8 Burst results for "Warton University"

"wharton university" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

07:17 min | 9 months ago

"wharton university" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"How did you end up doing what you're doing? What's your academic background that you have a passion for this? I would say interested in meteorology and and the whole weather environment started when I was a kid. It was A simple situation where I had to go visit my grandmother and relatives when I was pretty young and it was late April and And we had not you know the meteorology tools at not advanced well at that point time. So we wind up driving into fifteen inches of snow. It took you know one hour drive wind up taking US maybe like four or five hours to get there. Right. So that piqued my interest in terms of understanding weather understanding out has an implication on us from from a consumer perspective ban mandate transitioned into my life as a professional in the work that I do. And so. You're during my early career ahead transition through a number of different of job functions predominantly in the customer care Arab environment where I supported many many large multinational customers and having. Whether events globally impacted business operations, and I had the responsibility of making sure that we had the ability to mitigate the risk or ORI or recovery operation against. Online. And that just transitioned into the work I do today in business continuity disaster recovery. which is all about risk identification, understanding the threats, and then you know building the appropriate response or you know or recovery if it's that case what what is your educational background? I have technical background. Have, a mix of technical aspects of it background. And then transitioning into into management correa. So I've had you know George Washington. University, Wharton University of Pennsylvania. From. A management perspective my undergraduate was. A Phoenix and I'm had some technical. And way back when when it used to be called ethnical career institutes things of that nature though it. So it's transition from technical to a management skill mouth. Drew Business Operations at of Environment. And let me just give you a little bit of background on Steep Focus. He is the director of the emergency management preparedness in response with a T and T. He's got thirty plus years in telecommunications. Industry currently supports the New Jersey Communications critical. Infrastructure Sector NYC climate adaption adaptation task worse he also serves as at and T.'s alternate. Representative of the Department of Homeland Security National Coordination Centre. and. The Office of Cybersecurity and Communications is also the National Institute of Science and Technology Communications Fellow. Focused on community resilience and is also a member of the Fleet Response Working Group Steering Committee. So very much someone clearly that knows what they're doing and knows this very well. So I, just want to dive right in. So first of all. Many people listening whether these any minute why don't we have someone from at and T. on? Let me give you a reason why At and T. has a multifaceted disaster team prepared to respond during disasters the list, discuss this team the national. Sorry the national disaster recovery in the Rt. Tell US little about the team in the history of What's why that's important at and T.? It has its It's has its legs from there was a fire in the Chicago, environment many years ago and restoring a switching location, which was a hub for telephone calls things of that nature and and we had to make sure that we had the ability to recover that location. So back in those days, we had a rebuild the infrastructure. So. We started to transition to a mobile infrastructure where we build switching locations on fifty three foot trailers, and then we had the ability to send those mobile assets into those impacted areas at any time to recover. Previously, as a classic example of this capability was used the nine eleven. We had a switching location in the in the Wall Street area, obviously within the World Trade Center itself, and when the trade centers fell are switching capabilities cease to exist at that point I'm. So what we did is we roll these trailers out to Jersey City. In New Jersey, we ran fiberoptics through the Holland tunnel down into the Wall Street area and we will and we helped recover some indication down on Wall Street area. After nine eleven. So that's a that's a basis of why the team existed, and then obviously there's many many natural disasters that we you know responded to. American. Katrina on ounce through all major gains or NATO's wildfires all of those type of things ever since. And one of the things that was immediately coming to mind for example I wondered if you you're involved was recently relatively recently, he reik Rico whether at and T. N. response there. That has that one was probably the most challenging out of all of them only because of the logistical aspects, right? So we had significant. Damage in Puerto Rico the infrastructure was clearly damaged from a power infrastructure perspective from telecommunication own of you and obviously it's it's an island. So the Logistical Challenges Warren, how do we get all of these recovery assets that I talked about two or Rico? And so. We looked at we contracted. Private Private. Aircraft to get asset spare we want. Fema Barges we actually deployed assets aren't a C. Five and C. One thirty military assets. It was. It was a pretty. Interesting type of response and and. And once we got there, the challenges existed as well. So there was logistical challenges around food and water. We had our responders that we typically go to a response than we carry what we go bad and those go back separately have food and water, and all the things you need to rank of three four five days now were on the island weeks and the food supply water supply and everything.

US Office of Cybersecurity and Co T. N. Drew Business Operations New Jersey Communications Fema New Jersey George Washington Steep Focus Jersey City Department of Homeland Securit Wharton University of Pennsylv Puerto Rico National Institute of Science World Trade Center Chicago Steering Committee reik Rico Holland tunnel
"wharton university" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

04:51 min | 11 months ago

"wharton university" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"You've probably heard that social security could run out of money in the next few decades the program's projected funding shortfall has been a political talking point for years that cynicism may be a good thing new research finds the corona virus pandemic could impact the amount of social security money available to go around it's a story by Megan Lenhart senior writer at CNBC make it Megan what we have so eventually the leader that models from the Penn Wharton university is showing that the food security funds are going to be hit by the pandemic and you know we always knew that the vessel security program was a little bit in you know in the red in the future but I think you know the pandemic is obviously going to speed this up should we see massive unemployment for a long period of time and you know some other factors that will contribute and explain to how social security is funded and how what's happening right now is hurting security is primarily funded through a payroll tax than if you're employed you're probably gonna pay it and so when their kids were currently working right now are paying into the fund and then that is being used to provide benefits to those who are retired or disabled or you know of course families who have a spouse or parent who dies so you know it's it's kind of a hit now type of program and it generally works pretty well those taxes cover all the expenses but unfortunately starting in a few years because people are living longer and we have a lot of baby boomers retiring so security will need to start dipping into reserve funds but it had in order to cover the benefit payments and did not becomes a little bit problematic now to be fair you're still going to get your benefits just maybe not the full amount that you think and this should start happening over the next couple years experts in the field security administration itself admits that will probably start to happen in about twenty thirty five or twenty thirty six depending on the estimates does that have to happen legislatively because that's a difficult one for elected officials to navigate of course of course it's certainly been a political talking point for years this isn't something that we them you know Jack discovered and I think most experts say that we will probably see some movement on this as that day gets a little bit closer and there have been other Honda plans and proposals over the years to sort of navigate and and hopefully covered this is projected shortfall speak with Megan Lenhart senior reporter at CNBC make it her piece was called it's good most millennials don't plan to rely on social security the pandemic could drain the trust four years faster how about the recovery with that shore things up again it depends on whether it's a V. or U. or W. I guess it definitely does depend so right now I think most experts are saying that we're probably in for a U. shape recovery which means essentially that we dropped off a cliff which we've all experienced and that we're going to start you know seeing a few bounces and then eventually it will be a more gradual recovery a V. shaped recovery of course is is what it sounds like if you look at a graph of GDP it sort of hit show the V. at the sharp decline in a really sharp spike back up now of course we definitely have seen coming hurting signs over the past couple weeks I mean unemployment seems to have reached its peak but at the same time we do have to remember that the security you know is funded by an essentially employment taxes so if people are facing permanent unemployment in the third definitely not to be paying into this thanks Megan that is Megan Lenhart senior writer at CNBC make it it is thirty minutes after the hour on this morning America's first news and I heart radio station news ninety three point one KFBK governor Gavin Newsom says an increase in corona virus cases is expected with the state's re opening you some points to the acquisition of hundreds of millions of masks increased testing ability hospital capacity and availability of ventilators as reason to move ahead with the state's three opening the governor says he has no plan to reverse course now the California department of justice is planning to do an expansive review of the Vallejo police department after eighteen fatal police involved shootings in the past decade Vallejo city council signed a three year agreement between the city and the department of justice Tuesday to develop best practices for their police force and reform the department who were and lift drivers.

"wharton university" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

Newsradio 600 KOGO

03:49 min | 11 months ago

"wharton university" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

"Of this you probably heard that social security could run out of money in the next few decades the program's projected funding shortfall has been a political talking point for years that cynicism may be a good thing new research finds the corona virus pandemic could impact the amount of social security money available to go around it's a story by Megan Lenhart senior writer at CNBC make it Megan what we have so eventually the leader that models from the Penn Wharton university is showing that the social security funds are going to be hit by the pandemic and you know we always knew that the vessel security program was a little bit you know in the red in the future but I think either the pandemic is obviously going to speed this up should we see massive unemployment for a long period of time and you know some other factors that will contribute to explain to how social security is funded and how what's happening right now is hurting security is primarily funded through a payroll tax than if you're employed you're probably gonna pay it and so when their kids were currently working right now are paying into the fund and then that is being used to provide benefits to those who are retired or disabled or you know of course families who have a spouse or parent who dies so you know it's it's kind of a hit now type of program and it generally works pretty well those taxes cover all the expenses but unfortunately starting in a few years because people are living longer and we have a lot of baby boomers retiring so security will need to start dipping into reserve funds but it had in order to cover the benefit payments and did not becomes a little bit problematic now to be fair you're still going to get your benefits just maybe not the full amount that you think and this should start happening over the next couple years experts in the security administration itself admits that it'll probably start to happen in about twenty thirty five or twenty thirty six depending on the estimates does that have to happen legislatively because that's a difficult one for elected officials to navigate of course it's certainly been a political talking point for years this isn't something that we them you know Jack discovered and I think most experts say that we will probably see some movement on this as that day gets a little bit closer and there have been other Honda plans and proposals over the years to sort of navigate and and hopefully covered this is projected shortfall speak with Megan Lenhart senior reporter at CNBC make it her pieces called it's good most millennials don't plan to rely on social security the pandemic could drain the trust four years faster how about the recovery with that shore things up again it depends on whether it's a V. or U. or W. I guess it definitely does depend so right now I think most experts are saying that we're probably in for a U. shape recovery which means essentially that we dropped off the cliff which we've all experienced and that we're going to start you know seeing a few bounces and then eventually it will be a more gradual recovery a V. shaped recovery of course is is what it sounds like if you look at a graph of GDP it sort of should show the V. it's a sharp decline in a really sharp spike back up now of course we definitely have seen some encouraging signs over the past couple weeks I mean unemployment seems to have reached a peak but at the same time we do have to remember that the security you know is funded by an essentially employment taxes so if people aren't seizing permanent unemployment in the third definitely not to be paying into this thanks Megan that is Megan Lenhart senior writer at CNBC make it it is thirty minutes after the.

"wharton university" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

04:53 min | 11 months ago

"wharton university" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"St Louis you've probably heard that social security could run out of money in the next few decades the program's projected funding shortfall has been a political talking point for years that cynicism may be a good thing new research finds the corona virus pandemic could impact the amount of social security money available to go around it's a story by Megan Lenhart senior writer at C. N. B. C. make it make and what we have so eventually the leader that models from the Penn Wharton university is showing that the social security funds are going to be hit by the pandemic and you know we always knew that the vessel security program was a little bit you know in the red in the future but I think you know the pandemic is obviously going to speed this up should we see massive unemployment for a long period of time and you know some other factors that will contribute an explain to how social security is funded and how what's happening right now is hurting security is primarily funded through a payroll tax than if you're employed you're probably gonna pay it and so Americans were currently working right now are paying into this fund and then that is being used to provide benefits to those who are retired or disabled or you know of course families who have a spouse or parent who dies so you know it's it's kind of a hit now type of program and it generally works pretty well those taxes cover all the expenses but unfortunately starting in a few years because people are living longer and we have a lot of baby boomers retiring so security will need to start dipping into reserve funds but it had in order to cover the benefit payments and did that becomes a little bit problematic now to be fair you're still going to get your benefits just maybe not the full amount that you think and this should start happening over the next couple years experts in the field security administration itself admits that will probably start to happen in about twenty thirty five or twenty thirty six depending on the estimates does that have to happen legislatively because that's a difficult one for elected officials to navigate of course of course it's certainly been a political talking point for years this isn't something that we them you know Jack's discovered and I think most experts say that we will probably see some movement on this as that day gets a little bit closer and there have been other Honda plans and proposals over the years to sort of navigate in and hopefully covered this is projected shortfall speak with Megan Lenhart senior reporter at CNBC make it her pieces called it's good most millennials don't plan to rely on social security the pandemic could drain the trust four years faster how bout the recovery with that shore things up again it depends on whether it's a V. or U. or W. I guess it definitely does depend so right now I think most experts are saying that we're probably in for a U. shape recovery which means essentially that we dropped off a cliff which we've all experienced and that we're going to start you know seeing a few bounces and then eventually it will be a more gradual recovery a V. shaped recovery of course is is what it sounds like if you look at a graph of GDP it sort of to show the V. it's a sharp decline in a really sharp spike back up now of course we definitely have seen some encouraging signs over the past couple weeks it means unemployment seems to have reached its peak but at the same time we do have to remember that the security you know is funded by an essentially employment taxes so if people are facing permanent unemployment scenes are definitely not to be paying into this thanks Megan that is Megan Lenhart senior writer at CNBC make it it is thirty minutes after the hour on this morning America's first news everyone well let's all stop what we're doing right now and take a month's that felt good just like that we had a nice special sort of moment together of course they don't all need to be quiet moments to be special they could be loud moments a few moments sporty moments door key moments moments where we talk walk just hang it doesn't really matter all because every time dads like us take a moment to spend with our kids it's pretty momentous sounds like somebody agrees so.

"wharton university" Discussed on The Playbook

The Playbook

11:34 min | 1 year ago

"wharton university" Discussed on The Playbook

"Gave Meltzer. They melted with entrepreneurs the playbook and I have an old dear friend and truly a mentor of mine doesn't know it Jodi Senate. He is the CEO and founder of Spartan. And we've known each other from the inception of got. It's gotTa be ten eleven years now right. It's right there that you and I have one thing in common changed my life in a conversation. You said I'm an overnight success seventeen and that's what. I teach young entrepreneurs and I really want to get to that with you because I think the most needed person for entrepreneurs in America is Joe. I'm not just saying that because I'm here is because what. Ut here this yeah well here. John what you teach is. What's missing everything else? You can access online and it's really about discipline. Consistency pain threshold conversation. I've thought about sending my kids. I have a nine year old thanking all I can still learn. We're we're we're did that threshold in my wife place. It's it's true. Though what's needed in America people that are going to be successful the of division between people that have a backbone now that are willing to not hurt their feelings. Forgiven feelings right. It's just the amount of physical activity that people can take. How important is that threshold while you could just got me thinking before even answer? That question like I have children. We have children. We have four kids right. How many kids do you have for right three girls? And how old twenty eighteen fifteen and okay. So you're little little older but but in there and my oldest my oldest fourteen. But you've just got me thinking it's actually easier for them in the sense that if they have some of the skills you just described. Oh my God look to the left. Look to the right. We got a bunch of marshmallows as competition. Yeah I when we grew up and where people were like us because we were pushed. We were taught work hard and was about hours in the and it's okay. You know the work hard play hard. Everything was really hard. It was hard and now hard is a bad word but I kind of feel like I kind of feel like the grandfather that says when I was growing up we had to walk both ways up bill with no shoes. But you know it was. It was certainly harder. When my father's father was grow right every generation has gotten softer And there's exceptions which throws off the norm so people will always take gugans or Joe's fifty ultramarathons crazy stuff but take the average person like my little brother is just a mule. He he's a worker. He went to Penn Wharton University of London School of Economics. Mba like but he will work still today twenty one hours before he goes to bed because he just keeps pushing himself and his built into him. I think some of it's unconscious. Dna that we've inherited from great grandparents grandparents to us but a lot of it's just trained. You gotTA train it. Yeah and so It's fun right because you and I are in the mix with kids so it's not only just talking about it for our environment and our business and and folks we want to inspire our own children and I'm pretty hard on my kids. I've read a few stories even even being hard and even having had people stop me in the street like like even being. I'm not that hard right. It's not that hard this I don't make the kids go on the Lewis and Clark expedition. Right right right kind of get back. He is hard but it's not that hard. They got a roof over their head. They got five meals a day. They get anything they want. It's not that bad but yeah they've got to work and raising your voice for example. Do Raise your voice to your kids. Not really all a wrestle wrestle. Nice I had the worst which I think motivated me which gave me great. Pain threshold is I was motivated by a single mom. Six Kids and just straight guilt and I tell people all the time I much rather my mom would have hit me. She never did or put wrestle me then. The guilt that she threw onto powerful on builds religions right. Yeah you'll find this as companies to by the way if you're really smart that's right. I I I was just with a guy the other day. Forty year old in Vermont and one of the wrestling tournaments who tough-guy tough gritty could live out in the woods for a month and he grow with two brothers and he said his mom was was tough and I said what do you mean. He said well when I was like seven. She had me cutting weight for wrestling down the basement. Lock me in the basement. Turn the woodstove on and I gotta sweat it out right. If I talked back I got punched lurid punched inefficient broke so he said people hearing that would would think we got a call social services or whatever but she made me and my brothers Resilient and today you just can't do that and so everybody so delicate and I think I think what it does is it it. It teaches helplessness. It's dixie musician. Yeah we're bubble wrapping ever kids right. Yeah and And protecting them from the ship they should know how to deal with. I had I had some crap gone today. I'm sure you did right every day. And so But it off. Yeah what what tools can use today. Because there is this transition of political correctness of hypersensitivity. The one thing that gets me because I have a lot of younger people that I dedicate my life. It's really what I'm about having. Training millennials in interim programs extra programs to learn to have you know this threshold of pain or the ability to get things done but my tool sometimes are not allowed or appreciated people. Tell me I hurt their feelings. And it's not even that I'm yelling. I'll raise my voice so everyone in the office hears me so they learn the lesson. But I'm not. I'm not someone who yells in calls names but the things I say sometimes extremely constructive and I'll tell someone you did not do a good job. Right that's sucked but I'll say things like that. And then you know my hr personal come in and campaign to hurt their feelings and flowers. I I guess or a hug. Hug is a problem too great. There's a great book by Ken. Blanchard the one minute manager and he talks about this idea that you got to set expectations. The second you hire somebody right or befriend somebody where you let them know that. You're almost like a drill sergeant in the beginning of the relationship. And if you're not like that and you're soft and you don't set guardrails expectations. And they don't know what the threshold right. The boundaries boundaries are then it then it could get ugly like you just described so I think I think we owe it to our staff as leaders to set those expectations and boundaries. Right right at the outset. So it's a quick. Read that Book One Minute Man. That's like Sega Guy Twenty pages but the other thing is It's too late by the time they get to the office. It's the upbringing that that was the problem. And there's no way so when you say what are the tools There's no way around it. It requires Hard physical things around and your system the Spartan races etc and things like that can be utilized in a corporate environment. I wanted to change the respect. We did at our company early on when you're first starting. We participated in some of the first part in races and it was fun because I could see your some of the softer employees that I had broken right away. Yeah and their dynamic change and why do people love it like I feel these kids want to be pushed? They want to be disciplined. They want to have the right habits feeling of accomplishment when when when it's over right when you do something hard whether that's being disciplined and not eating my kids wrestling right so they gotta cut wait for two days. I'm not a fan of that. Yeah it's pretty hard for fourteen year old too naughty for two days. Yeah right and so All those little things add up. And then you've got a frame of reference you've got something in your mind that you could call back on the next time you face something hard so your team that came out and did the Spartan race next time they don't meet the sales numbers. There were spoiled. Whatever it is and they're afraid they're going to yelled at by you. They can envision what it was like crawling up hill from mile under the barbed wire and say wasn't really that bad but if they grew up on park avenue and they were wrapped in bubble wrap and they never got yelled at and nothing ever went wrong. I never got pushed will. Then you yawn it. It might as well be the harks quoting a bunch of exactly. Yeah so the frame of reference you gotTa go to a tough times. I mean we had. The culture has always had a right of passage. Before a child was growing up. They had to go. Do some vision quest something hard. I don't do that anymore. Yeah I work a lot in Kenya and build some community centers and what the Muscle. My warriors do time. They're thirteen years old to prove their exact quote is extraordinarily. They literally are circumcised in front of the whole tribe. And if they flinch there then shepherds they're not warriors. One of the other things that I find interesting is the consistent behavior so I believe in enjoying a consistent persistent pursuit of your potential and I think that's ingrained in what you do personally but it's also the consistency of what I'm looking at the things that you've created done yourself from the ultra marathon to the death racist to just a regular spartan races that it's incremental. I say lower the bar and I know it's counterintuitive the people to understand you will achieve more if you take bite-size pain and then the bigger painting. I see a lot of that philosophy. And what you do the People. I actually one of my staff Jason had said to me when we were hiking in the mountains in the very early days of starting spot. And what do you do if you bite off more than you can chew? Keep doing that. So so I learned very early on twenty years ago. Maybe more. There's there's a race in Queens New York Transcendence Ron. It goes around and one mile loop. It's thirty one hundred miles so thirty one hundred times. You go around one mile loop and you can't do that event you can't or anything hard Think about thirty one hundred miles about one mile mile this one do the next one and before you know what you string together and you get the thing and so. How long does it last? Fifty days sixty days depending on somebody could do fifty need to go home and sleep sleep on the people sleep right there in a car or whatever but the point is and you gotta you gotTa Pat Yourself on the back..

America Spartan Jodi Senate Meltzer Ut John Penn Wharton University of Lon wrestling CEO Kenya Queens New York Clark expedition Jason Lewis founder gugans Vermont Blanchard Ken
"wharton university" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

15:57 min | 1 year ago

"wharton university" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

"Over and over and over again on today's show we're interviewing the New York Times bestselling author of the Book Pitch Anything Throughout Oren Klaff's career he Ladies and gentlemen if you've ever struggled to picture ideas and the cell something this is the show for you our exclusive interview with New York Times bestselling author or in class I'm shows don't need a celebrity narrator to introduce the show the big show US eight kids co created by two and women thirteen multimillion dollar businesses ladies and Gentlemen Welcome to Thrive Time Shaw the side Yes yes yes and Yes oh snap thrive nation we've got implant on this show or in class welcome into the DOJ O of Mojo how are you sir better now that introduction that was very fine I don't usually get at that I usually get wharton university saying like next up on stage and look to introduce you very well respected author Warren Klaff please put your hands together Taylor anyone Buehler Buehler has written about frame breaking we'll go ahead and introduce awesome with Little Golf Channel Mix here you're awesome man you seriously you are the you're the guy who taught me about breaking frames and I just I just I have to ask you this my friend what what a person's spires you to to write that book pitch anything yeah well desperation need frustration pain the end of the runway insight you know all that stuff no that's what inspired me to finish the book to start the walk with relief you know people like the way I did things and it couldn't figure out just how I was doing so much business closing deals in a certain way and it looked like nothing was happening when everything was happening and saying what are you doing tell it to us and then I was on a radio show and then I had a one of Howard Stern's people listening and they got in touch and then agent and in New York and stuff so things happened I don't know people like me in a way we win you know you've sold over a million copies of the Pitch Anything Book and you've written for the Harvard Business Review Inc magazine on Super Noor and you're an investment partner I believe in two hundred million dollar at Private Equity Fund is this is that correct yes that's right we're invested in company as and buying companies so doing the Lord's work you're also a motorcycle enthusiast is this correct yeah now that we can talk about out have owned a thousand motorcycles in the last ten years anyone office here more closing a seven and a half million seven half million dollar deal today right and people come here in the finance office glass windows in pretty normal office but every once in a while some will open wrong door and they'll go happen because out behind you got mechanics and their wellbeing and they're putting together race motorcycles and they got tattoos and kind of TV Show Kinda mechanic guys working back there and they just weren't walk into a different business same business we have a warehouse outback where we old motorcycles and cars attached to the finance office so yeah motorcycles cars absolutely had me hooked granite car in the Daytona five hundred this year so that was pretty incredible where are you located right now where where do you work we're office located I'm in a secure undisclosed location in southern CAL -fornia okay so you're you're there the weather's nice many want to know how did you get to a place in your life where you have thousands of motorcycles the Daytona five hundred hundred walk us through the Bulgaria beginning of your career where to be or an experienced start yeah well I mean one time when I was very young The door handle on our Rolls Royce was broken and I had to ride to school in just a regular old minivan with no it's sad it's a sad story there's this as a sad story in the you know that was a transformative moment for me realized that not every car was Rolls Royce no I think a you know there's always entrepreneurial growing up at some point in college on the East Coast we started a software company just myself in a buddying we added a couple of people there in finally in the East Coast was not the happening in place for software and get software engineers and everything so we moved out to California and we grew grew to seventy people to growing fast the approaching cresting through ten million dollars in revenue and we should grow ourselves out of cash so you know at that time there wasn't a venture group you know in the in the restroom of every seven eleven every starbucks you couldn't walk in and raised three million dollars but the timing finished ordering the coffee nothing in in software financial couple Kleiner Perkins a couple firms in the valley So I went out to try and find money and then we got all these questions your pro forma your key assumptions when you're KPI what is your marketing plan look like what's the org chart holes in the org chart was f you know the forward twelve months this clan what has ltm you know where your ratios and we didn't have any of that we're just running a software company and and so in a span of two weeks that was sort of forced to semi produce all that stuff but I wasn't familiar with it and didn't produce it to the quality that the then market wanted I wasn't able to raise the money the company that we needed to really grow it and it kind of fizzled out wasn't a disaster but it didn't reach its true potential Abrek how are you my friend I am great thank you by the way have you had a good weekend thus far a half what were you doing yesterday highlights for us so yesterday my daughter had a football game to cheer at in Yukon Oklahoma really do you like Yukon this time of year well it wasn't bad as first time I've been there this time of year you know what they say about you on this time of year what's a I have no idea now on today's show that were being orange laugh who's the best selling author and he's teaching about how to break frames a and I want to make sure this is very relevant practical all the listeners out there what he's talking about is how to pitch anything how to sell something right when did it occur it to you as a chiropractor that you were going to have to learn how to market and sell something because in Chiropractic school I don't know if they covered what would you I discover oh it's it's about more than just chiropractic care it's about selling chiropractic care probably would been in the first couple of weeks when I was sitting in my office alone was it can you describe how it felt when you were in an office where you had probably the chiropractor tables you had the decor you've got the logo business card and nobody is checking out no customers are coming to find you in a word depressing yeah it was very sad time and a lot of frustration so how did you how long did it take you to figure out how to actively market your business and how to sell something way too long if you had to guess how many years months did it take you I would say I struggled along trying to figure that out decade really yeah and I think a lot of listeners out there listening right now there's probably a podiatrist probably a dentist from your doctor probably lawyer probably a contractor to somebody out there listening who's a plumber and you're really good at plumbing Cairo practicing treating patients being an attorney but if you can't sell anything and it doesn't work right and Jason you've seen this you've seen you've managed the elephant in the room stores what happens to the people who hired to work at the front desk who can't sell anything when we find people who can sell things there it is and if you're out there and you WANNA learn I do believe in the human capacity to learn new skills that's why I'm doing this show here on a daily basis but you have to learn that there are a fundamental processes fundamental mechanics it's like there's there's moves that work so just like you could teach almost any child to learn to play the piano if given enough practice and you can teach anybody to shoot the free throw if given enough practice you can learn how to effectively sell something but Orrin was talking to you guys he was sharing with you that he had a software that was going well things were going well but he couldn't raise the capital needed because he didn't know how to pitch anything right now that's where most entrepreneurs dreams they just can't sell you can't sell well then your business goes to hell and that's where most business owners dot that they die on that hill of saying I just don't know how to sell anything but Orrin decide no no no no no I'm not going to let my dreams die there I'm going to actually learn to sell something and man did he learn how to sell something guy learned how to sell and sell so well that he was able to raise over a billion dollars of capital throughout his career he's earned enough money to have thousands of motorcycles he sold over a million copies of book teaching you how to sell something this guy now is the sales machine but Jason worked with a lot of clients I'm sure a lot of great people out there who at first before being coached by had struggled to sell something right can you talk about what happens when you have a great business plan a great logo a great staff acquaint vision a great dream but you can't sell anything what happens well it's like being in a firefight you can have the biggest gun that has the most accurate sites most lethal ammunition but you can't pull the trigger you're not GonNa win ooh negative Dr Brek give give somebody out there urge but somebody out there who's listening to today show and they're going that's me I actually I don't know if this show he's reading my mind because I haven't been able to sell anything in years there's a doctor you're listening there's a dentist there's a lawyer there's a chiropractor there's a contract what would you say to the contractor to the business owner to this person out there listening who just can't sell anything well first of all I'd say keep getting because you can learn a new skill and for me it was just a almost an innate aversion to selling and then being there you go an innate aversion yeah I do not like the idea of selling as a doctor you feel you think feel I don't know which is the the more proper term the You shouldn't have to sell yourself that you you you know a lot of doctors will remove themselves from any money exchange loss to sail you're above the city yeah I beneath sales are beneath you in a way but even as a kid I mean you know you had fundraisers and things I never enjoyed those really yeah I did what I did not you know knickknacks that I was ready to say this interesting I was not a natural suzman whatsoever but you can learn a new skill and so if you have a an issue of any kind I mean just like Warren saying I mean he had to create the performance in the all the stats and stuff that the venture capitalist wanted at the time he had to go and learn and you also can learn so it may not be in sales and maybe in a different area but definitely there are things that you have to either learn or find the people that you can bring around you and your team that that have the skills Jason have you ever had an aversion to sales I did really why it was one of those things where I always thought that I live my life as like on the path of least resistance just easier to go where about conflict I'll be fine almost almost like a sales pacifist it sales but what turned me around really quick was when you guys let me know hey this is really important this is your quota you have to hit this mark one day where I realized my whole thing was out ask people hey you WANNA buy a membership they go nice go okay that was it and I watched another employee kind of show me how els process works where it's not like a yes or no thing it's a no then you answer more questions and then you close if you're out there looking for the formula there's a great book called the soft selling and a hard world soft selling in a hard world I just want to paraphrase I want to condense and give you the proven process for sales step one is you want to build rapport built report you want to encrypt it out but you want to build a report that did the the process formula is our NBC Okay Report Needs benefits close isolate objections report needs benefits close isolate objections build a poor then you find the persons you bring it to a close or a call to action you want to move to the next step what happens is there's always an objection so then you isolate the objection you find out what the real objection is might say it's too much money or it's they don't have enough time or the need to talk to their spouse you isolate what the real concern is and then you come back and to close the deal so it's report needs benefits close isolate objection I objection just yesterday we're looking for new location to move the time show world headquarters as we near the end of the lease for this building and I found this I found the land here doctor recommended garnish screen right now yes here it is this is the land so this is this is where it is and it's four miles from here at an undisclosed location right over there and so we this is where it is and you kind of look I'm GonNa put in the man I'm sitting in the man on Google maps you could look at here drop it in the man there it is so we kind of looks like almost like a golf course accounting but if we zoom back out there this is what's beautiful this this right here this would be where the where the building would be put got to one you've got to pitch you you've got to convince the real estate agent that if you're buying this property for for the other neighbors because everybody around there has kind of like a one acre lots nice houses lots of trees and they also have.

Oren Klaff US Shaw New York Times DOJ two hundred million dollar three million dollars ten million dollars billion dollars million dollar twelve months ten years two weeks one acre one day
"wharton university" Discussed on Snacks Daily

Snacks Daily

10:16 min | 2 years ago

"wharton university" Discussed on Snacks Daily

"Distribution center to your fame and simple is owning it now and this is FedEx and UPS and Uber eats. His worst fear. Now, Jack knifed over the last couple of years. We dive into these animals reports, and we've noticed theme that when it comes to shipping FedEx and UPS they've benefit from ecommerce aka Amazon. But there was always a big, but in every one of those reports. Yeah, Amazon is fed them tons of delivery business over the years card. But if Amazon ever decides to do its own shipping. That's a huge concern for these shipping companies much cardboard. Now what's coming next? We're thing. In like a few maybe some HR moves Jack if I'm the top logistics person, at UPS I am pumped about this news. And I'm going to get the premium version of Lincoln, because Kruger's gonna hit me out, and they're going to say, I love what you've done at UPS great rest ever UPS is paying you. Amazon will pay you double. We want to endorse you for shipping skills snacker full disclosure. This Jack I own Amazon shares for a second story away luggage, just raised one hundred million dollars and hit a hefty one point four billion with a B valuation. Pro tip. If you're getting a suitcase, get the bigger carrier don't want the regular one. Do you want the bigger one? We're talking like this is the candy version of luggage. This is the kind of luggage, where you would take this out of the overhead compartment and eat off of it, the inside of the suitcase. I own has like one million thread count, like futile linens. If you've been on a flight from JFK to San Francisco, by the way, there is like a TSA regulation that requires travelers under the age of. Thirty six to own one of these things. They like pull you out of line to, like, sir, you look like you're twenty eight years old. How come you don't have an away luggage? It's highly suspicious that you don't have a way luggage. Please come to the back road. Now, the co founders are Steph Corey, legendary Brown bear, and Jen Rubio who are both former Worby Parker alumni, they used to work at Worby, and it will be Parker's where they learned how to cut out the middleman and physical goods direct to consumer through an awesome website, and some physical stores and some Gress of social media. Right, right. A thousand influencers are all over Instagram. Now they've sold like a hefty number. They've sold. One million suitcases thus far. Yeah. And snacker opened up your Instagram or your Facebook, right now, chances are there isn't a way add waiting in your news. Just sitting there now the fundraise this past week that happened had some wild news attached to it, which included something, let's get this down. Okay. So, Jen Rubio one of the co founders had been dating Stewart Butterfield. I feel like I'm telling like a high school store. Stating Stewart Butterfield whose these CEO and founder of slack, and what happened post fundraising now I am. So glad you asked Stewart Butterfield these slack, founder, who's preparing for like their company to go public soon tweeted at gen a marriage proposal. It said, let's make this a double whammy, will you marry me Jennifer? Now, I wanna know from the ladies out there is that romantic and not sure. Well, we both miss that opportunity because we went a slightly different route. Now here's the key. A way is actually an amazing lesson in long term thinking had a tough start it started with two other tech companies tech slash luggage companies. Same thing as a way. So we were talking three luggage startups the year. It's like twenty fifteen twenty sixteen and what was the theme Jack of these star battery packs in your luggage. You could charge your phone. Anytime feel now then something kind of funky happened. The TSA band lithium ion batteries on planes because they could like ignite and start a fire. Yeah. It was kind of an issue. So. Away happen to have this long-term thinking baked in that perfectly prepare them, what was the first key? It was pretty fortuitous, but they had batteries that you could remove from the suitcase. So if you check your suitcase you can remove the battery and you're good to go the second key. Is that a ways co-founders realized that luggage, isn't a technology luggage should be fashion lifestyle choice? So they called themselves a travel company, not luggage company, and a quote, from the founder from the beginning, everything is related to making travel experience better. Then they launched a magazine called here which was all about travel. This was the seller for me the ten year guarantee because those little swiftly wheels at the bottom of your suitcase. I need a tenure guarantee, because those things break like right away hated doggedly. We on that and the other key there, fundraise. They have seven stores already. They're now going to expand to fifty stores off. Okay on travel beyond just suitcases. So they're going like casper here. They're not just online with a website. They're building physical stores. So Jack what's the takeaway for buddies over to? Way we're calling this new breed of unicorns. They're called brand corn. Exactly. And we all have heard of unicorns, which is a private tech company with over one billion dollar valuation. That's the definition, but there's a bunch of other companies that should be included in the club even though they're not just tech companies. They're actually physical company and in the last few months, we've seen these physical companies these brand Koren's become brand occurrence, because they've reached over one billion dollar valuations, who we talking about here, all birds, glossy, casper Wrentham runway, and then Harry's just a week ago sold for one point four billion dollars. They've got some tech prowess for sure. But these companies are brand and physical goods, I for our third and final story. Jack toss on striped overalls. John Deere stock just dropped eight percent and illustrates every aspect you need to know about the trade war is a as a New York City. Born embrace get. I didn't see my first John Deere, tractor till like circa, like puberty Nick, I pity, you because the smell of freshman newer, is a wonderful thing. Also, john. And to not only did invent the plow. Putting also Middlebury college educated man. Born in Vermont, you kind of tell you could sense. His presence on campus. Jack freshman year I could I felt it every single channel the plow now. What actually happened with John Deere, stock going on here. Wall Street, whipped out the pitchforks, and sold it down eight percent. Because the earnings on Friday of John Deere will just off. Now, we've got a little blame here on mother nature because a combination of bad harvests and midwest floods, that's going to affect them sales for farmers, farmers. The customers of John five straight quarters. John Deere has missed earnings estimates. And then the CFO laid out this quote in the earnings, which we heard this, and we were like on this, this is a tough one. This is a tough one. He said further trade progress between the US and China is becoming increasingly important, there's no silver lining to that. Quote now, so everything in the trade war that's happening is bad for John Deere. So you've got farmers on the one hand because China is buying fewer soybean. With the trade war going on American, farmers are saying, you know what we're gonna have to buy less John deer products about how much more, we're going to have to pass on four hundred sixty four million worth of tractors from John last. That's what John Deere's expecting, and then what's going on with steel steel, the US has tariffs imposed on all foreign steel, and like John Deere's like what the hell I build my tractors out of the steel, this is gonna cost me more America runs on Dunkin. John Deere runs on steel, and then the third thing is aghast. Dear sells tractors abroad, and those sales are falling because of retaliatory tariffs against USA made stuff. So Jack, what's the takeaway for buddies who are riding along over? John Deere, quick reminder to our snacker actually, there are no winners in the trade war, now the goal the core goal the crux like the basis. The thesis the hypothesis, everything going into tariffs is one thing by less Chinese goods. That's the goal in the only potential winner of this trade war. With john. It's like US-based manufacturing companies that might benefit from us buying less from China, that's like John Deere. But when you step back and look at John Deere, stock, it is off fifteen percent since the trade war really started around January twenty eight look China is a huge problem, and they're breaking like economic rules, which stinks. But e com wanna one I'm an econ. Grad for Middlebury college tariffs, everybody, loses their a bad idea, Jack you whip the takeaways force. Sure, Amazon is making big moves to insourcing outsource insourcing its own ship deliver, please open up one a year like real physical restaurants in the United States, we want to check this thing out, so we can cover more preferably in San Francisco's every make it second away has just become a brand of corn in new word, which means a non tech Unical. This isn't fetch this thing is going to happen in his happen. Third and final story deer and code. That's the official name of the John Deere tractor company. It's a reminder that there are no winners in the trade, Jack I'd be confident. Two toss that as a tattoo on my arm. No trade war winners, now, time for a snack factor today. Right. Yeah. Hit us up. Okay. Here we go guys. All right. Philadelphia, the Rome on the mighty skull kill river was the first capital of the United States, but it also had the first US stock exchange and there's a third part of the story. Also this neck fact of the day is brought to you by Jack Kramer, third part of the story, Philadelphia had the first business school founded in eighteen eighty one, it's called the warden school at university of Pennsylvania, and snacks if you're wondering why this nags daily was little more teaboy than the rest? It's thanks to Nick Martel who just graduated from Wharton university with an MBA chats nickel, I got the galley gear still hanging up in the closet. I put it away nicely. I'm still figuring out if I screwed up the hat thing with the flipping of the, the thing after you walk down with the diploma. It's very confusing. Graduation congrats. This is a big accomplishment, and awesome work. Thank you to all the incredible. And professors and students who have been big fans of snacks from the very beginning. All right, snappers. Thank you for potting with us today. We will be back with you tomorrow. As jack. I like that plan can't wait. The Robin Hood, snacks podcast. You just heard reflects the opinions of only the host who are associated persons of robinhood financial LLC and does not reflect the views of robinhood markets, Inc, or any of its subsidiaries or affiliates to podcast for informational purposes only, and is not intended to serve, as a recommendation to buy or sell any security, and is not an offer sale of security. The podcast is also not a research report and is not intended to serve as the basis of any investment decision. Robinhood financial LLC member, FINRA SIPC.

John Deere Jack Kramer Amazon United States John Stewart Butterfield Middlebury Jen Rubio FedEx founder TSA China Nick Martel San Francisco robinhood financial LLC John deer Vermont Robin Hood Lincoln
"wharton university" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

01:42 min | 4 years ago

"wharton university" Discussed on KOIL

"Things are we're going to take a moment to to break down in and share some of the top quotes and and things that we learned from that but man again of lots going on in healthcare allen a as i'm yeah you've seen now what are some of the headlines a car your attention this week so one of the first one set i saw it was in the wharton university pennsylvania magazine and it was released on february third and it was why healthcare so right for digital disruption so what this talks about is just how much technology is out there and what howell just right healthcare is for digital disruption in the since when you go well you don't necessarily know what something cost and their websites another people who have been over the years trying to put all the pieces together and so there are up three new business models that are are be and look that in the first is obviously digital platform saw healthcare problems so tell of madison for example of the second one was you know regulatory restrictions so it estimated one point one trillion of the three point three trillion that's us bids annually all healthcare is wasted this presents an opportunity for disruption by technical start ups light video health that we've had of our show and well this innovations in all kinds of other start up companies that are trying to find solutions like keep it there's group with a trying to come up with what the costs are all cross the country for different services that you might face in the third would it was a relief to do but you know prevented of care and different things that you can do technologically you know.

wharton university pennsylvani howell healthcare problems madison