtive there.

geoff douglas mikheil saakashvili ukraine alberta abbas cbc germany ted dominic hurricane urmas waterton lakes national park toronto