35 Burst results for "Watergate"

Bob Woodward Busy Promoting 'Peril,' Should Be Covering Clinton Lawyer's Charges

Mark Levin

01:44 min | 3 d ago

Bob Woodward Busy Promoting 'Peril,' Should Be Covering Clinton Lawyer's Charges

"Talking about the biggest story that should be wall to wall coverage on every network tonight should be in the front page of every newspaper And that is the indictment of one of the top warriors with a Quentin campaign and when it's clearly a conspiracy to commit one of the biggest frauds in the history of this country Certainly when it comes to politics You know I go back to Watergate and those two guys that were riders that we've now turned into like gods of journalism Guys Woodward where the hell is that guy right now Seriously Why isn't he doing his job talking about this Why isn't Woodward an American investigative journalist started working for The Washington Post right Guy that helped bring down Nixon Why isn't he telling the truth on this story You know what he's doing today 8 hours ago Yahoo News headline Bob Woodward weren't warned Donald Trump wants to be president again for one worrying reason Let's land The president Bob Woodward thinks he knows that what Donald Trump wants to do if he wins the presidency again On Tuesday's MSNBC morning Joe Woodward and fellow Washington Post journalist Robert Costa spoke about the reporting that went into their newly released book peril The book details the final months of the Trump administration lifts the lid on many of the expletive laden rants and attempts over turn the 2020 election results

Woodward Bob Woodward Quentin Donald Trump Washington Post Joe Woodward Nixon Robert Costa Yahoo Msnbc Trump Administration
Biden Turns From Afghanistan to Domestic Agenda

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:44 min | 2 weeks ago

Biden Turns From Afghanistan to Domestic Agenda

"I am joined by byron york at the washington examiner and fox news. Good morning byron. How are you good morning you doing. Well thanks The lead story for me today has also the lead story in the wall street journal. The headline is biden seeks to shift focus to domestic issues after afghanistan. Exit white house plans to spend september pushing for passage of the president's agenda as he faces falling poll numbers. I personally believe that. Most americans know about the thousands of american citizens l. p. r.'s and sib holders abandoning afghanistan that they don't quite know the details but they're intently concerned with it and that it's an iceberg issue that the president is mishandling by treating it as something that will be forgotten. David drucker disagrees with me. Brian rosen wall. Very much disagrees with me. That americans are paying attention. What does byron york thing. Well i think that american's feelings about us citizens being left behind ghanistan. I think those feelings are essentially folded in to the poll. Numbers that you're seeing Biden's approval rating for his handling the situation afghanistan which are in the twenties. I mean those are nixon and watergate. Poll numbers So i do think that americans are aware of that now. A couple of things about biden changing the subject. Of course he wants to change the subject answer as well A lot of the pr. The question is what will allow the press. Go along with it if you look at politico's playbook this morning and we just tiny tiny little mention of afghanistan Much more on the biden Agenda on the other hand i was. I didn't hear the first half hour of your program Did you read. Senator blumenthal's tweets. Today did not. I tweeted the story out that he is outraged. He's a democrat but go ahead and tell people about it. Well Senator blumenthal Yesterday afternoon Posted a threat on twitter. My staff and i have worked night and day to secure the safe passage of two planes waiting in mazari sharif to take american citizens at risk afghan allies and their families to safety. My office join forces in this humanitarian mission with an incredible coalition of advocates ngos former servicemen and journalists to try to evacuate our fellow citizens in afghan allies by the way ngos former service members and journalists. Anybody missing from that list. Department and pentagon. Yeah exactly so anyway. He goes on And so this is as you point out a democratic senator which may be necessary to give this issue enough credibility for some members of the press to pay attention

Afghanistan Biden David Drucker Brian Rosen Byron York Senator Blumenthal Washington Examiner Byron Fox News The Wall Street Journal White House Nixon Mazari Sharif Twitter Pentagon
Lord Conrad Black Claims in New Article No Evidence Nixon Committed Crime

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:19 min | 2 months ago

Lord Conrad Black Claims in New Article No Evidence Nixon Committed Crime

"Talk about the incident in history that made called bernstein undeservedly famous Your latest piece with a wonderful title from the editors at american greatness is fifty years of deep state propaganda. And it has to do with the the nixon debacle and the watergate scandal. You met president nixon after he left office. You've got to know him. You wrote a superlative work on the man. Can we start with the basics. How how is it that he has gone down in conventional wisdom as the crook. Tricky dicky win as you have pointed out in your book in latest article and i just summarize it and tell me if i i'm i'm passing you ineffectively. There is no evidence that he actually committed a crime with those payments. You know there never has been and Ever tried because he wasn't well enough to face trial but Or or do you know to go and give evidence at trial. He got a pardon so he wasn't then be tried and sell that The fact is that there isn't it. I haven't the inconvenient fact about this whole Watergate business that Ah it. There is no evidence. Nixon committed a crime. Some people in his entourage that there's no better but they did not allege that mr nixon told them not to basically perjury charges in getting and obstruction of justice but none of them alleged that the nixon told them to do and And and so. The whole thing rests on did his approval of payments to watergate thin than some some of the which did that constitute obstruction of justice and all the closest we have is powered hunt as whereas it just tragically died in a plane crash near the number of young children and nixon said we'll give him give him the money he wants but he didn't say fung as he he's quieter wise under oath or anything like that. He never said anything like that. There's never been one shred of evidence that that's what nixon authorized payments for and he always alleged and there's some of the tapes that the that he specifically said they've got to be able to pay their lawyers and feed their families and so we'll we'll give the money for that. There's something wrong with

Nixon President Nixon Bernstein Dicky Mr Nixon Fung
G. Gordon Liddy, Watergate Mastermind, Has Died at Age 90

Pacifica Evening News

01:57 min | 6 months ago

G. Gordon Liddy, Watergate Mastermind, Has Died at Age 90

"And a radio talk show host after emerging from prison, died today at the age of 90. His son, Thomas Lady confirmed the death but did not reveal the cause of the event. To say it was not related to covet 19. Lady, a former FBI agent and army veteran, was convicted of conspiracy, burglary and illegal wiretapping for his role in the Watergate burglary, which led to the resignation of President Richard Nixon. Spent four years and four months in prison, including more than 100 days in solitary confinement. Years later, he said, he'd do it again for his president. After his release Lady became a popular, often provocative radio talk show, as you also worked as a security consultant, writer and actor, but he was outspoken and controversial, both as the political operative under Nixon and as a radio personality. Letty recommended assassinating political enemies, Bombing, a left leaning think tank and kidnapping war protesters. His White House colleagues ignored such suggestions. But one of his ventures, the break in at Democratic headquarters at the Watergate building in June of 1972 was approved. The burglary went awry, which led to an investigation a cover up and Nixon's resignation in 1974. Lydia, former FBI agent, An Army veteran, was convicted of conspiracy, burglary and illegal wiretapping for his role in the escapade. It was also convicted of conspiracy in the September 1971 burglary of defense analyst Daniel Ellsberg Psychiatrists who leaked the secret history of the Vietnam War known as the Pentagon papers. Watergate conspirator G. Gordon Liddy dead

Thomas Lady President Richard Nixon FBI Democratic Headquarters Nixon Watergate Building Letty Lady Army White House Lydia Daniel Ellsberg Vietnam Pentagon G. Gordon Liddy
G. Gordon Liddy, Watergate mastermind, dead at 90

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 6 months ago

G. Gordon Liddy, Watergate mastermind, dead at 90

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting Watergate conspirator G. Gordon Liddy has died G. Gordon Liddy a key figure in the Watergate burglary that ultimately led to the resignation of president Richard Nixon died Tuesday he was ninety lady son Thomas lady confirmed the death but did not reveal the cause other than to say it was not coded nineteen related Liddy a former FBI agent and army veteran spent four years and four months in prison after being convicted of conspiracy burglary and illegal wire tapping for his role in the break in at democratic headquarters at the Watergate building in Washington in June nineteen seventy two lady went on to host a syndicated radio talk show wrote best selling books and acted in TV shows micron CEO Washington

G. Gordon Liddy Mike Rossi Thomas Lady Richard Nixon Liddy Watergate Building FBI Army Washington Micron
Jessica Simpson Reflects on Ex John Mayer

Daily Pop

01:25 min | 6 months ago

Jessica Simpson Reflects on Ex John Mayer

"Jessica simpson speaking at about how she really fell. When john mayer told the world she was crazy in bed. Jessica wrote that and her memoir and she says she was mortified when john called her sexual napalm but in this exclusive interview. I look that she has with tamron hall. Jessica explained why he does not own her anything. Should he follow a justin timberlake and do this public mac hall pa for some of the very public treatment. I definitely don't feel grime. public apology. you can't take it back. I feel like people end up finding their way to let you know we're sorry And i and. I think that i mean he might not be sorry. That's okay but like to talk about anybody sexually disrespectful. But i mean that's on him. I wouldn't mind if somebody left their review from you know what i mean like. It could be on the other hand like what happened with halle berry. Somebody said that she was bad in bed and she hear trying to find these accusations. Implicated in watergate.

Tamron Hall Jessica Jessica Simpson John Mayer Justin Timberlake John Halle Berry
CBS News political reporter Roger Mudd has died at 93

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:35 sec | 7 months ago

CBS News political reporter Roger Mudd has died at 93

"A longtime political reporter and anchor Roger Mudd is dead at the age of 93, his son Jonathan Mud, told The Washington Post. He died from complications of kidney failure. Much spent almost two decades covering Capitol Hill for CBS News. Among the events he covered extensively was the Watergate scandal and its fall out. He served as the weekend anchor on CBS during Walter Cronkite's tenure before moving to NBC for a short time after not getting the role following Cronkite's retirement. His journalism and broadcasting career spanned more than 50 years again. Roger Mudd dead at the age of 93.

Roger Mudd Jonathan Mud Kidney Failure The Washington Post Cbs News Capitol Hill Walter Cronkite CBS NBC Cronkite
White House narrows income limits for stimulus checks

Here & Now

04:30 min | 7 months ago

White House narrows income limits for stimulus checks

"Of a threat from far right groups, including followers of the Cuban on conspiracy. Those extremists claim Donald Trump will retake the presidency today. This is not stopping the Senate from carrying on the House adjourned, but not before Democrats passed two major bills last night. One on voting rights, the other on police reform for more. We're joined by NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis. And so Democrats have railed against bills passed in state houses across the country that would make it harder to vote curbing things like mail in voting and early voting that work expanded last year during the pandemic. So what would this federal voting rights bill do about that? Well, this legislation has been a top priority for the party. It's not new. It was introduced in passed in the house in the last Congress. So this vote this week was a bit of a do over. They've called it the most sweeping government reform bill since the post Watergate era. And what wouldn't do it would do things like allow for automatic voter registration, it would make Election day of federal holiday. It would restore voting rights to people with past felony convictions. It would also expand early voting that we saw you so much in the 2020 elections. It would also do things like create more independent redistricting commissions to sort of end party controlled drawing of congressional district. On campaign finance. It would require more disclosure of big donors. It would require transparency about those ads you see in your social media feeds, and it would create a new public financing system for congressional candidates. Would also do things like expand conflict of interest laws that would ban members of Congress from serving on corporate boards and require presidents by law to disclose their taxes. Okay, sweeping to say the least. Thea other bill passed last night is the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act. Police reform has been a democratic priority for a long time. What's in this one? This is another bill that passed in the previous congress. So they're doing it again. This'll legislation would do things that would ban choke holds, it would change so called qualified immunity protection so it would make it easier to pursue claims of misconduct against police officers. It would put restrictions on no knock warrants, and it would require new data collection on a police encounters. It would also direct more money to community based policing programs. This one is not. I mean, it's not as controversial as the voting reforms Bill, which has very strong Republican opposition. No Republicans supported it. There is a bit more support among Republicans for police reform, especially in the Senate. There's competing measure by Tim Scott, who's a Republican of South Carolina. So there's maybe a chance there could be more bipartisan effort to move that bill forward, But the other measure is purely a symbolic one of the stage. It's still a tall order in the House Democrats know based on previous failures that these bills don't have much hope of getting to 60 votes in the Senate, which, of course, is the magic number to break a filibuster, they would need 10 Republicans to vote with Democrats. So why are they so determined to pass them if the prospects looked in Part of this is just elections are making good on their promises. These issues are very important to the Democratic base, and I think it's about keeping that promise. But you're right. I mean, I think that's going to be one of the cork tensions, if not the court tension of this Congress. I think Democrats really sensitive this fact that they control Washington. Now they have Congress and the White House and they want to be able to run in 20 to 2022 on accomplishments. But they have these really narrow majorities in the House and Senate, which really limits what they're going to be able to do. You know, it's not just the filibuster to the parties are really divided right now. There's not much that they agree on. The bigger picture, though, is Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer just doesn't have the votes to change the filibuster, and it's not clear that he ever will in this Congress. One of the biggest opponents, a centrist Democrat, Joe Manchin, of West Virginia. He was asked last week if he could ever see changing his mind. And he literally yelled never at the reporters who asked him the question, Okay, digging in on the filibuster, So just in the moment we have left we have the Senate is still in session. They're debating that Cove in 19 relief package. What's the latest? You know they're making some tweaks to the bill. They've done things like reduced the income limits for people to get those $1400 stimulus checks. There was concerns among Senate Senate Democrats that too much money was going to people who didn't need it. Otherwise, The bill seems to be on a glide path. They don't expect to get any Republican support. But Democrats seem pretty unified behind it. If it passes this week, they gotta send it back over to the house to pass it back over there, but Right now. They're on track to meet a march 14th deadline that they've set, which is when current extended unemployment benefits run out, and they don't want to see those benefits lapsed. So there's a real pressure campaign to get it done by then. OK, that's NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis with the latest thanks to your right welcome. Well, every

Senate Congress George Floyd Susan Davis Donald Trump House Democrats NPR Thea Tim Scott House South Carolina Bill Chuck Schumer Joe Manchin White House Washington West Virginia
Fanne Foxe, ‘Argentine Firecracker’ at center of Washington, D.C. sex scandal, dies at 84

WTOP 24 Hour News

04:43 min | 7 months ago

Fanne Foxe, ‘Argentine Firecracker’ at center of Washington, D.C. sex scandal, dies at 84

"Age, the name Fanny Fox means something. The one time stripper gained insane notoriety after she jumped into the tidal basin on an October night in 1974. She was in a gown the car she'd been in Had been pulled over by police and the man she was with made the story even bigger. He was Congressman Wilbur Mills, a Bible Belt politician who also led the powerful House Ways and Means Committee. That night, assured Fanny Fox his place in the annals of political scandals. And we've just learned today that Fox died recently at the age of 84. Let's learn more about her role in D. C History with Washington Post obituary editor Adam Bernstein. Hey, Adam, Thanks so much for being with us. And at this point, most people in Washington probably don't know anything about Fanny Fox, who was she It's a good question. Thank you so much for having me on well. The reason she was such a big name here is because of her involvement. As you said with Wilber Mills. He was the some have said the second most powerful man in Washington on Lee. We superseded by the president sort of it in the early 19 seventies, Wilbur Mills was chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, which controls a lot of money, and he had been in Congress for many decades. By that point, so he had this reputation of Um, accumulated reputation for food for power. And he also was from Arkansas, the Bible belt, and he had also cultivated this reputation as a as a workaholic. A grind. Um, a man of utter rectitude. And so what happened was, uh, you know, nothing would have been revealed of this affair, at least publicly. Except for this bizarre episode is you mentioned at the Washington the title based Mackenzie's senior The Jefferson Memorial. And on October 7 1950 74 He who? Wilbur Mills, who had been seeing Fanny Fox at her burlesque, Cole, You're in D. C. I was with her one night two in the morning and they get into this weird accident near the at the Tidal Basin. Basically, they're in a car without lights on the police. See them, They stopped him. And Fanny Fox. Or, you know, on impulse jumps out of the car and into the title base, And she starts you know, wrestling with the policeman who goes in after her. It's discovered that her face is all batter that Mills who were these Coke bottle glasses, His glasses are smashed. And is reeking of alcohol, and the TV crew happened to be nearby as well. So it's just perfect storm of of of politics and media, and this is right at the time of Watergate as well. So everybody was looking for the next scandal. So what ultimately happened to Wilbur Mills? Then what was the code on Fanny Fox? Good question. So Wilbur Mills survives. Oddly enough, the next election he goes, He goes back to Arkansas and sort of in this folksy manner tries to play it off. You know, his famous quote at the time is One should never drink champagne with a foreigner that that's the lesson he took away from him. And and you know, weirdly enough. He survived with his wife. She seems to back in publicly. But you know, right after winning the election and seemingly surviving by by a thread appears on her, appears with Fanny Fox again on stage in Boston, Fanny Fox and parlayed all the publicity into this lucrative career on the burlesque circuit. And he goes on stage. It's It's just terrible embarrassment captured on TV of all places again, and his career is them finished. He I think he resigns. He spends it goes into recovery. Disgraced from public office, but then spend the rest of his life. He lived a to least another 15 20 years, basically helping other recovering addicts like himself. Fanny Fox have Ah Less of Ah, a much harder time of it. She Prospers for a couple years winds up down in Florida. I couldn't find out that much about the family didn't want to cooperate, but I was able to look up various records. She she got a couple of all things degrees. Including one you know, in marine science of all. Wow. And but I couldn't figure out I couldn't figure out what she did with her time. Her lawyer didn't say your family wouldn't talk. Um I don't know. She had jobs or just How she struggled by and we will just have to live that mystery. Continue, Adam, because our time is up, though, clearly we could talk about this for a very long time. Thanks So much for being with us. Thanks. That's

Fanny Fox Wilbur Mills House Ways And Means Committee Tidal Basin Congressman Wilbur Mills Adam Bernstein Wilber Mills Washington Arkansas Jefferson Memorial Washington Post FOX Adam Mackenzie LEE Cole Congress Coke Wrestling Mills
Merrick Garland Confirmation Hearing For AG

Morning Edition

06:35 min | 7 months ago

Merrick Garland Confirmation Hearing For AG

"But today is all about Merrick Garland. He'll appear before the Senate to take questions from lawmakers for the position of attorney general. Most people know Merrick Garland's name because of something that didn't happen. Garland never got a hearing after President Obama nominated him to serve on the Supreme Court five years ago. Here's NPR justice correspondent Carrie Johnson. Merrick Garland has devoted nearly 45 years to the law. But he didn't start out that way is, he told Professor Martha Minnow at Harvard Law School in 2016. Why don't you go to law school in the first place? Chemistry, well chemistry and math. Garland had planned to become a doctor. He wanted to help people one on one, but his collision with the hard sciences spun him toward the law, where he's looked for that sort of direct connection ever since. In the mid 19 eighties. At his law firm in Washington, Garland became a rising star. He made time for a young college graduate who worked in the copy center to Randy Thompson says Garland reviewed one of his papers, photocopied it and rearrange the paragraphs. That was the beginning of In essence and becoming a riding coach. For me, it was just extraordinary experience and became my coach. Eventually, my mentor and 30 something years later, a friend. Eventually Garland Road, MMA reference for law school and has kept in touch ever since, Thompson says garlands Still a little old school still humble, still looking to help. The only thing that really has changed about him, And I guess me as well is the color of hair. I don't know, well respected judge as attorney general. Help get the department under the quagmire of partisan politics that many people think it devolved to under President Trump and Attorney General Bar That's Georgetown law professor Paul Butler. He says the DOJ has been reeling from political scandals and racing to confront the threat from homegrown extremists. Merrick Garland has faced both before. After clerking on the Supreme Court. Garland took a job as an advisor in President Jimmy Carter's Justice Department. In those years after Watergate, DOJ struggled to separate partisan influence from law enforcement and establish new boundaries for the FBI. Garland also played a bit part in some of the biggest investigations of that era from political corruption to national security that Garland says later turned into hit movies. American Hustle about the Abscam case. Argo about the ex filtration of hostages in Iran and the most important the miracle on ice. Which was about the Lake Placid Olympics, where I did work on the security for the Olympics By the 19 nineties, Garland was prosecuting a violent gang that terrorized people in a public housing project. And helping build a case against DC's mayor Marion Barry. On drug charges Back inside Justice Department headquarters, Garland became the man to see for the hardest problems. The car bomb exploded outside of a large federal building in downtown Oklahoma City, Garland would soon travel to the site of the most deadly domestic terror plot in American history. 168 people died in that bombing in Oklahoma. Former deputy Attorney General Jamie Go Relic remembers watching that day with Garland by her side, he basically said while watching Children being pulled out of the wreckage. That he had to go. He really wanted to go. We both had young Children at the time and What we saw on those screens was so affecting. Garland oversaw the search warrants protected the chain of evidence and insisted that reporters have access to court proceedings. We wanted somebody Who could make sure that the investigation was done by the book. And that any indictment was bulletproof. Prosecutors later convicted Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols for their role in that bombing. Former prosecutor Beth Wilkinson says Garland played an important role in other confrontations with extremists in those years, including a standoff with the heavily armed Montana free Men. One of the examples I can think of is sometimes and there were these stand downs where there would be, you know, arrest warrants for someone, or there would be some kind of controversy between people who were challenging the federal government. America's first instinct wasn't to go in and arrest everyone. It was to try and along with the FBI to see if there's a dispute could be resolved. Wilkinson says. The FBI went on to arrest those men later. She credited garlands, quick thinking and cool head that may have prevented a tragic outcome. Just about the only criticism Garland's nomination has drawn is in the area of civil rights. Garland is a moderate, so I don't see him as the bold and visionary leader or racial justice that some people were hoping for again. Georgetown law professor Paul Butler that he's not an ideologue is both discerning for people who want an attorney general. To meet this moment of national reckoning inspired by the movement for Black lives and the killing of George Floyd Butler says he thinks girls just from the White House long time civil rights advocate Wade Henderson says Garland is up to the task. But Henderson says it's a big one. The next attorney general, for example, has to do everything In his or her power to fight for voting rights. Police reform Criminal justice reform and LGBT Q equality. For the past 23 years, Garland has been a federal appeals court judge in that role, he doesn't have much of a chance to share his personal views. Carolyn Lerner, the chief mediator at the courthouse, says Garland took an early, an important lead to update policies that protect workers from sexual harassment and other misconduct. I think it's very clear that Judge Garland cares a lot about these issues, and he really wants employees to be happy and comfortable in the workplace, and when he was chief judge, he took his responsibility. To these employees very seriously, she says. Garland wants to continue another of his projects at the Justice Department tutoring sessions with a young public school student. This year. The judge is working with an 11 year old boy and his twin sister. Your mom is Andrea Tucker. He makes this so interactive for them and so much fun and they can't get enough of it. It's the kind of public service that Garland has always wanted to

Garland Merrick Garland Justice Department Carrie Johnson Professor Martha Minnow Randy Thompson President Trump Paul Butler Supreme Court FBI Harvard Law School Jamie Go Olympics Georgetown NPR Beth Wilkinson President Obama Marion Barry Senate Jimmy Carter
Georgia prosecutor investigating Trump's call to Raffensperger

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

06:17 min | 8 months ago

Georgia prosecutor investigating Trump's call to Raffensperger

"In addition to the events of january sixth. The article mentioned just one other specific event quote president. Trump's conduct on january six twenty twenty one followed his prior efforts to subvert and obstruct the certification of the results of the twenty twenty presidential election. Those prior efforts included a phone call on january second during which president trump urged the secretary of state of georgia. Brad ravensburger to find enough votes. To overturn georgia presidential election results. President trump threatened secretary burger if he failed to do so. I know that that thing in georgia that little episode of attempted election interference by donald trump has been swallowed up by history already. This phone call was eclipsed by the violent attack on the us capitol just four days later. It's like how the resignation of vice president. Spiro agnew got swallowed up in history because watergate forced the resignation of president nixon right after it and so when i wrote a podcast and wrote a book about spiro. Agnew people are like. Who's that guy. He wouldn't believe what a big scandal that was for a minute until a much bigger scandal eclipsed it and made us all forget the earlier one when really really life changing terrible thing happens. It tends to blot out the memory of other really bad stuff. That might have happened just before this and so it is with this georgia call. But there's a reason that this georgia called this january second phone call is the one other specific event that the author author the impeachment resolution decided to include in their charges against former president trump. Because it's because before the january sixth violent attack on the us capitol members of congress. Were already considering a second impeachment of president trump just for that goal because at that point before island attack on the us capitol. His hour-long phone call to georgia secretary of state pushing and threatening george official to try to get the election results overturned there before the attack on the capital that was president trump's most egregious and blatant act of trying to apparently criminally alter and mess with the election results to try to hold onto power. And he not only did it. It was all on tape. So what are we going to do here. But i only need eleven thousand votes found us. I need eleven thousand. Give me a break for you. Know what they did. And you're not reporting it. That's a that's a criminal. That's a criminal offense and you can't let that happen. That's that's a big risk to you and to ryan you lawyers. That's a big risk is not fair to take it away from us like this and it's got to be very costly in many ways and i think you have to say that you're gonna reexamine it and you can reexamine but reexamine it with people that wanna find answers not people that don't wanna find answers. You can't let it happen and you are letting it happen all you know i mean i'm notifying you. You're letting it happen. So all i wanna do is i just wanna find Eleven thousand seven hundred eighty loads. I want you to find exactly enough votes to declare me the winner of the election in your state. And if you don't that's a big risk to you. I'm notifying you all criminal offense by you say you have reexamined. Didn't i actually one or else. And when president trump made that call on january second four days before the attack on the capital he hit already called. Georgia's governor to pressure him. To overturn the state's election results to trump also personally called a level official in the georgia secretary of state's office. The guy in charge of elections investigations and spent a long time. Personally pressuring that guy to quote find the fraud that would result in overturning. The election results in georgia and declaring trump the winner while president trump was making all of these calls personally the top federal prosecutor in atlanta. Us attorney in atlanta resigns under direct pressure from the trump white house because trump felt and communicated to that the us attorney that he was not doing enough to find that non-existent fraud that would somehow allow the overthrowing of the election results. One of the things that made the series of escalating interventions georgia's election so remarkable. Was that it. It was just also blatantly illegal. Not just impeachable but illegal like go to jail illegal. It is against the law in georgia to solicit someone to commit election fraud state election officials to find you exactly the number of votes you need to turn the election result the other way threatening collections officials that they to change vote counts in your favor or else would surely seem to fall under that statute will now even as donald trump's second impeachment trial unfolds in the us senate and what a spectacle it is and that trial unfolds on an article of impeachment that specifically references trump's threatening call to george a secretary of state while nell a high profile state prosecutor in georgia district attorney the largest county in the state fulton county has now opened a criminal investigation that centers on that phone call district attorney. There has sent this letter to george secretary of state governor lieutenant governor and attorney general extracting them all to preserve any and all records related to the two thousand twenty election quote. This letter is notice that the fulton county district attorney has opened an investigation into attempts to influence the administration of the twenty twenty georgia general election. This investigation includes but is not limited to potential violations of georgia law prohibiting the solicitation of election fraud the making of false statements to state and local governmental bodies conspiracy racketeering violation of oath of office and any involvement in violence or threats related to the elections administration quote. This matter is of high importance. Excuse me the this matter is of high priority. The next fulton county grand jury is due to convene in march. This office will begin requesting grand jury subpoenas as necessary at that time

Georgia President Trump Brad Ravensburger Donald Trump Spiro Agnew United States President Nixon Spiro Agnew George Atlanta Congress Ryan Fulton County George Secretary White House
'The King of Talk': Remembering Larry King

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:03 min | 8 months ago

'The King of Talk': Remembering Larry King

"Larry King has died. He was 87 in a career that spanned 60 years. Larry King interviewed just about everybody. Reporter Jeff Lunden has this appreciation. With his trademark suspenders and his deep baritone voice tinged with a Brooklyn accent. Larry King spoke with Presidents George Bush is our honored guest for the full hour. Next on Larry King Live World leaders Moammar Qaddafi. The leader of the nation of Libya, celebrities, the brilliant Barbra Streisand, authors, scientists, comedians, athletes and on and on and on. I'm always engrossed in the guest. Larry King spoke with Jesse Thorn on the turnaround podcast in 2017. I'm always listening to the answer. I'm always learning, So I guess I'm better every day at learning. The Brooklyn born King actually was an indifferent student, but said he always had an innate curiosity when we would go to dodge it. All my friends wanted autographs at the injury. I never asked for an autograph, but I would walk with the players is they're going to their cars asking questions. Why'd you bunt? Why they do this in the third inning. My curiosity is still insatiable. King began his career is a DJ in Miami, and it's where he got his name is well. When a station manager told him his given surname, Zeiger was too ethnic. He chose King from a liquor ad in a newspaper. By the late 19 seventies, King had an overnight talk show on national radio. Then the 1985 Ted Turner hired him for his new network, CNN. Media commentator and author. Bill Carter, who's a CNN contributor, says the timing was perfect. Picking up something like Larry King may love sense because he had Establish himself kind of as a guy who could get big guests. They could have big names and promoted and became sort of the linchpin of their prime time lineup, and King stayed there for 25 years. Some critics complained that he was too chummy with celebrities and lob softball questions. It is guests. His strategy was I'm never gonna make the guests uncomfortable. And that means not only will they come back, but they'll tell their friends. He won't ask you about that ugly divorce of yours. You know, he'll ask you about your favorite movie, so he didn't challenge people, But he did get information. He was pretty good at that, like when he talked with ex President Richard Nixon. Well, I don't want to dwell in the Watergate thing that's been covered so well. But some personal things when you drive by Those collections of buildings. The hotel the two apartment houses the office building, You feel weird, funny. No, I never give it a thought. Never given a thought. Never given a thought. That's one place where you just don't look back. As far as Watergate is. I know you don't look up at the buildings themselves. Not at all. Not a matter of fact, I've never been in the Watergate. Larry King famously didn't do a lot of preparation before his interviews, the less I know. Better Now, That sounds strange to people. Like If you wrote a book. I wouldn't read the book for interview do because I would then know too much about the book and I'm in the same boat as the audience. They haven't read the book, but King knew the national zeitgeist. He covered the first O. J. Simpson trial every night, says Bill Carter. He basically started the cable monomania move. We're going to just cover this story. That's it In a way. It was perfect for life because it was celebrity oriented. It was in the news, but it was not political. Ultimately, CNN canceled King show because it wasn't political competition from Fox and MSNBC took its toll on the ratings. But King was a survivor. He was married eight times and had Quinn couple bypass surgery after a massive heart attack, and King took his talk show to streaming video and kept on working for NPR news. I'm Jeff Lunden in New York.

Larry King Jeff Lunden Moammar Qaddafi Jesse Thorn King Brooklyn Zeiger CNN Bill Carter Barbra Streisand George Bush Libya Ted Turner Miami Softball Richard Nixon O. J. Simpson Msnbc FOX Quinn
GSA designates Joe Biden "apparent winner," enabling official transition

Mark Thompson

04:15 min | 10 months ago

GSA designates Joe Biden "apparent winner," enabling official transition

"And so more than two weeks after the major networks declared Joe Biden, the winner of the presidential election, Emily Murphy finally did what she should have done back on November 7th when Biden's victory became apparent. Now. Emily Murphy is a heretofore unknown federal government employee who is the head of the General Services Administration. It is her job to sign off on Biden's win, which allows the presidential transition to officially begin. It permits current Trump Administration agency officials to coordinate with the incoming Biden team and provides millions of dollars in government funding for the transition. If you've listened to the Ron Owens report in recent weeks, you know I was not in Emily Murphy side when it came there doing her one big job. It doesn't seem that difficult aspect. She said she needed only to ascertain that Biden is the apparent winner of the election. And yet somehow she delayed it up until yesterday, forcing hundreds of people joining the new Biden administration to work without government paid assistance. Hmm. That sounds very trump here. I mean, seriously. Despite Biden's clear victory, she stalled in her letter, finally initiating the formal transition process. Murphy said she had not been pressured by the White House to delay the transition and did not make a decision out of fear or favoritism. She wrote, And I quote, please. No, I came to my decision independently based on the law and available fax. Yeah, of course she did. She's neutrals sort of. I mean, she was appointed by President Trump and unsuccessfully tried to be on his transition team in 2016. And every day she delayed making the obvious choice made it more difficult for Joe Biden to put his people in place and work towards a smooth transition to the new administration. In effect, she allowed the delay to possibly be used by enemies of the United States like Russia, who thrive on making countries chaotic. Bottom line. I don't believe her, but at least now her 15 minutes are up. As for Trump Well, he tweeted now that he's not conceding and plans to move full speed ahead with his various legal cases challenging what he calls the most corrupt election in American political history. So we continue to witness the torture. It's vindictive, classless strategy of the president, making his successor's job more difficult from day one. It's almost criminal. Will Rogers sure never met Donald Trump. I admit I'm still enjoying the pain look of Trump. It makes you wonder. Could he actually believe that he won, Huh? Come on, man. No, but the way he's not carrying himself might make future government officials and everyday bosses think twice before surrounding themselves with sick of fence. Is there any doubt that in speaking with foreign leaders who called him out of obligation, he did all he could to poison the water for Biden, his scorched earth way of handling defeat. Go down in history as the classic example of hubris and Pettiness. I'll be watching with great interest how true Republican senators in Congress members deal with him. Now they no longer will have the power to directly make their lives miserable. A few weeks ago, I was pretty convinced that Trump would keep the GOP in this corner for the next four years by offering daily critiques of anything Biden does. I hope the media would wake up and see how they've been consistently manipulated by Trump and punish him by not reporting every word he speaks. Now, though, you know last week or so I'm watching some of the Republican senators who repeated his Bs open up a bit. And veteran Watergate reporter called. Bernstein has now released a list of 21 Republican senators who in private, have repeatedly expressed extreme contempt for Trump and his fitness for office. Maybe by 2024. His own party might reject his bed for a rematch. Meanwhile, is the first round of Biden administration nominations a release. It's clear that by this choosing people who are indisputably X Spurs in their fields over bigger names and democratic politics. There'll be very little on the job training needed for senior members of Biden's White House, as CNN reported. The simple act of hiring people qualify for their jobs is in itself a rejection of the Trump model, which installed donors, right wing ideologues and inexperienced allies into positions of power in some instances, The express purpose of undermining the institutions they were meant to lead, so we'll find ourselves with a very competent yet a times boring new president and a faceless cabinet. After all we've been through these last four years. Doesn't that sound

Emily Murphy Biden Biden Administration Trump Administration Ron Owens Joe Biden President Trump Donald Trump General Services Administratio Murphy White House Will Rogers Russia United States GOP Congress
Carl Bernstein says 21 GOP senators contemptuous of Trump

AP News Radio

01:03 min | 10 months ago

Carl Bernstein says 21 GOP senators contemptuous of Trump

"Former Watergate reporter Carl Bernstein's tweeted out the names of nearly two dozen Republican senators who he says have criticized the president behind his back but some of those named are denying the report Karl burns Steen took to Twitter denouncing the senators quote Craven public silence that's helped enable president trump's most grievous conduct he listed twenty one names Utah's Mitt Romney is on the list earlier this month casting doubt on trump's claim the election and somehow been stolen not accurate and to destructive but senator Chuck Grassley spokesman disputes his listing saying there's no difference between what the senator says publicly and privately South Carolina senator Tim Scott's office called his placement on the list baseless accusations of someone who clearly has an axe to grind burns Steen said he learned about the politicians suppose it feelings through conversations with their colleagues staff members lobbyists and White House aides Jackie Quinn Washington

Karl Burns Carl Bernstein Donald Trump Steen Senator Chuck Grassley Craven Mitt Romney Utah Twitter Tim Scott South Carolina Jackie Quinn White House Washington
Donald Trump Is Still not Conceding To The Election Results

Monocle 24: The Globalist

09:52 min | 11 months ago

Donald Trump Is Still not Conceding To The Election Results

"Donald trump is still refusing to concede after losing the us election and is insisting that he won citing baseless claims of voter fraud. He's backed up by most of his republican party and together. They're ignoring the will of the people the very foundation of democracy brian classes and associate professor in global politics at ucla and a columnist for the washington post and has written extensively on these subjects. Brian is this aku. no it's not. And the reason for that is because a coup has a very specific definition. Which is a seizure of executive power by military force. And that's not likely to happen in the united states but it is potentially going to be something where the republican party and trump are attempting to seize power after. They've lost an election which is extraordinarily dangerous for democracy. And even though it's not easy to succeed in it is. I mean there joe biden. We'll get inaugurated on january twentieth. The amount of damage is doing in faith in the democratic institutions and the democratic process of the united states enormous. And so we shouldn't take lightly i mean. Can you imagine the international reaction. If this was happening elsewhere in the world. Latin america africa. There would be a huge global outcry. Why are so many colluding with the emperor's vision of his new clothes. It has happened elsewhere in the world we had an election. a couple of years ago in the gambia in west africa in which gem lost the election and then claimed that he wanted and tried to stay in power and there was a threatened military intervention To remove him and eventually forced him out. So you're you're absolutely right. It would be treated differently and very seriously the reason why people are going along with it is twofold one is on the international stage. You have hesitancy because of geopolitics. So you know. Boris johnson would condemn this. If it was happening in west africa he won't condemn it in the us because he's worried about the blowback from the trump administration the last seventy days and on the domestic stage. The republican party is going along with it because they've made a calculation unfortunately that they think that it's best to keep the base fired up and also they don't want to alienate the base by breaking with trump before. They think he's had his time to sort of run his course so they've made a very cynical strategy Part of their game plan. And it's as i say it's doing immense damage because a majority of republicans now something between seventy-five and eighty five percent of republicans. Believe this election was stolen. Despite every piece of evidence pointing to this being one of the most well managed and well executed elections in modern american history. So at what point does it. Democratically elected leader become a dictator. It's a very good question. It's a gray area. It's it's basically win. They have taken power and failed to relinquish it in accordance with the democratic process. And so this is an instance where if trump were to stay in power illegally then yes of course We would have to stop talking about the. Us has democracy. What we have now is an attempt right. I believe that the democratic institutions of the us even though they have been battered under the last four years in our very damaged are strong enough that in this instance it won't prove successful and i think if we do actually game out the idea of him somehow trying to stay in the white house after january twentieth wouldn't the. Us shut down. There would be there would be riots. There would be violence. There would be general strikes. I mean it's it's unfathomable because even though that chunk of the republican party the hards believed that trump's somehow one or that the election was manipulated. And they're wrong about that. Eighty percent of the country knows joe biden one which is depressing. It's only eighty percent because it's quite clear that he won but it still overwhelming and therefore it's impossible to imagine Trump stained power without enormous backlash to that. And i don't think the republicans would actually go along with it once you get to that stage. I think they're indulging him because they think it's a ploy but i don't think that they would let him stay in power beyond inauguration day and i'm guessing that also republicans don't want to alienate the voter base. That may well get them to senate seats in georgia on the fifth of january. Yeah it's an interesting strategy this because of just in terms of pure it's obviously extraordinarily cynical but if we're evaluating interest from the merits of strategy as effectiveness there's a potential for blowback here right if you tell people that the elections are stolen from you in places like georgia. There's a risk that people in georgia who are republicans. Don't vote right. I mean they have. They have to get their base out and so even though they might be fired up about the the narrative that the republicans are selling them the narrative selling them as saying don't matter because they get rigged anyway which is again not true but some people believe that to be true and you wonder if on january fifth which is not a normal time for people to be voting. Usually special elections have low turnout whether the democratic base which is going to be very fired up for this could have a boost from the fact that some georgia republicans will say. Forget about it. I i don't wanna vote. Because i've heard all these conspiracy theories that my vote won't be counted anyway so you mentioned the danger for democracy an and as he also said one presumes that eventually he will have to go but how much damage can inflict before he does. I mean one area would seem to be how we view democracy in the future and would perhaps appoint to a changing of the constitution. Which really only has a couple of paragraphs on the office of the president. And i guess it relies. It's soft guidelines isn't it relies on on the good nature. The good faith of the president to to behave in a presidential way. Maybe that needs to change. Yeah i mean. I think the story Of the post trump era could be one. That's very optimistic. For democracy depending on how the senate seat elections go Because as you rightly point out what he's done is exposed. How much of american politics relies on norms and the sort of good faith that people in elected office will obey those norms. And what could happen as happened. After watergate with richard nixon is an attempt to codify right into law the norms so that they can't be up for discussion and i think this would be a very positive development that being said he can do enormous damage. He's got seventy four days in office and you know he is poisoning Republicans in particular in terms of their minds thinking about democracy. And that matters. I mean you have to have both parties believe in the legitimacy of the other party when they went elections if you want to have a democracy survive and right now that is not the case. And i you know. It's the first time in at least modern american history. That's been true so we do need to pay very close attention to what he's doing in terms those soft aspects of democracy. Now he's mark espa the defense secretary since then. There's been a run of firings and resignations at the top of the pentagon. John now has his people in place. And he's ousted those whose who would defy will. What might he try and achieve here. I mean could. He bring troops home from afghanistan in time for christmas. As long said he would thereby further destabilizing the region could he provoke conflict with iran leaving biden with a huge issue to deal with. Yeah this is one of the mysteries. I mean trump. You usually can understand trump pretty well by looking at ego narcissism personal interest financial interests. The question here is whether that explains these moves. As well so one narrative of course would be espa stood up to him on various things like deploying the military to quash protests and said. I'm not going to do that. And this is payback for him to fire him but there is some other stuff going on. That makes me wonder if there's more to this story like for example. A series of arms deals that have seemed to be arms transfers. It seemed to be concluded with various middle east Dictatorships and the question is is trump trying to do something to us foreign policy or is he trying to provide favors to countries that he may have future business interest in because his financial empire is going to be under enormous when his debt gets called in after he leaves the white house and there could be some Interest for him in trying to curry favor with some foreign governments in which towers may sprout up in the coming years. I don't know but Tinkering with national security drain a already volatile. Lame duck period is extremely dangerous. And it's not just the firings it's also the fact because he refuses to accept biden's transition biden hasn't started getting the presidential daily brief so he's not up to speed on all the threats facing and all of that means that it's less likely that biden will be as ready as possible on day one and that is something that should not be a partisan issue it should be for all americans to care about and of course he's not getting the funds that are meant to be released for the transition team either and there's a deadline for the legal challenges and as you say it's unlikely any of them will stick to to the degree that they changed results. So how and. When is this going to end well. Presumably what will happen is the certification deadline which is coming up in a couple of weeks for the various states. will come and go with certifications so that you know the new times called or email. All of the secretaries of state who are in charge of elections in in all fifty states and one hundred percent of them said that there was no fraud in their states and in fact trump's lawyers are saying the same thing in court when they're pressed right. The judges are are you. Are you alleging fraud. And they're having to say no because the lawyers actually have to inhabit reality so at some point the results will be certified and once that happens. It's a legally binding certification. That trump has lost the election so i think that the delusion will increasingly become a fringe view. It will still exist. Trump may never accept that he lost but as long as he's out of the white house on january twentieth limits the amount of damage he can do because it will be the end of his time in real power. Brian thank you very much indeed.

Republican Party United States West Africa Trump Administration Joe Biden Georgia Donald Trump Boris Johnson Gambia Ucla Washington Post Latin America Senate Biden
A Third-Rate Burglary Attempt

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

05:46 min | 1 year ago

A Third-Rate Burglary Attempt

"This episode Lauren is a third rate burglary attempt. This episode is all about Watergate. I am so excited. I'm so excited and you know what? This is why you decided to pour us a glass of wine. To keep you entertained because honest to God, this is a lot. Old White men doing a lot of crap? Yeah. Well, cheers to that I guess. Here we go. SIP SIP. All right everybody laid on me. Buckle up. The Watergate scandal was a political scandal in the US involving the administration of US President Richard Nixon from nineteen seventy, two to nineteen, seventy, four leading to Nixon's resignation. So okay picture it nineteen, seventy, two President Richard Mille House Nixon was running for re election. The United States is still embroiled in the Vietnam. War. The country deeply divided a forceful presidential campaign seemed essential to the president and some of his key advisors All Right Act one. ooh. Ooh Act one the Watergate. Complex. Here's our key players here. Okay. We have Richard. Nixon. Who is the president of the United States and he is also the Republican nominee for the nineteen seventy two election tricky Dick Tricky Dick. Exactly. We. We also do have George McGovern who is the Democratic nominee for the nineteen seventy, two election although he barely shows up in the store you have to know that he's the he's the Democratic nominee. There's H R Haldeman he is the White House Chief of staff and you have John Erlich men, who is the council in Assistant to the President for domestic affairs? We also have the committee to re elect the president. Do you do you know what this? Committee is often referred to as. Is this like it's like the power four or committee to re elect the president. It is officially abbreviated the CRP, but it is often abbreviated as C. R. E. P. or creep References to that throughout this and creep is I mean yeah it works in this in this case citation, but it is officially abbreviated cr the committee to re elect the president. So in that, some of the key figures are John, Mitchell, who is at this point, the attorney, General of the United States and then he becomes the campaign director. There's Jeb Stuart Magruder, who is a business executive and the acting chairman of the CRP and then a couple of names eubank actually be promoted with G Gordon Liddy he's a former FBI agent and European employee, and there's also e Howard Hunt who is a former CIA agent and CRP CRP employees. All right. Here's the setting. The Watergate complex. K built between nineteen, sixty, three and nineteen seventy-one. The Watergate was considered one of Washington DC's most desirable living spaces. It was popular with members of Congress and political appointees of the executive branch the Watergate Complex actually a group of six buildings in the foggy bottom neighborhood of Washington DC in nineteen seventy two the headquarters of the Democratic National Committee was then located on the sixth floor of the Watergate office building. So the Watergate complex, it was intended to be a city within a city so it was supposed to have so many amenities that residents wouldn't need to leave you know. So they were supposed to have like a post office and restaurant and Jen concierge Oh sure gyms in the seventy everyone's smoked like chimneys died forty eight. Right that's why nobody who lived in the seventies is still around. I always assumed it was just like a single building I didn't realize it was like. Axe So? Yes. There was the Watergate Hotel there was Watergate West and Watergate East, which were like apartment buildings. There's a Watergate office building and there's one of their Watergate apartment building too. So it was a big complex It was actually proposed and built by the Italian architectural firm SGI. And one really interesting. The one thing that I found renders ing is the Vatican was actually a major investor in this project get how. So because of this, the Vatican was at one point part owner of the Watergate until nineteen sixty-nine that's wild. Yeah, right. Whatever the Italian I mean. Come on. The Watergate's popularity among members of Congress, and again, these high-ranking of appointees was very strong and so many members of the Nixon Administration settled there that the DC press actually named it the Republican, Bastille? Wows. Yes. So another group we have to worry about right now are called the White House plumbers. They are simply sometimes called the plumbers or the room sixteen project Jay were covert White, house, Special Investigations Unit which was established within a week after the publication of the Pentagon papers in June nineteen seventy-one. Okay. So the plumbers job was to stop and or respond to the. Leaking of classified information, the news media and just a quick refresher at the Pentagon papers which was officially titled. Report of the Office of the Secretary of Defense Vietnam Task Force was a US Department of Defense History of the United States is political and military involvement in Vietnam from Nineteen forty-five to nineteen, Sixty, seven in twenty eleven. This report was formerly declassified and released.

Watergate Watergate Complex President Trump United States Richard Nixon Vietnam Congress John Erlich Democratic National Committee Nixon Administration Burglary White House Lauren Executive George Mcgovern Jeb Stuart Magruder Pentagon
11 Trivia Questions on 19 Word Hints for 19 Letter Movies

Trivia With Budds

03:25 min | 1 year ago

11 Trivia Questions on 19 Word Hints for 19 Letter Movies

"All right nineteen letter movies with Nineteen Word Hands. Let's see if you can figure all these out number one crusading reporters Woodward and Bernstein dig through the Merck surrounding President Nixon's misdeeds searching for the truth about Watergate, what is that movie number one number one? And number two, Brosnan settles in for his third outing as double o seven this time with Denise Richards as a hem doctor. Christmas Jones number two Brosnan settles in for his third outing double o seven this time with Denise Richards as a ham doctor Christmas Jones number two. Question number three no twinkies for Woody Harrelson, this time but hordes of undead still to battle in this decade later, Dom Com sequel number three. What is that Zombie Com sequel with Woody Harrelson And number four, a mild-mannered diplomat is stirred to action after his wife is killed in Kenya. After meddling with pharmaceutical companies number four, a mild-mannered diplomat is stirred to action after his wife is killed in Kenya after meddling with pharmaceutical companies number four. And Number Five more rock more Jack Black More Kevin Hart. But still no board games in this sequel to a reboot number five more rock more Jack Blackmore Kevin, Hart. But still no board games in this sequel to remove. Number six the American remake of Seven Samurai with a star studded cast of Charles Bronson Steve McQueen and Horst. Holtz. Number seven the time is just right for an out and out thriller like this reads this best pictures tagline. The time is just right for an out and out thriller like this reads this best pictures tagline tough one number seven. Number Eight, a one, thousand, nine, hundred, four German fantasy films. Title is a bit of a lie and actually wraps up in about one hundred and two minutes Barack. This nineteen eighty-four German fantasy films. Title is a bit of a lie that actually wraps up in about one hundred and two minutes. And number nine the only film within the franchise to Askew Arnold Schwarzenegger though it features a CGI incarnation of his t eight, hundred number nine, the only film without Arnold, but it does have CGI t eight, hundred, number nine. Number ten one can imagine the pitch for this one was toy story with animals and yeah, it made eight hundred and seventy five, million dollars number ten toy story with animals nineteen letters eight, hundred, seventy, five, mil. Andy Bonus for nineteen letter movies number eleven for two points. If you're playing along at home, please recall one, hit wonder deep blue something's classic nineties tune while you find this more classic morning, Meal Movie Classic Morning Meal, Movie Deep Blue Something Classic Nineties, tune those your clues for number eleven.

Woody Harrelson Denise Richards Brosnan Kenya Kevin Hart Arnold Schwarzenegger Seven Samurai President Nixon Jack Blackmore Kevin Jack Black Christmas Jones Woodward Andy Bonus Charles Bronson Steve Mcqueen Barack Holtz Bernstein Horst
President Trump doesn't dispute downplaying COVID in order to reduce 'panic'

Start Here

05:56 min | 1 year ago

President Trump doesn't dispute downplaying COVID in order to reduce 'panic'

"There are a few games for every president. One of those games is that at some point, Bob Woodward will write a book about you. While you're in office, the Democratic National Committee is trying to solve this prime minister. Began before dawn Saturday when five intruders were captured by police inside the offices of the committee in Washington. By Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein broke the Watergate story since then Woodward has done his thing where he talks to literally everybody can at the White House and writes up the narrative that emerges to do that he often talks to sources on deep background that means names aren't used not even their direct quotes. The reason I bring this up is don't talk to him. Someone else will and the best way to get your version of the story out there is to give him a call. I. That is how he managed to get interviews over the. Last several months we begin tonight with those bombshell recordings. We yesterday we finally learned what is in Bob Woodward's latest book about President Trump. There were lots of revelations in the Washington Post report, but the biggest was the claim that the president intentionally misled Americans about how bad the novel Corona virus was at a critical moment and this admission do not come from a bunch of unnamed sources it came from President trump himself. Let's ABC's chief White House correspondent Jonathan, Karl John We've now learned the president did a ton of on record interviews with Bob Woodward. What did he tell him? Well, he did eighteen interviews with Woodward Woodward tape them, and now we we hear the audio here the President's voice in this headline on the virus, which is you see the president's progression slee we only have five people hopefully everything's GonNa be great. They have somewhat of a problem, but hopefully, it's all going to be great but we're working. With China just so you know and other countries very very closely. So it doesn't get out of hand February seventh interview. So this is really we're starting to grasp the the severity of the pandemic overseas, not necessarily here in the United States yet the president tells Woodward quite candidly that this is really bad. It goes through Air Bob that's always tougher than the touch. You don't have to touch things right. But the air, you just breathe the air that's how it's passed. This is more deadly than the flu more deadly than even the most strenuous flus. So. The president is acknowledging on February seventh to Bob Woodward that this is a really dangerous threat. And in and by the way. The virus fast forward that working hard looks like by April and theory when it gets a little warmer. Miraculously goes away. That's true. We know what the president was saying publicly was largely downplaying the threat. This is a flu. This is like a flu within a couple of days is going to be down close to zero. Now it's turning out not just all people. Today and yesterday. Some startling facts came out. It's not just old all. Were asked him about that in a in a subsequent interview in the middle of March, and the president quite candidly says that he likes to. Downplay the threat basically because he doesn't want to get people to work up, I, wanted to. Play it down I like laying it down. Because I don't want to create panic. And you were sitting in the White House briefing room waiting for the press secretary as this was all dropping yesterday, right like Woodward's audio recordings playing on CNN's. What was the response from the White House? Well, this is an extraordinary story of Woodward and scientist Woodward's reportings. We often get in his books. There's actual tapes of the President's Voice essentially acknowledging that he had been misleading the American public I mean. This is this is there other details of the book that were also you know embarrassing so clearly, a little bit of damage control in real time is going on in the white? House the. Breathing was pushed back by fifteen minutes than another fifteen minutes than another fifteen minutes and eventually Kelly Mac, in any of the press secretary comes out. So this president does what leaders do good leaders it stay calm and resolute at a time when you faced an insurmountable challenge, that's what this president is not that the president lied to the American College about the threat posed by the president has never lied to the American public on Cova actually say. That the president. Did Not downplay the coronavirus threat never downplayed the virus. Once again, the president expressed calm. The president was serious about this when Democrats were pursuing their sham and. Hear the president's. Own Voice telling Bob Woodward. Always play it down I still like playing down likes to play it down because he doesn't want to create a panic and then after macanese briefing, the president came out made an announcement on related about his potential judicial nominees. And he was asked about this and said you know so did you mislead the public well I think if you said in order to reduce panic perhaps that sell fact is a cheerleader for this country I love our country and I don't want people to be frightened I don't want to create panic as you say, and certainly I'm not going to drive. This country or the world into a frenzy, and he acknowledges right there right there what he said on the tape to Woodward yes. He he does downplaying worried about creating panic. Well. So what is the justification of that though John Jonkers? I didn't WANNA start a panic but on the other hand, if somebody hears, you say this is no worse than a flu and they act like that and then they get the coronavirus and have horrible health from vacations I mean, what do you say to that the White House? It's a tough one because this is a president the. Leadership and not creating a panic isn't about like lying to

President Trump Bob Woodward Woodward Woodward FLU White House Democratic National Committee Washington Chief White House Corresponden Press Secretary Washington Post Prime Minister Carl Bernstein ABC United States Kelly Mac John Jonkers China CNN
"watergate" Discussed on Killer Knowledge

Killer Knowledge

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"watergate" Discussed on Killer Knowledge

"Directed the break <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in? <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> A. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> John, Dean. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Be. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> G Gordon <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Liddy. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> See! <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> John <Music> Mitchell. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> The correct answer <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> B <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> G. Gordon <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Liddy <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> would go on to be convicted <Speech_Male> of conspiracy, <Speech_Male> burglary <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> wiretapping. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> He was <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> sentenced to twenty <Speech_Music_Male> years in prison, <Speech_Male> but served <Speech_Male> only four and <Speech_Male> a half years. <Speech_Male> After <Speech_Male> news broke about <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the Watergate incident, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Nixon <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and his campaign <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> staff moved quickly <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to distance <Speech_Male> themselves from the break <Speech_Male> in and <Speech_Male> disavowed any <Speech_Male> knowledge of the Burglars <Speech_Male> Question <Speech_Music_Male> Number Two. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> What <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> eventually connected <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the burglars <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to Nixon's <Speech_Music_Male> reelection campaign? <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> A <Speech_Music_Male> A burglar's <Speech_Male> confession. <Speech_Music_Male> Be <Speech_Music_Male> a cashier's <Speech_Music_Male> check. <Speech_Music_Male> See. <Speech_Male> Phone <Speech_Music_Male> records. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> The correct <Speech_Music_Male> answer is <Speech_Music_Male> be <Speech_Music_Male> on August first <Speech_Male> nine <Speech_Male> seventy. <Speech_Male> A twenty five thousand <Speech_Male> dollars cashier's <Speech_Male> check <Speech_Male> earmarked for the Nixon <Speech_Male> campaign <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> was traced <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to a Watergate Burglars <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Bank <Speech_Music_Male> Account. <Speech_Music_Male> The media <Speech_Male> would play a huge <Speech_Male> role in putting pressure <Speech_Male> on Nixon <Speech_Male> administration officials. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> The scandal was <Speech_Male> most famously investigated <Speech_Male> by reporters <Speech_Male> Bob Woodward <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and Carl Bernstein. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Question number <Speech_Male> three. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> What publication <Speech_Male> did Woodward <Speech_Male> and Bernstein <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Work for? <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> A <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> The Washington <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Post. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Be <Speech_Male> The New York. <Speech_Male> Times <Speech_Male> see <Speech_Music_Male> Time <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> magazine. <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> The, correct answer <Speech_Music_Male> is. <Speech_Male> A The <Speech_Male> Washington, Post. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> The <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> most famous <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of Woodward and Bernstein <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> sources <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> was FBI <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> deputy director <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> mark felt <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> known <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> for years by <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the nickname. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Deep throat. <Speech_Male> As <Speech_Male> evidence mounted <Speech_Male> tying Nixon <Speech_Male> to the break in <Speech_Male> and his subsequent <Speech_Male> cover-ups to save <Speech_Male> his career. <Speech_Male> The Senate. <Speech_Male> Watergate committee <Speech_Male> began hearings <Speech_Male> and Nixon's <Speech_Male> men began <Speech_Male> to talk <Speech_Male> question number <Speech_Male> four. <Speech_Male> Who on Nixon's <Speech_Male> team revealed, <Speech_Male> the president <Speech_Male> recorded his <Speech_Male> Oval Office meetings. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> A, the <Speech_Male> attorney general. <Speech_Male> Be, <Speech_Male> Vice <Speech_Male> President Ford <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> see <Speech_Male> his deputy <SpeakerChange> assistant. <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> The <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> correct answer is <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> C. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Nixon's deputy <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> assistant <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Alexander <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Butterfield <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> testified <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to the Senate Committee <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> on July Thirteenth <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Nineteen seventy, <Speech_Male> three that <Speech_Male> Nixon had recorded <Speech_Male> all conversations <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in telephone <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> calls in his <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> offices. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Nixon's <Speech_Male> cover-ups <Speech_Male> escalated even <Speech_Male> more <Speech_Male> including the now <Speech_Male> infamous Saturday <Speech_Male> night massacre <Speech_Male> when he ordered <Speech_Music_Male> the firing of the special <Speech_Male> counsel in <Speech_Male> charge of the Watergate <Speech_Male> case <Speech_Male> question number <Speech_Male> five <Speech_Male> to end this episode, <Speech_Male> who <Speech_Male> finally <Speech_Male> ordered the release <Speech_Male> of the Oval Office <Speech_Male> recordings? <Speech_Male> A, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the <Speech_Male> Senate committee. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Be <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> The supreme <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> court. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> See <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the Department <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of Justice. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> The <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> correct answer <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Be <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> The supreme, court. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> The justices voted <Speech_Male> unanimously <Speech_Male> against Nixon's <Speech_Male> claim of executive <Speech_Male> privilege <Speech_Male> and the tapes <Speech_Male> were released. <Speech_Male> The <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> House voted to <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> impeach Nixon, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and with no <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> support in the Senate <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to keep him in office, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> he resigned. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Vice President <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Gerald Ford was <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> sworn into office <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in part. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Pardon Richard Nixon <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> from being prosecuted <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> for <Speech_Music_Male> his crimes. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male>

Richard Nixon Senate Bob Woodward President Ford Oval Office Bernstein G. Gordon burglary Washington Dean. Vice President Liddy. Mitchell. Senate Committee FBI deputy director attorney Carl Bernstein. executive
"watergate" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy Theories

14:24 min | 1 year ago

"watergate" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

"Connection to the President on August twenty ninth. Nixon held hill the press conference at his oceanside home in San Clemente California and once again addressed the Watergate break in after conceding. That mistakes mistakes had been made on both sides of the political aisle. He assured the press that thirty four year old White House counsel John Dean had personally investigate estimate the accusations and found no ties to the White House. Nixon then made what would turn out to be one of the most brazen and ironic statements of his political career quote. I can say categorically that his investigation indicates that no one on the White House staff. No one in this administration station presently employed was involved in this very bizarre incident. What really hurts in matters of this sort is not the fact that they occur because overzealous overzealous people in campaigns? Do things that are wrong. What really hurts is if you try to cover it up? Nixon speech held one Modicum of truth John Dean's investigation hadn't found anything because John Dean's investigation didn't exist in fact ever since June Seventeenth Nixon and his aides had been doing everything in their power to stymie the official investigations into the burglary. That's the official. She'll story at least John Dean would later admit that he and FBI Director. Patrick Gray had personally destroyed incriminating documents from Howard hunt safe but even after Dean's admission Nixon's apologists would question whether the men had acted on the president's orders orders or their own volition but more on that in a bit as September arrived Woodward continued his covert meetings things with deep throat while he Bernstein pounded the pavement. After three months on the Watergate case it felt like the reporters were finally making Progress S.. The cracks were beginning to show amongst the ranks of Nixon's reelection committee. Several employees were now convinced that their bosses were involved in something something illegal while most were still too scared to give up any information on their own. A few were willing to confirm or deny information. The reporters already had on October tenth less than a month before election night the Washington Post released their most damaging damaging revelation yet under the headline. FBI Finds Nixon. Aides sabotaged Democrats. Thanks to tips from deep throat and a a few creep employees willing to talk Woodward and Bernstein had discovered that Watergate was not an isolated incident for over a year before or the June seventeenth. DNC bugging operation members of the reelection committee had conducted a massive campaign of politically motivated spying and sabotage designed to ensure Nixon's second term frequently. These dirty tricks amounted to little more than practical jokes in in one instance creep associates race through the halls of a hotel where DNC campaign. Staffers were staying and stole all the shoes they'd left out in the hall but be polished but other activities were more serious and sometimes illegal. They spread slanderous rumours about Nixon's political enemies to the press in forged letters to disgrace them. They had already been successful in forcing a significant Democrat challenger to drop out of the race during the primaries again. That's all the official story says. While many of the men who participated in these activities would later admit to their crimes. It still left the unanswered question of how much Nixon actually knew about the operations. We do know that some of his closest advisers and aides were involved as Bernstein and Woodward reported on Tober tenth. These sabotage operations had all been paid for through a secret slush fund at the committee to reelect president moreover the activities were not merely the brainchild of Liddy and hunt but had been conducted at the direction of White House. US officials in fact the slush fund was controlled by John Mitchell the head of creep while he was still serving as Nixon's attorney general despite its explosive content Woodward and Bernstein's article barely registered with the American public only only McGovern and the. DNC seemed willing to believe that members of the White House staff had been involved in an elaborate conspiracy. Many Americans dismissed the accusations. Mutations as politics as usual on November seventh nineteen seventy-two Richard Nixon defeated George McGovern in a landslide on slide. Victory taking forty nine states and over sixty percent of the vote in the aftermath some of Nixon's aides privately joked that the Watergate Watergate scandal was to thank for Nixon's win. The Democrats had spent the last few months of the campaign fixated on an issue that according to the results Americans Americans simply didn't care about has Nixon began his second term Woodward and Bernstein found themselves in a Rut after are all of their reporting on the Watergate story. Americans had chosen to stick with Nixon while there were had played a critical role in the arrests of G. Gordon Liddy Eighty and Howard Hunt. They were confident that other members of Nixon's administration were guilty as well but so far only seven men liddy hunt want the five burglars had been indicted for the young reporters. It felt like a failure but the story was far from over on January eighth. Nineteen seventy-three the indicted. Men's trials began Howard Hunt and the four Cubans pled guilty. He immediately though they maintained that no one else was involved. mcchord and lady fought their charges but nonetheless they were convicted. On January January thirtieth on all eight counts from the outside the guilty verdicts might have seemed like the conclusion to the Watergate story but for Nixon in his administration they marked the moment that the real problems began though. The public didn't know it yet. Creep had already spent close to five eight hundred thousand dollars on the Watergate. Burglars Legal Fees in an effort to ensure their silence now that each defendant faced upwards of forty years in prison in that silence was going to become a lot more expensive on March twenty first John Dean visited Nixon in the Oval Office. Desperate to convince the president of the seriousness of the situation. The agitated young lawyer claimed that Watergate had become quote a cancer answer on the presidency that was growing daily. If they didn't find some way to get it under control. It was only a matter of time before their allies started. Turn against them. His Council could not have been more present two days later. The judge from the Watergate trial addressed his court and read title letter that he'd received from James mccord the burglar and former CIA officer in the letter mcchord clearly spelled out. A number of issues is that he believed had affected his trial quote. One there was political pressure applied to the defendants to plead guilty and remained silent to perjury. Occurred during the trial in matters highly material to the very structure or tation and impact of the government's case and to the motivation and intent of the defendants three others involved in the Watergate. Operation were not identified during the trial trial when they could have been those testifying for almost a year Woodward and Bernstein had written countless words on the Watergate scandal handle each article chipping away at the seemingly impenetrable wall of lies surrounding the White House Woodward was proud of the work he and his partner had done but he was well aware that it hadn't changed anything but from the moment mccord's letter was read before the court it was like a damn had burst open as the White House scrambled to work on yet. Another denial John Dean began to sense that the tides were shifting when Nixon asked him to put together a document on everything he knew about Watergate. The thirty five year old lawyer suspected that he was about to become the scapegoat for the entire cover up on April seventeenth. John Dean informed the president that he had begun cooperating with the. US Attorney's Office office later that same day Nixon learned that along with Dean his chief of Staff. Hr Haldeman and top aide John. Ehrlichman were being investigated it for their roles in the cover up two weeks later on April Thirtieth Richard. Nixon addressed the American people from their television screens. He once again insisted that he was innocent and had no knowledge of the involvement of anyone in his administration nevertheless due to the accusations accusations he had found it necessary to accept the resignation of HR Haldeman. John Ehrlichman and John Dean for the sake of of maximum transparency. He would also be appointing a new attorney general but by this point no declarations of innocence could could stop what was coming on May Seventeenth the Senate's newly-formed Watergate committee began a series of televised hearings into the break INS and cover up back lasting for over two weeks. The hearings were a cultural event. The likes of which the world had never seen the major TV networks works took turns carrying the live broadcasts while pbs replayed the proceedings at night and pr aired audio of the hearings Gavel Talal on May Eighteenth one day after the Watergate hearings began Nixon's new attorney general Elliot. Richardson and announced that he was appointing an independent special prosecutor to investigate allegations of criminal activities surrounding Watergate. The special the prosecutor would have the right to follow whatever leads. They saw fit divulge their findings at their own discretion and could only be removed by the Attorney General himself health and Short Nixon's ability to thwart or monitor. The investigation in any way was effectively. Blocked the man. Richardson had selected selected for the role was far from the neutral party. That everyone had expected Archibald Cox was an attorney law professor and former solicitor solicitor general with a Sterling Record. He was also a staunch Liberal Democrat and a friend of many of the president's political enemies. Publicly Nixon applauded the Attorney General's choice in promised his full cooperation with the investigation but privately he was furious in his memoirs memoirs. He would state that quote if Richardson had searched specifically for the man whom I least trusted he could have not done better than Archibald Cox Walks. The president now found himself in the unprecedented position of being simultaneously investigated by both judicial and legislative slate of branches and finally all of America had taken notice almost one year earlier Watergate headlines had elicited I rolls and apathy now the entire nation was gripped by Watergate fever according to the US Senate within one month of the hearings and astonishing ninety. Seven percent of Americans were aware of the scandal. Seventy one percent of Americans were falling the hearings rings through at least one media format the hearings made stars of a number of politicians. Sam Ervin the Folksy Democratic senator from North North Carolina who led the hearings became famous for eviscerating witnesses without dropping his country lawyer mannerisms Republican Senator Senator Howard Baker asked quote. What did the president know in win? Did he know it so frequently that it became permanently ingrained and in the American lexicon but the real stars were the line of Nixon appointees who are called to testify most notably Nixon's former special counsel counsel John Dean the young lawyer shocked the Senate Watergate Committee with one stunning revelation after another. He insisted that he had spoken to Nixon. About the Watergate. Cover up on more than thirty five separate occasions that the president had advanced knowledge of payments to buy. Hi the Watergate Burglars Silence and that he was willing to pay upwards of one million dollars to keep them from cooperating with prosecutors unfortunately early dean didn't have any documentation to prove his claims and as the only highly placed member of Nixon staff who had turned state's witness Nisa against the president. He suddenly made himself a lot of enemies. One after another. The president's loyal lieutenants attempted to pin the entire in your cover up on him for a moment. It seemed that Watergate might forever remain an unsatisfying case of. He said he said with the public forced to choose between Nixon's word and deans. But there were still more revelations to come.

Richard Nixon John Dean President Woodward Bernstein Watergate Senate Watergate Committee White House attorney FBI DNC official G. Gordon Liddy Eighty Senate Richardson Washington Post Howard Hunt
"watergate" Discussed on Today in True Crime

Today in True Crime

11:51 min | 2 years ago

"watergate" Discussed on Today in True Crime

"Today is Sunday September eighth two thousand nineteen on this date in nineteen in seventy four. US President Gerald Ford announced his decision to grant his predecessor Richard Nixon a full free and and absolute pardon for all crimes committed while in office ensuring that Nixon would not be prosecuted for his role in the Watergate scandal. Welcome to today in true true crime podcast original every day. We flip back the calendar to this date years ago and recount one event from true crime history. Sorry I'm Vanessa Richardson and today were covering President Ford's pardon of Richard Nixon before we unpack the ramifications of the pardon. Let's go back to the morning of September Eighth Nineteen seventy four just before eleven. Am Carl Bernstein typed the last sentence and hit the return key sending the carriage flying back to first position without waiting for the ink to dry he snagged the freshly written article from his typewriter grabbed his coffee mug with the other hand and pushed away from his desk. The thirty year old reporter wound his way through the expensive maze of desks and filing cabinets that made up the bullpen of the Washington Post by the time he reached the desk of city editor Berry Sussman. He had finished proofreading meeting. He deposited the pages on top of a stack of other completed articles and looked around only now. Did it strike. Bernstein that the bullpen was oddly quiet to be fair. It was a Sunday but like Bernstein. Many of the post reporters had long since abandoned and and the antiquated notion of things like weekends only minutes earlier the office had been a buzz with chatter but now there was no one in sight rounding column Bernstein found his colleagues crowded around the small TV in the corner as they often did whenever there was a game on Bernstein hadn't paid much attention to sports for the past two years but he thought he deserved a break on the TV screen President Gerald Ford Sat behind his desk in the Oval Office addressing the cameras by the sound of the things he had already been speaking for several minutes and by these presents do grant a full free and absolute pardon onto Richard Nixon for all offenses against the United States which he Richard Nixon has committed for a long moment after the broadcast had ended Bernstein continue despair at the television screen. He was vaguely aware that his colleagues we're watching him and wondered if his expression betrayed his rising blood pressure but before any of his colleagues could speak. Bernstein unturned and strode back to his desk. There was only one person he could talk to right now. The phone rang six times before Woodward word finally answered. Bernstein's partner sounded as if he had just woken up. Did you see it. Bernstein asked Woodward hadn't and he asked what Bernstein was talking about. The SOB pardoned the SOB Woodward didn't ask Bernstein to clarify which Sob's Oh bees he was referring to there was no need the reporters had spent the last two years covering the Watergate scandal for the Washington Post they had been responsible for some of the biggest scoops early on when virtually every other newspaper was ignoring the story it had all started on June seventeenth nineteen seventy two when five men were caught breaking into the offices of the Democratic National National Committee with bugging equipment by tracing checks deposited in the bank accounts of the Burglars Woodward and Bernstein discovered that the men and had been paid through Nixon's own reelection committee the break in and ensuing scandal soon became known as Watergate after to the DC building complex that housed DNC headquarters Nixon of course vociferiously denied that any of his men had been involved even when Woodward and Bernstein discovered that Nixon's top aides had approved funds for the break in Nixon continued to deny that he'd lead had any knowledge of it but nearly two years later a Senate investigation and special prosecutor forced the president to release tapes of conversations recorded at the White House revealing that he had been lying the whole time beginning within days of the Watergate break-in Nixon had orchestrated vast cover up of the scandal he had personally squashed and FBI investigation into the break in and I paid the Watergate burglars to stay silent about the White House's role facing certain impeachment Nixon finally resigned on August ninth nineteen seventy four and Gerald Ford became the thirty eighth president of the United States that had been one month ago since Nixon's resignation Bernstein had walked into the post each morning hoping to hear the news that the former president was being indicted now that would never happen after a moment of silence silence. Woodward asked Bernstein if he thought Ford and Nixon had made a deal. Maybe Nixon had only stepped aside because he expected a pardon. Bernstein thought Woodward was being naive. Of course there was a deal. This was the final perfect corruption of Watergate dozens dozens of Nixon's top aides and advisors were going to jail over the scandal but the man behind it all would never be held accountable. Woodward reminded Bernstein that according to a nineteen fifteen supreme court decision by accepting the pardon Nixon was technically admitting guilt old sure said Bernstein technically but it wouldn't stop him from denying any responsibility for the cover-up just as he had all all along there wasn't much else to say Woodward asked Bernstein to let him know if there were any more developments and then hung up for a moment. Bernstein sat staring at his typewriter since they'd started working together two years ago talking to Woodward had helped Bernstein clarify Fayaz thoughts but now he wasn't sure how he felt. He was still angry to be sure but he also felt somehow lighter. Berry sussman poked his head out of his office shouted at Bernstein. The editor wanted to know if he had time to take on a developing developing story. Bernstein grabbed his jacket. Maybe Ford was right that it was time to move on for the past two years. Watergate head had hung over Bernstein like cloud coloring everything in his life. Maybe it was for the best that it was finally over. There would always be other stories to chase coming up. We'll discuss Ford's just occasions for issuing the pardon and the the political ramifications that followed now back to the story during his address to the nation on September Eighth Eighth President Ford explained his decision to pardon Nixon by saying he believed it was the only way for the nation to heal from the wounds of Watergate. He also said he believed that. Nixon and his family had suffered enough. Whatever his intentions the fallout from President Ford's decision decision to pardon Nixon was immediate and intense his press secretary biographer and close friend Jerry Ter Horst resigned in protest later that day within a week of issuing the pardon his public approval rating had dropped from seventy one percent sent to forty nine percent. Many Americans saw the pardon as a statement that the president of the United States was above the law others suspected that there had been some kind of corrupt deal between Ford and Nixon one month after issuing the pardon Ford was called before the House Judiciary Committee to explain his decision responding to questions from representative Elizabeth Holtzman he stated. I was absolutely lutely convinced then as I am now that if we had had an indictment trial conviction and anything else that transpired after this that the attention of the president the Congress and the American people would have been diverted from the problems that we have to solve and that was the principal reason for my granting the pardon despite his insistence he'd made his decision with the best interest of the country in mind. Ford grappled with a suspicious and hostile public for the remainder of his presidency in nineteen seventy six when he lost his reelection bid to Democratic challenger Jimmy Carter. Many political commentators cited the Nixon pardon as the moment Americans turned against the President and Washington Post Reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein were among those initially actually infuriated by the pardon several decades later their opinions on the matter of changed considerably in a two thousand eleven interview on MSNBC'S ABC's morning. Joe Bernstein stated that he had come to see Ford's decision to pardon Nixon as the right thing to do and an act of courage courage today. Many historians have come to a similar conclusion in nineteen seventy four the United States was facing a flailing economy Konami and was still mired in the Vietnam War as well as the Cold War with the Soviet Union Americans were understandably exhausted from two years years of Watergate without Ford's pardon they likely would have faced at least three more years of a highly public and divisive investigation nation and no one could predict how the country would react to the conviction and imprisonment of former president in two thousand one. Ford was awarded the profile in courage award by the John F Kennedy Library during the award ceremony Senator Edward M Kennedy said that time has a way of clarifying past events.

Carl Bernstein Richard Nixon President Ford Bob Woodward president Joe Bernstein Ford United States Washington Post Watergate Berry Sussman editor Vanessa Richardson White House Senator Edward M Kennedy Jimmy Carter Congress
"watergate" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy Theories

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"watergate" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

"Hunt was one of seven men who had been indicted for the watergate burglary. The trial was scheduled to begin one month after the plane crash killed his wife dorothy haunt was interesting for another other reason when rescue workers sifted through the wreckage they found her purse which contained ten thousand dollars in one hundred dollar bills so there were immediate suggestions that the money had something to do with watergate at this point nixon's administration was still <music> vehemently denying its involvement in the bugging and cover up but it would later come out that creep had spent upwards of five hundred thousand dollars covering the legal fees and buying the silence of the watergate seven when the white house tapes were released in two thousand thirteen they made it clear that nixon had been prepared to pay more while discussing how much it would cost to keep the watergate seven from talking he said quote you could get a million dollars. You could get it in cash. During the senate watergate hearings james mccord would allege that creep had used dorothy hunt to funnel the money to her husband who then dispersed it amongst the watergate defendants but the allegations didn't stop there the presence of the hush money and the fact that dorothy hunt was killed so soon before her husband was set to be tried in the scandal that was threatening to envelop. The white house struck many americans as to unlikely to be a coincidence incidents. Some started to wonder if the crash hadn't been an accident after all in the days after the crash a chicago based activist activist and private investigator named sherman skolnick started looking into the crash and the more he looked the more coincidences started wanted to crop up. The first thing that struck skolnick as aud was the speed with which the f._b._i. Had arrived at the crash site. A normally a plane crash investigation would fall under the purview of the national transportation safety board or n._t._s._b. And yet residents residents of chicago's south side neighborhood reported that within an hour of the plane going down the streets around the crash site. Were crawling with f._b._i. Types william ruggles house the acting head of the f._b._i. Would later admit that fifty of his agents were at the site right just forty five minutes after the crash arriving before anyone from the n._t._s._b. Working independently both government agencies assise came to the same conclusion. The crash of united five fifty three was the result of pilot error compounded by poor communication and disciplined by the crew. Oh the first issues had risen during the landing the skies over midway were heavily overcast on that day the pilot captain wendell the.

dorothy hunt sherman skolnick watergate nixon burglary james mccord william ruggles chicago acting head investigator five hundred thousand dollars ten thousand dollars forty five minutes one hundred dollar million dollars one month
"watergate" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy Theories

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"watergate" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

"Just open the app tap browse and type conspiracy theories in the search bar. This is our second and final episode on the conspiracy sousse surrounding the infamous watergate scandal last week. We discussed the official story starting with the bugging of d._n._c. offices and culminating being with president richard nixon's resignation in nineteen seventy four this week. We'll explore some of the biggest conspiracy theories surrounding the scandal. Watergate is one of the most infamous events in american history. Its name is synonymous with corruption subterfuge and the gradual loss also faith in the american government that defined the nineteen sixties and nineteen seventies as such. There are countless conspiracies about this particular topic topic today. We're going to touch on three of them. Conspiracy theory number one the wife of nixon's former attorney general was kidnapped opt beaten and held prisoner to keep her from blowing the whistle on watergate months before anyone else had any idea how deep the criminal conspiracy went conspiracy theory number two the c._i._a. Engineered the crash of united airlines flight five fifty three to keep dorthy earthy hunt the wife of watergate burglar e howard hunt from revealing damaging secrets about nixon's administration and conspiracy theory number three e nixon's attempted cover up of the watergate scandal was motivated by a desire to draw attention away from the real story. That story story was that e howard hunt and frank sturgis both watergate criminals had carried out the assassination of john f kennedy nine years just prior. Let's start with our first conspiracy. The wife of one of nixon's cronies was held held captive and beaten in order to prevent her from blowing the whistle on nixon's connection to the watergate burglary. This might sound outlandish but it's it's hard to say where the nixon administration would draw the line when it came to protecting this particular secret when richard nixon i heard about the arrests estimate watergate in june of nineteen seventy two. He became so angry that he famously hurled ashtray across the room. Nixon was particularly particularly furious that james mccord junior was among the watergate burglars or water buggers who had been arrested mccord had previously worked as a security officer for the c._i._a. And was currently employed by the committee to re elect. The president nixon knew that it was only a matter of time before the connections between mcchord and the white house were revealed this seemingly minor burglary threaten to unravel his entire administration nation. One of the men in charge of preparing the white house's official response to the arrest was john. Mitchell mitchell fifty nine was nixon's since former attorney general who by then was the head of creep on the day of the watergate break-in mitchell was on the campaign trail in newport beach california with his wife..

richard nixon nixon administration Watergate watergate howard hunt Mitchell mitchell president official attorney american government burglary james mccord white house john f kennedy frank sturgis united airlines newport beach california d._n._c. officer
"watergate" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy Theories

05:24 min | 2 years ago

"watergate" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

"Release. It's the audio tapes but after the backlash he'd faced for the saturday night massacre. He knew that he couldn't simply ignore the subpoenas on may first. I the white house released one thousand two hundred and fifty four pages of edited transcripts of the recorded conversations. The white house's summary summary of the documents argued that they would put an end to the accusation since quote in all of the thousands of words spoken even though they often are unclear unclear and ambiguous not once. Does it appear that the president of the united states was engaged in a criminal plot to obstruct justice but if the white house the truly believe this would remove the shroud over nixon's presidency. They were sorely mistaken rather than proving his innocence. The edited edited transcripts raised new questions about watergate at one point nixon discussed the prospect of raising a million dollars for hush money. Just as john dean had alleged there were veiled references to money laundering burglaries and a host of other activities that made nixon seem more like a mafia boss then a president aside from any illegal activity the transcripts simply made nixon look bad whereas nixon had once once been considered something about policy genius he now appeared self obsessed paranoid reckless in crude the pages were littered with so many instances of the phrase expletive deleted that it became a national joke. The only thing that transcripts didn't show was any concern about the country's country's best interest but while the contents of the transcripts were incredibly damaging what wasn't in them was possibly even more troubling in eighteen and a half minutes section of a conversation between nixon and haldeman from the monday after the break in was blank when asked what about the missing section white house chief of staff alexander haig city feared that it had been erased by some sinister force unsurprisingly unle many americans jump to the conclusion that the sinister force responsible for the scrubbed conversation was nixon himself the implication location was damning whatever was said in those eighteen and a half minutes had to be more damaging than anything the white house had already released but while the transcripts were plenty damaging neither jawara ski nor the senate watergate committee were satisfied with what they had they wanted wanted the unedited recordings originally requested if the tapes truly were consistent with the transcripts then nixon should have no problem turning them over nixon doubled down on his insistence that the tapes were protected under executive privilege but the supreme court disagreed on on july twenty fourth nineteen seventy four the court unanimously ruled that nixon had to turn the unedited tapes over to ski special prosecutor's accusers office follow. You're listening continues to the audio. You're hearing is from the so called smoking gun tape when of many handed over to the special prosecutor's office in late july. It was first released to the public on august fourth nineteen seventy four this time. The official story is pretty <unk> tough to dispute despite the poor audio quality the tape reveals a conversation between h r haldeman and richard nixon recorded in the oval office on june twenty third nineteen seventy-two just six days after the watergate break in haldeman broaches the topic by saying quote quote the democratic break in thing. We're back to the in the problem area because the f._b._i. Is not under control because gray doesn't and exactly know how to control them and they have their investigation is now leading into some productive areas and it goes in some directions. We don't want minute to go when nixon encourages his chief of staff to continue haldeman suggest using the c. i. aid shut down the f._b._i. Investigation russian quote the way to handle this now is for us to have walters call pat gray and just say stay the hell out of this. This is <hes> business this year. We don't want you to go any further on it. Nixon replies uh-huh after reviewing the plan he tells haldeman you call them. I'm in good good deal. Play a tough. That's the way they play and that's the way we are going to play it. The tape confirm arm that nixon had been involved in the cover up from the beginning..

nixon haldeman white house prosecutor pat gray president chief of staff watergate senate watergate committee john dean alexander haig united states supreme court official walters executive million dollars
"watergate" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy Theories

05:25 min | 2 years ago

"watergate" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

"Archibald cox raced back to his office to prepare his response. The the next morning cox issued a subpoena for eight taped conversations that john dean had identified. The president once again refused to cooperate in a public address to the american people on august fifteenth. He explained his position by stating quote a much more important principle is involved lived in this question then what the tapes might prove about watergate. This principle of confidentiality of presidential conversations is at stake in the question of these tapes tapes. I must end. I shall oppose any efforts to destroy this principle which is so vital to the conduct of this great office. Virtually no no one bought the argument within days. Nixon's approval ratings plummeted to thirty one percent marking a thirty six percent drop rob only six months previously staunch nixon supporters were forced to admit that the president was hiding something whatever their political affiliations affiliate everyone wanted to hear what was on the tapes on october nineteenth with the deadline to respond to cox's subpoena fast-approaching approaching nixon suggested a compromise the white house would provide the special prosecutor's office with transcriptions of the pertinent tapes an a an independent third party would be allowed to review the audio tapes and would confirm that the transcripts were accurate after that the prosecutors would agree not to request the tapes again. If nixon's compromise wasn't bad enough his choice of third party made it an obvious ploy nixon suggested suggested john stennis a senator from mississippi who was technically a democrat but was a known nixon supporter. He was also famously asli nearly deaf unsurprisingly archibald cox refused the offer he announced that he would be informing the justice department that nixon in had refused to comply with the subpoena at last it seemed that president nixon had his back up against the wall but he was not going down without a fight eight the next day october twentieth would come to be known as the saturday night massacre according to the mandate of the the special prosecutor's office nixon could not fire archibald cox but he could get rid of his boss on saturday october twenty breath nixon called his attorney general elliot richardson in demanded that he fire archibald cox richardson refused and immediately resigned resigned in protest this man that the justice department second in command the newly appointed attorney general william ruggles house now held authority over the special prosecutor's office nixon proceeded to order ruggles house to fire cox like richardson. He refused and tendered hindered his resignation. Nixon moved on down the line to robert bork the solicitor general at last the president had found someone willing to follow his orders bork wrote the letter firing archibald cox bringing an end to the chaos nixon had rid himself of one enemy eh but his situation was now more dire than ever his flagrant attempts to influence the investigation had destroyed any question of his innocence on november seventeenth nineteen seventy-three nixon addressed americans in yet another desperate attempt to convince them of his innocence breath in the historic press conference. He stated the words that would ironically come to define his presidency. Let me just say that. I made eight mile mistakes but in all my years of public life i have never profited never profited from public service i earned every cent and in all of my years the public life i have never obstructed justice and i think that i say that in my years of public life that i welcome this kind of examination because people have gotta know whether or not their president's a crook well. I'm not a crook. I burned everything. I've got feelings of. Frustration and impatience pervaded the nation as nineteen seventy four dawned it had been six months since since the existence of the nixon tapes was revealed to the public get the content of the tapes was still being withheld but despite the lack of new discoveries the senate watergate committee had quietly continued its investigation in march their work led a federal grand jury to indict seven nixon's since top aides including john mitchell h r haldeman john ehrlichman and charles colson and while archibald cox had been removed moved the special prosecutor's office was still operational solicitor general bork appointed leon joe worsley to take over the investigation to war ski immediately followed in his predecessors footsteps by subpoenaing the white house for sixty four recordings. Nixon was still determined not to release..

Nixon Archibald cox president archibald cox richardson prosecutor john dean general bork robert bork elliot richardson senate watergate committee william ruggles john mitchell justice department john stennis leon joe worsley richardson john ehrlichman mississippi attorney
"watergate" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy Theories

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"watergate" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

"Knowledge of payments to buy the watergate burglar silence silence and that he was willing to pay upwards of one million dollars to keep them from cooperating with prosecutors. Unfortunately dean didn't have have any documentation to prove his claims and as the only highly placed member of nixon staff who had turned state's witness against the president he had suddenly made himself a lot of enemies one after another the president's loyal lieutenants attempted to pin the entire cover up on him for a moment it seemed that watergate might forever remain an unsatisfying case of he said he said with the public forced to choose between nixon's word in in deans but there were still more revelations to come in the last week of the hearings brings a white house aide named alexander butterfield told senate investigators something that not even john dean new in february of nineteen eighteen seventy one nixon had installed a voice activated tape recording system in the oval office. The president had secretly been recording according every meeting and phone call he taken since before the watergate break-in somewhere in the bowels of the white house. There were tapes that could prove whether dean or nixon was lying. They could definitively answer what the president knew and when he knew it if they ever saw the light of day coming coming up the white house resist pressure to release the nixon tapes now back to the story in the spring of nineteen nineteen seventy-three america had reached peak watergate frenzy one study determined that eighty five percent of the population tuned in to follow follow the senate watergate hearings as the hearings drew to a close the committee's investigation uncovered the fact that nixon had secretly taped deep conversations in the oval office. The response was immediate. Both the senate committee and special prosecutor archibald cox requested that the white house turnover any tapes relating to watergate john dean and l. put together a list of specific dates in times of meetings that he believed would be compromising to the president on the evening of july twenty third both the senate committee and the special prosecutor's office received a written written statement that nixon would not be turning over any tapes..

nixon john dean president senate committee senate white house alexander butterfield prosecutor archibald cox america l. eighty five percent one million dollars
"watergate" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy Theories

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"watergate" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

"At his trial quote one there was political pressure applied to the defendants to plead guilty and remained silent to perjury occurred during the trial in matters highly material to the very structure orientation and impact of the government's case and to the motivation russian and intent of the defendants three others involved in the watergate operation were not identified during the trial when they could have within by those testifying for almost a year woodward and bernstein had written countless words on the watergate scandal each article goal chipping away at the seemingly impenetrable wall of lies surrounding the white house woodward was proud of the work he and his partner had done but he was well aware that hadn't changed anything but from the moment mccord's letter was read before the court it was like a dam burst open as is the white house scrambled to work on yet another denial john dean began to sense that the tides were shifting when nixon asked him to put together a document on everything he knew about watergate. The thirty five year old lawyer suspected that he was about to become the scapegoat for the entire cover up on april seventeenth. John dean informed the president that he had begun cooperating with the u._s. Attorney's office later that same same day nixon learned that along with dean his chief of staff h r haldeman and top aide john ehrlichman were being investigated for their roles in the cover up two weeks later on april thirtieth richard nixon addressed the american people from their television screens he once again insisted that he was innocent and had no knowledge of the involvement of anyone in his administration. Nevertheless due to the accusations he had found it necessary to accept the resignation of h._r. Haldeman john ehrlichman and john dean for the sake of maximum transparency consi he would also be appointing a new attorney general but by this point no declarations of innocence could stop what was coming on may seventeenth. The senate's newly formed watergate committee began a series of televised hearings into the break ins and cover up accusations lasting for over two weeks. The hearings were a cultural event. The likes of which the world had never seen the major t._v. Networks took turns carrying during the live broadcasts. Well p._b._s. Replayed the proceedings at night.

john dean watergate richard nixon john ehrlichman woodward Attorney perjury white house mccord senate bernstein partner president chief of staff two weeks thirty five year
"watergate" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:47 min | 3 years ago

"watergate" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"I learned that. Two days after the arrest that the Watergate when Gordon Liddy one of the organizers and and directors, they Watergate undertaking as well as the Ellsberg told me the two of the men that he'd used earlier while working at the White House. We're now in the DC jail that was the motivation for Erlich men cover up of Watergate. I know also from the tapes and doing a book where I transcribed about a thousand Nixon secret tapes, Cape conversations, what his motive was. He was worried that his attorney general had approved this, and he really thought John Mitchell is attorney general with responsible for him being president. So it's out of worry about that Haldeman chief-of-staff he just generally worried about this thing coming out and being reflecting poorly on the White House. There's no real organized meeting where people sit down and say, now how do we. Obstruct Justice or anything like that. Obstruction of Justice is a very fuzzy crime, and it's not a bright line crime, and it's very easy to cross that line and begin across it. And that's what happened. I after the election, the break in rest occur in June of nineteen Seventy-three. After the election, I realized we're on the wrong side of the law, and that's my my initial reaction is my God. We've got to get this corrected, but my second reaction is we've gotta make this cover up work. We just can't. We're all in trouble, and that's when I did the foolish things like destroying documents that showed Erlich men's role in the Ellsberg break in and what have you and did that until one of the regional Watergate. Burglary team starts pressing me for money to remain silent. And that's when I went to Nixon and said, listen, this is going to go on. Definitely these people are going to want more money. He said, how much? I don't know. It could cost a million dollars that's about five and a half million today. And when I was unable to convince him how how much trouble we were in, I knew in trouble and that's when I broke ranks. Well, we're talking with John Dini's former White House counsel for president, Richard Nixon. He served in that post from nineteen seventy to nineteen Seventy-three. And of course, testified before the Senate Watergate commission as well. And he's speaking out now a lot about what he sees in Washington and the Trump administration and want to know what your question for John dean is. And actually let's go to a call right now. Bill is calling from new London, Connecticut, you're on the air Bill. Hey, John, you've done a great service to America and we really appreciate it. I wish somebody would step up and stop these racketeer's that are in the White House now stopped at supreme court nomination. Two guys, crook. I really would love to personal just thank you, but also to ask you, how do the American people prevent this kind of fascism for me emerging in the racism that's that's emerging. What do you think? I think it certainly starts in November where message you've got to be sent to the president that enough. There's gotta be a check on his presidency Republican controlled. Congress has no inclination to do anything on oversight or telling him he's gonna stray. And I think that's where it's gotta start. If it doesn't, we're in real trouble. John dean, how much do you? I mean, this is something that I think people have been thinking about a lot, but how much do you see the effect that Watergate and president Nixon had on America's trust in the office of the presidency presidency itself? How much do you do you see that as reflecting on how people view the office today? I remember thought after Watergate, we would ever have anything close to it. We had something following Watergate for about a decade called post Watergate. Morality, which was a higher standard Watergate being sort of the low market as to what was acceptable to the American people. But that's slowly began to a road and the only really lasting impact Watergate has been one on the media and to on the legal profession in the media presidents before Watergate were given the benefit of the doubt when Eisenhower said, oh, that that U2..

Richard Nixon Watergate White House John dean president Erlich Ellsberg John Mitchell America Gordon Liddy John Dini attorney Burglary Congress Haldeman Connecticut
"watergate" Discussed on Slow Burn: A Podcast About Watergate

Slow Burn: A Podcast About Watergate

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"watergate" Discussed on Slow Burn: A Podcast About Watergate

"House that's a big one going through that list it makes me think that it wasn't some law of nature or even some lov politics the prevented nixon from getting away with watergate it makes me think that if a few things had broken a little differently he could have served out his second term and put the whole ordeal behind him on the other hand even if nothing about nixon's downfall with preordained that doesn't mean it was just a random outcome either the system really did work or more accurately there were people who work inside the system who did what they could as a result a bunch of interconnected institutions the press the courts the department of justice congress all of them did their part to bring about the ending that we now take for granted even if we did just get lucky isn't that still an argument for hope i gerald are porcu solemnly swear that i will faithfully execute that i will faithfully execute the office of president of the united states the office of president of the united states and we'll day richard nixon resigned and gerald ford was sworn in as his replacement ford who become nixon's vice president after spiro agnew resignation about six months earlier had long been an unabashed a defender of the president and he'd continued vouching for unequivocally until the bitter end you may remember that back in nineteen 72 when ford was house minority leader he made himself very useful to the president by helping to squelch congressman write patents early investigation into watergate on september eighth 1974 four did nixon one more good turn i gerald ford have granted in by these presence two grams a.

watergate united states richard nixon vice president ford congressman department of justice gerald ford spiro agnew six months two grams
"watergate" Discussed on Slow Burn: A Podcast About Watergate

Slow Burn: A Podcast About Watergate

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"watergate" Discussed on Slow Burn: A Podcast About Watergate

"Congress well what's a high crime misdemeanor go way ahead fibs up burst of blood a democrat burgers republican episode aden going south elizabeth holzmann really didn't want to be in the house judiciary committee in nineteen 72 the thirty one year old democrat from brooklyn had just unseeded a guy who had been the chair of the committee for almost twenty years holzmann thought her constituents would prefer to have their new congresswoman focus on other things you went to see all the people who are responsible for the selection process and i got nowhere and when they put me on the house judiciary committee my heart sank and i said this is not an auspicious beginning here i am i first legislative everett and i lose holzmann would go on to served four terms in congress and later should become brooklyn district attorney but first she had to do something else you can be sure that islanders scratched and claude to get on that committee if i had had an inkling of impeachment but i had no inkling and the powersthatbe had no inkling and i'm sure the president had no inkling either than impeachment was going to happen remember in 1872 would nixon was reelected very few people cared about watergate the coverup had been so successful that nobody understood that the president of the united states could be involved five months after the burglary at watergate nixon was reelected by a landslide at the time of a second inauguration is approval rating stood at sixty eight percent the senate hearings were broadcast.

Congress aden brooklyn district attorney claude president united states burglary nixon the house senate sixty eight percent thirty one year twenty years five months
"watergate" Discussed on Slow Burn: A Podcast About Watergate

Slow Burn: A Podcast About Watergate

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"watergate" Discussed on Slow Burn: A Podcast About Watergate

"Donald sam urban tank club of july third of the press club at ten o'clock in the morning come on by well the place was packed we've had withholding some reuters and new york times and the uh time magazine and uh international reporters there must have been 50 people they're they're room were overwhelmed by sh and the next day the press was fabulous all over the country in july forest i was getting so in cost radio stations all over the country that again was robbed caguan and now to close things out we're going to turn to paul muggy on us a former fbi agent who helps tied the watergate burglary to nixon's reelection campaign here's maggie honest talking about his first meeting with a crucial source and employee of the committee to reelect the president named judy ho back you you know what you know i i can trust you he's he's got let's go to my my house in rural one they'll tell you anything you want to know and uh we'll talk very nice boutique right so we went out there we do restore it could when we hours of the morning the good work all kinds of information cheetos you'll be the bookkeeper auditor of clean seesaw means of dollars in cash sings seesaw money giving to liddy money giving to mccoy's she had to save that she went into all kinds of money in their money discordant decrease and she had the role of uh accounting for all of that money before we get any further can i ask you to tell me what you were thinking as you're getting information i mean even what was your reaction i mean losing surprising to use your mind renewable rethinking off always taken a bill of partly quite solving this case because with the first breaking.

reuters uh time magazine caguan burglary nixon president judy ho auditor Donald sam new york times paul fbi liddy mccoy
"watergate" Discussed on Slow Burn: A Podcast About Watergate

Slow Burn: A Podcast About Watergate

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"watergate" Discussed on Slow Burn: A Podcast About Watergate

"Agent who help break open the watergate case during its opening weeks he told me why he thinks journalists bob woodward and carl bernstein particular get way too much of the credit for nixon's downfall like i said during this episode i'm just gonna play you a little bit of these interviews if you want more head over to sleep dot com slash slowburn for now here's dekalb it the legendary talk show host who used his airtime on abc during the final months of the 72 election to shine a light on watergate when few others in the media were doing so among others cavite had on ted kennedy who took the opportunity to speculate openly mere days after the break him but the nixon campaigns potential involvement cabot also had on nixon's attorney general richard kleindienst who assured cabbage viewers in september of seventy two that the breakin had been subject to one of the most thorough investigations in fbi history i'm curious how you came to take it seriously i mean what what what about at me you want to not just questioned ted kennedy about it but to have kleindienst on so early no one else was you know it seemed to me that besides maybe some folks it's cbs and obviously the post yeah it was kind of a non stories of what what drew you to it what made you think it was worth with your time and attention with ahead the answer to that but i sensed sub thing was there that simply add to be attended to obviously had no idea how is already in little did we dream that some day we to have available to us an audio tape of the president as johnson said of the united states nixon ranting screaming railing after antiwar movement railing at the press is recordbreaking obscenities rare against jews in fact assu about anything you can think of it was really a low of what while a man and railing against you right.

carl bernstein nixon dekalb ted kennedy cabot richard kleindienst cbs president johnson bob woodward cavite attorney fbi
"watergate" Discussed on Slow Burn: A Podcast About Watergate

Slow Burn: A Podcast About Watergate

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"watergate" Discussed on Slow Burn: A Podcast About Watergate

"The following podcast contains explicit language a slowburn listeners after seven episodes were getting close to the end on january 30th look you're the final chapter of slowburn in which impeachment proceedings against richard nixon begin and the president resigns under pressure but before that he wanted to give you something else as you've heard me say on this show slow burns the production of sleep plots plates membership program everson slowburn launched sleep plus members have been getting a bonus episode each week featuring an interview with someone who has a unique perspective on watergate today i'm gonna play some samples for you from a few of those interviews our goal with these bonus episodes has been to give listeners a deeper understanding of watergate when the goes even further than the stories we've been telling in the main episodes here's one example a few weeks back we put out an interview about the judge who presided over all watergate most important courtroom proceedings the judges name was john j srecko i've mentioned him on the show a few times but i don't think i've adequately conveyed how significant he was or how complicated his legacy is on the one hand judge syrichta was as instrumental as anyone in getting people to pay attention to the watergate breakin and making sure that white house officials were held accountable for it on the other hand some legal experts think that he acted unethically in various ways to his appetite for publicity and power prevented him from giving the watergate defendants a fair trial so i spoke to someone from the senate watergate committee staff a lawyer named david dorsan who feels very strongly about syrichta and the controversy surrounding him if you want to hear that interview sign up for sleigh plus today you're gonna hear excerpts from selling the other interviews i've done for instance we've got dick cavite we may remember from his cameo in episode 1 talking about the hate mail he received for spotlighting watergate on his talk we've also got a staffer from congressman right pat binns banking committee talking about how she and her colleagues thought they were being wiretapped by the white house during patten's watergate investigation then got the guy who started a fan club for senator sam ervin the star of the watergate hearings and finally got the fbi.

richard nixon president syrichta david dorsan cavite congressman pat binns white house patten fbi everson slowburn senate watergate committee watergate senator sam ervin one hand
"watergate" Discussed on Slow Burn: A Podcast About Watergate

Slow Burn: A Podcast About Watergate

01:50 min | 4 years ago

"watergate" Discussed on Slow Burn: A Podcast About Watergate

"Empire. This podcast has a production of sleep plus slates membership program, sleep plus members Get a complete bonus episode of slow burn every week, going deeper into the wild World of Watergate. I'm sharing some of the amazing stuff I found in researching the series and playing extended versions of my interviews with people who watched that. I'll go down this week. I've got an interview with Paul, Maggie on us an X FBI agent who worked in the Watergate case early on he and I talked about how the FBI tends to get left out of the Watergate story And what that's been like for him and his former colleagues. On Wednesday, I'll be doing a Facebook chat on the sleep Plus group page. Sleep plus members help support the show and the rest of our work You can find out more and sign up for sleep plus that sleep dot com slash Watergate. Slow burns produced by me an Andrew Parsons are script editors, Josh Levin. Gabriel Roth as the editorial director, sleep plus the art work for slow-burn is by Teddy blanks from chips. Thanks to NBC archives in the Nixon presidential library museum for the audio. You heard in this episode. Thanks. This slates Chao to June Thomas and Steve lie. You can find a full list of books, articles and documentaries, Use research. This episode on our show page A next week's episode of slow burn. I'll be diving into a bit of a rabbit holes the boom and conspiracy theory, the followed Watergate and what the conspiracy theories that came out of it. Tell us about Nixon's downfall. Somebody in a Watergate Merritt A J gear Hoover if they had proper witnesses and the right questions with, again the exam 70s bodies and find out what's really happening nation. Tune in next week?

Watergate Paul FBI Nixon presidential library mus Gabriel Roth Nixon Facebook Josh Levin editorial director Hoover NBC Chao Andrew Parsons Steve lie Maggie June Thomas
"watergate" Discussed on 20/20

20/20

01:48 min | 4 years ago

"watergate" Discussed on 20/20

"Yes but not that far off entry night was to be friday night to june 16 there was a man working in the back very very late i mean he stayed and he stayed in the state safadi night this was some dedicated democrat we thought he'd never go look for it would go into the watergate bully and put in tapes and door was tape so it would would not lock the hero of that night was a man named frank wheels craig wheels was a security guard at the watergate office building just a garden hose demanding new found the door tape once in and you took the tape off and then you founded tape the second time was something that told me that he should check not only check the door of she called police about one fifty two in and morning the call comes out for and let's burglary at the watergate hotel i discount blink buys yet we'll take a call we were there in a minute men in half we approached the front door 2600 virginia avenue we sauvegarde and their fright wells sitting here the guard post anna walked up to this door here the front door fanned i took out my badge to make sure he could see us at newbury last night i tapped it on the grass i guess i said police had all song gulf cat i think ahead just as like a t shirt underneath trying to give me the image i wanted police also if a uniform coral had answered that call it could have been a whole different ballgame there's a lookout.

burglary anna frank watergate