19 Burst results for "Wardle"

"wardle" Discussed on The Bitcoin Podcast

The Bitcoin Podcast

02:06 min | 4 months ago

"wardle" Discussed on The Bitcoin Podcast

"Given the relevancy to the times. I should know that is i know she's plays track but shout out to her holdovers clues clues in slack was always couzens. Shoutout to another girl beats her husband. That's the girl who beat up. Johnny depp isn't it. That's the beat johnny depp. A shoutout to us asaka her. Name's nado soccer. She's the japanese in black tennis player as she's doing her thing. We see youtube boo. We see to wait. Go back go back on go back. She's not just important because he's japanese black woman. She's more she's i'm i'm digging a hole. She's what are you talking about. it's not bad. I'm just shout outs next person. Shout out to daniel shot out to the or or or daniel. Shout out to those could ed. It was giles. Old long neck in wide smiles. Zoe saldana we love you. And that's it for the shout outs. That's it for the episode. Joined the slack. Do the things twenty percent off a lot more for point and other stuff They sell lotion to for. You're not Play lotion are nuts. to moisturizer nuts you need moisture on their sounds bad. Sounds like a terrible idea. Wardle you put moisture down there because you know sometimes you you know sometimes you it big fuck you good idea because sometimes you look old. Sweaty lotions love. That could play way sometimes. Other boxing's occur. Unum zang because i wear jeans smell there do when you're fresh out the shower bro. This is a prototype. Those young ladies out there fresh out the take showers is when the sex has power. You know what i'm saying. All right lady. Yeah.

couzens Johnny depp asaka daniel Zoe saldana soccer tennis youtube giles ed Wardle boxing
"wardle" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

06:57 min | 1 year ago

"wardle" Discussed on KOMO

"That's the latest from the Coma forecast team, you would listen to an ABC News special race for the vaccine. It's again here is ABC news correspondent Erin Cuter. Ski health workers across the country rolled up their sleeves for shots to protect them from covert 19 and to start beating back the pandemic a moment of optimism even as the nation's death toll reaches 300,000. It is also a moment of decision whether or not to get a vaccination. It's a question we will all have to ask ourselves. Already, the Internet is flooded with misinformation and conspiracy theories about the vaccine to combat it. ABC is Bob Woodruff tells us Now Facebook is combing through posts and removing those that damage or mislead Aaron. The Internet is flooded with dangerous misinformation. We're seeing this information spikes, it spiked because people are uncertain. And people are taking advantage of the fact that people are uncertain. Claire Wardle has been tracking these inaccuracies since the very beginning of this pandemic, she says. These distortions air driven by political and economic motives or conspiracy theories. Certain posts falsely claimed on the during his covert 19 vaccine will change People's Edna people, then take that. But what did Noah and then they come up with a false narrative, which is it's gonna change. Ordina claims like this are firmly debunked by scientists and have no basis. But they continued to be shared online, critics say on platforms like Facebook, Facebook is the largest host of vaccine misinformation, among come. Social media. Earlier this month, Facebook announced the campaign to remove covert vaccine misinformation shared by its users. On both Facebook and Instagram. We will start to remove misinformation about the covert Vastine that could lead to harm in an exclusive interview with ABC News, vice president of product and Social Impact, Naomi Klite. Says Facebook has long warned users of inaccuracies with banners on the site and has removed about 12 million misleading covert 19 posts since March. Now it's actively searching for vaccine falsehoods. How do you make that determination that something should be removed? This is a really difficult challenge. We should not be making these decisions ourselves. That is why we're working with these health partners to identify the claims these harmful cones that should be removed. It's also why we're working with fashion occurs to identify misinformation and reduce it. But according to experts, Facebook and Instagram aren't the on Lee home for misinformation. It's very easy to focus on Facebook and Twitter, and they're the platforms that I discussed a great deal, but actually, YouTube is a real problem. One YouTube video, for instance, has over 15 million views. On this Joe Rogan podcast conspiracy theorist Alex Jones is invalid. Claims are going undisputed. So in this video, you've got Alex Jones. He's on a podcast, and he's talking about vaccines. And he's talking about these concerns about DNI, Would you saying is that this marinade that is part of the vaccine will somehow be incorporated into the DNA's human cells, But that's just absolutely false. It will be the motivation for people want to intentionally give up this bad information. Sometimes it's to make money. Sometimes it's to drive you to their website whether actually selling health supplements, so it's in their interests to create a community. Other people are seeking questions for their lives on they have found communities online where people have said I'll tell you why your life isn't going very well, making it all the more challenging to combat Most vaccine misinformation is shared and close circles online. How did to know what's circulating in these groups? And because the messages are being shared by people who know each other? You're more likely to believe it. If you put content that violates our community standards, we will take it down. That's true if you posted anywhere, including in a private group, What do you say to those expert critics After said you just Have done this a million too late or too slowly. I would say that this has been a top priority for the company's since January. Everyone at the company is working on this In some way. Twitter tells us it has been labeling some inaccurate tweets as disputed information while removing many others permanently. And right now accurate information is crucial because by the end of this month, hundreds of thousands of Americans will decide whether or not to take a vaccine. Aaron. Bob. Thanks. NBC's Bob Woodruff. I want to turn back to Dr Richard Besser at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. What have you heard? That's out there. And how do we all combat it? Yeah, yeah. I'm a general pediatrician, and the kinds of concerns that I hear now are very similar to the concerns. I hear from my my patient's parents around any vaccine. You know, the question comes well, Can this give me the disease? Well know the code the vaccine against Cove. It cannot give you covert. It has no living virus in it. How do we know it's safe? Well, we know it's safe because it was tried and in trials that are the standard that are used for vaccine approval. But we need to continue to follow this going forward because this was Fastest approval process in history doesn't mean that the same questions weren't asked. The same studies were done. But but patients in these studies were followed for a much shorter period that is normally done. So over time, we may find that there are things we learn in terms of safety there. Maybe groups of people who receive this vaccine that That have reactions that we hadn't thought about, and that's something it's critically important Tohno so transparency going forward, Letting people know what's being done to continue to study these vaccines and recognizing that pressure is not going to get people to be vaccinated. It's It's listening. It's understanding people's questions and recognizing that some people may want to wait. And that's not an irrational choice. Everyone's got a difference in risk. Howard's personally I think vaccines safe and effective. My parents are both 90 and I recommend that they get it when my group is called. I'm gonna get it as quickly as I can. On my I recommend. I'm going to recommend it for my patients. Families not for my patients yet because it hasn't been stayed in Children, and I'm a pediatrician, so it's not yet approved for anyone under 16. But I'll be looking to see the results of those studies so that we'll have a vaccine that everyone in America I can feel comfortable getting thanks to Dr Richard Besser, or former colleague here at ABC News, now CEO of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. And we asked Fizer chief Dr Albert Borland, what he would say to someone who has convinced themselves the vaccine is unsafe..

Facebook ABC News Dr Richard Besser ABC Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Twitter Aaron Bob Woodruff Alex Jones YouTube Erin Cuter Claire Wardle Bob Ordina Joe Rogan Noah
"wardle" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"wardle" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of adults in the U. S. Say their quote pretty certain they will not get a covert 19 vaccine and that more information will not change their minds. That's according to research out this week from the Pew Research Center. Why might that be? Well, Facebook has been a hotbed of misinformation and disinformation about covert 19 vaccines, and this week, the company said it would remove all false information about the virus that could quote Lead to imminent physical harm. We wanted to understand what kind of misinformation people are being exposed to when it comes to covert 19 vaccines. What's being said, and what could be done to stop the spread of false narratives? Claire Wardle has been looking into this. She is the co founder and US director of first draft That's a nonprofit that's focused on research to address misinformation. Ordell, co authored a recent report called Under the Surface Covert 19 Vaccine Narratives, Misinformation and Data deficits on social Media. And Claire Wardle is with us now. Thank you so much for being with us my pleasure. First of all, could you just tell us how prevalent covert 19 vaccination misinformation is and the ways in which we're being exposed to it? So we have seen misinformation about vaccines online for a number of years, But we've certainly seen an optic this year, and we've seen an uptick in the last month since the new announcements around potential vaccines. And there's a whole host of different narratives out there about the vaccines. But there's also an absence of accurate information. People just have questions. So talking about Facebook's decision. Yes, there are false claims that they're taking down, but there's a lot of people who were just asking questions. Facebook can't take those down. But people have got genuine questions that we're just not answering. Adequately enough. Do we know who's creating this content and why it's so successful. Some of it is to make money people trying to drive kliks to their websites where they're selling health supplements. So there's those kind of people There are people who are just trying to crave connections with the community. So many ways they have become part of some of these communities online where people sharing information, and they want to be part of that community. And so this idea that the government is controlling you. People's lives have been turned upside down this year. They're looking for explanations, and unfortunately, there are conspiracy communities providing what looks like explanations so people kind of seduced. Very kind of a social element to this, and then some people are just doing this to cause trouble to see what they can get away with. You know, the anonymity of the Internet allows them space to create these hoaxes and falsehoods, and they sit back and laugh. So there's a number of different motivations for people doing it. And, of course, different interventions that we need to roll out based on those different motivations. Okay, So let's Purcell little bit more. The Facebook A statement that it would quote remove false information that could lead to Imminent physical harm Your reaction to that. Is that what it doesn't go too far. It's just too big. What do you think of it? So if I was to either list 100 examples, actually, Very few of them hit that barrier. There's a lot of people that are posting information that goes right up to that boundary. But you'd be very hard pressed to say that false rumor is going to lead to imminent harm. And so yes, if somebody says this vaccine was made from aborted fetus material that is false, and they will take that down. But if somebody is raising the question to say, I think the media is in cahoots with big Pharma, you know to control us. If you're a content moderator, Do you take that down? If somebody says, you know, my family member was part of the vaccine trial, and they had a terrible reaction. Is Facebook gonna take that down? Are they going to do the necessary fact checking to pick up the phone to say so there's a lot of noise right now that these policies sound great in a press release, But when you actually look at the examples, it's very difficult to say. Would we take down all of that speech because that leaves These arguments of censorship on nobody's allowing us to ask these questions. I guess. I also asked about the use of the word imminent. I mean, I would think of imminent physical harm being you know, there's been some terrible stories recently. Where of people in relationships for whatever reason, sort of encouraging each other to harm each other sort of goading each other into sort of physical, you know, into activities which you know, could lead to harm but I don't know how one would argue. That preventing someone from taking a vaccine would ever lied to imminent physical harm. Do you know what I mean? I don't know how you could even make that argument. Exactly. And I think one of the things that we argue is that there's a lot of emphasis on individual posts on what we're missing is the daily drip drip drip drip drip of low level vaccine misinformation, none of which would break Facebook's barrier. But we don't know what this looks like, If over a couple of years you see this kind of content that's questioning The government is questioning the CDC is questioning Dr Fauci. None of those posts, you know, would pass that test. However. What does it look like? If that's what you see every single day, and we have almost no research that allows us to understand that longitudinal impact of misinformation in your research paper, your team looked at misinformation in three different languages spanning 41 countries. Just tell us a bit more about that. What did you learn from that? So some of the most dominant narratives in English was about liberty and freedom. So there's a lot of narratives in this country on Australia in the U..

Facebook Claire Wardle Pew Research Center government US co founder Purcell Australia director Dr Fauci CDC
MacOS Big Sur reveals Apple secretly hates your VPN and firewall

SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

MacOS Big Sur reveals Apple secretly hates your VPN and firewall

"Os big sur has exited beta and been released to the public. Despite this there is no indication that apple has changed this behavior Some default apps on macos big sur which remain in beta bypass any network firewall. Vpn connection a user has connected This behavior was first spotted by twitter user amex x. s wd and is more thoroughly explained by security researcher. Patrick wardle according to patrick on older versions of mac os. A firewall could be set up using the network. Colonel attention but on mac. Os big sur. Apple has deprecated the extension which allows for many of their apps to bypass the firewall. Patrick provides to mac. Os big sur firewall examples. Lulu and little snatch so. This is frustrating

Patrick Wardle Apple Twitter Patrick
"wardle" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"wardle" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's the Ted Radio Hour from NPR. I'm a new summer. And I think I'm a pretty good citizen. I am law abiding. I stop at red lights. I pay my taxes. I try to be nice to my neighbours. You probably do, too. But what rules do we follow? When we go online? Well done. There are no rules. But maybe there should be because what happens on the Internet can have really life repercussions. So this particular example happened towards the end of April. 2019 That's Claire Wardle. She studies how information spreads online and how tech platforms filter fax from miss information. She's been researching a recent case related to the polio vaccine in Pakistan, a series of videos the merge in Pakistan, which basically question the safety of the polio vaccine. One of the videos claimed the kids were dying after getting the vaccine, another claim that the vaccine was making. If you watched the video, it is absolutely clear that it's a fabricated video. It shows a man talking to the camera. And then the camera pans and you see a row of kids laying down one by one on a hospital bed. Supposedly after getting the polio vaccine. You see this guy basically saying to these kids on the bed so clearly like coaching them to act a specific way exactly, but inherit social media where we just look at the headlines and we don't watch the clip. Just seeing the imagery of the Children lying on the bed.

polio vaccine Claire Wardle NPR Pakistan
"wardle" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"wardle" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A doctor. Why introducing now without any consultation when the doctors are extremely ah, weary from the Corona virus, I have started in February and they have been doing an absolutely excellent job. Korea. South Korea has bean Ah model country in her handling the situation working on they are now trying to they've engaged into war. With the doctors and now pointing the fingers at the doctors for not agreeing to their terms. South Korea has been such a success story in terms of containing the Corona virus. What's going wrong now? Why these high figures? The people like everywhere else in the world. Did it being careful for such a long time that they're just letting go a little bit from that point of view? We're also getting the higher numbers again because we're we're testing like that first time around Korea. Just Goto old all out when he goes to testing. So in the hospital that I am working at, we have had one patient tested positive. Which meant that every single person in that Wardle, their families and every single health professional surrounding it got tested Street away on the same day. So it sounds as though you have faith in South Korea's capacity to control the Corona virus, then We do we do. But we do need our doctors onboard, and unfortunately, making them angry. He's not. There is not the way to go, especially in this situation when they're so tired. And the students and the junior doctor than even the comm professors are actually At the moment, giving up the jobs. They are resigning from the posts because the government is criminalizing them. They're saying that they will press criminal charges for not following orders. Which is, um, is unheard off in a democratic country. To be fair. I was her Yang Mi Park, a research professor at Korea University College of Medicine in Seoul on for all things Corona virus related. Don't forget to check the BBC news live page, which on at the moment is focusing on European countries tightening rules. Amid several different outbreaks. That's on BBC news website. Distribution of the BBC World Service News are the U. S. Has made possible by American public media producer.

South Korea BBC Korea University College of Me Wardle Yang Mi Park Seoul producer professor
"wardle" Discussed on The Security Ledger Podcast

The Security Ledger Podcast

16:05 min | 1 year ago

"wardle" Discussed on The Security Ledger Podcast

"Is really to use arrows to kind of circle. Back to the issues and vulnerabilities zoom bid a really good job fixing those within a day. So Kudos they also kind of had their own. You Know Bill Gates memo moment where they said. Hey we're focusing. All our engineering researches net resources now specifically on security and privacy not new features amazing they also brought in external security researchers Durga expand their bug bounty program almost complete one eighty in Prioriti- prioritize security and privacy to get back to your question about competitors. I wouldn't be surprised if some of the other more star type solutions or competitors would have similar flaws or issues again. Their general priorities are just increasing the user base and making credible critically usable product hours. If you look at something from Microsoft they believe teens or maybe Google hangouts those kind of things. Those are products that are are are created by a more mature companies companies. That have been in this game for a long time and realize the impact of security and also have the teams and the security minded developers. Because you know writing code and right insecure code or two different things I it's like you have to have kind of this hacker mindset while you're writing the code or have team within the Within the organization that can read team or analyze the application. Do Source Code Audits Reviews? I'm sure previously this isn't something that zoom invested in because that's a very Endeavor also does slow down Getting the market which again for startup like getting the market fast. Is You know how you Gillian. Yeah this is. This is not a problem as you know not a problem unique to zoom or. This is the problem that is endemic startup culture. Right hundred percent so I think this is just a great example not to pick on zoom too much. I mean they do what the market demands right if they were to spend six months developing a new product or new version rather and they went their customers like we. We didn't change anything but it's more secure like prior to this penick like users wouldn't have cared about that you know they're like where I am emojis. And where are my like background like Easter's users don't care about security that much At least initially so what I would argue immerse. We're prioritizing so you know it's kind of interesting scenario where You know you have the Silicon Valley Angle User Angle and the end result unfortunately as a product that maybe completely scared because if you zoom invite now what do I accept actually gotta.

Bill Gates Prioriti Microsoft Google Gillian
"wardle" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

04:43 min | 2 years ago

"wardle" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Be back. I'm assuming next week. And we're going to be busy this week. I'm based in Vegas. March madness is coming. We have three conference tournaments out here, which is pretty crazy. I get to see Gonzaga, and I get to see the WD see the mountain west in the Pac twelve and then I put my head down. And these brackets are coming out. I love this time of year. I'm more of an MBA guy than a college basketball guy. But I really respect the fact that it's time to dive in and get to know some of these teams we had two coaches join us earlier tonight from Bradley Brian Wardle joined us after their epic comeback against northern Iowa fun to talk to him and how about the head coach of Gardner Webb. We talked to Tim craft about his journey after they beat Radford seventy six to sixty five. So a lot of these teams that they win their conference tournament. You never heard of like Gardner Webb. They're going to match up in the first round against someone. Really good, right? They're gonna play a Kansas. They're going to go up against north. Carolina, whoever it is. And they're gonna get smoked most likely, but then you see a story of sister Jean and Loyola Chicago or you see a story of a team that goes on a deep run and Wichita state. It could be anything could be a team that you weren't that familiar with they get in. And then they get to the Sweet Sixteen and that's one of the big hooks of March madness. This year is the absolute year that Gonzaga has to win. Mark few in Spokane has been building a powerhouse for well over a decade. And now, they're really good. And there are a one c they have to win a final four is not good enough. Even for zag. None of that. Forget about a final four banner. You gotta go out and win. And we look at some of the other teams what a shame that Zion in his career, which is a short one at Duke has missed out on the home at home series with North Carolina. What a shame. I mean. The Knicks are tanking in order to get Zion. Zion could probably have played right in the first. Game. He got hurt. He had to come out of the game because of the niece sprain. But Zion in my opinion was good enough to play in that last most recent game and he didn't play because arrest again hopefully for the tournament in the ACC tournament. I wanted to mention the rockets beating the Mavericks ninety four to ninety three finally for me. I think it's time to take them seriously in their battle with the warriors. The warriors lost to the sons at home tonight. One fifteen to one eleven they have completely checked out checked out. Now. Good good news is they're going to check back in. They're going to get back into it. And they're gonna probably do. Well. But there's no debate that they checked out the great NBA insider, Marcus, Marc, spears writes quote. This is amazing. Listen to this. This was the son's first road win all season. Against the Western Conference team. They will Owen nineteen the previous nineteen losses were by an average of seventeen point nine points per game. The only road game they've won in conference was tonight. Against the defending champs, one fifteen to one eleven can you imagine? If you bet the sons on the money line in Vegas. If anybody knows what that payout is hippy up via Twitter at j t the brick. How incredible would that be oh for nineteen and they beat the warriors on the road for their first conference road win of the season. Incredible to me that that could happen. Let's keep it going fielding out in Cleveland, Ohio. You're on CBS sports radio. Yes, there JT creases you giving me some time in a long time listener first-time talking to you. Thank you. No problem. I wanted to make a comment about the warriors. And then losing to this. That's almost ridiculous. It's still on the same end. Do you feel like with Kevin Durant with the little ankle tweak? Contusion might be a problem going forward when they try to finish off this last time. I don't see that. I watched a highlight tonight. Thanks for the call. I don't think it's going to be the end of the world for him. But this was a big night for them because you know, Klay Thompson was Charleston. Steve Kerr, wasn't happy Durant tweaked. If you look at all the things that happen tonight, and they lost. That's a really bad performance for them unacceptable. But as I keep saying this, nobody cares. I have friends who host sports radio shows in the bay area. And they'll spend four minutes on this. They'll open up their shows tomorrow on the warriors lost and everybody will be like cool. So what who they play next? How do I get a ticket? What are they moving into the new arena once the playoffs in my career being on the radio covering the? The NBA. I have never seen this have you have you ever seen a team that when they.

Zion Kevin Durant Vegas Gonzaga North Carolina NBA Bradley Brian Wardle Gardner Webb Pac Mavericks basketball Kansas Twitter Knicks CBS Loyola Chicago Klay Thompson Spokane
"wardle" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"wardle" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"And say, here's my pleasure is tell me what did you? I want to be engaged and be acting and looking at their ears. Being active role. Even the kids a matter. How older young they are? 'cause they need. They're the ones who learning with us. They try to really get them, you know, engage in active and in taking care of their diabetes. They find value in this understands that at some point once they're grown up living on their own. They're going to be doing all of a sudden around for people with type two diabetes. The approach is a bit different. I would say that we're actually more likely to maternal affect the number of people diabetes in the country, but preventing diabetes by talking about trying to put the horseback in the barn with something that you'd think of as a cure, Dr Karen maker, high you has been in immediately involved in one of the most important diabetes prevention studies since it was started in the mid nineteen ninety s it's called the diabetes prevention program, and it showed that some combination of exercising weight loss and this medicine that we use traditionally for diabetes treatment called metformin you earlier before people have diabetes. Were both effective ways of reducing the rate of progression to diabetes and people who are identified as having pretty hard risk based on sugar values and a new medicine for people with type two injected medicine that isn't insulin. But it is a this hormone called GOP one in various forms of it. That are mimics of it. Injected therapy to to how well the pancreas was making fun. And so that works really, well it turns out to be. A very effective therapy. Are also looking at how well the remaining cells that produce insulin can be preserved and since there is no cure, Dr Todd and ABC I was happy to help kids diabetes camp every year. Call camp John Wardle.

diabetes Dr Todd John Wardle Dr Karen maker GOP metformin ABC
"wardle" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

03:08 min | 3 years ago

"wardle" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"I think a lot of people promise them, we're going to movie with you and this and that and it never kind of paid off. I was really worried that they because they had done all this media stuff before they were going to be very jaded in retailing. And it was just going to be this wrote his my story kind of thing. But once we finally persuaded them to do it. They greet to do it. And turned the first vincis. I was I didn't have the CJ. We had a little light Saab. I didn't they were gonna show up. But when they did show what they. They would just you're looking for a filmmaker is kind of emotional, musty. That's where the connection between the audience and the contributors occurs. And I think sometimes people documentary should be this dispassionate thing where we just kinda tell the facts of a case or a story wherever but I- complete reject that. I think you're looking for emotional honesty, emotional truth. And what was surprising to me is when they sat down for the interview, they were willing and able to tap back into the emotion that they felt when they were experiencing this for the first time, and I think it may be just because it was so events seismic and crazy that not just all their friends. They just they were there when they were talking about it. And let's say lots my skills as a filmmaker. And maybe that was a small part of it. But I think you film is only ever going to be as good as contributors, and they were they were prepared to go to these emotional places that I didn't expect and showing them the film at the end one of the things that was amazing. They both loved the film, which was great. But they showed it to them separately. Because they wouldn't get you on at the time. Which is again, you can see in the film is very hard part of the filmmaking process but separately, they both came up and hugged me. And it was like it wasn't because they liked the film, which they did it was because I followed through and my team followed through what we said we were going to do and just that simple active doing what we said we're going to do is like such a big deal for them. It almost didn't matter. What the movie was like it was like you did what you said. Thank you for that. So yeah. But just wanting to add you guys out here in America, you tend to use the term subjects to describe people in documentaries, and I guess in the UK the traditional have been brought up in we tend to cool them contributors, and particularly this film because they were subjects of a human experiment. They didn't know they were part of. I was found comfortable using the subject, and I was very conscious. I think the the power will by scientists over their research subjects is similar to the power. We have as documentary filmmakers over our subjects. And it's really, you know, when you point a camera someone you've got lights, and you've got the minimum. You can ask them pretty much anything and most people go there, and that's a huge responsibility. And I think it's incumbent on us to just be mindful of that every single day filming, and we're editing. Can I? Yeah. I I I never say subjects I kind of openly rejected as well. I say protagonist because it's just nice. It's very thinking. But also, it speaks specific toback imagery, like this sort of USA photography and film science as if there was like something legitimately scientific about reducing reality to a two-dimensional plane..

USA America UK
"wardle" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

03:12 min | 3 years ago

"wardle" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"I will I will say though, that there's like there's a really to me a strong line between style and form, you know, in very much. I think personally think that hell county is peddling inform and not style style is very much of a near. It's very much trend. It's very much. And I don't mean those productively I mean, those just to distinction inform is very much like the literal material of the sculpture or the actual shape of it not the sort of camera style or the and so with that being said, what was really important for how easy was that. You know, you don't you don't get to consume the film. You know, you're not like given given the story or like a given the narrative because if you and this is coming from a a a very perhaps overly conscious African American photographer. Artists filmmaker whatever that is like knows that most stories about black. Folks are connected to struggle connected to slavery connected to this and they're like given to people and people consume them, and that kind of becomes the entire history of the entire narrative, the entire everything. And so how do you to me? That's a big problem because I think that we're bigger than a variety of ways in which we've been depicted. And so how do you address those things it's like not not let someone easily consume the protagonist or the characters, you know, make someone investor imagination. And then force you to reflect on the fact that oh actually have only seen these types of representations. Because now that I'm only seeing this like this is new, but like why is this new because it's banal it's has to do with it takes a long time to get the film is very aunt is very time forward like very anti industry in that. Like you have to spend time to find these. Moments which is not happened in the past. And so for those in the film. It was literally like we weren't even make an film because I spent so much time with them just hanging out and always had the camera, but we're playing video games where like playing basketball, we're watching sometimes filming. Sometimes I'm not literally just Chilean. I like to say that I was like, you know, not there to capture the lousy to participate in their lives remote really interested about this. How much did you explain to them the foam that the film was going to take and how much did contribute to this thing that they would just going to be a normal observational documentary? It's impossible to for them to to know. But also for meeting like this project wasn't intended to be. I mean, it was intended to be seen. But I had no idea. I was two and a half years. I was sitting before the first grant we submitted to was that Garrett Scott in. So the guys didn't even know what Sundance was for them for me to go from shooting with this little camera. And then for it to all of a sudden being theater with three hundred people watching was was kind of it was jarring for even them. They're like, that's what we re doing the whole time because I'm just shooting and we're just hanging out. You know? Which I think is is really fascinating..

Garrett Scott hell county Sundance basketball
"wardle" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

03:15 min | 3 years ago

"wardle" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"Experiment. Locked at Yale till twenty sixty six there's also sort of journey of discovery with the study going on there as well. So there was a lot of into into we've and we the bits we had it in the past. We really worked hard at plotting it as tightly as we could. And I wanted things seed information here, and then pay off here, you You know, know? it was exciting for me to combine that kind of really meticulous grennell film-making with the kind of observational investigative stuff where we don't know where it's going to go and one of the challenges getting the film of the ground was people was the third act. Where's it going to go? And I was like, well, it's a documentary. That's the whole point you don't necessarily know we're going to end up. But but I think because the first two thirds first half or so densely plotted, and we could see all the story elements and stuff. People really freaked out by that more observations aspects and getting all to work together was a real really screw with your mind and the ad it we had post it's everywhere and graphs mapping kind of emotional arts. And all this kind of stuff. Well, I think special challenge in three identical strangers that I remember experiencing. What I I watched it as the first ten minutes of the film is one of the most incredible stories you've ever heard. And I remember thinking where does this go from here? Yeah. Burn through so much story in the first fifteen minutes, you saw people said to me, I'll just didn't. I thought you would just wasted it kind of thing. And there was a lot of pressure on us to make it more like a Netflix series or something like that in the certainly enough story to do that. But I was always like films like narrative and documentary where there's like a surplus of story where it's so dense that you actually probably have to come back and watch again, and you'll get something completely different for me. And I was always very there's a lot of pressure on me to make into series, and I was always refocused like no this this needs to be told him one sitting in a cinema people need to again. That's fine. I'd rather have too much in than too little when you asked me I thought about that. It was so I mean, it seemed like such a seamless difficult seamless thing that was so easily done. But I when I was watching it. I knew how difficult and all that kind of micro. Macro things you doing. I was like so impressed by the fact that it works as such an entertaining thing was huge box office hit. But when you're watching film maker, you thinking all the work that has gone into this that was what was going through my head in full. Admiration. So thank you. I've been four grounding style in this conversation, but I want to spend the last part of this talking about the interactions. You had with the subjects in your film, and responsibility that you felt towards the subjects in your film, rebel. You talked about one of your goals. In HALE county is wanting do something different than other cliches and representations that you've seen in in other films. The lives of the of the people in your film are complicated lives like anyone has complicated life, and and I wonder how you thought about representing them. And and and since the film has been out how that relationship has evolved. Yeah. Good question..

Yale Netflix HALE county fifteen minutes ten minutes
"wardle" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

04:21 min | 3 years ago

"wardle" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"Within the steel. Yeah. The goes to character. You know, I got a new subject who was willing to talk during the so we had to I had to fly over to New Orleans, and this interview, and then insert it in and then there was going to be more George, and he was he George was going to threaten to take the story away from us. And how do you how do you? How do you? How do you stop that from happening as you just have to just really really try different things and just pull pull him out. Like just take things out that are so tempting to leave and story lines. Like, maybe hijacked this film for a second time. So you don't do that Lucas for enough? Enough months. Doing the coming of age story of me growing up and making this film, and then kind of growing up and becoming kind of a detective of my own life and solving. This mystery of what happened and gathering, my friends and all that that came appoint where Lucas being a young man was and they knew this was happening. He just didn't want me to seem unlikable as as a female character. It's like a lot of people are very freight to go there with female characters. And I just I just knew that to work with a older more experience female editors. So I brought on the second editor whose name is Kimberly Hassett greatly under utilize greatly haunted working mostly as a producer now. But extremely intuitive and talented as an editor and she came on for the final five weeks. And she would let you be unlikable. Well, she she women that much harder on those those we kind of with go there and talk about these difficult things. And and some of the things the things that mitt to that may not be so flattering. The true to life, and because this documentary about me, and my friends I was so concerned that we had to have we had to reflect how how things are and how my relationships with my friends are and how it was that we got to make this film. We were nineteen and what kind of personality I was and what kind of person I am now. And we had to be honest. And capturing that so we Kimberly when they're with me, and that was that was completely instrumental and important in the process where we then left these holes edit where I knew that was going to be working with Kimberly. And then we fill in these hoes with deeper more mature and the standing, and then from there, we have fashioned the entire thing became the seamless beautiful thing with Lawrence's help that sound designer who came in and just move all the kinks. Tim compared to HALE county, your shirkers three identical strangers has more of a straightforward chronology to it. But I don't imagine that necessarily made it an easier process in the edit room. What were the things that you had to find in the edit room? Yeah. We mentioned under real time precious can get through the I mean, I think. Although the narratives linear in incident respects, and it's oversee commercial film. I always felt like we were going to combine all these different aspects of documentary filmmaking. I mentioned earlier and me and Michael the edits shared the law of influences. Arrow Morris too. No Asif Kapadia to James Marsh people at a lot of dogs. We also what's the bad Hollywood movies like. Average Hollywood movies like the Michael J FOX film. The secrets of my success was like a reference point for the s sequences. We were watching born identity for kind of identity through aspects of the film. I guess working out the biggest challenge with was working because it works. I mean, cool good films works on different levels. Brin family story human story, tabloid of these brothers separated reunited, and then also separated again, but then you've this these other Matic ARC's playing across the store, and we really thought a lot about them. You know about the film moves from position of thinking. Nature is really dominance in the importance of nurture. And it's also a journey of discovery experiment, which separated the triplets, the secret.

Kimberly Hassett Lucas George New Orleans Michael J FOX Tim Asif Kapadia editor mitt Hollywood Brin Arrow Morris HALE county Lawrence James Marsh producer five weeks
"wardle" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

04:29 min | 3 years ago

"wardle" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"We've been we've been travelling together on end. So we kind of like old horses. I haven't I saw Sandy's film at false and. I was a community hypnotized, and I haven't seen Tim's. But I told him that just watching the trailer. I was like I mean. Amazing. Unbelievable. And I told him it's gonna come to all the theaters in my town. So I can't I can't spend time watching now. And he was like I respect that. People talk about of finding film in the edit room. And I've heard some of you talk a little bit about that. But I'd like to go a little bit more deeper into that idea remote. Can can you talk about what happened in your editing process? That allowed you to find your film. Jeez. Tom. That's that's probably the biggest question you could've asked because. The film is it's literally a puzzle. You know, it's not, and you could say that about any film because I'll films are additive unless it's like one shot, but then it's kind of edited because you have a beginning and end. But like, it's it's there's varying degrees of puzzle nece, and this is like a one million piece puzzle specifically with once again, like the capacity to like, you surp- something that you can't predict the film is built to be a sort of like to most most films are interested in like walking someone the woods path, you know, like our films like trying to put you in the woods, and allowing you to just like have this experience of an atmosphere, and so the editing process was you know, it was actually quite fun now to think about it because you get to the I'm not gonna. Too much to say as I'm sure for for the two other panelists as well. What I will say because I've said it before is that the the most beautiful thing about the film is because we're dealing like we're intentionally dealing directly with someone subjectivity in trying to engage that with as much agency as as possible as possible through openness through ambiguity. You're confronted with your personal truth on a daily basis, which is something that is important and genitive like I'm like joss, rob Maya like, this is what these three images are doing together. And this is how it's going to do this and Joscelyn's Ike. Well, actually, I like this one a little bit shorter. This is what it's doing actually in Rob's like, well, you know, both you to know what you're saying. But it's actually more like this. And then my doing this and you have to negotiate. The way that you perceive the audience is going to respond to that in accordance with the spirit of the film. We're trying we're obviously carrying the way in which an audience views it, but I mean. Yeah. So it's it's like it was quite beautiful like, you leave and you're like, I know myself better because I have people that I trust who have point of view that are conflicting with mine that are just as true, and that's like really rewarding. Sandy, you talk about the vitality of your collaboration with this former breezed escape border editor. And the importance of not CD earlier in the process set, and you down the path of making this more personal film. Once you're down that path. And once you were in the groove of finding know what else did you have to discover in the edit room, everything it was I guess it was like nine months of me sitting in my garage with Lucas, but it wasn't just completely nine months with him. It was like I worked with him for seven and a half months, and then he kind of was completely expired and exhausted and was just way too much because we, you know, his skill was just a lot of it was graphic like moving things around and trying out moves with me. And and discovering the story. Sorry. Let them out of the garage. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. For for for smokes, and skating guess, but we you know, the thing is part of it was mean, not wanting wanting George because George loom large and within the editing..

Sandy Tim rob Maya Lucas George Tom skating joss editor nine months
"wardle" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

02:52 min | 3 years ago

"wardle" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"And when you made the documentary version of circles, you gathered a new tribe, and you talk about not CD as an example of of someone who. Was a participant in in this process. I I'd love to hear from each with abuse starting with us Andy to talk about those other allies and advocates for your for your film because each of you is trying to do something different. It's not that easy to explain maybe doesn't fit into a neat pitch box. And and so how did people come to believe in what you were doing? What does that mean to you? It was extremely difficult trying to convince people to to get involved in this thing because the footage first of all I had to produce sixteen millimeter for this before people could believe that this thing exists. And that looked the way did before I begin pitching to other people and finding try like I tried to make this film pretty much in the same spirit of the way. I made sure as teenager hand-picking people. And just going at it, and you know, believing this thing together. So once you talking about I guess pitching and getting people involved, and that kind of thing at any stage who were the kind of keep it was really I understand what you're doing. Let me tell you. It was really hard finding a producer to to one and believe in me, and to know what and talking about and working on this alone. So pretty much worked on this as my own producer. And a lot of people who are more. Evan's than and well-connected. We're horrified that was kind of doing this loan and editing in my garage with an editor who was actually pretty much untried names Luca seller. I think he's really talented. He was very good at sitting with me and trying out things with me, and we discovered this. He's actually a skateboarder his he was actually discovered as a barista at Starbucks by Jeff fears when you need it an insistent on his film, author the JT LeRoy story and Lucas game. And Jeff said you've recommends his boy scout because I couldn't afford to hire a real editor grownup editor I'd never produce. It was just me. So I took a chance and Lucas we kind of like really Gerald on on mood, and he was young enough to understand and kind of remember what it was like to be hell raising eighteen year old trying to make movies. He was twenty seven and a skateboarder was low old to be skateboard by then. So we sat together and just listened. Music and built these collages. And and I realized very early on like a maybe nine months a year before we even began working together. I need a sound designer because I wanted to get sound and soundtrack and.

Evan Andy editor producer Gerald Lucas Starbucks Jeff eighteen year nine months
"wardle" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

04:38 min | 3 years ago

"wardle" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"Tell the story without myself being involved, and it was actually a friend great editor in that CD who who one of us and Jesus camp and the Wolfpack and she looked at my archive and looked at all this Sunday. Don't you realize you can't tell this story is about you? And then I had to deal with me. So I tried to kind of recapture what it was to be a kind of an eighteen year old before I made sure just recapture. What was in roiling in my mind? Before I tell the story of the the filmmaking and my friends who got involved and. The whole thing. It was like basically trying to recapture the cadence and the rhythms of a life like my life and getting my friends involved in this one of the other things, of course, making a documentary rather than a fiction or just a personal thing where it's just me musing about this thing. Self-indulgent manner was having to involve the other people whose lives who actually. Sucked into a black hole with the the theft of the film as well. And that was getting in touch with my former friends, I guess, and that took a lot of research, and persuasion and. Pain getting them back into this thing and telling our story as a whole as well as just mine are third and final speaker is Ramal Ross director of HALE county this morning this evening. The film is set in the black belt of Alabama cotton country immersing us into the lives of two young African American men in their families. I I encountered the film in twenty fourteen is a jury member for the Garrett, Scott development grant, that provides mentoring to first time filmmakers remodels works. Ample stood out amongst the other applicants for its striking imagery that reflects his background is a still photographer. But the sample was very impressionistic with scarcely any dialogue. I imagine the project would develop more traditional narrative elements, but Ramal stuck to his more poetic vision. And that boldness was rewarded with numerous honors, including the Gotham documentary award and an Oscar nomination, I asked her Mel how he chose the film style. Yeah. I think pretty early into the project maybe three or four years. Sorry, three or four months until the project made an editor to and the edit very much resembled sort of the traditional language of documentaries, specifically as relates to the representation of black folks, and sort of the African American experience, and so sort of reflecting that what I considered to be a problem, or it's sort of trap of of knowledge or assumed knowledge started to like build using respond directly to the content that was there, and then you know, sort of the mantra or the creed of the film began to have a couple of goes, I think somewhere around like five or six things that weren't as important that weren't more important than each other, which I don't remember all of, but I can say like I wanted to sort of address the sort of trappings of Meredith. The trappings of story wanted to sort of wanted to use black skin as content sort of acknowledge that the sort of the media landscape as it relates to black folks sort of rohrschack test for your experience with the community, white or black or everything else wanted to sort of create a film that was an actual experience of what it's like to perhaps participate in someone's life into be there. And so sort of like proceed words in some in some in some way. And. I think those are the ones I kind of remember, but sort of working together sandy in the interview, I did with you. I'm pure non-fiction. You talk about the importance of having a tribe as an artist you talk about in Singapore. When you're a teenager, you had your tribe of people that you were able to make this first film..

Ramal Ross editor Jesus Singapore HALE county Gotham Garrett theft Pain Mel Alabama Oscar Meredith director eighteen year four months four years
"wardle" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

02:50 min | 3 years ago

"wardle" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"Matt's. We'll start with Tim Worrell director of three identical strangers his film investigates case of New York triplets who were separated at birth. They discovered each other's existence in college and became minor celebrities in the nineteen eighties. I wouldn't leave the story if someone else retelling it, but it's true. They worded. It's started to college. It was the first day of school. All these people coming up to seeing how are you any? I'm like, I don't know what you're talking about guy turned around. I knew it was that he's double. So you're not gonna believe a twin brother. God. Jets come into it opens. And there I am his is my is my has his eyes and it's true. And that story went from being amazing to incredible Arkell two twins reunited. I think I might be the third. When people ask me, what is the most remarkable story you ever encounter? I tell them. It's the story of the triplets. You guys have been on the front page of every newspaper in the world through they were warlike closed, and they were like brothers. It was a miracle was nothing that can keep us apart. That's when things kinda God. What they didn't realize is that they hit been the subject of a shady scientific study in the making of three identical strangers. Tim and his crew uncovered new details about the case his filmmaking style combines new interviews with archival footage and impressionistic re-creations of the past. He works with the UK production company raw known for the documentary VM posture that also used artful re-creations, I asked him how he met the challenges laid out by this story. My background is a filmmaker. Come from a really kind of in the UK. We have a real kind of observational tradition. Converter tradition of filmmaking which is very very prescribed approach. You know, you don't have Coleman. Tree. Don't have pop music. You don't there's all kinds of kind of rules, and I guess early on. I realized that tell the story I was going to have to use all kinds of different elements of filmmaking and break free of these. Constraints from this technique. I think one of the things we've got some reconstruction at the top of the film, initially, very reluctant to use it. I'm very ambivalent about reconstruction. But what I realized is for people to really gone on emotional journey with this film, which for me is what filmmaking is about. It's having an emotional connection with your audience..

Tim Worrell UK New York Coleman Jets director Matt's.
"wardle" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

03:35 min | 3 years ago

"wardle" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Sports. Seven twenty six now max traveling with the team by the R I Ramsey call the game last night in the loss. And our sister station be one on one exercising may get you to eat better. Apparently while some people may hit the gym. So they can enjoy all their favorite fattening foods with less guilt. It turns out that all the time. You exercise is motivating you to change your eating habits. That's according to a new study out of the university of Texas at Austin regular exercise, actually translates to people making healthier food choices, according to this particular piece of research. So that's pretty good news. So you went on both ends of the coin now seven twenty six Valentine's Day supposed to be a day when you show your significant other how much you really love them what they mean to you turns out, they'll Christina not many people are doing a very good job of it. In fact, according to a new groupon survey. Fifty eight percent of Americans would give their partner in f- failing grade when it comes to their effort on Valentine's Day with only fifteen percent giving their Honey. And I told you it's all about the guilt trip. Wow. Really is. Wow. So what do people need to do to get their partner to give them a passing grade, homey up, I guess, I guess so for seventy percent of people it's getting a gift, it's really important. So of course, what gifts you get them. Could also helps boost that grade for fifty eight percent of people the thing they really want. Well, it's the dinner out with chocolate the second most popular gift. And so here's some other gifts that people want for Valentine's Day that twenty six percent what twenty six percent of people want tickets to a comedy show. Okay. Thirty percents say a -cation and a local hotel a spa package comes in thirty one percent trip to an exotic end or a warm weather locale at thirty one percents. Some of the stuff cost some serious scratch though. Right. Trim. It's not gonna be, you know, cheap jewelry that comes in at thirty six percent bling home-cooked meal. Thirty nine percent sign. What do you want, Meatloaf? Nothing says love like a nice, Meatloaf. Man. A massage comes in at forty six percent. I would imagine that's a very popular gift. Could be free. Yeah. And of course, flowers at forty six percent, you can't lose with flowers. Interestingly enough while you might think it's I'm not gonna use this word. No gals. It says. Oh, yeah. Exactly. And you know, I'll I'll do it. If you want him to drag my knuckles along with it. No. You might think that it's women who are the most critical when it comes to Valentine's Day the poll finds the opposite to be true. Believe it or not more than half of the men surveyed said, they expect maximum effort from their partners on Valentine's Day, while only thirty six percent of women say the same kind of surprises me to be honest with you. But again, you know, as I said earlier to you, it's all of guilt trip. That's all it is. It's a hallmark celebration. You know, it's another reason to get out there and buy a card you'll love this. Because your dog lover American kennel club is hailing the return of New York's museum of the dog a museum dedicated exclusively to the canine themed, fine art. Well, that's cool. AKC said the museum which is essentially opening up in New York today after moving to Saint Louis back in nineteen Eighty-six ramps will feature works by artists, including sir, Edwin Landseer Maud Earl and Arthur Wardle the museum also includes an educational area where visitors can actually learn about the different kinds of breeds of a dog, and they have a virtual dog that learns tricks based on hand signals also has an app where users can interact with the exhibits through a museum with Artie, it's a virtual dog who serves as a tour guide. Cool. Not great. So the museum of the dog is opening up in New York City. It's now seven thirty.

Valentine partner New York City Meatloaf groupon university of Texas Austin AKC Edwin Landseer Maud Earl Christina Arthur Wardle Artie Saint Louis thirty six percent twenty six percent forty six percent Fifty eight percent Thirty nine percent fifty eight percent thirty one percent
Sen. Rubio takes Apple to task for slow response to Adware Doctor's data harvesting

Mac OS Ken

02:28 min | 3 years ago

Sen. Rubio takes Apple to task for slow response to Adware Doctor's data harvesting

"To the other side of the aisle. We go where we find Republican Senator Marco, Rubio, asking apple, adware, doctor what's up with that. Specifically, apple insider says, Rubio wants to know why it took up as long as it did to remove the app from the MAC apps store. You may remember the story. The one that had security researcher, Patrick Wardle finding that that app was expo trading, some user data, the servers in China. He warned apple of the issue, and apple did nothing until the story. What public now Rubio wants to know what took so long. The p. says the Senator has sent a letter to apple CEO, Tim cook seeking answers and offering suggestions quoting up, lend cider apple waited until after the adware Dr story became public to address the issue, including pulling the app Rubio complained according to axios

Apple Rubio Senator Marco Patrick Wardle Senator Tim Cook Researcher CEO China