40 Burst results for "Washington Post"

Fresh update on "washington post" discussed on Rush Limbaugh

Rush Limbaugh

00:40 min | 10 min ago

Fresh update on "washington post" discussed on Rush Limbaugh

"A starting point, but it's not justice. What in the hell is that threat mean? Are you kidding me? We're watching the shop in trial. We don't get a total 100% guilty Death penalty, You name it. Will be more bloodshed. More riots. Oh, and by the way, we can send these people T jail. Life imprisonment. But that will be justice enough What you want? Somebody knocked him off in jail. Is that it? Melvin, let me tell you about the first law of motion. The first law of motion is if a cop stops you don't get in your car and drive away. That's the first law of motion. This. This is out of control. These people aren't interested in letting the wheels of justice work. They want mob rule, and they want it now, even though the Washington Post's own database show that police had fatally shot 14 unarmed black victims, as well as 25, unarmed waits in 2019. You were black person get shot every day 14 in 2019. Another thing The media won't tell you. Rush commented on this not long ago, and here's what he had to say. In liberal Ville in America. Today, the cops are guilty the cops or the problem. Just like an American foreign policy. The United States is the problem, not the solution. The cops are the problem. They're not the solution. Black lives matter exists on the premise that cops are white, racist pigs murdering random innocents. African Americans. And they're in a liberal politician in this country that doesn't join that refrain. But if you understand liberalism If you just listen to these people. What more do you have to hear them go after all these so called murdering cops. Randomly murder. Innocent African Americans is not going to take long. If there's no push back to that. Before citizens are going to get the idea that the cops are the problem and that the people who run cities and states are also going to see the cops is a problem. You have your average New York City crime ridden neighborhood. You throw a cop in there, and that's what destabilizes the neighborhood as far as de Blasio and people who think like him. Leave the neighborhood alone. Those people have their own culture. They've got their own life, the crime they're committing against each other. Screw you. The blossom even talks about raising his son to be afraid of the cops, and he's the mayor. His wife is African American. So his son is a person of color, and he often tells people that we have to talk to his kid. Be on the lookout for the cops Be on the lookout for the people. It might intend him harm. They spread this myth. They spread this. They amplify it. They make it much worse than it ever is. So to me. It's really sad. These people, I'll tell you, their jobs are tough enough. Law enforcement military. Jobs are tough enough without people that employ them or are their bosses come along and portraying them as the problem? All right, Stick around game or coming right up on the excellence in broadcasting Network Rush lives off timeless wisdom..

2019 New York City 25 100% Melvin America Today Rush 14 Unarmed Black Victims De Blasio African American 14 United States Network Rush American Washington Post First Law Of Motion African Americans
Rebecca Carrol: Being a Black woman raised by White parents

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

01:30 min | 6 hrs ago

Rebecca Carrol: Being a Black woman raised by White parents

"Rebecca carol. Welcome to the podcast. Thank you for having me okay. So i had to get in touch with you after reading your incredible incredible op-ed in in our paper in the washington post headline is as a black woman raised by white parents. I have some advice for potential adopters. Let's start from the fifty thousand foot level. Why write this piece so as soon as people started talking about. How bill racial reckoning. I thought well are. We reckoning or are we reckoning right and transracial adoptees particularly black transracial adoptees have an integral perspective on race and reckoning. We have lived especially adult. Black adoptees have lived in this foundational dynamic which we are trying to trying to be connected and trying to also be who we are while also mitigating often. Times are white families racism and so that perspective. I think is really important in this moment as we try to build on reckoning with race and changing the way that we talk about race and racism.

Rebecca Carol Washington Post ED
Fresh update on "washington post" discussed on Chris Plante

Chris Plante

01:18 min | 42 min ago

Fresh update on "washington post" discussed on Chris Plante

"While unarmed on you can look at every case that even links to local news stories and stuff. But Michael Uh Lo Duca was shot and killed 42 years old White man shot and killed while unarmed and Red River Parish, Louisiana. And nobody seems to care. Timothy Daniel's Statham shot and killed in Athens, Georgia, February 18th while unarmed 37 year old white man by the police, and I don't know the race of the police officers, and I don't consider that to be an important factor. But our American news media does because they appear to like riots and looting and mayhem and conflict. Race conflict. Honestly, it's Charles Manson's dream. He always dreamed of race riots, Helter skelter and all that. 58 year old white man. Richard F. Thomas was shot and killed in Caroline County, Virginia, on February 1st while unarmed Bradley Alexander Lewis at 19, year Old White Man shot and killed while unarmed in Tucson, Arizona on January 20th. That's Joe Biden's inauguration day, and 35 year old Ashley Babbitt, a white woman was shot and killed while unarmed in Washington D. C on January 6th. Now why do these lives not matter? Why do these police shootings of unarmed people not matter? And really the only conclusion that irrational person can come too, if you spend time looking into it. Is that it doesn't contribute to racial polarization in the United States of America because fewer African Americans were shot and killed by the police, while unarmed every year, fewer African Americans were shot and killed by the place while armed ever here. On and somehow the news media's coverage of all of this is is just completely detached from reality. And again. I go to the Washington Post own website, and I can look at the statistics of African American homicide rates versus Caucasian homicide rates when it involves firearms. The Washington Post informs me that African American homicide rates are more than 10 times what Caucasian homicide rates are when using firearms. Now That's a clue when it comes to the rest of the statistics, just by the way. And The Washington Post maintains this database, but they appear to be unaware of what the database tells them. And and and honestly, Mike the media is that we expect corrupt politicians. I expect corrupt Republicans to come along Creek, corrupt Democrats and corrupt independence. Bernie Sanders is an independent. He's corrupt his health. But the news media is supposed to be in our brilliant system of checks and balances the final check in our system and they fail miserably that you know they don't get an F. They get a Z when it comes to their their their horribly corrupt conduct. Year after year day after day, truly outrageous stuff, and Mike I know millions of people are asking the same question. And, you know they have the approval rating of child molesters, the American news media and still they spit in your face and tell you that they're doing a great job. On bit's really appalling it honestly is They were out there fanning the flames last night. Uh and, you know, honestly, it just goes on and on, Michael. Thank you. Thank you for the call. I I appreciate night fully understand your frustration. I certainly do and receded, toe leave. It wasn't an accident. Policing in our country is inherently. Unintentionally racist. What an outrageous Nancy Pelosi should be slapping her with a ruler or something. And if you follow the news, which I do Here's the Here's one from News 12, the CBS affiliate in Florida, 12 time convicted felon charged with murder. You got to see a picture of this guy and he belongs in prison just by looking at it. 12 time. Convicted felon from Belle Glade. Florida is facing murder charges. The Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office arrested 41 year old Antonio Ferguson. On a warrant of first degree murder, attempted first degree murder and Kelly felony possession of a firearm. Hey, wait a minute. That was the church, illegal possession of firm for Dante. Right, then he didn't show up for his court date. Deadly shooting happened just after two a.m. march 15th and the Lake Crystal Development, which is just south of Okeechobee Boulevard and How many people are shouting is that dusty open fires through a sliding glass door on a group of people in an apartment, according to the report. Investigators believe Ferguson exchanged text messages with someone at the apartment just before the shooting. One shooting victim had a fight with Ferguson 11 days earlier on, and they say that he shot how many people show how many people he should They actually leave it out of this story shot multiple people. And he's back on the street. Now what's going on 12 time Convicted felon is back on the street with firearms going over to people's places and shooting the place up. What's up with that? Hmm? Not a not a happy story, but you know, you put convicted 12 time convicted felons back on the street on all they got guns. That's a price illegally illegally, and they'll still get illegal guns after you make it illegal for law abiding citizens to get guns. Woman arrested after refusing to give back $1.2 Million bank transfer accidentally wired to her account. Ah, woman bought a house and a brand new car after quickly moving money sent to her by mistake. Uh, 911 dispatcher. It's absolutely crazy. She's a 911 dispatcher arrested after she refused to return $1.2 million accidentally wired to her account authorities, said Louisiana woman who worked in a sheriff's office for over four years as a 911 dispatcher. Discovered. That there was one point new $1.2 million in her account That wasn't there yesterday, and she being no fool transferred it out of that account on into another account, which was more secure for her. And she absconded with the moment with with the money rather and bought the house and and took up. Not waiting. You know, you don't want to wait in situations.

Michael Uh Lo Duca Nancy Pelosi Richard F. Thomas Bernie Sanders Ashley Babbitt Charles Manson Antonio Ferguson CBS Michael Joe Biden Timothy Daniel Mike $1.2 Million Bradley Alexander Lewis Washington D. C United States Of America February 1St Florida January 20Th
'Harry Potter' Hit-and-Run Crash Kills Federal Judge

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:38 sec | 22 hrs ago

'Harry Potter' Hit-and-Run Crash Kills Federal Judge

"A bizarre crash in florida leaves a federal judge dead at twenty three year. Old north. lauderdale woman. Claimed me harry potter after cops say she killed a federal judge who served the eastern district of new york for seventeen years. They hit and run crash friday morning on a sidewalk in boca raton. Leaves seventy five. Judge said feuerstein dead and a six year. Old boy seriously injured cops arresting tasha snob with first responders say was disoriented an aggressive and claim she was harry potter. According to a police affidavit. Cj papa the washington post reports police found bottles in her bag labeled thc cannabis and drug known to cause erratic behavior

Harry Potter Lauderdale Feuerstein Florida Boca Raton Tasha New York The Washington Post
Fresh update on "washington post" discussed on Brian Lehrer

Brian Lehrer

00:31 min | 43 min ago

Fresh update on "washington post" discussed on Brian Lehrer

"And my feet, And for some people who've been working from home the past year style may have taken a bit of a back seat in favor of comfort. Now is more and more people are getting vaccinated. Some are eager to get back into dressing up a little bit again. The Washington Post recently reported that online clothing retailers are seeing a resurgence in general with a growing interest in resort where also selling dresses and tuxedos and going out clothes in bold bright colors. What about those special pieces of clothing already in your crisis that haven't seen the light of day in a year, the ones that recall the special memory or signifying important change in your life. Well, it might be a few more weeks, maybe even longer until you can bust those items out again, depending on your situation. But in the meantime, a new show on Netflix explores the special meaning that people give You certain clothes they wear. So joining me now to talk about her. Syriza's is Emily Spivak, artist, author of the book Warn in New York. 68 Sartorial Memoirs of the City and now creator of the Netflix, Docuseries Warn stories. Which is out now. Hi, Emily. Welcome back to W. N. Y C. Brian. Thank you so much for having me back and just as a Segway from our last segment, I'm going to play a clip from your next Netflix series, which features Antoine, who is incarcerated in California. And after being really dissatisfied with how baggy prison clubs were, he started altering them to make them more fitted. And here's 38 seconds of Anton talking about what? That first moment of doing that felt like When I first put on my alter pants,.

Emily Spivak Emily California Antoine W. N. Y C. Brian 38 Seconds Netflix Anton Syriza First Warn In New York Past Year First Moment Memoirs Of Docuseries Warn Weeks 68 The Washington Post City Sartorial
More Than 100 Corporate Leaders Meet to Discuss State Voting Laws

News, Traffic and Weather

00:50 sec | 1 d ago

More Than 100 Corporate Leaders Meet to Discuss State Voting Laws

"The Washington Post reported that more than 100, top executives and corporate leaders huddled online to discuss what to do in response to changes some states are making to their voting laws. President Biden today will sit down with a bipartisan group of lawmakers going to work on the more than $2 Trillion infrastructure plan is now proposing what would be the biggest public works program ever. And big tax increases on corporations and the wealthy to pay for it. He's selling it as an infrastructure plan. But it's more including big investments in roads, bridges, airports and high speed rail but also a coast to coast network of electric vehicle charging stations Broadband for rural areas, replacing 100% of lead pipes in the country. And $400 billion to care for the elderly and people with disabilities. ABC is Jonathan

President Biden The Washington Post ABC Jonathan
Fresh update on "washington post" discussed on Chris Plante

Chris Plante

00:33 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "washington post" discussed on Chris Plante

"What is going on in United States America when comes to race and crime and guns and murder and the police and all of this stuff? It's a story that the news media avoids, You know, like, like the Stevie's was thinking somebody else. Something else had to clean it up in the last moment there, but they avoided like the skeevy is because they don't want the skivvies and they don't want to talk about this issue because it's frightening to them. And because You know, the angry mob might turn their sights on them, and everyone lives in fear in today's world that if you tell the truth about something that you'll be destroyed it Zbig issue in America Today we used to be the land of the free and the home of the brave and free speech and due process and The left is here now, and they're against all of those things. They genuinely an authentically are They're against us having a border that's under control. They're against having a common language in a common culture. They're they're against us there against the mainstream. There, the left their radical and they have really done a great job of marketing and selling their anti American bill of goods. And millions and millions of people bought into it, Chris. They've been brainwashed in high schools and college campuses to be anti American anti bill of rights, Anti Constitution anti American, fundamentally and in so many ways many millions and millions of Americans, but I I read the news and then for the most part, I try to remember it. I do as good a job as I can. There's a lot of stuff that I take in. But in 2013, The Washington Post had a story and they haven't done it again since because I think they got in trouble for doing it. Fact that's hard to find on the Internet gun gun deaths shaped by race in America, then Keating. He was probably canceled after writing the story. Gun deaths are shaped by race in America period. That's the lead sentence. Whites that whites were white are far more likely to shoot themselves, and African Americans were far more likely to be shot by someone else. The statistical differences Dramatic, according to Washington Post analysis of data from the U. S Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Ah white person is five times as likely to commit suicide with a gun as to be shot with a gun. For each African American who uses a gun to commit suicide. Five are killed by other people with guns and then they have a helpful graphic here. Now that's kind of an irrelevant jumble, but their whole point is see that they're an anti gun institution Anti Second Amendment institution. They want to disarm the populace so that we live in a country where only the state is armed to the teeth, and the citizenry has been disarmed. This is their long term goal. They've been working toward that goal for many years now. Then they have a graphic here and in the graphic day for some inexplicable reason use the metric of per one million people. When normally statistics they're done per 100,000 people, but I'll I'll turn it into more user friendly statistics for you. On the fly. Here they have homicide deaths and one column and suicide deaths and another come. We're not really talking about suicide today, so I'll go to the homicide Death. The Washington Post using CDC centers were disease control and prevention statistics. And they say that using the 1,000,151 African Americans are killed Homicide by gun, and they're only using guns, not not other weapons. But guns are the primary vehicle by which people are are murdered in the United States, Of course. 151 per one million people, which breaks down to 15.1 per 100,000. Whereas 15 whites per one million people are killed with guns 151 African Americans killed with guns per one million versus 15. Now that is a ratio of more than slightly more than 10 to 1. You see African Americans killed homicide and by the way, proximately 90% of African Americans killed with firearms killed by African Americans not killed by by Caucasians, two Hispanics or Asians. Asians really left out of the action here almost all the time in the statistics. But we're talking about a homicide rate using guns used on Lee isn't guns but again Number one vehicle by which Andre ratio is more than 10. Times about African Americans murdered using guns versus Caucasians murdered using guns Now police officers out on the street every day probably know this. They're probably aware of this. And therefore, if you're a police officer, you pull someone over and the windows were tinted end as an African American driving the vehicle. You know this statistic and that affects your thinking. Now that that's just effect. It just does. That's reality. That's human nature. You can't you can deny it if you want, I guess because people deny everything, but but it would be foolish and foolhardy. I'll say foolhardy. To deny that that is a issue in a reality. And quite honestly, let me say this it with his movement called Black Lives Matter is the woman yesterday has brought millions of dollars and how it houses around around the country s so she could live in a lot of different places. The Black lives matter, Founder Woman What Black lives. Manner is here. Emma and O R. Is the headline in the New York Post Black lives manner Because you bought a bunch of houses, you see, But here we have this statistic that the homicide using guns rate African Americans versus Caucasians more than 10 times, that's more than 1000% increase. 100% increase would be twice as much and this is 10 times as much. It's slightly more than a 1000% difference, you know, and increase. Look at white people. Homicides with guns 15 per one million now. African Americans 151 per one million people. The Washington Post using CDC numbers Now those are alarming numbers. And if you spend your life with a T shirt and a sign in your window, the bumper sticker on your car's sign in your front yard that says black lives matter. You should be hysterical about this statistic. You should be up in arms. You should be writing about this. You should be looting about this. You should be protesting and running people for Congress based on this because this is an alarming, nightmarish statistic, just saying So then, because this is what I do I I went to Al Gore's amazing Internet today, Peace be upon him, and I looked at Washington D. C. I live in Washington. See, Washington City is about 66 Square Miles. It's a federal district. It's It's small geographically about 700,000 people. It's Ah City, Little City State of sorts, and I discovered that this year so far this year and 2021 a D. No dominate the year of our Lord. There have already been 51 homicides in the District of Columbia 51 homicides. And on. That's you know, on tracked be over 200 homicides in a not very large geographic space, and I'm not very large population. Um, and then I did a little more looking, and I found that The Washington Post maintained this. That's 51 homicides that I went to D. C police website on homicides. And I found that there were so far this year. 25. This is the first thing I found unsolved homicides 25 unsolved homicides in the district, Colombia So far this year again, it's April 13th. And of the 25 unsolved homicides thus far this year in Washington, DC 24 of the unsolved homicide victims are African American, and one is Hispanic. There were other people have murdered who are Caucasian but know who did it apparently or their people charged anyway, So we got 25 unsolved unsolved homicides so far this year 24 of those African Americans, one Hispanic and, um, and that is somehow not even a news story. It's not even in the Washington Post. It's not on the local news. They made covers. Hail..

Chris United States 100% Washington U. S Centers For Disease Contr District Of Columbia 2013 1,000,151 April 13Th United States America Al Gore 51 Homicides 15 10 Times Yesterday 90% Washington, Dc Washington City Emma 2021
Business leaders gather to discuss voting law changes

The NashVegas Cafe

00:21 sec | 1 d ago

Business leaders gather to discuss voting law changes

"Over 100, Top corporate execs and business leaders from major airlines, retailers, manufacturers and NFL owner met online today to talk about how they can show their opposition to new voting laws considered in some states and enacted in Georgia. But critics say are designed to restrict voting, especially by minorities. This is, according to various sources, including The Washington Post in Wall Street

NFL Georgia The Washington Post
Fresh update on "washington post" discussed on Chris Plante

Chris Plante

02:37 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "washington post" discussed on Chris Plante

"You see that He was not met with aggression and violence, she said. I'm done with those who condone government funded murder. And then she put in a little thing about funding for Planned Parenthood because that must continue unabated as well. She didn't really I just added that because it's irony. You see, they don't understand irony. No more policing, incarceration and militarization. That's what she said. No more policing. That's no more incarceration on militarization. So if you know you're gonna have to have, you know, one of the three. I've got to say it can't be reformed, she said. She's an extremist and a radical. And a Democrat member of the House of Representatives in Good standing with Nancy Pelosi, the Democratic leadership and the news media. Now with that said, I have met it ends in the past, pointed to The Washington Post, which is a corrupt institution owned by the richest man in the world, Dr Evil and they don't cover the news. They very often cover it up. It's my hometown paper. I get it on my front doorstep every day, but they do maintain and we've sent out links to this a number of occasions over the years. They maintain that database which is very helpful in this regard. Very helpful in this regard. It is their police shootings database, All right, and they maintain since 2015 a very, uh well an excellent database website that lays out all of the police shootings. And they, of course break uptown pie of right race. Of course, you gotta have race and by everything else, and but you can also break it down by weapon, unarmed, unarmed white people, unarmed black people, honor and Hispanic people, people armed with firearms with knives, people armed with other weapons, people attacking with cars. Was their body cam video, gender by state. You can break it down by all these things, and I actually went to this yesterday to take a look at it just to refresh my memory on a few things, and it should be noted that more unarmed Caucasians are shot and killed by the police every year every single year, then unarmed African Americans. Now there's a Disparity in terms of percentages of the population. Of course, they're also disparities in terms of the number of homicides committed in crimes committed and people should pay attention to that, because It matters. It does matter. And it certainly matters of here. A police officer out on the street because that's the reality of the battle space that the left has created here, But I went there. I went there yesterday, and and I went there this morning again, and I looked at 2021 just so far this year, 2021. How many people were shot and killed by the police while unarmed, for example, and the number is 10 people, 10 people, five white, three black and two Hispanic, All right. And of the white people that have been shot and killed while unarmed so far this year by the police in the United States, all doubtless unfortunate situations but not necessarily innocents situations. Michael LoDuca, unarmed 42 year old white men was shot and killed March 10th in Red River Parrish, Louisiana. Um, and there was no body cam video of that. Timothy Daniel Statham, or staff from 37 Year old white man. Shot and killed February. 18th. Athens, Georgia. Nobody can recording Richard F. Thomas 58 year old White man shot and killed while unarmed in his vehicle in Caroline County, Virginia. Not far from me. Nobody can recording Bradley Alexander Lewis 19 year old unarmed White man shot and killed Tucson, Arizona. Nobody can recording Ashley Babbitt. You may know her name 35 year old unarmed white woman shot and killed January 6 2021 inside the U. S. Capitol. Nobody cam recording, But there was cell phone video of this thing. Now These are all individual cases with individual fact patterns and involving police officers and individuals that were shot and killed while unarmed by the place. They're all Caucasian. There were also so far.

Ashley Babbitt Nancy Pelosi Bradley Alexander Lewis Timothy Daniel Statham Richard F. Thomas Michael Loduca United States January 6 2021 House Of Representatives February. 18Th March 10Th Caroline County, Virginia Athens, Georgia 42 Year 10 People 2015 Tucson, Arizona Red River Parrish, Louisiana 2021 U. S. Capitol
Over 100 Corporate Leaders Meet to Discuss State Voting Laws

Rush Limbaugh

00:29 sec | 1 d ago

Over 100 Corporate Leaders Meet to Discuss State Voting Laws

"And corporate leaders have gathered online this weekend to discuss what to do in response to changes to some state voting laws, According to various news reports by the Washington Post, Wall Street Journal and others. The leaders numbered more than 100. Including executives from major airlines, retailers and manufacturers, plus at least one NFL owner talking about potential ways to show they oppose the legislation, which has already been signed into law in Georgia and is being considered elsewhere.

Major Airlines Washington Post Wall Street Journal NFL Georgia
Republicans Flock to Florida for Donor Retreat

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:27 sec | 4 d ago

Republicans Flock to Florida for Donor Retreat

"National committees. Spring Donor retreat kicks off today. The GOP retreat is being held in Palm Beach, Florida and is expected to draw some of the party's biggest donors. Most of the event is being held in the luxury hotel. But tomorrow night's dinner will happen and Mar a Lago, where former president Trump is expected to speak. The Washington Post reports that at least 350 people have requested to attend the former president's speech, the largest of the retreat sessions. The retreat runs through Sunday.

GOP Palm Beach Lago Florida Donald Trump The Washington Post
Virginia's Alexandria schools will not switch to three feet of distance inside classrooms

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:30 sec | 5 d ago

Virginia's Alexandria schools will not switch to three feet of distance inside classrooms

"At least six ft apart through the rest of the school year, the CDC has said that with adequate masking students could be as close as three ft to one another. All other major school systems in Northern Virginia are going with the CDC guidance. But Alexandria City School officials said they're worried that the switch could lead to high levels of quarantining. The Washington Post reports. The district will switch to three FT between desks during summer school. And when classes resume in the fall coming up here on W T O P. We'll hear from

CDC Alexandria City School Northern Virginia The Washington Post
‘Washington Teachers’ Union remembers president Elizabeth Davis

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:11 min | Last week

‘Washington Teachers’ Union remembers president Elizabeth Davis

"Here. A double duty will be this morning on a deadly car crash in buoy on Route three. Oh, one both drivers involved have died. One of them was a Elizabeth Davis, the president of the Washington teacher's Union. He a modern day civil rights leader. Washington Teacher's Union General Vice president Jacqueline Pogue. Lyons said the union is devastated by the loss of President Elizabeth Davis. She worked as a teacher for more than 40 years and served as president of the Union for eight years. She was 70 years old. That's all she did was eat, sleep and breathe the rights of the teachers and the rights of the students in the district. Maryland state police said that Davis was driving south bound on route 301 and the area of Harbor Way in Prince George's County when she struck a car sitting at a stoplight. Both Davis and the other driver died from their injuries. Valerie Bank W T OBY News also learning more this morning about the other driver killed in the crash. It was 68 year old John star. He was sitting at that light when he was rear ended and died on scene was heading at the time heading home to Annapolis after singing at an evening Easter Mass in Bethesda Star was a long time musician and taught music at a private school. His girlfriend tells Washington Post that he was on the road most nights traveling Around to perform.

Washington Teacher's Union General Vice President Jacquel President Elizabeth Davis Union For Eight Years Elizabeth Davis Lyons Valerie Bank Maryland State Police Oby News Davis John Star Prince George Harbor Annapolis Bethesda Washington Post
Man Arrested at Disney Resort in Florida After Refusing Temperature Check

AP 24 Hour News

00:28 sec | Last week

Man Arrested at Disney Resort in Florida After Refusing Temperature Check

"Julie Walker, A Louisiana man who said he spent $15,000 on a Disney world vacation, was arrested after he refused to get his temperature checked at a Disney Springs restaurant. And refused to leave. According to the arrest report. Kelly Sills was arrested in February but spoke to reporters over the weekend comparing Disney security to Nazis and the Mafia. According to The Washington Post, He said he walked into the restaurant through an exit and didn't realize

Julie Walker Disney Springs Restaurant Kelly Sills Disney Louisiana Nazis The Washington Post
Voices From The Trial Over George Floyd's Killing

Radio Specials

02:45 min | Last week

Voices From The Trial Over George Floyd's Killing

"The ongoing murder trial of Derek Shove in the former Minneapolis police officer charged in the death of George Floyd. Has been excruciating. The testimony of the witnesses, many of whom wept on the stand, the video evidence had played over and over the last minutes of Floyd's life with show Van's knee pressed on his neck. The emotions have been particularly sharp for black people in this country and those who are from Minneapolis yesterday I spoke with Michelle Norris and Charles Blow. Norris is a former NPR host who was raised in Minneapolis. She's now columnist for The Washington Post and Charles Blow is a columnist for The New York Times who recently went to Minneapolis for the trial. Michelle, I'm going to start with you Thistle playing out in your home town. You grew up 10 blocks from what George Floyd was killed. And you wrote on Twitter and I'm going to quote here You'll take care of yourself and your people. If you're tracking this trial, this is trauma, watching it, watching others who watch it and are forever haunted, watching and waiting to see the impact on the 12 jurors watching all of this, so take care. Tell me your thoughts watching this trial. I'm traumatized and I'm I'm hurt. And I'm angry and anguish. For my hometown and for the nation. What we're seeing here is collective trauma. Everyone who took the stand Who witnessed this talked about being haunted. Talked about feeling helpless. I've been talking to my people in Minneapolis, you know all week, especially this week, and you know, there are a lot of tears. I think people watching this not just in this country but all over the globe are stunned and saddened by what they're seeing because he may have seen the video. But now you're seeing it in three D, and this is a New dimension of this trial. You know you saw inside out close. You heard his is breathing in a way that was so intimate. So what their Children did was horrible on so many levels. But we look in this trial at what he did to George Floyd. This trial invites us to think about what he did to a nation. And what he did to the city and what he did in particular to that community. The people who drive by that black every day to the Children to the elders to the homeowners, and I can say with certainty that he probably would not have done that. 20 blocks west or 20 blocks south or even 15 blocks south where people sit in sidewalk cafes and and you know, and go to participate, Ease and artisanal pizzerias. He was making a statement about George Floyd. He was also making a statement about that community. And we all pay the price for that Now in our pain,

George Floyd Charles Blow Minneapolis Derek Shove Michelle Norris Floyd Norris NPR The Washington Post The New York Times VAN Michelle Twitter
Suspect in Capitol checkpoint attack suffered from delusions, paranoia

Commonwealth Club

00:47 sec | Last week

Suspect in Capitol checkpoint attack suffered from delusions, paranoia

"Continues into Friday's deadly rampage outside the U. S capitol that ended in the death of Capitol police officer William Billy Evans. The wounding of another officer and the killing of the suspect, 25 year old Noah Green. His brother telling the Washington Post. The family had concerns about Green's mental health and that even suffering from delusions, paranoia and suicidal thoughts the night before the attack, texting his brother. I'm sorry, but I'm just going to go and live and be homeless, the 25 year old also reportedly battling drug addiction and suicidal thoughts, But what exactly inspired the violent attack still unclear. ABC is Ty Hernandez. Meantime, the wounded officer in the attack was cheered as he was released from a D. C. Hospital Saturday night. Partisan

William Billy Evans Noah Green Capitol Police U. Washington Post Paranoia Green Ty Hernandez ABC
Noah Green, Capitol Suspect, Struggled Before Attack

NBC Nightly News

01:20 min | Last week

Noah Green, Capitol Suspect, Struggled Before Attack

"A symbol of our country's democracy and this but once again yesterday the capitol building was attacked today family and colleagues mourned the loss of capitol hill. Police officer killed while defending it. We're also learning new details about the final days of the suspect who ran his car into a security barrier attacking officers and there are new questions about how to secure the capital while still keeping it open as the people's house we have two reports tonight and we begin with kellyanne today at the capitol new concrete barriers place near the now closed end padlocked entrance. Yellow police tape the visible signs of friday's tragedy. The suspect's car towed away from where authorities say twenty five year. old noah. Green rammed a barricade in a deadly attack that killed an officer and the suspect. Today law enforcement visited a covington virginia home about three hours outside washington. Dc where the former college football player had grown up the washington. post reports. green's family issued a statement today citing his depression and potential mental illness. Adding that green was not a terrorist by any means greens. Motive is a key question on social media. He wrote about losing his job.

Kellyanne Capitol Building Yellow Police Capitol Hill Covington Washington Green Virginia Football Depression
Family and friends concerned Noah Green was unraveling before Capitol attack

Saturday Morning Update with Rick Fowler

00:47 sec | Last week

Family and friends concerned Noah Green was unraveling before Capitol attack

"People around the world today for spending their condolences after Officer William Evans was killed and another officer injured after a man drove his car into them yesterday. Following that attack, Capitol police chief yoga nom de Pittman said. This has been an extremely difficult time for U. S Capitol police. I just asked that the public continued to keep U S Capitol police and their families and in your prayers, the man who carried out the attack, Noah Green was shot dead after getting out of the car and lunging at police with a knife. Green's family and friends tell the Washington Post He became paranoid and have hallucinations. He was convinced his former teammates on the Christopher Newport University football team drugged him. A new

Officer William Evans Capitol Police Yoga Nom De Pittman U. S Capitol Police Noah Green The Washington Post Green Christopher Newport University Football
MLB moves 2021 All-Star Game out of Atlanta

News, Traffic and Weather

00:44 sec | Last week

MLB moves 2021 All-Star Game out of Atlanta

"New voting laws in Georgia, civil rights and faith leaders in Georgia are calling for boycotts on the state's biggest corporations for holding back on condemning the new election law they say will suppress minority voting. Say comments this week by Coca Cola and Delta Airlines were too little too late because they condemned the bill. A week after Governor Brian Kemp signed it into law. The faith and civil rights leaders want corporate leaders to agree to a press conference to publicly condemn Georgia's law and similar measures in other states. They're planning boycott starting next Wednesday, April 7th on Michael Kastner just crossing my desk from the Washington Post. Major League Baseball planning to move 2021 All Star game out of Atlanta amid criticism of Georgia's new voting along We'll have more on that throughout the afternoon. I'm sure in our sports updates, ABC headlines Arnett and Chinese

Georgia Governor Brian Kemp Delta Airlines Coca Cola Michael Kastner Washington Post Major League Baseball Atlanta ABC Arnett
How Three Women Re-Wrote the Story of War

On The Media

02:05 min | Last week

How Three Women Re-Wrote the Story of War

"Before the vietnam war there was a law that banned women from reporting on the front lines of any war for the us. When president johnson refused to officially declare a state of war in vietnam in opening appeared no ban a handful of pioneering women bought one way tickets into the battlefield they had no editors no health insurance and little or no formal training reporter elizabeth becker former washington post war correspondent in cambodia and then npr's foreign editor and then national security correspondent for the new york. Times has just published. You don't belong here. How three women rewrote the story of war. Chronicling catherine lewa a french. Photojournalist franky fitzgerald an american long form journalist and author and kate webb in australian combat reporter elizabeth. Welcome to on the media will thank. You broke his great to be with you. I wanna start with where you started. You give your initial experience very short shrift. When asked why did you cross the ocean to cover a war. When you're so young you said the short answer was a nightmare. I was all too keen to leave behind. My masters adviser had rejected my thesis on the bangladesh war of independence after. I refused to sleep with him and he said one wasn't related to the other. Just tell me what happened. This was nineteen seventy two and there weren't that many women in graduate school and he made a move. And i said no. He pressed on and i said no he rejected. The thesis. said. I had to work harder on it. Then resisted any idea that one related to the other. That even made a pass at me. So you know you're young enough that you think that you have your whole life ahead of you and wary enough that i said i'm not leaving my life in this guy's

Elizabeth Becker Vietnam Catherine Lewa Franky Fitzgerald Kate Webb President Johnson Washington Post NPR Cambodia Elizabeth New York United States Bangladesh
Maryland police handcuff, berate 5-year-old boy

Red Eye Radio

00:40 sec | 2 weeks ago

Maryland police handcuff, berate 5-year-old boy

"Reaction pouring in after a police body camera video shows officers berating a five year old boy who they picked up and return to school in Maryland. A couple of Maryland police officers were caught in a very bad situation as the Montgomery County Police Department released body camera video showing two of its officers be rating of five year old boy who had walked away from his elementary school, calling him a little beast and threatening with a beating video shows. One of the officers repeatedly screaming that the crying child with her face inches from his. The boy's mother filed Lawsuit over the January 2020 incident, and The Washington Post reports that the police Department and the county's public school system declined to address the incident in detail, citing the mother's lawsuit

Montgomery County Police Depar Maryland The Washington Post Police Department
The Washington Post Reporter Natalie Compton on spring break in Florida

WGN Programming

01:08 min | 2 weeks ago

The Washington Post Reporter Natalie Compton on spring break in Florida

"Of course, Spring break. It's going crazy in Florida. People are just you know, I totally get it. It's been an awful awful year on now We're thinking vaccines and summer or warm weather at least an outdoors. Let's get out and And party it up. What are the concerns right now? About how much spring break in is going on? Yeah, You're right in all of that, which has been, uh, you know, it's difficult because I think everyone's really excited about seeing vaccines going really well, But right now only 27% of Americans have gotten about one shot, so we're still nowhere near where we need to be in terms of like traveling safely again. And, as they said in the news earlier The CDC is very worried about spring break and spring break travel right now. So we are not in a place where people could be partying in Florida partying in Mexico, but we know that that's happening. There's like arrests happening all the time. In Miami, people being pepper sprayed. It's chaos, so I don't want people to think that you have to be trapped in your house this spring break taking a road trip to the beach House could be a safer alternative. But right now we really

Florida CDC Mexico Miami Beach House
Samra Habib on Being a "Queer Muslim"

Chosen Family

01:25 min | 2 weeks ago

Samra Habib on Being a "Queer Muslim"

"Our guest today as samra habib. She's a writer journalist and photographer based in toronto last year. She released the critically acclaimed. We have always been here. Acquire muslim memoir and it was the winner of. Cbc's canada reads twenty twenty. I love this book so much. I think i cried at least three times. She's a leading voice in canadian. Literature for writing and photography has been featured in publications like the new york times the guardian the washington post and vanity fair. We spoke to her at the beginning of the year. I actually saw an astrologer a month ago with a seven arlen session not yet to take a bunch of breaks and she told me that When i was born my father was having his saturn return so he was going for law was really released of inches bow. How was gonna support a child and we just moving from basically but a new kid would arrive you know. That's kind of like a consistent theme through meisters for home I think that is very much shaped by the fact that growing up. I didn't really have this stable home way.

Samra Habib The Guardian The Washington Po CBC Toronto The New York Times Arlen Canada
"washington post" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

02:51 min | 6 months ago

"washington post" Discussed on Post Reports

"It's truly making a difference for survivors like myself. In fact the grace it has afforded me has compelled me to pay it forward. It is the inspiration for my reaching out to you. Best to you carol. I learned you name that day. Carol Griffin what she would tell me. It would change the way. I. Looked at the story I just published and it would give new meaning to the system that failed in Clark. Soon. Carol would name the person she was implicating in that email. And it was a name I had heard before an might quote it in my first story. A name that was all over Jairo cruises case docket. Judge.

"washington post" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

04:20 min | 6 months ago

"washington post" Discussed on Post Reports

"When you when you were speaking in court new gave your victim impact statement. And then you saw the outcome with what the judge decided to sentence cruise to like. The judge actually heard you understood what you were saying your words had any impact. Honestly I feel like when the judge asked Or said that he was going to take some time to like deliberate and think about what he had heard from my statement and from. Cruises statement He. rescheduled. You know his decision and I didn't go to that. The I felt like he didn't. Want to say to my face if I hadn't been there that day and made that statement I don't know what the judge. How he would have ruled. It's hard to think that like. It would have been. An. Even more. I guess reduced sentence that it would have been less jail time. and that you know going and saying what I said. I'm glad that I went I'm glad that I. mean. My statement I felt like the judge heard me I don't know if. It mattered enough. This episode of Post reports podcast is brought to you by facebook at facebook. We've taken critical steps to prepare for the US elections. We've more than tripled our safety and security teams implemented five-step AD verification, and launched a new voting information center. Learn more at facebook dot com slash about slash elections. A few years went by and Lauren tried to move on. Eventually, she began therapy. She was gripped by these panic attacks that really started to disrupt her work life and social life. She tried to channel the anger and disappointment into more positive. She turned to advocacy work. And she organized a march for other sexual assault survivors in DC. But it was hard to pretend like things were back to normal for Lauren. Especially because after the attacks cruises career kind of took off. He got a new job at led Zeppelin Matt, which was one of the hottest restaurants in town. And this restaurant happened to be just a few blocks away from Lawrence, Salon? He was unavoidable. She saw me at a bar. She saw him outside of her apartment. Once when she was cutting hair, she even saw him walk by the Salon Window. Wasn't okay with me like him being so close like. How am I supposed to live like? How am I supposed to like just live my life? She was terrified. She needed some feeling of security. Some reassurance that someone somewhere was watching him. He was supposed to be on supervised probation. So, she went to the court website. She found the case docket and she saw a note that there have been a recent hearing hearing in her case and no one had told her about it. which is actually a violation of her rights as a crime victim. And at that hearing the one that she wasn't therefore. Cruises, probation officer revealed that there have been a mistake. Over the past four years cruise was supposed to be getting treatment for his violent sexual tendencies. This was supposed to be a crucial part of his probation and rehabilitation. But it never happened. Instead of any meaningful attempts at rehabilitation, it seemed as if he monitored like a low level drug offender. Judge Morrison said that despite all of this failures, the chef have been on pretty good behavior and really didn't need to be monitored any longer. So he moved cruise to unsupervised probation. At. This point in the story, a lot of people would have just accepted this outcome. It had been years since the assault. What could learn really do? It got to the point where you know my wellbeing. had been sacrificed so many times that..

Lauren facebook Judge Morrison assault He. Or US Salon Window officer Lawrence DC
"washington post" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

02:57 min | 6 months ago

"washington post" Discussed on Post Reports

"This is canary an investigator podcast from the Washington Post..

"washington post" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

02:28 min | 6 months ago

"washington post" Discussed on Post Reports

"Time. Okay Thank you and try not to. Turn out to talk with your hands and like hit the table. If, you've been listening to post reports for a long time. You might remember a story we did almost two years ago. It was about a woman in DC who was sexually assaulted and how she took matters into her own hands after the justice system failed her. We'll you start with just saying who you are and what you do at the Post my name is Amy Britain and I'm an investigative reporter. After post reporting, she found out that the story didn't end where she thought. It did in fact, it started her and our producer Rena Florez on reporting journey that culminated in a whole new series it's called Canary The Washington Post investigates and all seven episodes are out today Just a warning, this episode contains explicit language and descriptions of sexual assault. One day back in June of two, thousand seventeen, a young woman walked up and down a bustling street in Washington DC. She was carrying with her a stack of paper flyers that she passed out in bars and restaurants and cafes. But these fliers they were unusual. They weren't advertisements were lost him film posters. Instead they had screen shots of something called a case docket. It's like a timeline of the major events of Criminal Court case, and it has the names of judges and lawyers and defendants. This docket showed that a man pleaded guilty to charges of sexual abuse. There were several photos of him and at the top of the fires and bright red capital letters it said. This man has assaulted six women in DC. These flyers were a warning? The woman who handed them out At the time, she didn't want her identity to be known. She was victim. But she was a lot more than that. And Her story started me on a reporting journey that has lasted for nearly three years. A story that has played out in the middle of a larger cultural reckoning..

Washington DC Amy Britain Canary The Washington Post Rena Florez investigative reporter Criminal Court assault producer
"washington post" Discussed on The Business of Sports With Andrew Brandt

The Business of Sports With Andrew Brandt

02:36 min | 9 months ago

"washington post" Discussed on The Business of Sports With Andrew Brandt

"Brad got a good one for you. This Week List Clark of the Washington Post on that breaking story last week about he toxic and harassment culture. At The Washington redskins. Yes, I call them that with the Washington football club with a soon to be new name. All the things that went on in that Liz and or a writer at the Washington Post will oxen. It's embraced reporting talked to many people in and out of the organization. About what happened with that culture was how young women treated there. Hopefully, we'll have changed ahead with. What's going on? With the lawyer being hired, trying to do an internal review, hopefully, some systematic change will go on, but there's a lot of discussion about what you reported Mayan sites talking a lot about Dan Snyder the owner of the Washington Redskins or The Washington football clubs soon to be a different name than redskins. We will talk about that in the minute I. The ran of the week when we are now at the precipice. The NFL in the NFL PA, or having these negotiations, I've said it for months. This was bound to happen in here. We are a replay. Of? What happened in baseball? Will put aside the overarching question whether we'll have football whether we can have a sport that requires the opposite of social distancing whether we can have a sport when the viruses raging in hotspots whether we have sport where they're not gonNA bubble where they're going to be multiple infections. We don't know they're gonNA, be infections that required quarantining of entire say offensive line's defense lines the whole team. How do you have competitive Balance Eddie have a team all of that, but putting aside that and it's related. We have this two part negotiation both at the same time that happened in baseball now is happening in football. Health and safety which protocols we have. A mass joined coordinated effort by stars the NFL. Saying what's going on, we don't have our protocols yet. We don't know what we can do. We don't have an infectious disease plan here we go. That's still being negotiated. Listen contentiousness that we're seeing on social media. And number two the money. We haven't even gotten there. We hear about the owners warning forty percent reduction mostly in this year or this year next year, the players wanted to smooth it out in years ahead. We hear about cap going down forty million dollars next year have about bat. This is going to be a problem. No question and that sort of goes away while we hear more about what's the plan. What's thousand safety plan? You combine all this that we have a three.

Washington redskins Washington Post NFL Washington football baseball Brad Dan Snyder Clark harassment Liz writer
"washington post" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

08:08 min | 9 months ago

"washington post" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"Get your quote at Progressive Dot, com today we have been talking about the article that drop last night in the Washington Post regarding the culture of sexual harassment within the Washington Football Franchises Office There's been a lot of reaction to it. We were discussing how it almost was a letdown, and by no fault of the content or the women who have experienced these horrible things at their workplace, this hostile work environment, but because of the. The delay in the release of the article, and because of the way that the Washington football franchise has been in the news recently and all of the conversation, circulating around the racism and the sponsors, and all of that stuff people worked for speculating and their speculations were like net flicks, special type stuff like Dirtyjohn type stuff like unsolved mysteries craziness. What happened to ray type stuff? Right like I mean it's just people's brains. We're just going crazy. And so when the article was released talking about this culture of sexual harassment, there was a reaction that was like. Oh! That's it. That's what we got all worked out about worked up about and we feel like that's not fair. Because their story, obviously something that deserves to be talked about it is something that is whether you want to believe it or not rampant in the sports world, and probably elsewhere I can only speak for my personal experiences, but I've got stories Katie. I'm guessing you have stories as well. I don't know that they meant to have two women on the Dan Lebatardshow. The day after the Washington Post article about sexual harassment dropped I big. It was purely coincidence, but here we are so another question that people are talking about is what is Dan Snyder's culpability in all of this. Look as you mentioned Katie. He is not a likable character. He's not one of those people that you see when you're looking for. For, godparents of your kids go. You know who would be great Dan. Snyder signed him up for that job. Right I mean like people just traditionally don't like him, and the reputation is well earned. We could go on and on about the stuff that Snyder has done as his own team but we don't have time for that right now. My question to you is what is his role in what these women experienced. Yet that's a tricky question. Right and I don't know the inner workings of the Washington Redskins and how they have everything set up in house right, but I can speak to my experiences with the bucks. I worked for a team the Milwaukee Bucks for a year. And was one of the best years of my life. It was owned by four different owners. Join Owners. Okay. They did not work in the building. They didn't live in Milwaukee the team. A lot of them lived in New York. We saw them at plenty of home games. We saw them on the road. They came to so many road games, and so that's how I came to know the different owners for the bucks. What I'm saying is this they don't? See the day to day. The inner workings of what's happening. At the office, right, what's happening within cubicles or offices, or what's being said from employee to employee. That's on the shoulders of other people. Who they put in place right as an owner who you hire to be your president, who you hire to be your coo in your your C. Suites, your executives that's on you and and it seems that the executives that he hired. Drop the ball on many cases I will say in Reading The Washington Post Article Gen. My biggest concern is why don't they have a bigger? Hr Department like that's. That's a problem to me that the HR Department for the Washington Redskins an NFL team with a storied history only has one. One person that people can actually pick out of a crowd and say hey. I think that's our HR REP like if anything bad happens, I think. Maybe that's the person we should go to and I think that's the person I can talk to to me. That's a problem when I worked for the bucks, I picked out five people five people from the HR department, and that's an NBA team, and so for me I think that the structure of the organization is a problem and the culture. Obviously, that was allowed in in. Flourished there that they allow such inappropriate behavior was the problem and so yeah. I think that's where Daniel Snyder could be on. The Hook is the people that he put in place to make sure this stuff didn't happen and it did under. Their Watch! It's tricky. which is the very first thing you said? Because you don't want to be a hypocrite in this space, right, you don't want to condemn Daniel Snyder, because he's just not a likable guy, and then be okay with Mark Cuban to talk to about somebody in your NBA Space Katie who oversaw something very similar with the mavs, but kept his job. You know made what seemed to be a heartfelt apology about the culture that was beneath him and kind of took the took the position that. I didn't know any of this was going on, but if I had known any of this going on, there would have been swift repercussions, and that you know we would still like. It's hard to sit there and go well. We were okay with Mark Cuban keeping his job and keeping the team and saying that he was GonNa, do better going forward and not give Daniel Snyder. The same benefit of the doubt like that's tricky, right? The problem is Snyder has a longer. Rap Sheet for lack of a better term. Right like he's got all of these other. Perceived errors in Judgment Sharpeville, the least of which is not having a racist name for many many many years, and resisting and saying capital never will I change the name right so like he just doesn't get that benefit of the doubt that we have given to mark Cuban and I. Don't WanNa. Be a hypocrite in that space well. It's like think about the new. England patriots penalty their most recent penalty right like for filming the sideline the TV crew. That's not even on the football ops side when we all saw that penalty, where like a million dollars a third round. That's a big deal. For the charge, maybe not like is the crime worth the the punishment. Probably not, but this wasn't the Patriots first offense right, so it was. A different couple different instances where they told the line or cross the line, and now they're getting a really big consequence coming down for filming the sidelines like for me when I look at Daniel Snyder. He's wrapped up and a lot of different issues right now, negative headline after negative headline, and now this comes down. It looks made. Worse than if this was just a vacuum situation of hey, this culture is terrible. They need to fix it. He didn't know it was going on during his watch now he does, he's going to make the necessary changes and get the right people and restructure the HR department, whatever that would be better, but because to your point, this isn't in the vacuum and a lot of things have transpired under his ownership. It looks worse and it looks bad, and it looks like he is more likely to be on the hook for something like this and then. Then we haven't even gotten into the allegations, Riley. We've been talking about like the lead up to the release of the story. Daniel Snyder's culpability in the story. We haven't even I guess I assume that many people were able to like. Take ten minutes yesterday and read it because the anticipation was so big and everybody's like I wanNA. Know what it is I'm just assuming that a lot of people saw it I. Mean we could dive into some of these things, guys? They're nasty like they're. They're despicable, right? We're talking select cvs the taxi glass. That women had to be careful about walking down because men could literally be beneath them, looking up their skirts. Like the second grade to me like come on like these when you were all. Right, my school jumper, or whatever and you? Sophie shorts underneath to deter that like. How are women having to think about this in the workplace? It's twenty twenty. It's messed up man. For businesses around the world today isn't a restart. It's a rethink that's why they're partnering with IBM to Change How they from supply chains to customer service. Let's put smart to work visit.

Dan Snyder Washington Post HR Department harassment Mark Cuban Washington Redskins Katie Washington NBA Milwaukee Bucks hostile work environment Milwaukee Dan Lebatardshow IBM New York Dan football Sophie England patriots
"washington post" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

04:41 min | 9 months ago

"washington post" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"To be involved in this, you're talking about one of the most like terrible people of the last, however long you to go last decade right as far as like what he was accused of, and now you're attaching that to this. All of that was like holy unfair, and again the merits of the article alone there there we need to talk about the systematic harassment, sexual harassment and sexism that exists in these spaces. Spaces but damn if they didn't mess up the process by letting people spin on it for a couple of days, and the reporters who put out like Yo Yo dog I'm hearing some stuff. It's not good like it really was problematic I know and I hate that part because I think twitter as great as it is can be a detriment. Social Media in general can be a detriment and I don't want to. Over hyped isn't the the proper word for it because that diminishes what happened to these women in this article, which is horrible, and they shouldn't have had to have dealt with that on a day to day basis, and they shouldn't be crying in the bathroom at lunch. Break with others who are going through the same thing, and they shouldn't have to be fending off sexual advance after sexual advance via text message. In fear of trying to keep their job, but at the same time you're point like you're reading things on twitter like is he actually a friend of Jeffrey Epstein? was he a part of that circle? That's crazy and that's unfair that so many people's name got dragged through the mud because people were just creating things to create it while we waited and that's that's the detriment of social media and I hate that for some people who yesterday and the day before probably were days of hell for them of wondering. What is this Washington? Post expose GONNA. Be About am I included. I have no idea I mean the whole thing I thought. Wasn't good. I didn't think it looked good from the optics I, thought that it was handled poorly to say the least and I think a lot of people were fueling the handling of it, just from spouting off on their twitter, and that to me was unfair for a lot of people, and it minimized ultimately and I. Don't think he asked intention at all in ended up minimizing the story, because it couldn't live up to the expectations that people had created in their mind. It's kind of like when you read a book and you picture who plays the main characters in your head, and then that gets turned into a movie and you're like no man that's. Like that's not how it went down in my head, and it can't ever live up to the story you created in your brain, and the problem is. This is already an issue Katie as I'm sure you well know as many of our female colleagues in this space know that already gets minimized or already told relax. You're no fun. Just go justin joke yeah. Don't rock the boat. Oh I thought you were. Were Cooler than that, and then you're sitting there, questioning your own judgment going and my being gaslight right now or maybe I am overly sensitive. Maybe this is just how it goes. Hey, I want to be accepted in the space. Maybe I do need to just go along and like if you think that that's not something happens regularly for women in the space. Just scroll through twitter man just scroll through twitter. Twenty four hours and look at all the women who have identified with what those fifteen women talked about in the Washington Post piece. We are going to be joined by Liz. Clark of the Washington Post, one of the two articles along with will hobson who put together this expose on the rampant sexual harassment in the Washington football franchise offices as Katie alluded to many of the people who have been singled out and named the peace have since been fired or left I believe the play by play guy that you mentioned announced yesterday that he was quote unquote retiring from the team. How convenient what it's been! A good run is what he said. What claiming I'm? Sure he's got many many other things that he'll be focusing his attention on now. So yeah we're going to talk more about this on the Dan Le Batard show. We have a lot of other things to get to ESPN released list of the best arena height music. and. We have some problems with it. We were I mean come on like come on, get it. If you get a chance, subscribe to ESPN daily. It was put out in the ESPN daily email. It's a great compilation, but come on Katie I know you were like. Oh, I. Know I actually wrote them down because I'm this invested in Georgia? Take any notes on the Washington Post article, but she has many many on the hype Music List Espn daily put out. Hello. This is your apartment. I need some favors from you. Your.

twitter Washington Post Katie harassment Washington Jeffrey Epstein ESPN Espn Georgia justin Liz Clark hobson
"washington post" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

15:17 min | 1 year ago

"washington post" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Want to you agenda very the best to Ryan Crocker joins us now from spokane Washington. He's diplomat in residence at Princeton University versity ambassador Crocker. Welcome back to the program. Thank you for having me so first of all that tape that we heard from you in two thousand sixteen. PUT IT in context. Why are you saying About about your earliest time there in Afghanistan that we didn't even know what the task was in two thousand two overall. I think the task was clear then. And it's clear now. Go to Iran Kate the capacity of al-Qaeda or anyone else operating from Afghan soil to do another attack like nine eleven. The challenge is how do you get there. And in this particular case The the argument debate going on that I could perceive from Kabul Do we simply consider mission accomplished. Because they'll see it as on the run or are we going to have to take steps to ensure that they never come back and that had to do with four levels missions and civilian component. So it wasn't we've we've always known We still know eighteen years later What this is about? It is preventing a resurgence in return to Afghanistan in friendly hands for al-Qaeda. Okay so the mission overall preventing a resurgence of al Qaeda data but Ambassador Crocker. Forgive me because I'm I'm a little confused I think in that two thousand sixteen Cigar interview. You say that whether it's a long term commitment or a minimal commitment is that was that the the confusion as early as two thousand two. Well let me put it this way. They the minimum commitment. Ah An economy of force operation which it certainly was to Take on al-Qaeda. Is that enough do we say we. We've done it and then pull back Or do we maintain a longer term presence to stabilize the Afghan state and to be sure that were in position to react immediately to anything that would look like a return of al Qaeda that that was the debate the Betas I saw it so ambassador Crocker. Give me your big picture. Take here what do you think is revealed in this six part Washington in post series about. US officials approach to the to the war. Our strategy What is your takeaway here? Well I it was an amazing effort by post over several years to accumulate. All of these papers through the Freedom of Information Act and that that is commendable I think though that They are sensationalizing to mark degree to try to produce the smoking gun and so forth that You know lying to the American people when I think the real story is to to to sift through all of those documents all of those interviews and to try to pull together. Some true lessons learned what worked. What didn't why What does this tell us about possible future engagements by the US In other countries ethically military engagement so Again A I I think the real meaning of these papers is yet to come when I for someone or someone some group to go through these meticulously And see what they tell us in toto and I don't think the inspector general all is is that should stop. I mean I think there should be a policy. Discussion and very much in the public is so I think the uh the real meaning of this will be when someone or someones takes it on a long-term mental physical project so ambassador Crocker agreed with you on that vast trove of documents like this. I think probably deserves many iterations of analysis but to your point about the the post sensationalizing this I mean John. Salko ahead of the very agency that conducted these interviews and you were one of the interviewees. Louie's he told Craig what he told the Post. The American people have constantly been lied to. I don't is. He is sopko sensationalizing analyzing his own agencies work. You have to go through And he would have to say Here's the life hi From from my perspective looking at a couple of the big issues out there like the collapse APPs of Kabul Bank In in two thousand ten Yes it was a huge mess. It was also broadly known Because it just remember this is this is Afghanistan no more Taliban government free press. They were correspondent all over Kabul and they were on these stories so I I just don't see the smoking gun and that's why I think the thrust of these papers should be. What does this tell us about what to do? And more importantly what not to do You know that's the story I'm looking for. That's the set of Afghan can papers that I think are really going to be worth reading. Okay so perhaps. There isn't any one I don't even know if there's anyone that's an out lie. But but the the issue is Were the was the. We're the American people misled about the The progress being made in Afghanistan over multiple administrations. I mean you mentioned the couple bank crisis which is a really interesting moment in this story. Right from two thousand ten then when the Kabul Bank collapsed under what billions of dollars of a billion dollars a fraudulent loans including some that were made to then President Hamid Karzai's family now now in the Washington Post story. The Post points out that Carl I can bury who was ambassador In Afghanistan just before you he was pressing Karzai to take action on the Kabul Bank problem alum but apparently they say that that changed when you replaced him in July two thousand eleven and let me just read a quote here from a couple of Treasury Department officials who are in the Afghanistan papers abors says they say it was a case study of how fragile and precarious. US policy can be literally literally overnight. Our entire policy change Crocker's attitude was is to make the issue go away buried as deep as possible and silence any voices within the embassy that wanted to make this an issue that's from Treasury Department officials. Now the reason why I raise this is because because again about the American people not being leveled with here is not an example of the self defeating nature of US Policy Policy Neff Ghanistan over many years because we know you cared deeply about corruption. You've talked about that for years. But here we have treasury officials saying you didn't want to alienate Hamad Karzai in push him on anti corruption efforts because of the US troops urge coming under President Obama. Almost at the exact same time respond to that it it wouldn't be a question of Pressing President Karzai. I'm I did that. I had multiple meetings with him Multiple meetings with other senior officials on this issue I think the real question out there is Should we have decided that couple bank and it's they know mom was You know the single issue should drive our presence that if they don't come clean on Kabul couple bank think we should pack up and go home No we should not So it's there's a big difference here between handling selene multiple items on it and gender and making your whole agenda The issue of corruption What President Obama asked me to do ninety sent me to Afghanistan? Those two things renewed the relationship with President Karzai which was in tatters at the time and to negotiate a long-term long-term bilateral agreement between Afghanistan and the US We did both and President Obama came to Kabul to sign that agreement so is corruption important. Of course it is it is it is utterly corrosive. Should it have driven every decision we made in which case we pulled out So that's that's the difference Well you know you. You have spoken a a lot about the problem. How big problem? Corruption was not not a uniform problem of course but a big one that was perhaps inadvertently only of the. US government's own making right. I mean in the in the Afghanistan papers you're quoted as saying our biggest single project sadly and inadvertently of course may have been the development of mass corruption. Once it gets to the level I saw when I was out there at somewhere between unbelievably hard outright impossible to fix but it was the. US pouring these hundreds hundreds of billions of dollars into an extremely fragile state right and even a believe humanitarian groups on the ground. Were saying there isn't the infrastructure. Sure here to be able to to soak up all that money in a legitimate fashion. So I'm wondering why do you think the White House or the Pentagon and why didn't they realize know or believe that that flood of money could be a source of flowering of corruption in Afghanistan. Well that's precisely the point. We need to remember that Afghanistan was new dimension for us at the time We didn't quite know what to expect after the Taliban were unseeded One one of those hard lessons painfully learned. I think is the just just to describe it to you. inability of A A a country status system To to manage these these kinds of inflows That that was all new Lewis. And that's why I think again. The lessons learnt part of this is so important. And that's what are those do- The major projects Early on because it's going to take you someplace you don't WanNa go. We didn't know it. Then we know what now I knew actually in very short so just two quick quick quick questions for unite appreciate your time But you said the inability of the sort of receiving nation that's just experienced. US military military action the inability of that nation to cope with all the money is one thing but are we also not talking about the unwillingness of Pentagon gone and White House officials to listen to their very own advisers on the ground right. I mean there is an example in the in the post story saying one contractor was saying he was doling out three million dollars a day for projects in one Afghanistan district where the infrastructure amounted to mud huts and no windows and there are people. Were saying. This is crazy but I'm getting a sense. That officials weren't listening whether is always that disconnect between headquarters and field ask any foreign foreign correspondent about the editorial staff back home As a field guy and that's a constant refrain. Listen to the folks in the field but again here I I said the one of the interviews. This is a glass half full for me Because I got to see what it was like in two thousand and two when there was nothing And it's very much that's the case that we have made a difference. Look there were one hundred thousand troopers in. US troopers in Afghanistan When I left in twenty twelve There were about ten thousand housing there now Casualties have dropped hugely. Think this And yet the Afghan government is staying. The course with this troop presence is one tenth. What used to be So is that winning well It has kept the Taliban from taking over the country again. They don't hold a single one. Thirty four provincial capitals with a now vastly reduced. US investment. I would say that's a pretty cheap insurance ENJ- policy to prevent another nine eleven. Well my final question to you ambassador and again I'm grateful for your time is look I just keep returning your point well taking but I still keep returning to the the the notion. That's what's shot through this. This investigative series is the American people weren't levelled with so I'm just wondering you know not just the American people but all the the members of the United States military who have served more than two thousand of them who gave their lives so to their families as well bill. Can you tell them that. They should trust the messaging given given to them by officials of the United States government when it comes to military action abroad should we trust what are officials. Say One of the great strengths of American society is that it is an open society citing We are allowed in this country. We are insured in this country that we can be out in question authority and we should always do that. I think it is very important At the same time I think that Those who have lost loved ones in Afghanistan Should also also take some comfort in the fact that Their their daughters and sons answered the call to duty Went forward into A real war and paid the ultimate price Is that sacrifice without me absolutely not it. It represents all that is good in this country So I think you can you you can handle both a a A sense of our right in our media the citizens to question authority but at the same time to to realize that these sacrifices were for the security of the United States. And I would tell anyone that as we sit here in twenty nineteen The fact that the Taleban has not been able to come back that al Qaeda is not able to get the time space and security to plan another nine eleven They have sacrificed for our national security and our security is better for it. We'll embassador Ryan Crocker served as US ambassador to Afghanistan from two thousand eleven to two thousand twelve. He was charged a fair in two thousand and two. He's a diplomat in residence at Princeton Princeton University. And he recently published an opinion piece in the Washington Post titled I served in Afghanistan. It's not another Vietnam. We have linked to that at one point. Radio DOT ORG Ambassador Walker. Thank you so much for joining us today. Thank you for having me well Craig whitlock posts investigative reporter..

Afghanistan US Ambassador Crocker Kabul Taliban Kabul Bank President Hamid Karzai al-Qaeda Washington Post Washington Princeton University Craig whitlock President Obama Pentagon spokane Iran Ambassador Walker
"washington post" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

10:49 min | 1 year ago

"washington post" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Says there's unmistakable evidence that. US officials knew the war had become unwinnable but may never have had a winning strategy in place to begin with and now members of the military who served in Afghanistan are reacting here. Shane Reynolds who served as an Army combat medic in Afghanistan in two thousand ten for all of us that went over there and worked so hard into our families through so much and there was never a strategy. We were just going through motions chasing ghosts through mounds. This hour point will dig deep into the Afghanistan papers and we'll speak with a former. US official WHO's quoted in them and joining us from Washington is Craig Whitlock. He's the investigative reporter Behind the series the Washington symbol series the Afghanistan papers and we have a link to his reporting at on point. Radio Dot Org Craig. Great to have you back. Thanks for having me so you know we wanted. We talk to you on the day that the first part of the series was published earlier this month and we wanted to have you back for a full hour because quite frankly in in this particular news cycle. I just thought that like in any other reality. We'd have your stories would be the big stories of the year and they risk getting a little buried. So let's let's let's spend some some significant time on this first of all for folks who haven't been able to read through the six part series just tells. What are the Afghanistan papers? Sure so these are interviews more than four hundred interviews that An Obscure Government Agency called the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan conducted with people who played a direct role in the war there. They range from generals and diplomats White House officials to aid workers or where troops in the field as well as Afghan and NATO officials. These interviews were conducted between twenty fourteen in two thousand eighteen as part of a lessons learned project to to discuss mistakes made during the war in the hopes that they wouldn't be repeated in any future conflicts We obtain them took three years and in two lawsuits under under the freedom of Information Act but it took us a long time to obtain them but the first time we've been able to make public these interviews and transcripts and notes in their entirety Birdie. Okay well let's listen back to a moment from two thousand one from October eleventh. Two thousand one just a few days. After the United States began bombing in Afghanistan and President George W Bush held a primetime press conference at the White House. Reporter asked him how he had planned to avoid being drawn into another Vietnam like quagmire quagmire. The president said we learned some very important lessons in Vietnam. You said rely on Special Forces not a big army and then here's what President Bush added people often ask me. How long will this last? This particular battlefront will last as long as it takes to bring al Qaeda justice it. It may happen tomorrow. It may happen a month from now. It may take a year or two but we will prevail and what the American people need to know what our allies no. I am determined to stay the course and we must do so. We must do so President George W Bush in October of two thousand one so quite a Resolved tone of voice there from the president early on Craig but what does what not the Afghanistan papers reveal about how quickly the United States realize that it was not going to be a straightforward military operation in Afghanistan. Oh I think it took a while at first the whole mission was to go over and retaliate for nine one one to capture and kill al-Qaeda leaders in Afghanistan and in the first six months we accomplished most of that you know al Qaeda's leadership was was dead captured or had fled to places like Pakistan unlike Osama bin Laden did so we really accomplished the the main objective of the war early on but after those first six months that's when things started to drift and part of the the problem was of course of Bush administration got distracted by its planning to invade Iraq But we also the the objectives became mushy at that point became unclear. who were we fighting? Why were we continuing to fight What responsibility did we have for the government of Afghanistan to try and rebuild the country You the things got kind of mushy after that right so muddled strategy at best or no strategy at worst and how does that. So so the core of what your reporting shows here is is that truth is in great contrast to what officials were consistently telling the American people for years on end. So what are some of the things things that that The American people heard right so the talking points throughout the world have been pretty consistent you get a US military commanders and diplomats or people at the White House and they pretty much take the same line. They've said we're in a tough fight. There's a lot of challenges. We might have some setbacks but invariably they say we're making progress and it set phrase. We're making progress That has been repeated Month after month a year after year neff Ghanistan even when it has become apparent That we're not making progress. We're stuck in in a stalemate or a quagmire but what's interesting in the Afghanistan papers is not just as our the tone of things completely different people admitting there were real problems and the war or was was really suffering from a policy and strategic level but there are actually some interviews with individuals both military headquarters in Kabul and people people who worked at the White House who said there is a deliberate effort to distort to statistics or measurements to spin. The word to always make it seem like we're making progress when these people in fact knew we we were not winning a deliberate distortion. I mean that's the thing that I keep coming back to. That's a unveiled in each one of the pieces. Uses in your in your series Craig but about the not the consistent truth of the fact that the United States wasn't making progress in Afghanistan. I mean you've been here you in the Washington Post Since the series came out have been hearing from members of the military who served in the region and for example. Let me just play a bit of tape here from from the Post. This is Greg. Frost Romi served as an army intelligence officer over four deployments in Afghanistan from two thousand six to two thousand seventeen. And here's what he told you. There's a lot of years sex. You're just pushing the Rock Hill and you go home for six months and you come back and the rocks at the bottom of the hill. And you're like well now I'm GonNa start pushing it again. You know why so Craig. What kind of reaction are you? Hearing from members of the military I think enlisted members of the military or junior officers who served in Afghanistan particularly those who serve multiple errors. who were sent back it again and again? There's there's a real frustration Anger even the they feel like they put their lives on the line. They carried out Their orders and what they were told to do very tough assignments and I think for a lot in into reading the Afghanistan papers their commanders or senior officers in the US government who are now looking back. They're admitting that things were really screwed up. I think these these veterans are you know feeling a sense of betrayal. The why did you send us back. My friends died in the war. People I served with were killed. Shouldn't you have been more forthcoming all along about how this war was going and maybe we should have had this national conversation. Many years ago Well Shane Reynolds that Army combat medic that we played the tape from earlier in the show. He also said that we felt there was no plan. There was no strategy. There is no will to change anything about that. All of our leaders you saw them on television giving speeches on leadership and publishing their self help books or their leadership books on retirement. They had abandoned us. Abandoned abandoned US many of us before we even got there the war to them. It was a box to check something to do in their career. That's Shane Reynolds a an Army combat medic. What response has the Post Gotten Craig from From the from the ribbons and brass as Shane says from from the Pentagon well. They've been pretty quiet but I don't think there's much they can say in the sense that when you read the Afghanistan papers what's startling is that As set soldier just mentioned it felt like on the ground there is no strategy. But what's what's shocking artery these interviews with commanding generals who say the same thing There's an AH army general. Dan McNeill was a two-time military commander of NATO forces in Afghanistan. And he very bluntly said that you there was no strategy. said he was just told to go over there and and do good things and he asked Higher ups at NATO in Washington before he went to Afghanistan in two thousand seven he said you know I asked people to define for me what winning men and nobody could and he was far from alone. There is a British general who's in charge of NATO forces forces in Afghanistan General David Richards. And he bluntly said you know. We had a lot of of tactics but there was no coherent long-term strategy General Doug Lute who is the Afghan words are in the White House for Bush and Obama said you know we didn't have the foggiest idea of what we were undertaking in Afghanistan So these are the generals in charge easer the brass. There's they're not disputing their comments. But it's pretty startling to hear that kind of assessment. Come from the people the top well Craig got a minute and a half to go before the break when we come back from the break we're actually going to be talking with someone who's Quoted in the Afghanistan Papers Ambassador Ryan Crocker. So set up our conversation with him for us a little bit. Who who is he and why is he a key player in the Afghanistan story so Ryan Crocker is very well known and accomplished diplomat In the State Department he served as the top diplomat in Kabul twice twice both in two thousand and two which was just. After we reopen the embassy Afghanistan was really in a shambles at that point but he came back as ambassador. You're under President Obama during the surge Several years later so he he has a good view of the Afghan war from from different time perspectives. He also served as has. US Ambassador to Pakistan The neighboring country which is also a key player in the world so he has a lot of perspective in the war over time. We'll talk with Ambassador Ryan Crocker when we come back from the other side of this break and.

Afghanistan United States Craig Whitlock Shane Reynolds President George W Bush White House Army president NATO Kabul Ryan Crocker Washington Post investigative reporter Washington Special Forces al-Qaeda
"washington post" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

11:50 min | 1 year ago

"washington post" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

"How did the Washington imposed obtain the Afghanistan papers? What can we all learn from these secret interviews about the war? What are we all need to know about what's happened in Our Name? I'm your host Brian stelter and as you know this weekly podcast is our chance to go. In depth with media leaders and newsmakers was talking about how the news is made how the media works. And this week we've seen an incredible example of the news media at its best a project. Three years is in the making from the Washington Post by investigative reporter Craig Whitlock and a team of dozens of people who helped honor these secret interviews about the Afghan war a major investigation by the Washington Post major revelations about the nearly two decade long war and Afghanistan top. US officials officials repeatedly misled the American public to conceal doubts about the likelihood of success in Afghanistan. This is deeply deeply disturbing being alarming and it should be for for the American people a campaign of lies. The Afghanistan papers project was published by post on Monday morning. Now it's Friday morning and I'm thrilled to be joined and by Craig Whitlock. Who led this project? Craig thank you so much for joining me. Thanks for having me. You've been working on this in secret for very long time. Take me back to the beginning gene when you start to think that there was something the public needed to see. That was being kept secret so I we didn't know in the beginning it was August twenty. Sixteen this all started with an old fashioned tip. We got a tip. That Michael Flynn the retired army. General had given unpublished interview with Thin Obscure Government Agency about the war in Afghanistan. And you have to remember back in August. Two Thousand Sixteen Michael Flynn was becoming well known maybe even notorious he is for his supportive of then candidate trump dislike of Hillary Clinton but when he was in the military Flynn was known as A pretty straight shooter and someone who wasn't afraid to criticize how things were going within the ranks. So we're very curious what he said in this interview and we put in a public records records request under the freedom of Information Act and we thought we get our hands on this pretty soon but the long and short of it is it turned into a three year legal battle and you discovered there were many many more interviews. How many interviews? With other people what we didn't know it I we I just requested the the Flint interview but later we found out that that this was part of a bigger project where they had interviewed hundreds of people and even at that time we didn't know how many hundreds but ultimately turns out they've interviewed more than six six hundred people who played some kind of role in the war from generals or military commanders to diplomats to White House officials but all the way down the the the ranks to aid workers people in the field. We managed to finally get our hands after three years on more than four hundred of the interviews. And we're still fighting thing for the rest and these interviews were conducted by this agency is Edson Obscure Agency the Office of the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan reconstruction or were. Is it SEGALLA. How do they pronounce Cigar Cigar and this organization? Did you even know it existed when you were starting out. Did he covered national security issues and had covered. The Pentagon has a beat for several years. And so this agency. Their job is to investigate. Waste and abuse in Afghantistan and make sure money's being spent properly like you would expect from an inspector general but they did something different With these interviews back in two thousand fourteen fourteen. They decided to start a program called lessons learned where they would interview people involved in the war to see what mistakes were made in the hopes that they could avoid making these mistakes again if we got stuck in another war like it but the context again was interesting back in two thousand fourteen. Everybody assumed the war was finally coming to an end. President Obama had promised to withdraw all troops from Afghanistan by the time he left office and he had in fact declared an end to combat operations. Even though in fact we were still fighting over there but at that time people thought the war was was over was ending and so they were perhaps talking a little more freely than they would've otherwise. I think it's so interesting that it starts with a single tip about a single interview and and then snowballs you never know when a single tip is going to lead to too well and this one. We didn't know because we were just pulling on the string and we kept pulling but it was hard. We kept getting doors slammed on us. We thought it was a pretty straightforward public records request. This interview is not classified. This agency in fact doesn't even have classification authority when you deal with the military a lot of times the immediately invoked national security reasons. We're not giving information but this agency didn't I didn't have that same with authority but again we thought we would get this in in short order but once Flynn was named National Security Advisor for trump This agency finally denied us and we had to go to court to fight to get it and we did win but it took awhile and you mentioned. They're still more. You're fighting for in court tussle tussle but more about that you know the the journalistic and legal background to a story like this when we say you're fighting in court. This means multiple lawyers right multiple court sessions. This is not sheep for the Washington Post. It's very expensive. Unfortunately we have a terrific in-house counsel who deals with these issues. But once you go to court you need to hiring outside counsel and we did in this case again very good lawyers you WanNa make sure you put your best foot forward in federal court case but the court cases take a long on time and what's unusual in this instance as we actually had to sue twice we sued I for the Flint interview and we won that and we thought that would essentially they serve as a test case that surely this agency the Inspector General. After we won the first time they would cough up the rest but they kept dragging their feet. We need to take them to the court a second time which you know we were sort of banging our heads against the wall. But that's what it took to pry loose all four hundred interviews. And why do you believe that this was worth doing. What was the I think I think I can understand? Why but articulate what the the motivation is something like this? Well if if you go back in time there's really never been a public accounting for what happened in Afghanistan. There is no nine one one when that happened. AH The government created the nine one one commission to try and get some answers to figure out the lessons of how that could have happened and even in Iraq there have been attempts to do lessons. Learned Programs Army did a big like two thousand page history of what went wrong in Iraq and later declassified that but nothing like that's ever happened happened with Afghanistan. There have been some congressional hearings but hardly any in recent years. Nobody's really done a top to bottom review of what went wrong so we thought maybe this this would be a way to get into it and once we got the Flynn interview He was really forthright and he was in fact pretty blistering in his criticism of how the word been portrayed to the public. He said time after time by the time the public messaging was given to the American people. They're always told we're making progress. We're doing better. We're winning. And yet he said that intelligence reports from the ground made cleared the complete opposite that we were losing and he said it was almost a crime. What had happened happened out? The American people were misled about the nature of the war. Once we saw that we were like well. We want to see the other four hundred interviews. We want to see what the other other people said. We knew. Then I think that this was a potentially very important story. I used to think during the height of the Iraq war that when we're we're covering. US military claims government claims come with a warning label a warning sticker that says governments often lied during wartime and yet we. Don't I believe that sometime deep down inside and we hope history doesn't repeat itself every single time but you're saying it's pretty clear from his interviews. History did repeat itself again. Country was lied to for years. They were certainly misled. And that's the power of these Afghanistan papers is I think I mean we knew and had reported that the war wasn't wasn't going. Well just the fact the war that takes eighteen years by definition that were not going very well certainly. Many of the problems have been reported on on on all sorts of news media for many years but was different about these papers. It was the people who are in charge of the war. The people running the show so to speak they had had these grave misgivings and doubts about the strategy about the mission about how things were being portrayed and they were just enormously blunt about about it in these interviews and that I think gives them the power of the contrast between what the American people were being told in public and what these same people felt in private There's been some criticism however of the way the posts characterize this for example Dartmouth Professor Jason Lisle Road Analysis for the post website. WHO said If you're surprised by what's in the Afghan papers you haven't been paying attention He's citing the scores of quote rich accounts from journalists about election fraud corruption. Human rights abuses mucis battlefield setbacks and failed reconstruction. What do you say to that? Well he's right in the sense that that's been well reported. The posters reported this CNN CNN is reported this. I mean who. WHO hasn't we've had correspondence air for eighteen years reporting these very same issues and certainly You know scholars like Dr Lyle. I'll have been studying these issues but again I don't think anybody has ever uncovered statements in black and white hundreds of interviews of people involved in the war for admitting that it was a disaster. intones that are frankly pretty stunning i. I haven't seen that anywhere and I think that's why these reports in our coverage bridge of it has resonated. We've entered enormous response from my readers. And it's been very gratifying. I think we finally broken through with the truth about the war. And that's something that seems so hard to do To get sustained focused attention on what's going on in the conflict folks zones that America finds itself in Afghanistan chief among them but other other conflict zones where they are drone strikes and other accident went on all the time and pretty pretty easy to look the other way. If you're just going about your day to day life consuming the news did you feel you how to desire or motivation to break through that. Well we were going to try. I mean I knew going into this. One of the things was going to happen once. We published either. It would sink like a stone and nobody nobody would pay attention because everybody is obsessed with politics at the moment or perhaps it would grab people the way I thought you know why the way it had grabbed me when I read these documents and we spend a lot of time not just preparing these documents so he could show them to our readers we went to great lengths so that when people read these quotations -tations and the articles e could actually see the experts from the documents themselves. We'd audio excerpts of people like Michael Flynn and Ambassador Ryan Crocker telling these kind of blood-curdling stories almost about what did go on during the war. We thought if we could present it in the right way again we hoped it would would strike a chord with readers and I think it worked out. I think it was incredible the way the post rolled this out on Monday morning with All of your articles in a.

Afghanistan Michael Flynn Washington Post Craig Whitlock US Iraq Brian stelter Washington Edson Obscure Agency army White House Hillary Clinton investigative reporter Pentagon CNN Afghantistan Obama
"washington post" Discussed on The Dan Bongino Show

The Dan Bongino Show

07:48 min | 1 year ago

"washington post" Discussed on The Dan Bongino Show

"Showing you again folks how I believe the FBI. I was duped into initiating a bad investigation which they continued shamefully later knowing the information was garbage Lisa page. FBI lawyer who's appeared in the news. Obviously yesterday we covered her on our show who is just playing victim now and one of the most pathetic things I've ever seen in my life here's lead. FBI lawyer and the biggest political spying scandal in US history. I'm sorry you know we offended you by calling you out on it. I mean seriously but I do you believe Lisa page was being genuine when she went up to Capitol Hill and she gave some testimony. She was asked very specifically by Mark Meadows about where the FBI and the CIA where they got their information from and who their sources are remember the central tenant of what we're discussing. I have to continue to harp on. There's as you understand this. Is the scandal the FBI stories been. We got the information from Downer. And that the information we may have got from the CIA. That was from different sources. They didn't know anything. Anything about the dossier. Why because Brennan just told you we didn't know about the dossier and steal really put up her testimony? I want to read this again. So Mark Meadows. He tells excellent Congressman from North Carolina Tells Lisa page in this testimony. Hey We know there are multiple sources paid says. I know that I know all the information found. Its Way to a lot of different places certainly in October. Two Thousand Sixteen but if the CIA is early as August in fact had those same reports thus steel. I'm not aware that I'm not aware of that. And redacted meadow says so you say our source is your source arse was he working for you page says well no sir. Well I mean how could he be exclusively your source. I believe they're talking about steel. Oh potentially helper paid. Says I don't know if the CIA had Mr Steele Open as a source. I would not know that folks. Listen I don't l.. Trust Lisa page as far as I can throw. I can't throw anybody very far. No what I want to. I'm simply suggesting to you that I don't believe she's lying here. I believe she is telling doing truth. Do you get what she's saying. She is still under the impression that the F. B. I.. Open their massive spying investigation at the Donald Trump because they believe the information they were getting from the intelligence community and the CIA in the East See. The electronic communication was coming from verified separate separate sources folks. The information was likely coming from steele the exact same source they were using and they don't know it. It's not verified defied. It's the same thing she goes on. It gets good here. Lisa page says yes sir because with all due honesty if director Brennan so we got that information from our source right. I'm just reading this directly the FBI got this information from our source if the CIA had another source of that information. I am neither aware of that nor did this EAE provided to us. If if they did. Because the first time we meadows interrupts we do know there are multiple sources page comes back. I do know that. And then she goes on to where we were talking about before. It's a backwards but it's important. We put it that way. You get where I'm going with this. The the bureau was involved in massive malfeasance for continuing a spy investigation. Continuing an investigation. They knew was was predicated by the latest January of two thousand seventeen when they're interviewing steel sources on bogus information and they kept swearing in any way I'm telling you the malfeasance how feasible is rife. We are only discussing the initiation phase initiation phase now the disagreement out in the Washington Post piece. We're talking about right now between borrowed hearts is based only on that. And I believe Horowitz if if I'm not trying to get ahead of this but I wanna discuss this piece because it's in the news and you need to know about it if Horowitz's conclusion Russian on the report coming out this Monday. If his conclusion the inspector general is they opened up the investigation properly. This is not an out for the deep state. Why Joe and please tell me? This makes sense. Because Horowitz doesn't know so what the. CIA is not lying about and if the FBI produces a file saying hey this is the information we got from Brennan. Of course we were going to spy. I on the trump team Brennan told us there was a massive scandal. Then Horowitz may be right makes sense and bar may be right to how can they both be right. The FBI investigation was properly opened the FBI investigation. Wasn't there saying different things. No they're not. No they're not Lindsey. Graham Kinda hinted at this last night. Everybody take a big fat juicy timeout. We don't know what's in the report if Horowitz's report says yes. It was opened based on information they got from the Intel community and then dorms report coming out hopefully weeks or maybe a month or so later. We haven't seen dorms report. Says that information they got was based on lies from John Brennan who didn't tell the FBI he was using the same sources. Folks this is not aww pass for the deep state at all everybody chill. We don't know yet joe. Please tell me that made sense. Yeah good we don't know yet shares rebounding could be right right it does not give up the media of course is jumping to paint this as no the FBI did nothing wrong. They were investigating based on solid information. Bar saying you all don't know where the information in Cambridge yet right. Now take away number two from this Washington Post piece last night. They kind of throw this in at the end. This a throwaway now to reset where we are on this because this is important. The Post is saying well Horowitz's suggesting you know this was properly predicated. What is the FBI FBI officials story about what it was predicated on? I already told you the officials stories. We open the investigation. Because I'm a diplomat. told us they talked to his trump campaign member popadopoulos palace who told them about dirt on Hillary who popadopoulos heard from Russia age. That's the official left the story and the FBI story to how. How do we know that? Because he's the only person refers to Mifsud who talked to popadopoulos initially by the dirt on Hillary allegedly cozy only one who refers to Miss Sudas of Russian Asia. No no one else. Not even muller not branding. Either I would call me say that because co me. I told you is going to stick to the script that hey the Intel we were fed from Brennan and the Intel Community said a Russian agent was talking Popadopoulos. That's what we were told told you. Get the official version of events relies entirely on Serbian Russian agent so Devlin Barrett throws this little throwaway Away in at the end from the Washington Post piece came out yesterday in the.

FBI CIA John Brennan Lisa Horowitz Washington Post Mark Meadows Mr Steele Intel Community Donald Trump US Intel North Carolina Downer Hillary meadow Russia Popadopoulos
"washington post" Discussed on The Dan Bongino Show

The Dan Bongino Show

12:35 min | 1 year ago

"washington post" Discussed on The Dan Bongino Show

"You don't perform better. You will look better. You doubt me men women try it out. Look in the mirror take a mental snapshot of what you look like comeback. Seven days later it takes about seven days foundation from brickhouse nutrition to load. Look at yourself. You're going to have that hard toned. Look I promise you this stuff is no jo Jo. How much much as little joe he loved using jets yeah? My nephew drove all the way up from Fort. Lauderdale to get a bottle of this stuff for me that he loves it that much foundation it is a critique people and go pick this up today right around the holidays brickhouse nutrition dot com slash. Dan brickhouse nutrition dot com slash. Dan Do not miss out foundation. One of the finest nutrition supplements I've ever taking. Don't take my word for it. Do the MIRA test yourself. You will not regret him all right getting right back so without further ado. Here's John Brennan in a Congressional Congressional hearing chatting with tray gouty when he was still in Congress we'll call that chatting and gouty s McKee question. 'CAUSE gowdy knows the whole story at the time and says to him. Hey John when did you learn about the dossier that Ben let me just say that the FBI already acknowledged was the central core four of their warrant to spy on the trump he. When did you learn about that and listen to Brennan Shady shifty answer this guy such a liar? Check this out you. You know who commissioned the steele dossier. I don't rely on no one because we we did. It wasn't part of the Corpus of intelligence Information that we had. It was not in any way used as a basis. This is for the intelligence community assessment. That was done. You sure about that. Do you want to revise that answer. Now remember John Durum keep in mind the players here folks. This is like a big elaborate play. You have to keep in mind the actors in this player the protagonist in the antagonise bill bar. Obviously the attorney general you know that John on Durham is his United States attorney bars in the United States attorney. Hours the Department of Justice we pay who is investigating this it is clear he is either interviewed or is looking to interview Brennan. Brennan's answer. You already saw it as on the record you just start. We didn't manipulate that. That's a full cut only again cut for time to fit into into the show. Brennan is already on the record and Congress saying I did not see the dossier. I didn't know anything about it. It had no role ever and Joe Sadness foreshadowing element the beginning of the show. It was not part of the Corpus Diligence we used we got we clear on that John. Brennan CIA yea. We knew nothing about nothing about nothing about this dossier ladies and gentlemen really. Let's go back to an older piece by our good friend. Lee Smith who has a terrific book out now called the plot against the president. Lee Smith wrote this piece. In December of two thousand seventeen lease been read in on this case for a long time. This piece will be up in the show notes and the benefit of our Bongino report in the show notes is we include older articles as well that are now relevant again today the title of the piece. It's a must read even though it's older. Did President Obama read the steele dossier in the White House last August. Wow that's not possible. Joe Because is this primary intelligence guy. John Brennan didn't see the dossier he didn't know anything about the dossier to win December. So someone that's what he told. Chuck Todd let's go to Lisa a little screen shot from the peace and take a look at least this is a little longer but this is important. You hear this because remember what Brennan said. He hasn't seen the dossier till December this case with the FBI. Joe Started because of Downer Popadopoulos. Not The CIA right waken and on. Here's Lee Smith from that piece in contrast to the FBI. According to Jacoby Mary Jacoby Glenn Simpson from Fusion. GPS as wife who hired to dig up dirt on trump by the way according to Jacoby the CIA quote hop to and immediately worked to verify this dossier by August of two thousand sixteen by August of Two Thousand Sixteen folks remember the by the CIA had verified the key finding the dossier yea to the point that the Washington Post revealed it was having is only top secret meetings with Obama. That's not possible folks. How is is any of this possible? How is the CIA? But by August not in August in other words they verified before for liberals listening by August. How is the CIA verify dossier that's already been debunked and John Brennan? WHO said he hasn't even seen? How is this? How is this happening happening? How is this happening? Let's go back to the lead Smith piece. I gotTa Tell You Paul. You're on fire after a rough start. You are on fire with the pieces today. Nice work just giving me that. Look these MRS wife former CIA director. John Brennan testified in front of the House Intel Committee. This may that the dossier gay quote wasn't part of the Corpus of intelligence information we had. It was not used in any way as a basis but Mary Jacoby Obi Glenn Simpson says he brought it to Baba it seems that Glenn Simpson wife may be correct again. In April. The New York Times reported that last Summer Brennan was so concerned about Russian efforts to help trump remember that only exists in the dossier because it's fake that he briefed top lawmakers including Harry Reid in the August briefing for Mystery Times reports. Mr Brennan indicated that the the CIA focused on foreign intelligence was limited in its legal ability to investigate possible connections to trump. It goes on this is critical. The briefing talking about branding briefing read August about these Russian connections. which only exist in the dossier unprompted Harry Reid to write a public letter to the agency responsible for collecting domestic intelligence on August? Twenty Ninth Harry. Reid wrote to Director Comey. FBI that the threat of Russian interference is more extensive than widely known and may include the attempt to falsify official election results in recent classified briefings from officials in an interview have left them. Fearful that President Putin is goal is to tamper with the election by August. So by August the CIA verify the dossier John Brennan claimed he hadn't seen by August there. Briefing Harry read about information and the dossier about Russian interference. It's clearly fake Harry Reid because John Brennan can't domestic domestically investigate. PBS No law enforcement powers into running an Intel operation at the CIA. John Brennan Pushes Harry Reid to write a letter to the FBI to start investigating rating trump folks based on a dossier Brennan. seen this Lee Smith piece peacecorps pieces of gym. This is one of those evergreen pieces. You should keep up on your iphone. It is so so worth your time. Keep in mind. This is all being written. Keep in mind. The actors protagonists antagonists on out there being written put out there in the social media ecosystem by Glenn Simpson the fusion. GPS TONER WHO's paid by Hillary. This be written by his wife. Leigh Smith goes on in the piece. It gets worse. Believe it or not in in this piece. He's discussing here. Keep this on June twenty third. Apparently June twenty third of two thousand seventeen some bombshell arrives at the White House writes the Washington Post. Someone hand delivers a bombshell document to the White House. Lee Smith reports. This is from the Washington Post he says inside was an intelligence bombshell rights. Greg Miller L. Nakashima Adam Antonio so the Washington Post they right in the Washington Post a report tron from sourcing deep inside the Russian government that detail Putin's direct involvement in a cyber campaign disrupting disrupt and discredit the US presidential race. That's what's in the envelope but went further Joe. The intelligence captured Putin specific instructions to the operations nations objectives defeat or damage the Democratic nominee. Hillary Clinton and help elect her opponent. Donald Trump you. No one wants Simpson's wife. Mary Jacoby writes that Facebook Post. About how the CIA had verified that you know the date on that. It's the date after that Washington Post piece I thought see. I hadn't seen the dossier till until December so. How is it that the Washington Post is reporting that an envelope which ladies and gentlemen I assure you contain some information from likely even how how or steel that made its way into the dossier made its way to the White House? But Brendan's saying he hasn't and seen any of this yet. Mary Jacoby the day after the Washington. Post report Brennan his seen some of this and actually delivered it to Baba. Clint Clinton Simpson's wife who's reading on this whole thing because they're running this Intel operations fusion. GPS is writing about on facebook. And then deleting the post accordingly Smith two questions here. Don't forget where we came in. Remember Pink Floyd. The Wall is where we came it. Don't forget where we came in the leaks to the Washington Post about this earlier. The about to say this case was predicated. Fine fine no big deal the FBI had great information started bill bar time out. Pump the brakes ABS. You don't have to pump the brakes anymore. We may have some information from the intelligence community inspector general. You don't have remember remember the official. FBI story is. We didn't start this investigation. Based on information from the CIA Brennan. We started it because Australian diplomat down or told us about Popadopoulos so now I've led you down the path. What are the two questions we still have open the envelope? Lee Smits writing about that June of two thousand seventeen. That's delivered to the White House. Ladies and Gentlemen God forbid a bit in that envelope was information from stealing helper because then we would know conclusively with a period exclamation Asian point at the end of that sentence. Both we would know conclusively that John Brennan was lying that John Brennan lied lied under oath was familiar with the steal. Information that made its way into the dossier. Don't get confused with whether it's in the dossier or not. It was steals information if steele was getting the information from Stefan however a spy. Who if you listen to yesterday's show was undoubtedly being paid by the US government spying spying slush fund the office of net assessments? Then Ladies and gentlemen I'm telling you we blowing the doors off this thing and it explains exactly why the leaks leaks coming out the leaks. Don't worry the FBI's investigation was properly predicated and done why. It's based on an incomplete data. Set because Horowitz doesn't have the authority to go investigate the intelligence community. He's the Inspector General for Justice the FBI the FBI is going to say what I've been telling telling you the whole time we were due. It does not give them a pass. They continue the investigation. Knowing the dossier was garbage garbage that may be even worse than the Intel community. But get ready be prepared mark this show today cab this information at your fingertips protests because the liberal narrative with their media pals which the Washington Post Endeavour Barrett is preparing for. Now.

John Brennan CIA FBI Washington Post Lee Smith Brennan Shady White House Glenn Simpson Joe Sadness Jacoby Mary Jacoby Glenn Simps Intel Mr Brennan steele Mary Jacoby Harry Reid John President Putin Mary Jacoby Obi Glenn Simpson Washington
"washington post" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"washington post" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"There's a lot of podcasts out there and only small number get large audiences digitally podcasts and a few others. But how do you get? I mean, the brand of the post means that it's going to get a gigantic boost. Yeah. But how do you build an audience? I'm sure you get a lot of people ask this. Yeah. How do you do it? I mean, we we are lucky that we have a strong brand. And one of the things that we have thought a lot about is how we leverage that brand to grow the potential audience for a podcast. And this is something that actually the daily has been very smart about as well, you know, we know that there is a group of people who are avid podcast listeners and research shows that people who love podcasts love podcast, they listened to many multiple podcasts in a week many hours of podcasts in a week. And then there is a larger group of people who never listen to podcasts. Maybe don't know what they are certainly don't know how to open the app on their phone, and that's a huge opportunity. And it's something that because we have a strong brand already. We can make a lot of efforts to try to reach out to those people and to give alternate ways to listen to podcasts that were making. And so I won't say that we've solved it, but we're working on it a lot using our ability to reach people through our website thinking about how we might deliver a podcast to someone who doesn't know what it means when you say go, right and review this in podcasts, and the more that we can play with sort of that strength that we have in audience and reach the better off. We are podcasts. What is going to expand the the podcasts audience because I feel like yes, there is a small passionate and growing podcast off. Audience. But for the number of podcasts, it's you know, the Pakistani and says very well served. I feel. Yeah. I so I think the answer is that the podcast ecosystem is going to have to develop this sort of. You know, it's very apple podcasts Centric right now. There's a very small percentage of the listens to the post podcasts happened through apple. And some we have pretty similar to everyone else, which is majority coming through. The apple podcasts platform we also promote heavily to apple podcast, Google podcasts. Sure. The sort of par sweet Spotify. Iheartradio. Jeff mention all those. I'm just going with the ones I mentioned. So you know, we we make it try to make it as clear as we can to people sort of where you can get these things and what app to click on on your phone. But I do think the next step in podcasting. If we're going to solve this problem of sort of glut of material most of which is very hard to to find. If you don't know what you're looking for is going to have to be some sort of professionalization some development around the way that people get their podcasts. And there's some, you know, new apps that are developing right now to try to solve some of these discover ability problems, it's something people have been working on for a couple of years. I don't know that the answer is up there yet. But the question is very much out there. And that's at least that's at least if I step, and and like, I said, you have people like us can have thinking about what are the other ways that we can make sure that we're exposing people to this kind of material. So if somebody doesn't know. What to do with the word podcast? They can at least still understand. Here's an audio product. And what you do is click here and listen to it. How do you make money adds we base? That's. We we do you'll hear ads on some of our podcasts right now, we are really focused mostly on developing as a department and kind of figuring out what the Washington Post is in podcasting. So we're we're we're focusing on sort of audience growth, and you don't need to make enough money off the squarespace adds to support the nine people. Just yet isn't that what we're looking at to justify whether or not this department exists. Yeah. Okay. That's good. Good for Jeff Bezos..

apple Jeff Bezos Washington Post squarespace Google
"washington post" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"washington post" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"I think what the daily did was highlight in a way that people hadn't realized before how much of a market there was for news on in the podcast ecosystem and not to say that. There wasn't news before right NPR and other public radio stations of always put their news out onto onto podcast platforms. But this idea that you could cross something that felt really podcast native. It didn't feel like as being repurpose from a radio broadcast, and that people would be really excited about that. Yet. I how different is it doing a daily podcast versus a weekly podcasts. Faster. If did even more of them. Five times. Like every single week. You know, the principle is the same. Good audio is good audio. The reason why you're telling the stories you're telling doesn't change the staffing, certainly quite different, right? We have to have more people working on our daily show than like, how many people are separate now is nine so executive producer hosts and seven producers, and that's you know, we felt really strongly when we were thinking about doing daily, and we thought about it, forever Snapchat. Discover channel for that. We have not discoveries. I know, but I'm just saying it takes nine people. Yeah. I mean, that's like the of them. I don't know that much I set discovered, but we felt we've really strongly about if we were gonna do a daily, and like I was saying we thought about it for really long time that if we were going to do it. We didn't want to do it just to do it. We wanted to do something that felt like it was going to add something into that ecosystem, and it was going to represent. What we want the Washington Post to be in audio. And so we didn't do it until we were kind of shore that that was the investment that we wanted to me subconsciously or consciously re like it has to be different from the daily. Come on pianist. No. I mean, of course, the daily it's, you know, it's it's there you can't ignore that. It's there, but we did. And I and I don't say this as sort of like. And people wrote about it. We wrote about it. Yeah. The daily is going to be like in like paragraph three maybe Fagor for your might be imperative for one. Yeah. But I mean, yes, we always we certainly knew that comparison was going to be there. Of course, you know, we we listen to the daily. So it was in our minds. But it it's not rewriting history to say that we made the choice to do a daily news podcasts sort of air not saying we're going to intentionally go a different way than the daily or even saying we're going to do this because the daily exists. It really came out of what do we want the Washington Post to be doing an audio? When people say you should listen to the Washington Post. What does that mean? And I think it it just so happened. I think in in a really lovely way that a lot of the things that we felt like we could bring our core assets of the Washington Post led to us differentiating ourselves. From the daily to create a program that runs in the afternoon, and is sort of a not summer ization of the way of the day, but taking that kind of step back from the the just headline kind of kind of news. We knew that one of the assets that we wanted to highlight about the Washington Post was the breadth of our coverage that news is so much broader than that one kyron just politics. Not just politics. We people think about Washington Post, and they think politics. Yeah. And we're super proud of our politics coverage. I would put our reporters up again anybody in the world for our politics coverage. But our newsroom we cover everything. We cover culture we cover the economy. We cover the environment. We cover weather. We have a restaurant critic we have arts critics, you know, our our idea of what the news is much broader than politics. And we couldn't have believed that most. People's interests are much broader than politics that we could offer something that will kind of speak to the greater variety of human interest. And that led us to wanting to create something that was multi segment instead of something that was just one story over the whole episode. And so those two things they're different from the daily, but they're not different from the daily..

Washington Post NPR executive producer Snapchat
"washington post" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"washington post" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"We are really really glad that they're excited about what we're doing. And it is a great opportunity to teach them more about. Okay. So what do the reporters then get wrong about? What makes for a good podcast compelling podcast. So there's two there's two things typically, and it's more. It's not about what makes a great podcast as much as it is about what makes for a great Washington Post podcasts things that fit into what we're trying to accomplish. So what we're trying to do. The Washington Post is reflect the best reporting and storytelling that our newsroom has to offer highlight our personalities highlight this incredible kind of depth of experience that we have in our newsroom, and so all of our programs are oriented towards that we really focus on high quality reporting, high quality storytelling, and we're pushing into. To that Rome much more than that, kind of talk discussion kinds of podcasts that are proliferating out there. So when we hear an idea that's not going to be for us. A lot of times it is. Hey me, and my friend half these great conversations, and we should sit down and record them. And first of all just me, and my friend have great conversations is usually not a good podcast, they do exit require editing and pre thought, but they're certainly not in the direction of what we're trying to do at the post, which is this more polished approach to helping people understand their world through the depth of experience that we have in our room. So give me give me an example of a post podcasts. Like it. Not just a good podcast, but a good Washington Post podcast. So I think, you know, post reports which is our latest launch is a really really great example. It is just highlights the complete ethos of the Washington Post every single day you. You can go to that podcast. You hear three different stories everything from politics to tech to culture and using the voices of our reporting to to explain why those stories are happening. What they mean give you a peek behind the scenes of how they got reported and done. So in a way that feels really polished that uses music and sound in a really integrated way to create something that feels like a experience while you're listening to it. I think another great example, there's a podcast we did we last year year and a bit ago called letters from war. And this was a collaboration. We worked for almost a year with our military reporter, Dan Lemouth, he had gotten access to this trove of letters that were written back and forth by one family during World War Two. And it was these four brothers. They wrote almost every single day. And it's you read these letters, and it's just the most incredible story. They all served in the Pacific. Of the war, and between them had sort of every experience, you could have in World War Two one of them fought in one of the very first battles and was injured in came home with PTSD and suffered PTSD their as-as life. Another one came home sort of a massive war hero from two of the biggest battles of the Pacific front. Another one was an airplane mechanic and ended up serving on the island from which they were launching the attacks, and ultimately, the the bombs onto Japan. So just you read it, and it's like this incredible story and right from the very beginning of that reporting..

Washington Post PTSD Pacific Rome Japan Dan Lemouth military reporter
"washington post" Discussed on The Dan Bongino Show

The Dan Bongino Show

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"washington post" Discussed on The Dan Bongino Show

"What if the reason they cannot agree on a date anyone for the at this point who was involved in the spy gate scandal on trump what if the reason they can't agree on the date is because nobody really knows that they why do people keep saying if you listen yesterday show that all things started happening around late spring of two thousand sixteen the reason they don't want to agree on a date is because certain things happened in this investigation where's the recruitment of spy to this guy how her to interact with trump team members trying to attract them and probe information now joe the reason that date is up in the air on this is because traditionally the way federal investigations work and what i really can't stand media media people just stop talking if you don't know what i'm serious if you don't know what you're talking about about how these cases work and you're not willing to do the homework you're not helping philip bump at the washington post has an unbelievably stupid piece in the washington post yesterday about how spy gate isn't about spies that is so dumb i lost probably twenty i q points reading it you don't you just don't know what you was doing spy you can't even do journalism now you're doing spy operations he clearly shows no interest at all in the actual operational mechanics of either intelligence or law enforcement operate none but they write about it so with ornate of ly.

washington post joe philip
"washington post" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"washington post" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

"Our current president also hates the press he likes to talk about how much she hates cnn and the new york times and and he seems particularly to hate the washington post president has latched on personally to washington post owner jeff bezos who also founded and runs amazon dot com jeff basis literally the richest man on earth right now the president for months has been publicly attacking the washington post and the connection between the washington post and amazon through the paper's owner jeff bezos the president has been blunt about this in his own online statements and within the last few weeks it has felt like maybe this was starting to tip over into enemies list territory this was the wall street journal last month quote in the past week the president has turned what we're sporadic and often private criticisms of amazon dot com into a sustained volley against the company often causing stock market fluctuations with his tweets against amazon fuelling mr trump's iras not so much amazon but the company's ceo jeff bezos who also owns the washington post according to people close to the white house mr trump says mr bazo says hand in newspaper coverage he dislikes and he's lashing out at amazon as a proxy these people said the president's most recent flurry of tweets targeting amazon has coincided with publication of washington post stories that he dislikes what's not clear is whether mr trump will take actions that will harm amazon's business interests all street journal last month there was also this around the same time for vanity fair quote the president is focusing ever more closely on his perceived enemies and obsessions amazon whose owner jeff bezos also owns the washington post is currently his main target according to four sources close to the white house trump is discussing ways to escalate attacks on amazon to further damage the company quote he's off the hook on this it's war one sorts of told me he gets obsessed with something and now he's obsessed with basis set another source trump is like how can i.

president new york times jeff bezos washington post amazon wall street journal mr trump mr bazo street journal cnn washington ceo white house