35 Burst results for "Washington University"

George Washington University to drop 'Colonials' moniker

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 2 months ago

George Washington University to drop 'Colonials' moniker

"George Washington University is dropping its colonials moniker The school located not far from The White House says it can no longer serve its purpose as a name that unifies George Washington University has used the name colonials since 1926 a special committee looked into the name and determined opponent saw it as referring to colonizers who stole land and resources from indigenous groups killed or exiled native peoples and introduced slavery into the colonies and supporters of colonials viewed it as referring to those who lived in American colonies especially those who fought for independence and democracy GW will keep using colonials until a new name is introduced Ed Donahue Washington

George Washington University White House Ed Donahue Washington
Maryland's Sen. Chris Van Hollen treated for minor stroke

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 3 months ago

Maryland's Sen. Chris Van Hollen treated for minor stroke

"Senator senator senator senator Chris Chris Chris Chris van van van van Hollen Hollen Hollen Hollen has has has has been been been been hospitalized hospitalized hospitalized hospitalized after after after after a a a a stroke stroke stroke stroke the the the the Maryland Maryland Maryland Maryland Democrat Democrat Democrat Democrat is is is is being being being being treated treated treated treated at at at at George George George George Washington Washington Washington Washington University University University University hospital hospital hospital hospital for for for for a a a a few few few few days days days days after after after after suffering suffering suffering suffering a a a a minor minor minor minor stroke stroke stroke stroke in in in in a a a a statement statement statement statement van van van van Hollen Hollen Hollen Hollen says says says says he he he he experienced experienced experienced experienced light light light light headedness headedness headedness headedness and and and and acute acute acute acute neck neck neck neck pain pain pain pain while while while while delivering delivering delivering delivering a a a a speech speech speech speech in in in in western western western western Maryland Maryland Maryland Maryland and and and and sought sought sought sought medical medical medical medical attention attention attention attention after after after after returning returning returning returning home home home home on on on on the the the the advice advice advice advice of of of of a a a a physician physician physician physician he he he he says says says says an an an an angiogram angiogram angiogram angiogram indicated indicated indicated indicated he he he he had had had had a a a a small small small small **** **** **** **** tear tear tear tear in in in in the the the the back back back back of of of of his his his his head head head head but but but but he he he he been been been been informed informed informed informed there there there there were were were were no no no no long long long long term term term term effects effects effects effects and and and and he he he he expects expects expects expects to to to to be be be be back back back back at at at at work work work work in in in in the the the the Senate Senate Senate Senate later later later later this this this this week week week week he's he's he's he's the the the the second second second second high high high high profile profile profile profile Democrat Democrat Democrat Democrat to to to to report report report report suffering suffering suffering suffering a a a a stroke stroke stroke stroke this this this this weekend weekend weekend weekend Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Pennsylvania lieutenant lieutenant lieutenant lieutenant governor governor governor governor John John John John Fetterman Fetterman Fetterman Fetterman the the the the leading leading leading leading Democrat Democrat Democrat Democrat running running running running for for for for Senate Senate Senate Senate in in in in the the the the state state state state was was was was hospitalized hospitalized hospitalized hospitalized in in in in Lancaster Lancaster Lancaster Lancaster after after after after suffering suffering suffering suffering a a a a stroke stroke stroke stroke as as as as well well well well fifty fifty fifty fifty two two two two year year year year old old old old said said said said he's he's he's he's on on on on his his his his way way way way to to to to a a a a full full full full recovery recovery recovery recovery Jennifer Jennifer Jennifer Jennifer king king king king Washington Washington Washington Washington

Maryland Stroke Stroke Stroke Stroke Senator Senator Senator Senato George George George George Wa Van Van Van Van Hollen Hollen Pain Pain Pain Pain Pennsylvania Senate Senate Senate Senate Lancaster John John John John Fetterman Senate Senate Jennifer Jennifer Jennifer Jen Washington
"washington university" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:47 min | 3 months ago

"washington university" Discussed on WTOP

"Hollen is in the hospital admitted to George Washington University hospital this weekend after suffering a minor stroke Van hollen says he was experiencing lightheadedness and neck pain after delivering a speech in western Maryland He says there's no long-term effects though or damage as a result of the stroke but it'll be remained under remaining under observation for a few days D.C.'s been struggling with a spike in violent crime Now there's a road map with suggestions for bringing crime down The gun violence reduction strategic plan put out by the independent agency the criminal justice coordinating council includes 16 recommendations such as setting up a peace room where a team made up of crime analysts violence reduction managers and staff from relevant city agencies would come together when there's a shooting and immediately dispatch violence interrupters It also recommends upping the number of violence interrupters in the city Long-term strategies include guaranteed income to reduce poverty The report says the city has the talent ability and resources to reduce gun violence but is lacking the political commitment coordination and a coherent strategy to do so Shana's Julian WTO news Route 15 north of Leesburg can be a picturesque drive through loudoun county but it's also busy and can be dangerous and now loud and county is getting close to making a decision on how to improve travel and safety This is the town of lucketts loudoun town has been debating widening route 15 to a four lane road with medium from Leesburg up to here with a bypass around the town and its traffic light and then with a two lane road and median up towards the Maryland line What's still to be determined is whether the bypass would run east or west of 15 through farmland and wildlife.

George Washington University h Van hollen criminal justice coordinating Hollen Maryland Julian WTO D.C. Leesburg lucketts loudoun Shana loudoun county
How KT McFarland Became the Person She Is Today

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:38 min | 5 months ago

How KT McFarland Became the Person She Is Today

"KT McFarland's with me today. I can't been waiting for this one for a while. Got to run into her cpac with the crazy part about it is through all of our travels. We have been on TV together multiple times on interviews, but never in the same place. It seems like at the same time, especially with the last few years going. And so it was so good to be in the same room, not on the same convention center, but there with you in Orlando. It is great to have you on the podcast today. Well, I agree. I mean, I feel like I really know you well because I've been on television with you. We've talked to each other, but we've never actually met in person. And so here we are yet again, not in person, but it's good to be with you. It is. But it works out, great. Well, you know, one of the things is and especially the way life goes these days is we all have our backgrounds and where we come from. And people see us and make judgments, basically, you know, we're on TV or we're on the interviews, one podcast that was kind of like, one of the things I love to do with this podcast has been great to be able to do is sort of people see how we became, you know, you or how you became me and it gives people that background so that when they see you, they say, hey, I know where she came from. I know what was going on. So tell us a little bit about how you became you in a lot of sense. Gosh, that's so nice. Well, I started out as a freshman in college in 1969. I was from Madison, Wisconsin from a working class family, but I got a scholarship to go to George Washington University. But I needed a job. So I was a really fast typist. And through a series of accidents, got a job as the nighttime secretary in The White House situation, freshman in college. And I was working for Henry Kissinger in the Nixon administration. So I went to college during the day, majored in Chinese Chinese studies, wrote my bicycle, went to The White House situation room every afternoon, and then typed the first draft from what was then called the president's daily brief and is still called the president's daily brief. And that was the classified items briefing items that would be on the president of the United States is desk in the Oval Office every morning at 7 a.m.. So I typed the rough draft at night, somebody finished it off in the morning. And I did that all through college, through part of graduate school. And all of a sudden I got promoted after chain. And I was Henry Kissinger's research assistant. At a very young age, and so saw firsthand to some of the most extraordinary periods of American foreign policy. It was the opening to China, the end of the Vietnam War, the Paris peace accords. The detente with the Soviet Union, Middle East peace negotiations. So as a very young person in my late teens, early 20s, was exposed to people and events.

Kt Mcfarland Nixon Administration Orlando Henry Kissinger White House George Washington University Madison Wisconsin Oval Office United States Vietnam China Paris Soviet Union Middle East
Dr. Marty Makary: Natural Immunity Could Pass 22 Months, Suggested by Other Studies' Trends

The Dan Bongino Show

01:51 min | 6 months ago

Dr. Marty Makary: Natural Immunity Could Pass 22 Months, Suggested by Other Studies' Trends

"I want to be clear the 22 months of circulating antibodies you discovered doesn't mean it's limited to 22 months when you're saying is we only know about 22 months because that's all the virus has been circulating around it It could be three years could be 5 years could be two years ago That's what you're saying right That's right and we've known this all along Our study out of Hopkins which was published in the top medical journal it was published in jama that's the number one medical journal out there Even though LinkedIn took down my post when I posted my jama study on LinkedIn we contacted the CEO and then they magically reappeared in 15 minutes Wow Like magic This is our top tanks Well this is the phone mission This is affirming all the other studies of which there have been a hundred throughout the pandemic showing that hey natural immunity works for at least a month a month into the pandemic Then two then four then 6 Cleveland clinic Washington University All these big studies kept rolling in and they public health officials kept dangling while we don't know how long it's going to last Yes we do because your hypothesis was wrong The hypothesis at the beginning should have always been that it works until proven otherwise because it works for the other coronaviruses SARS and mers those are the only two other coronaviruses that cause severe illness in humans They work long term That's been studied That's a settled science And we don't see people getting reinfected at the bedside going on a ventilator or dying It's healthy people do not get reinfected and go on a ventilator and die That is always been our observation but they are not seeing patients They're living in an ivory tower We have two centralized of a sort of decision making oligarchy And they're not listening to bedside

Top Medical Journal Linkedin Cleveland Clinic Washington Un Hopkins Sars
There's One Virus Out There That's Worse Than the China Coronavirus

The Charlie Kirk Show

00:47 sec | 7 months ago

There's One Virus Out There That's Worse Than the China Coronavirus

"I think there's actually a more dangerous virus than the Chinese coronavirus out there. The media, that's pretty good. I gotta say. It's hard to disagree with that. It's the virus, and there's a lot of different words to describe it. Woke ism, diversity equity inclusion, critical race theory. And it's everywhere. At Columbia University, they have black only graduation ceremonies. At western Washington University, they have black only dormitories. United Airlines is now announcing that 50% of all the new pilots they're going to hire are going to be black pilots. I don't know about you. I don't care about the color of the skin of my pilot. I hope he can or she can land the plane when they need to land the plane.

Western Washington University Columbia University United Airlines
"washington university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:18 min | 10 months ago

"washington university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Today is Ori who says professor of physics at washington university in saint louis. He's lucid this michael analytical techniques to study extraterrestrial materials. You don't have been better. had before. Mason at evolution of solar system expedite stars. Mccolm right thank you for having me. Yes a few people is that you can send me right. But before we to them. I would set the context for us studied law on big teals arriving on earth or iran. I understand that the the solar system itself part of a half billion years sore. Perhaps and then we have had. He bought mic flip dom fan of dying or came in And so could you talk a little bit about sort of the historical context. How mosquitoes at ryan King from men. What what he knows himself on. Yeah so the meteorites The natural materials these rocks from space that we get most of our understanding from the meteorites really are leftover pieces of different asteroids and planets. We have pieces of mars in the moon. That also bombard us From space and these meteorites we have sixty six thousand of them are a record of The various planet formation processes. That started like you said four and a half billion this exactly. This is one of the benefits of our field is that we have these laboratory techniques that are extremely site so the solar system formed four point five six seven billion years ago. We know that we know that precisely and we we call time zero the formation of the first rocks in the solar system so we know that very well and the solar system's history. Kind of prehistory. Before that is from A molecular cloud type of of clouds. You might see in the ryan nebulous if anybody doesn't he backyard astronomy so our solar system started by a cold dense molecular cloud like that A piece of that cloud collapsed and because it was spinning slightly. This is a physics concept. in a collapsed very small fraction that size it conserved angular will menton just like an ice skater does when she does a twirl. A jump in and spin so that caused that material to spin out formed kind of a pancake a flat pancake. And that's what we call the solar nebula and at that point it was a bunch of gas and dust not a lot of complexity. And then mayfield cosmo chemistry in meteoroid. Ix seeks to understand how we want from that really simple Astrophysical cloud of gas and dust to the planets that we see now so there are all kinds of chemical in impact processes that led us to where we are. Now you out tonight is sort of a process with some of that cloud as sort of come tastes into something and helps get some sort of critical mass..

Mccolm ryan King Ori saint louis washington university Mason iran michael menton mayfield cosmo ryan
Holocaust Survivor, Scholar Awarded $815,000 Balzan Prize

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 11 months ago

Holocaust Survivor, Scholar Awarded $815,000 Balzan Prize

"An Israeli French American Holocaust survivor and historian and a U. S. scientist specializing in got bacteria are among the recipients of this year's battles and crises recognizing scholarly and scientific achievements Seoul Friedlander was awarded the prize for Holocaust and genocide studies the Pulitzer Prize winner and macarthur fellow eighty eight year old Friedlander has taught widely in the U. S. took Telavi view diversity he was recognized for examining the persecution of all Jews in Europe then beyond the country focus studies that had preceded him I'm for making postal documents acceptable in scholarly practice while Jeffrey Goldman from Washington university in St Louis who's to wilted about St for founding the field of human microbiome research I'm Charles to this month

Seoul Friedlander Telavi Pulitzer Prize Friedlander Macarthur U. Jeffrey Goldman Europe Washington University St Louis Field Of Human Microbiome Rese Charles
A Kid’s Dream Come True — Video Games as Medicine!

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

01:29 min | 1 year ago

A Kid’s Dream Come True — Video Games as Medicine!

"The age old. Mantra of parents won't let their kids have a gaming console too. Many video games hurts your brain but last summer. The fda approved the first ever prescription video game. It's endeavor rx and it's meant to help treat. Adhd in kids aged eight to twelve. It's not a standalone. It'll be prescribed along with other more traditional medication. Without insurance it costs about one hundred dollars a month a year later developers are just starting to reach out to doctors and potential patients. We spoke with ian bogus. He directs the film and media studies program at washington university in saint. Louis we asked him. What's a medicinal game. Even like it's kinda like any video game you've got a little character writing vehicle and you piloted through obstacles in order to reach a goal. That's interesting so it doesn't feel like you're taking your medicine. Yeah and you know. That's part of the appeal of games for any purpose for education or for politics or for for training. Or what have you is. Maybe you won't notice that you're doing this thing you don't want to do if it's in video game form but the creators of endeavor rx claim to have made technologies that are measuring and adapting to the player. Who would be an adhd patient who had been prescribed the game that according to them make alterations kind of customizing the experience to optimize the attention treatment

Ian Bogus Washington University In Saint FDA Louis
Who is K.T. McFarland, Trump's Former Deputy National Security Advisor?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:17 min | 1 year ago

Who is K.T. McFarland, Trump's Former Deputy National Security Advisor?

"We have so much to discuss with regards to the disasters occurring in central asia in the last two weeks. But let's start by those who may have just accidentally happened on this channel. Found us on rumble. Downloaded this podcast. Tell them a little bit about who. Kt mcfarland is when she started to get involved in national security issues. And then you'll climb to the heights of power in the white house under the trump administration starting in nineteen seventy. I was a freshman in college at george washington university and got partial scholarship and had to pay the rest of my way through school. So i got a part time typing job in the west wing of the white house and the white house situation room. Working for guy wasn't very well known at the time by the name of henry kissinger and he was richard nixon's national security advisor. So i started working part time in the nighttime typing pool for henry kissinger In the west wing and then worked in the nixon administration. The ford administration went to graduate school during the carter administration went to oxford university and then. Mit where i studied and taught nuclear weapons Then joined the reagan administration when we won the cold war Was part of the pentagon team Did one help win. The cold war got the pentagon's highest civilian award for that service. And then i retired. We'd want our cold war. My war was one done. And so i married. Had five. kids was living the good life in new york and long island and then september eleventh happened and it convinced me to get back into government because i had such a pretty extensive experience. I point so. I did And i ran for the. Us senate against hillary clinton the organ lost. Predictably but i did Get back involved in a lot of issues. And then he came. The fox news national security analysts for over a decade until i joined the trump administration Which i did at the beginning and so here. I am out of the trump administration of back on talking to import. People like you about issues. I care deeply about what your national security

Kt Mcfarland White House Henry Kissinger Richard Nixon George Washington University Ford Administration Pentagon Asia Carter Administration Reagan Administration Oxford University Long Island Hillary Clinton New York Senate United States
What Happens to Viruses After the Immune System Eliminates Them

The Pulse

02:20 min | 1 year ago

What Happens to Viruses After the Immune System Eliminates Them

"On their own. Viruses are pretty much helpless and they are one hundred percent dependent on infecting cells. This is catalina lopez. She is an immunologist at washington university. School of medicine in saint louis. They cannot go anywhere. They basically can replicate outside ourselves. They they would just disappear. Viruses are dependent but they are sneaky. They get into cells and use their infrastructure to replicate to infect another cell and another one amplified themselves and multiplied themselves. Always using taking advantage like parasites. Are they alive. That's a really good question Well what defines something being alive. I don't know. I think they are really good. And taking advantage of life things to keep propagating but since they're completely dependent. I think i think there's aspects of the definition of live that may may not apply to viruses so they may not be fully alive but like zombies. They can also be really hard to fully kill to get rid of the virus. The immune system has to kill infected cells but cavallina says many viruses find ways to hide for a lot of viruses. We know not larger more complex viruses. We know that they have strategies to stay that. Allow them to hide they infect itself from this immune response for example so this infected cell is not seeing and then if you don't eliminate killer clear it then you will have that virus always hanging around in your body sticking around in any way possible and we're finding with more sophisticated tools. Just not looking for actually fully competent viruses but looking for elements of the virus. It's genetic material. Maybe it's proteins. If we go and look for those little pieces of the virus in the body what are starting to find that a lot of this virus actually are montaigne for a long time in the body

Catalina Lopez Saint Louis Washington University Cavallina School Of Medicine
Scientists Were Wrong About Climate Change Then and Are Still Wrong

Mark Levin

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Scientists Were Wrong About Climate Change Then and Are Still Wrong

"Dot com Mr Producer This goes back to April. 22nd 2009 and I dug this up. Birthday predictions of 1970. This may have been on Instapundit actually. The reason you shouldn't believe Earth Day predictions of 2000 and nine And they point out even back then, 12 years ago. For the next 24 hours. The media wall saw this with tales of imminent disaster that always accompany the annual Earth Day Doom and gloom extravaganza. Oh, it's only gotten worse. Ignore them. They'll be wrong. We're confident in saying that because they've always been wrong and always will be need proof. Here's some of the hilarious, spectacularly wrong predictions made on the occasion of Earth Day 1970. That's when it was founded. We have about five more years at the outside to do something, Kenneth what Ecologists. Civilization will end within 15, or 30 years unless immediate action is taken against problems facing mankind. George Wald, Harvard biologist. We're in an environmental crisis, which threatens the survival of this nation and the world as a suitable place of human habitation. Barry Commoner. Remember him? Washington University biologist Man must stop pollution and conservatives resources not merely to enhance existence but to save the race from intolerable deterioration of possible extinction. New York Times editorial the day after the first birthday. Population will inevitably and completely outstripped whatever small increases in food supplies. We make that death rate will increase until at least 1 to 200 million people per year will be starving to death during the next 10 years. Paul Ehrlich, Stanford University biologist. 1975. Some experts feel that food shortages will have escalated the present level of world hunger and starvation in the famines of unbelievable proportions. Other experts more optimistic. The ultimate phone population collision will not occur until the decade of the 19 eighties. Paul Ehrlich,

Mr Producer George Wald Barry Commoner Kenneth Washington University Harvard New York Times Paul Ehrlich Stanford University
Aducanumab: A Controversial Drug for Alzheimer's

Short Wave

01:21 min | 1 year ago

Aducanumab: A Controversial Drug for Alzheimer's

"New drug for alzheimer's ought to be good news but a lot of experts. Don't see it that way. The data just aren't there right now to say that. This is the drug to open up the new era for the treatment of alzheimer's possible that it does not work. I don't wanna give them. That is not going to help them and could possibly hurt them. Redo chatterjee here. Npr science correspondent john. Hamilton john who scientists. And what's the drug they're talking about. That was dr. jason carla wish at the university of pennsylvania. Dr david rynd of the institute for clinical and economic review and dr joy snyder of washington university in st louis. The truck they were talking about is called canham out it's now being marketed under the brand name. And it's the first drug ever approved by the food and drug administration to treat the disease process underlying alzheimer's at you home is really good. At reducing those sticky plaques tend to build up in the brains of people with the disease that sounds very promising. Why skepticism from those experts. Because it's still not clear whether reducing those plaques can slow down. The loss of memory and thinking caused by alzheimer's also educate mab has some potentially dangerous side effects like swelling and bleeding in the brain. Oh and then. There's the cost which looks to be about fifty six thousand dollars a

Alzheimer's Hamilton John Jason Carla Dr David Rynd Institute For Clinical And Eco Dr Joy Snyder Canham NPR University Of Pennsylvania Washington University St Louis Food And Drug Administration John
Dr. Marty Makary and Other Sciences Suggest Natural Immunity Is Lifelong

The Dan Bongino Show

01:07 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Marty Makary and Other Sciences Suggest Natural Immunity Is Lifelong

"Check this out. Wall Street Journal Story by Marty Macari Who's terrific. He's a colleague at Fox. Talking about this new Wall Street Journal Op Ed, he wrote. I'm talking about it called the power of natural immunity. Told by the media and their fear mongering campaigns to Should get vaccinated right away. You have you had the coronavirus. We've been told that because you got to keep people scared all the time. Well, do you? Well, that sounds like a personal decision to me because it's Marty, who is a medical professional. Unlike the people in the media writes in his piece, Natural immunity is adorable. Researchers from Washington University in ST Louis reported last month at 11. Months after a mild infection, immune cells were still capable of producing protective anybody's the author, the authors concluded. Prior Covid infection induces quote a robust and log lived long lived. Huma rel immune response, leading some scientists who suggest that natural immunity is probably lifelong. Cause infection began months earlier than vaccination. We have more follow up data on the duration of natural immunity than unvaccinated immunity. Where are you hearing about that? You're hearing about that anywhere else, Fellas, ladies, anyone? Who's Jimmy here about that? Didn't hear about that. That's kind of been. Yeah, Yeah. I didn't hear about

Marty Macari New Wall Street Journal Op Ed Wall Street Journal Huma Rel FOX Marty Washington University St Louis Jimmy
University of Maryland mulls mandating Covid vaccinations for students

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

University of Maryland mulls mandating Covid vaccinations for students

"Are debating whether to require students to get a Corona virus vaccine before fall semester starts. Rutgers in New Jersey is the first major university to announce that all students must be vaccinated for the coronavirus before arriving for classes and we might see that happen at local colleges and universities as well, A spokesperson for the University of Maryland College Park told wt O p. They are considering it. The school made a request to the university system of Maryland and the attorney general's office to allow for mandatory vaccinations. American University and George Washington University said they're still coming up with a plan for the upcoming year. Rutgers does have an exemption for students for religious and medical reasons. Battery Bank

University Of Maryland College Rutgers New Jersey Maryland American University George Washington University Battery Bank
Top 10 players signed by Patriots

Strong Opinion Sports

05:48 min | 1 year ago

Top 10 players signed by Patriots

"Talk about the Patriots. The the Patriots grabbed everybody's attention by making move after move after move after move. Like we're watching it over agency going off. How many people are going to bring in its kind of unbelievable how many starters they've added? And so I count they added ten players that I think are very very significant to their team next year. In fact, I would say pretty clearly the Patriots are back and a lot of people saw this coming, you know, but they are going to be a force in the NFL next year here is my list my nerdy list of the ten players the top players. They added that are very significant to their roster next year. The first two are massive. It will reshape the entire Patriots offense. They added two tight ends Johnny Smith and Ed Hunter Henry. To Johnny Smith signed from Tennessee. He signed a four year deal worth up to fifty million dollars. That's Thirty one point two five million dollars guaranteed and he's only twenty-four years old. So that's Monday. That's a really gigantic Marquis franchise player. He cited the reason why it came to New England is cuz he loves Bill Belichick. He's got great respect for him. And I want to point out of all the everybody I'm about to talk about these shows to be in New England Bill Belichick got his kind of guys who sought out New England wanted to be there and wanted to work hard and win a Superbowl. I think it matters. It's very very exciting. These are not with Josh Gordon's or what's the other example Phillip Dorsett who they made a move for and they're not really like that. You think they fit they don't work out know. These are guys who all chose to be in New England who wanted to win a Superbowl. I really want to win a Superbowl. These guys went out of their way to be New England now the other tight and they brought in With twenty-six-year-old tight end Hunter Henry from the LA Chargers got a three-year deal twenty-five million dollars guaranteed. It's worth up to thirty seven point five million dollars total if he meets all those incentives. They also added two wide receivers the Patriots brought in Nelson agholor to a you got a two year twenty six million dollar contract East twelve years old. Now a lot of people do not like this move and I I get it Nelson agholor is not the most flashy player in the NFL but I think if it's very well with Cam Newton, he's good at he's not going up and getting the ball. He's got good hands did some stuff of the Raiders that I think deserves your attention go watch what he did with the Raiders and I just I'm like, huh a lot of good plays. Okay. I understand. I see the potential Bill Belichick and the Patriots would see and Nelson agholor go will give the guy a good contract, especially considering the Patriots have like our desolate at wide receiver. They need help. They got home. Who is awesome but he can't do everything by himself from the slot. They have n'keal Harry who n'keal Harry. I I think he's going to pop. I think he's going to progress and keep getting better. But she's not a number one right now. So on top of the page where it's also added Kendrick Bourne guy from my local area actually went to Eastern Washington University 25 years old. He's coming from the San Francisco 49ers. He got a three year deal worth twenty two point five million dollars. Now another thing the Patriots did they also added they signed Center Ted carriages and they traded for tackle Trent Brown. So this is the new Patriots offense right now. They've receivers Nelson agholor, Julian Edelman Kendrick born and kill hair is its own nuclear Aguilera. I'm doing my best. It's a hard game to say. They also have Sony Michelle running backs for any receivers Sony Michelle at running back and improved offensive line. Cam Newton at quarterback who I get why people doubt Cam? He's a former NFL MVP and with when you put cams Talent with a lot of weapons including two outstanding tight ends Hunter Henry Smith, right man. I'll tell you what I look at the Patriots offense and think two things immediately number one. Everything is going to run through their brand new Titans. Their entire offense now is probably going to drive down the seams of the field right up the middle. They're going to use our tents heavily lot of play-action again. I am scheme wise things will look a lot like the page words did back in the day when they had drunk and Aaron Hernandez together to start tight ends. Now number two. I feel very very confident with Cam Newton as the Patriots quarterback and it surprised me but I want to remind you that two years ago. Tom Brady was the page word starting quarterback and did basically nothing and the reason was there were no weapons there. He kept running into the same brick wall. His receivers weren't good enough. So, how can I think you and I would both agree. I like Cam Newton Tom Brady's a better quarterback than Cam Newton. So my point is if Tom Brady couldn't make it work with New England's roster. How was Cam Newton supposed to succeed? He was set up to fail will now Cam Newton's being given weapons is being set up to do. Well, I'm excited man. He's a former NFL MVP, he's hungry. I I personally believe Cam Newton's going to have an awesome year and it really is going to make extended one-year deal with like it was like three and a half million dollars with a bunch of incentives. I honestly think we're gonna look back at his contract at the end of next year and go. Can you believe the deal they got on Camden he played so well for no money. I really think he's he's a guy who can didn't play well enough wage. Last year to earn a new gigantic contract. So he's going to have to show what he can do this year and maybe earn more money next year but I think cam is poised to do very very well and make a lot of money and win a lot of games in New England

Patriots Nelson Agholor New England Bill Belichick Johnny Smith Cam Newton Keal Harry Ed Hunter Henry Josh Gordon Phillip Dorsett NFL Hunter Henry La Chargers Raiders Kendrick Bourne Ted Carriages Trent Brown
Construction contract awarded for new St. Elizabeths Hospital in Washington DC

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

Construction contract awarded for new St. Elizabeths Hospital in Washington DC

"D. C is closer to reality. The district and United Health Services have awarded a construction contract for what will be a state of the art facility in Ward eight. Turner Construction company and emcee and build will handle. The $375 Million Project Hospital will be run by UnitedHealth and George Washington University at ST Elizabeth's East. Expected to create about 2000 jobs, and it's set to be finished in 2024 5 42.

United Health Services Turner Construction Company Million Project Hospital Ward St Elizabeth Unitedhealth George Washington University
Is This Ancient Biblical Forgery Actually Real?

Kottke Ride Home

05:48 min | 1 year ago

Is This Ancient Biblical Forgery Actually Real?

"So close to a century and a half ago. A man named moses wilhelm shapira found fifteen manuscript fragments in a cave near the dead sea. They were written in an ancient hebrew script and contained. What shapiro claimed was the original book of deuteronomy blitz despite interest from the british museum to the tune of a million pounds. The manuscripts were found to be forged. Shapiro was disgraced and the documents disappeared but now a scholar named don dershowitz is questioning. If those documents might have been real all along so while the british museum was examining the manuscript fragments for authenticity themselves. Back in the nineteen th century. A few of the fragments were also on display to the public already attracting tons of visitors. The news of the possibly oldest ever discovered biblical manuscript had made headlines around the world. While awaiting the museum's official decree of authenticity. Someone else decided to take matters into their own hands. Charles simone clermont. Is you know who the times describes as a swashbuckling french archaeologist and longtime nemesis of shapiro's end quote examined the fragments for a few minutes and immediately went to the press to say that they were fake. The risk he played on his cursory examination paid off when the british museum experts agreed. Shapiro was humiliated by this and ended up. Tragically dying by suicide a few months later. The documents were sold at auction for a fraction of what they were originally expected to sell for. And most people soon forgot about the whole thing now. Dershowitz from the university of potsdam germany has published a new paper and companion book making the case that the manuscript was real all along quoting the new york times but dershowitz makes an even more dramatic claim the text which he is reconstructed from nineteenth century transcriptions and drawings is not a reworking of deuteronomy. He argues but a precursor to its dating to the period of the first temple before the babylonian exile that would make it the oldest biblical manuscript by far and an unprecedented window into the origins and evolution of the bible and biblical religion dershowitz. His research closely guarded until now has yet to get broad. Scrutiny scholars previewed his findings at a closed-door seminar at harvard in two thousand nineteen are divided. A taste of fierce debates likely to come but of dershowitz is correct. Some experts say it will be the most consequential bible related discovery since the dead sea scrolls in nineteen forty seven and quotes the times. Sagely points out that it's much tougher to prove something authentic than it is to prove. It's fake but there's an additional hurdle to be jumped. In this case the physical fragments themselves may no longer exist so back in eighteen eighty three there was a mad rush at the time to find biblical artifacts that would prove or disprove various points of contention emerging in biblical scholarship moseley around the documentary hypothesis. The idea that the first five books of the bible or the pentateuch were actually written by various authors. Not just one traditionally thought to be moses. It was in this climate of aggressive archaeology that shapiro. I established himself as an antiquities dealer in jerusalem and during which time he and clermont no became enemies. After camacho correctly denounced a collection of pottery. That shapira had sold to the german government. It's also important to note that shapiro was a convert to christianity having been raised jewish in russia so he was viewed with some skepticism from the other biblical scholars and archaeologists and also faced intense antisemitism after the deuteronomy manuscript was denounced. Fast forward to now. Dershowitz says one of the main reasons he thinks the fragments could have been real is because their contents differs quite a bit from the deuteronomy in the bible and many of those differences lineup with discoveries that were only made when the dead sea scrolls were found in nineteen forty seven sixty four years. After chapitoulas discovery of the fragments dershowitz also investigated. Some of shapiro's personal notes archived at the berlin state library and found three. Handwritten pages of shapiro trying to decipher the fragments. Filled with question marks and transcription errors. Dershowitz said quote if he forged them or was part of a conspiracy. It makes no sense that he'd be sitting there trying to guess what the text is and making mistakes while he did it end quote while some scholars of the evolution of biblical text or undershoots side cautiously believing the deuteronomy fragments may be genuine. Most pig refers people who study inscriptions are the ones that usually authenticate documents. Most of them aren't convinced they say the original fragments bear the hallmarks of modern forgery. That they agree with the notes made by the experts who examined them at the time and since no one has the fragments to examine physically now. It's a closed case and as for the content being impressions christopher rolston leading pig refer at george washington university said quote. Forgers are pretty clever with regard to content and they've been very clever for twenty five hundred years and quotes despite dershowitz his published paper and companion book. The jury is still out and who knows if it will ever truly be born ounce. It would have some pretty huge complications. If it does due to some of its key differences for example. It's missing all of the laws of the deuteronomy were familiar with in the bible. Ones upon which traditions and entire libraries have been founded. It would also bolster the theory that are tons more stories and traditions out there than just the ones that have been preserved in the hebrew bible.

Shapiro Dershowitz Moses Wilhelm Shapira Don Dershowitz Charles Simone Clermont University Of Potsdam British Museum German Government Sagely Chapitoulas The New York Times Berlin State Library Moseley Shapira Camacho Germany Harvard Clermont
Faketinas

Locatora Radio

05:02 min | 1 year ago

Faketinas

"Get started with. I think this person or this story broke during the summer. it's kinda hard to tell now with the pandemic. what time is like but one other prominent ones that i remember seeing that wino- was flooding. Our timeline was the story of jessica. Craig aka or formerly known as jess la. Barletta cringe already awesome early known formerly known best. I'm about that. Let's get started. Let's talk about her. Yes so this woman has allegedly and apparently apparently been taking on different like black and afro sport identities throughout her life. She's an a professor or was a professor and academic where george washington university and university teaching. You know black studies are afrikaner studies and publishing books but at some point she were shifting from being in a north african to being african american and then being afro latin next sand after boaty gua was i think the final landing place for her her official forum her final warm so jessica. Krog just aka justifiable maleta hers combination of black fishing and being a fake tina at the same time and She got called out basically rightfully so rightfully so by a group of professors who are after latina's who had issues with her they were witness to or on the receiving end of like aggression from her and like prejudice and bad behavior while she was masquerading as after let nine different contexts. Apparently being super like belligerent towards black women in my on cool and really I think overcompensating and so trying to be an ex sorted extreme caricature of like this south bronx like her. Allegedly her mother was like a drug addicts prostitutes like this narrative that should created about herself so black women in the academy you know began talking about these different experiences and came forward and said This is not right. Yeah she was definitely performing like whoa kness being extreme radical like it was very performative. She was a published academic author and she also received a ton of accolades rice. She received she was a finalist. For the twenty twenty frederick douglass prize book prize presented by yale's gilder lehrman center the study of slavery resistance and abolition. She also was nominated or a finalist for the twenty thousand nine. Harriet tubman book prize and just received a ton of accolades has really been propelled or was propelled forward and questionably hired because of not solely for her identity. But because of the work she was doing and also the way. She positioned herself as offer latino or body gua and it's very cringe to think about all of the opportunities she stole from actual author. Latinas boras caribbean women. That are doing if not the same work or better work you know. And so it's that was probably one of the first ones that we saw. And then i think it kind of just opened up the floodgates for a lot of others than i don't know about you ma. But in my chicano studies department at uc santa barbara. There were a couple of fake denies that i will not name. They were not. They weren't anyone that i took like. I didn't take any classes with them but they were around. People talked about them. People knew like this person is very white claims this this cheek. Ghana mohican identity. You know is wide. Skin blue is performing she gun. You know some kind of ghana identity wearing that. I had because with the free that carlo ecstatic the whole thing right and it's like you like i they weren't. They were my peers. I was a student right. But i have friends that were graduate students. And they would tell me about these. Things happen. And in their cohort or in their in their seminars. And so you know. I think if if you've been in academia right. I haven't been to grad school. But i was an undergrad but i've i've definitely seen the fake tina's around so they definitely exists and i think this one opened the floodgates for a ton of

Craig Aka Jess La Boaty Gua Krog Jessica Barletta Yale's Gilder Lehrman Center George Washington University South Bronx Tina Latinas Boras Frederick Douglass Harriet Tubman Ghana Caribbean Santa Barbara Carlo Academia
Vermont Sen. Patrick Leahy returns home after hospital visit

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

Vermont Sen. Patrick Leahy returns home after hospital visit

"For months senator Patrick Leahy has been released from a Washington hospital expenses the eighty year old senator Patrick Leahy is looking forward to getting back to work after a brief visit to George Washington University hospital Lahey reported not feeling well at the capitol in was sent to the hospital as a precaution and for testing earlier Tuesday he'd been presiding over the Senate as president pro temp at this time I will administer the oath of the senators in the chamber swearing in colleagues ahead of next month's impeachment trial for Donald Trump Leahy is the longest serving member of the U. S. Senate he was elected to Congress in nineteen seventy four Jackie Quinn Washington

Senator Patrick Leahy Lahey George Washington University Washington Senate Donald Trump Leahy Congress Jackie Quinn
"washington university" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"washington university" Discussed on WTOP

"Yet to be approved by regulators. That CBS News correspondent Jim Chris Hula CBS News confirming the president Biden is bringing aboard his longtime doctor who will serve now is the new White House physician, Dr Kevin O'Connor was also Mr Biden's position while he was vice president. O'Connor then became the founding director of executive medicine at George Washington University. He has served 22 years in the Army. Two German shepherds are settling in at the White House this morning. Both champ and major arrived yesterday champ joined the Biden family back in late 2008 just before Joe and Jill Biden moved into the official residence of the vice president. He came from a breeder of two years ago. The Bidens then adopted major through the Delaware Humane Association. President John F. Kennedy and his wife, Jackie, also had a pair of German shepherds when they were in the White House. Well, that brings us to w. T. O P s PET of the week. Our pet of the week is sponsored by the Rocky Gorge Animal Hospital Resort and Spa. Danny Rizzo is joining us live now on Skype from the Humane Rescue alliance. You've got a little bit of work to do here to top the new White House pumps. Tell us about belladonna who was looking for a new home. We sure do of belladonna. I think of anyone could do it. She is super sweet. She's about three years old. She's a boxer mix, and she's got those huge super cute ears that everyone in our staff just loves. She's really playful, energetic. She's about £51. So she's a pretty big girl. But she's super Smart already knows a lot of commands and really is a wonderful dog. Is belladonna, a good dog or a very good dog. She's a very good dog She loves treats, loves playing fetch. And really, she is most happy when she could drape herself over you on your lap and just snuggle up on the couch rates. How did belladonna come to the shelter? She actually came to us from a local transport from Montgomery County. So she's a local girl, so we'd love to find her a local home here. She's really sweet. How do folks get in touch with you guys so that they can take a look at belladonna and maybe take her home? Absolutely so they can set up a virtual me angry and learn more about her at humane rescue. Lyons dot warg. Thank you, Danny. We appreciated Danny Rizzo with you Humane Rescue Alliance and you can.

White House vice president Danny Rizzo Dr Kevin O'Connor Humane Rescue alliance Jill Biden President John F. Kennedy Delaware Humane Association Rocky Gorge Animal Hospital Re president CBS News Joe CBS Jim Chris Hula Army George Washington University founding director Montgomery County Skype Jackie
"washington university" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"washington university" Discussed on KOMO

"Say he would contest congressional certification of Joe Biden's win, reportedly fired out of fundraising text just before things went sideways of the U. S Capital on Wednesday used the fundraising text to promote his objection to the results that he is working to ensure everyone has a voice at the ballot box organization called Wind. Red, Distributed Holly's text, which was obtained by Camellia Television, ST Louis Meanwhile, former Missouri Senator John Danforth, an early backer of Holly called his support for Holly the worst mistake of his life. Danforth called his former proteges plan to object to the election radical and dangerous. A B C's can't Martin Separately, publisher Simon and Schuster announced It's canceled Holly's plan book, saying it can't support him After his role in what became a dangerous threat to democracy and freedom. Holly called that Orwellian on the pandemic. Top government infectious disease doctor, Anthony Fauci addressed Washington University in ST Louis. He expressed astonishment. There are still people who consider the pandemic a hoax. That to me is unimaginable that that is going on in the United States, you know something almost as unimaginable as what happened last night. In my town here of Washington, D C. Something that you say. How could this possibly be going on the covert tracking project reported a new first more than 4000 dead in the latest reporting period. This is ABC News. Come on his time, 10, 04 and traffic every 10 minutes on the forest from the Dubin Law Group Traffic Center J. Phillips. In the Seattle wanna remind you that everything is clear on MLK. Wait South Norfolk. We had a collision, blocking both directions completely. All lanes are open. Now Sterile 5 to 9. The Snohomish River Bridge is back open to vehicle traffic. After Marine Crossing Tonight at 11 O'clock south on Highway 167 will close completely at East Grandview Avenue until the 4 a.m. hour for construction work currently in Lakewood, the south bound by five on and off ramps at Thorne Lane. Are closed overnight. Your next report at 10 14. J. Phillips Cuomo News. Shannon.

Holly Senator John Danforth Anthony Fauci Joe Biden J. Phillips Cuomo ST Louis Camellia Television Missouri South Norfolk ABC News Shannon Schuster Snohomish River Bridge Washington University U. S Capital Dubin Law Group United States Seattle J. Phillips Washington
"washington university" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:02 min | 1 year ago

"washington university" Discussed on WTOP

"George Washington University Hospital, part of the nationwide vaccination kickoff event. US surgeon General Drum Adam's among those on hand. The development of a covert 19 vaccine is nothing short. Of revolutionary and this comes less than a week after the FDA granted emergency use of the vaccine and visor so far shipped out almost three million doses across the country. Can Duffy w. T O P. News University of Maryland medical system got its first shipment of fighters Corona virus vaccine Today. It arrived this morning at the system's flagship hospital in Baltimore. The first people to get the shot in Maryland, our health care workers, employees of long term care facilities. As well as first responders. Meanwhile, Howard University Hospital scored 725 doses to vaccinate It's health care workers Children's National Hospital Medstar Georgetown University Hospital and Medstar Washington Hospital Center will get their vaccine doses tomorrow. Kaiser Permanente will get its allotment on Wednesday. We've learned that D C is getting several 1000 extra doses of the vaccine from Virginia. Here's w T. O P S Meghan Cloherty Duffy look wandering Nesbitt, Head of D C health confirms the city is getting Mork over 19 vaccinations from Virginia than from the federal government that will allow the district who are closed part structure to vaccinate healthcare workers who reside in Northern Virginia. Working the district, Nesbit says. Next week she expects to distribute 8000 vaccines from Virginia to the six city hospitals who are sharing the 6825 vaccines. The city's getting from the federal government. We can't provide timelines in terms of what date we will get to the general public or when we will get to other risk groups and phase two Because we simply don't know how much vaccine we will get. And when D C health is also in discussions with Maryland to share its vaccines, Meghan Cloherty w T O P. NEWS There is a chance that Congress won't be allowed to go on a holiday recess until the House and Senate passed a covert relief package. Virginia Senator Tim Kaine says his official objection has support from members of both parties. So what's the holdup? The two big sticking points are liability protection against damages claims related to Cove it and money for state and local governments. Republicans want liability protection Don't Light state and local government. Eight Democrats One state and local government and don't like liability protection. What can we do? Tim Kaine, Democratic senator from Virginia, says both sides have liability proposals. If there's an agreement before winter break. He fears though it may involve dropping those contentious points. Issues with consensus include money for health care workers, substance abuse, small businesses, food and rent assistance, schools, transit and Extending unemployment benefits to more people for longer time with bigger checks in northern Virginia Christi King w T o P News ahead here on w T O P President elect Joe Biden addresses the nation after the Electoral College affirms his November election victory. 10 07 even during challenging times like.

Virginia National Hospital Medstar Geor George Washington University H Senator Tim Kaine federal government Medstar Washington Hospital Ce Maryland Howard University Hospital US T O P. News University of Mary Nesbit Kaiser Permanente Meghan Cloherty Duffy Northern Virginia General Drum Adam Baltimore Meghan Cloherty Joe Biden FDA
"washington university" Discussed on The Academic Minute

The Academic Minute

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"washington university" Discussed on The Academic Minute

"Today on the academic minute Johan Neem professor in the Department of History at western Washington University discusses three men vocabularies and why the least dominant could be the most important. . My research argues that our debates over higher education have three better vocabularies, , the utilitarian, , the pragmatic and the virtue ethical. . The first two are dominant especially among citizens and policymakers too utilitarian colleges must satisfy the preference of higher education's consumers to pragmatists including many elected leaders. . Institutions must consistently evolve to meet the changing needs of society and the economy. . To Virtue. . At this on the other hand, , colleges have internal goods of their own such as the cultivation of knowledge and curiosity about the world and these internal birds require practices to sustain them including, , valuing basic over applied research and teaching. . To virtual emphasis, , colleges must change the world rather than just adapt to fit it. . That's how university is structured and what faculty members and students do while in college shaped the ultimate educational and scholarly outcomes. . Many of today's most popular form seek to make higher education faster cheaper standardized but threatened the kinds of academic practices that cultivate intellectual virtues. . By understanding these Meta vocabularies, , we can make sense of the ways in which participants in the public conversation around higher education talk past each other. . We can recover a shared language for Liberal Education I. . Hope my research will help college students, , their parents, , voters, , and policymakers. Makers . understand the different perspectives that we can use to think about the purposes of college. . Ultimately, , in my research I wanted to understand why professors like me are uncomfortable with reforms that to many others seem to make common sense. . By identifying these Meta vocabularies. . I was able to see what was at stake for all who care about higher education's future that was Johann name of western Washington University. .

western Washington University Association of American colleg Dr Lynch Pascarella Johan Neem President professor Department of History Johann
"washington university" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"washington university" Discussed on Cardionerds

"You have a great day. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> Wow <Speech_Music_Male> what an amazing <Speech_Music_Male> episode <Speech_Music_Male> a huge thanks to <Speech_Music_Male> the fellows and faculty <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for enriching us with <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> another terrific discussion <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and an incredible <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> edition to the Cardi <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> nerds case report <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> series. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Be sure to check <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> out the show for all <Speech_Music_Male> the case media available <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for view <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> key take on <Speech_Music_Male> points and special <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> points and links <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to the program. <Speech_Music_Male> If you like the educational <Speech_Music_Male> takeaways <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> graphics delivered directly <Speech_Music_Male> to your email <Speech_Music_Male> silence for the heartbeat, <Speech_Music_Male> the cardinals <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> newsletter by clicking <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> on the link in <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the episode show notes. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thank <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the ACC <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> element training session <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> chaired by Dr Machine <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> reasons for <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> their incredible <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> support and collaboration. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Can <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a very special. Thanks <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to our phenomenal <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> production team <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for elevating <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the platform <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Collins. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Tommy. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> UNICEF do <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> rick, Ferraro <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Evelyn Song <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and dividend verghese <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> internal medicine <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> senior residents as <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the Johns. Hopkins. Hospital <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> as well <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> as the team men <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> had mentor and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> University of Maryland. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Cardiology fellow <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and decide <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> if you love the show <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> as much as we do <Speech_Music_Male> be sure to spread the <Speech_Music_Male> word reading <Speech_Music_Male> US favorite podcasts <Speech_Music_Male> platform and <Speech_Music_Male> consider becoming a <Speech_Music_Male> patron of the show <Speech_Music_Male> on Patriots. <Speech_Music_Male> Alright. That's <Speech_Music_Male> time to make <Music> s you <Music> split. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> The <Speech_Female> leasing of our med school <Speech_Female> band the peacemaker. <Speech_Female> So I looked pretty <Speech_Female> much obligated. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I've got to say that's <Speech_Male> at the same <Speech_Male> time. <Speech_Male> But also <Speech_Male> the most brilliant and <Speech_Telephony_Male> cool thing I've ever heard <Speech_Male> you've got to sing <Speech_Male> for us now before <SpeakerChange> you go. <Speech_Male>

"washington university" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

08:11 min | 2 years ago

"washington university" Discussed on Cardionerds

"Program here in other thing that's been a pleasant surprises I never really knew much about Saint Louis prior to living here and being able to quickly integrate within the practice environment at Wash. U.. And then moving my family to Saint Louis quickly learn how money. There are not just professional development within the fellowship program, but also it's been a great place to live and raise children and have a family. It's really been a great place both professionally in the fellowship training program and is a great place to live. So it's really been a great thing for me. I want to thank you so much for teaching us about a great case, a really interesting disease process and really just telling us a little bit about the program Saint Louis. I hope when all this pandemic situation is over that I have opportunity to visit y'all. Thanks for being on the show. Absolutely, thanks for having us. Thanks for having us. Thank you again. and. Now for the comment by Dr Katie Zang, who is our associates director and a cardiac calls you specialist thank you very much for inviting me to participate in this episode of the Cardio Nerds Podcast as an associate program director for the cardiology fellowship program and a cardio oncologist here at Wash U., it's been really exciting for me to see interest and expertise and cardiac amyloidosis grow among the rising cardiology fellowship classes. This is a very exciting time for our patients with cardiac amyloidosis. Since we now have effective therapies to treat the disease as well as noninvasive testing options that can greatly facilitate diagnostic process. One point mentioned earlier that I want to highlight again, here is the wide variability in clinical presentation that you will encounter among patients with cardiac amyloidosis. Of course, they'll be the occasional patient that checks all your red flag findings markedly increased LV walls, low-voltage bilateral, carpal tunnel, a FIB heart failure, but really the majority of the patients that we encounter in real life don't check all. Of these boxes and when you look at all of these factors individually, there are a lot of patients out there that have L. V. H. A. FIB or carpal tunnel, even relative April sparing of strain. You'll find if you look carefully enough lesser-known red flag findings that we found to be very useful include or the static hypertension intolerance of traditional heart failure medications and unexplained neuropathy. To. Really improve detection of patients with cardiac amyloidosis. We need to have a high index of suspicion for really all patients that we see the fellows who rotate with us on Cardio Oncology know that once you have your eyes open, you really start to see amyloid everywhere to give you a recent example I was in the echo reading room a few weeks ago and opened up an echo on a post op patient who was having non sustained V. T.. And really the was fairly nondescript. You know pretty average except for mildly produce enough scrolling down I got to the strain images and wow, there was just a really striking epochal sparing of strain. I, really hesitate to call or even suggest amyloid when there's really no other echo findings. No increased wall thickness or restrictive diastolic filling. So I opened up the patient's chart and right there the first line of the neurosurgery. H. and P. said history of bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome emitted for lumbar lamb neck demy needless to say this patient got an immediate cardio oncology console a technician empire phosphates skin and was diagnosed with tr cardiac amyloidosis. The second teaching point I want to highlight from this really excellent case presentation is appropriate use of the technician power phosphates can I it's really critical to exclude Al when ordering this test since Al is the primary cause, a false positive technician scans. If a monoclonal protein is detected by as pepper, you pep immune immunization or by abnormal free light chain ratio than technician skin is no longer specific for tr cardiac amyloidosis and a biopsy is needed. Secondly, the technician skin must be performed with respect imaging and orbited false positives due to blood pooling of tracer in the LV cavity. And finally I think it's really important to remember that the technician skin as a diagnostic test has really only been validated in highly selected patients who are evaluated at specialty amyloidosis centers around the world. So as we start to use this test, a wider patient population potentially with a lower pre-test probability for tr cardiac amyloidosis, it's likely that the sensitivity and specificity of the test will change. So then this brings us to the question of the role of cardiac biopsy. In general. I. Think a great two or three technician power phosphate scan combined with the absence of a monoclonal protein, a clinical history and cardiac imaging that are consistent with t. r. that's really sufficient to make the diagnosis frequently. However, things are not so clear cut and a biopsy is needed to exclude Al in the presence of monoclonal protein our practice here at wash. U. Is to refer patients for biopsy of an involved organ, which usually ends up being the heart. A recent patient of ours had a classic amyloid Echo along with multiple myeloma end of the one, twenty, two, I mutation in the transpired gene. So in this was a great case of how cardiac biopsy with mass spectrometry was really critical to accurately type the amyloid protein. In terms of future directions for the amyloid sphere I think we still need to do a better job of identifying patients with Kartik immolate early, enough in their disease course for our therapies to be effective I, think that targeting amyloid education to our medicine and cardiology trainees. Probably the highest yield way to do this, and that's why I'm really proud that we're taking part in this cardio nerds podcast to help to disseminate this information. I'm also really proud that all of our. FELLOWS IN GENERAL CARDIOLOGY FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM DO CARDIO ONCOLOGY rotation, which provides exposure to the inpatient and outpatient care of cardiac amyloidosis patients, as well as exposure to our multidisciplinary amyloid meetings where we really go over the intricacies and the diagnosis and management of these complex patients for those fellows out there that are interested in research is a lot of really exciting research going on right now in the amyloid world, a lot of it is aimed at developing for improving our ability to detect. Cardiac amyloidosis earlier, some of these diagnostic scores are echo based others are more emaar based. I think no matter the modality when he to make sure that these studies include patients from different medical centers, different countries, and also at different stages of disease so that we can optimize the utility of these diagnostic scores. Once we try to apply them to the general population in real life, there's also an important need for novel therapeutics that are effective in more advanced stages of disease, right? Now all of the therapies that we have al and tr are aimed at reducing production of amyloid protein in the case of Al Chemo in the case of teach yards to feminists on person and participate in all of which ultimately reduced miss folding of the TR protein. But for those patients who present and more advanced heart failure were not making an impact on the.

cardiac amyloidosis technician amyloidosis Saint Louis Al Cardio Oncology L. V. H. A. FIB multiple myeloma associate program director Dr Katie Zang Chemo Wash U. Kartik immolate director
"washington university" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

SuperTalk WTN 99.7

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"washington university" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

"I'm just telling you there's no way these charges stick when it was in the operating manual for the guy to do it. Some look in this story. White professor admits she pretended to be black. I absolutely cancel myself. George Washington University historian Jessica Krug. Or maybe it's crude. Whatever revealed in a medium post That she's lived under various assumed identities within a blackness. That I had no right to claim. This is like that Rachel Dole's all again She has Vince's quote. I have lived under quote various assumed identities within a blackness. That I had no writing. What does that mean? Says that this is a George Washington University professor has been pretending to be a black woman. Throughout her career. I have a skewed my lived experience as a white Jewish child in suburban Kansas City. Under various assumed identities within a blackness that I had no right to claim First North American blackness than us rooted blackness, then Caribbean rooted Bronx blackness. She confessed on a post on medium I am not a culture vulture. I am a culture leech, she wrote, saying she's been battling unaddressed mental health demons for her entire life. She said mental health issues could never explain or justify neither condone nor excuse her false identity. I should absolutely be canceled, she added. No, I don't write in the passive voice. Ever because I believe we must name power. So you should absolutely cancel me and I am absolutely can't canceling myself. I'm telling these people these people are flip in crazy. Writer Robert Jones Jr tweeted about the post early this afternoon, saying he's in a state of complete and utter shock and sadness. He also referred to Kruger as Jeff La Bomba era, calling her an activist, he had often differed, too, and stepped aside of online. And so I'm seeing a picture of her. And you know who she looks like. You remember that crazy woman on B s N B C. There was a professor. Wake Forest. What was her name? That had sort of a list. I can't remember that Chick's name now. But she was no blacker than I am. And you know, she always she. She did her hair and a black thing. But, you know, I always suspected that this girl looks like her. She looks like her. George Washington University has yet to confirm Krug six identity, but her faculty page Lister is a Lister is a specialist in African American history. Oh, she was the full Monty, didn't she? Although the biography has since changed business insider reporter Gram star surface, they cashed version describing Krug as An unrepentant and UN reformed child of the hood. The childhood. She recently published a story for essence named on Puerto Rico Blackness and being when nations aren't enough. Which was reposted by care being news. And culture site REPEATING islands on August 29, according to Duke University Press..

George Washington University Puerto Rico Blackness Jessica Krug professor Chick Monty Duke University Press Rachel Dole Robert Jones Jr Caribbean Kansas City Wake Forest Kruger reporter UN Writer Jeff La Bomba Vince
"washington university" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"washington university" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"And five pins and a mechanical pencil around in your pocket. This is for you. Google's lens APP is adding a new feature. And let you point your camera at complicated math problems, and it'll solve them for you. Oh, Basically, it's for confused parents trying to help their kids with homework. Yeah, now had I had something like that. When I was going to school. I would have used it a lot. But we all know how that words you get 100 on all your homework papers. Then you take a test and you get an F because they're watching you in class If you break your phone out Researchers at Washington University in ST Louis. Are turning regular old bricks into batteries. They're filling the bricks with nano fibers so they can store electricity. And they're hoping that someday we could literally store energy and the walls of our homes. Awesome. Yeah, well, there goes WiFi. Geologist who studied plate tectonics say that Africa Is going to eventually split right down the middle into two separate continents and is going to form a brand new ocean. Course, none of us will be around to see it. It's going to take millions of years for that to happen. The two halves Right now are moving away from each other by about 1/4 inch every year. Told you Nerd news. Amen. R Well despite putting up a good fight and the bubble the Spurs air out of the playoffs after a 22 year impressive run new research shows Cove in 19 most likely hit a sooner than we thought. Joe Biden is calling for a nationwide mask mandate for three months, while President Trump says the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee is in favor of locking up all Americans in their basement for months on end. Texas Attorney General Kim Paxton is blaming Cancel culture for cuts TOE Austin's police department more coming up W AWAY I news time. 7 51 now traffic and weather together from the W away I traffic center. Good morning traffic starting to build up a bit in one of our most usual spots. If you're going to be heading east on Loop 16 04 You'll need just about one or two extra minutes to get from Houseman. Toe. Luck Can Terra on Luke for 10. You'll need about 10 or 12 minutes in total to get between Bandeira and I 35 in either direction. I'm calling Ellis NewsRadio 1200 Wook I. This report is sponsored by the podcast, The Daily Zeitgeist. The Daily Site. Geist is a podcast from the world's.

Google Geist Ellis NewsRadio Joe Biden ST Louis Geologist Daily Site Attorney General Kim Paxton Washington University Africa Houseman President Trump Texas Bandeira Spurs Cove
"washington university" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

07:46 min | 2 years ago

"washington university" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Kelsey Chevrolet, all excited about our in studio guest. He works for the PNG MLB, Cincinnati Reds Youth Academy, longtime coach and instructor and it's an honor pleasure and privilege to welcome in studio Donnie Amrhein, Donnie. How are you, stud? How's it going? I'm splendid. Check if life was any better. I think the deck was stacked all that's beautiful. Now, when I first invited you on, we were umpiring together of M v P park. Yes, sir. And You know, I said, What I wanted to say was that baseball and softball are the perfect It's the perfect sport. But it's played. It's managed its coached. It's administered by imperfectly people. So, Yeah, So, Yeah, we're not perfect, but it's the perfect game. Now since the pandemic hit, how have you filled the void of no major league baseball until like late July? Well, here's the deal. My house is clean. All the gardening is done. And of course, in the evenings you can watch. Replays of the Reds world Siri's games and assorted other Reds game, So that's all that was always great. And then there was the issue of the floating return to play for my high school team I coach at ST Ursula Academy. Yes, and Um Constantly in contact with the A, D, A. And the assistant A G. What games do we want to drop? How are we going to reconcile a new Practice regimen. Where will we practice all those kind of things? So there was still a lot of stuff going on? Beautiful Now, This wasn't a question that I sent you. But you are wearing an all Star game T shirt. Washington, D. C. 2018 And you were there and tell us about that. Come We were Major league baseball was kind enough to include A fast pitch softball tournament called the Jennie Finch Classic. Many people out there would likely know the name Jennie Finch. So I took one of the Reds. Academy teams 16 and under and we went up on buses, too. Washington D. C. We stayed at George Washington University. Major league baseball laid out the red carpet for us. Of course, we got to go to the futures game. We've got to go to the home run hitting contest. We got to tour Washington, D. C. And all on Major League Baseball's dime. Dad is outstanding. And I'm asking Cliff in Bridgetown and Tim in Finney Town toe. Hang on. I'm going to get Teo your comments because I want to find out where you played Little League baseball. And as the previous callers were calling in My guest tonight. Donny Amrhein has played and umpired and coached in all these places all over Southwest Ohio. Am I correct correct 40 plus years umpiring. I've umpiring a number of national championships I've given umpired once at the Olympic level. So if you learn your craft, you know the rules in your hustle. The ballplayers will forgive an occasional miscue, you know? Totally agree. And yet we have. There are a lot of horse stories about parents and everything. But if they see You hustle and you're exactly right that can be forgiven and the old Joe DiMaggio line. You never know who's watching you for the first time, and you only get that one chance to make that great impression. So I'm going to hustle and make a hostile mistake if I have to, But you're absolutely right now. The Cincinnati Reds Youth Academy. What an awesome training facility in academy it is. Can you talk about the impact on the kids in the community? Sure. Um Of course, there's a buy in By and by the The youth and their guardians, parents. They if they if they do so, they show up. The the academy makes available to them tutoring. Speed, agility, training, acceleration, training skills development. Mentoring. They are obligated to do some community service work, becoming a team player. Generating a lot of friendships. But of course they have to be accountable. They have to show up. We do we do great checks. So you have you know grades are very important. A cz you might imagine even with the NFL level Um, which is a different sport, but you can have lots of talent. But if you don't know the playbook You might not get on the field. Great to know great to know. We've got a lot of questions for Donny and he's you're welcome to call in and ask, Don a question. It's 7491 7800 The big £1.700 on T right now, don, let's go out to the phones. I want to hear from Cliff in Bridgetown. Cliff you used to umpire Major League baseball. I played baseball at Tokyo. I impart all in fields and, uh oh, no. Federally start coaching early Lord with Coach tinkle like her before he went to elder. Well, I am tired. I am part of the Ohio State you again when I was 19. And it was four guys. I feel that played with the year before that back when Speakman played Steve Day played Greg Groove getting Ellman calling guys. You know what those our Goro kills. Ah! In 1971 I went down to Florida when the Barney Dairy School and I am part of the Gulf Coast Way. 71 72. And back. I was won the umpires when you were on strike. I applied the games down there, and I had Tom Sabre one night behind the plate and I might. There's only a couple of still living because that's back when the Let's try telling Mick Sharkey empire in pro ball and I am powerless. He was like my partner. And people you were talking about can feel we are proud to tristate finals out there and less throughout. Wesley Wesley, who was a tri state coach. You got paid off when he turned the lights off. And they were mercury vapor lights. It's 20 minutes to get the lights to come. Yeah, he says, because he paid for the lights, he could turn them off. But that didn't work out too well. But, yeah, Johnny bench tonight when the Army reserves together before Thomas and no will cost Cheney and Randy Marsh were over there and a company invest and I were in the headquarters company. Oh, man, And then the night I had Tom superficial, said John. I'm nervous as hell. He's acquitted. You got DVDs you have in the world, he said. It's all you do is watch me. Catch the ball. Absolutely all God, Cliff, great stuff and Donnie, let's try town and make shark. They were two good ones. Yeah, way all put together and I have been down for two years. And it was he tried till lied about his age..

baseball Major League Baseball Cincinnati Reds Youth Academy Donnie Amrhein Cliff Donny Amrhein Washington Reds Jennie Finch Kelsey Chevrolet ST Ursula Academy MLB Jennie Finch Classic Joe DiMaggio Little League softball George Washington University Coach tinkle don
"washington university" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

07:31 min | 2 years ago

"washington university" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Central Washington university and he has adapted to our new reality by streaming his geology lessons live on you tube complete with the culinary I just watched one of your videos their neck and I have to commend you on the authenticity there's there's no bells and whistles here you're doing it outside in the sunshine we can see you positioning your yourself and your camera for the optimum lighting and then the and then started a list of the top of the hour just like a pro so I also noticed that you were you were saying hi to students basically all over the world well it is a shock David it's a pleasure to be with you by the way this morning but yeah I it it was just something I wanted to try to keep myself busy that's really the the first thing to say I just I'm a calendar guy wanted to put things on my calendar and I started live streaming from the backyard and before I knew it there were folks from all over the world who were engaging pretty regularly now are you the university is closed I assume so well were you were you doing any online classes for your regular students well the timing of this you know things became real for all of us about that about the time that we were in spring break for central Washington university so I wasn't busy in the middle of a quarter and so I started doing these live streams I think the first one was on Saint Patrick's day and I kind of got things rolling and I do five of these a week out from my backyard and then in the meantime our for our spring quarter here at at central started up so I've got some online duties with my students but these backyard things are easy to do and and it's just an hour every every evening more or less and it's actually pretty fun so you're you're on TV all the time well you know it it's we we do make some programs here for Casey TS in Seattle and and other PPL stations across the northwest so I have a little practice kind of talking into a camera lens but in this case it's a it's a camera lens on a on an iPhone and I just happened to buy a couple months ago and and the video and audio quality on that little Dinky phone is amazing and then I had to teach myself how to broadcast your YouTube and that was also chimpanzee could do it I think so for all the grief that apple gets these things are really in fact I am scraping you right now on my iPhone from my home studio so that's just that's that's just the way it goes that actually is not too different what I was doing from my bedroom at the age of sixteen into a tape recorder except now you can hook yourself up to the rest of the world so tell me square one yeah that's right so so so tell me well when you were doing these I guess I can call them international broadcast what kinds of stuff for it what what are the students interested in in in learning from you what what are some of the the the crazier questions you get well of course it's all over the board we're dealing with with viewers from all ages so I I I have picked up on the fact that a lot of parents are are using this as a home school opportunities so there's kids from a you know there's there's Patrick age sex and there's double in age ten and then so they've got questions and then of course there's people of all different ages typing in and there's also these different countries and so on weeknights I do things that are Washington centric and then on weekends I changed the time so that people from Europe and Asia primarily can watch at a reasonable hour and so then I pick topics that are a bit more global in scale but it's it's all stuff I'm a Washington guides all Washington based stuff and so it's bizarre that somebody in Pakistan is on the edge of their chairs listening about snow quality falls or something about those numbers don't never come here but they like the process they like learning new things and and I I think they feel some sort of connection as well well but I mean you you have the luxury of being a geologist one of America's most geologically active states right Hey man you're preaching to the choir they're absolutely right and so that's that's kind of one of the themes that I'm I'm from Wisconsin right when I learned about geology and got into this geology thing I've I purposely came here to Washington state and so I'm just sharing all the riches that we have geologically here and people are responding for sure so have you not us this is all very portable technology have you thought of just taking people on on field trips and and do some live rock hunting or you are good day you are good I've I've just gotten I've had a lot of help from viewers you know everybody's got advice and some of it's ridiculous but some of it's really helpful and and so there was a guy that said basically I'm I work with some you to program and and you need a I can't remember the brand image just arrived yesterday you need some sort of gamble or something where you put your phone on this little cradle things again I can take it all over the place yeah yeah and I'm pretty pumped up about it so yeah if I can find a couple of field sites in locally here to start in the end I have decent cell coverage I think that's the next step good suggestion also that's your idea was when we were there and yeah because I want to see a broadcasting live from the call dera of mount St Helens now that would get you some clicks the ticket is only six months to arrange a helicopter flight in there last summer to film for the P. B. S. thing so yeah there shouldn't be any any harder than that all this stuff yes I can imagine your now do you make any money at this well no I do not I I'm hesitating because you know there's folks at the university here who have been extremely supportive and one gal in particular who's the executive producer of this Nick on the rocks program for PBS she's constantly encouraging me to kind of expand and and revenue streams and all this and I'm just afraid of all of that I'm I'm just a geology guy with relatively low low profile job at the university and and I've been allowed this freedom to kind of do this stuff for free for the public and I I'm I don't want to get away from that so I I feel like it's it's probably a a weird approach but that's the answer to your question no I don't make any money off this and I feel generally especially in these times right now people just want to connect with somebody who's genuine they'll they want a real person so they don't want some Polish you know person I I've got all sorts of dropping stuff and I love the bike isn't working it out yes nobody would accuse you of being polished that's a compliment in a weird way because they they just want somebody real on the other end and and and so I I'd hate to screw that up that number is teaching geology on his live stream he teaches at central Washington university and if you Google them you will come across as YouTube channel and you'll become the smartest person in the room when it comes to tectonic plates and magma flows and good to talk with your good luck have a good time thank you Dave I really enjoyed chatting with you this morning the clouds burn off full of sunshine this afternoon and later this week because it's seventy degrees coming up on Seattle's morning news our history guy Felix padel takes us back seventy six years to another presidential election year during another uncertain time in American history this is Cairo.

Washington university
"washington university" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

05:35 min | 2 years ago

"washington university" Discussed on KTRH

"Air National Guard Ehrman our very own robberies better seller yes when questioning the results of the election was so bad they said troops to lose indeed he won't say he will bow down and kiss Hillary's ring that'll blow to democracy into flux and bad things are gonna happen troll has to say before the vote did he's gonna lose and then he's going to support Hillary he has to do it otherwise democracies in danger well speaking at George Washington University what are we three years after the election let it go lady such bitterness such chomping on the better route Hillary shopping all the better route she's still finding excuses do you remember all the excuses first it was your damn women you women let your man tell you had a low number that then it was the Democrats because they're all socialists remember she said when forty five percent of Iowa Democrats supported Bernie Sanders instead of me that tells you what I was up against so you got the women you got the socialists she's always blame the blacks there's a seasoning hatred by Hillary for the blacks and I can tell you that Barack winning in two thousand eight I bet you when she got good tanked up on that Chardonnay who about three o'clock when she was two bottles in with some of her girlfriends just better white women they said the staff away locked the doors and just scream at the top of their lungs it does black people especially black man they want to presidency from her and then by the time she ran she was so old fable she had to be we should flop over that have to roll over into the back of a van poor thing I actually feel sorry for she went as bad as Joe Biden is for twenty twenty it's going to be terrible to watch bad bite is going to end up being like report better gives birth and I'm not joking is gonna win the nomination and then we're gonna have these think pieces if Biden dies before the election if Biden dies before the inauguration what would be the constitutional procedure our guest now is Alan Dershowitz to discuss this eventuality here's Hillary at George Washington University chop it on that bitter root now I was the first person who ran for president in more than fifty years without the protection of the voting rights act and let me just say it makes a difference we saw that once again during the twenty eighteen mid term affections which were a case study in voter suppression voters faced intimidation and harassment that echoed some of the worst chapters in our nation's history voter ID requirements amounted to a modern day poll tax voter ID requirements which were literally made up for the purpose of preventing certain people from actually being able to cast a vote that would be counted we saw you are voting place for this long lines and malfunctioning equipment again in certain places in North Dakota we saw sweeping efforts to prevent people from voting particularly native Americans living on reservations in North Carolina Republican operatives illegally collected absentee ballots fill them in and bail them from post offices near voters homes and don't you find it interesting all of the politicians who have argued for years for stricter IDE rules and limits on early voting are curiously quiet about these proven abuses that is no accident it is in service to their larger political goals of obtaining and keeping power you know when someone loses a presidential race that's when you learn a lot about their metal that swing you learn whether they would have been a good president or not and Hillary is reminding us good grief she got so close she would have been a terrible precedent that nagging way that whining that she lost that excuse making that never taking personal responsibility for terrible campaign the thing about it is she's approximately three percent as the retaining list with can you use let me just say it makes a difference we show linear at the village of Rockville opening in fall twenty twenty is rifles newest senior living destination nestled in a quiet neighborhood when there is designed for individuals want more choice.

Ehrman forty five percent three percent fifty years three years
"washington university" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"washington university" Discussed on KOMO

"At western Washington university say no to a hate group that spread propaganda around campus almost lamonica Peters reports we condemn racism in any form after stickers from white nationalist group patriot front were distributed across western Washington university this weekend the university issued an alert Monday afternoon warning students about the incident by the time we were notified of a man went to look at a Monday three of the four had been taken now we took down the fourth one as far as I know we haven't seen any others western has been the target of racist acts before and encourages students to report this type of behavior still some students say they'd like to see the university be more vocal and actively put a stop to it obviously they're doing these kinds of things because they've gotten away with it in the past some student leaders say they want equitable resources for students to deal with the racial incidents on campus they also told us that they aren't surprised by the latest racial incident we did have an instance last year of a student who was pretty vocal vandalized racial slurs across campus made threats to people of certain religions and so I mean I think that western is the place that that can happen the university issued this statement saying in part western Washington university strongly condemns the white nationalist believes that the patriot front he will not be tolerated in our community Monica Peters come on is. news time is now for fifty time for the call will propel insurance money update three major stock indexes closed down more than one percent to begin the fourth quarter a slide that wiped out the third quarter gains for the Dow and the S. and P. five hundred.

western Washington university Monica Peters lamonica Peters one percent
"washington university" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"washington university" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Where George Washington University that is a white man will student sign up fake petition to change it in the name of diversity and inclusion let's find out sign a petition for me side with trying to petition to have them change some things on campus have been offended by them just a picture of a white man we're proposing that and it is in fact the reasons I was so what it is all as soon no like I never thought about it does by some students have the the more yeah yeah we do we want to be be offended so is this something you guys get on board with absolutely we care juror white guy dynalife you're one of the many ways in which the calls and then just to be a white man thank you thank you this is probably the most important one is to leave but I totally get that totally give that to be aboard other people's or yeah twenty nine years ago thank you so I haven't really thought of the greatness of like just thought of it as the latest.

George Washington University twenty nine years
"washington university" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:28 min | 3 years ago

"washington university" Discussed on KQED Radio

"DC special counsel, Robert Mueller's four hundred page report has finally been published. Mr. Mueller's report says he found no criminal conspiracy between Mr. Trump's campaign and Russia, but could not reach a concrete legal conclusion on whether Donald Trump tried to obstruct the investigation itself it details. Ten instances where investigators looked into whether President Trump has tried to criminally obstruct the probe, but it does not come to a conclusion I talked to Jonathan Turley professor of public interest law at George Washington University in Washington DC, what really comes out of the record is this very detailed. And in some cases disturbing picture from the White House. The president alternately was saved from himself by his staff. You know, the president clearly wanted to fire. The special counsel that would have amounted for many people to an act of obstruction. But you have this amazing scene where the president ordered his White House counsel to fire the special counsel and the White House counsel refused. Refused. A direct order of a sitting president. And it's for that reason that this president was able to get through this scandal, very likely without a serious criminal despite himself. It seems. That's right. I mean, it's not easy to obstruct something that's not a crime. But the president made a determined effort. I mean, he almost did that. So there's no criminal charges. But the report does highlight that he did try to do it. Well, he certainly did try to know whether that constitutes obstruction certainly be debated. But it does leave the sort of odd zen like question if the president or. Ordered an act considered obstruction, and nobody listened is it still an active obstruction? And the fact is he didn't fire the special counsel. He didn't destroy any evidence. He didn't force the investigation to a premature ending. So if you separate his rhetoric the records, not that bad, but he clearly had an intent to be obstructive. At least on that issue. There is an interesting part in the report where the president is quoted as using. An exploitive word, and he says, oh my God. This is a quote. Oh my God. This is terrible. This is the end of my presidency. I am dot dot dot what does that tell us about the state of mind of the president? Because as you say he does feel vindicated now after the report was published. He says I'm having a good day. It doesn't seem that. He was that easy going as the investigation was announced. Well in fairness to the president the special counsel does say that he believes that the president. Was primarily concerned about. How how this was going to affect his administration as opposed to ending the investigation. Especial council does say that he fired James call me, the former FBI director not because he wanted to stop the investigation. But because he was upset that Komi wooden say publicly what Komi was saying cravenly that the president was not actually a target of the investigation. What will the Democrats do now? Well, the Democrats themselves are in a bit of a bind the leadership never wanted to impeach Trump. But they ran on teaching Trump to regain pow control the house, but it was never very plausible that they wanted to actually remove Trump. Why would they should bring about a pensive ministration? So the Democrats always wanted to wound but not kill Trump leave him in office Nemec state. Well, they've succeeded in doing that and continue to play up this report investigate Trump. But there's not any real indication. They're moving towards an impeachment. Looking forward though, does this report in hinder his possible reelection, actually, I think the report strengthened his reelection in a couple of respects collusion really was negated as a theory in this report. That's what started all of this. Also, most of those people who were convicted were convicted of. Unrelated crimes, there never was a serious collusion case made against anyone except the Russians who did the hacking, but that wasn't for collusion that was for the effort to disrupt the election. So I think in the end the president is strengthened by the report in that he can say with justification that they did not find some crying connected to collusion. But these stories come out of the report will be played back. The problem is that Trump is this 'nigma, you know, he's not a more president in the way he conducts himself and that frill thumb and then a polls others, but that's not a change. That was professor Jonathan Turley at professor public interest law at George Washington University. Newsday from the BBC World.

president Donald Trump special counsel White House Jonathan Turley George Washington University Robert Mueller professor Washington DC Russia BBC Komi FBI director James
"washington university" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:34 min | 3 years ago

"washington university" Discussed on KCRW

"With the program on extremism at George Washington University. Governor of Connecticut is proposing the first statewide tax on sugar, sweetened drinks to raise money and to fight obesity. Several cities have already enacted such as soda taxes, and as new evidence this week suggesting that they do work, but sometimes not as well as hoped NPR's, Dan, Charles has the story the way Chris Madsen sees it sugary drinks are a menace to society, she teaches public health at the university of California Berkeley, it's a pretty high bar for public health to be able to say something is causing a major epidemic. We can do that for sugar sweetened beverages. Berkeley was the first city to tax those drinks and Manson is leading a team of researchers. That's trying to see how it's working. We think going out to the same neighborhoods every year for the last five years, and we've been asking people the same questions like how often do you drink sugar, sweetened drinks? They did this before the soda tax went into effect three years ago and every year since focusing on low income neigh-. Neighborhoods and we saw a fifty two percent decline in consumption over the first three years. Fifty two percent. Yes. This has a huge impact. Her study appears this week in the American journal of public health. Now a couple of cautious people's memories aren't totally reliable. And maybe people in Berkeley, just don't want admit, they're still drinking, lots of soda other. Researchers who are studying soda taxes are not relying on people's memories. They're looking at sales data from stores, Anna Tuchman at Northwestern University is part of a group studying Philadelphia's soda tax Philadelphia is taxing more. Drake's both sugar sweetened and diet versions because its main goals raising more money for schools and playgrounds Tuchman says sales of those drinks in Philadelphia have dropped since the tax went into effect by a lot more than forty percent. But there's a catch. We find very large increase in sales of soda and other taxed products at stores that are located zero to four miles outside of the city. It seems. A lot of people in Philadelphia are driving to stores right outside the city to buy their beverages, especially the sugary drinks not so much the diet soda when you take that into account sales in and around the city dropped by about twenty percent. Not forty percent and sales of sugar sweetened drinks fell even less. It's like people are able to maintain their sugar and calorie intake and the city is falling short in their ability to raise tax revenues Tuchman. And her colleagues are still revising their paper. It hasn't been formally reviewed by other scientists yet right now though, it does show some of the difficulties that cities face with their soda taxes. There are political obstacles to the soda industries been fighting back arguing that sodas taxes are unfair to consumers and won't really make people healthier. But more places have implemented them Oakland. San francisco. Seattle and soda tax advocates say there's a simple way to keep people from avoiding the tax going outside the city have attacks that covers an entire state or country. Dan, Charles, NPR news. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. I'm Josh barrow host of KCRW's left right and center, we couldn't fit all the lawsuits in our show. So we've added a new one L RC presents all the president's lawyers a weekly examination of law liability and.

Anna Tuchman Philadelphia Berkeley Dan university of California Berke George Washington University American journal of public hea Charles Connecticut NPR Josh barrow Chris Madsen Seattle KCRW Northwestern University San francisco