25 Burst results for "Warton"

Small Business Owners & The Legalities Surrounding Covid-19

The Common Cents Show

06:14 min | 4 months ago

Small Business Owners & The Legalities Surrounding Covid-19

"Welcome to episode forty nine of the Common Sense. Show a MICA and we're ready to get this thing started. Let's do some social media. Shoutouts you can find us on facebook at facebook dot com slash the commonsense podcast instagram at the common sense podcast Twitter Sense C. E. N. T. S. Podcast and our show email is info at the Common Sense. Podcast DOT COM. We're GONNA get right into it with this week's this week in small business news. Let's go so in small business news this week. We have news out of Dallas and this is specifically referring to a salon owner. Her name is shelly. Luther and Shelly. Luther is the owner of a salon in Dallas Texas where she defied the government shutdown order and kept her business open and Some people have called her move. Selfish other people have lauded her move But you know the the reality is is that small business owners are feeling the pinch and that's why they feel like they need to do this. rightly wrongly. I'm not sure I'm not sure if I'm the one the call it right or wrong but what I can say. Is that at a certain point when you've been locked down and you have to feed your family and you're not eligible for unemployment or you can't get any government assistance or the government systems that you did get ran out. Some people feel the pinch of what's actually happening but first let's have. Cbs tells the story of Shelley. Luther in Dallas stay tune. Here's the news outside the courthouse. A small group of supporters gathered with and guns to watch the hearing on their phones and to cheer on. Shelly Luther determination has been made that you are in contempt of court as you can see. We are still open. The Salon owner openly defied. The governor's order that salons remained closed. Ripped OPPA cease and desist letter from the county and ignored a temporary restraining order from the court. If you would like to take this opportunity to dollars actions were self putting your own interests ahead of those of the community in which you judge Eric. Moyo offered Luther a chance to avoid jail time. He asked if she would apologize acknowledged she was wrong and agree to shutdown her business until Friday. But Luther would not yield. I have to disagree with you sir. When you say that I'm selfish because eating my kids is not selfish. Up Hear Silence. They're going hungry because they'd rather feed their kids. So Sir if you think the laws work. Warton kids getting fed. Please with your decision. But I'm not the judge senator to serve seven days in jail please. One day behind bars for each day. Her business opened its doors while so many others stay. Shut so my question to you is what do you feel about shelly? This decision to keep her business open obviously in her words to the judge. She says she felt like she had a business not. She felt like she had children that she had to feed by keeping her doors open and she talked about her hair stylists who also had families to feed. Obviously she has some community support. She also has some people in the community who disagree with their action. But how I feel about it is. I feel that as small business owners right now. We ARE BEING SQUEEZED. So and of course it's all from St External environmental things that we can't control in last week's podcast. We talked about that with Ben Patois about dealing with things that we can't control the anxiety of trying to control such things and really at the end of the day. It's every small business owners. I guess how I come down is that it's every small business owners up or right to choose with. They WANNA do with their own business. Should they open should they? Should they open up prematurely as should they own Stay closed even here in Liberal Massachusetts. There is a Gulf owner of a golf course who also has declared that she is going to open her Gulf quote a courses prior to Governor Baker here Massachusetts letting her know that she can't let letting non essential businesses that they can or cannot do it. Why because she feels like if she doesn't open up soon enough then she is going to potentially lose her business. You know I feel for everyone. Who's in the situation and of course and I am as well Jonathan. Of course we have bills to pay the bills not stopping. We've been able to defer some bills to pay down some bills to pay a bit of some bills but the bills. Don't stop they keep going. And while the bills keep going and wall some vendors have been understanding about where we are they also have bills. It's the trickle effect where everyone is being affected by the previous wave of a person not paying and ultimately at some point. If you remember in earlier podcast talked about how the bill is going to toll and things are GonNa be do and small business owners are going to have to pay. So Do I feel like shelly? Luther in Dallas is wrong for which he did. The answer is she. I my personal answer. Is I think that if she feels like she needed to do this. To protect your family. Then she did. She did what she had to do. And honestly if you have a family that you're trying to protect you know you could. There's going to be arguments on both sides. What is protecting your family's protecting your family. Not going back to work because you don't you don't make other people with other families sick or going back to work in actually making money so that you can support your family because there's going to be a tremendous downfall windfall effect on your family. I don't think that there's any real straightforward answers to what's right and what's wrong

Shelly Luther Dallas Facebook Mica Massachusetts Senator C. E. N. T. Texas Golf Ben Patois CBS St External Eric Moyo Shelley Governor Baker Jonathan
Vapotherm CEO Joe Army: Wisdom from the Northern Kingdom to the Board Room and Beyond

MedTech Talk Podcast

06:06 min | 5 months ago

Vapotherm CEO Joe Army: Wisdom from the Northern Kingdom to the Board Room and Beyond

"Now at some point you you you found your way outside of Vermont and went to Uri. You paid your way through. Uri Newer a history. Major and I I was also a history major. Remember coming out of school wondering what I was going to do with a history degree. Talk a little bit about that. What why did you choose history? You know You ended up in kind of a science focused background but our some of those choices played into your development. I think before we get to that. We have to make it. Sound like is really nice. Well planned out. You know you and I both know. That's not true Very well I. I wasn't really a very good at school in anything that I ever did in school. I graduated pretty close to the bottom of my high school. And you know didn't really like school wasn't good at it and I ended up going back into the woods until you know it was clear to me halfway through that summer that you know if I could find a way to get into college I should do it up going with small state school in Vermont and ended up. You know be invited not to return to that school. After two years for variety of reasons and then spent the next year banging nails in Newport Rhode Island and paying off all of my student bills that point time and really beginning to think. About what kind of life do I want to have and you know working in the woods in northern Vermont is hard work but I will tell you Hump and bricks and sheet rock in Rhode Island in the wintertime? That's no box of chocolates either. So ended up really thinking it through. There was a guy. I've been very lucky in my life is. I've had a number of people show up at the exact right time to become a mentor to me and this guy showed up Dick Shoals and this other Guy Fred Dowager and they started begging me over the head about you know you could do a lot more than this. Is this really what you WanNa do with your life and Dick is the one who helped me figure out why history major and he said look you know you wanna be able to come out of college knowing how to read write and Sake so go figure out how you can do that and I was like to read and I always loved history and I understood. That would help me punch those three things so I know I wasn't worried I didn't think about a trade school like well. I'VE GOTTA go learn to be you know XYZ. I just wanted to come out of there knowing how to read. Write and thank and I've told is pretty important foundation and helped me a lot my career in from there. I went and sold stocks. Were living on Wall Street for you. Know three or four years and did okay at that and then ended up getting accepted to business school. I went to wharton. And that's when I decided to go. Specialize you get an MBA in finance marketing. That's more like trade school so there was not a linear path. You know was getting bounced out of schools. It was figuring out how to actually do well in school and education really is the key. It is the way out for people who are looking at along way up from where they sit today. Yeah no that's a so true and I couldn't agree more now coming out of Warton. Where did your career take you at that point? You know. You're not gonNA believe this but I actually worked in federal government between my first and second year at Wharton I won a fellowship and at that time in this was in the late eighties early nineties. We had another gigantic financial mess on our hands and it was the savings and loan meltdown. And I'm sitting there thinking about what I wanna do. My summer between first and second year and I'm reading in the newspaper about this and about the formation of this resolution trust corporation and so I applied for the fellowship but then you had to actually go get the job and so I called. Call that Guy Who was named in that newspaper article every day for like six weeks and finally I got him on the phone and after he was screaming at me about. I got better things to do than look at this big stack of pick messages from you They vitamin down in DC. And next thing I know I got a job offer and I was working with distressed assets and I was really intrigued by the whole thing. I worked really cool projects I made no money and I was taking the train from Philly to DC every day for you know that was like the slow bus that had like a three and a half hour commute in total and then. I ended up getting a CONDO. They gave me a Condo in in Georgetown. Meantime my wife was living in West philly which you can imagine. That was a box of chocolates. So I really fell in love with this whole notion of distressed assets and thinking about you know when you're in a distressed assets situation whoever could keep their act together and really think about what is the what is the inherent value of those assets. And how could you best deploy them pretty good chance of getting something pretty cheap and then turn it into something pretty special? So that's where I ended up. After Business School I ended up at coopers lybrand they had a big consulting business and part of it was they had a restructuring in kind of a turnaround business and after coming out of school. That's right where I went. I did that for the next six years. And you ended up obviously in running venture backed companies and companies that You know probably at a different point in their evolution then the companies that you were working more on the distress side. But what are some of the lessons that you picked up Working with those distress assets. And are there things that you learn their the end up applying or become kind of part of your thought process as you as you work with companies that are maybe on the upswing of their path absolutely jeff again? This is where I kept getting lucky in guys kept showing up in my life and giving me advice in point meet her. I direction nine. Another mentor net practice. A guy named Bob. Hope Bob was about as tough as nails and he was a really old school so I was. I had to go and kind of knock the door down a little bit to get him to teach me how to do it. He did really taught me from the get-go that I didn't care what kind of business it was. Cash was the whole thing. Like if you don't have the cash I don't care about whatever company and you better figure out how to make that business self sustaining no matter what and then the second thing he kept hammered into me was. Is there really business?

Vermont Business School DC BOB Guy Fred Dowager Guy Who Newport Rhode Island Rhode Island Dick Shoals Dick West Philly Warton Coopers Lybrand Philly Georgetown
Keith Carter And The Poetry Of Photography

The Candid Frame

09:01 min | 8 months ago

Keith Carter And The Poetry Of Photography

"Though photography involves a technical practice practice it can still illicit moments of lyricism and poetry. The power of such work comes from its ability to elicit emotion from a viewer something that is only possible when the photographer considers more than just pixel counts and sharpness. Keith Carter has built a career on having an exacting photographic practice both as a commercial photographer and as a fine artist it is body of work is elevated by his embracing the idea that imperfections flaws and moments of failure are as much a part of the photographic process as good equipment and a well exposed piece of film. He understands that one of his greatest strengths as a photographer is his willingness to mind his own life. World and experiences enters as familiar and mundane. Isn't it may appear to create something universal. Yes but I agree with you. I get wildly stimulated in a new place it's something I've never seen etc etc etc.. That makes you us. synapses fire fire in a different way. And you work in a different way on the other hand. If you're in a place that is relatively familiar. There's a different percents of communists and on a good day. You can still find that same excitement. You just have to look sometimes a little. Harder won't talk to Keith. About the literary influences of his work as well as the role his wife played in his evolution as a photographic graphic artist. This is a body enacts and welcome back to the candidate for him Bozo appreciate you making time for me. I've been wanting to talk to you for a long time. I've long admired your work Anderson civility and anytime. I've had a chance to hear. Can you speak like he did at art center a couple of years ago or or something that I catch on on on the computer. I just really really have always appreciated sincerity Freddie and just the genuineness that you bring to your love of photography that I see exhibited in your work. Well thank you I appreciate it. I wanted to start because so many times when photographers ask other photographers about their influences. It usually is related to other other photographers. They know that the writer Horton foote. Made an impression on you early on. And he's a great American screenwriter and playwright and it seems that it came aim at a sort of a pivotal time when you're sort of defining yourself in terms of who you were photographer and I was wondering whether you could speak to that well. You're you're entirely correct. I was muddling around with several ways to progress and I went to a lesser. Where Horton was on a panel discussion and it was a snooze? Roma handles discussion a number of academics. You Know Elbow Patches etc and his lovely a silver headed man but the molest Lewis Voice and they were deconstructing. All of Horton's plays at this point and I was sitting in the audience and when it became his turn to talk he says something that just rocked my world and still does to some extent he said well you know when I was a boy growing up in Warton that's a small coastal town in Texas agricultural town. He said I told my teacher. I wanted to be an actor and my teacher said Will Horton. That'll be difficult in a town like this. But you're going to need to know several things if you want to get in the arts and he said you're going to no need it's no the history of your your place where you come from and you're going to need to travel go away you probably get away and maybe come back etc etc and you're going to need to know the most important thing in that you're going to need always belong to replace. I'm paraphrasing here. But if you know his plays he writes about universal things that happen everywhere but he writes about him essentially in a small town where there are great truths being told him small ways. I just sat straight up in my chair taught. Oh yeah you know everybody makes fun of my place for good reason. But that's what I'm GONNA do. It is. I'm probably in my twenties point from an analysis. I'm going to belong to this place in I'm going to play. They like I know how silly this sounds. I'm GONNA play like ours. Dropped from another planet into this culture into this landscape into these people with this speech into these myriad animals into this peculiar surreal landscape. And I'm GonNa Photograph everything everything everything that's how it started. That's not where I ended up today but that was how it began along. I think it's such an important lesson because I see so many young photographers who often dismissed the things that they are very familiar with. They see the things is that they've known most of their lives the experience they've had and they see it as boring not particularly interesting and they look elsewhere in terms of finding subject matter for whatever creative work. They're doing particularly with photography. But it's when I've often look at bodies of work by by by students though so me the work that they feel is important and I go what are you doing. That's just you know that you're just doing for the sake of doing and more often than not it's the very sort of personal intimate. I'm at work. That becomes the more interesting and the most dynamic and the most infused with energy and passion than anything that they were doing where they were it primarily to demonstrate what they're capable of technically and. I think it was a wonderful gift or provided you by igniting igniting that awareness so early on in your journey as a photographer I agree The other thing is he was a kind man. And and sometimes they're in short supply society and a light a light the conversations we have over over the years after Talker in when it was a younger photographer Acoust- you WanNa make a living too so I was really interested in narcissistic things of my Tom. I want to make my own pictures but I think is important for younger photographers to live near a larger market. Even though we damn good transportation so and so forth and find some sort of shame or associate or a passion to follow and in my case I kept my commercial work separate. I do the best job I could but my my personal was a whole different entity and I was always much more interested in personal work because I thought it was awesome AAs riding my little bitty rallies autobiography in some ways but as writing pictures that kind of fine images can electric as Blasco matic images in murky like. I've always found your your work very poetic where it was poetry. A big part part of your development in terms of nothing. That's maybe not so much a year photography but in terms of learning to sort of observe the world he s Steel is like a lot of adults different aspects of literature but the thing about literature. As most poetry's he's as often relatively linear certain plotlines. Poetry comes in those Strange places depending on who the Bodas out stars a Jala words for what they do to your psyche with me or the elliptical thoss it they are images in my case they Bring to mind. I think Barbarossa washing the elephant to deliver read that store owner porn but it's not really about Washington L.. That kind of thing. He's always been comfort. Aniston a creative ignition on occasion. I get stuck a little bit every now and then a will get a a good book. Librarian just revisit a couple of people and I'm sure they do that but it helps make under the same thing with

Will Horton Keith Carter Horton Foote US. Art Center Freddie Writer Anderson Lewis Voice Roma Aniston Warton Texas Washington Acoust
Climate Change And The Housing market

The Interchange

12:00 min | 11 months ago

Climate Change And The Housing market

"We're going deep on the housing market. So let me ask you when you bought your house out there in Berkeley. Were you thinking about natural disaster risks. Well yes primarily earthquake risk. Yeah I mean you know if you're in if you're northern California then a among basically the entire west coast you're terrified water quakes. I also terrified earthquakes so I was thinking about that. I did I looked at houses in some other places where I was worried about. Things like floods and sea level rise But I'm a little further from the water. So I'm I should be safe from that barring some horrible horrible climate change outcome but You know obviously now. Wildfires are irrelevant factor here to what's the market it for earthquake insurance like don't get me started on the market for. It's it's a horrible you. It's incredibly expensive in the coverage which is really bad. There's like a California State Program called the California Earthquake Authority which like Kinda backs it but you have to get it to your local lender and Or your insurer and your insurers don't all cover it it's it's a mess we won't go there. I live in East Boston. And I'm surrounded by water and so the first thing I did when we were thinking about buying a house out here was does look up fema flood maps and do our research on flooding We're up on a hill so turns out according to the FEMA maps were in pretty good shape over a hundred year period of time But guess what I found other. Those maps are not so good the I would say the primary learning learning for me from all this Learning that I've been doing around. Climate risk is that FEMA flood maps or not great. Yes it's a real problem and that is part of what we're GONNA be talking about in this show I I watch tell you that I feel pretty good still I mean we are way up on a hill We're we're kind of surrounded by one side on a river. We've got the airport on one side so there's really not a lot of flooding risk for us like there is in other parts of East Boston or just throughout Boston. Really in fact. Mild down the street at the edge of Boston harbor on our side in East Boston through developing these is new condo buildings. He super expensive units that. Sit Right in these special flood hazard areas like even in the FEMA maps that are out out of day. These buildings buildings are in flood hazard areas. 'em He boggles the mind how to these things. Keep getting bill. How are they insured? Who is backing these these buildings and so this week? We are exploring the financial risk of this kind of development and our guest co-authored really deep and important study quantifying the problem in the US housing market and identifying. How banks are shifting? That risk took us the taxpayers our guest is named a meanwhile Assad. He's a professor of applied economics at the Graduate School of business at Hec Montreal Montreal. He joined us from his Montreal office. And show you doug this piece of research up you pass it over to me. And then the subsequent New York Times article that came amount summarizing the research. What compelled you about it? Well I think in my ongoing obsession around understanding climate risk in the ways is that it's playing out. I think one of the things that I'm finding to be interesting and terrifying Is basically like I think. Climate change and the risk of climate. Change is going to cause all these little distortions in our economy. There's just going to be so much of our economy is driven by weather and natural natural disaster and temperature all this different stuff and so I think you could almost look till like any section of the economy apply climate risk lens to it and then say this is GonNa GonNa get. This is going to turn weird. You know in one way or another and one of the areas that I think we're starting to see that play out right now as evidenced by means research is is in the mortgage market and obviously that one carries a particular weight in the United States. Because it was largely the cause of our last financial financial disaster and in fact the players who are involved in that less financial disaster particularly Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac which are you know sort of the US tax payers ars burying the burden of a bunch of mortgages. They appear to be involved This time as well in sort of an inability to price in a risk USC which is basically what happened in financial disaster. Now it may not be the same order of magnitude of a risk that we saw last time around. But it's a good example to to me of one of the ways in which climate change is just going to start to cause these strange little distortions in our economy right so the market for coastal mortgages in the US is worth sixty billion dollars or more per year depending on you know The real estate market and housing construction etc and and the striking thing about this research and other similar findings is that it's not confined just to a small number of coastal properties if you have have significant default rates it can reverberate through communities and potentially the broader housing market and so a lot of people are asking at least in the popular press when they're summarizing this research. Could this be a repeat of the two thousand seventeen thousand eight housing market collapse. That caused a financial crisis. I think the answer is at this point. No Oh because we're talking about a specific slice of the housing market at least when it comes to coastal properties but still there is this reverberation that can happen through these communities. It's not just like a bunch of select houses that are at risk it can actually have a ripple effect yeah. I don't think we know entirely yet. I think you know a means research which which I talked to him about is new and there isn't a whole lot of research on this yet so I think it remains to be determined. Exactly how big the the risk is but it is true not sort of fear monger here. I think it is true that like the numbers that you're talking about the potential losses to the American tax payer. As a result of this you know as it stands today air in the billions probably But maybe not yet at the level of the financial crisis in two thousand seventeen thousand eight which was you know couple orders of magnitude larger than and so. We should overstate it at the same time. This is the beginning right. And we just don't know where this is going to go and I think it's important to this Shaina light on all these little market distortions caused by climate change because that's the only way that we're going to actually adjust as a result and this to me the whole thing about this series stories that we've been doing on climate risk which is step one is understand the risk but then step two is do something about it. Price it in Insure against got it. Plan around it something And so you know we just gotTa make sure that we're doing that whether we are individual citizens or homeowners whether we are business businesspeople or whether we are policymakers even the federal government and so this is just another place where that's needed you guys really bring the walk in this interview. Yeah I mean look. Give me an academic academic paper and let me run. And you've made a huge mistake but no I mean this is really interesting research. And and the the challenge is that it's not it's not easy to say like like with the impacts of climate change on the mortgage market right now that that's hard to measure and so what I mean and his colleagues who wrote the paper figured out was a pretty clever way to try to get it this question which has to do with the relationship between private lenders and Fannie and Freddie and the rules that govern Fannie and Freddie so it's sort of inherently a a little bit wonky but I always think it's really interesting great. Well let's hear your conversation with a meanwhile Saad who's a professor of applied economics at the Graduate Business School. HEC G C Montreal. The study that you're talking about it's called mortgage finance in the face of rising climate risk. Amin thanks so much for being here. Thank thank you so much for your invitation. It's a pleasure. I'm really excited to chat with you about this research that you conducted recently but I think we should start by offering a little bit of context setting for folks who are not deeply embedded in the mortgage market and as fascinated by. Perhaps as you are so what. What is the role of Fannie and Freddie in this market very briefly and what's the sort of what are the restrictions that Fannie and Freddie have that private lenders do not right so prior to the existence of the creation of Fannie and Freddie the banks that were giving mortgages which is needed to have deposits matching deposits of customers on their balance sheet to extend mortgages Now Fannie and Freddie ready to change that that that mechanism because they allowed the banks to sell their mortgages to Fannie and Freddie and shield the commercial banks from The risk of default of households when when households default on their mortgages the lenders are not exposed to the default risk and it provides liquidity to The commercial banks into non-bank lenders so that they can extend many more mortgages than the amount of deposits that they have on their balance sheet and so this process of securitisation that Finian and Freddie enable is allowing lenders to extend many more mortgages than it would otherwise they were created during during the new deal so we're talking about FDR's administration And have been central to enabling households American households to be homeowners so okay so a mortgage lender has sort of two options are broadly. Speaking mortgage lender has two options with alone. They can hold it on their balance sheet or they can offload it to fannie or Freddie and securitise it and so the sort of crux of what the the the question you've been asking is can we see any impact from climate change or specifically from natural disasters on that decision right which mortgages to originate that a lender can offload in which mortgages in a lender originating. Hold yeah absolutely so there's being there was a a major academic work in Two thousand eight a right. After the financial crisis that said that commercial banks were selling their their bad loans to the government sponsored enterprises Fannie and Freddie That word by that worked by Ben Keys at Warton Really showed that The lenders were offloading The uninsurable On observable bad risk onto the balance sheets of Fannie and Freddie now when When we thought about this securitisation process we would we? We also thought that they would offload their bad climate risk That it is if Fannie and Freddie are not cautious in the kinds of mortgages that are purchasing They're purchasing from the commercial lenders commercial lenders that have of a branch network on the ground have loan officers They know The areas in which they're extending loans. Well they may be able all to observe the climate risk of little abellard better than Fannie and Freddie and And then when we we worked more and more on the research search we realized that Fannie and Freddie really didn't have a proper mechanic SOM to assess the sort of climate risk of they were purchasing from the commercial lenders We realized that they were using maps. That were outdated We realized that Fannie and Freddie were not

Fannie Freddie Fannie Mae Boston California Fema United States Freddie Mac Montreal Berkeley Professor California Earthquake Authorit Hec Montreal Montreal New York Times
"warton" Discussed on WBAI

WBAI

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"warton" Discussed on WBAI

"It was fascinating tomatoes. So many people had no clue they were really like how what I mean. Where would you even come up with that idea? So I realize the financial literacy even in school never mind at home. Or anywhere else in our society is not being taught that you need to earn it saying that and then invest your money wisely. That's the path. We've never they've never covered that in any class anywhere in school. They're not teaching us about you, saying even business even in business school. Now, I went to business school myself. I went to Warton's I completely agree with you. I think you are how to be an employee and even in my entrepreneurship classes, I think the entrepreneurship classes kit could not could only go. But so far because they were all theoretical. Like, I I think any entrepreneurial class should have people starting a business in class literally. And I took classes were in a number of us actually started a Business Bureau business plans, we talked about it. We read case studies. Did we actually do there's something completely different about? Actually, you're absolutely right. The entire system is teaching us how to be an employee whether it's on a higher level corporate level like you. And I did a business for you know, or. Or or just being an employee like I talked from all the way through elementary high school at any other post high school education that that kids do they're not teaching us anything about her personal finances. Most importantly, yeah. Sure, they he just how corporations work and all the theory behind it. But they're not teaching you know, what is credit what are assets liabilities. What about our personal money? What should we be doing there? There should be classes on just explaining all the concepts. So many people are confused by the stock market. My goodness. Thousands and thousands of products out there in different ways to real estate to. There are tons of ways that you can invest in real estate minds just one you no longer Meinhold. That's one you got four thing. You've got wholesale. He got lease option tax liens, there are just endless ways. And that those are the things we're not being taught about her personal finances. What we should be doing how credit works. What's a credit card? What's a debit card? I mean all of the about. Absolutely, okay. So now, please tell us again. So now, you have these four home single family. Homes. What were the challenges in managing them while being a bartender and while working from time to time like was it? You know, you make it sound very very easy, but they aren't people lose their shirt and real estate. I mean, the market crash in two thousand eight certainly took a lot of value out of people who are individuals who own homes people who had invested in homes, and then additionally took money out of regular people were not even in the market, but who were invested in the stock market and experience the fallout. So tell us, you know, we don't want to make it seem as if it was all gravy. What were the challenges in managing those first couple or several properties. Absolutely. I mean there were challenges that are at every turn. I was super duper young. I was self taught. I wasn't you know, even in hindsight. I wish I had maybe invested in a mentor. Somebody to really teach me the ins and outs. I did it the slow and hard long way, you know, like saving saving savings and using all of my own money to invest in real estate took time. I mean the sacrifices of that alone. I was working purely to be investing. I wasn't spending. I wasn't living lavishly. I wasn't you know, going out and partying. I was always working at the bars at night on special occasion. You know, the Saint Patrick's Day that halloween's all that fun stuff kids to there were challenges in that. But in the actual I made so many mistakes, I was super young as I said again, so. Some of the you made investing in with your with your initial properties. Sure. Well, one thing I wouldn't have done before you know, if you don't have especially in Canada. If you don't have a twenty percent down payment you have to have your mortgage third by it's called the Canadian mortgage housing corporation. So I wish and it was just a matter of maybe I forget that was a long time ago, but maybe less than five thousand dollars. I could have saved so much more. You know, you still have to pay that mortgage insurance for the duration of your term loan. I could've saved so much money. There had I just, you know, come up with that extra five thousand dollars. Right. Some UNC lose a lot of money over. You would have saved a ton more. Yes. Absolutely. Yeah. Whether just weren't weren't savvy at the time. I wasn't savvy at the time thinking, oh big deal. It's only adding an extra whatever it was hundred bucks monthly like no big deal to buy the house. They're giving me a mortgage. I gotta paper like oh my God. I'll just take it. I was just so hungry to get a mortgage thinking like, you know, I I don't have a high salary. I'm just a bartender banks. Don't really like that. So I was just taking whatever I could get. I'm like, yeah. Sure. Sounds great. I was finding all these mortgage papers. I had no idea what any of it meant. This is the first deal at essentially afterward. You know, I read through every single line. I like to learn everything, especially when I'm signing my name to it. But he was scary. And there were those challenges that later now looking back. I'm like, yes or learning how to use other people's money. That's something. I didn't know I'm just like again old school slow way. Like, oh, I'll just use all my own money. I could have had so much more by now. I learned that stirs or previously downpayment. Okay. Absolutely another another.

Warton Business Bureau Canada five thousand dollars twenty percent
"warton" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"warton" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"U G N. You there? He me time is fifty three past the hour. Joining us now is the owner of Omaha Steaks. You have been listening to us over the past few weeks. Talk about the fabulous deal for Christmas. That Omaha Steaks is offering to people who listen to the DJ program. But it goes much further than that Todd is the fifth generation of ownership in the family at Omaha Steaks. And I guess maybe the thing what was it like when you grew up a tell me about your your family a little bit. And you're growing up in this company. Was it always assumed that you'd be the next boss? Well, you know, it's so I run the business today. I must generation owner. My great great grandfather started the company in nineteen seventeen. And you know, and so my cousin I run the business together today. And I always kind of knew it was always the conversation was always about, you know, about how we can get involved with the business, and what's the business about we just sort of grew up in it. So it wasn't. It was never like bad like that. But it just kind of slowed like that. I guess. Yeah. Well, that's what happens a lot of good healthy family businesses grew up around him. You know, the business and you went to warden. So you were trained in business. It's not like you just had to learn it from the people that were there, your family said Judah Warton, and that's probably the best business school in the country. It definitely was. And I learned a lot of Warton, but I have to tell you that actually getting in and doing it and being exposed to it since I was ten years old was probably the best education. Of course. All right. So here we are at Christmas time. And there are a lot of people are looking for rare gifts notice, I didn't say raw I said rare the idea of giving food has been enhanced because of the technology being able to deliver. I know when I got my Omaha Steaks was. It was pretty fantastic actually is food gifting something that just happens at this time.

Omaha Steaks Judah Warton Todd ten years
"warton" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"warton" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"Tax reforms policy changes rather than operating fully with the typical economic model where we assume that people are fully informed about the tax system perfectly rational etcetera and using that to forecast response if we can build some structure about how we know people come to understand the tax system what bias play out and build that into our forecasting. I practice I think that helps us figure out and better. Forecasts what's going to happen after we change taxes, which types of tax changes, we should expect to be beneficial for not and so on. So is that like saying in some things they take into account more behavioral economics? Exactly. Yeah. So we're trying to. You know, there's a lot of people who care a lot and do very serious work trying to think about how people understand their taxes and how to forecast what they're going to do any given year. This is their branches of government that focus on this a lot. And the thing I think, you know, the time is ripe for building. More ideas for behavioral economics into this exercise and usually know from psychology to really put a bit of structure on this problem to improve our forecasting accuracy. Okay. So are you taking this forward to to extend this piece of research further? Are you going to look in separate areas? Now, I'm working on very conceptually related work across a couple of domains. That's just broadly on the topic of building more psychology into tax policy analysis. So it's mostly not on prospect theory at this point, but it is following up on the idea that we can use the structural predictions of existing psychological models better tax policy. For example, you're thinking about how people come to understand how their complicated tax bracket structures work, and how the optimism that building and some heuristic some biases into that type of framework thing about how people come to attend or not to sales taxes things of this flavor or I will thank you for coming in and chiming with us. And if you like what you hear when like more knowledge, please join us at knowledge dot, Warton dot U, Penn dot EDU. For more insight from knowledge Warton, please. Visit knowledge dot Morton dot U Penn dot. Eighty..

Warton
"warton" Discussed on Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"warton" Discussed on Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

"Second half kickoff. Davidovich kicks it way short. Congress comes up to the nine Brexit right up the middle, and then the whole closes he gets out to the twenty seven yard line before he's brought down. And that's where Michigan will take over first and ten from the twenty seven. While we'll get a chance to see if they've listened to their head coach, and they're gonna come out and pound the ball and take control of this line of scrimmage and make this Rutgers team understand that you know. Hey, thanks for coming in and thanks for playing hard. But we've got bigger things on our plate. Then the scarlet knights wolverines come out first and ten they've got two receivers left Collins and people's Jones shotgun pistol for Patterson. He gives it to and tries the middle of the Rutgers line and only gets a yard Trevor Morris there to stop him the twenty eight it'll be second down and nine for the wolverines one of the things. Rutgers is doing is they're talking that outside linebacker right on the hip of the defensive was that gentry pulled around. I don't think he saw and just ran by looking for the next available blocker and he's the linebacker. That's making that play. In the backfield. Patterson in the shotgun known Perry in motion. Higdon is set to the Wright Patterson raises this like it's looking to throw throws deep down the sideline for people's Jones. That's incomplete. Isaiah Warton covered right in front of the Michigan. Bents tried to go deep over the top man coverage out there on the edges, and I gotta give Avery Brown. And I say a Warton credit. They're not giving away any easy ones except the one earlier in the first after Nico gone, though, the disappointing thing about that passes. Even if even if it's caught by people's Jones it was thrown. So that it was going to be out of bounds. Third down and nine Michigan's first possession of the secondhand shotgun for Patterson. He's got back to throw blitz coming. Lots of time. Lots of time throwing the ball is. Catch by Zach gentry close to the fifty yard line. Plus.

Wright Patterson Michigan Jones Zach gentry Davidovich Trevor Morris Isaiah Warton Rutgers Congress Nico Bents Higdon Avery Brown Collins Perry twenty seven yard fifty yard
"warton" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"warton" Discussed on KTRH

"H. Houston's news weather, traffic and iheartradio station. Dozens arrested on Capitol Hill. I'm Audrey Warton. It's five thirty on NewsRadio seven forty two a traffic and weather together. Here's Katie London. Both are expected to survive. Chicago mayor Rahm Emanuel is not going to sneak seek another term after facing criticism for not taking a tougher stance on violence in the city. Tropical storm, Gordon is expected.

Rahm Emanuel Audrey Warton Katie London NewsRadio iheartradio station H. Houston Gordon Chicago
"warton" Discussed on News Radio WGOW

News Radio WGOW

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"warton" Discussed on News Radio WGOW

"The way you don't apple for those of you who are Warton business graduates for those of you, who are astute, business oriented people You will understand what I, say when I say apple is primarily their. Business model they're not a profit company their cash, flow company they make. A lot of profit but the. Business model is Boko cash flow they have got cash flow out there operating income they're operating cash flow every every quarter is mind boggling Now you what's a, fine point because every capitalist entity is seeking profit well He okay maybe seeking but. Not all of them, wanted there's some people want able to. Write off losses it's rare far between but apple has a differently unique. Model What program Well I'm through. With it made the point here about No The question of CHAI calms afraid that they will get out competed when it comes to labor know where where's? Where's anybody gonna go to find cheaper assembly line, labor It's not going to happen The CIA the supply chain is all in the supply chain is all in Taiwan and China and some of its. In Indonesia and so forth but they're trying and. India and it isn't working They are trying. You know India has a law that any product sold there has to be, made there so apple an apple products are very expensive they're. Much more expensive near avian average Indian citizen can afford so apple has been. Trying to manufacture the iphone. Five s and the the the tiny foreign screen in, India to bring down. Production cost it is a, working for for whatever reason, is not a criticism of apple it's just tough to do you need their average assembly house over there at. Foxconn five hundred thousand employees if you're if you're gonna if you're gonna to you ever stop to think how many phones you have to make. A second to sell ninety million and a quarter I mean you just can't you can't Pack that up and move it to some other company that doesn't have the population that doesn't have the skilled workforce trained. For years and years and years people it's not that that's why the calms. Think, they've got, apple over, a barrel here you know, I cloud I cloud requires data. Centers their data centers in North Carolina, there Davis.

apple India Warton Foxconn CIA North Carolina Indonesia Taiwan Davis
Regulations and the future of technology

Knowledge@Wharton

03:28 min | 2 years ago

Regulations and the future of technology

Arizona Federal Government Maine Google David Mandela Mit Warton Senate Toyota Department Of Transportation Uber Airbnb Waymo
"warton" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"warton" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"Of the people who need it the most that has not yet happened. Okay. So how how fast might private insurance grow and how how would it grow? Like how would it increase the number of households that are insured? Yeah. So to responses, one is that we were unable to really tell how much the private sector is simply taking policies from the NFL and writing them instead. And so not actually changing the total number of people insured in the US versus growing the number of insured. And it seems like both are happening from our conversations with insurers, and there was a lot of thought that to really grow the number of insured. There has to be much more focus on the demand side as well as the supply side because people don't understand flood. They don't understand insurance as sort of financial literacy about the role it plays. They're very price sensitive. And so lots of people just don't want flood insurance. We need to address that. And there's a lot of thought that again, if we roll it into homeowners, maybe could kind of help with the demand side. What else should we know about this study and what you've found in some of the issues? It raises. You said there was a bit of a conflict about, you know what role private insurance should be playing to begin with? Yeah. And I think. I think the market is definitely going to continue to grow. And I think it's also true that there will be a continued role for the NFL p. and certainly in the near term, the private is not going to be able to take on all of flood residential flood in the US and certainly not over the next few years, but we will still see substantial growth, which I think will be beneficial to number of consumers. I also think that that growth doesn't necessarily have to undermine other important functions of the flood insurance program. So for example, premium revenue right now is used to map the flood hazard in the US, and those maps are important beyond insurance, but for communities and households trying to manage their flood risk. And for example, a policy proposal that some insurers are supportive of is to put in a quivalent tax on the private policies to continue to fund flood plain mapping. There's also concerned that the private sector that the flood insurance program offers mitigation grants to help with these repetitive loss structures. Stuff that wouldn't be available if you are in the private market. That's at our other research shows that the vast majority of flood mitigation dollars coming from the federal government are actually not tied to the NFL p post-disaster dollars. So that would continue to be there. We will thanks for coming in today. So much about this incredible issue blood insurance. Thanks. Thank you. So if you liked what you hear, please come to our website for more knowledge at knowledge dot Warton, dot u. Penn dot EDU for more insight from knowledge at Warton, please visit knowledge dot Morton dot u. Penn dot EDU.

NFL US Warton federal government
China's Pork Industry: A New Effort to Help Farmers Modernize

Knowledge@Wharton

02:08 min | 2 years ago

China's Pork Industry: A New Effort to Help Farmers Modernize

"As the conversations over trade continued between the united states and china one important area involves various aspects of agriculture and for our conversations the need for pork in china is extensive that country is the largest consumer of pork in the world much of that has to do with the number of people in that country and their dining habits but the industry in china is a good size one but it is still a developing one in the last couple of years the wharton school in the penn school of veterinary medicine have worked with farmers and others on the pork industry in china ink conjunction with the pen wharton china center located in beijing doctor in green hall is deputy director of warton's leadership program and an adjunct professor of management here at the wharton school dr thomas parsons isn't a socio professor of swine production medicine at the penn veterinary school of medicine and they join me both here in the studio to discuss what they have been doing and great see again it's a while how it speed to see and to be on the other side of the mike right i know you're used to over here can we do some cross selling if you would like absolutely but if you like you can take out tom great meeting you thank you for coming in dan thanks so much for the opportunity thank you i guess let's start with how this program really started out in china working with the farm industry over there about looking at the pork industry so i think it really started through the opportunity university provided through the china researching engagement funds so it was an opportunity to go ahead and improve our presence in china and we've been able to partner with zoa which is one of the leading animal health companies in the world to start to formulate an educational program for chinese pork producers and i think from our perspective you mentioned the high amount of pork that's consumed there as a consequence of that there's a lot of pigs raise their so pigs in the world are in china so if you're interested in in pigs china's certainly a place that you you might wanna be that's say that's like a hotbed for for for.

United States China Wharton School Green Hall Deputy Director Warton Adjunct Professor Professor ZOA Penn School Of Veterinary Medi Wharton China Center Beijing Dr Thomas Parsons Penn Veterinary School Of Medi Mike Partner
"warton" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"warton" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"Has just raised people's expectations on ecommerce but you also see a difference in consumer so the millennials a lot has been written about but now people are focusing on generation see and these are what people are calling digitally native customers consumers there once who believe that grew up with the phone in their hand essentially and they shop through their phone they expect online and if you don't have a seamless shopping experience that goes across physical stores mobile and online these people are just going to go somewhere else it just doesn't make sense for that so if you're systems a lot of the legacy retailers they understand it i'm not saying they're naive and they don't get the importance of ecommerce but they have legacy systems that are hard to integrate and the online and offline had been so separate that for some of these retailers it's very hard to get up to speed that gives an advantage to the digitally native retailers who came in after expectation so they came in with an online presence on and then they started opening stores it was much easier for them to inch great the shopping experience in the other way around so all eyes tend to be on the amazons walmart's the big examples but what are some of the other retailers flying under the radar they're doing things well in your opinion well a lot of attention is being played to these wetter called digitally native vertical brands of course our favorite here at warton is the worby parker worby parker is one of the big ones that started and really got the cage that got the equation right and what what digitally native vertical brands have in common is i an amazing brand that really caters to a customer segment and really cares about what the customers want so they offer something of value the other thing that characterizes these digitally native vertical brands is that they are vertical which means that they go direct to the end user and they can do that because they start out online and they don't need to go through physical retailers this assembly that eliminates layers and in many cases offers a good price so worby parker as well as bonilla bows or casper's some of the other digitally name.

walmart warton casper bonilla
U.S. airstrikes targeted Syrian chemical weapons infastructure, Mattis says

24 Hour News

01:59 min | 2 years ago

U.S. airstrikes targeted Syrian chemical weapons infastructure, Mattis says

"In midtown in the sixties on long island into the north of the city good morning i'm donavan wins news time at the tone five thirty breaking news now on ten ten wins promoting i'm john belmont the us written in french dazed warton later air strikes against syrian chemical weapons targets overnight this morning hundreds of people gathered in damascus honking their horns flashing victory signs and waiting syrian flags in defiance it was just after four am their time that you explosions jolted damascus let's get the latest now from abc news airstrikes in syria the us along with britain and france carrying out targeted missile strikes against the assad regime's chemical weapons infrastructure in london this past hour british prime minister theresa may addressing the country meeting these targets with the force that we have to kuwait will significantly degrade the syrian regimes ability to research develop ads deploy chemical weapons strikes followed the confirmed chemical attack in douma outside damascus last weekend we have sought zoo so using every possible diplomatic channel our efforts have been repeatedly thwarted both on the ground and in the united nations president trump addressing the nation last night as the mission began we are prepared to sustain this response until the syrian regime stops its use of prohibited chemical agents the pentagon did not share the target list with russia russian president vladimir putin calling the strikes and active aggression michelle franzen abc news wins news time five thirty one traffic center here's jill nicolini alright taking look at the expressway no problems to report is you make you wait here over the verizon bridge and as you make your way onto the guan is looking good from thirty eighth street up to the biki a limit of a slowdown as you approach the brooklyn battery tunnel but nothing major on the northbound side a smooth ride as well through queens on the.

Michelle Franzen Brooklyn Russia President Trump United Nations Kuwait Prime Minister ABC John Belmont Donavan Verizon Bridge Jill Nicolini Vladimir Putin Pentagon Douma Theresa London Assad Regime
Bat-wielding suspect shot dead by police after apparent road rage incident

24 Hour News

02:15 min | 2 years ago

Bat-wielding suspect shot dead by police after apparent road rage incident

"Long island in coastal connecticut today cloudy increasingly windy with snow times through midday in the city and near suburbs one to three inches mainly on non paved surfaces roads mainly wet to slushy expect three to six inches though in nassau county six to ten inches in suffolk county and then he coastal connecticut suburbs where roads will be snow packed and slippery into this afternoon winds increase in gusting near forty miles per hour near the city to near fifty on eastern long island temperature's slowly rise through the thirties to a high of forty two late today tonight lingering clouds brisk and cold with a low thirty two tomorrow still brisk and cold clouds and sun snow shower and places during the afternoon high forty one partly sunny thursday high forty four fridays brisk and colder despite some sun i thirty nine thirty four degrees with light snow in the city and immediate suburbs heavier snow on long island humidity ninety two percent wins north at fifteen gusting to twenty five repeating the current temperature thirty four later today hitting high of forty two wins news time four zero six while the mayor was away the governor came to play while mayor de blasio travels out of town governor cuomo came to the jackson houses found what he called disgusting conditions in an apartment he toured and has ordered state health officials to investigate he wants to make repairs and improve living conditions warton mechanism do we want to put in place to get around the nights your bureaucracy he plans to hear from the city council about what should be done bronx council member ritchie torres call the situation unacceptable the more than a humanitarian crisis it is a failure of governance and political leadership here in new york city noting the mayor's trip he says it's akin to absentee management at nitra juliet papa ten ten wins news wins news time four oh seven police say a bat wielding suspect shot dead by a nassau county cop was on a long crime spree that began saturday in the bronx reportedly rob someone there before hijacking vehicles in manhattan around ten thirty in the morning and breakneck this guy got into a road rage incident where he got outta the car smacked another driver in the head with a bat according to police the rookie cop on patrol came upon the scene told the guy to drop that bad a civilian and tried to.

Long Island Nassau County Suffolk County Cuomo Jackson Ritchie Torres Bronx Connecticut Mayor De Blasio Bronx Council New York ROB Manhattan Thirty Nine Thirty Four Degree Ninety Two Percent Three Inches Six Inches Ten Inches
"warton" Discussed on KKAT

KKAT

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"warton" Discussed on KKAT

"That the the gory at warton school of business but tony sounds right asian making all at out on intensive confident that with all the matters looked asian stocks are down and but the futures are up mr i am so he says about the future so they must be important there are about one hundred points right now could be a good day and every trader is trying to explain this roller coaster ride over the last two weeks just as we did here's a veteran traders name is ted weisberg goes in this is that market that clearly had not had any kind of meaningful correction you can go all the way back to the trading lows of mike two thousand nine where the dow was sixty five hundred where now even after tonight clouds at dow twenty four thousand there's a slightly below okay sounds rape theft yeah that guys sounds let's go with him a walk a tony and i pretty much added covered who booted this ground but reason the news cares it'll ted but the hello you lay dead huge fan basically put veteran trader on your resume now you can put that at the time needed in about five weeks listen you and i both that is the uncertainty regarding the future right here is deadly for months or having to another debate me talking stocks and bonds go that that's a sign of the apocalypse club the future is very bad it has no few is no doubt clear of that you'd be telling you what to do with your money listener just the fact that you've been appearing a caboodle all these year that maybe that that's quite the cop island all you special ed students out there like guns be an inspiration yeah i mean if he making make he's not fraud caboodle lots of business based show and this guy's been out of for like four or five years now yeah it's my main right there who golf so everybody be helps may help create your phone calls keep up avid are i've got no matter who i loved neil back to the.

mike fraud golf neil warton school of business tony ted weisberg rape theft five weeks five years two weeks
"warton" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

SuperTalk WTN 99.7

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"warton" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

"A known as war is it w w i r t o wind or maybe that's misspelling warton willing is there groundhog yeah as opposed to one who came first warton william pucks a tony phil good question and and what do we listen to rodents now i have no idea but both of them say six more weeks of winter like we didn't know that was done y'all got to do is read the farmers almanac i had do is walk outside hanno kidding john illinois you're up next john what's up well i feel i'm calling from springfield illinois in its twenty five degrees of global warming today didn't that monks it's actually five degrees warmer than when uh president obama announced his candidacy he talked about global warming that day and even he laugh because it was twenty degree this the called this the call the gore effect right there yeah and i as a as a personal aside uh i also on a boat in my son his gotten in a little scraped with his spoke with a with our boat but his first real job he was very busy and high school and college so as first real job wherever you got paid was driving a nuclear submarine really yeah well so yes so he's in the navion yeah won't congratulations i love a little bit bigger than my boat although i could probably qualify as a you boca raton you think on exactly all right john preview to be much well wait will hold on yeah yeah so when i my first uh presidential election if the time my dad was working poor senator so he asked us to vote democratic in the primary so my first presidential primary i voted democratic you were talking about this friday and as soon as you voted for carter you know what was the wrong thing well i wanted to tell you she's a balance now wait look unfortunately we're at a time i wish we had more time from the wtmj news center nashville mayor megan berry through a spokesman says it no time did the mayor or her former head of security attempt to use tax dollars to support their affair oliver records do show the city paid for his hotel room on four extra nights in three different cities news brought to you by staples traffic and weather next time pima liver wtn news sleep from the genesis diamonds wtn traffic center in both directions.

illinois obama senator carter john illinois springfield president gore wtmj nashville megan berry oliver twenty five degrees twenty degree five degrees
"warton" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"warton" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"One onepercent treasuries are tumbling we've got the tendered on nineteen thirty seconds yield two point four seven percent the dollar weakening against most of its g ten peers in the first official drug trading day of the new year the dow up 44 up twotenths of 1 percent again the s p up sixteen up sixtenths of 1 percent nasdaq higher by eighty two higher by one point two for several as for the outlook for markets in the new year jeremy siegel is a professor of finance at the warton school he was interviewed this morning on bloomberg television friday we at the jobs report one hundred ninety thousand aspirant that's more than twice the level that is being supplied by the population that drive down that unemployment rate now you know what we're all guessing where it's been ats we spark wage gains but found some of the optimis thing three and a half percent but we're going to reach that by the end of the summer at these wage rate gains and byron weaned vice chairman of the private wealth solutions group but blackstone group is out with his list to predictions for 2018 he says stock speculation will get out of itself this year leading to a short correction in the sp 500 while oil will vault above eighty dollars this quote populism tribalism and anarchy spread around the world right now west texas intermediate crude sixty twenty eight a barrel down twotenths of 1 percent brent is at sixty six forty six down sixtenths of 1 percent again gold up eighttenths of 1 percent thirteen thirteen the office is 102 on wall street that means it is time.

dow the outlook jeremy siegel warton school unemployment rate vice chairman brent official nasdaq professor of finance bloomberg byron blackstone group texas 1 percent nineteen thirty seconds four seven percent One onepercent eighty dollars
"warton" Discussed on Thunder Radio

Thunder Radio

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"warton" Discussed on Thunder Radio

"Com already quote get by get healthy will what are you game than i work with you would always going up quite like it coach i got a chance to to get around out their own huddled this week it as guts see your quarterback britain of warton second he's a special kidney oh oh did we losing he he leaves the coach speechless as what he does actually and tried had trying to split trust me he backed up right there real quick i think he's gone through hell is inland was on the bus yeah he is on the bus an a hurdle other yelling and screaming so you know maybe they crashed but you know like like he was named nolan well nolan's for that you know that's brand new program i believe this puts them at three in one in there in there uh in the region in their region now right there yeah i believe seoul's hats going to give them a pretty good shot that is going to give him a real sharded and i know that it's it's it's one of those situations where uh he's got some young kids go in and he's back with us coach history i got to watch some film on your quarterback a talk about him he a special athlete he had me no out a wonderful night denied in couldn't be more product now that that is a brand new morton the second right it is writer warden beckett yet a good night not running the football coach louis arc they'll back uh you know we kind of struggled amid all over in the or style often depot quite it will put an airport uh you know a code word sorry ether do three quarterback they run he can throw the ball he he really looks good any any seems to get uh he seems to get his base andrea no you know quarterback play peru will he seems to get his base honoring before throws of football was at accurate to say yeah definitely come a long way in rhetoric every time out there you know can going to require the quarterback beckett all year uh so every time out or would spoken up that knowledge in uh the night all right you said you have a bye week next week what's.

warton seoul beckett andrea peru nolan writer football louis arc
"warton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"warton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Hintze paul today i'm car result is thursday the fifth of october good as always to have you along everybody i know it often doesn't seem like it very often of late but there is a procedural method to the legislative madness in washington dc case in point of vote in the house today to pass a one point four trillion dollar budget plan passage that plan sets the table for a tax code overhaul down the road reconciliation is the legislative maneuver you're going to be hearing a whole lot about but even though reconciliation will make it easier for the gop to get taxes done that doesn't mean in is going to be easy there are a whole lot of big deal questions still up in the air chief among them how to judge attacks blamed score it figure out its potential effects on the economy we have marketplace's adrian hill to explain something called the dynamic scoring and why it has both sides in such a ladder dynamic scoring can cause policy pundits to flee it's magical thinking say critics isn't valls assumptions that are too hard to make and supporters say it's the only real way to know what a tax plan might do yeah both five five at the gate law hyperbole hints matters teaches at the warton school dynamic scoring is at the end of the day a tool unlike any tool its value is in how and who is using it douglas holte can former director of the congressional budget office says the way plans are traditionally scored it tries to take into account all sorts of reactions people might have a higher or lower taxes uh uh it it a quick does not change the budget economy dynamic scoring on the.

paul the house gop washington warton school douglas holte director of the congressional four trillion dollar
"warton" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"warton" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"We're speaking today with warden finance professor david muster about this year's winner of the warton jacobs levy prize for quantitative financial information and the word given annually to leading lights in the world of finance and this year's winner is stephen allan ross who's considered by many in the field to be one of the most important thinkers in modern finance uh one of his best known ideas for which he is receiving this award a is arbitrage pricing theory also shorthand known as apt and it's a staple of finance since he developed it in nineteen seventy six while he was a professor here at warden it's been called a by some the of the foundation for all risk factor models used today so unfortunately mr ross died this past march at 73 shortly after he was announced the winner of the prize which will be awarded posthumously on september 15th at the jacobs levy center's annual conference to be held in new york more recently been a professor for many years at the mit sloan school of management ross's work covered many fields from asset pricing to management corporate finance so for fesser muster less let's just start by talking about his probably most famous theory apt which i just mentioned was truly groundbreaking as a way to analyse risk and returns in financial markets it looked at had identified assets that were trading to low or too high because of market miss pricing can you explain how important that theory is and the basics of how it works.

professor new york financial markets david muster stephen allan ross mr ross jacobs levy center mit sloan school of management ross
"warton" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"warton" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"I think that warton as a finance institution really can bring third question of what what is the evidence around performance uh help people make sense of the different strategies that different uh fund managers are deploying and helped to amplify to the finance committee community not just to the general public but really within the finance community this is a field this is a field of investment that is emerging these are some of the really important research questions that are coming from that uh in to help people make sense of what good looks like so you mentioned the private equity investments that your particularly interested personally you know out the warned social impact initiative we've been doing this longterm study on impact investing private equity no impact investing i think fits into a gender lens profile but not everyone is um calling themselves impact invest gender lens impact investors so how might we with that project where were looking at the financial performance in the impact where white we find sort of funds that are interested in gender lens so we are tracking a hundred and twentyfive towns that we have now broken into four or five different categories the first are funds that have an explicit quantified gender lens mandate now they may self identifies an impact fund or they may not identify as an impact on in some cases they're allergic two being referred to as an impact fund their view of impact is that they're getting access to capital for.

"warton" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"warton" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Failure of the nba elite duff mcdonald's welcome to bloomberg thanks for having me let's start out talking a little bit about your career in journalism what attracted you to writing about business it's funny you should ask i went to warton as an undergraduate a little unwittingly i i was from toronto and i did not have a sense of wall street at the time he knows interested in being a businessman was which is what i told my guys councillor right so he told me to go to business school so i did and i did well enough there and got a job at goldman sachs out of undergroud it's it's not that you want to too but it's the law you come out of war goma is the line you could go to goldman sachs here you go to kinsey there there's a whole bunch of option exactly although i kinda stumped my classmates i only got one job offer real is accent parents if you've got one from goldman you're supposed to have gone one from everybody else here but i worked there for two years in corporate finance name and while pressed with the quality of the talent and the you know they know what they're doing they're in it was for me and i actually tried to get a job in book publishing i and couldn't get hired so there was nothing available in steam engines you were looking into this businesses is that were soon going to collapse exactly so thank you publishing industry for not hiring me early hiring me later and then a friend suggested journalism and i looked into so you had never really been thinking about writing jib has there been previous authorship any rate among national even not on the side like i was capable writer but i know i don't think i ever want said i want to be a writer and so back your question how did i get into business journalism it's because to get into journalism i.

nba toronto goldman sachs goma goldman writer duff mcdonald bloomberg warton two years
"warton" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"warton" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"And they're really game to try and get into the business early right and so they need to know how to towel hype from what's practical they need to know enough uh we're not trying to convert people at gordon into neuroscientists oh by not but we need them to be savon of our stein so just before we get into sort of the the content of it could have if you could tell us a little bit more about what the ins the institute in compass the initiative encompasses the ordinary science initiative what what's in there right so i think we're trying to be quite bride um and i think that is our already in iowa signalled in the name itself ordinary science initiative because we don't want to define what the field should be um we want to sort of view wide open to what uh what the possible applications might be what the particular relevance might be for neuroscience with business applications and that's because you know we're in an environment where things are rapidly changing and so uh you know and who are michael an eye to prescribe exactly how all of these applications will be developed are certainly only experts in the areas that we are experts in um and uh and yet the breath i think is wider than that but i think overall right there are these sort of main arms of what we're trying to do and one of those is uh is to really increase the the level of research enterprise here across the university and that intersection with warton itself so um you know there's a large nra science community at pen.

gordon stein iowa michael warton