33 Burst results for "Warhol"

Prosecutor: Husband of missing wife bought cleaning supplies

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | Last month

Prosecutor: Husband of missing wife bought cleaning supplies

"Prosecutors have detailed suspicious activities by the husband of a missing woman. Brian Walsh of cohasset Massachusetts was arraigned Monday in Quincy and held on half a $1 million bond on a charge of misleading investigators. His wife, Anna, a mother of three, was last seen January 1st when she was purportedly traveling to Washington, D.C., for her job at a real estate company, prosecutors say Walsh attempted to delay investigators when he failed to tell them about his visit to a Home Depot, captured on surveillance video on January 2nd when he bought $450 worth of mops, buckets, tarps, tape, and other items, Walsh's cell phone data shows he traveled to the areas of Brockton and abington while he was supposed to be on home confinement, awaiting sentencing on a federal fraud case involving the sale of fake Andy Warhol paintings, a broken knife, and blood was also found in the basement of the couple's home. I'm Jennifer King

Washington, D.C. Brian Walsh Cohasset Walsh Quincy Massachusetts Anna Home Depot Brockton Abington Andy Warhol Jennifer King
"warhol" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

03:13 min | 3 months ago

"warhol" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"Going back to, as you mentioned, obviously being so careful of the transparency and talking about who came from where does that then with the model now obviously the documentary is complete, is this model then still within your own catalog or something you could offer other customers or is it then stolen by Netflix or by Warhol state? Yeah, so the model itself and every model that our users generate is always controlled by them. So we think the ownership of the model, the underlying data, or the underlying architecture of the model is always proprietary to us because we built it from scratch. But the data that was created or curated for creating the model itself and the model and the derivatives of the model are belonged to they always want to our customer in this case in this case Netflix and the producer and director of the series. Although, from what you said about the technical innovations that came from it's not exactly walking away. Empty handed at the end of that. Oh, absolutely not. Yeah. So it's actually really encouraging that we're able to break down barriers of entry to AI voices. And there's a lot of motivation from how the work that opioid AI, especially stable diffusion have done to kind of make this technology accessible to more and more people. And a huge barrier of entry with voices accumulating voice data, it's very, very difficult to actually collect voice data properly. And for people who do like voice erect, I don't know how many people have during the pandemic have had to make virtual presentations where they have to do their own voiceovers. And they realize they shut down they're like awkward because they just like ten minutes long. I'll be done in ten minutes and then they start recording and they make a mistake on every other line. So even like collecting data itself is a challenge. Wow. Impressive nonetheless and yeah, definitely we'll be keen to see what other products you guys are working on and just tell everyone where they can find out more about the work that you and resemble our doing right now. Yeah, so you can always go to resemble AI. You can sign up for free. You can build your own voice. Type in some text, hear how you sound or how your artificial play sounds. There is a bunch of marketplace voices that are available to our users. And there's a bunch of functionality that we're keep rolling out to more and more audiences. So tech like speech to speech, which we're still slowly rolling out to our entire user base localize, which transforms your voice into different languages. So it sounds just like you, but speaking Mandarin or Japanese, et cetera. You can do all of that stuff just by going to resemble AI..

Netflix Warhol
"warhol" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

03:26 min | 3 months ago

"warhol" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"And also the AI that was performing Andy's choice as well. So very upfront at the very beginning of every episode. It was a 6 part documentary docuseries and beginning of every episode, the screen would pop up saying this is the voice of Andy Warhol modeled by resembling the eye. At the end of every episode, a very similar screen able to pop up, et cetera. So a lot of attention was given to transparency and from our perspective a lot of our attention is always given to consent. While we're creating content, it's quite impressive. I did watch the documentary. I was I did a notice just how close you were able to get the voice, but I know that one of the hallmarks is that they say creating a whole model from relatively small amount of data was did this sort of strain the limits of the tech or did you have to come up with new technical functions to be able to work with such a limited amount or I assume having a bill or when they're helped make things a little bit easier for this particular project. Yeah, yeah. So we have an internal joke at resemble where we say that Andy Warhol has innovated more with synthetic content than the world knows. So we published papers on the findings and the research that we've done on creating vocalizations that aren't producible by text speech engines and how do we do that? How do we control expressive content to a very high degree in terms of having to put just this text with text based predictions and accompanied by perhaps metadata that's like voice you might have seen like techniques that have popped up within. Computer vision like very, very recently we're talking like two weeks ago I think OpenAI introduced something called out painting, which is essentially you take an image and then you can like paint outside of the image. So we have somewhat like very similar techniques we're able to give it some context and then let it predict what the next outcome should be. So quite a bit goes into transferring over the style and the prosody and obviously like you mentioned Bill Irwin helps quite a bit. And so getting a human loop, we don't want to take that out of the equation altogether, getting into a performance, something like this. I wasn't very close to anyone, although I guess I wanted to be. And then, you know, getting Andy's AI voice to kind of carry over the pauses and the cadence and the emphasis on certain syllables. I wasn't very close to anyone, although I guess I wanted to be. So human loop is equally important. Piecing it all together. Yeah, it's so the final result is I guess a blend then of the model and the impression I guess by the actor. Yeah, so majority of the docu series was created with just the text feature engine. So it performs really well. It's the lines that are particularly important where the director and the producer want to get a very particular message out to the audience is where bill's voice comes in and he directs the AI voice in a very particular, better for those passages..

Andy Warhol Andy Bill Irwin bill
"warhol" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

03:25 min | 3 months ago

"warhol" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"Luckily, you know, the people who have been doing artwork and et cetera and even the language models, what you've noticed is like models have been able to take less and less data and kind of use this technique called transfer learning. And it's approximate a lot better to what's not in the dataset. And kind of make these predictions a lot better. So luckily at that time, we had our models working for they were fairly good with low amounts of data, but this was still extremely challenging to get right. So that's essentially what we took and we created his voice from there. And then we realized it wasn't just when we started creating content. Rather, the producers started creating content what they would say is just like, I think N was mentioning earlier. It's like when you do something with Dolly or with mid journey, et cetera, you type a prompt and then it's like you think what she said, you hit gold when it's like the right image, right? With audio, it's slightly different. I can make someone sound like Eric, but how do I make someone perform like Eric? In this case, how do I get someone to sound like Andy that's one thing, but how do I get them to perform like Andy? So one of our goals that resemble is to always allow a lot of creative freedom. So they shouldn't be thinking about how the voice is being created, but rather the type of content that they're trying to create. So from the art perspective, you're not worried too much about how the art is being drawn, you're worried about I want the hair to look like this. I want it like 8 K or whatever. And I want the brute blue scarf for whatever. So here's a little clip of three versions of one particular line. And this is just three out of many that they're created with subtle differences. I wasn't very close to anyone, although I guess I wanted to be, I wasn't very close to anyone, although I guess I wanted to be, I wasn't very close to anyone, although I guess I wanted to be. So like three different versions of his voice and three performances of his voice rather. And you can see there's very subtle differences between them. And essentially what you want to do is you want to we want to give freedom to our users to craft this content, how they imagine it should be performed. And was this sorry, so is this that then you had to get the approval of the producer director and presumably the Andy Warhol estate? Yeah, so jumping to that, let's get to it before we are going backwards rather. Before we took on the project, one thing that we're absolutely it's critical is that we do have consent from all the parties. In this case, we had consent from the Andy Warhol foundation Netflix, the director of producer on screen. And what was really cool is that they made sure that it was very obvious that this was created with AI and also accrediting who used some of his performances that we modeled his voice and his performance over to Eddie's and his voice. So giving credit to the human that was performing as well..

Eric Andy Dolly Andy Warhol foundation Netflix AI Eddie
"warhol" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:13 min | 4 months ago

"warhol" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Sent a message to me that they are leaning towards this not being a fair use. I will point out the Warhol foundation to the extent I have this right at this point. Would have to run the table on the other three to get there. It's a very challenging case. Both sides say the potential stakes here are enormous. Not just on the art world, but on publishing on movies, and so on. Are they exaggerating or do you agree with that? Oh, absolutely. This is going to be one of the most significant decisions with respect to secondary works of all time Anglo Saxon law. At issue is control of the original work by the artist for the original work. And to the extent that this is held to be not a fair use. I think the critics are correct that that will mean that the original artist have much more control over their works. The question is whether or not the next step in that argument is correct. Does giving the original artist more control over the work inhibit future creativity and as we heard in the oral argument, there was a lot of discussion of licensing, doesn't the right to license these original works to make changes allow you to still engage in level creativity. This was not said in court, but look, you had very wealthy entities involved here. You had Vanity Fair, Andy Warhol, they clearly had the wherewithal to license the photograph again from Lynn goldsmith in order to do these 16 Colorado silk screens. But they deliberately chose not to. It strikes me that ling goldsmith was entitled to some benefit for her creativity in the first place, which she was being deprived of. So yes, there is going to be a change in the bargaining power amongst artists as to secondary uses of original works. Whether or not it stops creativity. I just don't think so. Thanks so much, Terry. That's intellectual property litigator Terrence Ross, a partner at cat and Newton rosenman. And that's it for

Warhol foundation Lynn goldsmith ling goldsmith Vanity Fair Andy Warhol Colorado Terrence Ross Terry Newton rosenman
"warhol" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

01:45 min | 9 months ago

"warhol" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Andy Warhol's shot sage blue Maryland becomes the most expensive work by a U.S. artist sold at auction. By The Associated Press, New York. Andy Warhol's shot sage blue Maryland sold for a cool $195 million on Monday, making the iconic portrait of Marilyn Monroe, the most expensive work by a U.S. artist, ever sold at auction. The 1964 silk screen image shows Monroe and vibrant close up. Hair yellow, eyeshadow blue and lips red on a rich blue background. It's almost the most expensive piece from the 20th century ever auctioned, according to Christie's auction house in New York, where the sale took place. The Warhol sale unseated the previous record holder and another modern master, Jean-Michel Basquiat, whose 1982 painting untitled of a skull like face sold for a record 110 and a half $1 million at Sotheby's in 2017. Christie's said an unnamed buyer made the purchase Monday night. When the auction was announced earlier this year, they estimated it could go for as much as $200 million. It's an amazing price, said Alex rotter, chairman of Christie's 20th and 21st century arts department. Let it sink in. It's quite something. This is where we wanted to be clearly, said Guillaume ceruti, CEO of Christie's. It proves we are in a very resilient art market. The proceeds of the sale will go to the Thomas and Doris ammon foundation Zürich, which put the painting up for auction, the foundation aims to help children with healthcare and educational programs. Warhol created more than one image of Monroe, this particular painting has been exhibited in museums around the world..

Andy Warhol Maryland Michel Basquiat Christie U.S. Marilyn Monroe The Associated Press New York Alex rotter Christie's 20th and 21st centu Sotheby Guillaume ceruti Christie's Jean Thomas and Doris ammon foundat foundation aims to help childr Warhol
Andy Warhol's 'Marilyn' sells for $195 million, setting record for American art

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 9 months ago

Andy Warhol's 'Marilyn' sells for $195 million, setting record for American art

"I I I I know know know know I I I I kind kind kind kind of of of of painting painting painting painting has has has has set set set set a a a a record record record record for for for for the the the the most most most most expensive expensive expensive expensive piece piece piece piece of of of of art art art art by by by by an an an an American American American American ever ever ever ever sold sold sold sold at at at at auction auction auction auction it's it's it's it's a a a a piece piece piece piece of of of of artwork artwork artwork artwork you you you you have have have have probably probably probably probably seen seen seen seen many many many many times times times times before before before before Andy Andy Andy Andy Warhol's Warhol's Warhol's Warhol's portrait portrait portrait portrait of of of of Marilyn Marilyn Marilyn Marilyn Monroe Monroe Monroe Monroe the the the the nineteen nineteen nineteen nineteen sixty sixty sixty sixty four four four four so so so so screen screen screen screen features features features features the the the the actress actress actress actress in in in in a a a a vibrant vibrant vibrant vibrant close close close close up up up up yellow yellow yellow yellow hair hair hair hair blue blue blue blue eye eye eye eye shadow shadow shadow shadow ruby ruby ruby ruby red red red red lipstick lipstick lipstick lipstick on on on on a a a a blue blue blue blue background background background background yeah yeah yeah yeah that that that that one one one one well well well well it's it's it's it's officially officially officially officially known known known known as as as as shot shot shot shot sage sage sage sage blue blue blue blue marlin marlin marlin marlin and and and and it it it it has has has has sold sold sold sold four four four four hundred hundred hundred hundred and and and and ninety ninety ninety ninety five five five five million million million million dollars dollars dollars dollars Christie's Christie's Christie's Christie's of of of of New New New New York York York York says says says says not not not not only only only only is is is is it it it it the the the the most most most most expensive expensive expensive expensive piece piece piece piece done done done done by by by by an an an an American American American American artist artist artist artist ever ever ever ever sold sold sold sold it it it it is is is is also also also also the the the the most most most most expensive expensive expensive expensive piece piece piece piece from from from from the the the the twentieth twentieth twentieth twentieth century century century century ever ever ever ever auctioned auctioned auctioned auctioned off off off off the the the the buyer buyer buyer buyer was was was was not not not not identified identified identified identified I'm I'm I'm I'm Oscar Oscar Oscar Oscar wells wells wells wells Gabriel Gabriel Gabriel Gabriel

Times Times Times Times Andy Andy Andy Andy Warhol Warhol Marilyn Marilyn Marilyn Marily Ruby Ruby Christie's Christie's Christie New New New New York York York Christie Oscar Oscar Oscar Oscar Gabriel Gabriel Gabriel Gabrie
"warhol" Discussed on What Bitcoin Did

What Bitcoin Did

02:36 min | 10 months ago

"warhol" Discussed on What Bitcoin Did

"BlockFi dot com which is BL O CK FI dot com. I think the interesting point that you said on that is like, if I know you're a Bitcoin, I understand you. And it can be differences. Look, I'm certainly a little bit more on the left than Bitcoin, but at the same time, we know there's certain principles that you hold. But I think the interesting thing about that is not just that you hold Bitcoin. You've done the work to understand time preference that you've done the work to understand the economy. And what's been really interesting is this kind of exit from the system that people like you talking about. There's big pushes to move to homeschooling. There's big pushes to change. With off the shelf, open-source technology, by the way. Michael say this has been providing some of that as well. I'm not saying it's a common bears website. But there is this push and pull between decentralization and centralization and rather than sometimes maybe fighting people on the big stage, the best thing is to set up these smaller communities and help people and let them understand. What we're learning is that in the age of Warhol's 15 minutes of fame for everybody, the biggest audience is not advantageous anymore. It doesn't bring you riches, it doesn't give you bring you wealth or health or any of that. It makes you really a target if anything. And this is the whole fallacy of social media. We're still stuck in this old paradigm where you have to have the number one ratings to be the best to be the king of everything. Those days are just over. I mean, everything has been bifurcated, split. There's too many channels of everything. So what becomes valuable back to networks is your network. So for 15 years, I've been building my own network, which we call git mo nation, which is everyone who listens to or belongs in one way to the no agenda show podcast. And this network we've facilitated that with things like our own Mastodon server with a complete open-sourcing of the in fact, we don't even call our listeners listeners, we call them producers, and they actually do produce. So we have thousands of people with expertise in one particular area, feeding that back to us. And they buy themselves start to self organize into meetups, even set up a website, no agenda to meet ups dot com. Every day around the world, there's at least a group of 8, but sometimes 80 who are getting together and it's completely separate cultures, sexualities, ages, genders, everything, but they.

Warhol Michael
"warhol" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

04:50 min | 1 year ago

"warhol" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"That wasn't the core of Basquiat and Warhol's relationship. And Anthony of course, one of the things about this moment is, of course, now they're both icons of contemporary art, icons of the last 50 years of art. But at that time, Warhol was sort of almost a maverick character he wasn't being taken terribly seriously, Basquiat was on the app. You know, he was fated. He was in celebrated group shows. He may not have had a massive museum presence, but he was certainly the artist who was perceived as having the edge of the two. So there's a curious dynamic in that too, isn't there? Yeah, it's one of the central questions of the play as why are you doing this? And they ask it of each other. And they both have different motives at the beginning. In the case of Warhol, yeah, museums were no longer buying his work as prices were in decline, which is a pretty amazing to think now that there was a period where his reputation was going down, but that was the case. And Basquiat was this hot new thing. And he was on the cover of The New York Times Magazine and everybody wanted a piece of him because he was the new hot thing. And yet he was almost almost in danger of being taken like a fad and it might just like a soap bubble disappear. So there was they shared an agent and his name was Bruno bishop burger. And he saw an opportunity for both of them that Basquiat could align his name with the most famous artist in the world that would be good for him and probably give him longevity as an artist. And Andy could tap into youth energy and be hip again. And so they both had initial kind of prurient mode of perhaps to get to embark on this collaboration. But what history tells us and what I've tried to do in the play is show that a deep love form between these two very different people. Khloe, can you tell us something about how you work with the actors who are working with people who once existed? You've done it before with one night in Miami. Obviously, the temptation for those actors would be always to look at everything they can possibly find. What do you think do you encourage that to what extent do you leave them to their own devices? A combination of both. I would say that Paul Bettany, who plays Andy magnificent and Jeremy's magnificent in my humble opinion because they do two things that I think are very important. They open with the character as we think we know them, they lead us into the door of our world, then they become this mythical thing, this thing that is ours that is Antony's. And then they close the shop and come out through the door back with what might be perceived as a key characteristic. So I think for me often it is whenever I do people who have lived before, it is do not do an impression. Give me a hint.

Basquiat Warhol Bruno bishop burger Anthony The New York Times Magazine Khloe Andy magnificent Andy Paul Bettany Miami Jeremy Antony
"warhol" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

05:40 min | 1 year ago

"warhol" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Welcome to the week in art I am Ben Luke this week, Warhol and Basquiat on the stage in London, faith ringgold at the new museum in New York and Betty Tsar recreates a mural in Los Angeles. The collaboration and new play dramatizing the relationship between Andy Warhol and Jean-Michel Basquiat and the period in which they worked together on a group of paintings has opened at the young Vic theater in London. I talked to the playwright Anthony mccartan, and the director Kwame koyama. As a faith ringgold retrospective opens at the new museum in New York, I talked to massimiliano Gianni, the exhibition's curator. And at the freeze art fair in Los Angeles, Helen stylist talks to Julie Roberts, the cofounder of LA gallery, Robert's project, about a mural by Betty Tsar, created and quickly destroyed in 1983 and being repainted for the fair. Before that, the new series of our sister podcast are brushed with continues on the podcast I talked to leading artists in depth about the influences and cultural experiences that shape their life and work. The latest episode is a brush with Alison Katz, the Canadian painter. Do subscribe wherever you get your podcasts to hear that and to explore the catalog of more than 30 conversations. And do also subscribe to the weekend art and give us a rating or review on Apple podcasts. It helps others to find us. Now, a new play about Andy Warhol and Jean-Michel Basquiat opened this week at the young Vic theater in London, starring Paul Bettany as Warhol and Jeremy Pope as Basquiat, the collaboration was written by Anthony mccarten, the man behind the biographical films, the theory of everything about the theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking and the two popes about Pope Benedict XVI and Pope Francis, and it's directed by the young Vic's artistic director Kwame koyama..

Betty Tsar Michel Basquiat Vic theater Ben Luke faith ringgold Anthony mccartan Kwame koyama Basquiat massimiliano Gianni Helen stylist LA gallery Andy Warhol Warhol London new museum Los Angeles New York Julie Roberts Jean Alison Katz
"warhol" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"warhol" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Church music. And in the world, the Brown I discovered beautiful classical music. Piano music show pad, the shit clarity shilling. Things like this were really new to me. And I was so curious about everything and the people were so sophisticated at Brown and it rises the road on the school of design. So I just had the world open up to me and just ways that had never been open to me before. You know what? I realized you were one of the few guests I've had who talks even faster than I do. I'm talking fast, but I'm loving it. I hope you understand it. I absolutely understand and I'm quite enjoying it. So you get to New York after graduating from Brown. And you'd always wanted to meet Andy Warhol and the people who make famous. And you not only got to meet them, you got to work at his magazine interview magazine. Yes. Which I should say, parenthetically, just filed for bankruptcy. In close, yeah. So when you were there and got to see all of the Warhol superstars and everything, what made the biggest impression on you in terms of your own life in terms of your own personal and professional identity, because you were, you know, you were in your early 20s, I imagine at the time, and it's a very formative period when you're still shaping who you are and figuring out who you want to be. And you're looking at all these people who kind of remade themselves who transform themselves into something else. I love that. I love the world. Now the people that I met through Warhol were the people that I always wanted to know. They were not bullying. They did not judge you. There was unconditional admiration if not love. People were free, people who made their choices, people were different, you know, some people, perhaps had better clothes than others, but everyone was noted for their own worth, their own gifts. And I think that's why I felt so good because I felt at home..

Brown Andy Warhol New York Warhol
Julia Fox Name Drops and Gushes Over Kanye in Interview Magazine

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:57 min | 1 year ago

Julia Fox Name Drops and Gushes Over Kanye in Interview Magazine

"Oh my God, I got my hands on the interview, magazine that Julia Fox is, oh my God, Julia Fox, Kanye's new girlfriend, girl, the moment, whatever you want to call her. The talk in this interview magazine is a very, you know, lady entitled fancy schmancy magazine. You know, Andy Warhol began and it's one of those magic. They normally get celebrities to interview celebrities. So it's like a double hand job interview. All these things are like that. How's the relationship with yay evolving? And fox goes, you know, I'm so used to being fucked all over in relationships. So I keep waiting for him to disappoint me because he makes very grandiose promises. And it's like, how could he ever pull it off with all the other things he has going on? But he always does. Last night was a testament to that. Would there be like 9 days where he always pulls it off? He's love bombing you, girl. She talked about another date where Kanye played the movie Zola for his friends and Julie was so touched to include Zola and our narrative. I can't take these people. And then she name dropped a lot of people who were at the house watching. Who was their last night? Oh, Dave Chappelle, Marilyn Manson, Naomi Campbell, the actor from the new Batman camera on Jack Donahue from Salem, Andrew Richardson from Richardson magazine, Richie Suzanne, all my friends came, Richie a sashimi with Marilyn Manson and they had a really nice heart to heart. Who the fuck? Who is Richie's Shazam? Who is Andrew Richardson? Who's Jack Donahue? I know Jack Donahue from Alec Baldwin's character and then show, but oh, all these people. Why do I need to know them? And by the way, who's inviting a rapist to dinner. Kanye's inviting Marilyn Manson to dinner? I'll have sweet. What a sweet birthday

Julia Fox Kanye Jack Donahue Zola Andy Warhol Andrew Richardson Marilyn Manson Richardson Magazine FOX Richie Suzanne Dave Chappelle Richie Naomi Campbell Julie Salem Alec Baldwin
How AJ's Mother Got Him Hooked on Gossip

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:09 min | 1 year ago

How AJ's Mother Got Him Hooked on Gossip

"When I was a little boy, my mother never read me children's books. She read me the gossip pages from the four dailies. We had delivered to our home. And as she licked her thing is through the pages of the New York Post, the daily news, the Long Island press, and newsday, she exposed me to a world that I knew I had to be a part of. Now, what could a little boy possibly have in common with Andy Warhol, Liza Minnelli, Tom Jones, or Cher? Well, apparently everything. To me, those big names in bold print who were always in the news weren't people as much as they were invitations into a world. I knew I had to live in, or at least visit from time to time. So before I bolted out of the house to play with my friends in the schoolyard, I would sit at the kitchen table with my mother as she read out loud the papers gossip columns to me. Cindy Adams Liz Smith, wrote a Barrett. I love to hear where movie star spent their summers. What films they were making, where they ate, and who they were in love with. And of course, some of the gossip artists would have just fallen flat. Had it not been for the comical side of my father who would sprinkle in some jokes now and then. You know, a simple mention from my mother about, say, Joe DiMaggio would turn into a detailed screed that my father would deliver from across the room. He'd say, he was the greatest ballplayer in the world, ruined by a Hollywood whore. And as soon as my mother took the side of mala Monroe, he digging deeper. Look, the guy goes to surprise his wife with roses on a movie set one day. He gets there. He gets there and sees 5000 people staring at her panties while they're blowing wind up her ass from under a subway grating for half an hour. And that was that, three weeks later, he filed for divorce, and he was never the same man. Is that true, man? Unfortunately, yes, on this set of the 7 year rich. Yeah, she had literally all right, my father would say. And everybody scratched it. Mickey Rooney, you will bring a Tony Curtis brandel Monty cliff uncle mill to even Ruby Rose is scratched that itch. It was my mother who made me crazy about gossip. Without her, there's no gossip column. There's no book. There's no podcast, no nothing. Who knows right?

Long Island Press Cindy Adams Liza Minnelli New York Post Tom Jones Andy Warhol Liz Smith Cher Mala Monroe Barrett Joe Dimaggio Hollywood Tony Curtis Brandel Monty Clif Mickey Rooney Ruby Rose
Jen Psaki Says Joe Biden's Africa Travel Ban Will 'Protect the American People'

Mark Levin

01:40 min | 1 year ago

Jen Psaki Says Joe Biden's Africa Travel Ban Will 'Protect the American People'

"Now the reporter dared to inquire cut 11 go President insisted that the travel ban on South Africa doesn't punish them and the neighboring countries But South Africa's leaders say it does how long does The White House envision that travel bans thing in place We will continue to assess that I would say that the objective here is not to punish It is to protect the American people How come when the objective was to protect the American people from the Wuhan chinavirus You couldn't say Warhol you couldn't say China You couldn't even say virus It's COVID-19 Excuse me COVID-19 COVID-19 What are you white supremacist that's COVID-19 COVID-19 yes COVID-19 Well what does that mean It doesn't matter It's COVID-19 Okay COVID-19 Trump says all right we're going to stop it at the source We're not going to racist You white supremacist You obviously hate Chinese and Asians and they used it all in their campaign ads It's like when he was trying to secure the country from certain terrorist states that were majority Muslim but the vast majority of the Muslim population in the world was unaffected by it It didn't matter You're anti Muslim I'm all look at that he's a racist Not only that he's an anti semite Oh yes he's an more progress made with Israel more progress made He's got kids who are Jewish He's got grandkids but he's the anti semite

South Africa Wuhan White House Warhol Donald Trump China Israel
"warhol" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"warhol" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Brilliant about Jose's exhibition is that it goes far beyond that and sort of makes these connections earlier on and where else career to point out. Yeah, this again, a career long expanse of engagement with Catholic themes. Certainly Catholicism is self is a very visual culture as well. So you can sort of sense that imprint in a lot of the works. It's certainly true in my case that when I learned about his Catholicism and then started looking at the work, it was amazing how much it just seemed to be hiding in plain sight. If you haven't tweaked it, and then you look back at the earth, you think, oh my God, how did I know this, you know? Right, right. And I mean considering the attention to Warhol, it's almost surprising that there is such an incredible large facet of underexplored aspect of his career, but Jose says it really beautiful beautifully talking about how this exhibition in some ways kind of humanizes him. I think it's fascinating to sometimes feel that the art world is maybe allergic to themes of religion and to maybe acknowledging that artists have these interior spiritual practices rituals, traditions within them. And I think this exhibition is just a really interesting way to learn something new about an artist that perhaps you feel like you might know, right? Everybody knows Warhol's image. He's imprinted, especially in the lives and minds of New Yorkers. And to actually take a rather deep dive on a grand scale through this theme, again, there's works from all decades of his career. That's why I think the title really works well this revelation, of course, it's in some ways a biblical reference, but also points to the surprise. I think a lot of our visitors will feel, especially when they walk into the first gallery and see this monumental Raphael Madonna. Well, thank you so much for telling us about this show. Thank you so much, Ben for having me. It's great to be on the podcast..

Jose Warhol Raphael Madonna Ben
"warhol" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"warhol" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Instead, we sort of start in the very beginning, looking at his immigrant roots, the impact of growing up in Pittsburgh's ruska delena as a Byzantine Catholic and then moves from there to themes about his images of women to themes about the kind of corporeality and sensorial nature of the Catholic body to the repetitions of the last supper to his approaches to renaissance masterpieces in his appropriation of these great works. And then one of the kind of challenging aspects of bringing it to the Brooklyn museum was recognizing that, of course, at the Warhol museum, you have four other floors of Andy Warhol to take in while you're experiencing revelation. So we actually added an entire new section to the Brooklyn museum show that is sort of a zoomed out perspective. We titled it material world what we worship. And in that section, we bring to bear some of these works about violence. Like I said, the orange disaster electric chair painting, there are examples of his race riot works from 1964, which, of course, our titled race riot, but actually show police brutality against peaceful protesters in the Birmingham children's march. And it also sits in the same space with a giant 80s painting about dripping dollar sign with Heinz tomato boxes, del Monte, peach boxes. This sort of balance acknowledgment of the reality of how power authority violence, these are all kind of the tenants of the United States just as much as the kind of poppy, if you will. Imagery of consumerist icons. And I think that collapses is quite fascinating. And these section actually begins with some of these fantastic black and white paintings of religious advertisements pulled from advertising pages. So we see a Jesus nightlight. We see kind of admonitions and warnings to heaven and hell are just one breath away. So I think it's fascinating that within that section, you have these announcements, advertising announcements of what's important of what's desired of what's hoped for in this consumer society..

ruska delena Brooklyn museum Warhol museum Heinz tomato Pittsburgh Andy Warhol Birmingham United States
"warhol" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"warhol" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Also love how when you see the work in person and it is unglazed, which is pretty fantastic. It exceeds the boundary of the canvas. You can see the silkscreen wrapping around the corners where it's sort of been stretched over the bar. And I think that also lends this sense of visual impact. This piece is just as much about these kind of juxtaposing horrors and kind of forgiveness as much as it is about that imprint of media, the power of media and that attention grabbing nature of these kinds of headlines. Because Warhol was so deadpan when he delivered interpretations of his own work, he would often just allow people to interpret them and say, wow, or you are so smart or whatever wasn't easy. You would always sort of resist over speaking about a lot of his work. I wondered though if he would have made that connection with the fact that racial violence, especially in the South America, is associated with religious worship. And so there's always been that direct correlation, but the KKK being the most obvious example. Do you think Warhol is drawing attention to that here? I think that's a really great point. I feel like one of the reasons why Warhol's work is so studied, so exhibited, so returned to is because of that kind of opening that Warhol left four interpretation, often red is kind of a superficiality, but I think also in some ways just allows for more interpretation, I think than an artist could ever give their own work. I think there's something really interesting about this exhibition where it's not so much about defining Warhol and sort of finding that smoking gun, if you will of these connections that he's making, but I think about specifically some of the other New York Post paintings that wartha hall has made in 1962, a much more painterly work called a boy for Meg just sort of announcing the birth of prince Margaret's son, Frank Sinatra profiled the weather..

Warhol KKK South America wartha hall New York Post prince Margaret Meg Frank Sinatra
"warhol" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

05:29 min | 1 year ago

"warhol" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"His spiritual side. The exhibition seeks to explore what it describes as the tension between Warhol's spiritual upbringing and his life as an out gay man. For this week's work of the week, I spoke to calm and. The curator of the Brooklyn exhibition about a painting in the show, New York Post judge blasts lynch from 1983. You can see an image of the work on our website. Click on the podcast tab and look for this episode. Carmen, you've chosen one of the sort of least let's say it iconic works of the Warhol cannon to talk about, and that makes it all the more intriguing. Tell us about it. Yes, that was definitely on purpose. I think Warhol as we know needs no introduction. And perhaps Andy Warhol revelation, the exhibition itself could be seen as a re introduction to perhaps a new underknown, undersea aspect, really career along engagement by Warhol of the themes of Catholicism. And so when I selected the piece, which is titled, you know, in that Andy Warhol way, New York Post, judge blast lynch, so that's the headline that you're seeing on this work. I was really intrigued by being able to kind of navigate multiple narratives at once, which I think the exhibition does really beautifully overall. The piece is small as well, right? It's kind of incredible in a show that has massive 25 foot long, last supper paintings and enormous room filling evocations of the Raphael Madonna to select something that's effectively the size of the New York Post. And it's actually cropped. So even smaller than the typical kind of newspaper front page, if you will. But it hits you immediately. It's in black and white, and I know we can dig into the headlines. But there are just layers to this piece. It's from 1983. So it's quite late in Warhol's career comparatively. But if it's in really well because the exhibition as a whole, really navigates between works from the 1950s, 60s, 70s, 80s, and includes lots of interesting ephemera from Warhol's life, even his childhood. So there's definitely a date range within the show and I think that this work is sort of like a period at the end of a sentence. Okay, so let's dig down into those headlines. So as you say, it's a cropped front page of the New York Post. Tell us about it. Yeah, so we're seeing in black and white, a silk screened version of the April 1st 1983 front page of the New York Post. So it is the 80s logo of the New York Post. It blares out at us. But truly, that headline catching effect comes from the headline itself that Warhol selected very specifically. So the headline that really reaches your eyes and is used as the title says judge blasts, quote lynch, judge blast lynch. Above it is another headline that reads race slay teenager gets 5 to 15 years with the image of said teenager, Gino boba. And of course, as Americans, perhaps, as people who know the United States history, it's quite easy to fill in the second half of the lynch mob that the judge is referring to. This case, if you will, is one that's very close to the history of Brooklyn and the people of Brooklyn. Gina bova was part of a group of young white teenagers who beat up a group of black men going home after their day's work as transit workers, and William Turks was murdered as a result of this beating..

Warhol New York Post Warhol cannon Andy Warhol Raphael Madonna lynch Brooklyn Carmen Gino boba Gina bova United States William Turks
"warhol" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"warhol" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Top stories on our website this week. Three sculptures looted from the ancient city of Palmyra and seized by Swiss customs officers in the Geneva Freeport have been returned to Syria's permanent mission at the United Nations. As Catherine hickley writes, the sculptures dating from the second or third century were smuggled into Switzerland in 2009 or 2010 before the outbreak of the Syrian war. Customs officers discovered them, along with one looted piece from Libya and 5 from Yemen during a routine check at the Freeport in 2013. They had been stored at the Musée d'art in disloyal in Geneva for safe keeping, but Syria claimed the three sculptures at a Geneva tribunal in 2020, and they were delivered to the Syrian ambassador to the United Nations on the 18th of November..

Swiss customs Geneva Freeport Catherine hickley Palmyra Syria United Nations Musée d Switzerland Libya Yemen Freeport Geneva
"warhol" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"warhol" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Time Andy Warhol was moving into film where he was pushing the boundaries of form and content Although he was a visual artist he was fascinated with the movies And he understood that movies were closer to other time based mediums like music That's film critic Amy taubin As a young actress she sat for a screen test that Warhol's factory He performed hundreds of these There was a 16 millimeter camera on a tripod and a stool to sit on And we'll look at your face and he adjusted to one light and the angle of the camera And he said look into the camera try not to move try not to blink and he went away Inside the camera was a single spool of film which took about three minutes to run When Warhol showed you the results he would slow the film down to silence speed 16 frames per second a third slower than life The experiment in duration that wahoo was part of and that The Velvet Underground was a huge part of before they got involved with Warhol even Was something that cut across there he is mediums After being introduced by filmmaker Barbara Rubin Warhol started managing The Velvet Underground in 1966 He offered a few suggestions such as adding a German model to the mix She called herself Nico and her voice was a striking a sharp appearance To all those parts developed underground became the factory's house band Warhol leveraged his fame to take them on the road with the exploding plastic inevitable a multimedia show featuring music and dancing strobe.

Warhol Amy taubin Andy Warhol Barbara Rubin Warhol wahoo Nico
Kate Bornstein: Still a Gender Outlaw (7/27/21)

LGBTQ&A

01:55 min | 1 year ago

Kate Bornstein: Still a Gender Outlaw (7/27/21)

"Begin with in the last few years. We have really up to you in your work when it comes to gender been talking about in writing about living outside the gender binary for over thirty years at this point and now we're able to point to people like you and your work as one example of things we can turn to to read and learn but early on thirty years ago. What if any resources did you have. Were their books. You're reading or people you were talking to anything at all. There was no internet and there was nothing to look at if you could look up transexual but then you would get christine jorgensen and you would get very conservative. People people who were born men grew up were living as conservative men and transitioned into conservative women and the freaks. Their voice wasn't published. It was coming out through warhol's films at first. That's where that's where the real first non binary presence was felt in the country. Jackie curtis was calling themselves. I'm not a man. I'm not a woman i went. Whoa okay. Let's talk about that in for so long early work. That was how you described your gender not man not woman. Was that how it was commonly being discussed or is that like your individual way to describe it. That was my individual way to describe it. I didn't know many people personally who were also looking at themselves in that way but as more and more people started defining as trans and as we had the internet than i was hooking with people who did that defined that way.

Christine Jorgensen Jackie Curtis Warhol
Interview With Actor, Producer, Jason Blum

Awards Chatter

01:48 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Actor, Producer, Jason Blum

"Great to speak with you. Jason thank you for making the time. And i guess just to start at the very beginning. Can you share with our viewers. Where were you born and raised in. Did your folks do for a living sure. I was born actually in los angeles. I moved to new york when i was very young. My dad was an art dealer. Had a gallery in l. a. Actually called the ferris gallery. Which is my middle name gave warhol his first west coast show. Showed the soup cans there ferris gallery and my mother was not historian They're both still alive. My mom was a professor of art history. She taught different here in l. A. sheets sutter riverside and on the east coast. She spent most of her time teaching at a suny purchase. She's retired now But i definitely grew up with artists than in the arts and with two parents who were in the arts and had not had those parents. I probably would have been doing something else so i guess you know i know that you eventually went off to vassar but before that if you can think back to your adolescence and there may be people at that stage who are watching or listening or whatever. I'm just curious. Do you remember what your interests and passions were as as a kid. Sure i definitely do I've actually been thinking a lot about my adolescence. Because i just read this great book which i would highly recommend to all all of you Fellow zuma's out there called notes on silencing and it's By by a woman named lacey crawford i met her the other day and It's about her experience at saint. Paul's not a good experience. But it's it's it was it. May i've been thinking a lot about my adolescence. Because i went to boarding school as well. I went to go called taft before that went to public school outside of new york city. I grew up in a little town called dobbs ferry

Ferris Gallery Warhol Jason West Coast Los Angeles East Coast Vassar Fellow Zuma New York Lacey Crawford Paul Taft New York City Dobbs Ferry
"warhol" Discussed on MinddogTV  Your Mind's Best Friend

MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

06:20 min | 1 year ago

"warhol" Discussed on MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

"Because you only live once so right and you've never had any theatrical training no no artistic training you've never wearing a class play or anything like that. I'm sure if you go back to elementary school okay. Now i mean from king's up through college born nineteen eighty-five and lawyer for ten years. I've been artists and activists for about the two So whether they never end and you have matt nap oh and took living. The dream yellow yellow. You only live once so whatever. You're doing whatever you're curious about do people. And and that's the great thing about the internet and social media now is you can start. You know doing what you're passionate about and sharing it with people you go back fifteen or so years You couldn't do that. So i almost name this. Podcast living the dream. Because i started working on a film based on a documentary based on that because some somebody told me i was living the dream when they found out i was playing rock band. And they were Retiring telling me there signifying that they would never gonna play in a band and it really struck me as wine not only get one chance in life you know you only get one chance in life and basically I i wanted to do. Spread that message of live the dream while you still can't do whatever it is it's gonna make you happy because you know you don't get a second chance at life but and so that's that's the whole message That's why i started this. That's one a lot of the guests on your show bring that kind of creativity entrepreneurial spirit so keep up the great work and keep having great guests on the show you too and i. You know i appreciate what you're doing. I i think it's it's different have gotten Any like Praise from artists. I know you've gotten some recognition but tell me about tell me about artist recognition mean i had a. I had a zoom with With an artist Her name is martha martha wilson from franken furnace. And she has she has done a donald trump pressure than she is. Really kind of a legend She's a generational than me and She she appreciated what i was doing. And giving me encouragement young people in the world slowly but surely the writing news articles if you go to zero dot com is a lot of news articles in the art world and slowly but surely people are appreciating that. Even though i might not have know how to paint and sculpt i'm not letting not stopping me from trying to live my dream and trying to do things that are creative so you just you know you put your heart on your soul into in. You can do whatever you put your mind to. How about taking And i'm not suggesting you do this. I'm just asking if you have you taken a class or thought about taking classes in acting or comedy or any of that kind of stuff. I think about getting an mfa. Master's in fine arts because a lot of the big fancy artists in moma and the metropolitan museum you know have that type of a degree. It seems to be something that's important in terms of getting success in the gallery world. So i think about it. I'm looking at that. As donald trump was a very strongly the wheel hugely well on that note. I wish you you'd success usually seems as i hope you'll be usually successful at like nobody's ever seen the hands. I i learned from trump directly so not everybody will do you need to practice the accordion for several years. Really isn't the recording. I appreciate your time here. And i wish you great success. I hope people will Will check your website out and support you. The event is the data again of the event. Thousand sixteen just go to n. ny on instagram. And you'll see everything about it and make sure mine dog one instagram as well. Great thank thank you so much retired tonight. Continues sex coming in by fennell. That's the you buy. Buy buy to hall folks. Not warhol dot com pretty easy. Url to remember Interesting fellow interesting and man and you know what good for him for Following his dream doing something just to avenue ambition. I know he He stood up for his morals and ethics Which got him in some trouble at the law firm for four actually Doing the right thing. So and then took his ambition and drive to do something artistic. Let a lot of unique things had to happen For for the ducks to line up in a row as they did for him to be doing this can very unusual art form. And you would always see something like this. In new york city folks ran a lot of people. Some comedians in general. And i'm thinking of have been bad mouthing new york city completely lately but you don't see the of character Performance and Just originality coming out of any place else in the world other than the big apple new new york city. That's what my takeaway from tonight. I hope you enjoyed this program. I'd love to know what you thought about. It influenced mine dog. Tv dot com in fort. Mind al-tv tomorrow. What we have tomorrow johnny Tomorrow at one. Pm nick girod loose somewhere on the other side of the pond. Finland one of those countries the netherlands. Something over there And he's written a book To fifteen different stories of to true life. Struggles of some of the History's most important. Recognizable names So that should be an interesting conversation. Something i wanna bring up. Starting this thursday thursday night. We have something new for you. It's open lines every thursday night Fewer calls the show is yours. Anything on your mind. You want to call and talk about patrons members of the patriot on page.

martha martha wilson ten years trump fifteen one chance fennell Finland tomorrow second chance new york city Tomorrow thursday night tonight instagram netherlands nineteen eighty-five n. ny new new york city thursday thursday night once
"warhol" Discussed on MinddogTV  Your Mind's Best Friend

MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

08:12 min | 1 year ago

"warhol" Discussed on MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

"And follow tootsie warhol please. Why y y oh yeah. Let me pick the banner up alarm. I forgot about the banner. They so well. Thank you for the plug in all that stuff. I appreciate that my my. I'm going to definitely cut up a little bit of that in in. Use it for promotion. I was saying. I was saying i wasn't gonna paint face orange. I wasn't doing any i was like. I was like okay. I don't like trump. But i'm living my life but then i got boom on. I'm in the lion's den you know and it's mac and then i'm in the front page the time shaking hands with him and i go now. I'm into deep. So i have to do more and that inspired me to start to use art as a means for the activism right. I gotta ask you though. I mean you shook his hand. I got my reaction to that would be really. I got need to go. Watch my hand. And i just don't know how you could shake the man's hand filling and knowing what he's all about knowing everything's behind about and all that stuff it would give me just made me wanna puke Did it give you any kind of physical reaction like any hesitancy. Pull back. And i wanted to shake his hand. 'cause you know it's a kind of especially before coronavirus and i think it will come back. It's a kind of a thing especially for men in a meeting. It's like you know or you met michael jordan. Did you get his autograph. The dig wouldn't shake his aunt. It's kind of thing you know to do. And i'm glad i did. It doesn't mean that we're bff. But when i shook his hand. It's the only i had never done any donald trump impersonation or voice before. I'm not as talented as a jimmy. Fallon all the voices but after the meaning when people ask me. What the hell was that. I saw you. You're on cnn. You're on every channel walking out of the elevator at trump tower. A million cameras and you shaken hands with. And and that's what i said. You know this andy warhol. When he said in the future everyone will be famous for fifteen minutes. I said it came true. Because i wasn't famous before that i was just you know regular guy and i wanted to shake his hand and i'm glad i did because i think he gave me the voice. The beasts thank That could never done a trump impression. And then i started telling people about the meeting and they will. They loved it. They were always saying took to do the do the voice and it's really people enjoy. It's there even a lot of trump supporters who i met in the streets of new york city who just can't help but laugh when they see me painted that way and i'm being friendly. I'm not hostile on the streets. And and they sometimes want to take a picture of me and have a less. Did he try to manhandle yet. Because i noticed when he does shake hands he he tries to do that. Thing were kind of takes control in. I heard about that. So i was aware but i know he was coming in strong. So i i had know i- firmed it up a little bit and i mean it's just a surreal experience especially with all the cameras right. There would have been thing by shook hand in new office. But i did it. It was like i blacked out went to another galaxy and then came back and i was shaking his hand. It was like a out of body spirits. Wow so in new york. Do you feel like you made any difference in new york as far as For from the. Because i talk about this all the time we with. Because of the electoral college we think our vote counts but i knew beforehand. I'm in new york. And it doesn't matter how i vote the state. The state is going to vote a certain way anyway. So my vote doesn't no matter. How voting do you think you made a difference in new york. I think so. I mean you have a good point that if i you know it was an pandemic when i was doing a lot of this campaigning and i don't have a private jet to be flying me around to different states so i make do with what i can you know in my hometown but it could have been more impactful if i went to a swing state but that being said it. There are lots of people that i met in new york who were not Voting in new york. I met people and in two summers. I did protests. Awesome belongs not twenty nineteen and twenty twenty and also i think just by having conversations with them i may have encouraged him to vote at all. You know because a lot of people said ma was vote and there. I'm saying come on. Vote for someone do it. I want you to vote. Whoever it's going to be for. I hope that you'll agree with me. But if not still just get out there and vote so i think we made a difference and really the the biggest thing you know in addition to the real engagement that i had with thousands of people doing this performance art i when i leave the secret tape to the new york times. It was on september twelfth this past year front page above the fold. The headline was in meetings with a black leaders. Trump photo ops instead of substance and then the whole thing is just quoting my tape. That was a front page article that is not spin. I mean it really just quotes what he said to black leaders And that could have influenced people's minds. So that i think was quite impactful. I'm a- i'm kind of stunned at the moment Because i consider myself a pretty active. Try to stay informed as i as i possibly can. I don't get my news. Smith serfdom mainstream media do all new york new york times to some extent but Not but i never. I didn't hear about this. And now i'm embarrassed by it but i'm also a little bit articles. Yeah yeah So be talked about voter rights. And i agree with you that it's everywhere these days But one of the things. I i heard brought up is a bad about the new the georgia law. That says you can Bring water food to people online. And somebody brought up that it's been the case in new york For a long time. Is that true. I'm not aware of that. I think it will worry about voter rights. The thing you know protecting voter rights. I think we gotta start at home. Don't we absolutely. New york has traditionally been one of the states in which is most difficult to vote. Now you know it's only on traditionally on one day and if you're working it's very difficult if you have kids that you're taking care of it's very difficult and Us they make a lot of states made it easier to vote in the pandemic because they were worried about too many people showing up at one time with the with the virus but new york did not have a good voting record so there are things that all of us can be doing to increase the voter turnout. And that's something. Even though. I no longer work with the group that martin luther king junior started I do many things in his legacy. And i know that he would want to make it easier for people to vote area. Yeah i agree. I i think mike compassion with the. I'm not sure the the difficulty of not bringing water to people online and that kind of stuff with necessarily a bigger deal towards Keeping minorities or discouraging the minority. Vote as it would be like a a rural area where You know a lot of poor minorities live and the it's not right down to black. You can't just get off on kit off line. Just run next door and grab something 'cause new york city you can get stuff you can get water get anything any two within Spits zone of every are. It's it's everywhere. Yeah i don't know about it. But i do think it's a complicated thing and I just think there there is too much of a Effort by people who want to continue to have power to Discourage vote And Really do anything they can to book. Black minority vote And it's a big problem But so what can be done on a realistic level To to combat nationwide.

michael jordan new york city new york donald trump september twelfth fifteen minutes Trump trump one day tootsie warhol thousands of people mac twenty one time Smith one tower past year two New york
Are We Being Forced to Buy Stocks

Money For the Rest of Us

06:27 min | 2 years ago

Are We Being Forced to Buy Stocks

"Last week in the insiders guide email newsletter I pointed out the expensive valuation of US stocks. Specifically I showed that the forward price to earnings ratio the P. E. based on earnings estimates over the next year was twenty, two point nine. That's three standard deviations above its average of sixteen times going back to two thousand, three at data from Ned Davis. Research. In reply to that email, Andrew wrote regarding stocks being expensive on a forward e true but there's no alternative. What do you do with bond yields near Zero and the vanguard total stock market? Index. Fund. Yielding two percent. By VPI, the vanguard total stock market ETF. JASA forwarded to me a paper by Bridgewater says, which I'll discuss in more detail later in this episode. I had a similar question from a plus member in the money for the rest of US plus member forums. He wrote. So the Fed signals that it wants to keep rates low for three more years. Canada's pension. Fund is reevaluating bond-holdings and you've got an army of small and large investors bidding up companies like Tesla and snowflake to absurdly hype. All this combined to make me think are we as individual investors now forced to buy equities? Is this the mother of all bubbles in which there's literally no other things suitable for purchase. There is a lot of speculation in stocks right now. Jim. Bianco Bianca Research pointed out that small traders are dominating the options market. Bear most of the trades right now and seventy five percent of that volume is an option contracts expire in two weeks. So short term bets. Look at South Korea and article from Bloomberg pointed out that day traders in South Korea have accounted for eighty seven and a half percent of the total value of stocks traded in the first part of September. You. Some men chief strategist at Samsung Securities said retail investors appear to be seeking short-term profits after hearing their next door neighbors earned lots of money from stocks after the March selloff. Receiving a similar situation in India. The Financial Times reports that the number of individual investor accounts rose twenty percent from the start of the year, the twenty, four million, and they point out that around the world, an influx of investors are investing in stocks for the first time. Are. We in a bubble? Is it a speculative frenzy? Are we forced to buy these stocks because there are no alternatives with also? One of the things I like to do investing is think about what's different this time what's unusual? What what doesn't fit the pattern? I had two instances of investing this past week where something didn't fit the pattern Lebron, I were driving up in the mountains of Montana and a small bear cub really bolted right in front of us no idea what it was running from. My son suggested he was running from the year twenty twenty. And then few days later at our front door, there were seven cows drinking water from the driveway eating our bushes. There are no cows around us. We live in an area that nobody keeps cows but there they were right in front of my house. Turns out. They had strayed from the National Forest, which is not very far some outfitters have grazing rights and drop off the cows and leave them there all summer pick them up come late October, and they had straight down because some of that newly cut barley fields, but it didn't fit the pattern. Cows at your front door. Don't fit the pattern. What's different now on investing front that could justify more expensive valuations for stocks. Well, for the first time, ever US interest rates are near zero from short term out to ten years. This is known as a flat yield curve, which is an unusual. We've had flat yield curves in the past. But it's flat near zero. There was a flat yield curve where ten treasury bonds and cash for yielding similar back from two thousand and five to two thousand seven. But yielding four percent. And from two thousand to two, thousand, two cash and tenure treasures were yielding five to six percent. Today, the ten year Treasury yield is zero point, six percent and cash is zero. The Federal Reserve intense to keep it that way. The recent policy statement suggests that they will keep their policy rate. What's known as the Fed funds rate near zero until labor market conditions have improved. The. Unemployment rate has dropped close to to to maximum employment and that inflation has risen to two percent is on track to moderately exceed two percent. They included their economic and rate projections and all, but four officials on the committee. Expect the Fed funds rate is still be near zero at the end of twenty, twenty three. Rates are low across the board. It is a different investment environment than we have ever faced before. And that's what this paper by bridgewater associates was about. It was titled Grappling With the New Reality of zero bond yields virtually everywhere. It was written by Bob Prince Greg Jensen Melissa fear, and Jim Haskell. I. Discussed Bridgewater Associates Founder Ray dallies views back in episode three, hundred changing world order in this paper bills off that. Before we continue let me pause and share some words from one of this week sponsors masterworks. I've shared on the show how low interest rates are on bonds and yields and cash about zero money has to be invested somewhere in preserving your wealth is as hard as it's ever been. That's where masterworks comes in. If you're looking to diversify out of the traditional public markets, then take a look at masterworks. They make blue chip art investing possible works by artists like Banksie, 'cause and Warhol. Art is a one point seven trillion dollar asset class that has performed better than s five hundred by one hundred and eighty percent between two thousand and two thousand eighteen according to Citibank.

United States Federal Reserve Jim Haskell South Korea Ned Davis Bridgewater Bridgewater Associates Financial Times Andrew Bianco Bianca Research Canada India VPI Tesla Bob Prince Banksie
Interview With Carl Craig

Back To Back

05:48 min | 2 years ago

Interview With Carl Craig

"Is this your studio in Detroit is this like a complex you live in? Do you have a separate studio? Built a a built room in the backyard. So onto the back of the house, I had the guy who whose company who originally designed Electric Lady Land Studio else I'll add his firm did the did the design? Architecture so they did the whole. The whole space. So it's almost like another building mess right on the back of the House so We, we call it an extension, but as you know, it would be like A. Size of of maybe a small party store or something you know candy shop if it was in the building by itself nearby, right? Yeah one it's I think it's good to have a separate space mentally. Just do something that doesn't feel like you're working out of your house just a separate. You know that work life balance yes. Go is good for me because. I had a building. kind of a kind of a not you allowed like a big Detroit building, but it was you know a spacious building on its own. and. Not, definitely. Not In walking distance from from either where I was living when I when I got it or where where we live now. But. In in the sense of of you know a bigger city like New York It will probably take about forty minutes to get there. But in Detroit time, it takes about fifteen herreid. So so relatively close in comparison to. Other cities stuff and. That one was like. It was like running a boat. Because you can be in one side of the building and it's raining and you don't even know that is coming through the other side of building and we had that on on many occasions where it would just you know it would just pour through. We had damaged records. We had kinds of things and and you know the the the Detroit. I think is always to you know own a big building because. The cheap in Detroit rather still chee even though the the cost of them went up there still still very cheap. and. You get into owning a building has five floors. Floors and you can't even use a quarter of it. But you know you have this big as building. So it's like you know buying a Rolls, Royce? And maintain it right exactly, and then having to maintain it. You know. So you're. You're rolling around town in this big ass. Rolls Royce is not really necessary good roll around in a you know a a a s quarter. Something smaller. Yeah. I mean it's interesting that we're talking about spaces and creative spaces. Because I was actually just reading that your your art installation just reopened now in New York and I was reading up about you know the space that that's in for the people who don't know united in. A converted Warehouse Space and Yeah I was just thinking about like. repurposing spaces in how how reuse spaces and how that's tied into your music and Techno Music in general I think techno is a lot about Rican text to allies, ing sounds and spaces, and maybe just to start off or anybody who doesn't know what is the party after Party installation exhibit that you did. A project. which is a beacon which is. CONSIDERED UPSTATE NEW YORK In some way but I think it's called Hudson. Valley is is what it sounds so so they have this big. former box factory, and I think they used to make boxes of packaging Nabisco or or something like that so you know it's it's A. Really a gigantic again space. with multiple. Rooms. My favorite room is the Warhol Room that's got a a beautiful. A series one series of Warhol, goes all the way around the whole room though world ms probably five thousand square feet or maybe even more you know so. My piece is not directly below it but. but below it in in what's considered a basement and they usually have like Dan Flavin pieces down there light the light installations from Dan Flavin and in another part of of the basement, there is a big flavin wall this that's down there and glows neon. And My Room is A. Mighty. Twenty thousand. Square feet maybe and a lot of columns. And a lot of windows and when I first saw of course there were all these these ideas that that will come into mind you know it definitely is going to you know rave back in the nineties

Detroit Dan Flavin Floors Royce New York Electric Lady Land Studio Warhol Nabisco York
Teenagers Surfing on the Wave of the Apocalypse

Lost Notes

04:30 min | 2 years ago

Teenagers Surfing on the Wave of the Apocalypse

"And welcome to another edition of the shape of things to come. I'm bill floor and I'm Dean Miller and our guest this week artist student teachers. Start off where everything starts off with. Let's introduce ourselves. Then Dan My teachers. Yeah. Go ahead. Base I was more comfortable from the time. I was little kid with what were considered freaks than I like drag Queens I like boys, hugh tweets, their eyebrows I wanted them to put my makeup on J. I Sing I mean going to a dead boys concert with you're sitting in the front row at CBGB's and stiff baiters. Ripping out his pubic hair throwing at you. That's disgusting. But it was amazing. On wore I play drums as teenagers. We were filming gigs for the mumps we were helping the erasers build up their sets for their shows and we've been very involved and so there was kind of this organic thing that came together. You know maybe we should maybe we can do that. You know I mean maybe we can do that. By Play Guitar. Let's say you had. School. In one hand and. Being in a band and hanging out with blondie. David Bowie and the other hand and it was impossible to do both things. Boy Do you think would happen. There'd be less school-going. Joe I buy another talk. I wanted to be a rock and roller I play guitar, and I just wanted to make wild noise. Or. Unveil. muschamp coffee you would see warhol walking around with his polaroid and handing out copies into you magazine. So this is what I thought. Every teenager did it didn't occur to me that. What an unusual environment this what? We're here sort of to talk a little bit about the band place music and give people a chance to find out what the student teachers are really because I think a lot of people in New York even though I know most of the people in the band from the New York area don't know that much about student teachers. Any. Seems to be a mystery to herself and everyone. While sometimes, that's effective. I don't know. Imagine this group of teenagers in the late seventies in new. York. City. Most of them are still in high school, a couple of recently graduated. They're obsessed with bands like television and Patti Smith the Ramones Roxy Music. Most of them come from fractured family lives and find community in the club scene. But get this in the span of six months they go from not knowing how to play instruments to headlining their favorite clubs. Then opening IGGY pop getting interviewed I'm GonNa have their favorite radio stations eighty nine point one W Nyu. How do they make that happen? This Ragtag Group of best friends lived and breathed the scene. They spent all their time together by records running fan clubs. Reading. Rock magazines. They'd go to shows together and off often get mistaken for being in a band so. One day in bills living room they decide. Why not? Let's form one. Just. kind of said that everybody everybody's all play drums and I'll play guitar. Okay. You play Bass and I said, okay. Then lawyer said well, I don't know if my voice will be good enough because she was gonNA sing. So maybe you should be from female rhythm section and then we We all hated. Wouldn't bands felt like sports teams. And with David I both being gay and Philip, and then later Joe being straight boys and then, Lauren? Laurean. Laura being the female rhythm section we really love what we did visually. I think it's more important than we have a concept an idea. I A music. Actual technical ability because we knew our instruments well enough to be able to contain the idea to an extent. But you guys can make it. I mean you think you're gonNA make it after the All of us into. Your knew we weren't musicians and none of us cared but we cared about is that we were gonNA have a blast. We were going to be cool. We were GONNA be the coolest kids and we weren't going to imitate anyway.

New York David Bowie Joe I Mumps Dean Miller Pubic Hair DAN Patti Smith Hugh Laura Warhol Iggy J. NYU Philip Lauren
Teenagers Surfing on the Wave of the Apocalypse

Lost Notes

05:19 min | 2 years ago

Teenagers Surfing on the Wave of the Apocalypse

"I've been approached about the student teacher story before by people who always seem to have this moralistic agenda to tell this cautionary tale of young people who are in over their heads or taken advantage of with too much freedom and sex and drugs, and rock and roll. And I definitely want to be clear with you that I actually believe that artistic exploration and that. Freedom is worth a certain amount of existential risk and I'd rather live next door to junkies than millionaires any day. And I'm endlessly grateful. That we came of age in a place time like that. And welcome to another edition of the shape of things to come. I'm bill floor and I'm Dean Miller and our guest this week artist student teachers. Start off where everything starts off with. Let's introduce ourselves. Then Dan My teachers. Yeah. Go ahead. Base I was more comfortable from the time. I was little kid with what were considered freaks than I like drag Queens I like boys, hugh tweets, their eyebrows I wanted them to put my makeup on J. I Sing I mean going to a dead boys concert with you're sitting in the front row at CBGB's and stiff baiters. Ripping out his pubic hair throwing at you. That's disgusting. But it was amazing. On wore I play drums as teenagers. We were filming gigs for the mumps we were helping the erasers build up their sets for their shows and we've been very involved and so there was kind of this organic thing that came together. You know maybe we should maybe we can do that. You know I mean maybe we can do that. By Play Guitar. Let's say you had. School. In one hand and. Being in a band and hanging out with blondie. David Bowie and the other hand and it was impossible to do both things. Boy Do you think would happen. There'd be less school-going. Joe I buy another talk. I wanted to be a rock and roller I play guitar, and I just wanted to make wild noise. Or. Unveil. muschamp coffee you would see warhol walking around with his polaroid and handing out copies into you magazine. So this is what I thought. Every teenager did it didn't occur to me that. What an unusual environment this what? We're here sort of to talk a little bit about the band place music and give people a chance to find out what the student teachers are really because I think a lot of people in New York even though I know most of the people in the band from the New York area don't know that much about student teachers. Any. Seems to be a mystery to herself and everyone. While sometimes, that's effective. I don't know. Imagine this group of teenagers in the late seventies in new. York. City. Most of them are still in high school, a couple of recently graduated. They're obsessed with bands like television and Patti Smith the Ramones Roxy Music. Most of them come from fractured family lives and find community in the club scene. But get this in the span of six months they go from not knowing how to play instruments to headlining their favorite clubs. Then opening IGGY pop getting interviewed I'm GonNa have their favorite radio stations eighty nine point one W Nyu. How do they make that happen? This Ragtag Group of best friends lived and breathed the scene. They spent all their time together by records running fan clubs. Reading. Rock magazines. They'd go to shows together and off often get mistaken for being in a band so. One day in bills living room they decide. Why not? Let's form one. Just. kind of said that everybody everybody's all play drums and I'll play guitar. Okay. You play Bass and I said, okay. Then lawyer said well, I don't know if my voice will be good enough because she was gonNA sing. So maybe you should be from female rhythm section and then we We all hated. Wouldn't bands felt like sports teams. And with David I both being gay and Philip, and then later Joe being straight boys and then, Lauren? Laurean. Laura being the female rhythm section we really love what we did visually. I think it's more important than we have a concept an idea. I A music. Actual technical ability because we knew our instruments well enough to be able to contain the idea to an extent. But you guys can make it. I mean you think you're gonNA make it after the All of us into. Your knew we weren't musicians and none of us cared but we cared about is that we were gonNA have a blast. We were going to be cool. We were GONNA be the coolest kids and we weren't going to imitate anyway.

New York David Bowie Joe I Mumps Dean Miller Pubic Hair Laura Patti Smith DAN Hugh Warhol Iggy J. NYU Philip Lauren
Rembrandt, Miro fetch millions at Sotheby's virtual auction

Wisconsin's Morning News with Gene Mueller

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

Rembrandt, Miro fetch millions at Sotheby's virtual auction

"Collecting. A self portrait by Rembrandt has sold for a record $18.7 million at a virtual Sotheby's auction. Picassos, Giacometti's and Warhol's went for multiple millions, and someone paid 2.8 million for a Seascape trick tick by Banksy. That's almost double the top estimate. The top seller Miro's 1927 woman in a red hat it brought in almost $30 million the highest sale price in Europe so

Sotheby Rembrandt Giacometti Miro Warhol Europe Picassos
The Woman Who Shot Andy Warhol

Hostage

03:44 min | 3 years ago

The Woman Who Shot Andy Warhol

"Our first clip is from podcast original female criminals covering the attempted murder of one of the most well known American artists of the twentieth century. Andy Warhol writer in Radical Feminist Valerie solanas befriended warhol in nineteen sixty seven through the New York Avant Garde art scene. He showed an interest in producing one of her plays titled Up Your Ass at invited her into his inner circle of artists and influencers influencers at the factory but in nineteen sixty eight. The pair had a falling out. Valerie became convinced that Warhol was trying to steal her ideas and pass them off as his own in paranoia fueled rage. She confronted Warhol in his studio armed with a thirty two caliber revolver it. She pulled out her gun aimed at Warhol's back while he was on the phone and fired before Anyone could stop her when the first shot went off no one in the studio realized what was happening Amaya. Yeah thought sniper had fired through the window. He threw himself on the ground Hughes on the other hand thought. The sound was an explosion from the offices of the Communist leanest party located two floors above them. More Hall was the only one who realized what was happening. Though her first shot had missed missed him he turned the sound and when he saw Valerie was holding a smoking gun he yelled Valerie. Don't do it no no. Oh but his words couldn't deter her Valerie wasn't discovered marksman her second shot also missed however over the third bullet struck Warhol in the abdomen hitting his left lung spleen stomach liver and sopha guess before exiting his back he collapsed to the ground. At which point Valerie turned to a Maya. He was the only bystander who hadn't taken cover making him a perfect target for Valerie. She fired twice more one shot hit but miraculously passed through Maya without damaging any organs Valerie then approached Hughes pointing the gun directly directly at him. He begged for his life but Valerie told him simply. I have to shoot you. She aimed the gun at his chest at such a close range. It was impossible for her to miss. But fate intervened the gun jammed and as has she tried to get it working again. The elevator doors opened Hughes realizing that Valerie was distracted and agitated told her to just take the elevator and leave. Valerie did exactly that Morrissey and Hughes immediately called nine nine one one. When the paramedics arrived and saw the blood they believed that Warhol was already dead no one could have survived the injuries he'd sustained Amaya had to convince them? That warhol was still breathing and that he needed immediate medical treatment. Finally the first first responders loaded warhol into their ambulance at the hospital. His heart stopped at four fifty one PM. The doctors doctors declared him legally dead but they were able to resuscitate him by massaging his heart and rushed him into emergency

Valerie Solanas Andy Warhol Hughes Warhol New York Avant Garde Writer Amaya Morrissey
An Interview With Jared Harris of 'Chernobyl'

Popcorn with Peter Travers

15:28 min | 3 years ago

An Interview With Jared Harris of 'Chernobyl'

"My guest is jared harris emmy nominee for <unk> noble and we're here to celebrate that and the success of this series which like i was saying to you before how did it happen. How did people get so interested that they told their friends about. It and i'm going to watch five hours about a nuclear disaster. Yeah they will sounds a good way to spend a sunday evening sure how much much yeah word of mouth there's no substitute for word of mouth. Is there <hes> <hes> on on that sort of a reaches. After parliament upon the critical mass of people saying this shows great. You've really got to check it out. You didn't need that. What was the thing that well. I grew up in this subject before i said yes. Yes well. You know actually they had made h._b._o. You know they say okay yeah. They said h._b._o.'s doing this. Series is about noble and i remember i remember the invent myself <hes> sending you the first full of episodes. It's on i twenty pages into it. I was gripped and <hes> craig's did an amazing job and i was absolutely i'm on board. <hes> i'm and and the experience of reading it was very much similar to watching it and that you you have fascinated. It was gripping. It was surprising there was a lot of information mation that you want to wear over at the time and i remember i was alive at the time and i remember it being reported in the news <hes> i was deeply moved by the sacrifice and the heroism of the people people involved <hes> and <hes> there's a lot of very clever aspects to it. If you think about it i mean creek now. He's a he has a very successful podcast. We talks talks about screenwriting me. He is knowledge of of the different genres tobacco unite not first episode. He's constructed it so much like a sort of horror story oy and then episodes two and three <hes> the political thriller and four is a war movie and five zero courtroom drama <hes> <hes> yeah that's that's right and it was shifting the whole time so you never quite knew what to expect. Why are people now going to noble peyton what what because i know the world topsy turvy in many in many ways but really well. It's also taking south-southeast in that not even half off dressed. They've been hanging out there doing that too. When you wouldn't go to you wouldn't go to go down to the world trade center and do that. Let's hope is deeply deeply country insensitive we all knew about it know about it but without really knowing that that was one of the things i really admired about his the way that he decided cray decided to tell the story because it was momentum exactly that and he starts with the the explosion. He doesn't spend the first hour developing relationships that you see these little seventeen disaster films where you have to know everything that's going on. Someone's gonna australian marriage major whatever these things this thing started buying with it right right at the top and and he followed that momentum of the story that was the propulsion policy of that so yeah. I really admired the way that he he came out. This <hes> the construction of the story telling the story when this this show is this acclaimed when you get this emmy nomination. What's it mean to you. What does the whole award thing. I mean i mean obviously yeah well. There's i experienced. Well your head do you in <hes>. Do you get any ballot dacian out of it. I mean i'm really thrilled that it got so many nominated nineteen was incredible and for a one off show a limited series to get recognized across the board almost every single department that was really exciting. I was obviously obviously excited for myself as well and you know. The truth is as well. It's a it's a sort of momentum for from a career point of view genital mean that yeah so obviously becomes important from that side as well <hes>. I'm thrilled to being the minorities. I mean i mean we all. I've seen you in so many things where i would say yeah ill. He must one for that. You you know and we all look at performance that way and we say that was terrific and we remember do we remember in the end three years from now who actually one it. You know i was nominated for them. He was before for madman and i think study of forty minutes. After i lost i was in at the bar and someone congratulated me winning so yeah i mean and you could just be silent and try and correct to komo who won you just ran. I wonder what he was wonderful yeah he he was. I mean that's the thing about it is when you when you got when you got that far everyone you it becomes like saying you know this year. Purple was the best call a ah. I mean they're all brilliant. Performances and they're also brilliant. Performances nine didn't get a look in you know so those two. Emmy nominations were for guys who hang hang themselves right. I don't know what that is. Do you go through scripts now. Where's the handling only uh see because what was going to happen off. This is probably every script that needs a sort of russian scientists. I would be saying now. You've just now how you vote up another guy jared palmer. Let let's do it. You nuke you grew up around this. You know your father and your mother in this business. You know your brothers are based in yes. It was like no escape or no. We were two zero anything else. Did you even consider it. I thought because i'm the the middle child so i was always you have to fight your corner as the middle child so i was very argumentative so they thought that i'd be lawyer. <hes> something like that the way that families decide they start assigning roles to the children and i didn't really light the role that that was headed my way that i so i came to america i went to university. How did the family take you going real because i was the first member of the harris family. They've gone to college on my father's side yeah. Why am i they were they. They were throat and what was this 'cause every time somebody's on who's gone through the british british school system i i had my own version of it but there's always some kind of discipline that goes on in those school. Yes you have one of those schools. They basically tortured you off. Favorite movies were prisoner woman. We we as the media like calling yeah. We would watch them. It'd be decide which one of the german guards with the teachers and we decide who we were in the story. I sti i was part of an escape committee at the school and planned an escape blaze and you made it to north carolina. I got out late but you also since your data's richard harassed. He's at home. What is he teaching teaching you. He's saying to you yeah because he stole larger than life absolutely from this sporting life when i first saw him to dumbledore he was huge. I mean you never you never properly got the sense of his personality on screen because he always had to head to dampen it down for for the camera and the size of his personality the strength of his person ninety you needed to see him on stage to get that because he would fill the whole space and he enjoyed being himself really really enjoyed it and i'm you know i'd be at restaurants and he'd start turning a story and then he'd start. This person over here is eavesdropping so he'd movies is chad so that he's you to acknowledge that person's watching and then he'd see that person is so he pushes chat for the bikes. I'm by the end of the story. The whole restaurants listening hits the punchline and they will applaud and he'd he'd love there. I mean so what are you dealing as this child child. I was very shy really didn't think that i was going to be an actor. I i went to duke and i didn't really have a plan. I remember member you go through that thing called orientation week you arrive that week eilly before the school gates they will the freshman that it's a giant campus and they tried to orientate orientate used where the campuses classrooms are whether it's derogatory is the food hold and everything and then each night they would have a mix away have a keg beer in a pizzas and i remember it was it was sunday and i realized god. I'm back in school monday. I'm back in school. I've been in school since i was seven boarding school since i was seven and i thought well i've sort of pot one of the plan. What is i've gotten out of. I've gotten away from high on. I got to the states but i can quite considered the consequence. Which is i'm back in school. I i thought i couldn't figure out what why am. I done this to myself because i could have been out committed yeah because my elder brother was seventeen boom and he was out no more school and <hes> an isis flyer on the table and it said it was a free keg of beer bryanston theater and <hes> there was a mix of there and i thought oh i'll just i just go there and i'm not gonna think about embarking class tomorrow and i went there and i. I obviously must have been curious about what my father did. I must have been but i really did not think that i was going to have a career as an actor or anything like that. I just i was really very very shy. You know and in america at college no one knew anything about me and i could just it just discover my my myself my personality my own interest and i'm very quickly. I went i start i auditioned and i love the community and i love the the camry of theater. I liked the idea you have your very intense goal very intense relationships to try and get this thing on put put it in front of people and i love the adrenaline of it. I love the learning partner bandit because you study the plane. Then you have to study all the early still they'll do by your face and by looking still there but i i remember seeing you an early movie. Did sometimes you say. How do you cast instance something. How does it happen where you played andy warhol. Oh yeah so. That's what i'm looking at. You've just described how you were growing up what you've studied bodied how you did it in hollywood they say why don't you play andy warhol. Well i mean initially. I went into into met to meet mary harron for that. I mean i i i saw it as an opportunity and it was i. I'm mary and said look. I'll toss me to come back in three days time. I give me give me a couple of weeks. You'll have an the idea of how close i can get the part and so i went off and i did a little research and i came back in and i well came in and character from right from the off walking into the office. I also thought to myself. Andy would never put himself in this position he way he was under this much pressure. He tried flip on somebody else so i bought a video camera and i made a video tape of then would issuing me so that they would feel self conscious <hes> but but you know talking talking about dramas about college when that movie came out here in new york my first acting teacher and director had moved to the new york and <hes> taken a different job and i said come to the premier with me. You know it'd be great you and my first acting teacher. It'll be really good so we we we do the red carpet and we're working our way up the red carpet and somebody else says he was your first director first teacher. You must be so proud. Here area's name up in lights and the premier new york city because yes. I'm very proud so you must have all those years ago. You must have seen something special in him. He said no i didn't is there anything special in doing english play or he does someone to keep an eye on the accents for me truly spiring. Ah love so good. I mean i just think when i think you're impossible to typecast. I just don't think it has tried i to make even a lot of actual people. You've done john lennon. E put uses as grant in lincoln <hes> you are. You've just do this to noble right up to that. Do you take those people home with you i in there. I remember i mean whilst you're doing it they they they stay within once you've finished. Actually the hardest thing is to prepare a role that you don't get to do because that guy not person rumbles around inside you because he never got to do it. Yeah i remember symbol that when i was doing warhol on doing the research now everything i would have very gossipy conversations with my mother on the fine which i didn't have often i sort of regretted not i don't know what it was with her but he was a huge gossip and he'd sit and chat to people on the phone and get them to tally everything about what they did that day and <hes> <hes> anti brought out your mom. This is a good thing yeah well <hes> i- <music>. I'm fascinated by s gone and would love to go back to that character into that story. I was deeply impressed by <hes> how misunderstood <hes> he he is also that his story is and and and his reputation is so at odds with with with what he did. You play too many characters that died so you're you're kind of destroyed for

Andy Warhol Emmy America Jared Harris New York Jared Palmer H._B._O. North Carolina John Lennon British British School Peyton Craig Director Mary Harron Cray Harris Family Lincoln Dumbledore Richard Partner
Campbell Soup Grapples With Weak Sales

Todd Schnitt

01:02 min | 4 years ago

Campbell Soup Grapples With Weak Sales

"The volume of soup sales because it's down dramatically. Let's I guess bottom line is that the pallets are becoming more sophisticated soups are more intricate. Campbell's does have the higher end soups. But yeah, the typical soup and in the typical well-known Andy Warhol artwork Campbell Soup cans, the traditional condensed soup with little gold circle. And and other variety those sales have been plummeting. So they've they've got some issues to deal with but. I don't think that the interim CEO really wanted to deal with a George Soros conspiracy. Tweet from one of his VP's. This is crazy. Texas man accord, I saw on FOX's website, Texas, man, allegedly searched the dark web trying to find a young girl to murderer and eat Nathan. Alexander Nathan

Alexander Nathan Andy Warhol Texas Campbell George Soros Interim Ceo VP FOX
Trump Tower fire victim was avid art collector who spent time with Andy Warhol

Travel with Stephanie Abrams

00:57 sec | 5 years ago

Trump Tower fire victim was avid art collector who spent time with Andy Warhol

"Nine term eight six six five oh nine t e r m a fatal fires trucks one of midtown manhattan's most wellknown addresses as chris barnes has details just after five thirty this evening our department received an automatic alarm for a fire in the trump tower that's new york city's fire commissioner discussing the fire that broke out in a fiftieth floor apartment in trump tower it did kill sixty year old todd brass ner an art dealer and friend of the late artist andy warhol six firefighters received minor injuries no members of the first family were in the building at the time and they're still looking into the cause of that blaze for usa radio news i'm chris barnes south carolina senator lindsey graham appeared on abc news this week today and said that although he believes embattled epa administrator scott pruitt has done a good job the spending habits issue quote doesn't look good you're the epa administrator into lobbyists changed the locks you've got.

Manhattan Chris Barnes York City Commissioner Andy Warhol Senator Lindsey Graham EPA Scott Pruitt Administrator USA South Carolina ABC Sixty Year