29 Burst results for "Warhol"

Fresh update on "warhol" discussed on Even the Rich

Even the Rich

00:25 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "warhol" discussed on Even the Rich

"He wants to end over again Harvard if he wants to know Harvard Brown or whatever you know he's not GonNa get a job You know the DA's office after law school. If he doesn't if he wants to demi come on, he's not gonna go work. You know out on a ranch in Wyoming for you know one of the founders of the grateful dead I mean look this daredevil aspect comes from the fact that he the the he did not believe the normal rules of life applied to him. And he had good reason for that because everything just came. Without thinking to him whatever he wanted he could have. You know and that's why you know he didn't carry money. He was constantly losing his wallet. He borrowed money for me and I had to ask Jackie you ask him to ask Jackie to give it back to me you know stupid forty dollars. But at that time it was it was a big deal. I mean, he he just people paid for him. He didn't carry money lost money. He never always had the best this in the best data, the best clothes noticed. You know the Andy Warhol was. Is. Just like the people he hung out with. So why would the normal rules of life apply to him I? Mean you know you want it to go kayaking in the Arctic Continent Arctic give you won't onto the kayaking in you know in the see you know in soft sweet need do that or you know go to kayaking. Indo Caribbean and almost died the way it was was John You. Know it. All gooden. Use a high data guy. You know he was of Livin life to the fullest who's having a great time. You know you would go to. A studio fifty four with all these models with Bruce springsteen's wife's phone number in his in his pocket, and he you know he would go to A. Movie with the frigging movie stars and all the cameras would be on him not on the movie stars. He just believed and I don't blame him that the normal rules didn't apply to him, and so they didn't apply except one time and you know. It was fatal. Now. In terms of the rules not applying to him. Do you think he relished that her? was there any part of him? That kind of wanted to have a more normal existence? I think there was a little of both couldn't escape it if your name is John F. Kennedy Jr... Is No escaping who you are and your legacy. So I mean part of him love that because everybody was worshipping him in fawning over him and. Giving him tickets to this in Daven, you name it whatever he wanted he could add. Okay. So so often without even paying for it. So so so apart of him relish that, but I mean the other part of him I think over time got sick of it and needed an escape..

Harvard Brown John You Andy Warhol Arctic Continent Arctic John F. Kennedy Jr Harvard Bruce Springsteen Wyoming Indo Caribbean Jackie Gooden
Are We Being Forced to Buy Stocks

Money For the Rest of Us

06:27 min | 3 weeks ago

Are We Being Forced to Buy Stocks

"Last week in the insiders guide email newsletter I pointed out the expensive valuation of US stocks. Specifically I showed that the forward price to earnings ratio the P. E. based on earnings estimates over the next year was twenty, two point nine. That's three standard deviations above its average of sixteen times going back to two thousand, three at data from Ned Davis. Research. In reply to that email, Andrew wrote regarding stocks being expensive on a forward e true but there's no alternative. What do you do with bond yields near Zero and the vanguard total stock market? Index. Fund. Yielding two percent. By VPI, the vanguard total stock market ETF. JASA forwarded to me a paper by Bridgewater says, which I'll discuss in more detail later in this episode. I had a similar question from a plus member in the money for the rest of US plus member forums. He wrote. So the Fed signals that it wants to keep rates low for three more years. Canada's pension. Fund is reevaluating bond-holdings and you've got an army of small and large investors bidding up companies like Tesla and snowflake to absurdly hype. All this combined to make me think are we as individual investors now forced to buy equities? Is this the mother of all bubbles in which there's literally no other things suitable for purchase. There is a lot of speculation in stocks right now. Jim. Bianco Bianca Research pointed out that small traders are dominating the options market. Bear most of the trades right now and seventy five percent of that volume is an option contracts expire in two weeks. So short term bets. Look at South Korea and article from Bloomberg pointed out that day traders in South Korea have accounted for eighty seven and a half percent of the total value of stocks traded in the first part of September. You. Some men chief strategist at Samsung Securities said retail investors appear to be seeking short-term profits after hearing their next door neighbors earned lots of money from stocks after the March selloff. Receiving a similar situation in India. The Financial Times reports that the number of individual investor accounts rose twenty percent from the start of the year, the twenty, four million, and they point out that around the world, an influx of investors are investing in stocks for the first time. Are. We in a bubble? Is it a speculative frenzy? Are we forced to buy these stocks because there are no alternatives with also? One of the things I like to do investing is think about what's different this time what's unusual? What what doesn't fit the pattern? I had two instances of investing this past week where something didn't fit the pattern Lebron, I were driving up in the mountains of Montana and a small bear cub really bolted right in front of us no idea what it was running from. My son suggested he was running from the year twenty twenty. And then few days later at our front door, there were seven cows drinking water from the driveway eating our bushes. There are no cows around us. We live in an area that nobody keeps cows but there they were right in front of my house. Turns out. They had strayed from the National Forest, which is not very far some outfitters have grazing rights and drop off the cows and leave them there all summer pick them up come late October, and they had straight down because some of that newly cut barley fields, but it didn't fit the pattern. Cows at your front door. Don't fit the pattern. What's different now on investing front that could justify more expensive valuations for stocks. Well, for the first time, ever US interest rates are near zero from short term out to ten years. This is known as a flat yield curve, which is an unusual. We've had flat yield curves in the past. But it's flat near zero. There was a flat yield curve where ten treasury bonds and cash for yielding similar back from two thousand and five to two thousand seven. But yielding four percent. And from two thousand to two, thousand, two cash and tenure treasures were yielding five to six percent. Today, the ten year Treasury yield is zero point, six percent and cash is zero. The Federal Reserve intense to keep it that way. The recent policy statement suggests that they will keep their policy rate. What's known as the Fed funds rate near zero until labor market conditions have improved. The. Unemployment rate has dropped close to to to maximum employment and that inflation has risen to two percent is on track to moderately exceed two percent. They included their economic and rate projections and all, but four officials on the committee. Expect the Fed funds rate is still be near zero at the end of twenty, twenty three. Rates are low across the board. It is a different investment environment than we have ever faced before. And that's what this paper by bridgewater associates was about. It was titled Grappling With the New Reality of zero bond yields virtually everywhere. It was written by Bob Prince Greg Jensen Melissa fear, and Jim Haskell. I. Discussed Bridgewater Associates Founder Ray dallies views back in episode three, hundred changing world order in this paper bills off that. Before we continue let me pause and share some words from one of this week sponsors masterworks. I've shared on the show how low interest rates are on bonds and yields and cash about zero money has to be invested somewhere in preserving your wealth is as hard as it's ever been. That's where masterworks comes in. If you're looking to diversify out of the traditional public markets, then take a look at masterworks. They make blue chip art investing possible works by artists like Banksie, 'cause and Warhol. Art is a one point seven trillion dollar asset class that has performed better than s five hundred by one hundred and eighty percent between two thousand and two thousand eighteen according to Citibank.

United States Federal Reserve Jim Haskell South Korea Ned Davis Bridgewater Bridgewater Associates Financial Times Andrew Bianco Bianca Research Canada India VPI Tesla Bob Prince Banksie
Interview With Carl Craig

Back To Back

05:48 min | Last month

Interview With Carl Craig

"Is this your studio in Detroit is this like a complex you live in? Do you have a separate studio? Built a a built room in the backyard. So onto the back of the house, I had the guy who whose company who originally designed Electric Lady Land Studio else I'll add his firm did the did the design? Architecture so they did the whole. The whole space. So it's almost like another building mess right on the back of the House so We, we call it an extension, but as you know, it would be like A. Size of of maybe a small party store or something you know candy shop if it was in the building by itself nearby, right? Yeah one it's I think it's good to have a separate space mentally. Just do something that doesn't feel like you're working out of your house just a separate. You know that work life balance yes. Go is good for me because. I had a building. kind of a kind of a not you allowed like a big Detroit building, but it was you know a spacious building on its own. and. Not, definitely. Not In walking distance from from either where I was living when I when I got it or where where we live now. But. In in the sense of of you know a bigger city like New York It will probably take about forty minutes to get there. But in Detroit time, it takes about fifteen herreid. So so relatively close in comparison to. Other cities stuff and. That one was like. It was like running a boat. Because you can be in one side of the building and it's raining and you don't even know that is coming through the other side of building and we had that on on many occasions where it would just you know it would just pour through. We had damaged records. We had kinds of things and and you know the the the Detroit. I think is always to you know own a big building because. The cheap in Detroit rather still chee even though the the cost of them went up there still still very cheap. and. You get into owning a building has five floors. Floors and you can't even use a quarter of it. But you know you have this big as building. So it's like you know buying a Rolls, Royce? And maintain it right exactly, and then having to maintain it. You know. So you're. You're rolling around town in this big ass. Rolls Royce is not really necessary good roll around in a you know a a a s quarter. Something smaller. Yeah. I mean it's interesting that we're talking about spaces and creative spaces. Because I was actually just reading that your your art installation just reopened now in New York and I was reading up about you know the space that that's in for the people who don't know united in. A converted Warehouse Space and Yeah I was just thinking about like. repurposing spaces in how how reuse spaces and how that's tied into your music and Techno Music in general I think techno is a lot about Rican text to allies, ing sounds and spaces, and maybe just to start off or anybody who doesn't know what is the party after Party installation exhibit that you did. A project. which is a beacon which is. CONSIDERED UPSTATE NEW YORK In some way but I think it's called Hudson. Valley is is what it sounds so so they have this big. former box factory, and I think they used to make boxes of packaging Nabisco or or something like that so you know it's it's A. Really a gigantic again space. with multiple. Rooms. My favorite room is the Warhol Room that's got a a beautiful. A series one series of Warhol, goes all the way around the whole room though world ms probably five thousand square feet or maybe even more you know so. My piece is not directly below it but. but below it in in what's considered a basement and they usually have like Dan Flavin pieces down there light the light installations from Dan Flavin and in another part of of the basement, there is a big flavin wall this that's down there and glows neon. And My Room is A. Mighty. Twenty thousand. Square feet maybe and a lot of columns. And a lot of windows and when I first saw of course there were all these these ideas that that will come into mind you know it definitely is going to you know rave back in the nineties

Detroit Dan Flavin Floors Royce New York Electric Lady Land Studio Warhol Nabisco York
Teenagers Surfing on the Wave of the Apocalypse

Lost Notes

04:30 min | 2 months ago

Teenagers Surfing on the Wave of the Apocalypse

"And welcome to another edition of the shape of things to come. I'm bill floor and I'm Dean Miller and our guest this week artist student teachers. Start off where everything starts off with. Let's introduce ourselves. Then Dan My teachers. Yeah. Go ahead. Base I was more comfortable from the time. I was little kid with what were considered freaks than I like drag Queens I like boys, hugh tweets, their eyebrows I wanted them to put my makeup on J. I Sing I mean going to a dead boys concert with you're sitting in the front row at CBGB's and stiff baiters. Ripping out his pubic hair throwing at you. That's disgusting. But it was amazing. On wore I play drums as teenagers. We were filming gigs for the mumps we were helping the erasers build up their sets for their shows and we've been very involved and so there was kind of this organic thing that came together. You know maybe we should maybe we can do that. You know I mean maybe we can do that. By Play Guitar. Let's say you had. School. In one hand and. Being in a band and hanging out with blondie. David Bowie and the other hand and it was impossible to do both things. Boy Do you think would happen. There'd be less school-going. Joe I buy another talk. I wanted to be a rock and roller I play guitar, and I just wanted to make wild noise. Or. Unveil. muschamp coffee you would see warhol walking around with his polaroid and handing out copies into you magazine. So this is what I thought. Every teenager did it didn't occur to me that. What an unusual environment this what? We're here sort of to talk a little bit about the band place music and give people a chance to find out what the student teachers are really because I think a lot of people in New York even though I know most of the people in the band from the New York area don't know that much about student teachers. Any. Seems to be a mystery to herself and everyone. While sometimes, that's effective. I don't know. Imagine this group of teenagers in the late seventies in new. York. City. Most of them are still in high school, a couple of recently graduated. They're obsessed with bands like television and Patti Smith the Ramones Roxy Music. Most of them come from fractured family lives and find community in the club scene. But get this in the span of six months they go from not knowing how to play instruments to headlining their favorite clubs. Then opening IGGY pop getting interviewed I'm GonNa have their favorite radio stations eighty nine point one W Nyu. How do they make that happen? This Ragtag Group of best friends lived and breathed the scene. They spent all their time together by records running fan clubs. Reading. Rock magazines. They'd go to shows together and off often get mistaken for being in a band so. One day in bills living room they decide. Why not? Let's form one. Just. kind of said that everybody everybody's all play drums and I'll play guitar. Okay. You play Bass and I said, okay. Then lawyer said well, I don't know if my voice will be good enough because she was gonNA sing. So maybe you should be from female rhythm section and then we We all hated. Wouldn't bands felt like sports teams. And with David I both being gay and Philip, and then later Joe being straight boys and then, Lauren? Laurean. Laura being the female rhythm section we really love what we did visually. I think it's more important than we have a concept an idea. I A music. Actual technical ability because we knew our instruments well enough to be able to contain the idea to an extent. But you guys can make it. I mean you think you're gonNA make it after the All of us into. Your knew we weren't musicians and none of us cared but we cared about is that we were gonNA have a blast. We were going to be cool. We were GONNA be the coolest kids and we weren't going to imitate anyway.

New York David Bowie Joe I Mumps Dean Miller Pubic Hair DAN Patti Smith Hugh Laura Warhol Iggy J. NYU Philip Lauren
Teenagers Surfing on the Wave of the Apocalypse

Lost Notes

05:19 min | 2 months ago

Teenagers Surfing on the Wave of the Apocalypse

"I've been approached about the student teacher story before by people who always seem to have this moralistic agenda to tell this cautionary tale of young people who are in over their heads or taken advantage of with too much freedom and sex and drugs, and rock and roll. And I definitely want to be clear with you that I actually believe that artistic exploration and that. Freedom is worth a certain amount of existential risk and I'd rather live next door to junkies than millionaires any day. And I'm endlessly grateful. That we came of age in a place time like that. And welcome to another edition of the shape of things to come. I'm bill floor and I'm Dean Miller and our guest this week artist student teachers. Start off where everything starts off with. Let's introduce ourselves. Then Dan My teachers. Yeah. Go ahead. Base I was more comfortable from the time. I was little kid with what were considered freaks than I like drag Queens I like boys, hugh tweets, their eyebrows I wanted them to put my makeup on J. I Sing I mean going to a dead boys concert with you're sitting in the front row at CBGB's and stiff baiters. Ripping out his pubic hair throwing at you. That's disgusting. But it was amazing. On wore I play drums as teenagers. We were filming gigs for the mumps we were helping the erasers build up their sets for their shows and we've been very involved and so there was kind of this organic thing that came together. You know maybe we should maybe we can do that. You know I mean maybe we can do that. By Play Guitar. Let's say you had. School. In one hand and. Being in a band and hanging out with blondie. David Bowie and the other hand and it was impossible to do both things. Boy Do you think would happen. There'd be less school-going. Joe I buy another talk. I wanted to be a rock and roller I play guitar, and I just wanted to make wild noise. Or. Unveil. muschamp coffee you would see warhol walking around with his polaroid and handing out copies into you magazine. So this is what I thought. Every teenager did it didn't occur to me that. What an unusual environment this what? We're here sort of to talk a little bit about the band place music and give people a chance to find out what the student teachers are really because I think a lot of people in New York even though I know most of the people in the band from the New York area don't know that much about student teachers. Any. Seems to be a mystery to herself and everyone. While sometimes, that's effective. I don't know. Imagine this group of teenagers in the late seventies in new. York. City. Most of them are still in high school, a couple of recently graduated. They're obsessed with bands like television and Patti Smith the Ramones Roxy Music. Most of them come from fractured family lives and find community in the club scene. But get this in the span of six months they go from not knowing how to play instruments to headlining their favorite clubs. Then opening IGGY pop getting interviewed I'm GonNa have their favorite radio stations eighty nine point one W Nyu. How do they make that happen? This Ragtag Group of best friends lived and breathed the scene. They spent all their time together by records running fan clubs. Reading. Rock magazines. They'd go to shows together and off often get mistaken for being in a band so. One day in bills living room they decide. Why not? Let's form one. Just. kind of said that everybody everybody's all play drums and I'll play guitar. Okay. You play Bass and I said, okay. Then lawyer said well, I don't know if my voice will be good enough because she was gonNA sing. So maybe you should be from female rhythm section and then we We all hated. Wouldn't bands felt like sports teams. And with David I both being gay and Philip, and then later Joe being straight boys and then, Lauren? Laurean. Laura being the female rhythm section we really love what we did visually. I think it's more important than we have a concept an idea. I A music. Actual technical ability because we knew our instruments well enough to be able to contain the idea to an extent. But you guys can make it. I mean you think you're gonNA make it after the All of us into. Your knew we weren't musicians and none of us cared but we cared about is that we were gonNA have a blast. We were going to be cool. We were GONNA be the coolest kids and we weren't going to imitate anyway.

New York David Bowie Joe I Mumps Dean Miller Pubic Hair Laura Patti Smith DAN Hugh Warhol Iggy J. NYU Philip Lauren
Rembrandt, Miro fetch millions at Sotheby's virtual auction

Wisconsin's Morning News with Gene Mueller

00:26 sec | 2 months ago

Rembrandt, Miro fetch millions at Sotheby's virtual auction

"Collecting. A self portrait by Rembrandt has sold for a record $18.7 million at a virtual Sotheby's auction. Picassos, Giacometti's and Warhol's went for multiple millions, and someone paid 2.8 million for a Seascape trick tick by Banksy. That's almost double the top estimate. The top seller Miro's 1927 woman in a red hat it brought in almost $30 million the highest sale price in Europe so

Sotheby Rembrandt Giacometti Miro Warhol Europe Picassos
"warhol" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

10:12 min | 9 months ago

"warhol" Discussed on Historical Figures

"I'm looking for Truman. F F fat boy. I'm not sure sure I'm looking for Truman. I'm very big fan of his work in young man. You need to stop sending Truman Letters. You need to stop calling the house and you need to stop to Truman Sale. That he's very upset. and to whom am I speaking. This is Truman's mother. That actually happened Mrs Capote was the one to tell Andy to back off but andy channeled. His Passion elsewhere completing an exhibition inspired by capote's writings the fifty cy young amateur warhol growing into himself. He obtained a job at R. C. A.. Records Kurds he and a friend traveled the world. He had corrective surgery to reduce the size of his nose. He was a working artist in New York City. Things look good then pop. Art Hit the scene Pop. Art Was a movement started in Britain. That by the end of the fifties was just starting to find an American audience. It relied on a kitschy Ritchie. Ironic use of popular mediums imagery a far cry from the abstract expressionists suit warhol. He loves celebrities hated High Art and he had a retinue of commercial techniques at his disposal but the field of pop art was filling up rapidly. Mandy spent much of a year developing a comic book style before four. Learning of Roy. Lichtenstein's work and Andy had yet to fully let go of abstract expressionism. Film Director Emil Dantonio. A friend of Andy's remembers the young artists showing him two of his newest paintings. What do you think? Don't me about the one on the right. It Coca Cola bottle I took the cross hatches from. I'm an exhibit I saw in the stable gallery and then added some shading around the the one on the left. It's a Coca Cola bottle that's it that's it well. Well one of these is kind of ridiculous and the other is what you're actually doing. I know it's stupid. I just liked the way it looked alone. Put No Andy. The abstract one is shit. Stop doing anything like that. The one on the left. It's good it's brutal. It's who we are. Many showed similar comparisons to art curator's Ivan Karp and Henry. Gonzales all agreed with de Antonio don't dress up subject don't make it artistic present. The image as it exists in real life after all this reflected what Andy found interesting interesting about Coca Cola you can be watching. TV and see Coca Cola and you know that the president drinks coke. Liz Taylor drinks coke and just think you can drink coke to coke coke and no amount of money can get you a better coq than the one that the bum on the corner drinking. Liz Taylor knows it the president. You didn't knows it who the bum knows it and you know it in. Andy's mind why dress up a coke it ruins the simplicity then in one thousand nine hundred sixty to the. The big idea came to andy the one that would set him apart. We'll return to our story in just a moment. Hi It's Carter. Sure you're a fan of true crime but are you ready to put your skills to the test and be crowned undisputed beauty expert. Then try your hand at par cast new Trivia. PODCAST killer knowledge. Join me every Tuesday as to competitors go head to head to correctly the answer multiple choice true crime questions. Whoever gains the most points after twenty questions wins? It's all the murder mystery and suspense. So you've come to expect from podcast now in a fast paced interactive format each episode dives deep into different shocking topic from history such as the Manson Anson Family Jimmy Hoffa and even the Jonestown massacre with each question and answer comes. Additional context rounding the event enlightening even the most knowledgeable legitimate true crime lover. You can play by yourself. Challenge your friends and prove your prowess by sharing results with park asked on social media. You never know you may even find yourself in the hot seat one day. Follow Killer Knowledge Freon spotify or wherever you get your podcasts. Now back to the life of Andy Warhol has to be something ordinary something so normal. You wouldn't notice it if it pissed on your leg. I don't know you're the artist but I know my life to well. I need something new and you just said two things that are each other's the exact opposite my stops next meal. You've been absolutely useless. What did you eat for lunch today today yesterday yesterday when you were a kid? What did you eat today? Ham on Rye Sandwich with pickled yesterday skipped lunch at half an apple during work when I was a kid every day. My mom made us mom made you wack Campbell's tomato soup see something like that. No that Campbell's tomato soup isn't this your Jiwan. What how much do you want for the idea? Bad idea meal. I have to go buy new paints new canvas in every Campbell's bulls tomato soup between here and Fifth Street. So give me a price. How much do you offer the idea? The next day Warhol paid mural that Tau fifty dollars and soon thereafter developed thirty. Two paintings of the Campbell's soup can he called the collection. Campbell's soup cans Andy. Andy employed a technique. He had learned only the year before called silk screening. This allowed him to reproduce photographs on blown upscale with his choice of colors he worked out. A sketch of a single soup can and reproduced the exact image thirty two times Wendy inches high and sixteen inches wide with no artistry or illustration address them up each had. Do exactly like something you could find in your cupboard to New York warhol had made the most mundane insignificant artwork possible civil but for Irving blum the curator at the Ferris Gallery in Los Angeles. The Eh done something genius bloom offered to display the exhibit and even added a final touch redesigning his gallery in the style of a supermarket aisle the world of Pop art now had its emblem a can of soup. Let's easy to see why art critics were confused and made a portrait of a commercial item. Developed it using commercial techniques replicated a commercial setting as the backdrop and called it all all art not only that he was charging a whopping one hundred dollars a canned and he would continue doing so nineteen sixty three. So warhol continuing doing on the theme depicting dollar bills coke bottles and more soup cans in the same forthright manner all of which were displayed at the coveted stable gallery in New New York. Andy's first major gallery in the city. He continued experimenting with Silk Screening and repetitive printing. His darker works explored American violence depictions of automobile accidents mushroom clouds and electric chairs. You'd be surprised to hang an electric chair in the living room. Especially if the background matches the drapes oops. But his most iconic work came from Andy's favorite topic celebrities he began producing portraits riffing on color and framing with each new print his subjects included Elvis Presley Marlon Brando Muhammad Ali and perhaps most famously Marilyn Monroe and by the time of Monroe's death in nineteen sixty two warhol had already masked quite a collection of her images. Maryland was the perfect celebrity she was an icon rather than a single talent. A true symbol symbol of distilled fame and took a single image of her and replicated hundreds of times sometimes with different color palettes sometimes the same but warhol's Dell's depictions warrant flattering. His prints often had smudges or miss framing at times rendering the starlets face. Nearly illegible use of celebrity was only a starting adding point for Andy. It was the endless repetition that would impact audiences for Warhol Marilyn. Monroe wasn't the subject the endless pictures of her we see the constant pinups and advertisements the commercialization of a person that was the meaning of celebrity. And that's how Andy Warhol took. The world's most famous face and reduced it to the level of a soup can his work van meteoric admiration and controversy in the art world. Were Hall subjects had never been seen in such such a basic forthright way and most importantly his work was instant. Andy said of his own. Work if you WANNA know all about Andy Warhol just look at the surface of my paintings and films and me and there I am. There's nothing behind it. In other words it didn't take a graduate degree to understand Elvis Presley. It was simple yet. Revolutionary Canary by showing a soup can calling it art. Andy asked a broader question for the first time in history. Can anything be art. Everyone should have fifteen eighteen minutes of fame and had stumbled onto an America in which every object could be. Art and every loner could be famous. It was both a dream and a joke. Replicated replicated hundreds of times over by the silk screening technique and audiences responded by the end of nineteen sixty. Three Warhol was an international name. This was only the beginning. The next phase of Warhol's life the so called silver period would center around his most bizarre and controversial creation of all time the factory factory billy. It's wonderful you like the walls the hallways also also shiny. I'll abstract I want my just like it all right but I have to let you know. I'm not cheap anymore. Andy you want me to design your space. It's GonNa cost you billy I love you. I've got enough money to buy three of you. You start tomorrow other New York. Pop artists were increasingly collaborating with Warhol with their help and improve working area and it could surpass his previous output with ease and output.

Andy Warhol Coca Cola Warhol Marilyn Truman Campbell Truman Letters New York Mrs Capote Elvis Presley New York City Truman Sale Marilyn Monroe Liz Taylor High Art Britain Maryland Jimmy Hoffa Manson Anson Mandy Rye Sandwich
"warhol" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

11:10 min | 9 months ago

"warhol" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Hi I'm Vanessa. Richardson and I'm Carter Roy. Welcome welcome to famous fates apar- cast original exclusive to spotify each week. We'll release five. Fresh episodes centered around a common theme such as Hollywood icons John's influential women or music legends in each episode. We'll take a close look at the remarkable life of a different person with the help of voice. Actors will dramatize ties. Their incredible lives reimagining their greatest and weakest moments. Then we'll examine their controversial deaths. Some deaths came too soon. Some remains shrouded in mystery and some changed the world forever today recovering. Andy Warhol the father of Pop. Art Inspired inspired the phrase fifteen minutes of fame and prove to the world that anything could be the subject of great art anything at all in his later. Years Warhol Warhol survived an assassination attempt only to die due to medical negligence. A tragic death. That feels both out of place and yet perfectly in character. For the provocative artist you can find episodes of famous fates and all other podcast originals for free on spotify to stream famous fates for free on spotify. Just open the APP and type famous fates in the search bar famous fates is a spotify exclusive so you can only find it on spotify at par podcast. We're grateful for you our listeners. You allow us to do it we love. Let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and Instagram at podcast in twitter at at Park West Network. Now back to the life of Andy Warhol. Andy Warhol Story Starts Years Before his birth in the town of Meco part of the austro-hungarian empire or hall's Father Andrei were Hala left Meco in one thousand nine hundred fourteen to look for work in the United States but he returned only a few years later to find a wife. He figured his hometown would be the best place to look in partly because of macos Patriarchal Society where entree could marry a girl with only the approval of her family. This is how he chose Julia Zaba a woman opposite of him. In appearance and personality Andrei was large and Brusque Julia Petite in quiet. Neither headstrong feelings for the other. But Julius family liked Andres work ethic the mismatched pair married and a few years later Andrei decided they would return to America to Pittsburgh the Pennsylvania where he'd found work in the coal mines. Julia didn't like her new home. She refused to learn English and therefore rarely left the house. Luckily the House Got Busier. Julia gave birth to two sons before. Andy Powell in one thousand nine hundred eighty two and John in nineteen twenty five meaning that and by the time of Andy's birth in one thousand nine hundred twenty eight. The family had established a sense of routine andres meager salary and long hours relegated him to the distant breadwinner winner of the family. While Julia kept the House and cared for the boys and his older brothers also had their share of responsibilities which included providing extra income. Come to the family. Pablo took on his first job when he was eleven. But both boys played a large part in raising andy this included enrolling him in school and disciplining him when he acted out all right. You're going to walk inside. Go Up to the lady with the white hair and say oh you're going to say my name is Andy Were Hola. I'm six years old. I'm not Fixed Shush. I'm six years old and I'm in Mrs Finish Class. I'm not fix. I don't WanNa go to school. Yes you do moms too busy to take care of you. During the day mom likes talking to me during the day. She says she likes me better. Because you're not a thinker. No she didn't did to. Andy go to school. You go school this was the Warhol Household. self-governing solidly Working Class Stern. But loving and with a flair for the artistic Julia was a gifted scholar filling the home with drawings of kittens and flowers and he soon began copying her from his first years in school. His teachers recognized his immediate talent for drawing but in third grade and he had to leave class when he contracted a disease called. Sit In ham's Korea or Saint Vitus. Dance it it was an unlucky draw for eight weeks. Andy couldn't leave his bed. He grew skinny and frail. His skin turned blotchy and his nose. Protruded Bulb Asli there were emotional tolls as well. Andy developed a deep fear of sickness doctors and hospitals. His hypochondria would last his entire life but the time off had its benefits. Andy took up a new hobby to pass the time. Celebrity worship and the obsessed over gossip and star tracking magazines following following Hollywood's biggest stars. His favorite would be a little girl about his age and appearance who had already managed to become a household name. Shirley Temple Komo cracker in my them rabbit but I have following. I'm one by one. The idea that someone his age could achieve stardom greatly appealed to Andy soon he was cutting out pictures of Shirley and his other favorite stars then piecing them back together in collages. Of course this would later echo in his famous celebrity portraits but for the time being he was just a lonely starstruck fan day. He's coming does he think we have a fancy automobile to take us. What going to me late in nineteen thirty nine nine Andrei and some co workers accidentally drank contaminated water at their worksite? While the others recovered Andrei grew more ill he soon had to retire are unable to work his presence. In the home dampened the report Andean. His mother shared I coming up in the count of three one here good. Let's you wash your ears. Yes looked me. See your hands. What's this glue glue from from what I'm the tape? I making a project. You're making a project and it doesn't matter that you're entering the House of God with glue on your hands or late. Let's just start walking. While Andy Washes his hands. He'll have to run to catch up understood. Yes Sir but Andrei Drake cared for the family in different ways. Seeing the most potential in his youngest son Andrei saved money for Andy's education. He would die when Andy was only thirteen. High School came and went. Andy Hope to study art education at the University of Pittsburgh but his plans changed to be more practical practical in nineteen forty five Andy enrolled in the Carnegie Institute of Technology in Pittsburgh studying commercial art from the start and he didn't get along well with his professors and once again he'd have to answer to Paul this letter says you're flunking three classes. I'm only flunking three classes. It says you'll be expelled at the end of the term Pavel. I'm sorry but I'm not going to let someone who still bitter. They aren't Picasso. Tell me my drawing is eighty seven percent creative to understand his argument. We need a quick catch up on art history in one thousand nine hundred fifty s saw. The rain of an art style called abstract expressionism. Painters like Jackson pollock abandoned recognizable subjects and instead tried to capture raw emotion through color texture and juxtaposition art was defined signed by beautiful otherworldly expressions that spoke directly of the artists brilliance was created a polarizing atmosphere and eight year Grad student might understand the the significance of a Rothko print but the general populace just saw squares with salsa created a divide among artists. The quote real artists those who sold sold among the high end galleries and the quote commercial artists. Who worked advertisements in comics? Warhol didn't like this separation a kid from working class Pittsburgh. Berg didn't see the point in pandering to the New York elite but he also wanted to remain artistic and his work. Not just collecting paychecks. You're going to go go back in and ask them to let you take the glass. Now Dandy you take the class look at me. You're anti you're supposed to get the education get Outta Town Down Dad chose you. I don't know anything about Picasso. That's the point. But I know what happens to droughts. You've got to make this thing work. That means C plus or higher. Did you really just call it. This art thing warhol appealed to a professor and returned to class this this would prove pivotally important carnegie. Didn't see art the same way as Andy but it would teach him technical skills that would become distinguishing traits of his most important important work most notably printing similar to a printing press this involved copying an image over and over in assembly line fashion Warhol Paul and impulsive creative like the speed and output he could achieve working with mechanized art tools and he was about to go to one of the most fast paced cities on the planet in Nineteen nineteen forty nine after his graduation. Andy dropped the a from his last name. Becoming Andy Warhol and took up residence in New York City. New York would be the center of Andy's greatest accomplishments so we want to take a quick snapshot of who he was upon arrival. First of. Aw Andy was fiscally independent conscious of money since childhood warhol quickly secured commissions for. I Miller Shoes Glamour magazine and numerous window displays as he was good at his job. We're halls commercial. Work would win awards from the American Institute of Graphic Arts and the art directors club but he already possessed his trademark shakiness. Shakiness has more artistic work such as don't pick on me a picture of a man picking. His nose seem designed to offend and perplexed the viewer though he didn't get that much recognition for such art. He seemed delighted in pushing the comfort of his audience. There were other changes in his life as well. Socially Warhol participated and didn't many remember Andy from the fifties as an awkward but constant partygoer hardly able to make conversation he said of himself. I'm the type who'd be happy not going anywhere as long as I was sure I knew exactly what was happening at the places I wasn't going to. I'm the type who'd like to sit at home and watch every party that I'm invited to on a monitor. During my bedroom and warhol celebrity worship also continued. He was now enamored with the author. Truman capote like Shirley Temple capote represented an an idealized version of Warhol Gay Gregarious and though he had yet to write breakfast at tiffany's or in cold blood clearly talented andy reached out to Capote Multiple Apple Times through letters and phone calls. It didn't go well. Hello Hello.

Andy Warhol Warhol Andy Warhol Father Andrei spotify Andy Powell Julia Warhol Household. warhol Andy Hope Hollywood Pittsburgh John shakiness Julia Zaba Andrei Drake professor American Institute of Graphic Richardson
The Woman Who Shot Andy Warhol

Hostage

03:44 min | 9 months ago

The Woman Who Shot Andy Warhol

"Our first clip is from podcast original female criminals covering the attempted murder of one of the most well known American artists of the twentieth century. Andy Warhol writer in Radical Feminist Valerie solanas befriended warhol in nineteen sixty seven through the New York Avant Garde art scene. He showed an interest in producing one of her plays titled Up Your Ass at invited her into his inner circle of artists and influencers influencers at the factory but in nineteen sixty eight. The pair had a falling out. Valerie became convinced that Warhol was trying to steal her ideas and pass them off as his own in paranoia fueled rage. She confronted Warhol in his studio armed with a thirty two caliber revolver it. She pulled out her gun aimed at Warhol's back while he was on the phone and fired before Anyone could stop her when the first shot went off no one in the studio realized what was happening Amaya. Yeah thought sniper had fired through the window. He threw himself on the ground Hughes on the other hand thought. The sound was an explosion from the offices of the Communist leanest party located two floors above them. More Hall was the only one who realized what was happening. Though her first shot had missed missed him he turned the sound and when he saw Valerie was holding a smoking gun he yelled Valerie. Don't do it no no. Oh but his words couldn't deter her Valerie wasn't discovered marksman her second shot also missed however over the third bullet struck Warhol in the abdomen hitting his left lung spleen stomach liver and sopha guess before exiting his back he collapsed to the ground. At which point Valerie turned to a Maya. He was the only bystander who hadn't taken cover making him a perfect target for Valerie. She fired twice more one shot hit but miraculously passed through Maya without damaging any organs Valerie then approached Hughes pointing the gun directly directly at him. He begged for his life but Valerie told him simply. I have to shoot you. She aimed the gun at his chest at such a close range. It was impossible for her to miss. But fate intervened the gun jammed and as has she tried to get it working again. The elevator doors opened Hughes realizing that Valerie was distracted and agitated told her to just take the elevator and leave. Valerie did exactly that Morrissey and Hughes immediately called nine nine one one. When the paramedics arrived and saw the blood they believed that Warhol was already dead no one could have survived the injuries he'd sustained Amaya had to convince them? That warhol was still breathing and that he needed immediate medical treatment. Finally the first first responders loaded warhol into their ambulance at the hospital. His heart stopped at four fifty one PM. The doctors doctors declared him legally dead but they were able to resuscitate him by massaging his heart and rushed him into emergency

Valerie Solanas Andy Warhol Hughes Warhol New York Avant Garde Writer Amaya Morrissey
"warhol" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

05:01 min | 10 months ago

"warhol" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Warhol a lights out of me I'm gonna end up finding my basement one day and we're going to think it's a heart attack really it's because they touch the water heater and some highly advanced scientific advice Robbie yes the gas fired water heater yes calculate your kid to buy gas see listen to a Saturday mornings at seven on geo cool for moms you nation with JT so file real life okay now from the studios in for everybody wants our commander Chris coming to you from our beautiful turn it don't burn it studios in Portland Oregon you know Christmas I hate to say it is just a few days away it really is and I'm just wondering if you're ready I'm wondering if you've made your meal selections hi I because I'm pretty sure yeah we got all your shopping day but we're not gonna be talking about shopping today we're gonna be talking about preparing the main course of your Christmas dinner with our dear friend meathead Goldwyn from amazing words that calm so he's gonna be with us in just a second gold Christmas music for you today of course made my friend how are you all I'm ready I I am designated beef man for Christmas dinner so that have been for years he is he did is usually a one my wife's nieces homes nearby and young people the and a big crowd so I I'm the one who gets stuck with the the tab on the beef and it's my pleasure I love yeah I I know that deal to very well because you know when you get labeled the cowboys could you actually represent a beef company they all expect that when they come to your house for dinner you know yeah it's like yeah I'm not I I just ordered about we are both for the B. for Christmas Eve or Christmas day you had so I should be fine so let's talk about that we talked about it before but I always think it's worth repeating prime rib he is not an actual definition of a piece of meat if you've got a rib roast and the grading system and the quality prime choice or select utilitarian whatever you wanna call it also and I think people get fooled about that I mean it's been very well covered over the years and all the food magazines and guys like you and me talking about it but every once in awhile somebody still says you know I went to the store Christmas and I bought a prime rib in it wasn't very good it was tough well they never read the label are they got sold a bill of goods your thoughts yeah it is confusing and I need has been written about but you're right a lot of people don't know what I mean they look at you know that's one of the reasons you when I make a living is because people don't know a lot about food we get to have each other but the big suit me that are cut off of this here are on are often called finals and the prime rib he is the way it looks final well I'm a spear and it is what it is is is in its the the state save big long slender muscle that runs along the spine and you've got one two folks right along your spine you can see if you can feel it his long tubular muscle that runs from your shoulder blades yeah and that's the Longines the Missouri side and the and the spears have it also and it lies right next to the spine and right below it are the ribs and the same thing honesty here so the real primal are the one seven bones star just below the shoulder down seven bones back and yeah you can run anywhere from twelve fourteen sixteen depending on the size of the spear twelve fourteen sixteen eighteen pounds of meat and bone and fat and it is probably the best me honesty here and in fact it's.

Warhol
An Interview With Jared Harris of 'Chernobyl'

Popcorn with Peter Travers

15:28 min | 1 year ago

An Interview With Jared Harris of 'Chernobyl'

"My guest is jared harris emmy nominee for <unk> noble and we're here to celebrate that and the success of this series which like i was saying to you before how did it happen. How did people get so interested that they told their friends about. It and i'm going to watch five hours about a nuclear disaster. Yeah they will sounds a good way to spend a sunday evening sure how much much yeah word of mouth there's no substitute for word of mouth. Is there <hes> <hes> on on that sort of a reaches. After parliament upon the critical mass of people saying this shows great. You've really got to check it out. You didn't need that. What was the thing that well. I grew up in this subject before i said yes. Yes well. You know actually they had made h._b._o. You know they say okay yeah. They said h._b._o.'s doing this. Series is about noble and i remember i remember the invent myself <hes> sending you the first full of episodes. It's on i twenty pages into it. I was gripped and <hes> craig's did an amazing job and i was absolutely i'm on board. <hes> i'm and and the experience of reading it was very much similar to watching it and that you you have fascinated. It was gripping. It was surprising there was a lot of information mation that you want to wear over at the time and i remember i was alive at the time and i remember it being reported in the news <hes> i was deeply moved by the sacrifice and the heroism of the people people involved <hes> and <hes> there's a lot of very clever aspects to it. If you think about it i mean creek now. He's a he has a very successful podcast. We talks talks about screenwriting me. He is knowledge of of the different genres tobacco unite not first episode. He's constructed it so much like a sort of horror story oy and then episodes two and three <hes> the political thriller and four is a war movie and five zero courtroom drama <hes> <hes> yeah that's that's right and it was shifting the whole time so you never quite knew what to expect. Why are people now going to noble peyton what what because i know the world topsy turvy in many in many ways but really well. It's also taking south-southeast in that not even half off dressed. They've been hanging out there doing that too. When you wouldn't go to you wouldn't go to go down to the world trade center and do that. Let's hope is deeply deeply country insensitive we all knew about it know about it but without really knowing that that was one of the things i really admired about his the way that he decided cray decided to tell the story because it was momentum exactly that and he starts with the the explosion. He doesn't spend the first hour developing relationships that you see these little seventeen disaster films where you have to know everything that's going on. Someone's gonna australian marriage major whatever these things this thing started buying with it right right at the top and and he followed that momentum of the story that was the propulsion policy of that so yeah. I really admired the way that he he came out. This <hes> the construction of the story telling the story when this this show is this acclaimed when you get this emmy nomination. What's it mean to you. What does the whole award thing. I mean i mean obviously yeah well. There's i experienced. Well your head do you in <hes>. Do you get any ballot dacian out of it. I mean i'm really thrilled that it got so many nominated nineteen was incredible and for a one off show a limited series to get recognized across the board almost every single department that was really exciting. I was obviously obviously excited for myself as well and you know. The truth is as well. It's a it's a sort of momentum for from a career point of view genital mean that yeah so obviously becomes important from that side as well <hes>. I'm thrilled to being the minorities. I mean i mean we all. I've seen you in so many things where i would say yeah ill. He must one for that. You you know and we all look at performance that way and we say that was terrific and we remember do we remember in the end three years from now who actually one it. You know i was nominated for them. He was before for madman and i think study of forty minutes. After i lost i was in at the bar and someone congratulated me winning so yeah i mean and you could just be silent and try and correct to komo who won you just ran. I wonder what he was wonderful yeah he he was. I mean that's the thing about it is when you when you got when you got that far everyone you it becomes like saying you know this year. Purple was the best call a ah. I mean they're all brilliant. Performances and they're also brilliant. Performances nine didn't get a look in you know so those two. Emmy nominations were for guys who hang hang themselves right. I don't know what that is. Do you go through scripts now. Where's the handling only uh see because what was going to happen off. This is probably every script that needs a sort of russian scientists. I would be saying now. You've just now how you vote up another guy jared palmer. Let let's do it. You nuke you grew up around this. You know your father and your mother in this business. You know your brothers are based in yes. It was like no escape or no. We were two zero anything else. Did you even consider it. I thought because i'm the the middle child so i was always you have to fight your corner as the middle child so i was very argumentative so they thought that i'd be lawyer. <hes> something like that the way that families decide they start assigning roles to the children and i didn't really light the role that that was headed my way that i so i came to america i went to university. How did the family take you going real because i was the first member of the harris family. They've gone to college on my father's side yeah. Why am i they were they. They were throat and what was this 'cause every time somebody's on who's gone through the british british school system i i had my own version of it but there's always some kind of discipline that goes on in those school. Yes you have one of those schools. They basically tortured you off. Favorite movies were prisoner woman. We we as the media like calling yeah. We would watch them. It'd be decide which one of the german guards with the teachers and we decide who we were in the story. I sti i was part of an escape committee at the school and planned an escape blaze and you made it to north carolina. I got out late but you also since your data's richard harassed. He's at home. What is he teaching teaching you. He's saying to you yeah because he stole larger than life absolutely from this sporting life when i first saw him to dumbledore he was huge. I mean you never you never properly got the sense of his personality on screen because he always had to head to dampen it down for for the camera and the size of his personality the strength of his person ninety you needed to see him on stage to get that because he would fill the whole space and he enjoyed being himself really really enjoyed it and i'm you know i'd be at restaurants and he'd start turning a story and then he'd start. This person over here is eavesdropping so he'd movies is chad so that he's you to acknowledge that person's watching and then he'd see that person is so he pushes chat for the bikes. I'm by the end of the story. The whole restaurants listening hits the punchline and they will applaud and he'd he'd love there. I mean so what are you dealing as this child child. I was very shy really didn't think that i was going to be an actor. I i went to duke and i didn't really have a plan. I remember member you go through that thing called orientation week you arrive that week eilly before the school gates they will the freshman that it's a giant campus and they tried to orientate orientate used where the campuses classrooms are whether it's derogatory is the food hold and everything and then each night they would have a mix away have a keg beer in a pizzas and i remember it was it was sunday and i realized god. I'm back in school monday. I'm back in school. I've been in school since i was seven boarding school since i was seven and i thought well i've sort of pot one of the plan. What is i've gotten out of. I've gotten away from high on. I got to the states but i can quite considered the consequence. Which is i'm back in school. I i thought i couldn't figure out what why am. I done this to myself because i could have been out committed yeah because my elder brother was seventeen boom and he was out no more school and <hes> an isis flyer on the table and it said it was a free keg of beer bryanston theater and <hes> there was a mix of there and i thought oh i'll just i just go there and i'm not gonna think about embarking class tomorrow and i went there and i. I obviously must have been curious about what my father did. I must have been but i really did not think that i was going to have a career as an actor or anything like that. I just i was really very very shy. You know and in america at college no one knew anything about me and i could just it just discover my my myself my personality my own interest and i'm very quickly. I went i start i auditioned and i love the community and i love the the camry of theater. I liked the idea you have your very intense goal very intense relationships to try and get this thing on put put it in front of people and i love the adrenaline of it. I love the learning partner bandit because you study the plane. Then you have to study all the early still they'll do by your face and by looking still there but i i remember seeing you an early movie. Did sometimes you say. How do you cast instance something. How does it happen where you played andy warhol. Oh yeah so. That's what i'm looking at. You've just described how you were growing up what you've studied bodied how you did it in hollywood they say why don't you play andy warhol. Well i mean initially. I went into into met to meet mary harron for that. I mean i i i saw it as an opportunity and it was i. I'm mary and said look. I'll toss me to come back in three days time. I give me give me a couple of weeks. You'll have an the idea of how close i can get the part and so i went off and i did a little research and i came back in and i well came in and character from right from the off walking into the office. I also thought to myself. Andy would never put himself in this position he way he was under this much pressure. He tried flip on somebody else so i bought a video camera and i made a video tape of then would issuing me so that they would feel self conscious <hes> but but you know talking talking about dramas about college when that movie came out here in new york my first acting teacher and director had moved to the new york and <hes> taken a different job and i said come to the premier with me. You know it'd be great you and my first acting teacher. It'll be really good so we we we do the red carpet and we're working our way up the red carpet and somebody else says he was your first director first teacher. You must be so proud. Here area's name up in lights and the premier new york city because yes. I'm very proud so you must have all those years ago. You must have seen something special in him. He said no i didn't is there anything special in doing english play or he does someone to keep an eye on the accents for me truly spiring. Ah love so good. I mean i just think when i think you're impossible to typecast. I just don't think it has tried i to make even a lot of actual people. You've done john lennon. E put uses as grant in lincoln <hes> you are. You've just do this to noble right up to that. Do you take those people home with you i in there. I remember i mean whilst you're doing it they they they stay within once you've finished. Actually the hardest thing is to prepare a role that you don't get to do because that guy not person rumbles around inside you because he never got to do it. Yeah i remember symbol that when i was doing warhol on doing the research now everything i would have very gossipy conversations with my mother on the fine which i didn't have often i sort of regretted not i don't know what it was with her but he was a huge gossip and he'd sit and chat to people on the phone and get them to tally everything about what they did that day and <hes> <hes> anti brought out your mom. This is a good thing yeah well <hes> i- <music>. I'm fascinated by s gone and would love to go back to that character into that story. I was deeply impressed by <hes> how misunderstood <hes> he he is also that his story is and and and his reputation is so at odds with with with what he did. You play too many characters that died so you're you're kind of destroyed for

Andy Warhol Emmy America Jared Harris New York Jared Palmer H._B._O. North Carolina John Lennon British British School Peyton Craig Director Mary Harron Cray Harris Family Lincoln Dumbledore Richard Partner
"warhol" Discussed on Can I Pet Your Dog?

Can I Pet Your Dog?

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"warhol" Discussed on Can I Pet Your Dog?

"The car and you can take your home for the night and christina went. Oh yes she's so cute and she's very timid and then she did that and then texted me ham on the way home with the dog. I think i was doing a show that night probably and then i said okay okay <hes> so my wife is in the photo styling business. She just props and wardrobe steph and there. We're doing this andy warhol. There was like a kid dresses. Andy warhol as i know it's very complicated she was making are you familiar with the brillo box azure so she was making counterfeit warhol stuff for this kid photo shoot yeah those silver big mylar balloons and there's a famous bowie bowie is famous warhol painting of flowers like four flowers. She was just sort of recreating creating all this and this poor dog is just laying in our dining room on the wood floor. Just like what this craft maybe crafts demise was the next day so she's just i got home late because i now i'm remembering i was at a show right and i just got done performing at home like at eleven christina's like well. This is gonna take like me all night so i said okay i. I'll help us long as i can but eventually i just go to sleep. It was like one thirty in the morning two in the morning when i finally was like i'm gonna go to bed right. What do you want to do with the dog but she's like well. I guess like she'll just stay up with me and then in and she was just lying there. The whole time watching is much just like wake. I don't know what this is right and then the next next day of the agreement was we'd keep overnight and then in the morning bring her to the vet to get shots and fixed and then on the way there. I talked to the woman from the rescue because i had never met her and she goes yeah. Drop her off and then once the procedures done either. You're picking up dog in its your dog right or i'm i'm picking up the dog and you'll never see the wow. Why was very much like you have got people lined up for this dog under just got there i. I don't know if i've ever heard of any rescue that just chills that night like it's always wild the first night i think yeah yeah. She was really timid. Allot shore so for wrote for a while. I was very much like i don't know if i can trust you right. We thought i mean you just become eugene. O'neill and you write this tragedy or the dog do we did. We were like oh did someone hit her with a shovel because she doesn't like that show i don't i doubt it yeah probably not probably we just generally free shovel talked yeah and then i got real philosophical. She was really afraid of garbage trucks and then i went this might be the first time. Did you see the garbage truck. It'd be terrifying if you've never seen a tire life like psychologically. The rescue thing was a little while a little crazy yeah the garbage thing i had the same thing where i was getting a little frustrated because he was losing his mind at it thought about it because it's like individual trash cans so a robotic arm grabs throws you on your head and he's it's just like i the candidate x. Logic human logic is sort of like what we're gonna pick up cans. Yeah i mean the robot..

andy warhol christina O'neill bowie bowie
"warhol" Discussed on Making It With Jimmy Diresta, Bob Clagett and David Picciuto

Making It With Jimmy Diresta, Bob Clagett and David Picciuto

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"warhol" Discussed on Making It With Jimmy Diresta, Bob Clagett and David Picciuto

"I mean, I have the initial idea which I don't know how much is. It's not really an originally just thought it would be an appropriate thing to have at workbench con I make that for him. And so we just talked about it for a few minutes came up with a couple of ideas, and they go so I didn't have to worry too much about the final graphic other than just a little lock direction. But it was you know, stuff like that just gives you more time in the day. And it comes out of the studio people notes printed on one of my answering machines, and and people are gonna look and go bread came up with this graphic, you know, it's can Herod that assisted collab- and an an and I have one time to do things. Yeah. So you were talking about Andy Warhol earlier and a couple of friends of mine worked for an artist named Jeff Koons you ever heard of Jeff Koons? Sure, my friend used to work for him boy did some stuff. So he's extremely popular. Artist in New York City, and he has basically a warehouse of people working around the clock twenty four seven there are shifts like night shifts of people that are just constantly coming in and turning all the time creating our work for him. And he's a gigantic artists yet, he people love and hate him. Yeah. I know that this is facing. I people like his always smiling and happy and artists are supposed to be down. Yeah. Depressing. Okay. Yeah. He's he's happy because he's probably very wealthy. Really really big expensive. Anyway, I've had two friends that have worked for him on and off in different times. But they have this like warehouse of people who do sculpture and paint in like, you know, detailed paint men big broad paint. And the people that build canvases and build structures Musa huge operation in high kinda have the same. Reaction to that that you had originally about Andy Warhol it except that. I don't know this this one feels like in his situation, and I don't know about the guy or anything, but it feels like that the work. The actual work is really being done by a bunch of other people. Now that doesn't read a wrong. I don't really care. But I think the thing is interesting is he created a brand around himself in around his choices around his aesthetic in the things that he likes and he comes up with and then his brand his company his studio produces those things. So that Jimmy that's basically the same thing that you're saying is like all of these things that you're doing on paper. Whether they're you're saying you're gonna from somewhere else or whether the graphic is done by you, regret or me or somebody else. It's it's still the idea is coming from you as a brand. And then the execution is coming from you as a studio in. So like, I kinda think the same thing about to make stuff, but the. Difference. There is the in. This is one of those things that have tried to think about that. I haven't really made time to fully think about I want the brand instead of being Bob I want I like to make stuff to be the brand. So I've always tried to push that thing out front a little bit. So that once other people are creating under the brand and are a part of the production. Whether I'm involved or not it doesn't seem disingenuous. Just the way that I've looked at it like, I don't want it to be a Bob thing. I wanted to be thing that Bob is a part of an insulin. So can be a part of an so Kameda part of you know, that gives it I think legs outlive me, and it gives it room for growth without it being the Andy Warhol, Jeff Koons situation. You know, not that those things are bad. That's just the way that I've tried to set my situation up is that it can outgrew me, basically. Well, an example that here in New York City is it Indian Larry is a motorcycle fabricator who died in an accident in two thousand four and but he died the peak of his popularity..

Andy Warhol Jeff Koons New York City Bob Larry Jimmy
"warhol" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

03:15 min | 1 year ago

"warhol" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Didn't Andy Warhol have. I know he had the Campbell's soup. Did. Did he have Heinz ketchup? Also. He did all right. One. But does the Heinz ketchup make more sense than for the wiper ad? I guess so that's the way he eats. It just with Heinz catcher if you remember he was dipping in the ketchup in a very very peculiar manner. But teddy Warhol I did my Walker to and catch the same way. I mean, I get it with everything on it. But yeah. I feel like I'm in good company. Now, we have the same hair. You can hear the sounds that matter. That's not good. There was also a promotion with door. Dash like that was giving a white haired wigs and catch up and the old Wasser box. So if you ordered through door dash to get your, yeah. And but this was before so no everyone's getting nickel on what what is this about? Hear the sounds that matter to the top five at five from the Roe Conn show with Anna davlantes, s weekday afternoons on seven twenty WGN, Chicago, very smart speaker user, just say play WGN radio on tune in news brought to you by hearing health, center dot com. Here's Steve Bertrand, little fog and mist around Ed O'Hare. But right now, it's still fifty degrees as the temperatures rose over this past weekend. So did gun violence in the city at least twenty two people were shot over the weekend. In Chicago that includes seven people struck by gunfire early Sunday morning at a drive by shooting outside of a bar on the south side, chug a police say someone inside of a silver four fired at a massive people outside of Reynolds lounge in the nine hundred block of seventy fifth street. That's in the city's crossing neighborhood two people died in that shooting. Police still have not determined. If the seven shot were targeted or part of a fight that occurred inside of the bar. Ryan burrow, WGN news cargo mayoral candidate Willie Wilson says he could have funded the campaign of an established politician rather than Rodham himself, but he says he doesn't really trust a lot of established politician businessman. Right. Politician today take people money and by people turkeys and everything else. They need investigation. Right. They crooks. I'm gonna tell you plan. I. I dunno better. Wilson was a guest on WGN Steve Cochran show. This morning Virginia's governor Ralph northern miss meeting with staff in Richmond today amid calls for him to resign after a picture from his nineteen Eighty-four medical school yearbook showing men in black face and a Ku Klux Klan robes surfaced last week. He has refused to quit despite backlash from both sides of the aisle, the death of an off duty Chicago police officer yesterday remains a mystery. The Cook County medical examiner has declined to rule whether it was a suicide or homicide, here's WGN's. Pam jolie. Say the forty seven year old woman was found dead of a gunshot wound in a car in the nine hundred block of south bell avenue in the city's tried Taylor neighborhood shortly after nine thirty pm Sunday law enforcement, sources tell the trip someone with her at the time has been taken in for questioning the police department had tweeted that a preliminary investigation pointed to an apparent suicide. But after an autopsy, the medical examiner's office said the cause and manner of death were pending. Pam Jones WGN new Chicago's O'Hare was the nation's busiest airport last year over time. Shaking Atlanta's Hartsfield Jackson airport. Speaking of travel. Airbnb says Cook County hosts brought in one hundred nine million dollars in two thousand eighteen that's up from about.

Heinz ketchup WGN Chicago Willie Wilson Andy Warhol Campbell Cook County Rodham teddy Warhol Hartsfield Jackson airport Ed O'Hare Steve Bertrand Pam jolie Airbnb Pam Jones Anna davlantes Atlanta Roe Conn
"warhol" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

03:02 min | 1 year ago

"warhol" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"I I am such a fan of Andy Warhol's that was that was really Andy Hello Heinz ketchup too. By the way, which I'm Andy world big fan of. And I like Andy was tremendous. I I have a fan of anywhere and he's only been dead for thirty thirty thirty. Yeah. I I don't know. I did not like that out of just. Let's not like anywhere hall Burger King. It's probably something leftover from class. I had to take in college where I had a film. Studies teacher who I guess the guy finally became a professor and decided that he would just show us two things for for four months, and it was home movies from the velvet underground band sessions university university, Nebraska, and and so it was that. And he would always namedrop how Andy Warhol was always there. Andy Warhol the factory whatever the hell, they call. It. Don't care. Andy Warhol was here. I swear ten times a class. The man dropped the name Andy Warhol does because anti was van. Sure. And so was Gianluca Dorde, which was the other thing we had to watch all of his French filmmaker. Oh, really, bad French movies infringe most subtitles. So maybe I'm just leftover hating on. Warhol because of that film studies class, but so in that commercial came up I had a flashback of the class. But anyway, we have the Microsoft we all win commercial, which I love really good. It shows. It was so good. It makes you feel so good that they succeed. Like that. The Bud Light another Bud Light medieval barbers campaign, which was great job. Search for veterans net. Flicks our planet. Okay. The coats that would be free. We're that Bill could be here by Verizon. We're here for you T mobile. They were all over the KEA give it everything. Home security with ADT stop with the property brothers. Wizard with Toyota another favorite was that was tremendous that I really enjoyed was the hundred year game by the NFL. This actually people thought that it was better than the game. It was really good. See the stars of the past going through it being themselves. They've the Franco era with the cat. We haven't. So let's play it. It's great. It's really it's really good one hundred season of the National Football League. Not about the league. It's about football. It's about the players. The fan. Marshawn Lynch starts and everything else to make today. Oh boy. A ball on the loose. At this. Nice black tie affair..

Andy Warhol National Football League Bud Light Marshawn Lynch professor Gianluca Dorde Microsoft Toyota Verizon KEA Nebraska football Bill Franco hundred year four months
"warhol" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"warhol" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"I'm not done. So that's a huge difference mean his his in a way where it was quite a lot is quite traditional was painting was and. And I think. No. We don't have that much in common really in in. I mean, I wouldn't want to compare myself anyway. But just think yes, I mean, in a way he's responsible for a lot of problems in the I think this concentration money miss love of money and the way people work and talk about us, and he he is one of the first people to to talk nice times about and and the ways prices have just been inflated as well. I mean, that's nothing. That's his problem. And the idea of an office wants to be famous and all that kind of stuff, but that's unleashed many demons. In the art world. And he's second right artists who think they can be like him. Yes. He he he did open a kind of worms, and then as left us to work out to do that kind of worms doggy. Yeah. I I agree with that. And I think one of the things about wool hose, he's understanding of those mechanisms and the the sort of infrastructures of those sort of power structures if you like will was much more sophisticated than he's often giving credit. Absolutely. I mean, he saw a whole of America from top to bottom. You know, he loved hanging out with rich people. But he so despised them as well. And if you when you see it doesn't have much good to say about them when you read the Dr is he really thought the he was I think he was very aware of social issues and famously I still don't if it's true. He did do the soup kitchen thing on Friday evenings, Jordan, just done if that's true or not. But we'll don't salvo the curator of the Whitney's suggests that is true. That's the case, and he was going to the top and the bottom of America. So he's very aware thoughts, and he came from a very poor background. That's why I made an exhibition about William Morrison Warhol few years ago, and they both of them Morris to Morris had clients who with some of the richest people in the world, but also he would travel around Britain giving lectures and talks and an meeting people who are some of the poorest people in the country and they both with super aware of that kind of quite angry buyers. Well Morris sent Morris insane. And I think it probably did that with wool hose where he probably was quite angry by these wealthy people. Just. Not worthy of it of his riches. It seemed to me that that show was was really trying to complicate Warhol as a as both an artist and a public figure in a way that you. You've you've expressed just now so contradictory about him in some ways. But I think we'll how in a way as he's especially in social media driven world has become a kind of caricature of what? Whoa, ho, actually woes deepen the mystery of supporting death is the thing that was a lot more. Here's a very political artist. You could argue I mean, everyone just thinks oh we just like money, and what is interesting surface and his new superficial. But actually, he was he was really deeply his very profound artists documenting the American empire. You know, the the the postwar empire was America. And he was he was there ought est. And if you think about what what was America like in the sixties and seventies, Andy Warhol's work. He don't read a book you look at those images almost. So I think you know, he was absolutely a chronicler. And he was a prophet as well like Morris? They're both prophets for the future. Both looked into the future. And saw what it was going to be like. We'll hope basically predicted the internet in assign some respect in terms of his interests in the way, he was veracious collector and. Wanting to be everywhere overtime me everyone be documented meeting everyone. He's gonna collecting habits is his wanting to document his life to record everything. I still maintain that if he was alive during the internet. He would have been one of the major players within internet because all his obsessions of the obsessions of the incident. Meeting people. Yeah..

Morris America Andy Warhol Jordan William Morrison Warhol Whitney Britain
"warhol" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"warhol" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"So those that as well, which is the magazine. Yes. Juice. So you know, he had his magazine they had film production. He had his office. He had his office, which was full of boxes and books, and magazines which wasn't even a chair and his full, you know, he had no he didn't office unusable. Basically, it was it was office of a relaxed office environment. I would say that makes sense some stuffed animals around pretty Polin was on the desk. But you know, you with you in that place. It was very exciting. Did that Mark that moment when he made that shift you'll studying history, and you make that shift into thinking there's a possibility of being an artist possibility is a good word because it's just showed what was possible. What was actually possible in the world as an artist you, basically, did whatever you wanted and heated every wanted as they seemed like it complete freedom. It wasn't actually the case when you eat the diaries and find out what was going on at that time. He's quite frustrated butts just like he could do he wanted. And. Yes, dismayed the world of baroque Altarpieces much love them, just not particularly become really compete with that with with contemporary life. And so I took about to finish my degree. Nobody knew what to do with the experience of being there. Really? I didn't even know what. It took some time to process in a way. But I just knew I'd been ruined by in terms of history. My life in our history had just been destroyed by guide same and one of the striking connections. I think between your work and Andy Warhol's life from work is is this connection with with music and particularly comportment Warhol's famous Cavs for the velvet underground, yes. And Rolling Stone, sticky, fingers, etc. Yes. Yes. But also just that sort of spiritual connection between art and music, and it seems to me that's right at the heart of what you do. Yes. Yes. It is. That existed before I really. The music my connection to music and pop music was. About four or five. So that was what he there. But then seeing an artist it was seemed to be part of that was well, it was interested in it was quite influential. So I was always happy to know that. And, but yes, for music thing for me was always huge huge still is I mean, maybe less so now lost touch popular music. But I still have opinions. But yes that was that not having any boundaries. I think it was the interesting thing with him film magazine music arts performance, in a way in his life was a performance for me as he's a great influence in that respect and the spies. Also, the fact that he sort of corralled people together into interesting situations. And you think about the film's may very many of them Warhol setting up a situation. And then seeing what happens, and you see that to certain degree in your work as well. Yes little bit. I mean, very different situations. But he's yes, he was of wire he's clearly was of wire of people. He wasn't really take palm things and I had a little bit about me as well. Very good at taking pond things. I like getting the paper to take part in. It's a contradiction in a way. That's yes. I deaf is definitely a connection in that respect. All over was an artist too. Had a very object based practices. Well, as the sort of more Merel in film based works and stuff like that. You will. I don't think of you as somebody who produces objects..

Andy Warhol Mark Polin Altarpieces Merel
"warhol" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

04:29 min | 2 years ago

"warhol" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Well, I could never say that I know him in that sense. But I think that you know, you see as an individual. I think that many there was a sort of hidden part to how he lived his life. Clearly, we're just talking about is Catholicism, you know, other things that were not commonly known. So there. There was a a distance, you know, whether it was being an insider and outsider because I think he was that to a certain extent, you know, it's like a way you're on the street in off the street. But I also think that, you know, there was an air of mystery that he purposely created around himself. You know, he begins using his own self portrait's year round sixty four and makes himself subject. But of course, the self portrait is not a new idea and the history of art. But eventually also he does become a brand in the eighties. He appears TV commercials appears in print commercials for various projects products, mostly outside of the US does one for Japanese commercial for Japanese television. So it's the level of product endorsement in the days the old days where you know, Joan Crawford sold Pepsi-Cola. So that's not a new thing. We still have you know, Matthew, mcconaughey, I think's Ellen cars. And so it's. Not a kind of, you know, new idea. But, you know, the the issue of, you know, the late self portrait's that he makes which of course, with fright wig where you know, there's a mysterious figure there, and I think most really good artists. Often say little about themselves. So I think for all that Warhol said in the diaries and all the, you know, and he's out there more than any other artists. I can imagine to some extent, you know, Skar wild certainly with someone who put out a lot of information about himself. So he's a little bit in that, you know, in that vein, but could ever know everything? And I think that's the same thing with his works of art that when they comes down to it. They remain mysterious as any great work of art. I think does I've always believed that this test of great work of art. Is that no matter how do you? How many times you go back to it? You can't completely figure it out. And I think that's the case with Warhol. We'll apparently met Donald Trump in several times. And he writes about Trump and Trump's first wife vonda in his diaries. I also see that Trump is quoted Warhol in a couple of his books. How do you think your show connects with this Trumpian moment we're in? Well, absolutely. You know, Warhol did have exchanges with Donald Trump. Of course, they were both on the scene in New York and Trump had asked him to make a painting of one of his buildings. I think it was Trump Tower and Warhol did it and then Trump rejected it because he said that the color combo didn't hidden like the color combo. And I think we're Warhol quotes in his diaries that you know, he felt Donald Trump was really cheap. So. You know, I think it's a great question because I do think that because Warhol's work is so a dented with the United States, and because the subject matter is absolutely drawn from for the most part, the US that it's an interesting moment to look at what is being projected in that work, and that optimism of the sixties in the postwar era, and a very different kind of America and America on the on the, you know, as the savior of the world, you know, the Marshall plan. I mean, we're in a very different place then than we are now. So I think it's very interesting to look at that. And to compare these two times when we're in an extremely different different situation. Both domestically and globally. You know? I think the other thing is to you know, think about the way Warhol creates these fictions through his films of the sixties, and the, you know. No, the inevitable rise culturally. And this is not something. I would say was something Warhol can be you know, said he did that he that he created. But you know, we live in an age of celebrity culture of reality TV. And so it's quite interesting to think of that, you know, cinema verite that started to happen in a lot of Warhol's films. Where you see it as you see it. There's no script it's an acting out..

Warhol Donald Trump Trump Tower United States mcconaughey Joan Crawford Skar New York Trumpian Ellen Matthew vonda America
"warhol" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"warhol" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"We'll be back with more from don't vote after this. It makes the prize people to learn that George Seagal was in fact, a pup office while pay us up just we'll Liechtenstein infants by coke to mass consumerism secrets the human condition by correcting costs of ordinary people going about that everyday lives sequel first rose to prominence in the nineteen sixties pioneering life-sized plus costs of figures, which she would create by wrapping models employee. Bandages an innovative use of an everyday medium that was unprecedented in history in the nineteen seventies. He began to Coasties Brahms. And then painting them uniformly white one of the very first of these groundbreaking PC's a life size. What the dances is the highlight of postwar and contemporary also in usual on the fourteenth of November. The largest and most impressive by C woke as Jack lean tos. Perkins of the postwar and contemporary department says is defining work of Korea and Tokyo century sculpture to find out more visit bombs dot com. Welcome back. We pick up where we left off with Donna disolve focusing on. We'll host work after his near death experience when he was shot in nineteen sixty eight we'll about his films trade commissions, and he's still lives. He's prefiguring of social media. He's appropriations of Leonardo's last supper and the Catholicism underpin interest in that work. We'll also hear about his relationship with Donald Trump. But we begin with the factory. The epicenter cool. A hang out place for Warhol's assault of debauchery and extravagance which celebrities from Jaga to eighty Cedric would poss- through. But it was also a creative engine. So Nancy kinda Yellowstone disavow how in vote was we'll in everyday production that. Well, I mean, of course, it's a place where he made his paintings. So he was silk screening there and a lot of the films are made at the factory shot actually within the factory. So you know, I think that he was a presence there. And and he was kind of director in terms of attracting people I think a lot of people came to him. And then letting people do their thing, you know. So in a sense, I thought he was a bit of the art director at that time, you know, he had raw material and all of these different characters who are my you know, who were attracted to him. And, but it's it's a film set in a lot of ways it's both painting studio and film set. And, you know, I'm, you know, clearly the site for a lot of acting out and a lot of drug taking, and you know, craziness, you know, I it's it's one of the points in the exhibition is there's a group. There's a section. Devoted to group of drawings from about an fashion photographer. Name auto fen that Warhol gravitated to in the early fifties. And he had a kind of cell on of sorts which was largely gay men, and they would dress up and wear Warhol did a series of caricatures. So I've lichen that in some ways to kind of first factory because if you see the factory you could see it as a sell on factory was a great phrase for it. Because again, it's so contrary to the idea of the artist alone in their studio, it's this industrial production. But it is also a kind of really amazing, Sal on that attracted, many, creative individuals themselves who wanted to be were actors wanted to be actors writers, you know, movie stars that came that saw Warhol out. And you know, the epicenter of a kind of in, you know, incredible. It's social phenomena. I understand that the Whitney has a special connection to Warhol's films. But she started making sixty three right? Yes. From sixty three to sixty eight he made something like six hundred fifty films. It's it's it's mind boggling, actually, and is so number of years ago. John hand hard who was in the curator of film and video at the Whitney started to had conversations with Warhol about his films and preserving his films, and that really gave birth to the war to the Whitney's catalogue resume project, and my lake colleague Kelly angel who is the author of the first cuddle aggressively a of.

Warhol Cedric Coasties Brahms George Seagal Perkins Liechtenstein director Donald Trump Donna disolve Whitney Jack Nancy assault Jaga Tokyo Korea Sal Kelly angel John
"warhol" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"warhol" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Part of our history where my own interpretation, you know, are we in some ways punished for consuming? There's one tuna fish disaster of two women who both are tragically die as a result of poison tuna fish. So it's it's a very maybe the flip side of, you know, a certain kind of postwar optimism, and I believe they remained some of his most searing paintings. And of course, the electric chair, which is just, you know, a startling image to see. And of course, Warhol makes the one in the show is a lavender disaster painting. So in a sense, the absurdity, the irony and the horrific nature, and maybe even our disregard, or are, you know, the way in which you can look at an image. And is it what is it really about? When you see this loan electric chair from sing sing prison, and the recognition that this is a means of capital punishment, and then it's maybe youthful. Lavender it. It really sets up inevitable, you know, incredible contradiction in what you're looking at. So do you see these works as having a political thrust? I do I mean, I think that that is a subtext in many of hall's works. Not all some would dispute that there's a lot of debate especially in the critical community about was Warhol political. And what he was doing. You could read just about any work of art and a political way. I think that they are. I think that that the, but there I think that's evident even in his pictures of soup cans, you know, I think that there's a certain kind of confirmation of obsessions desires and at the same time, it's putting it in our face. So there's a duality. And I think that we're all I've always felt he picked up on what I've seen is the twin contradictions of of the American psyche, which is the desire for innovation. But also for conformity later and sixty eight Warhol has been badly wounded in a shooting assassination temporarily the shooter is Valerie Salata and occasional actor in his films. What impact that has on his career? It's a very good question. Because I think that many people feel that after sixty eight you know, he, of course, it was he was horrifically injured. And nearly died was brought back to life on the operating table and carry those scars with him throughout but in the exhibition, we have a section devoted to a lot of the experiments that he was doing during that period. So rather than to see it, which some have, you know, seen it as the end of his great period of innovation of the sixties. I think it's a bit of a marker of the next kinds of experiments that said, I you know, I. I know that there were massive changes at the factory bulletproof door that was installed. It was no longer. Anyone could just show up, and you know, Warhol's enterprises probably came became more like a business very different than the sixties model. And so the production itself is sounds more organized. I wasn't there. So, you know, but everything that I'm aware of and people have spoken to who. Of course have worked with Warhol during that period. You know, there was the interview magazine is launched many many commissions, come Warhol's way. But then immediately, you know, couple of just a few years later in nineteen seventy-two. He makes his starts his mouth series. So it's really the beginning of another period of intense work, and and and pushing the envelope of painting..

Warhol Valerie Salata
Campbell Soup Grapples With Weak Sales

Todd Schnitt

01:02 min | 2 years ago

Campbell Soup Grapples With Weak Sales

"The volume of soup sales because it's down dramatically. Let's I guess bottom line is that the pallets are becoming more sophisticated soups are more intricate. Campbell's does have the higher end soups. But yeah, the typical soup and in the typical well-known Andy Warhol artwork Campbell Soup cans, the traditional condensed soup with little gold circle. And and other variety those sales have been plummeting. So they've they've got some issues to deal with but. I don't think that the interim CEO really wanted to deal with a George Soros conspiracy. Tweet from one of his VP's. This is crazy. Texas man accord, I saw on FOX's website, Texas, man, allegedly searched the dark web trying to find a young girl to murderer and eat Nathan. Alexander Nathan

Alexander Nathan Andy Warhol Texas Campbell George Soros Interim Ceo VP FOX
"warhol" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"warhol" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"Slash marketplace terms conditions and quality standards apply the US China rhetoric has been getting hotter. Meanwhile, US secretary of state. Mike Pompeo is facing pushback from his counterparts at the annual southeast Asian nations. Summit in Singapore, marketplace's, China correspondent Jennifer pack reports, Singapore's foreign minister. Vivian Balakrishnan says he told his American in Chinese counterparts that any trade war or unilateral sanctions will have a quote disproportionate impact on the city state. And that goes for the nine other southeast Asian countries who are part of a comp. Lex global supply chain. For example, Malaysia makes microchips which are then assembled into finished products in China before they're shipped to the US. So these economies will feel the pinch. If tariffs caused Chinese exports, the US to fall southeast Asia has always had to manage a delicate balance between the US and China economically the region's biggest trade partners, China, but militarily the region has relied on the US to counter Chinese influence with so much uncertainty. The southeast Asian bloc wants to minimize the damage of a possible u. s. China trade war and pledged to double down on trade pacts. Singapore has urged his neighbors to quickly conclude talks for a comprehensive trade agreement that includes China, Japan, South Korea and India, but not the US marketplace's Jennifer pack in Shanghai. No today would have been Andy Warhol's. Ninetieth birthday. Yes, pop art, yes. One of the most iconic and influential artists of the twentieth century. But as we're about to learn a pioneer in what Warhol called business art. Critic, Blake gopnik is finishing the work on a comprehensive biography of Warhol, and he came by to help us understand what Warhol had in mind with business art. Yeah. I mean, he's best known of course to the general public for his Campbell soups and his Maryland paintings. But I think his most interesting work is actually the way he created something that he called business art. And usually people see him as a sold out artists who've got other people to make his art, and his only goal was to make money, will he declared selling out the kind of art this thing called business are that can seem farfetched you can think, well, all he wants to do is make some Lou which he did like to do. But it's weird is than that because every time he tried to make money, he came up with totally cockamamie business plans. Business art is not the guy with the chain stores in the mall selling oil paintings. The structure of the business was seen as a kind of a work of art. Yeah, Andy Warhol claimed the act of being a good businessman could make you different kind of artists, a new kind of artists. But you know, when he tried to make money, the things people cues them of doing to make money, make no sense. He got involved with the velvet underground, a screeching band that turned their amps up to eleven to magic. The velvet underground was a money making scheme made no sense. Come on a love, the velvet underground, their legacy endures, but okay, they weren't mass-market. They barely made a cent for poor Andy or how about the time he decided to make a perfume for sale anti cold it you're in. Why are you apostrophe r. e. I n.

Andy Warhol US China Singapore Mike Pompeo Vivian Balakrishnan Jennifer pack Lex Malaysia Asia Blake gopnik Maryland Lou Shanghai India South Korea Japan
1st year of Nevada marijuana sales smokes expectations

Colleen and Bradley

03:01 min | 2 years ago

1st year of Nevada marijuana sales smokes expectations

"The suspect reacted during that altercation. Mr. Bauer actually bit one of our officers both of our officers deployed other electronic control devices are started having breathing, problems and was put into an ambulance. He later died at the hospital Nevada regulators and industry insiders say the state's first year abroad marijuana legalization succeeded. Even their highest expectation sales tax collections have already surpassed Fiscal year, and projections by twenty-five percent at a month of numbers is still outstanding tax bull sales could top five. Hundred million dollars when June's figures are counted that let a total revenue of about seventy million bucks. Twenty five million of which is devoted to schools although some people aren't too happy, with the weather legalization some medical marijuana. Patients say it has led to dispensary stocking fewer. Higher potency products that can't be sold for recreational use well, you might not want to eat the groceries inside a new. Los Angeles supermarket that's because the products are made of felt the. Pop up stores the brainchild of British artists, Lucy Sparrow who transformed twenty. Eight hundred square feet of the standard hotel and I'll stocked with Hansen groceries Jamie. Yuccas reports customers crowd the aisles, of, Sparrow Mark where. Everything, from pizza peanut butter is handmade, from, felt, felt. Is a very childlike. Fabric and often if not style So I. Think often harks back to being at school and some. Of your first craft projects I just take it to. The extreme they're sushi and soda artists Lucy Sparrow spent a year sewing and painting the thirty one thousand items that line store shelves but this art exhibit is hands on, and every piece is up for grabs the fact that. Provokes happiness and a sense of excitement that you wouldn't necessarily have other shows and it's also so inclusive it welcomes people. In, that wouldn't necessarily go to galleries Spero is clearly obsessed with felt she lives. And works on a farm outside of London and calls her office. The felt cave four years, ago I was still working as a receptionist in central London I did, a Kickstarter campaign to fund my, first, I'm Vic shy, Kerr, I show a corner shop, in London's east end created a frenzy on Instagram and the art world took notice two hundred pounds you can get Lucky Johnson milk in two thousand. Seventeen Sparrow built a Bodega in the Big Apple nine thousand pieces sold out the LA pop up also includes a gallery. This customer has her eye on the, Campbell Soup creation with a price tag of ten thousand dollars I think the imagery reminds me of Andy Warhol the pop art of the sixties something I defy. With and my childhood sparrows creations of oak warm and. Fuzzy feelings her felt fantasy land is a celebration of brands connecting people with life experiences I've just got it's. Just a little,.

Lucy Sparrow Marijuana Mr. Bauer London Spero Andy Warhol Nevada Los Angeles Yuccas Hansen Instagram LA VIC Kerr Hundred Million Dollars Ten Thousand Dollars Twenty-Five Percent Two Hundred Pounds
"warhol" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"warhol" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Parking three two one oh he's a mobster here or what yes this campbell's soup oh andy warhol wait what andy warhol the lady with the breeze in john smith yes they they found they discovered i think they discovered over here illinois on a boat there two dudes dudes on a boat the street here north north eight goes up to you know goes up to andrews clark how dudes think of anything that would have been how do you say warhol warhol or home dan and mike warhol fully and then the other ones and like our mayor so okay well how many did we get four okay in a boat to guys on a boat it here in illinois right the needs to walk by our route because she would see do sabato every day but it was he was he part of it or something.

campbell andy warhol mike warhol illinois john smith andrews clark warhol dan sabato
"warhol" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"warhol" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I love it i love the world now the people that i met through warhol where the people that i always wanted to know they were not bullies they did not judge you that was unconditional admiration if not love people were free people have made their choices people were different you know some people perhaps had better clothes and others but everyone was noted for their own worth their own gifts and i think that's why felt so good because i felt at home i felt that i was part of a special club andy warhol's interview magazine and they embraced me and there was no criticism of me as would have been at home in north carolina you know i was brought up in a very strict modest home but my nucleus the nucleus of my family was church so being a black man bought up in the african american missionary baptist church culture meant that i had certain rules in certain ways to deport myself too close and not only through through my actions or attitudes about life but when i got to meet andy warhol and people were walking around in jeans and blazers and sometimes we go should sometimes not we've got the world came to the doors of the factory in any warhol interview was the gate the gateway to the world for me well another thing about the andy warhol crowd is there was a lot of gender and sexual fluidity gender and sexual fluidity but it wasn't rampant in it wasn't overt people went into the office and there was a deportment about going into the factory you had a certain culture of the office and the factory which was very correct very traditional yet very relaxed and casual there were all kinds of people that were lesbians there were gays there were straight there were drag queens that were archers but everyone was equal so everyone mattered and no matter who you were it mattered you mattered because you had individual gifts and talents and that's what andy in my now there wasn't a lot of sexuality going on i do not see people having sex rampantly at work or taking drugs because it wasn't that atmosphere when i got to the factory it was long after andy had an assassination attempt so the chain rule change so people were chosen for their seriousness and chosen for the possibilities.

north carolina andy warhol
Trump Tower fire victim was avid art collector who spent time with Andy Warhol

24 Hour News

02:08 min | 2 years ago

Trump Tower fire victim was avid art collector who spent time with Andy Warhol

"Live and lake lakeview long island wins news time five twenty four we'll be an emergency meeting of the un security council today to discuss the alleged chemical attack in syria over the weekend president trump has issued some warnings in response to that attack has bob costantini reports sunday morning the president tweeting about the pictures coming out of syria quote many dead including women and children in mindless chemical attack in syria area of atrocities isn't walked down and encircled by syrian army making it completely inaccessible to outside world president putin russia and iran are responsible for backing animal assad big price to pay end quote the tweets come almost a year after president trump ordered a missile attack on an airbase in syria retaliation for a previous confirmed chemical bombing on abc's this week own land security adviser tom bossert wouldn't take anything off the table these are horrible photos bob costantini washington russia says the attack was a hoax designed by syrian rebels to provoke international intervention as with a missile attack on a syrian air base over the weekend the russians are blaming israel for that the pentagon says it wasn't the us wins news time five twenty five president trump was alleged no fan of the man who died in the fire in trump tower over the weekend and we're hearing that the feeling was mutual although art dealer todd brass ner lived in trump tower a friend sells the daily news rasmus despise donald trump and patrick goldsmith says trump once called his friend a crazy jew response from the white house comes from deputy press secretary raj shah who says basing a front page story maligning the president's solely on a decadesold unverified claim by a critic of the president whose own family members are jewish is absurd mature of the city council housing and buildings committee requesting new fire sprinkler legislation following revelations that parts of trump tower are exempt from the current regulations the daily news reports donald trump lobbied against sprinkler legislation for existing buildings twenty years ago thirty two degrees we have clear skies were going up to forty seven and midtown today we accuweather real feel twenty four wins news time.

Trump Tower Accuweather Press Secretary Rasmus Iran Bob Costantini Lake Lakeview Raj Shah Patrick Goldsmith Donald Trump Un Security Council Pentagon Israel Tom Bossert ABC Assad Putin Russia President Trump Syria Thirty Two Degrees
Trump Tower fire victim was avid art collector who spent time with Andy Warhol

Travel with Stephanie Abrams

00:57 sec | 2 years ago

Trump Tower fire victim was avid art collector who spent time with Andy Warhol

"Nine term eight six six five oh nine t e r m a fatal fires trucks one of midtown manhattan's most wellknown addresses as chris barnes has details just after five thirty this evening our department received an automatic alarm for a fire in the trump tower that's new york city's fire commissioner discussing the fire that broke out in a fiftieth floor apartment in trump tower it did kill sixty year old todd brass ner an art dealer and friend of the late artist andy warhol six firefighters received minor injuries no members of the first family were in the building at the time and they're still looking into the cause of that blaze for usa radio news i'm chris barnes south carolina senator lindsey graham appeared on abc news this week today and said that although he believes embattled epa administrator scott pruitt has done a good job the spending habits issue quote doesn't look good you're the epa administrator into lobbyists changed the locks you've got.

Manhattan Chris Barnes York City Commissioner Andy Warhol Senator Lindsey Graham EPA Scott Pruitt Administrator USA South Carolina ABC Sixty Year
"warhol" Discussed on We Paid To See This

We Paid To See This

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"warhol" Discussed on We Paid To See This

"The only difference is he has a very andy warhol vibe in the movie so he is other things he's a bachelor you don't really know who's like a like a people flock around mas but also he's kind of a sexual so is part of the movie is there's there's an emotional sexual connection kind of but it's always really cold and for the majority of the movie it's kinda like each why why does he even want to be mayor like be with a woman because he doesn't want to do anything with anybody it seems like he doesn't like people unless they are doing something for him kinda thing he has a very tight group of people around him the only trust of certain field i once had a relationship with a man who was very similar to this is what i want to say i really spoken at this i want name the person it was a very get michael sarah to play him but the point is it was somebody who wiz liked in spite of being a terrible person like everyone in his life right was kind of like the nicest thing that's ever happened to this guy doesn't fuck it up with you whatever and he loved me but we were so separate like i was as close as i could get to him and it was like just being kept inside a glass cage or something yet and and yet his a fan out later on that his kind of sexual proclivity is that right word was four.

andy warhol michael sarah
"warhol" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"warhol" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Play but like for a ban starting out of high school kick in new jersey came up with seventy five dollars great let's go how did they want a connecting with andy warhol um they were doing a a kind of residency from elevated by several degrees at a club on third street called cafe bizarre which was kind of a you know it was kind of hip it kind of corn ball at the same time and uh they were playing like five sets a night and a barber rubin was filmmaker at time in a your friend of warhol's saw them and brought the warhol crowd down warhol was getting interested in rock and roll in some way gotten interested in movies was just like oh okay with done visual art now she the movies are happening let's get it let's make movies or go why don't we get a band and when they saw the velvet underground they thought okay this ah work although they installed a lead singer nico because they thought the velvet underground looked boring she's a german actress and model who had appeared in la dolce vita yes had had an affair with the french actor alain delon long indeed and had a child with him and then they played at the dawn of which had been a polish community meeting hall and restaurant on st mark's place because these villa it was changing the sa andy warhol showed his films while the band played the out they view directed them against the walls yeah exactly the i remember yes indeed you were there and i always try i found a number of people who saw their shows but i talk to you and i was when i was working on the book the the idea the idea of happenings with something that was just beginning to kind of come into currency and the idea that you would have abandoned andy warhol showing the movies and all of this kind of stuff you'd have a light show a discount of multimedia idea was something that was just beginning to come into play and uh warhol and paul morressy his filmmaking sidekick a new dubbed these things the exploding plastic inevitable and yet they were quite sometimes they saw.

barber rubin nico alain delon andy warhol paul seventy five dollars