18 Burst results for "Water Environment Federation"

Fresh update on "water environment federation" discussed on Words on Water

Words on Water

00:17 min | 19 hrs ago

Fresh update on "water environment federation" discussed on Words on Water

"To words on water podcast from the Water Environment Federation GonNa dive into some topics today around carbon redirection and very glad to be helped through this topic by Onder Callous Gainer. He is founder of callous, gainer water technologies under thanks for coming on the PODCAST. You're welcome service glad to be here. Yeah. So this is you know a Guy And I try to grasp these technical subjects always grateful for people like you that bring such expertise and can help me understand these also dive into a bit deeper for our audience. And this is a these are topics are going to be featuring at at West, tech can act we wanted to preview this a little bit for folks. Could you start out explaining what is carbon diversion? Shoe, sure absolutely any carbon diversion is. Something I'm fairly. Excited to be a part of in my profession. It is definitely one of the hot topics in our industry..

Onder Callous Gainer Water Environment Federation
"water environment federation" Discussed on Words on Water

Words on Water

01:46 min | Last week

"water environment federation" Discussed on Words on Water

"The. Word. SORT. Hi, welcome to words on water a podcast from the Water Environment Federation. This is the host Travis loop we at West are extremely excited about west tech connect as everyone knows we are not able to get together in person this year the same way we always have been were sorry we're not gonNa see all of you in New Orleans. We are looking forward to seeing you in person in Chicago next year and twenty, twenty one but going virtual with left tech has provided. So many unique opportunities that were excited about and. We think will benefit all of you. No matter what your interests are. So left tech enact this. It's an online learning platform that offers interactive education in exhibitors showcase and networking experiences. You can learn all about it and register at. West Tech Dot. Org It's being held October fifth through ninth with core hours from eleven am to four PM eastern lots of other activities around that. The thing that's great is left. Heck is not just another Webinar or meeting. We know that you all have been participating in a lot of those since. Last Spring, this is this is different. This is beyond it's really dynamic. It's immersive learning and unique network gain experience. It takes the best of our.

"water environment federation" Discussed on Breaking Green Ceilings

Breaking Green Ceilings

06:31 min | 2 weeks ago

"water environment federation" Discussed on Breaking Green Ceilings

"Fifty percents that was their share. Our one third share was equal to what it would cost or A. Company. But the other third of the time, the atmosphere getting life skills training dealing with the things that made them at risk to begin with. So Naro in these cues from eighteen to twenty six getting job getting pigging, made their first job with benefits for six months getting chaining on getting real skill, getting some counseling, help help them with their issues and challenges, and also getting guidance on how to enter the workforce permanently was like quirk with training wheels this. So they would learn how to choke for work and how to dress for work and how to write a resume and also get job placements services to go out into. The world with a certification of experience and then the next cohort role and so thus far three hundred Camden US gone through that program and probably triple that Philadelphia Philadelphia. Some bigger. So the idea was good begets good started with wanted to do something good for the community and elevators In problem we ended up greening the the city, a providing riverfront parks and up front access to the community and providing jobs for for risk youth all coming from the idea of stormwater capture but the idea is looked at it from the lens of intentionally of trying to do as much as possible. Austrian trying to stay with our lanes. Yes. She must stay within your legal lane. But how you? Why is possible? Yeah. I'm just so impressed and inspired every time you talk about that story, it's just what I feel or believe that a water wastewater utility should aspire to and it's really inspiring that Camden, as well as some other cities around the country are actually can implementing similar type of objectives and it just speaks to how what you are saying earlier is that you go above and beyond just the water and wastewater services, you are making the connection between how clean water and effective wastewater services are actually apart of communities, overall health and prosperity. Is what I can see from the example here. That's absolutely I mean the idea is that wastewater water utilities have a lot of resources and they have the potential indifference to have an adverse impact, the communities the flip side of that is they happened the right intention analogy and look to do as much as possible. They can have tremendous impact on the community and so all worried Tony's to strive especially public think privacy but certainly, public utilities were environmental agencies or supposed to protect the environment to the of sent possible, and then we're also public agencies. We should be public servants. So the idea ideas that we should. Stay within our legal lands but need to opportunities to widen Isley as much of a positive difference as we can, and I will say that the paradigm of the water sector is really starting to change the water environment. Federation. The national systems to clean water agencies and the US environmental protection. Agency work together to create relatively new initiative called the clean water utility of the feature. Idea that or detailed you should go above and beyond just meeting the permit. Now Bear in mind meeting the permit is absolutely essential that should be the floor of aspirations at the ceilings ceilings should be we should be seen as an. Environmental Champions an anchor institutions are communities vast with the future initiative. As the story, initially by the EPA Water Environment, Federation the National Association, water agencies and thus far the how over one hundred, fifty utilities a signed up for this proposition looks is really good. Now, I will say on the one hand or Fourteen Thousand Wastewater Utilities One hundred fiftieth are in the punish Jaap in the bucket and on the other hand what's good about it is this one, hundred fifty or some of the largest utilities in the country so that in one hundred, fifty out of fourteen thousand, but most of the largest ones in the conscien- signed up to. Five eighty percent of residents of the United States are served by utility that believes in this is a principle also needs to go further and the US water lines is working on an initiative, a National Equity Initiative for time. Lucky enough to be working on to try to encourage as many utilities possibly take that approach to be anchor institutions in the community and look for opportunities to do as much good as they come. Right. When of the things that I was thinking of is now that you've kind of moved on from. The municipal utility authority you brought in a culture of creating an institution that was a good neighbor that was an anchor institution. How do you? I, guess ensure that that kind of culture and that kind of spirit continues on after your time is done at the institution will thanks very question something. I thought a lot of AL during my time deputy director for many years in the executive director for eight years too. So thinking a lot about that, because I didn't want this work to be a moment in time and then. After the way they were. So now it's almost like needing a lil leave. A will with is much intention allience also people, but there's only so much you can affect after you're gone from beyond the situation but e can I think the strategic and that's what I I was very mindful doing. So the one thing I wanted to make sure that it was not only top down Germany organization but also that my fellow colleagues employees within utility saw the. What was doing? So is important to hire people that would be like minded, and especially people who might be position to be decision makers in the few trapped last like my deputy I think by former deputy is now the head of the agency. Very, much a a kindred spirit of wines do much good as possible. So I think that was really important. You can't always control to succeed you but at least you maximize the opportunity. So I think that's important. So addition to planting people in the organization hopefully in decision-making staffy left people were kindred spirits and who believe the same sorts of things other things to do things that very difficult to undo the improvements that you've mentioned. For example, in order to control equipment resolve automated said that literally have to purposely tear it apart in order to get rid of. Funding to the Federal Grant Program a federal low interest loan program to take it out of service. We'd actually cause a you'd be like consequences. So that was done with an intention -ality everything is like the green infrastructure in the largest riverfront parks created I had conservation easement place on the park so.

US Camden A. Company Philadelphia deputy director EPA National Equity Initiative Isley Tony Germany Jaap National Association executive director
"water environment federation" Discussed on Words on Water

Words on Water

07:14 min | 3 weeks ago

"water environment federation" Discussed on Words on Water

"Look to words on water a podcast from the Water Environment Federation. This is the host Travis loop. We're very excited about west tech connect our new virtual version of left tech that is happening this fall October fifth through the ninth there is a tremendous lineup of content and we this podcast is going to take a look at one area that we think people will be very interested in. It's about overcoming water re-use challenges in the food and beverage industry. I am joined by Lucy pugh she is vice president and industrial water and wastewater technical practice director for a calm Lucy. How're you doing I'm doing great travis. Thank you very much. So this session that you're part. Of His on Tuesday October sixth at three thirty is a one of really great interest for folks out there. Could you Kinda give a summary? What's going to be featured in the session? Yes certainly travis. This is actually one of to food and beverage sessions. So this particular session does focus on reuse and There will be presentations that address energy recovery and also watery use within the food and beverage industry and takes a look at some of the technologies that are applied and also the cost that might be encouraged for watery USA and energy recovery. She talk a little bit how about how food and beverage wastewater prices are different than municipal treatment. Yeah, it's interesting. You know a lot of the processes are similar. So like municipal facilities, food beverage, wastewater processes, include solid separation, and typically biological treatment processes but the processes are designed to address the particular characteristics food and beverage wastewater, which can be really variable in terms of flow and characteristics. For instance, some industries most of the wastewater is generated at night when they're cleaning their production equipment the the. Wastewater can have really high oil and grease concentrations. Organic concentrations dissolved and suspended solids. It can be high temperature which could be a consideration for biological processes and it can also contain chemicals that are used to disinfect or clean equipment and and just other operations. So equalization is usually really important for food and beverage waste water solid separation using technologies like dissolve their flotation and then just a full range of. Processes activated sludge membrane bio reactors moving that bio reactors, anaerobic processes. So so obviously, those are also processes that are used in municipal treatment facilities that you know I wanted to ask about the most prominent and pressing issues or challenges that food and beverage waste processors face. You might have kind of touched on some of that there but could you could you kind of answered that question a little bit deeper? As municipalities are. Facing increased increasingly stringent nutrient requirements, nutrient removal requirements. All you know a lot of the food and beverage facilities discharge to municipal facilities a few of them have direct discharge permits, but a lot of them discharged to municipal sewer systems and so they're being asked to reduce nutrients and their discharges to reduce the low to the municipal plant We're finding that a lot of food and beverage facilities are having to upgrade their plants to address nutrient removal. And then obviously, water is so important to this industry And and if a facility is located in a water scarce area that's driving these facilities to look at re-use, what can they do to process process their effluent to be able to reuse it maybe and cooling towers or or other non nonfood application Processes in their in their facility. and and you're right the the varying wastewater loads and characteristics can be quite challenging to manage. So that's that's an ongoing thing that needs to be addressed. And then of course, they're always looking at reducing what can they do to reduce their operating costs so energy recovery is one way to look at reducing operating costs or or sometimes increased automation. For older facilities that may not have the level of automation that you would include in a in a new facility today. Speaking of technology and equipment how do technologies that will be talked about in this session at West Tech Connect How can some of those be be transferred to municipal municipal facilities? Yeah. Well, you know I think this session will be of interest to municipalities who have food processors in their service area because it increases their understanding. what the Food and beverage industry has to do to treat their wastewater in order to comply with the municipal requirement. But some of the technical approaches are also directly applicable to municipal treatment facilities especially, the Bio solids handling and high strength recycle streams of municipal facilities. You know there are a lot of the same processes us for both food and beverage because it's high strength, high nutrients a lot of times as for bio solids and high-strength recycle streams and municipal. Plants I think you've also touched on this a little bit but what what are the really the main goals here are is it to reduce waste disposal costs or is it that recapturing energy water and other resources for Reuse? Well, that's an interesting question. You both are so important and they're interrelated right Saw If you implement a strategy to capture energy, for instance, from high strength wastewater or from the bio solids that are produced from treatment of a high strength. Voice Water. typically, you're going to reduce your cost at at at a food and beverage plant. So so they are inter related or if if a facility is located in a water scarce area, the cost of water may be quite high. So so finding a way to be able to reuse that water also reduces the cost and Mesa Lot of sense well, Lucy and thanks for your time and again this. Is a preview of a session that will be at weathertech connect. You can learn a lot more about this event at wealthed dot org and we were talking about a session that will be on Tuesday October sixth at three thirty on overcoming water reuse challenges in the Food and Beverage Industry Lucy thank you so much and we'll look forward to seeing you at the session my pleasure Travis. Thank you..

Food and Beverage Industry Travis loop Lucy pugh Water Environment Federation USA vice president director
"water environment federation" Discussed on Words on Water

Words on Water

04:38 min | 3 months ago

"water environment federation" Discussed on Words on Water

"Money in the way we operate these treatment plant being together as a group sharing ideas after the sessions is just so critically important and so critically valuable. Yes it reminds me of the as I've often said the writer Steven Johnson talks about the need for connecting good ideas. He talks about the rainforest and he says you know good ideas. Come together in a place like a rainforest was bio-diversity. It's that diversity of ideas and opinions in a ability to connect. And and I thought of West tick as our rainforest and our specialty conferences and conferences. These are our rainforests because of the ability to connect. So as a professor Ginette you. Have this I think it's a wonderful opportunity. Where were you helped? Shape the next generation, the people who take over the world as we passed the mantle. Is there any type of advice sometimes when I know you have graduated seniors that you work with Grad students there any particular type of advice that you give them when they come and talk to you as they move on into their careers, I. Definitely first of all, I'm always promoting getting involved with with it I. Tell them about how it adds to your knowledge how it adds to. Your skill set You know it's not just the technical and the leadership skills that you develop, but West allows you to become a better human being in this sharing of ideas and so I want them to get involved in some of my proudest moments are when I get an email from a student at says I've just joined this committee. and I'm giving back to us, it's it's really important for students in our profession to be involved the water environment federation, but not just to go to meetings to really truly get involved to join the committees. To raise up yourself in these leadership roles and eventually be a board member or a president. Getting involved in that, you certainly set the example you are involved in F- in so many ways..

Steven Johnson water environment federation writer president professor
"water environment federation" Discussed on Words on Water

Words on Water

07:56 min | 4 months ago

"water environment federation" Discussed on Words on Water

"And how are they different for employees versus members of construction crews? So I think one of the things that became really apparent to US early on is that the health of the team depends upon the health of the individual. And we are all in this together. So you know the basic principles of physical distancing hygiene disinfection. Staying home when you're sick are the same across the board So there's there's nobody exempt from those right And going on things that we did pretty pretty early was create what we like to call a virtual firewall between teams so Adjusting both Alex renew staff schedules as well as construction steph schedules to maintain a separation the essential workers who are working on site on so that includes having Shifts like one we gone and one week off shifts for for different teams and four like operations and maintenance Coming up with Touches handoffs and in different places whereas one shift is coming on in. The other shift is coming off that there is there's a lag time there So you know this really has helped us both kind of limit exposure again when you have a lot of people on your site as well as if we should get positive reports of of covid of people with. Kovin than we're able to do contact tracing a little bit quicker right because you'll know who that pot of people is So you know it did require a lot of coordination with our construction crew and contractors because for normal project. You might have One safety specialist. Who is there the whole time? But you need that safety specialist on site so so in the weeks at that person might be off. We'd have we have to find other resources people resources to bring in during the shifts when that person might be off so we've really taken a an open approach to saying okay. Here's what we need to do. How do we implement that? And how does it impact the project going forward and and maintain this dialogue? Yeah I mean this has been a real learning process for everybody and as you've referenced you know things change with the with the pandemic and with guidelines and all that. Kinda stuff and you've been at this for a few months now so you've probably had to make adjustments to your procedures. Yeah definitely I think you can again. It goes back to needing to to be adaptable to as problems. Come up I think even thinking through construction and how to keep our construction projects on scheduled the procedures around bringing a new piece of equipment. Online has been a a something that we've had to think about an income up with a new procedure such as One of our one of our projects that involves bringing on new primary effluent pumps online. And you know the way we might have done that before. The pandemic began was having a bunch of people in our controlling men in our pumping station. to really test that new piece of equipment in so we've had to get really creative to follow our our own guidance in that involves having people in in different parts of the of the plant end. I'm using radios and telephones and zoom calls in order to to make sure that we're we're using our skate a system to at test the equipment in getting the right readings that we need from various different parts plant and and make sure that we're properly testing that program. I think The just being really creative around Virtual virtual platforms has been a really fun and interesting practice and thought. I'm in order to adapt to the situation in I think just at least having knowing what what we need to do and kind of really being thoughtful about the big picture of what? What is the purpose in? What what do we need to get out of it and then kind of being creative of how do you get? There is is a piece of learning absolutely Lastly I just wanted to ask you about your kind of communication to your community and what your messages are during this time about their water services and You know how you're handling this pandemic sure you know. I think we've mentioned before the flow never stops it. There's never a point where we can shut the lights off and just go home so we really work around the clock to support our customers and the community that we serve And we've been really appreciative. You know many of you. Who Know Alex new? No we have an environmental center. That's also community center. It's a polling place. It's a place for community gatherings and we've had to close close it to the community during this time but it's been really heartening to see how as we kind of closed the physical space that's open to the community. How in the virtual space when we put out our messages we've gotten just lots of great engagements as we go online and use social media and and of Educate our our our community about the work that we continue to. Do you know yeah. That's fantastic to have that positive feedback. It is it helps. It helps keep us up to add long. I think just building on what else in saying. We've been pretty intentional about trying. Were were already as an organization when it comes to engaging the community we try to be transparent about what we do because it's really important to we know that that We have ratepayers and we want to be transparent about the value that we provide in so that kind of that mission in that drive to to continue with this Messaging has meant adapting to making sure that that Alexandrian send our rate payers generally are aware of of what we're doing to keep keep this essential service going amid pandemic so talking about everything that we've talked about today that were we have. We're making accommodations where adapting our our staffing plan to make sure that our art treatment plant operations continue in our in our construction projects. Continue to keep the revenue program on on schedule fantastic and I should've mentioned in the beginning that Water Environment Federation is located in Alexandria. So you are our utility and we greatly appreciate the work you do so. We're glad to be customers. But thank you both So much allison and Caitlin for sharing what you're doing their Alexandria how your utility is adjusting and keeping this massive really important construction project moving forward so thank you. Both air have this.

Alexandria US Water Environment Federation Alex allison Caitlin
"water environment federation" Discussed on Words on Water

Words on Water

04:53 min | 4 months ago

"water environment federation" Discussed on Words on Water

"The word sort high. Welcome to words on water. Podcast from the Water Environment Federation. This is the House Travis. Loop we at West. Have a really exciting new platform to talk to you all about. It's called access water for this conversation. I'm joined by two of my colleagues Lorna Ernst Senior Director of Publishing Lorna how you doing good and joined by Andy Kale. She is senior manager of publishing. Andy how are you so access water instead of me describing it? I will let you all do it. Lorna what is access? Water access water organizes information and technical content. That's critical to the water sector into a single central location so using access water. You can safely remotely access a growing library of at this time. Almost twenty thousand pieces of content. And you can do that anytime anywhere. On any device and that has become critical since the onset of the recent pandemic it includes conference proceedings backseats technical reports books magazine articles compilations. We may compilations of different types of content on topics that are important to users p was the first one that we introduced And it will soon include webcasts podcasts and more You can go ahead. No you get your head no problem. So on the platform you also gain access to features like social sharing content personalization and access waters discuss tool. So you can search site right. Share discuss and learn all within one powerful tool and we will be adding new content regularly to the site so users can stay current you can pay as you go purchasing and using technical content as you need it or you can become a subscriber have access to all twenty thousand pieces of content and get full use of the many features platform and is for every type of water professional and for students for professors. It's also the ideal solution. For utilities incorporations academic libraries really any organization that would benefit from the ability to unify reference databases email subscriptions e books and Digital Library assets into a single central platform for employees it streamlines the search process and it provides unique ways to interact with the content and collaborate with colleagues and their subscription options to suit any size of organization ranging from the largest firms to the smallest labs..

"water environment federation" Discussed on Words on Water

Words on Water

06:27 min | 5 months ago

"water environment federation" Discussed on Words on Water

"A split sample was asked that question with the phrase climate change so it's it read like this to withstand threats from storms wildfires and more extreme and unpredictable weather caused by climate change and that was included in half half surveys in the others. That was left out. Some people have proposed this Spending and then we asked for people's support and it didn't including it. The phrase climate change didn't appear to significantly alter people's support at all. There were already some partisan differences in support for a resiliency package of one point two trillion dollars But the including the term climate change didn't appear to exacerbate those differences at all there. Most of the changes actually were within the margin of error So that's a really heartening thing because I think it's been held as an assumption that including climate change It it can be a loaded political term and can potentially throw off the rest of your results and in this case where we included it As attached to a specific policy proposal That was not the case so I think the lesson to take away here is That you don't have to shy away with from including climate change as a driver for a proposal you have at your water or wastewater utility Just be specific about the details and And the INS and outs of that policy proposals very interesting just from a technical standpoint. How POLLSTER AT APPROACHES TESTING? Something like that you know including it in. Solomon not in the other and seeing how those compare that's interesting And then obviously on the substance itself that it didn't It wasn't a deterrent Like you said the other. The other topic that was touched on this year is p. fast these forever chemicals that have just been more and more in the news You know there is a major motion picture released this past year. Dark waters about you know Pe- US What what was asked of people about p? Fasten what were the results sure? They were asked whether they had heard of P fast and if they had how concerned they were about them. Three quarters of Americans indicated that they had not heard of Jesus twenty one percent said they had and fifteen percent said they had heard of them and were concerned about them in. This did vary by region. So American like the what was designated as the east north central region and also the New England region. Where more likely to say they were familiar with the fast which makes sense because that's where some of those hot spots have been. I'm yeah in general I think it may have been a surprising finding to water nerds. Who are you happy all the time? Everyday the apples voters were unfamiliar with peace. As- some of that could be because they were just referred to as fast and it may be he had pulled using a different term blake forever chemicals or policy. I needed chemicals. I don't know there could have been some different results but I think it's pretty common. That people might have a generalized concern about chemicals as sort of an umbrella for lots of different things And a very very small minority of people have a specific concern over specific chemical. So I think that was born out here where we did see some data and a you know a large number of Americans are concerned about chemicals in their waterways but most are unfamiliar with this. Specific Group of councils. Yeah very interesting like you said for the water nerds for the people that live this stuff all the time it's like. How can you not know this is like the biggest deal but I guess it hasn't hasn't kind of gotten out there or there's issues with the terminology For some people to Even where I live in Wilmington North Carolina where we have Jax which is a under under that umbrella of P fast. A lot of people wanNA talk about it. They don't even use the phrase Jan Axel like. Oh yeah they're says chemicals in our water so very very interesting. I guess enclosing How does vow want these kind of poll findings to be used? What's the what's the people should people do with this information there's a couple of things Two main things that we hope this does is is to provide some Justification to bring to elected officials policymakers that shows that this issue. There aren't a lot of issues with this much support across the entire American population Regardless OF PARTY IDEOLOGY Gender Age geography all of these things people support Water and wastewater investment in infrastructure right. Now that seems particularly relevant because we're in a public health crisis and water utilities are at the intersection of Public Health and the environment So I think that's number one We have these data points. Bring those to your acted officials for water week. You know contact them and let them know this is. This is a political win for you. Everybody's supports this number. Two is is for kind of the Insider Water Utility Communication folks. There were some takeaways. From this survey that could be really useful for your own communications So the climate change Split sample data also people's lack of awareness around specific chemicals groups of chemicals like P fast There are some there. Are some good nuggets in there to help inform your own communications. So that's kind of where we also see. A benefit to to kind of the water sector is in their communications Yeah that makes a lot of sense. Well Katie. I appreciate you taking the time to share the results. I encourage people to To track the info down and take a closer look if they like. It's definitely very useful for the reasons that you've said And I know the Water Environment Federation. Were very glad to be a part of the value of water campaign for a number of reasons but especially You know for the value of this polling every year but Thank you so much for for Sharon it with US Tabas word on..

Water Environment Federation Solomon Wilmington North Carolina New England Jan Axel Katie blake US Sharon
"water environment federation" Discussed on Words on Water

Words on Water

14:03 min | 5 months ago

"water environment federation" Discussed on Words on Water

"Hi. Welcome to words on water. Podcast from the Water Environment Federation. This is the host Travis loop every year. The value of water campaign conducts some public opinion polling on people's views on water infrastructure and some related water issues. I'm very happy to be joined by Katie Henderson. She is manager for the value of water campaign. Katie how's it going? Great things are having been so excited to be here before we dive into the findings of the poll. Could you tell me Just kind of the basics you know like how many people were polled. Who was poll? Just kind of how that worked jurors so This whole is conducted by our bipartisan polling team and they pull over a thousand registered voters in forty seven states So as statistically significant it was polled the whole itself was fielded in mid March of this year so for context that was right as social. Distancing measures are being implemented across the country and we were already starting to see some market turbulence and other sort of economic indicators of can turbulent economic times. We're entering into already so other nerdy staff. It has a three point one percent margin of error so when we're talking about percentages keep that in mind because it can wiggle in either direction. So Yeah Yeah Good. Good stuff And I'm really curious. What are the key findings from this year? Paul what are kind of the big top line findings in numbers sure Our findings were in line with previous years. There's a majority of Americans that support investing in our infrastructure and they want the federal government to increase investment eighty percent of a more of American support rebuilding infrastructure which was a higher level of support than almost any of the other top line issues that were pulled The only thing that ranked slightly higher was rebuilding our economy which was eighty one percent so eighty-one compared to eighty and then a month earlier. It wouldn't have been nearly that high. The the facts that this happened when it did when the stock market was in sort of a free fall hat probably have influence on that too so overall a very high level of support bipartisan support and then eighty four percent of Americans supported with forty seven percent strongly supporting increasing federal investment in water infrastructure. And that cut across age gender income party geography ideology on so there's widespread support for infrastructure. And the fact that that support remained high in a similar levels as previous years Even as the pandemic swept across the country. I think is really notable. And of course we don't know what those numbers look like if we re re re did the poll today or next month but when. I do think that tells us is that people are really concerned about the economy right now. As a result of what's happening and to the extent that we can make the case that a strong wire infrastructure is the foundation for a strong economy. That seems like a good strategy to help maintain American support. Well you know. It's a couple of things always jumped out at me. The level of support that comes out in this poll for water infrastructure to have be up into that eighty percentile is just always amazing. And it's it's interesting to look at the topics that it ranks ahead which are often like you know the half dozen things you're hearing about in the news all the time. Whatever that that issue might be so that that level of support is always awesome to see and it's amazing to see it consistently year after year. It's amazing to see it like you said across all those different actors right Gender Politics Geography It just is is really You can't just say. It's a bipartisan support. Thing it's like every person support Kind of thinks that's fantastic. That's very interesting about the overlap with corona virus. And that really probably just being why the economy even even edged out this year What I it's always interesting to look at people's opinions of their local water services in their local infrastructure. What did the polling show this year? Similar to previous years people have a pretty high level of satisfaction toward their local watering wastewater services and their local water infrastructure This is a pretty common phenomenon. In national polling that people feel warmer around local issues local institutions than they do nationally But overall four out of five of American voters are satisfied with their local wiring may swatter services Eighty four percent. Were either some light. We're very satisfied when asked to rate the condition of their local water infrastructure systems Seventy eight percent of voters rated it as good either very or somewhat good and that was high among Democrats independents Republicans across the regions. It's modestly lower than in the past so again. That number is seventy eight percent in two thousand sixteen. When that question was first asked it was eighty six said and. I don't know that we can completely account for that decrease but maybe there's an increase in people's awareness around aging water systems and in the condition generally of infrastructure. So yeah that. I'm not sure we can totally account for that drop but regardless it's still said that's more than three quarters of people still rate. Their local infrastructure is good. Another kind of related question that we asked was around. People's drinking water preferences and a majority of Americans say they permit primarily rely on tap water around sixty seven percent. Say they drink tap water either filtered through a like Britta pitcher or a fridge or something or straight from the TAP and So I thought it was interesting that You know a small majority of people drink tap water even more than that trusted. Their drinking water is safe. Yeah that's very interesting. I wonder I wonder about that. Small decline in in satisfaction with local water service or infrastructure Just totally floating ideas like could it be that people's water bills. Maybe have gone up a little bit so that makes them a little bit less satisfied. You know if people are paying more money for anything they usually give them more reason to grumble but who knows yeah we did ask about affordability and It's still a majority of people that consider that their water. Wastewater services are affordable it's a smaller percentage of people who say that they're very affordable We also asked willingness to pay question around whether people would be willing to support a modest pay increase and while a majority said they would the proportion of people who said they'd be very willing has decreased So I think there's a little bit too that that there's an affordability concern When asked about whether they were concerned about the drinking water quality in their local community there was a Ito. There was a a little bit less concerned this year than previous four percents that they were extremely or very concerned. That's a seven point. Drop them from last year. That could be because people are distracted by other things like Ovid or it could be a waning affected the flint crisis which is in in the public discourses much and I think something that maybe supports that hypothesis is that among demographic groups African Americans were much more likely to say they were concerned about their communities water infrastructure fifty two percent which was a mean twenty points higher than any other Democrat. Wow not speaks to ongoing racial disparities and big trust deficit among black Americans and communities in cities across the United States So yes I think that's worth noting as well. Do you know how much of a difference that is from previous years is that is that growing that. That difference there I well I'd have to get back to you on that but I think it's in line with previous years that Africans Americans African Americans are much more likely to have higher levels of distrust towards their water. Misfire communities I think You can't Separate that from this link crisis I think the flint is not in the public discourse quite as much Churn camera but among black communities absolutely still is so. I think that's playing into that statistic as well. Yeah so pivoting from local perceptions to national perceptions What are people's opinions and feelings about the country's water infrastructure there seems to be much more awareness that the national water infrastructure story is not so rosy so. When asked to rate the country's water infrastructure only forty nine percent said that it was good which is down from fifty nine in two thousand sixteen when this poll was first fielded the number of voters that say the National Water Infrastructure is either somewhat or very bad was thirty seven percent Which is up a couple of points this year too. So people tend to think of their local systems as Being in better condition than the national average which is fairly typical phenomenon. Yeah well that's interesting that it's that it's Kinda gone up ten percent over the past four years And like you said before. Maybe that's because people are getting this message that there's aging infrastructure and need to expand infrastructure and I mean we certainly in the water sector. Hope that's part of the reason. Right is that is that our all of our education efforts are paying off in some way All right well. This infrastructure takes money to upgrade and to expand What are people's feelings about putting down money about investing in in water infrastructure as we tried to get at that question in a couple of different ways and the first one was was that ranking so ranking infrastructure in place of other priorities and it ranked high? We also asked whether they thought it was important for the president. In Congress to develop a plan to rebuild water infrastructure and seventy percents said that it was important either extremely or very important That is down from seventy four. Seventy four percent last year which is just outside the margin of error so There could be a covert affect Nara. Sure this is important but like we're focused on other things right now when it was asked how important it was for a plan to be developed this year Which so split sample was asked that question with no timeframe and another sample was asked with Win with a phrase that included this year and win. That's what sample that dropped to. Sixty percent seventy percent in general sixty percent if we said this year at ten point differences similar to previous findings as well that when you include an immediate timeline at slightly decreases the priority and that seems to be fairly typical phenomenon in political pulling in general so When asked whether they would support increasing federal investment in water infrastructure eighty four percents said? They would so this support is broad. It's comparable to prior years. Which is it's usually a number somewhere in the eighties and miss again. The support is high across all demographic categories Very interesting I know. One of the things that is Is a side note by me. It's being talked about. Is that as our economy looks to recover from. The Corona virus pandemic investing in infrastructure is one way to maybe go about that and to get people back to work and and certainly there is a need that matches up with that also. So let's let's see what happens in the in the weeks and months ahead of us here One of the great things about the poll is that it. It kind of each year uses the opportunity to ask questions about some different topics And I think there were two this year that I wanted to talk about one is climate change and just wondering What the polls showed about people's opinions around that yours so how we got about addressing climate change was there a couple of questions that addressed Resiliency and investing to increase the resilience of watering wastewater systems We decided to see whether including the phrase climate change had a polarizing effect on the survey results and so with a split sample. We inserted the phrase climate change in a couple of places We asked a question about people support for investing in resilient infrastructure with a price tag of one point two trillion dollars..

National Water Infrastructure Water Environment Federation Katie Henderson is manager United States Win TAP Paul waning president Congress
"water environment federation" Discussed on Words on Water

Words on Water

14:30 min | 7 months ago

"water environment federation" Discussed on Words on Water

"To words on water. Podcast from the water environment. Federation this is the host Travis loop another episode tackling the issue of Bio solids. It's a it's a very hot issue for the water sector right now. There's a lot of angles and sides to this topic to explore. So I'm very happy to have with me George Spouse. He is manager of Process Engineering and Research and development at the Metropolitan Council of the twin cities he is also the CO chair of West residuals and bio solids conference which is coming up March thirty first to April third in Minneapolis. George thanks for coming on the PODCAST. Thanks very much for having me absolutely So I I started out talking about. Why did by ourselves is a hot issue? Y in your mind are bio solids such an important resource for water utilities and and their communities while the bio solids really represent a kind of a key collection point or a point of concentration for the energy and nutrients moving through a community. So if you think about wastewater or just households that's kind of dispeat- dispersed throughout in a community or a collection system area and really a come together and concentrate and concentrate through through our processes until the point where. I all solids and you know. There's no point in in in that whole flow of energy nutrients where things are quite as concentrated as they are in the Bio solids. So at that point it's really easier and probably most efficient to extract every claim the energy and the nutrients that basically is cycling through a community. And so it's that extraction that allows us to kind of captured things refine them and then return them to the community and this is kind of a key key. Idea for being sustainable. You know that whole circular world rather than ask through world basically and I think bio solids are really kind of nexus point that it it allows at all to happen. Yeah and I think a challenge or maybe some marching orders for a lot of utilities or for our sector is to to do more education around that idea of the these circular nature of Bio solids the way that they are a resource that you just articulated that so well. I think we can definitely do more to try to articulate that to our to the customers out there. So could you talk As far as the Metropolitan Council and they're in the twin cities how you all use your bio solids So I work for the Met Council in our division is environmental services that we provide the way Swat. We provide the wastewater treatment and solids processing for metropolitan area of the twin cities. And we have. We have nine plants. But we've really consolidated are solids processing to wear those plants in by far far away what we do with most of our bio solids is is actually burned them in. Recover the energy directly into Steve. Zoe We have State of the art incineration and air pollution control systems. The heat off of that incineration goes directly into Steam System. That we That we used for plant purposes. He buildings in these called. Minnesota winters but also power the things in in the lab Salata steam and we have two generators so we produce Electricity and offset our electricity use by quite a bit. That's by far and away what we do with most of our bio solids but we do at two of our plants also do the the production of an agricultural material and cultural and biding used by farmers and so we. We have were involved in that as well. I think. One of the great things about this year's Residual I also conference. Is that we. We have to tourists and so one tower will be visiting our facility. The the Energy Recovery Facility here at Metro plant which is which is where we have state of the art Air Kush Two generators producing energy. But we also have associated with the conference second tour where city of Saint Cloud which is just little outside. The on. The twin cities will be offering a tour where they both highlight their land application processes. So they'll cover kind at that side of it and they're not only involved in this land application of Iowa Salads but they're also kind of cutting edge or leading way in nutrient recovery from those energy management recovery. So I think we've got you know that's how in the region that kind of covers both ways or at least two of the main ways I'll are us and so we've Adam both covered at sears a residual I'll salads tour offerings That's interesting to hear that you do that. Much energy generation with your bio solids. That's that's terrific It's it's certainly feeds into that. Circular circular notion. The theme this year for the conference is creative approaches to managing bio solids in an uncertain future. What led you all to to go with that theme really when the Co Chair Anna Monson and I were working on this or thinking about it we. We've we kind of said two things that we really wanted to hit was to help. Attendees it information would help them. Address uncertainty and and understand what the future holds for bio solids programs and then we really wanted to emphasize case studies that share success stories stories. Are you know more engaging in also more enlightening than some some more technical or dry talks in there also from the people who've lived at basically so so those were kind of the two things that I think really drove us to that idea for the team at the Conference Scher Makes a lot of sense when when this phrase uncertain future I have some ideas about what's what's meant there but I'm curious about When when you say uncertain future as it relates to bio solids. What do you mean by that by a vast majority at this point are by far and away emerging contaminants? Are you know how we will be dealing with those in? The future is certainly one of the biggest uncertainties So I think that that's kind of a key one but I think there's also a more there's also more subtle things related to uncertainty about how we will generate the resources or have the resources to actually address emerging contaminant somewhat. They cause as well as just the other unforeseen the unknown unknowns in so I by far enough away emerging contaminant sources at least in my mind in the world. I'm living in right now. The biggest unknown but this idea of like also resources and how to at will be able to actually accomplish things. It's amazing yeah absolutely. And so as we head toward the uncertain future as we grapple with emerging contaminants and resource issues. Why do you think creative approaches will be needed kind of that other part of your theme empowered? Because they're all new and so there's no there's no set solution right now so we're going to have to be creative solutions. I think that's that's kind of a big part of it. I think that I've also heard people mention a lot in. Who Deal or plan or or are involved with bio solids projects that you know nope plant or no bio solids area or no community is are not the same so each each each time. You're dealing with something. You have to be creative buffets. No situation is the same so So it's both the things are new and then the conditions of each situation are unique in. Both of those things require creative thinking. There's no. There's NO COOKIE CUTTER. There's no design guideline that. You just go away the solution in throw it on a sheet basically. Now that's a. That's a great point If if everything situations and you've got these new variables so you've gotta you gotta be creative up so this this overall theme. What does that mean for the conference when you when you decided to? This is the theme. How's that GONNA be reflected in the sessions and and the content? Well for one thing that I know. You're very familiar with his. We've we recognize the site this problem or this arising issue of per earn polly fluorinated. Akil substances P facet as as one thing. We really needed to hit hardness conference and so We we took that to heart and we have Two presentations in the opening general session by technical experts or leaders in the field so we went out. Made sure we got that. We have a full technical session with five five papers five presentations that will addressing pizzas and owing from the range of you know looking up projects that have looked at fate in the environment to writing some ideas about treatment alternatives. And then of course the thing I know you know about is. There's a workshop us to help us all learn how better to communicate about emerging contaminants and. I'm thinking in particular people nuts. Yeah absolutely so. Thanks for mentioning that I am glad to be part of the conferences year You're totally right. P. Fastest just such a huge issue and and as it relates bio solids and so we have a pre-conference half day workshop. That is looking at these issues. You Know How do we? How do we communicate around the BIO SOLIDS P fas- issue? What are what are the challenges? What are the ways to message? How do you? How do you talk about these things You know we're looking to have some speakers from through the Minnesota lands so we'll have someone from the state someone from the Met Council We're also going to how someone from the University of Minnesota talk about how you do public health risk communications and hopefully also have a visit from someone at the newspaper. They are to talk about the issue from from their perspective so it's it's just so critical for Water utilities and the Bio solids community so look forward to helping to contribute to the the terrific conference that way this year last last thing I wanted to talk about is technology You know it's it's continuing to have a greater and greater impact and role on our work in water and I'm kind of wondering your thoughts about what role technology can have in the future management of Bio solids as an interesting question because I am finding that the more I'm probably twenty five to fifty percent of the people I talked to when they say technology these days but they mean is the Internet of things and big data and and those types maybe more instrumentation type things. And that's when they say the word technology that's what they mean and I really do think that all of our things will be more efficient and better through the application of those things and I think you know by ourselves is definitely treatment or treatments definitely an area where those things will play a role and we'll help improve things who but I also see and feel in an event to residual byles conference. I know for five times now and what I enjoy about it or what I find challenging and interesting about bio solids is the technology in terms of like some fundamentals of mystery and dynamics are still open to to provide improvement so technology both at kind of the dough both definitions are those are the way we meet new challenges and improve. What we're doing and so I definitely think that's the role that it Scott that it has for for. I all salads now. Yeah makes makes a lot of sense and I think I think you're right. I use that word technology when I'm really referring to that that Kind of the digital digital world and everything happening there. Well George I'm glad to talk to you in in advance of this conference it. It's really impressive program. That's been put together and I look forward to being there being part of it attending a lot of these sessions and learning. But thank you for all your work to help. Put this terrific program conference together and we'll see in Minneapolis. Yeah thanks very much for having me and that. That sounds great. See their.

George Spouse Metropolitan Council Minneapolis Zoe We Minnesota manager of Process Engineering Met Council Energy Recovery Facility Iowa Saint Cloud Anna Monson Metro plant Steve sears Scott polly fluorinated Adam Swat University of Minnesota
"water environment federation" Discussed on Words on Water

Words on Water

09:44 min | 9 months ago

"water environment federation" Discussed on Words on Water

"But at the same time this was all happening We were becoming increasingly aware of maintenance demands of the green infrastructure design teachers in the associated amenities at our own projects. We build them. You anticipate don't really know how much thank goodness and so you start maintaining so we can't track to work out originally. I initially and found that nick companies that were doing the work. There was a lot of turnover in their employment because a lot of the folks on the main is played on a seasonal basis. So you get a lot a seasonal Trained one group of one-season employees. And they're gone. And then you have to retrain the next year same true if you bill and that was becoming costly and ineffective because we were seeing problems with the lack of knowledge to do that or on different the design features so we thought you know we needed to take more ownership of the projects and that would help us reduce our cost but more importantly provide ride the consistency from year to year year. That we're going to need to write something that up. We had a regional workforce need that was identified. We recognized that we had our own so NGI CPI the certification program fit the bill and allowed us the opportunity to utilize the internal resources are vast numbers. There wasn't any needs. Reinvent the wheel fantastic so you identified N. G. I. C. P. is as a a great way to kind of get this certification this training for that that kind of That key dominoes maintenance when it comes to greet infrastructure so how did you guys go about implementing it that you know kind of plugging in and bringing in GI CPI there. Yeah so the. The district invested in becoming a partner partner organization Within GP. I so we have to district employees completed the train the trainer course. I'm one of those and on the program itself was piloted in the summer of two thousand nineteen seats last summer. And we had seven initial trees. Five of those trainees were art of our good neighbor. Embassador program part of that cohort and there was an additional district. Employees that Participated in it. That was is involved and has responded. Released for contract procurement for other maintenance is needs we have for these practices and then of course we had. We had a lot of partner agencies of course so of an employee of one of the local Community Development Corporation racin that is a frequent awardee of our green of such took advantage of staff on. I could speak these issues issues. So we conducted the thirty five hour. Course we're over a span of one week. It was a lot of work and I would estimate about sixty percent of that. Time was classwork in about forty percent of that time in field tours and inspections uh-huh mark inspections things like that Swig it a lot of hands on activities as many as we could squeeze it in the allotted time and a and trump. I'm not sure if you've taken the course work or not but if you have. I'm sure you've heard that via retention in a bucket activity that is part of that training. The that was probably the biggest hits of the class were the to build a bio retention L.. In five gallon bucket so they can see and understand. Destruction crosses so. That's a very. That's very kind of enlightening activity right. It's it's a very visually physically get to be like. Oh this is the whole idea behind green infrastructure. This is what we mean to let it. Soak in right right right. That was the Aha moment. So all seven students completed the class. And we're thrilled to say that. All seven pass the certification exam. Yeah well but where this lead is really exciting on. So the district hired three of the good neighbor ambassador. Trainees as green infrastructure maintenance interns as of September last year. This is a one year internship. We're we're GONNA that's where we're going to have more ownership and him were hands on maintenance responsibilities with regard to you you know managing the vegetation better in our practices community amenities was really cool about this. That really interested in hiring one and three neighboring bathrooms at interviewed for the job. So impressed interview team competency of GI maintenance comprehension that they decided to expand it and hire all three at that time. That's awesome and that's you know I think that From from the Water Environment Federation perspective. That is just one of the huge goals of this whole program not just just to get green infrastructure out there in communities but The job creation side of this send Helping to build the workforce so that's awesome to hear the the that was bumped up in the hiring So what's What's next what were you guys look into go with you know use of NGI CPA and in Cleveland area? Well certainly we're going to capitalize yield upon what we've learned so far and how we used it insights with our with our partnership that we have with N. JCP programs we still have another thirteen students. The plan on training This upcoming spring early. Summer so there's a new cohort of good neighbor embassador Odd that currently employ at this time we have several internal staff of interest that we work on side Interestingly enough Couple of staff members are primarily focused on our J s efforts in the office they were onsite no maintaining the database of practices out there so they wanna have a better deal or what these practices do and when they the Other maintained so that's exciting to see and of course we're going to offer that to some external folks from artery organization. We'll see what kind of space as we have available for them but if there is room for them as well so we we still considered as a pilot program really happy with the results. As far you're in a recited the opportunity to digest feature. We do plan on taking on a more proactive maintenance role. Utilizing think those internal resources like restarted recognize the advantages obviously of the NGI's brides to us a UH utilizing knowledgeable. Internal resources allows us to be really creative with our maintenance activities with our GI teachers beyond Dombak at this time. It's to be determined how you will be dovetailed into our program. I like it. I think it's a lot of fun to train people who you know. Some of these folks have never really been exposed degrees or really taking them. This is not one one on one training. Either this is nuts and bolts of every detail. You'd ever WanNa know about green infrastructure. It's been a fun experience providing it it definitely takes them from you know like you said from really not knowing anything in some some cases to Being being certified to install and maintain this kind of stuff. So that's that's awesome to hear. And then these people can kind of be embassador Florida's while in the community right. They all of a sudden have this knowledge that they can Share with others and kind of educate their family and friends and all that stuff are good neighbor ambassadors are folks that live in our communities where we have constructed some of these in. We've had firsthand accounts were they told us stories of you. Know they can now go out in and take their neighbors and their family to our practices when it's all all about so and it means something different to the local residents but it comes from somebody that is groom grown up in the neighborhood versus you know somebody sewer district absolutely awesome while I look forward to following the path of green infrastructure. There in greater you're Cleveland area. and seeing how you guys use this program You know you're you're on Canada the early years of it so it's It's great and I think I think one of the reasons I wanted to this podcast so other cities can hear what you all have done and maybe hopefully come a following your footsteps so Chris Thank you so much which thank you travis. It was a great time talking to you. Thanks for the Opportunity.

partner Cleveland seeing problems NGI CPA NGI Water Environment Federation Florida N. G. JCP Community Development Corporat Dombak Canada travis Chris
"water environment federation" Discussed on Words on Water

Words on Water

15:08 min | 11 months ago

"water environment federation" Discussed on Words on Water

"Hi Welcome to words on water. PODCAST from the Water Environment Federation. This this is the host Travis loop very happy to be talking today with Valerie. Lucas the executive director of the clean water professionals of Kentucky and Tennessee the C. Valerie. How're you doing? I'm doing great travis. How about you? I'm doing very well. So you are a member Association of the Water Water Environment Federation Could you for those. That might not be familiar with how wealth is set up and what the member associations are and how that relationship works. Could you give a little bit of overview of of Your organization clean water professionals. Kentucky and Tennessee is one one of seventy five member associations of the Water Environment Federation here in Kentucky and Tennessee are member Association is about a thousand members members strong and each one of those one thousand members is also a member of where we have two staff members. We have an eight Person Executive Board and then we have thirteen technical committees and as far as the relationship with West goes because we are a federation when people ask asked me about that I kind of always related to an adult relationship with your parents so with is our parent organization and we are like their adult children and they help got us. They're kind of our North Star And we have a great usual respect for one another. But there's there's not an exact way that they tell us how to operate a in my almost three years at West. That's the first time I've heard the parent child analogy so. I'm glad to hear that I'm glad to hear it come from you. And that's a great way of explaining it We both have a lot of influence. fluence on the other. And and Have a great time as family but have our own kind of things going on to right. Yeah so what are the interesting thing things as you all change your name recently And I think it was a very deliberate purposeful decision. Not just kind of liquid. Let's Change Change Our Name. Could you talk about The genesis of that decision. And just kind of why you decided to do that. And what the old name was an Led to this new name. Absolutely sell our our own name was Kentucky Tennessee Water Environment Association which we used to be a pollution control association so years ago that nine changed and just this year we announced our name change to clean water professionals of Kentucky and Tennessee. And you're right Travis. That was very intentional. In fact it really a US started in two thousand and thirteen without us really knowing it when we worked hard to create a mission and vision statement and our mission is that we are an integral part of all clean water professionals careers and so kind of started way back then and has just more from there a Lotta. This was really about the public message right. And could you expand on that and and why You wanted to have a name that that really reflected your mission in a in a public friendly publicly digestible conaway. Right so We really really did want our name to reflect what we do and that's clean. Water are members clean water twenty four seven three hundred sixty five days a year ear and as you know has really been promoting this. We need to do a better job of telling our story and telling the story of water so we we wanted a very descriptive name. That helps us reach our public and clean. Water professionals seem like the perfect opportunity to let people know what we do. Yeah absolutely I was I heard recently about the whole discussion around green jobs ups and the idea that people think that means you know you work on solar installing solar something like that and this person was talking about Gosh everything in the water space. Everyone that works at water. Utilities is really a green job because we are cleaning water And so I I think the idea that you've changed that name to to better explain what we all do to. The public is fantastic. And I'm going to be real. Curious is to see if you're starting a trend among You know the other seventy four member associations out there. What have you heard feedback or comments comments from any of them? We have heard some feedback and that really is a goal of ours is not to keep this as something that we are just doing here in Kentucky and Tennessee see because the truth is we have been inspired by other web member associations out West up north. There's lots of pockets of clean water and people identifying with what we do water resource recovery. And so really. We're just kinda tagging along with with what we're already seeing nationally and we hope that continues of this is our grassroots effort to do that and we think if we're going to communicate with the public and we have to start with with ourselves we have to start with the water professionals and we have to change our language around water so that we do a better job of telling story. AM water yeah. I love it Another project that you all were involved in. That is very much about reaching the public and explaining cleaning Building awareness of water issues. I guess Involves what we kind of have called pure water brew and this is taking a a highly treated wastewater effluent and brewing beer with it and serving it as a way to start conversation And it was so awesome to see you all get involved in a project there. So could you a explain Kana Khana. What happened in the area absolutely away again? We were inspired by What we're seeing other folks do in the water sector and we didn't? We wanted to be part of that. Fun because water is fun and we have so many creative and innovative people in water so as a member Association we are always looking for ways to to get our members more engaged and This this brewing projects seem like a great way to get our members excited about innovation and and also just excited about really promoting the value of water to the public into ourselves from I guess a logistics and nuts and bolts standpoint. Who did you collaborate with on this project so this was such a fun? Exciting and really a big project to be a hard of we collaborated with Lobo Muskie Louisville water and both of those organizations have such great reputations in in water in the Louisville area and were great partners but we also a partnered with local entities. So local brewers. We had four different breweries as we partnered with. We partnered with ice. Oh pure which is a a local business here in Louisville where I'm located and then we just had so many engineering affirms lab Zoeller pumps to so many people wanted to be part of this project. Yeah awesome and I think You you went with a little bit of a different name. I know I know. Level water has their kind of pure campaign already so they didn't want to kind of confuse folks and it came up with this this Next round was kind of the name that this was done under which is obviously a great name that gets at the idea that of that water cycle right and that things things just keep going around and around Plays into beer to. Hey let's have another round and all that so really cool and what I loved about project is that it was very public facing when it debuted Could you describe that That day when it was released east. Absolutely we've paired our next round brewing release with our water for life events. We have an annual water professionals conference that moves moves around to seven different cities within Kentucky in Tennessee and so with the backdrop of the Ohio River. We promoted this next around brewing campaign and invited the public to try this beer. We did a concentrated campaign with our local TV stations. Radio stations and in the water also helps US create a video debt Educate folks. I can't forget that we also partnered with the University of our steel bowl and bay covered. It promoted it within the speed school of Engineering so it's just a really collaborative fun project to the art ask. Yeah and I'm. I'm sorry that I couldn't make the trip out there to To See at myself. I'm really curious what people people in the public said. Kinda what you might have heard that day from from people that were coming up here in about it and trying it absolutely lately We actually surveyed folks. We had volunteers to go around and ask people what they thought about the beer and we consistently heard that it was really great eight beer for her things like it's about time or it's just like the astronauts and this is what NASA has a you know we even within Uber Era. We took an uber on over to the park where we had the event and the driver even knew about it so it was exciting long That's awesome I I It's great to hear all that feedback. That's a it's always awesome when the public is on our messages. Or they get it you you know Very cool on. We're very happy that you all brought that beer up to two west tech our big conference and had it served in our beer guard was extremely popular. There's well thank you. We are glad to be a part of it and we are going to have a next round With our water professionals conference next Salah in Chattanooga sell the ideas that we will continue to promote this message of the value of water. And take this to the Chattanooga community in Tennessee and work with their ruse they are to let people know how important water is in every community in Kentucky in Tennessee That's breaking news is to me. That's awesome love it Great what I want to shift gears a little bit because I know another issue Of great interest to you is is kind of the status of women in the water sector and I am wondering if you could kind of share your thoughts on kind of what the landscape looks like these days for women and water. Why you think it's important and You know where where things might be headed in your mind. Sure I would love to talk about women in water you know. My background is civil engineering on a licensed professional civil engineer in the State of Kentucky not head About twenty two years of experience working in water at thirteen years of experience being the executive director of clean water professionals channels. And it's just amazing. I realize that I'm a visual learner. So seeing women Take leadership positions at what has been so valuable for me as a woman in the water sector. Yeah at so. That's that's terrific to hear do you. So you've been in water for a while have Have you seen more women coming into water during your career. Have you seen more women. Coming hanging on that side of of Engineering and science and Yeah just kind of what it. What have you seen as far as trends throughout your career so I do think there are more women choosing water and I think that's right I do think that they we still need more women as you know. Oh in our membership roster reflects this very much so a women only make got fifteen percent of water workforce whereas nationally we make up fifty percent of the workforce. So there's work to be done but when we see women like Eileen O'Neill Ginny heartfelt or Jackie Jerrell in positions of leadership I think that is so valuable for young women and for women like me that have more experience. It is just so important for us to encourage orig- other women and just really set a wide table so that we are welcoming and making sure that people feel like they have a place in the water sector. It's really a shocking statistic To hear that just fifteen percent that's one five Of the water workforce. Is Women Right when you when you look at the broader. US workforce you look at the the US population that's That's really amazing that it's that low but I'm sure it's also come up a good bit over the past twenty years so I know that at both. We're really striving to increase diversity across the water workforce certainly gender is a big part of that Because we feel it's important for for utilities to reflect the communities that they serve Are there other benefits. You think to to having a diverse workforce especially having you know that atmel female ratio better mirror. The communities that were in. I definitely think that diversity inclusion is so important an are worked for water. I really have appreciated Tom. as president of with the words that he spoke Tom is a white male works for utility. He's kind of the power position player at her hand to use his voice to really promote diversity inclusion was so important And then to have Jackie Gerald step into president as a female thank not only has wept talking about the the actions. Are there also that so important. Yeah I For this podcast I was just recently I was looking at the web page just went to it to check something something and I saw that the row of three that kind of.

Water Water Environment Federa Kentucky Water Environment Federation Tennessee Kentucky Tennessee Water Envir member Association US travis executive director Louisville Engineering and science C. Valerie West school of Engineering Chattanooga Lucas University of Person Executive Board conaway NASA
"water environment federation" Discussed on Words on Water

Words on Water

14:33 min | 1 year ago

"water environment federation" Discussed on Words on Water

"The water environment federation. This is the host Travis Lou very important. Episode today as we look at public opinion around water and water infrastructure, very excited to be joined by Laurie Weigel principal with Newbridge strategy who has been involved in polling, and looking at public opinion on water and water re water infrastructure. Laurie. How you doing great? Thanks for having me this morning. I'm a I'm referring to the polling that has been done each year, through the value of water campaign, which water environment federation is a part of, and this is one of the best things going in the water sector where there's an annual poll kind of looking at, at public opinion around water infrastructure, especially investing in water, infrastructure, very helpful for us to see what public perspective is. And I know. We use it. We is in the water sector collectively, use it as we approach elected officials, especially the federal level and try to show them where their voters stand on these issues and, and bottom line show, them that there's a lot of support out there. So I'm really excited to talk to you about the findings from this year's polling, and we hear a lot of issues in the news, these days, there's a lot of big things out there. But I'm curious as to where where water infrastructure stands, compared to these other issues, we hear so much about. Yeah. So we've asked variations of a similar question where were asking respondents to tell us how important number of different issues are to them personally that the president leaders in congress might tackle each year. And we've always included rebuilding America's infrastructure now water. Is not necessarily the most top of mind when they hear infrastructure. We know a lot of times, they'll think they'll think roads first. And then it's like oh yeah. In water to, but that is that is led the list when we get more specific when we ask about water infrastructure. It is as or even more important than broadly thinking about rebuilding America's infrastructure. It has been far more important than let's see some other me even more controversial infrastructure projects, like building a wall on the Mexican border for sample. But even even things like funding for defense, or anti-terrorism programs or even some healthcare related issues. It is a clips, those by far and that's not to say that Americans are concerned right now about their drinking water quality. Most of them say that they're in fact, not or just only somewhat concerned about it, but they definitely see a knee. Need to continue to make investments to make sure that there's not contamination and chemicals and pollutants in their tap and into sort of keep up with the the aging infrastructure. That was my next question is kind of what concerns people do have? So they're not too worried about the quality drinking water. That's interesting. Could you dive a little bit more into what what concerns came out of the polling, and maybe what the, the numbers are there and kind of your thoughts on it? They tell us, for example, if we asked them about, especially if it gets Pacific Anassa about chemicals, pollutants in the tap, or even in the natural environment. They're equally as concerned, we have the overwhelming majority must three-quarters telling us, they're extremely or very concerned about that. And obviously that speaks to people's clear connection between what they drink in their health. I just talked to voters in Montana last night about something. Completely different but water was one aspect of it. And, you know, something, they immediately gravitated towards started considering, you know, both taste there sense of safety and drinking that and whether and that they liked to be able to drink water from the tap. So, you know, it's really that sort of sense of safety and security, especially post sort of the Flint incidents that people really have a real focus on that particular aspect. But Secondly, they also do really recognized that a lot of the pipes and the infrastructure, and they can't detail all the things that go into water infrastructure. But there's a sense that those are aging. Now, it's really obvious when one of those fails in the community it affects everyone. And so that sort of, you know, these vivid reminders, every once in a while that this sin for structure is critically important up -solutely a thought it was. Interesting in the poll results when you ask people how they viewed the condition of water infrastructure, if I recall correctly, they kinda had some different perceptions about their local infrastructure may be versus infrastructure on a larger scale. Is that right? Yeah. So they were much more mixed when it came to the nation's water infrastructure. They still lean to feeling like it was good. But it was less than half that said that they felt like it was good. But when we talked about infrastructure in their local community, we had eighty three percent, but described that as barrier somewhat good, and that's a normal perception. You know, we jokingly say, sometimes it's this I'm okay, you're not idea, but there's definitely, you know, they want to believe that things are okay, where they are. You know, there's certainly some community is where we've sat and talked to talk to residents where it's really vivid and clear that there's some that there's things lagging and the. There's real problems. They're the most people are gonna air on the side, that things are okay and less. I've heard it's not. And that's pretty true throughout the country. I'd say the, the northeastern states were soared the least likely to perceive, their water infrastructure in their local communities being good. But some places like my, my region of the mountain states were overwhelmingly say it was great. And I know for a fact that there's some problems a need for investment. So you know, perception is is important, but sometimes we have to clarify give people more information to see how they react after that. Very, very interesting to hear the number that high over eighty percent feel like their local infrastructures in pretty good shape. And I guess, maybe folks in the northeast understand that they have, you know, some of the oldest water infrastructure in the nation just by the way, the nation was developed. So maybe maybe they're aware of that a little bit. We talk a lot about the need to invest in water infrastructure. And like I said at the beginning that was a big purpose of this polling is to try to get a sense for people's willingness or desire for the nation to invest more and water infrastructure. I think that's one of the findings were looking to really highlight. What, what did we find there? So we asked respondents that again, this was a national survey. So national in scope and into end you know, demographically appropriate to represent all Americans we asked them about increasing federal investment in rebuilding. Our water infrastructure in gave him a few examples, like types than the pumps and the reservoirs and treatment plants, and all those other facilities that ensure safe reliable water service for all communities, and we had eighty five percent indicating support for increasing federal funding for that. In fact, majority. Fifty two percent indicated strong support only one in ten were opposed, so it really is strong. It's also very consistent with past years. We've asked that exact same question for the past few years amid right around that those high eighties levels in terms of support. So it's not something that is waned over time or sort of, you know, the moved around and shifted in any way, shape or form the other remarkable thing about that is it really cuts across all demographic groups all partisan groups. It doesn't matter where in the country, you are or even your level of income. Everyone really supports a making those investments. And so if you think about it, even though they felt like you know, things were pretty okay? And their local community. They're still this desire to make sure that our nation has a solid water infrastructure. So. So you know we didn't say this was particular to your neighborhood your area. We looked at his really sort of a broader national agenda item, and we still got this level of support. It's a it seems to me to be a staggeringly high level of support in a good way. You've been involved with, you know, public opinion research, and polling for a long time. How does this level of support compared to other things you've seen? I mean is that does that really just jump out at you as being overwhelming? Yeah. You know, I tell people that there's very few things you know. And we get a tiny bit of a partisan reactions to this with, but we still have three quarters of Republicans, we've got almost every temocratic ninety five percent of Democrats indicating support independence, right there. So the national average in terms of their response. And that's pretty rare water is one of those things that bridges that no pun intended that, that partisan. Gap to an extent. Even when we get very specific and look at issues in particular state, or even in a particular city or community. Where sometimes where we're getting very specific about a funding proposal will see that we have less partisanship, when it comes to water than almost any other issue. I can think of right now. And certainly people are broadly saying, boy, we sort of put off a lot of investments that maybe we need to make in terms of our national infrastructure. You know, traffic congestion community. She places the main maintaining the miles and miles of highways and county roads around the country as well. But waters, one of those things that people place in a very different tier simply because we all need it one man, you know, in a focus groups that waters life. So it is one of the most basic thing said, making sure we maintain that is critically important in the everyone really wreck. Sizes that. Yeah, I really enjoy seeing that, that breakdown where, you know, kind of it's not a partisan issue. And I know that, that is something that the water sector is also trying to us as we approach members of congress and, and other officials to say, hey, look, this is there's no political risk here in supporting more investment in water infrastructure, everybody everywhere is behind this at two very, very strong degree. And also, like you said, no geographic, real real significant change, or anything like that. And you think you alluded to the idea that these numbers have been pretty consistent over the number of years that this polling has been done right. Absolutely. So literally this year's response at eighty five percent is well within the margin of error where we've seen in the past two. Two years where we were eighty seven eighty eight percent. So, basically no change at all in terms of in terms of response. And each year, we've seen a majority indicates strong support and that's important because that that's strong support really tells you that these are people that, that, obviously feel strongly about it, but also they don't tend to move around over time, they tend to sort of stick to their guns are more likely to be vocal and active on the initial as well. So that that's something that's really different about this issue because I think because touches everyone personally a couple other areas that were asked about this year. And it's something that I think the poll has done in the past aside from the infrastructure investment questions, has, has taken the opportunity to ask about some other areas this year, one of the topics was about kind of the affordability of water, and I was hoping you could share what? What people think about that issue about the affordability of water. Sharon, it's this is usually a trick question, because when you ask people, you know, his forcible or not so affordable. Sometimes sometimes perception drives that response. And they'll feel like you know, we've had people's tell us inflation is really huge issue this past decade in, of course, it really hasn't been in most sectors. And you know so if it just feels like if you're the grocery store, and you get a bigger receipt, each time, so it's, it's really striking that we had four and five telling us that they felt that what they pay currently for water and wastewater service is affordable. In fact, forty two percents I was very affordable. And that had not changed one bit over the last year, it was almost exactly the same as what we saw twenty eighteen very, very few only fourteen percent saying it's. Unaffordable there is, you know, as can be expected. There's a slight income distinction there, but still even among the lowest income segment that we looked at seventy five percent, said that what they pay for water and wastewater is, is affordable. And again, not huge regional distinctions either on that variable. And there can be blips, obviously, there can be cert- in communities, where investments, you know, have to be paid for through through fees, and in, in taxes on their water bills..

water environment federation Laurie Weigel congress America Travis Lou principal Pacific Anassa Montana president Sharon eighty five percent eighty seven eighty eight perc eighty three percent seventy five percent ninety five percent Fifty two percent fourteen percent eighty percent three quarters three-quarters
"water environment federation" Discussed on Words on Water

Words on Water

11:12 min | 1 year ago

"water environment federation" Discussed on Words on Water

"Got word. Hi, welcome to words on water a podcast from the water environment federation. This is the host Travis loop excited to be joined by a new friend and new colleague of mine Adam tank, he is the director of digital transformation at organic a water, and we had the great fortune to meet at the innovation summit out in San Francisco in March Adam thanks for coming on. Hey, thanks for having me. Yeah. Absolutely. Celestial dive into it people think by your title that we're going to start talking about digital stuff, but we're going to actually start on communications. And that's because when we were at this innovation summit this year. It was really focused on the whole idea that the water sector needs to be much more innovative in its communications in order to attract that next generation, and you're on one of the opening panels and. You came out of the gate calling the water sector out saying, you've gotta tell more stories. Why did you say that? What does that mean the work? I've and I said it on the panel the work. We do is mission critical for the world, maybe even more than almost any other industry out there. And the fact of the matter is that we do such a good job typically or generally do such a good job the work. We do people don't realize how difficult and complex and challenging what we do actually is very rarely. Do you turn on? Your tap. Water. Doesn't come out very rarely do not trust the water coming out of your tap, very rarely. If your water does does go out. Do you not have it for more than a day or two? And so people don't understand that. It's it's extremely difficult have these systems run efficiently effectively and as consistently as they do in. If we don't tell stories about what we do in. How we do. It people will continue thinking of us, basically just taking it for granted. So elaborate on that idea of stories what kind of stories are you talking about? You said what we do how we do it. But but go further than that. What what should we be telling people, really? So the the one that I love going back to not only because I do think it's a great story to tell. But because it's it can be extremely dramatic based on how the story is told is the the the the field operations employee for your local water utility or municipality who effectively is on call twenty four seven that one. You don't think about that? There's somebody actually focused on your system. Twenty four seven is ready to drop everything they're doing it as at a moment's notice serve you. But that person in this specific case someone that. Goes out and fixes a water main break at two thirty A M. On a night when it's twenty below in a small town, Wisconsin those are the stories that we don't hear about. But the fact is that when those people do their work it directly impacts your life. So as a listener, I imagine most listeners probably in the water sector. But if there's anyone that's not an even for those that are in the water sector. There are people that are doing this every single day water main breaks just one small example, but water main breaks people out there digging up streets getting dirty getting wet being cold doing very difficult work all because they want you to have water in your household. Yeah. I totally agree. Some of the best social media posts. I've seen from water utilities show. These people at off hours, right? Not nine to five. They're out there hits dark outside. Everybody sleeping like you said. And they are they're keeping things running. There is that crazy polar vortex this past winter, right? When like in Wisconsin, and Illinois, it was well below zero. And there was there was some social media posts showing how the show must go on. And those people are out there in those conditions dealing with the infrastructure, which was definitely under some unique stress at that time. So I totally agree that those stories need to be told more. And I also think that one of the ways we should tell stories is also about all the other jobs that are in the water sector. I there was a Brookings report. And they anti-debt they identified like two hundred twelve careers that are within the waterfield. And I don't know if I actually I know that the public is not aware of that diversity of jobs, and I think when it comes to building our workforce and building this next generation of workers. Bringing in different people from the community that showing that there's all these possible. Careers in water is important thing. So stories about them as well. Right like stories about definitely stories about the work. We do and the diversity in the work. We do in the technologies that we're using. I think are really important one one comment on the last on the last piece why I think telling me stories is so important not only because people deserve condition, but because the more people realize how bad shape our infrastructures in in in particular. I think the more investment going to garner, and we need more investment in the water sector. So that's that's a really big component. Yeah. No doubt and kind of bridging the comms and the and the digital piece. You know, there's this idea of data scientist right that that some of the really progressive water utilities are starting to add to their to their job Bank. If you will. And so that's that's an interesting store at ital- is and definitely important kind of person pull into water. Her right? Is you mentioned technology, and there's a lot of cool stuff happening. So there's their stories there. And that leads me to something else you talked about which was job titles and trying to break the mold of job titles. Could you talk about that? Definitely. I'm not I'm not I'm not one to change job title, just to change it. I think some people can can come off as maybe authentic or cheesy. If you say, you know, water distribution ninja or something. Like that. What I'm what I'm in? Support of though is having titles align with the actual work being done, especially if that work involves cool technology or next generation data analytics involves working with startups in a lot of jobs in the water sector do whether or not people know that. So what I would say like if we got on any this actually kind of a cool exercise. But if we got on any municipal water, utility utilities website. It look for open jobs. You're probably gonna see field technician to you might see a distribution engineer or wastewater treatment engineer at these types roles, and that's all finding good. The the the distinction. I'm trying to make is that those folks in many cases are working hands on with some really cool tools. So the folks that are out doing sewer inspections. It's not just going in this happens going in pulling up a manhole going with a flashlight and looking around some of them are using drones. They're using sonar inspection systems. They're putting manhole covers that are connected to the internet. They're doing stormwater management through digital. I o t connected devices. There's a lot more going on there in the job titles in the the the roles in what's being posted online need to reflect that reality. I think will. I think it will get more people interested in the work that we do. Yeah. Absolutely. It's funny. You use that word ninja you see a lot of that kind of magician. Ninja and kinda funny stuff being out there. But it seems to appeal to millennials right? These these fun job titles. So I had an interesting experience. I think two weeks after I saw in San Francisco, I was at water week in DC, and this is a big policy federal government or ended peace and I had someone that works at a federal agency Hammy their card and actually said innovation engineer as their title. And I was blown away. I I was totally blown away. I had to go find that person's supervisor who I knew and be like what is this? This is crazy. This is awesome. Again, if it's accurate great, not just cute for the you know for that. Right fit. Right. Yeah. This is pretty cool working for utility. No. They work at a federal federal government agency in DC. But but in their kind of in their technology and innovation office working to help kind of spur those areas across the water sector. So, you know, I think I think it was a fit and realistic. Sure. I want to build on that. Why big picture? Why do you think again, the water sector needs to take this approach to communications? You know at this time really this. This is what's happening on a macro scale with every other industry in. I think we can become a bit myopic and maybe too focused on. Just finding people that we think wanna work in water. So we're we're probably pretty traditional and how we recruit the schools. We look for the types of engineers. We look for the types of backgrounds. People have that we hire. The problem with that is that those folks in many cases can work in many other industries. So that would be the first one in the second is that those other industries are expanding the scope of what they do in terms of job titles in terms of roles in terms of responsibilities. So that they can capture the broader market. So it's not just the let's say your water utility or water, a water engineering firm. You're not just competing for people. That are interested in the water sector are competing between those people you're competing against all the other people out there that aren't in water that are also recruiting those people. So it's we have got to be more on the forefront or else, we're gonna continue losing the next generation

water environment federation engineer Wisconsin San Francisco DC Travis loop Adam tank director field operations scientist supervisor Illinois technician two weeks
"water environment federation" Discussed on Words on Water

Words on Water

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"water environment federation" Discussed on Words on Water

"Walkways in New York, and she described how no one else on the team had thought through something as simple as how it would be to be a single woman or a woman perhaps with a child walking through that space at night, and she influenced the design. Line of what was happening there to make sure that basically the space was safer for someone by themselves to walk through at night. And it's those types of small differences, but unique perspectives that need to come to the table for everything that we're doing in water infrastructure. What's your advice, then to women who are thinking about entering water? It's it sounds like your alternate messages. Still come on in we need you. Yes. We do. We do need everyone. We need everyone. Who has a passion for this space? So yes, come in. And don't try to go it alone. There are people who want to help. And there are lots of opportunities to engage with different types of people who can help you there. There are many opportunities to engage with people who can help you achieve your. Aspirations. I mean, this conversation is really been beneficial for me, you know, I've I've worked in communications and and media for twenty years and had obviously lots of female colleagues and terrific women as my supervisors and bosses, including Eileen O'Neill at the water environment federation. And I'm even further motivated now from talking to you. And hearing a lot of these points to be an ally. An advocate, I I feel like I have been, but I feel like there's probably even more I can do and honestly recording this with you. And putting it out there is that was one reason I wanted to do it was to to contribute in some way to this conversation. That's really important. And I just I really really value your perspective. And I'm glad we got to catch up. Finally, thank you so much for sharing your time. Travis than it was. Real pleasure to join you on where it's on water. Yeah. And for people that want to find you where can they do that? Yes. People can find me online as Mel the engineer. So I'm on Twitter and Facebook as Mel the engineer or you can Email me directly at Mel, the engineer at gmaiLcom awesome. Yeah. I follow on Twitter for a while. Lots of good stuff on there. So thank you so much. We'll be sure to promote your new podcast when it comes out. Great. Thanks so much traffic. Word.

engineer Mel Twitter water environment federation Travis New York Eileen O'Neill Facebook twenty years
"water environment federation" Discussed on Words on Water

Words on Water

05:06 min | 1 year ago

"water environment federation" Discussed on Words on Water

"Got word. Hi, welcome to words on water a podcast from the water environment federation. This is Travis loop the host across many communities here in the United States. And around the world storm water is a very big issue. And I'm glad for this episode's guest to be joining us. It's Marcus Quigley, the CEO of opti, Marcus. How're you doing very? Well, it's nice to be with you trials offend tastic. We chatted before this podcast, and we could've recorded that conversation. 'cause we covered a lot of interesting grounds. You made a lot of great points. So we'll try to to go with that today. But I'm excited for the chat. Here stormwater is is something that's a really important issue. And I'm really curious from your many years of experience from where you sit there at ATI. What are you seeing what are really the pressing issues with storm water? Why is it? Why is it so important for communities to? To manage stormwater. I think it's interesting we spend every day looking at this issue. But also one that hits communities very directly. I think with particularly over the last couple of years there have been such a significant of ants on the flooding side. That storm water is really front and center from people's perspective. And they have real questions about what the future holds particularly around climate change. And they're wondering how how their cities are going to hold up. I think on top of that. In addition to the quantity of water, water quality is something that is very important people on a day-to-day basis, particularly if they interact with the waterways, they go to the beaches, or if they're out fishing, or frankly, if they're just trying to enjoy a local park and are wondering why it now has a toxic algae, and they aren't able to do some of the things they used to do. So we've seen. A lot of changes in the environment. Immersing changes as well to our communities. I think on top of this uncertainty associated with things that we feel we have less control over. We also are still building a pretty good clip as a society and development interacting with these changes to the environment. And in our choices around development result in in changes to outcomes for communities as well. So I think although were a company and and attend a community. That's a lot of time thinking about these issues in half for a very long time. There are things that people are reading pretty much every day in in the paper or on the internet on the news. Maybe this is a strange question is stormwater. More of a problem is the more storm water to manage is, you know, becoming more of. A burden or a causing more negative impacts on communities. I think there's probably two big things that are colliding that are that are changing what the what the impacts are one is aging infrastructure. So many of the systems that we built were not designed for their current capacity and cities themselves were have changed dramatically even in even recent time. It's it's amazing. If you look at area photograph, even from what doesn't seem to need to be a long time ago, but ten fifteen years ago to now in the amount of development. That's happening can jozy communities. It's pretty stunning. So we have aiding structure at NAN on top of that. We want to build the expand. So the impacts really are are changing in a significant way from both of those effects. You mentioned the water quality side of things, and you know, CSO events the kind of combined sewer overflow events are a big issue. And you get you give me a figure when we chatted last that kinda stunned me. I don't think I had even heard it about sure. So I think by and large if you just bring up water quality to someone in a community. You think well, we're in we're in the US, we've addressed a lot of these issues, but the reality is we still discharge close to or over ending on. Who you ask about a trillion gallons of combined sewer overflow every year in the US, which is I think a pretty stunning number. There are

water environment federation United States jozy communities Marcus Quigley CEO ATI ten fifteen years trillion gallons
"water environment federation" Discussed on Words on Water

Words on Water

06:24 min | 1 year ago

"water environment federation" Discussed on Words on Water

"Got word. Hi, welcome to words on water applied cast from the water environment federation. This is Travis loop the host. I'm very excited for this episode to talk about water and smother issues in Saudi Arabia. I am joined by Mohammed Abdul Latif. He is superintendent for the Dhahran water opperations division within Saudi Aramco, which is the world's largest producer of oil soon to be a significant leader in energy in chemical businesses. Well, ominous also the director of the Saudi Arabian water virement association, which is a very large a member of the associate member of the water vibrant federation for the Middle East and largest Amei outside of North America. So Muhammad that he for funding some time while you're here. West tack to sit down in awe. Thank you all for to me to be involved. Us as you will sit on the superintendent on wartime Senator relation evasion in city minal as a superintendent is doing sure that the quality and sustainability of me won't of services is available twenty four hours a day seventies of week three hundred fifty six days a year to accomplish this. Major goals. We are responsible to grade and maintain three million gallons per day drinking water land where we are using of small sizes as a process to to remold sold from the water. As many of the people knows that the apple cores available in that regions are brackish water where the tedious is very high. Hi. And we need to read the of before rescinded for drinking water. Sure as we're as an responsible to raid and maintain more than one hundred one thousand miles of networks that's include doing king water towards shall them enforce and wastewater as will as the treated wastewater fluent networks. We are also a sponsor to play and maintain sixteen million gallons a day of a wastewater feet the land, which is three wastewater to tertiary level and hundred percent of the plan three to effluent way of the us and the Hong community poetic Asian. Moreover, we are responsible trade and in also at while water wells, scattered all over the area. At you mentioned Saudi Aramco is the. Not just oil in the company of the war, the company or high-value and emphasis on water as substance as is the key to the to our kingdom development by supporting deterrent projects. Painted them. Why the company is of that is reusing around agent of scent of its wastewater either for radiation or the silliest purposes Saudi-armed has strangers regulation, and they will have reuse of a wasteful to used process adopted conform titles twenty two regular stations. The company has an excellent history with the water reuse out. Looking about the water reuse in the county by building the still shitty. Tweet -ment land this way at forty five years, though. That's a lot of interesting information where where is Dhahran in Saudi Arabia. If you could describe that for for. People that have been there. I haven't interesting number on each. It's a small city. It's close to the Gulf in the east in the eastern province of savvy Arabia. How many what's the population? How many people the populations of the Hon is approximately one hundred twenty thousand people, but we the our responsibility when we are talking about our community where after the punchy four thousand. Okay. Okay. The interesting also jumped out was eighty percents reuse of of water or irrigation or other industrial uses. That's a very good radio. Res, and that's also very interesting that the located to the Californian standards is that is that was that the model than that was like this is what we want to yet. You've yes because California talked detours considered the most estranged. Senators on reuse. Okay. You also were one of the founders of the Saudi Arabia water environment sociation, which we've mentioned is a really large sociation water professionals. Why why were you part of forming this group why was this important? This is back in to Helen to we were silhouetted over from two different areas. The environment to Boston and the utilities all within Saudi out on hope we so that the bug this. So we also identified vitamin association whilst to preserve and enhance Volta quality in the entire kingdom Saudi Arabia, and it wall since then the association has many successful activities we go to the about these assistant. We conducted almost twelve international walls of the native

Saudi Arabia Saudi Aramco water environment federation superintendent Saudi Arabian Mohammed Abdul Latif Muhammad Volta Middle East us Gulf California apple Helen associate member Boston director Hong community Amei
"water environment federation" Discussed on Words on Water

Words on Water

07:48 min | 1 year ago

"water environment federation" Discussed on Words on Water

"Got word. Hi, welcome to words on water podcast from the water environment federation. This is Travis loop the host. I'm very excited to share some new water research with all the listeners I'm joined by Adam Davis. He is co founder of D H M research, Adam how you doing good. Thank you. So I'm excited to talk about this. You partnered up with blue drop to do a little bit of research into the area of kind of national opinion survey about water, and what Americans know about their utilities or local projects and so forth. And I thought that the results of the survey were very interesting different types of numbers different findings different topics in questions than I've typically seen. So could you set this up blue drop approached you all wanted to kinda learn a bit more about Americans opinion? A water. We dead was conduct that national survey earlier this this year, we we recognize blue drop DHA research that the industry is really a very important point. In time. The issue is infrastructure needing to address the the water systems in the United States. And that means you're going to be competing against a lot of other services for attention and money it relates to government affairs relates to public relations because rates are going to be going up and the industry is going to need assistance from different levels of government. So we felt it was very important to check in with with the public about this communication's key. I communicating with your customers, but also. Unicating with opinion leaders in all the different sectors and to be affective at communications, which is really Balu drops of focus you need to have good research. You need to understand where where people are and a wider their the goals of the research were to not only learn how people are feeling about drinking water and waste water and sewer, but why they're feeling that way. It's that blending of quantitative and qualitative researching what was really cool about. This study a Travis is that we split sample Americans on the issue. We asked half the sample about drinking water and half the sample about a waste water and sewer. The reason we did as we wanted a good of elimidate shack. I didn't want to run the risk of a sensitizing people by having them think about one of those. Services. And then being at asking them about the other one for fear that it might have an impact on their their attitudes. So we split Snapple. And I think we learned some good things on WADA questions very similar results. But on others. We we saw a some differences in when I when I look at the the report document that came out which all include a Lincoln, the podcast episodes of people can go in and read it right away in the introduction. Just that that very I kinda opening page there, you have some statistics that I think it'd be worth sharing with listeners about how much people know about the origins and destination of their a water was one of the key findings from the survey was of awareness, inaugur knowledge of levels and in. I think the the headline is a there's great ignorance aroun-. Water services more than a third thirty seven percent don't know the origin of their drinking water think about you're going to need the support of people as you move forward with increasing rates in having them help you in your state capital or on the hill in Washington DC. We have thirty seven percent that don't know the origin of their drinking water in two-thirds two-thirds don't know the destination of their wastewater after it is cleaned. I mean, they're they're not connecting the dots. Because we know from other research we've gun how important of bodies of water are two people from public health and just wanting to be assured. It's it's safe to outdoor recreation animal habitat, you name it. That was something that really jumped out at me Travis was was the high level of ignorance about half. Forty eight percent say they are not familiar with the quality level of their drinking water earlier in the survey when we asked the question, you know, that's your water of provider provide you safe water. We had good figures. I mean, that's that's good news. But it's incredibly soft because when you have some specific -ly what about the quality level that water? We always have fifty percent of the people saying they're not familiar with. Might take just a time out from this churn. Do you the we used an online methodology one of the reasons I love online surveys, besides the pack that the telephone survey option is just becoming more and more Dina dinosaur for a variety of reasons we could discuss maybe later, but you get more candid responses online. You don't have what we call a interviewer affect and a and a social desireability entering into these people are just with the question on the computer. There is an interviewer there. So about half say they are not familiar with the quality of the drinking water. This is huge more than three quarters are not familiar with drinking water or wastewater sewer projects in their community. Three or drinking water eighty four split samples, which is really interesting book. How close that is eighty three eighty four percent quarters more than three course are not familiar with drinking water wastewater sewer projects in their community. And it's their it's their dollars. That are really funding. A lot of those projects, right? Every one of those projects represented opportunity to connect the dots for people and in a allowing them to see the connectedness between water quality and water infrastructure of with their quality of life and liveability. So that was another thing that jumped out at me. And here's another concern. I have is that they wear nece was higher among not surprisingly higher educated. People higher income people in older, folks, that's drek for a moment that

water environment federation Travis Adam Davis co founder elimidate shack United States D H M Dina thirty seven percent eighty three eighty four perce Forty eight percent three quarters fifty percent