12 Burst results for "Warm Springs Oregon"

"warm springs oregon" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:12 min | 5 months ago

"warm springs oregon" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This is national native news, I'm Antonia Gonzalez. The confederated tribes of warm springs Oregon are seeing benefits from a hydroelectric project. As kws, Duncan Bruno reports, the tribes are seeing an increase in ownership and are looking forward to an economic boost. A partnership between the confederated tribes of warm springs and Portland General Electric saw an increase in ownership by the tribes of the pelton round Butte, hydroelectric project. Before the increase in ownership, the tribe's interest was at 33.33%, and as of January 3rd, 2022, they increased that ownership to 49.99%. Jim Mannion is the general manager of the warm shrinks power and water enterprises. The real benefit behind it is the economic gain that tribes will see as a result of taking a larger volume of energy out of the project and being able to market that and sell that energy. The board of directors and the tribal council authorized was an execution of a power sales agreement between us in Portland General Electric at a price that makes the project economically beneficial for us to take that increased ownership. So what we should see in years in a few years to come is an increased value or increased benefit economically to the general fund. Manion says in the year 2036, the tribes could have the opportunity to become a majority owner of the pelton round view project. For now, they'll see how the increased benefit economically goes. I'm Duncan Bruno. While many in the mainstream population in Australia marked Wednesday as Australia day for many First Nations people, January 26th represents invasion day, the arrival of colonizers brought loss of culture, country, and genocide, due to the pandemic, many invasion day events moved online, but there were still rallies in major cities. Adam Evans from the national indigenous radio service has more. In the late up to invasion day and organizer of a rally in Perth Western Australia said they can not let the occasion slide because of the pandemic, bibble and main mervin aides said First Nations people have been dealing with a pandemic since 1798. Pandemic of genocide. Our people dying at rights far greater than everyone else, such as population, so a pandemic to us has always existed and the pandemic that we face it's an English pandemic. The day involved various events around the country, including morning ceremonies, rallies and marches and concerts to celebrate survival and acknowledge the harms brought by colonialism the wiggle or a morning ceremony in Brian guru Sydney was just one of them. It celebrated the gadiel people of the aorta nation, through music, dance, language, and ceremony, while acknowledging the shade history. One of the events which took place online was a rally in Tasmania, which included speakers a dance ceremony and a minute silence to honor the average lives lost during invasion. While First Nations people raised their voices throughout the year January 26th, which represents the style of colonialism has become a day where we express their anger and sorrow while calling for change. That was Adam Evans reporting. The bureau of reclamation announced this week, James C to peshlakai is the new tribal liaison for the Glen canyon dam adaptive management program, which focuses on dam operations management and resource protection. She'll support communication between 5 interior department agencies and tribes connected to the Glen canyon and Grand Canyon in Arizona. Peschel Kai most recently served in the state legislature..

Duncan Bruno Antonia Gonzalez Jim Mannion General Electric Adam Evans Portland kws warm springs national indigenous radio serv bibble tribal council Manion Oregon Australia Brian guru Sydney mervin gadiel Western Australia
"warm springs oregon" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"warm springs oregon" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

"During times when our family experience. Food insecurity quoting. That's where i learned is watching her guidance. Schreiner said so the need to constantly create new things making a lot out of little has been a concept forever for me. Schreiner is also. I can't pronounce that word and grew up gathering berries and roots and hunting and fishing in alaska. It's a tribe name in you know i'm sorry and new peac thank you. She attended the university of alaska banks where she studied psychology and natural resources and became acquainted with other alaskan native foods and traditions. When she moved to bend oregon in two zero six. She started to notice that there wasn't a source for local indigenous foods. Excuse me for tribal members within town. The closest reservation potential access for traditional foods was more than hours drive north to confederate tribes a warm springs reservation in warm springs oregon and listener. Beth may know where that is as well. Excuse me So maybe she can provide us with a little background if she would. I'm sure she would love to but going on. I'm just wondering if they're still doing this. I bet that they are because a lot of like. I said a lot of tribes are have been presented with food inequality and food desert types of situations since its pandemic so we shall see how how well they're doing and whether they're getting any support programs going on schreiner sought to fill the niche desire for indigence foods central oregon and in two thousand twelve created security botanical. 's the tribal food business which create syrups teas and salts. She operated out of a small site in the heart town heart of downtown. Excuse me bend and grew all the plant material necessary on our previous pro property which was about a quarter acre plot of land quoting. We are kind of forced to move with the market out here. We ended up buying farmland and then it became security farms and that gave us the ability to grow more food host educational events. And that's when we knew it was time to really pick it up in quote Article of kind of lengthy. But i encourage people to read the article visit any links. You might find That other than the show notes link but newsom research about this. I'm sure there's a lot of interesting information in here. That indigenous listeners might be able to benefit from non indigenous communities might benefit from as well and her procedures. And what she's doing. So i congratulate her and i think or for efforts and all those who are working with her and please forgive me if i mispronounced your name one hundred times. Y'all i'll do the other the research. If i can find links include those in the show notes as well Aside from the The article itself in that will help people Get to know them better in. I think the concept is absolutely awesome. Absolutely awesome love it. Love it love it.

alaska Schreiner Beth one hundred times two two thousand about a quarter acre alaskan six university of alaska twelve
"warm springs oregon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"warm springs oregon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Thank you so much for being with us. Thank you for having me. You're listening to weekend edition from NPR news. The federal government is acknowledging that it defrauded to Oregon tribes more than 150. Years ago, the US betrayed in agreement that protected the rights of tribal members in the northwest. Oregon Public Broadcasting's Emily Cure it in reports. For decades. Warm Springs tribal member Luis Pitt Jr has been seeking justice United States Its good name is at stake. It is a U. S citizen who speaks on behalf of another sovereign nation, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs. He says. A lot of people don't know how Oregon and Washington came to be like 10 million acres that we gave to the United States. In 18 55, leaders of the Warm Springs and Wasco tribes signed a treaty with the U. S. Facing threats of violence and forced removal. They agreed to settle on a reservation and what's now central Oregon. Well, yeah, it's under military guard. We did yes, it says the Chiefs of the two tribes gave up that land to protect a way of life. And they expressly retained the right to hunt and fish off the reservation as Indian people have for thousands of years, But just 10 years after signing an agreement, the U. S betrayed the terms. Ah, federal agent drew up a so called supplemental treaty, claiming tribal members needed permission to leave the reservation, and they weren't allowed to hunt and fish elsewhere. Through deception. This became federal law efforts to undo the change to the treaty stalled for decades, even though it wasn't enforced, says Democratic U S Senator of Oregon, Jeff Merkley still stood as a symbol ofthe racist treatment, predatory treatment of the tribe, now a bill acknowledging that is awaiting the president's signature. It was sponsored by Merkley and by Oregon Republican representative Greg Walden, and unanimously passed both chambers of Congress. We have to recognize that there are many horrific acts that will never be be remedied. But when there is a moment where we can see a wrong that we can, right Yes. Absolutely. What We should do it firmly plants our movement forward. Based on historical truths rather than denials. Portland area Community organizer Seattle Med Mo. Sees any affirmation of Native American rights as connected to a broader movement for racial justice. I'm Shoshone Bannock mess. Christiania comma. Ed, Mo is executive director of the MRG Foundation, which fund social justice work in communities of color. She says, acknowledging shared histories of white supremacy opens up conversations about what should happen next. What does reparations and the start of justice look like for our communities? The legacy of that 155 year old fraud against the Oregon tribes has taken many forms, says Lewis Pitt Jr of Warm Springs. I grew up with having to learn how to run real fast talk real good. He remembers being just 10 years old when two white people sick dog on him on DH. They just Didn't like me because of my color. It has spent much of his adult life defending tribal members. Treaty rights. People think the United States of America is are those guys with the suits and ties over on the East Coast? No. In America. I am America us away. Where the citizens you have an obligation as well as those federal people to live up to the treaty, he says. Racism has been a constant, but the enemy has changed from an invading force to a familiar ignorance. For NPR news. I'm Emily Cure it in in Warm Springs, Oregon. You don't have to be wealthy or retiring to take advantage of tax smart charitable planning. Whatever your stage of life or income level planning now.

Oregon Warm Springs United States Oregon Public Broadcasting federal government NPR Confederated Tribes Jeff Merkley Mo Lewis Pitt Jr Luis Pitt Jr America Greg Walden Washington Wasco U. S
"warm springs oregon" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"warm springs oregon" Discussed on KCRW

"News. The federal government is acknowledging that it defrauded to Oregon tribes more than 150. Years ago, the US betrayed in agreement that protected the rights of tribal members in the northwest. Oregon Public Broadcasting's Emily Cure it in reports for decades. Warm Springs tribal member Luis Pitt Jr has been seeking justice United States His good name is at stake. It is a U. S citizen who speaks on behalf of another sovereign nation, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs. He says. A lot of people don't know how Oregon and Washington came to be like 10 million acres that we gave to the United States. In 18 55, leaders of the Warm Springs and Wasco tribes signed a treaty with the U. S. Facing threats of violence and forced removal. They agreed to settle on a reservation and what's now central Oregon. Well, yeah, it's under military guard. We did yes, it says the Chiefs of the two tribes gave up that land to protect a way of life. And they expressly retained the right to hunt and fish off the reservation as Indian people have for thousands of years, But just 10 years after signing an agreement, the U. S betrayed the terms. Ah, federal agent drew up a so called supplemental treaty, claiming tribal members needed permission to leave the reservation, and they weren't allowed to hunt and fish elsewhere. Through deception. This became federal law efforts to undo the change to the treaty stalled for decades, even though it wasn't enforced, says Democratic U S Senator of Oregon, Jeff Merkley still stood as a symbol ofthe racist treatment, predatory treatment of the tribe, now a bill acknowledging that is awaiting the president's signature. It was sponsored by Merkley and by Oregon Republican representative Greg Walden, and unanimously passed both chambers of Congress. We have to recognize that there are many horrific acts that will never be be remedied. But when there is a moment where we can see a wrong that we can, right Yes. Absolutely. What We should do it firmly plants our movement forward. Based on historical truths rather than denials. Portland area Community organizer Seattle Med Mo. Sees any affirmation of Native American rights as connected to a broader movement for racial justice. I'm Shoshone Bannock mess. Christiania comma. Ed, Mo is executive director of the MRG Foundation, which fund social justice work in communities of color. She says, acknowledging shared histories of white supremacy opens up conversations about what should happen next. What does reparations and the start of justice look like for our communities? The legacy of that 155 year old fraud against the Oregon tribes has taken many forms, says Lewis Pitt Jr of Warm Springs. I grew up with having to learn how to run real fast and talk real good. He remembers being just 10 years old when two white people sick dog on him on DH. They just Didn't like me because of my color has spent much of his adult life defending tribal members. Treaty rights. People think the United States of America is are those guys with the suits and ties over on the East Coast? No. America. I'm America us away. Where the citizens you have an obligation as well as those federal people to live up to the treaty, he says. Racism has been a constant, but the enemy has changed from an invading force to a familiar ignorance. For NPR news. I'm Emily Cure it in in Warm Springs, Oregon..

Oregon Warm Springs United States Oregon Public Broadcasting federal government America Luis Pitt Jr Confederated Tribes Jeff Merkley Mo Lewis Pitt Jr NPR Greg Walden Washington Wasco U. S
"warm springs oregon" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"warm springs oregon" Discussed on KCRW

"Transport patients the Stafford act has only been used to react to a disease outbreak once before in fall of two thousand when both New York and New Jersey requested help dealing with the west Nile virus miles parks NPR news Washington under the declaration doctors will be encouraged to practice telemedicine so that doctors can more easily weigh in on a patient's care remotely requirements will be waived to enable the use of more beds and longer patient stays at hospitals in every state will be expected to have an emergency operations center going immediately in terms of identifying more spots to set up drive through testing sites president trump says Google has about seventeen hundred engineers working on a website to identify preferable locations temporary bans on large gatherings are infected a number of states were new cases have been reported schools are being closed as well including in states like Ohio and Michigan again the big focus today is on getting as many people tested as possible with whatever kits are available in new Rochelle the epicenter of the African New York governor Andrew Cuomo urged area residents to take full advantage of the state's first right through corona virus testing site now to Italy where the death toll from the covert nineteen pandemic has surged again today from just over one thousand on Thursday to twelve hundred sixty six NPR Sylvia but Jolie reports this full protection agency announced that the number of people who have tested positive is now pushing eighteen thousand the Titans remain under a nationwide quarantine the government has severely restricted citizens freedom of movement and allows only grocery stores pharmacies in newsstands to remain open after German and French companies turned down Italy's urgent request to acquire health equipment a team of Chinese medical experts arrived in Rome with thirty one tons of ventilators facemask and other medical equipment foreign minister Luigi di Maio said Italy is now reaping the benefits of its solidarity with China where the pandemic originated so people Jolie NPR news Rome this is NPR news well since this twenty twenty got underway this week in Oregon the first person counted was an elder from the largest sovereign nation within the state Oregon public broadcasting's Emily Cureton has the latest historically native Americans have been undercounted the census bureau estimates it missed five percent of the population in twenty ten Caroline cruise of the confederated tribes of Warm Springs says that even with crucial funding for public services on the line distrust in government runs deep and so you have some of the older generation who has still carry a lot of that hurt and historical trauma who are never going to trust today they pass on they're just not going to cruise leads the tribe census committee its volunteers from the reservation will go door to door for the hardest to reach residents for NPR news I'm Emily Cureton in Warm Springs Oregon a retired surgeon accused of sexually abusing as many as three hundred forty nine children that were his patients over recent decades is now on trial in France sure well list Warnick is charged with abusing four people including two nieces during a search of his home investigators reportedly found more than three hundred thousand images of child **** and other materials as well as many notebooks in which the surgeon allegedly detailed sexual violence against young girls and boys from nineteen eighty nine to two thousand seventeen if convicted he faces up to twenty years in prison back to code where the list of major events called off because of the pandemic now includes Indy car canceled all races through April and the Boston Marathon to link its rate from April to September this is NPR support for NPR comes from NPR stations other contributors include fidelity wealth management where advisers work with their clients.

"warm springs oregon" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

14:39 min | 2 years ago

"warm springs oregon" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Here with us a traditional additional basket weaver and enroll member of the little river band of Pomo Indians. Corinne thank you for being here with us and you're telling us about your process anything else you WANNA say about these materials or even just the ability To still go out and collect or maybe there's challenges go ahead There are absolutely challenges to Being able to harvest a lot of our traditional harvesting sites are now on private property. So there's the challenge is getting permission to harvest in a place that you have been harvesting forever you know And then another challenge is climate change the materials every material has a window of harvest time. And and when you're an environmental stewart especially a basket weaver or food gatherer you. You don't really go by the seasons. Because as they shift. They've always shifted a little bit but right now what. I'm have been noticing for the last few years. Is that the window of time that basket materials are ready has been shrinking. We'll talk about Dogwood really quick because I'm actually right in the harvest season for her And you can you really should only harvest dogwood when it's dormant so I mean the coldest times of the year when all I believe have fallen off. And there's a few reasons they're fine fibers and the leaves that break off and keep you issues like fiberglass but it's also better for the plant to you do it when it's dormant so that the next year's growth is very very good so it's literally snowing here today it does not snow here usually So so it is cold but when I went out to check on my dog would it already has new leaves new little but coming out and this isn't the first year her that it's happened but it's the first time that it has been before the middle of December so The the window the amount of the flooding that we've been getting has actually been making it pretty hard to get to the Sedgwick beds So it's still flooding in our harvest time I'm which means we. You can't go diving for basket routes So it's been it's challenged there are there are challenges to you where we can harvest A lot of Public Parks That we have harvested in forever are using between herbicides and pesticides to control the weeds that we actually need for certain foods and things. So there's there's there's quite a few challenges and Part of what I do is working in community to try and get them to see that these these things are being utilized they need to be utilized. They don't need to be poisoned and that we need to have access. There's a great Entity called the California India Indian Basket Weavers Association and they've actually been working with the park service and helping the people at the park service understand what the rights rights of native people are harvest in those sites. So it's pretty pretty interesting stuff and it's always shifting And I I have to. I say in the last two or three years. I've actually been contacted by by more people in the last three years giving permission to harvest list on their site without me having to go out and ask so. That's really exciting for me. And it's important that you tell your story and sometimes times when you are sharing even how culturally relevant some of these species are sometimes things change. It's great even hear that people are reaching out to you saying when you're welcome come in come into where your people have always been no great to hear that You know what I want to go ahead and turn to Anchorage Alaska To say hello to David Gone. He is a member of the first peoples on board. And David is Rosebud Sioux. David thank you for being with us. Welcome good morning. It's just so inspiring to To hear Korean story. She's a great teacher isn't she. She is in. I can only imagine how hard it was to bring it down to the number of people that you did but when you do get to that number We do get to hear and learn about communities and and it really excites me. 'cause we get to learn through an artistic way and so David Tell us more about this award how it came to be in. Just what exactly you're looking for in in maybe even why Corinne insist this. Thanks and thank you for for having Korean and her other honorees on on the show. You know there. There are so many people like like these folks in our communities. Right and it's it's not the native way to to give give awards In fact I remember one of our honorees a few years ago. didn't didn't really get it until you know until until we had Really like a mini ceremony in a mini kind of performance. And I hate to say many because you know it wasn't but it was it's different. It's not just a plaque. And it's not just you know something you put on Awa- This is acknowledgement for the amazing work work. The art is life right Korean story is these. Baskets aren't just aren't just willow branches or spruce root sitting on the shelf. Right there's there's the gathering and there's the understanding of the of the land and the changing environment and the songs and the meaning and the generosity. All of that right is tied up into this work and it doesn't have to be just something you make. You know it can be something you do and how you share it and and your own spirit of generosity Kinda Rossi and what. First People's fun we call a community spirit It's about that collective right in so almost every time I am that we acknowledge. One of these folks They don't want the spotlight on them. They they wanNA bring their whole families and the people who help them gather and people who've taught them and the people that they've shared that work with Jennifer Eastern was She's passed unfortunately in the last few years but she was a Wonderful Humble woman who had come into money and her life she was not native. But you wouldn't know that She wanted to to to help native people and she put some money in In a fund and you know twenty years ago or so First those people fund hired Laurie. Portier who's Oglala and and Laurie has really grown this family into a very artist. Centred centered a network extended family of people. Like the folks. You're having on your show. Who are really trying to walk the talk and I would encourage all people on the call to go to first people's Fund Dot Org and check out the work doc Because it's all of our work and we're sensitive about right the people that were not able to honor because resources are limited. And and you know we don't have enough money to to to acknowledge more than enough. You know four or five or maybe six and a good year and so oh there's lots and lots and lots of many Deserving culture bearers if you will not just artists but people who are living the culture sure and they deserve a lot of recognition to and. Maybe you'll recognize somebody you can call in. There's no problem with that one. Eight hundred nine six two eight. Four eight is a number and David. Why is it important to support our artists? You know I think there's lots lots of There's lots of research you know. I I think we as people right. We're very Indigenous people we're all artists. We're all scientists right. Our ancestors were amazing. phenomena logical observers of the land and the weather and the stars and history and patterns and to hear Korean talk about you know how she goes about the basket get making process. You hear the science and you hear the math and you hear the values right so we as native people are very holistic and art helps us become better thinkers we can innovate. We cannot just learn a wonderful practice and technique sneak but it changes our mind and our brains right in ways where really we can become Full full indigenous people oh and full sovereign individuals and take that individual sovereignty and make it a tribal sovereignty and a nation sovereignty. Not We're all creating at our maximum right. We're fulfilled individually and as the community spirit honorees or showing us. We're giving back right. We're helping others find their potential and learn learn from our ways but in order to grow into to flourish today and twenty the twenty indeed in you know there are those elements to a lot of these artists and through the years. And I've heard many stories about your community spirit awards in a lot of times. It's about people who are passing on their knowledge. And that's something I know. Corinne does especially with the basket weaving So much to celebrate. We're celebrating artists today. We're celebrating culture celebrating community anything you WANNA share. Dial in one eight hundred nine six two eight for eight is the number right now. We're going to go to warm springs Oregon joining us today from. KWS's studio is a clue. Miot Roberta Roberta Joy Kirk and she is a bead worker to also enrolled in the confederated tribes warm springs and she is d our pleasure to have her here. Welcome Roberta hurt. Thank you good morning. Good Day to you and you know what. Congratulations as well and How do you feel about this kind of spotlight spotlight especially giving you a chance to even talk about your philosophy on art or why community matters? Go ahead while I was really Ah Humbled and honored to even be nominated for this award. The.

David Gone Corinne Roberta Roberta Joy Kirk California India Indian Basket stewart Laurie Alaska Oregon Fund Dot Org Kinda Rossi KWS Jennifer Eastern Portier Sioux
"warm springs oregon" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

14:39 min | 2 years ago

"warm springs oregon" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Here with us a traditional additional basket weaver and enroll member of the little river band of Pomo Indians. Corinne thank you for being here with us and you're telling us about your process anything else you WANNA say about these materials or even just the ability To still go out and collect or maybe there's challenges go ahead There are absolutely challenges to Being able to harvest a lot of our traditional harvesting sites are now on private property. So there's the challenge is getting permission to harvest in a place that you have been harvesting forever you know And then another challenge is climate change the materials every material has a window of harvest time. And and when you're an environmental stewart especially a basket weaver or food gatherer you. You don't really go by the seasons. Because as they shift. They've always shifted a little bit but right now what. I'm have been noticing for the last few years. Is that the window of time that basket materials are ready has been shrinking. We'll talk about Dogwood really quick because I'm actually right in the harvest season for her And you can you really should only harvest dogwood when it's dormant so I mean the coldest times of the year when all I believe have fallen off. And there's a few reasons they're fine fibers and the leaves that break off and keep you issues like fiberglass but it's also better for the plant to you do it when it's dormant so that the next year's growth is very very good so it's literally snowing here today it does not snow here usually So so it is cold but when I went out to check on my dog would it already has new leaves new little but coming out and this isn't the first year her that it's happened but it's the first time that it has been before the middle of December so The the window the amount of the flooding that we've been getting has actually been making it pretty hard to get to the Sedgwick beds So it's still flooding in our harvest time I'm which means we. You can't go diving for basket routes So it's been it's challenged there are there are challenges to you where we can harvest A lot of Public Parks That we have harvested in forever are using between herbicides and pesticides to control the weeds that we actually need for certain foods and things. So there's there's there's quite a few challenges and Part of what I do is working in community to try and get them to see that these these things are being utilized they need to be utilized. They don't need to be poisoned and that we need to have access. There's a great Entity called the California India Indian Basket Weavers Association and they've actually been working with the park service and helping the people at the park service understand what the rights rights of native people are harvest in those sites. So it's pretty pretty interesting stuff and it's always shifting And I I have to. I say in the last two or three years. I've actually been contacted by by more people in the last three years giving permission to harvest list on their site without me having to go out and ask so. That's really exciting for me. And it's important that you tell your story and sometimes times when you are sharing even how culturally relevant some of these species are sometimes things change. It's great even hear that people are reaching out to you saying when you're welcome come in come into where your people have always been no great to hear that You know what I want to go ahead and turn to Anchorage Alaska To say hello to David Gone. He is a member of the first peoples on board. And David is Rosebud Sioux. David thank you for being with us. Welcome good morning. It's just so inspiring to To hear Korean story. She's a great teacher isn't she. She is in. I can only imagine how hard it was to bring it down to the number of people that you did but when you do get to that number We do get to hear and learn about communities and and it really excites me. 'cause we get to learn through an artistic way and so David Tell us more about this award how it came to be in. Just what exactly you're looking for in in maybe even why Corinne insist this. Thanks and thank you for for having Korean and her other honorees on on the show. You know there. There are so many people like like these folks in our communities. Right and it's it's not the native way to to give give awards In fact I remember one of our honorees a few years ago. didn't didn't really get it until you know until until we had Really like a mini ceremony in a mini kind of performance. And I hate to say many because you know it wasn't but it was it's different. It's not just a plaque. And it's not just you know something you put on Awa- This is acknowledgement for the amazing work work. The art is life right Korean story is these. Baskets aren't just aren't just willow branches or spruce root sitting on the shelf. Right there's there's the gathering and there's the understanding of the of the land and the changing environment and the songs and the meaning and the generosity. All of that right is tied up into this work and it doesn't have to be just something you make. You know it can be something you do and how you share it and and your own spirit of generosity Kinda Rossi and what. First People's fun we call a community spirit It's about that collective right in so almost every time I am that we acknowledge. One of these folks They don't want the spotlight on them. They they wanNA bring their whole families and the people who help them gather and people who've taught them and the people that they've shared that work with Jennifer Eastern was She's passed unfortunately in the last few years but she was a Wonderful Humble woman who had come into money and her life she was not native. But you wouldn't know that She wanted to to to help native people and she put some money in In a fund and you know twenty years ago or so First those people fund hired Laurie. Portier who's Oglala and and Laurie has really grown this family into a very artist. Centred centered a network extended family of people. Like the folks. You're having on your show. Who are really trying to walk the talk and I would encourage all people on the call to go to first people's Fund Dot Org and check out the work doc Because it's all of our work and we're sensitive about right the people that were not able to honor because resources are limited. And and you know we don't have enough money to to to acknowledge more than enough. You know four or five or maybe six and a good year and so oh there's lots and lots and lots of many Deserving culture bearers if you will not just artists but people who are living the culture sure and they deserve a lot of recognition to and. Maybe you'll recognize somebody you can call in. There's no problem with that one. Eight hundred nine six two eight. Four eight is a number and David. Why is it important to support our artists? You know I think there's lots lots of There's lots of research you know. I I think we as people right. We're very Indigenous people we're all artists. We're all scientists right. Our ancestors were amazing. phenomena logical observers of the land and the weather and the stars and history and patterns and to hear Korean talk about you know how she goes about the basket get making process. You hear the science and you hear the math and you hear the values right so we as native people are very holistic and art helps us become better thinkers we can innovate. We cannot just learn a wonderful practice and technique sneak but it changes our mind and our brains right in ways where really we can become Full full indigenous people oh and full sovereign individuals and take that individual sovereignty and make it a tribal sovereignty and a nation sovereignty. Not We're all creating at our maximum right. We're fulfilled individually and as the community spirit honorees or showing us. We're giving back right. We're helping others find their potential and learn learn from our ways but in order to grow into to flourish today and twenty the twenty indeed in you know there are those elements to a lot of these artists and through the years. And I've heard many stories about your community spirit awards in a lot of times. It's about people who are passing on their knowledge. And that's something I know. Corinne does especially with the basket weaving So much to celebrate. We're celebrating artists today. We're celebrating culture celebrating community anything you WANNA share. Dial in one eight hundred nine six two eight for eight is the number right now. We're going to go to warm springs Oregon joining us today from. KWS's studio is a clue. Miot Roberta Roberta Joy Kirk and she is a bead worker to also enrolled in the confederated tribes warm springs and she is d our pleasure to have her here. Welcome Roberta hurt. Thank you good morning. Good Day to you and you know what. Congratulations as well and How do you feel about this kind of spotlight spotlight especially giving you a chance to even talk about your philosophy on art or why community matters? Go ahead while I was really Ah Humbled and honored to even be nominated for this award. The.

David Gone Corinne Roberta Roberta Joy Kirk California India Indian Basket stewart Laurie Alaska Oregon Fund Dot Org Kinda Rossi KWS Jennifer Eastern Portier Sioux
"warm springs oregon" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"warm springs oregon" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Failed water system serves more than thirteen hundred homes a daycare to schools home for seniors and a medical clinic Danny Martinez the emergency manager for the confederated tribes of Warm Springs fronts the water distribution center we give out about three thousand and thirty five hundred gallons of water every day Martinez says donations of supplies like paper plates bleach wipes and waterless toilets poured in from all over the Pacific Northwest at first but you know they they're all hoping that it's resolved today someone I. calling back to kind of posted by in after thirty days you mean you still owe now water dance now the boil water notices are into a third month the system has been on the brink for years every burst pipe is a contamination risk to the whole system the list of worries goes on firefighters can't count on hydrants the sprinkler system the call in system their conditioning systems the restrooms the torrents everything is affected by lack of water Martinez joins two teenage volunteers were taking a break from hauling jugs around to chase a butterfly fifteen year old Cajun rain Scott says butterflies are a good sign what is my speaking coming around room that's good that's good you know that means that means change and what would you normally be doing with your summer occasion rain hiring phone with my friends in skateboarding but I can't do that now because I'm helping the community and that's more important the C. warning so I rather be doing this tribal and federal officials say repairs under way now could potentially restore drinking water by the end of the month but that deadline has already been extended several times for NPR news I'm Emily Cureton in Warm Springs Oregon and this is morning edition from NPR news I'm David green and I made to Martin over to John McConnell now and keep you we do use the time comes up on seven fifty latest issue reported as C. H. P. is in cinema county Santa Rosa highway twelve west now before wanna wanna crash might be in the middle lane and in Marin county in one one south north of Sir Francis Drake crash cars there that you're there blocking anything though and.

Danny Martinez Warm Springs Pacific Northwest Scott Emily Cureton Warm Springs Oregon David green Martin John McConnell C. H. P. Marin county NPR Sir Francis Drake thirty five hundred gallons fifteen year thirty days
"warm springs oregon" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"warm springs oregon" Discussed on KCRW

"Good so you just want ice yeah right right yeah the failed water system serves more than thirteen hundred homes a daycare to schools home for seniors and a medical clinic Danny Martinez the emergency manager for the confederated tribes of Warm Springs runs the water distribution center we give out about three thousand and thirty five hundred gallons of water every day Martinez says donations of supplies like paper plates bleach wipes and waterless toilets poured in from all over the Pacific Northwest at first but you know they they're all hoping that it's resolved today so when I call him back there kind of puzzled by it after thirty days you mean you still now water dance now the boil water notices are into a third month the system has been on the brink for years every burst pipe is a contamination risk to the whole system the list of worries goes on firefighters can't count on hydrants the sprinkler system the call in system their conditioning systems the restrooms the torrents everything is affected by lack of water Martinez joins two teenage volunteers who are taking a break from hauling jugs around to chase a butterfly fifteen year old Cajun rain Scott says butterflies are a good sign water place you can coming around room that's good that's good you know that means that means change and what would you normally be doing with your summer Cajun rain having fun with my friends in skateboarding but I can't do that now because I'm helping the community and that's one four in the seat warning so are the redoing this tribal and federal officials say repairs under way now could potentially restore drinking water by the end of the month but that deadline has already been extended several times for NPR news I'm Emily Cureton in Warm Springs Oregon.

Danny Martinez Warm Springs Pacific Northwest Scott Emily Cureton Warm Springs Oregon NPR thirty five hundred gallons fifteen year thirty days
"warm springs oregon" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"warm springs oregon" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The emergency manager for the confederated tribes of Warm Springs funds the water distribution center we give out about three thousand to thirty five hundred gallons of water every day Martinez says donations of supplies like paper plates bleach wipes and waterless toilets poured in from all over the Pacific Northwest at first but you know they they're all hoping that it's resolved today so when I call him back to kind of puzzled by it after thirty days you mean you still now water dance now the boil water notices are into a third month the system has been on the brink for years every burst pipe is a contamination risk to the whole system the list of worries goes on firefighters can't count on hydrants the sprinkler system the coolant systems air conditioning systems the restrooms the torrents everything is affected by lack of water Martinez joins two teenage volunteers who are taking a break from hauling jugs around to chase a butterfly fifteen year old Cajun rain Scott says butterflies are a good sign why is he coming around room that's good that's good you know that means that means change and what would you normally be doing with your summer Cajun rain having fun with my friends in skateboarding but I can't do that now because I'm helping the community and that's one four in the same warning so I rather be doing this tribal and federal officials say repairs under way now could potentially restore drinking water by the end of the month but that deadline has already been extended several times for NPR news I'm Emily Cureton in Warm Springs Oregon this is morning edition from NPR news I'm David green and I made tomorrow stay tuned for the California reports Saul Gonzalez has that reporting from Los Angeles at five fifty one AM Joe McConnell now reporting bay area traffic.

Warm Springs Martinez Pacific Northwest Scott Emily Cureton Warm Springs Oregon David green California Saul Gonzalez Los Angeles Joe McConnell NPR thirty five hundred gallons fifteen year thirty days
"warm springs oregon" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"warm springs oregon" Discussed on KCRW

"For seniors and a medical clinic Danny Martinez the emergency manager for the confederated tribes of Warm Springs fronts the water distribution center we give out about three thousand to thirty five hundred gallons of water every day Martinez says donations of supplies like paper plates bleach wipes and waterless toilets poured in from all over the Pacific Northwest at first but you know they they're all hoping that it's resolved today so when I call him back to kind of posted by in after thirty days you mean you still now water dance now the boil water notices are into a third month the system has been on the brink for years every burst pipe is a contamination risk to the whole system the list of worries goes on firefighters can't count on hydrants the sprinkler system the call in system their conditioning systems the restrooms the torrents everything is affected by lack of water Martinez joins two teenage volunteers who are taking a break from hauling jugs around to chase a butterfly fifteen year old Cajun rain Scott says butterflies are a good sign what a place you can coming around ream that's good that's good you know that means that means change and what would you normally be doing with your summer Cajun rain having fun with my friends in skateboarding but I can't do that now because I'm helping the community and that's one four in the C. warning so I rather be doing this tribal and federal officials say repairs under way now could potentially restore drinking water by the end of the month but that deadline has already been extended several times for NPR news I'm Emily Cureton in Warm Springs Oregon.

Danny Martinez Warm Springs Pacific Northwest Scott Emily Cureton Warm Springs Oregon NPR thirty five hundred gallons fifteen year thirty days
"warm springs oregon" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"warm springs oregon" Discussed on KCRW

"Times for NPR news I'm Emily Cureton in Warm Springs Oregon and this is morning edition from NPR news I'm David green and I'm Rachel Martin and.

Emily Cureton Warm Springs Oregon David green Rachel Martin NPR