19 Burst results for "Walter Lippmann"

"walter lippmann" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

The Catholic Culture Podcast

05:21 min | 3 months ago

"walter lippmann" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

"It's here a couple of others. Carl i had a guy recommend the conquest of bread by cra pork. Ck r. o. p. o. t. k. i n. as written in nineteen. Oh six. This guy is a russian and arco communist and that looks mighty interesting. I had that recommended that. I think that could be it. Could be a great deal fund. walter lippmann is the basic problem of democracy twelve pages lippman was A a monster. That was a big influence on bernice. The basic problem with democracy and then of course we. I think that burma's essay the eight-page little essay. The engineering of consent is probably something that we we should get at some point to the conquest of bread. Carl you guys should some day read the intellectual life it spirit conditions methods by antonin shelbert cirta launch french dominican inspired by a possibly apocryphal letter by acquaintance Giving his advice to a student has rules for the intellectual life. And it's it's one of the most beautiful books i've ever read. That's an it's it's like from everything. The highest spiritual of the intellectual life to the diet and intellectual hobbies like. Don't have heavily season your food because an intellectual does not spend his life in the process of digestion. Stuff like that. it's fantastic. Goodman franklin's i really want to inflict heidegger. Gosh what is metaphysics. All right. his lecture from nineteen twenty nine. How long is this seven. It's ten pages but your you'll hate it. It'll be fun. carl loves that. He loves the hurt me but we knew that ten acre thing that'd be fun great fun and it's really it's really it's really interesting and you just see the man in his family just like grow in joy as he as he tells the story of them Doing this. it's it's a it's a delight and it's just a just a very smart guy but just a regular guy you know. Just just chronicling what he did without any flourish. It's an honest account. Yeah good so. I think you like this book. That's the impression i get at the end of this. Discard and scholasticism. Yeah yeah i. I like it. You'd never had thing. You didn't criticize a single point. He made it sound like you were just suspicious because of other stuff. I do like this book It was it was really hard for me to get through like stylistically. I mean there are nuggets in there you know the thing about crossing the threshold of the of the studio were shop. And in the in the chunk the chunk that coral read About about.

antonin shelbert cirta Carl walter lippmann lippman arco Goodman franklin bernice burma heidegger carl nuggets
"walter lippmann" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

01:43 min | 7 months ago

"walter lippmann" Discussed on The Book Review

"Packer returns to the podcast with his new book. Last best hope. America in crisis and renewal. He was here of course for his previous book. Our man richard holbrook and the end of the american century and is the author of many books including the national book award winner the unwinding an inner history of the new america. The assassin skate. America and iraq blood of the liberals the waiting and towards. Welcome back to the podcast so good to be with you pamela. So this is an interesting book. A short book for you. You say in the book that you modeled this political pamphlets often written during periods of crisis. Can you talk a little bit about that tradition and why you chose to do that with this particular book. Well i love pamphlets. they're short. They're usually intense and urgent because they're responding to a crisis in a certain moment but if they're well done. They lost their books that you wanna read decades. Later some examples are common sense by thomas paine democratic vistas by walt whitman. Which influenced me in this book. Walter lippmann drift and mastery and george. Orwell's the line in the unicorn written during the blitz in in london in world war two. I was trapped like so many people by the pandemic. I couldn't move around report much. But i had a head full of ideas. I had lots of things going on in my head. And i thought the best way to use this time is to write a short book. While i'm quarantined that tries to figure out what i'm thinking and what i have to say about the moment that were ended so the the pamphlet form seemed like the right one for the circumstances that we were all facing

richard holbrook walt whitman london Walter lippmann world war two new america pamela thomas Orwell War one end of the american century george one many books french iraq decades America so many people
George Packer on Our Divided America

The Book Review

01:43 min | 7 months ago

George Packer on Our Divided America

"Packer returns to the podcast with his new book. Last best hope. America in crisis and renewal. He was here of course for his previous book. Our man richard holbrook and the end of the american century and is the author of many books including the national book award winner the unwinding an inner history of the new america. The assassin skate. America and iraq blood of the liberals the waiting and towards. Welcome back to the podcast so good to be with you pamela. So this is an interesting book. A short book for you. You say in the book that you modeled this political pamphlets often written during periods of crisis. Can you talk a little bit about that tradition and why you chose to do that with this particular book. Well i love pamphlets. they're short. They're usually intense and urgent because they're responding to a crisis in a certain moment but if they're well done. They lost their books that you wanna read decades. Later some examples are common sense by thomas paine democratic vistas by walt whitman. Which influenced me in this book. Walter lippmann drift and mastery and george. Orwell's the line in the unicorn written during the blitz in in london in world war two. I was trapped like so many people by the pandemic. I couldn't move around report much. But i had a head full of ideas. I had lots of things going on in my head. And i thought the best way to use this time is to write a short book. While i'm quarantined that tries to figure out what i'm thinking and what i have to say about the moment that were ended so the the pamphlet form seemed like the right one for the circumstances that we were all facing

Richard Holbrook National Book Award Packer America New America Pamela Iraq Walter Lippmann Thomas Paine Walt Whitman Orwell George London
"walter lippmann" Discussed on Problematic Premium Feed

Problematic Premium Feed

04:40 min | 10 months ago

"walter lippmann" Discussed on Problematic Premium Feed

"It was assumed must have been simple and statistical with an obvious damaging merle moral supposedly in the national interest. The figures were not revealed if people did not like our image it was not good public relations to announce it or to reveal. Why better definitely repair. The image for better results are thinking of has become so blurred. We have so mixed our image and our reality that we assume our place in this world is determined by our prestige that is by others respect for image. Not least of all. Walter lippmann warning on june sixty prestige in the world has diminished. We have ceased to look like a vigorous and confident nation in competition for prestige sensible to try to perfect our image rather than ourselves. That seems the most economical direct way to pursuit produce the desired result accustomed to living in a world of pseudo events celebrities dissolving forms and shadowy but overshadowing. We mistake our shadows for ourselves to us. They seem more real than the reality. Why should they not seem so to. Others are techniques seems direct only because in our own daily lives the pseudo events seems destined to dominate the natural facts. We no longer even recognize that. Our technique is indirect that we have committed ourselves to managing the shadows. We can live in our world of allusions. We find it hard to imagine. Other people still live in the world of dreams we live in a world of are making comey conjure others to live there too. We love the image and believe in it but will they abroad. The making of credible images seems to be seems a problem. It is hard to persuade others to fit themselves into our molds to be at home among our illusions and mistake these for their own reality at home. Our problem the opposite what to do when everybody expects the accepts the images when these images public pushed reality out of sight here in the united states the making of images is everyday business. The image has reached out from commerce. So the worlds of education in politics and into every corner of our.

Walter lippmann united states june sixty
"walter lippmann" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"walter lippmann" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The sort of the notions of journalistic objectivity are kind of intertwined with a degree of white privilege that it's easier for folks like you and me to kind of detach ourselves from Some of the most socially contentious issues in our country, because oftentimes they don't Directly affect us in the same way that they do women and people of color and that maybe we need to rethink those standards in journalism. Well, we need to understand what objectivity is and what the origin of that term was. The origin really dates back 100 years to Walter Lippmann when he wrote about it, and I think people have routinely mischaracterized what objectivity is. It's not neutrality. It's not both sides is, um, is not so called balance it. Is that a recognition in fact, That all of us have preconceptions and that we need when we go about our reporting that we need to approach stories and open minded, fair, honest way on, do our reporting and do it really thoroughly and do our research and the most rigorous, possible way And when we've done that the notion of objectivity is that we will then report what we find and a direct, forthright Unflinching way. The idea of objectivity was to counter the propaganda of the era during the Woodrow Wilson administration, So I think it's a good concept, and I don't think the alternatives they're terribly good. And the alternative is that in a newsroom that every individual should be able to say whatever he or she wants, however, here she wants to And I don't think that really worked terribly well, and it has the effect of undermining the reputation of the institution. And I think it's important to point out that we are an institution. We're not just a collection of individuals. We is an institution stand for the practice of journalism in a certain way, In fact, our principles Set down in 1935. They are on the wall as you walk into our newsroom. They served us well, all these years and I think they continue to serve us well. Marty, you mentioned earlier. Some of the challenges that you could foresee covering the Biden administration. I'm curious for the journalism industry writ large. What challenges you see in, say, the coming decade because we've seen The pandemic really accelerate some of the existing challenges, particularly for local news, right well, there's any number of challenges and arses of field that will continue to be challenged. Most immediately. There is the challenge of the financial challenge, particularly for local journalism. It's important that we have strong local journalism. If we intend to have strong communities and strong and to have democracy remains strong at the local and state level. Longer term, I think we face a huge challenge. The biggest challenge that I think journalism faces, and that is that we as a society can no longer agree on a common set of facts. You know it was Senator Daniel Patrick morning Hand, who was famously said, You know you're entitled here on opinions, but you're not entitled to your own facts Well, these days, people believe that they are entitled to their own facts. The so called facts may be disconnected from reality. They may not be supported by evidence, but people continue to hold on to them because they reinforce their pre existing points of view. And so conspiracy thinking has become deeply entrenched in American society and, in fact in other societies as well around the world. And that's what that's a huge challenge for the press. But it's a huge challenge for democracy as well. How do we have a functioning democracy? If we cannot agree on a common set of facts? And how do we have journalism of people will not accept our role as an arbiter effects? I don't think that we're the only arbiter of fact on we are an imperfectly arbiter of fact as well. But I think we have to have that is that is a huge challenge for in journalism today and a huge challenge for democracy..

Walter Lippmann Woodrow Wilson Biden administration Marty Senator Daniel Patrick Hand
"walter lippmann" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

10:09 min | 1 year ago

"walter lippmann" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"49. Yes, 35? No, The requirement to pass a treaty is 56. So it is failed by seven votes. Then they had this special thing where those who were absent. Although they couldn't vote, they could announce what their position would have been. And that's how you wind up with this. 57 announced that had they been there. They would have voted yes or they did vote. Yes, 39 said that they were There and voted no or they would have voted. No, that's the highest but the Senate ever came. The closest sensitive ever came to passing the Versailles peace treaty. Gerry Armstrong of William Jule College on American History on C SPAN Radio on the U. S. Senate rejection. Of the treaty of Recite to End World War One. Now a lot of people say, Well, this is the problem. There are group inside the Senate called the Ear Reconcile bulls. They said. You couldn't drag us to vote for this treaty with all the horses of the American Cavalry. We will not do this. Now. There's a lot of discussion about How many were there? I'm gonna be using an estimate that you can see in a couple of different books because the normal you're gonna get between 15 and 18. So I'm gonna lest the 18 and they include all kinds of fascinating senators. There's fighting Bob will fall in theirs. President Theodore Roosevelt, attorney general and William Howard Taft, secretary of state who was an irreconcilable. There was no way in the world. He was going to vote for the treaty. There is a new senator from Illinois McCormick now. Ah, lot of people say, Well, that's what happened. These people somehow managed to defeat the pretty. That's the story, and that's not Story at all. One of those irreconcilables is a complicated character. He's our very own Senator James read from Kansas City Senator Reed had been in the Senate would be in the Senate for 18 years. He'd been the mayor of Kansas City from 1919 04. When our convention city burned and they rebuilt it through fast of nations and fast work. Um he made very clear he was an irreconcilable. I will not go through this treaty because he was an isolationist, But there's some mills. He was a racist and he was very direct that he was afraid that the league of Nations with its dark skinned people would eventually be able to out vote the white skin to people and imposed a new order of racial equality at the international level. Um I'm not using some of his more incendiary quotes because they are public quotes laced with the n word. Now, For some people, the story of James Reed becomes a story off who opposed the treaty. It's provincial ist bigotry that think this treaty That's not a good understanding of what happened here, either. For example, in one of the best The book's about this fight. Jonathan Cooper's breaking the heart of the world since then, take a look at this for just a minute. Ah, lot of people think that cosmopolitans. People who are fluent in foreign languages have strong experience brought those would be the people most likely to be in favor of the treaties is actually when you started to biographies, the people who were the most cosmopolitan members of the Senate. Tended to be the most opposed to the treaty. So, for example, this that new senator from McCormick was raised by a father diplomat. He used to boast and brag that he learned to speak French before he learned to speak English. He was very involved with global affairs, but he was opposed to the treaty. This is senator knots that Republican who had been president Taft, secretary of the state. He was an irreconcilable, but here's something very interesting. During the Senate debate, he announced a resolution that we now call the NOx doctrine that announced that if there were in the future, any threat to the peace of Europe in the United States would regard it a grave matter. Consult with Brinley governments and consider the possibility of taking military action to deal with it. In other words, he was an irreconcilable but not an isolationist. Now, some people say, Well, then, if it's not the story of those your irreconcilables were probably provincial bigots, then surely the story is that American public opinion. Wasn't ready for this gigantic step of huge stride into a formal commitment to join the security architecture of world politics. So Professor friend bite in his book Power without Victory, says It's time we kill that myth. We don't have what we would now call modern public opinion polling for another 15 years after the defeat of the Versailles peace treat, but what we normally use to gauge where Public opinion. Woz in those days was to look at where newspapers were, and the evidence he says, is overwhelming. There was there re strong American public opinion support for the treaty and for joining the League of Nations. Look at that list of newspapers except for the kids of the star. Many of them, including the ST Louis Post Dispatch favored the treaty. He takes a look at religious organizations, which were incredibly important 100 years ago, and it's overwhelming support from Protestants, including Baptists to Catholics. Two DUIs laborer was very in favor of the treaty, although they had some very strong reservations about one component of the treaty. Civic groups like the Rotarians and the New American Legion, came out in favor of the treaty and joining the League of Nations. 17 State legislatures passed with Motions, including the legislatures of California and Massachusetts, which happened to be the homes of the two most important opponents of the treaty and the most important brand new single issue advocacy organization in United States with something called the league to enforce peace, it had thousands of members all over the country, and they had $100,000 budget to try to advocate for the pretty. It was led by the former president, William Howard Taft. The evidence is This treaty had the popular support to be approved. By the way, there were some really interesting intellectuals were having to try to make fundamental decisions about this. So there's the great feminist social worker, Jane Adams of Whole House of Chicago, and there's W E B. Du Bois, both of them very disappointed for their previous support of Woodrow Wilson. Adams because the president had not been a vigorous supporter of the constitutional amendment to give women the vote by the way he had supported in Franchising women, But he had not supported doing it through a constitutional amendment and then WB. The boys who was furious at the president's inability to articulate publicly a strong opposition to lynching or to articulate why we needed to stop the race riots and what's interesting. It's both of them thought things over and decided they nevertheless would support Woodrow Wilson and the league. This is Walter Lippmann by the 19 sixties and seventies, I am told, I have read that. There was hardly any serious question of the day that serious Americans didn't wait till they read Walter Lippmann and see what they were going to think about it. He was a young advisor toe Woodrow Wilson, and then he broke with Woodrow Wilson at the New Republic. And the New republic In the summer of 1919 published a major attack on the Versailles peace treaty in the League of Nations. Thousands of subscribers to the new republic canceled their subscriptions angered at the attack on the president on his leg, and by the way, Walter Lippmann would say 15 years later. This is one of the biggest mistakes of my life. If I could do things over again, I would have continued to support Woodrow Wilson and the leak, so not only is their strong public support There's really interesting stuff going on among key American intellectuals who are aggravated with the president, but deciding that overall, the possibility of progressive reform and international governance is still worth it to try to get to the league. But here's last thing you need to know before we start into a couple of really important points. I think, using a stoplight approach that we can get a glimpse of what the balance in the Senate Woz about this treaty, and you're going to start to suspect something pretty quickly. This is a tragedy. If we take the green and the yellow, then we can see that three quarters of the Senate Was willing to join the league and past the treaty. The opponents were small. They were vigorous. They were energetic. They were vociferous, but they didn't have the votes to stop this treaty..

Senate league of Nations Woodrow Wilson William Howard Taft senator president Walter Lippmann Senator Reed Versailles President Theodore Roosevelt United States New Republic Kansas City Senator James Bob American Cavalry Gerry Armstrong Illinois William Jule College
"walter lippmann" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

08:36 min | 1 year ago

"walter lippmann" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Column in American greatness is George Will Conrad? A very good evening to you? I'm equally puzzled by George Will. I don't know him personally, I saw him having dinner ones. And he seems like an extremely easy going, man. And so this very delightful man, and he's a good friend and has been for 40 years. He's a brilliant man, a good companion and, ah Andi. I agree with 90% of what he says and beliefs and when he writes about the principles he believes in the rights eloquently and very rigorously, but the he's had an aversion to the president's since Reagan. Hey, didn't like the bushes. Hey, didn't like the Clintons. Hey, didn't much care for Obama. I'm not overly. I mean, I'd be little more generous in some cases. But I You know, I certainly can see his reasoning on that. But like many others, but for the most part, not people so intelligent and worldly as himself. He simply cannot think or speak rationally, but The current president on DA You know you you put a cz you did. But what comes to my mind I need to get into this kind of thing is a book that was famous nearly a century ago. By a French intellectual and Julian Bender called in English. The treason of the intellectuals. Now I'm not accusing George will treason, of course, but I mean, a person, you know, oppose the current president. That's the gust democracies thing wrong with it, but, uh, these people R and especially Georges, a philosophical and committed, fervent supporter of intelligence conservatism, and Donald Trump may not be the most stylish conservative. But he's in this landscape. Now this very tumultuous landscape is the only conservative we've got, and he has rendered immense service to the conservative causes. He's re established. The border is reduced taxes. He's engaged in penal reform. He's reasserting the legitimate national interest of the United States opposite China and others even friendly trading countries and hay is essentially upholding intelligent. Moderate conservative values on DH. I think it is the duty of all conservatives to put aside whatever versions they may have to the mannerisms of the foibles of the current president and address the policy issue because the country is going to make a choice this November. Ah, between very bifurcated choice between radically different pads forward from where we are on def the Conservatives were dragged down the Biden Sanders path by virtue of having deserted trump. It really will be legally but intellectually treason. George Wells, a columnist is that is that an insider's to war? Why he takes this stance outside of the presidency. It's AH, it's just built into the occupation. I think of other famous columnist who have opposed Successful president. I don't think George is imitating anybody on DH. I'm not really qualified to mind Read, Um, we came to the unspoken conclusion early on that we were better off not talking about the subject because they're used were so different. I've come to that position with a number of friends of mine. Let's keep the friendship and just avoid that subject. And But you know, if her political columnist, which he isn't up to a point I am the subject of President Trump is a rather prominent one. Uh, so I can't say, but I think in his own mind I'm having said I won't mind Read. I'm not. I'm just making a guess. And that's all it is that that he is so disturbed. Everybody considers to be the inappropriateness of Trump's personality of the garishness and the hucksterism and elements of his past and impresario and a and a very You know of a finance. Syria took every corner on two wheels because he was, you know, there's always a lot of death and speculation around Ah, on and then in Jorge's a traditional Torey was offended by that kind of flamboyant and risky capitalism. Andi. He just He just feels that President of the room for such people, but not in the White House and the president of the United States should be a much more learned, stable, predictable character within a certain mold. You know. John Quincy Adams only bettered President James Madison. We better president on DA and I like a number of these people taking in another one. Aye. He idealized Ronald Reagan on guy. Look, I don't have no issue with that. I think Reagan was a great president and a fine man. And you have a little bit too And he was he was. It was a great man. But Oh, and when they get back to what he should go up on Mount Rushmore, along with FDR one from each party, But, uh, I think I think, George I'm I'm guessing, but I think he is so Outraged by what he considers to be the boorish behavior of this president that he simply refuses to recognize of the fine things he's done, which, if they were done by AH, president into his personality was more it was liking. He would be leading the intelligent people cheering section for that president. I go to the example you've written extensively entrenched Lee Franklin Delano Roosevelt the great success of the 20th century. Given the crisis we're in now we can appreciate the scale of the crisis, he said. Vives. Walter Lippmann in 1932. You know this very well. I'm just going to read the quote. Franklin D. Roosevelt is no crusader. He's no Tribune of the people. He's no enemy of entrance privilege. He's a pleasant man who without any important qualifications for the office. I would very much like to be president. That reminds me of George will come on Conrad and limit never took, you know. Ah, Walter, Lippmann and FDR were friends going back to the Wilsons minister and they were both at Paris together in the peace conference and lip was one of the people who called him a freak until he became president. And there weren't that many you did, but he was one of them. And of course, he did not call him that after he was president, But but I was I want to say this. He saw the he was present when President Roosevelt spoke to the Congress for the last time and reporting on the altar conference and and he thought about it, and he stopped to himself. This. The president may not live much longer. I am going, Teo. I'm gonna do something I should've done a long time ago when he wrote a column that appeared I believe on April 9th 1945 3 days for Roosevelt died saying. But he weapon had not always been prone to appreciate what reservation had accomplished. But he was a great president who had rendered immense service to the country in the world. And he felt this was the right time to say they didn't say why. Obviously and hey, put in his own memoirs that He was he was glad that he had done it because he told President Roosevelt bad. At least he conceded that he'd been mistaken underestimating, but great presidents are interested in Abraham Lincoln was even though he was one of the most successful lawyers in the United States was regarded before taking office. And even for a while, after taking office as the bumpkin, a ruby Yoko from You know, a log cabin made Western on DH sort of homely style of those anecdotes and so on DH. You know that he is the man is way Can we look forward to George will writing a column similar to Mr Lippman's at some point in future, because, well, Konrad, Where does he go? I would say that there is a chance. But if if President Trump is reelected and continues his program And, you know, retires of normal time, and George is still writing. It's only the only B 83. You could do that. I would say there's a chance he would say, Look, I didn't like this man and I'm not going to say what I said about some aspects of it, But he has achieved a lot for the country. I think that's quite possible and that would have grace. I agree with that. Yeah, and and and therefore it would not be out of character..

president President Trump George Lee Franklin Delano Roosevelt Ronald Reagan President James Madison George Will George Will Conrad United States Walter Lippmann FDR George Wells Obama Julian Bender Biden Sanders John Quincy Adams Georges Um White House Mount Rushmore
"walter lippmann" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"walter lippmann" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Again. The first time I saw babe. Ruth was in the spring of Nineteen Nineteen Tampa Florida. Ben Been With our troops in France the previous year, so ruth was news to me. Bay blasted a batting practice pitch clear out of the park into a plowed field. I gauge that hit as about five hundred feet. While, Ruth Hit, I, watched and barrel the red sox manager talked. Ruth was our main holdout, said barrel. He's been signed to a three year contract at twenty four. This fellow can become the greatest single thing that's happened to baseball. They buy sand. I was watching your swing use winglike, no pitcher I ever saw. With my swing, it's all or nothing at all, replied Babe. I copied it after Joe Jackson's. His is the perfect Est.. Of all the sluggers spawned by the advent of the lively ball. Babe remains the only one I ever knew who never shortened or choked his grip when the concrete two strikes, he gripped his bad at the very end with the novel of the handle calmed and his right hand they'd like plenty of lumber and his war clubs. Many of his bats weighed forty two ounces. That's about a half pound more than the average. That spring Lee Red Sox McGraw's giants played an exhibition series I hung around for several games to watch ruth being converted from a pitcher outfielder slug and play left field. And the first game he hit the loftiest shot. I ever saw some six miles over the right field fence bill, and then sports editor of the New York Tribune. Didn't impress easily wrote. The ball sale so high that when it came down, it was coated with ice. Shortly after I turned out. A bit of verse entitled Son Of Swat Babe, Ruth. When you can lean upon the ball and lay the season bash against it. The ballpark is a trifle small. No matter how far out they've fenced it. In January nineteen twenty Colonel Jake Rupert Paid Red, SOx owner, Harry Frazee, one hundred and twenty five thousand dollars outright for Babe Plus Three, hundred and fifty thousand dollar loan. That transaction remains baseball's all-time bargain. Matter of fact, not only did Rupert by a team named Ruth it remained for this big overgrown youngster from the Baltimore Slums to lift baseball on his back and return it to. To the aura of respectability you see the black sox scandal occurred during the nineteen nineteen world series. I'll touch on that later, but let it be said that if a slugger of Babes, magnitude hadn't come along to capture the imagination of the crowd by sucking the ball, clean out of the lot where it couldn't be tampered with baseball might well have gone down the drain of Mediocrity. Some years later I was with Colonel Rupert at Saint Petersburg. Florida after he had signed babe to a two year contract for eight thousand dollars a year and Rupert commented. Who are we kidding? Pay Route Two hundred thousand dollars a year and he wouldn't be overpaid. Things didn't just happen. They exploded when the baby was my sidekick. I once had him on national radio hookup with Graham McNamee in charge at the last minute. The Babes carefully rehearsed script became scrambled before I could throw a hauler on him. He was often running. McNamee was frantic. The arcus delete her was frantic. The producer with his stop watch was frantic as Babe rambled on, and on at one point, the Babe was supposed to refer to the Duke of Wellington's historic remark. The Battle of Waterloo had been one on the playing fields of Eton. The Babe came out with this gym. As Duke Ellington One said the battle of Waterloo was one on the plane fields of elkton. Later I asked Babe. How could Laos up one short statement so completely? Well! Grandy said about that Wellington. Guy I wouldn't know Ellington yes, as for that. Eat In business well. I married my first wife and Elkton. Maryland and I always hated the place. It must have stuck. But perhaps for ruth is most embarrassing, and at the same time as most hilarious moment occurred on the evening, we died on the outskirts at Saint Petersburg during spring training. It was quite a dinner. Among the guests I had invited where the Walter Lippmann. The dinner was a huge success until it dignified Mrs Lipman. Asked Ruth to describe the famous home run. He called in thirty two series against the cubs. It's like this boom. Babe bigger than a freshly laundered barn in white. Gabardine puffing on a huge cigar. I'm writing the stuffing out of the cubs telling them they're the cheapest pack of chromosomes for what they did to our Guy Little Martini, an ex Yankee who shortstop them down the home stretch, and then was cut in for a measly half share of the series, Swag. Well, I pack on into the stands in the first inning, but in the it's tied for two four when I'm with nobody on base. The Chicago fans are giving me the works Charlie route. The cubs pitcher breezes, those first two pitches Bhai both strikes the mobs tearing down Wrigley Field. I shake my fist after that first strike I know. It was good, and after the second it was in there, too. I wave my bad at those bellary bleachers right where I aim to park the ball. Ruth throws it and I hit that blankety blank ball on the nose. Right over the fence. How do you like those apples used? So and so's I yell at route as I started around the basis by the time I reach home almost fallen down I'm laughing so hard, and that's how it happened. The Babes. Erudite explanation finished a battered Mrs. Lipman mumbled that they'd have to be leaving. Why did you use that language? I asked Babe. What the Heck Granny started you heard her asked me what happened, so I told her. And that's how most famed of home runs happened. Ruth may not have been at his best before the Mike and the drawing room, but he was the greatest single magnet sports has ever known six months a year from nineteen nineteen until his.

Ruth Hit baseball Colonel Rupert sox Graham McNamee cubs Duke Ellington Florida elkton Wellington Colonel Jake Rupert Saint Petersburg Tampa Joe Jackson Bay Waterloo Ben New York Tribune France Walter Lippmann
"walter lippmann" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

11:47 min | 2 years ago

"walter lippmann" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"So it's going to do what is Khrushchev going do meetings much fear people are told to pack their bags and don't expect to go home again we're staying at the White House whether there's war not they don't know for weekends there's darkness falling on the planet end story the credit chef backs down Kennedy is seen as triumph now begins the cover up Max this is the fun part right away The New York Times had a report published I believe in early November this is theirs this is an old Alexian years so there's an election going on in California in which Richard Nixon is going to lose the governorship to pack or to a to Pat brown and that defeat will in power a certain younger man named Jerry Brown he sees his father successful over Richard Nixon there are other elections going on by the times runs a story very early on that is close to the story who writes the story and how close. in bold when their military expert writes a story and he has a very good question. with our you tube capabilities how is it possible to Soviets erected operational missiles without us knowing about it and he can't quite figure that out but he asked the question in the administration immediately recognizes words he goes others are going to follow and they're very worried about the questions being asked because they had a sure the American people that they were being. over the Soviet buildup in Cuba that nothing would surprise them and yet they have been surprised so the question is what happened and it would be extremely embarrassing for the truth to come out which is that they had restricted you two overflights of their own volition. so that's what's going to be covered up at this point the Kennedy administration and the president himself with John McCone the Attorney General and others they make a decision to influence agents of influence don't they Max they come up with a list of people we need to talk to the significant a columnist at the time and they also go to the Saturday Evening Post Joseph Alsop he publishes something immediately after Baldwin's column what is the caller what is the peace that they publish and what does it say of the young president. it it's actually Stewart Alsop is yes and and a another Washington columnist who's known to be a very good terms of with president Kennedy is a personal friend and this story comes out in early December and this scene is administration's version they give you know preferential access to these reporters and it paints you know sort of this lesson jurist picture. men who were cool calm and collected you know not rattled by the build up. the scientific in their approach and you know they acted with the. most efficiency and except for except except for and the the tributes the gap to you know problems with the weather that grounded to you too whatever they whatever whether come it comes part of the explanation I know something's really going on Max it works that way for the stock market works that way for international security anytime you mention yes planet earth we have whether it's called climate all right they not only does Stewart Alsop and Charles Bartlett's peace in the December eighth nineteen sixty two Saturday Evening Post which is available November of course does it not only explains by modeling the photo cap but it blames Adlai Stevenson what did Stephen to do. right Stevenson it says wanted to appease the Soviets would like trading the missiles in Turkey well that's a fact exactly with the distribution of done secretly and so it sets up this straw man Stevenson and have him look weak in the you know this week sister in this administration is being calm cool and collected. and this because a lot of pain and suffering for Adlai Stevenson who would only suggested with administration ended up doing we immediately go to Congress because this is nineteen sixty two and one of the traits of Max's books is you've got to re visit what the Senate look like in nineteen sixty two what are F. K. and JFK and John McCone were facing Max who is who is John Stennis at this time and why see significant to the administration John Stennis is the rising a junior member of the Senate Armed Services Committee is considered kind of the air to Richard Russell who was one of the most powerful senators ever he's from Mississippi he was a former judge. and looked up to in the Senate and Russell tasks Stennis. and his sub committee which is the Senate preparedness subcommittee with doing the investigation and there's only going to be one in two. how did the Soviets get missiles in the queue without us noticing and that question is the photo gap are the Republicans using the term photo gap right away do they use it by thanksgiving. no they're either they're campaigning for the November election they really out of Washington in November and December but when they come back in January they're just steaming because they feel the Kennedy administration completely manipulated the missile crisis for political advantage and you have people like Gerald Ford who is much more conservative than any was later as president accusing the administration of actually withholding information about the build up until just before the election and then having this triumphant outcome he's really it's almost a conspiratorial explanations and there some of them though aren't going as far as Ford and there's but they're talking about this picture or photo gap it's sort of a play on the missile gap of the nineteen sixty election and the using that as well you know. again they don't understand how it is that the Soviet sneak these missiles in until they were up and ready to go I detail here Khrushchev was told that the reason that the U. S. wouldn't pick up the deployment of medium range ballistic missiles which you can see very clearly in Max's book they have the photograph is because they would be camouflaged he would you believe this he was misled by his own advisers however we didn't bother with camouflage we just were blind for about five weeks now we go to February Walter Lippmann who was he at the time and what did he write that gives of the Kennedy administration a lot of concern. Walter Lippmann is is the dean of columnists you know the most respected and widely read and he points out that the administration's vulnerability the recent questions keeping **** is because there's no. sensible easily understandable explanation for this gap and the dental administration explains this period they're still going to be questions asked and the questions go to for now for reports are assessing the administration's conduct during the Cuban Missile Crisis and a footnote here John King at John Kennedy thought about asking for a report on the Eisenhower's administration with regard to Cuba before he took office as an offset to this Kennedy John F. Kennedy was a good political animal fifty years ago two reports look to model the story but tell the truth Max and to look like cover ups at the time in other words they surrounded this with paper you talk to Mister Lehman who was he and what did you learn from him almost forty years later well this is it he was actually the one who said to me that the administration shot itself in the foot. he knows he was retired I think is living up to New Hampshire he's been waiting for someone to call in the text the Richard Lehman was the guy who invented what was called the presidential daily briefs we still have it in a different form it's sort of the CIA's newspaper to the president you know produce for a ten of twelve of the senior officials he was the one who developed that whole idea and for just a layman he pollute produce the Lehman report did he find the photograph. yes his it was that was one of the more interesting parts of the book is writing about these four reports about the photo get because layman's report this was the first the cone thought they were going to be Pearl Harbor style hearings. about this issue and so he escalate meant to produce the first report was done very quickly I think within two weeks of the end of the missile crisis and he is report is it's understandable. you know tells the truth it says that the September tenth meeting put restrictions on the CA the CIA felt it couldn't. you know overcome those restrictions Macomb comes back he sees what's been going on he's adamant and finally they have this one over flight of western Cuban discover the missiles to their shock so his report is Frank the next report is done by the IG inspector general of the CIA and it's also accurate is a little more bureaucratic and takes a little longer but it's also basi basically actor then the next level of analysis is the US intelligence board which at the time featured all the agencies involved in what's called the intelligence community now this was in negotiated report because sitting in the intelligence board was also on hand are from the state department and they of course knew that these restrictions have been put on and they were very wary of McKeown and they felt the CIA had too much power in the making of foreign policy already in particular the guy who was head of I in our Roger Hilsman was just very anti CA so he throttled and bottled and and argued over the language until if you read that report you wanna you really won't understand what happened now the the PFI A. B. that's the one where McCollum threatens to resign what is that right that's the board that advises the president on the intelligence community fifty police called at the time and the guy who's appointed by Kennedy that is Clark Clifford as famous as a Washington lawyer fixer and Clifford. is very anti John Makoni it along and and took the seat toward him and he'll be damned if he's going to let a report come out and praise John McCone for his patience in predicting the missiles so he turns the whole thing around he blames the C. I. A. that report blames the CIA for the folder gap not the White House click here for yes you you picked it up is an American lawyer but he later service many presidents including the secretary of defense of for a Lyndon Johnson during the Vietnam War so all of the players make their early appearance as a junior Washington power brokers in this report everybody's mixed up now McCollum threatened to resign he's going to have the five leading parts of the D. of DC I result of the Central Intelligence resigned the president knows the story however and when we come back the cover up must defeat the Stennis enquiring and strong voices in the Senate because they're all looking to sixty four they're all looking to making the threat of national security and the failure of the Cuban Missile of the bay of pigs and the Cuban Missile Crisis.

Walter Lippmann Khrushchev White House fifty years forty years five weeks two weeks
"walter lippmann" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"walter lippmann" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"My research subsidizing my writing subsidizing my pension subsidizing my medical care. You know, I could be like you professor on the public, dole your entire life, as you pontificate and show, the world you're in the training Ramos. But I make my own way professor, and I know that upsets you people by the book, they don't buy the book, but in your case, those of us who find you to be so loathsome. We have to pay your salary in your way no matter what. But they're critique is often overly simplistic UC, writes, the New York Times, and the Washington Post or not liberal equivalents of Fox News. Oh. They're not partisan news outlets nor in the employees. The Democratic Party. Oh, yes, they are. I wonder if you are. This guy's a propagandist. Ladies and gentlemen, which is explains wise in the Washington Post. Let's go on yet. Many of the reporters do share a world view. Oh. More have university educations, most live in a large metropolitan area on the east coast, where they ride public transportation with people who aren't like did he just say, I shouldn't be generalizing rich? How many times says he done this? Whether I large minority populations analogy btcu neighborhoods, and restaurants. Serving the opium food or regional Chinese and which they can probably get delivered to their apartments at midnight when they're still working on a story project, much pow. But there's a big country out there. A big country out there. The you guys hate and ignore in short. The best journalists in the United States are many ways more leat, and more cosmopolitan than the American public in general, is an e saying exactly what I said about the progressives. This is how they run the government you're stupid or at least you're busy. We'll handle things. That in and of itself is not a bad thing. Smart, people who are wear of different kinds of life experiences, make the best journalists, sir, you're stealing the arguments in your own words, of course, moving them around from Walter Lippmann can't you even give him credit for what you're regurgitating, but that does mean that they have a peculiar way of seeing the world, and they would be much less susceptible to attacks from the Mark Levine's of the world. They abandoned the pose of objectivity that opens them up to attack. So what he's arguing for is stop pretending to be objective. Yes. Reveal who you are. Because we're smarter. Because we're wiser because we'll deliver the news and we happen to be right. This guy is exactly the point of my book on freedom of the press. He's exactly the point. He's a foil. He's an illustration. He's an example. He's an ass. I'll be right back..

Washington Post New York Times professor Mark Levine Walter Lippmann Democratic Party Ramos Fox News opium United States
"walter lippmann" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"walter lippmann" Discussed on KTOK

"How many times has he done this? Whether I large minority populations and algae btcu neighborhoods and restaurants, serving food, or regional Chinese and which they can probably get delivered to their apartments at midnight when they're still working on a story project, much pal. But there's a big country out there. A big country out there. The you guys hate and ignore in short. The best journalists in the United States are many ways more leat, and more cosmopolitan than the American public in general. Isn't he saying exactly what I said about the progressives? This is how they run the government you're stupid or at least you're busy. We'll handle things. That in and of itself is not a bad thing. Smart, people who are aware of different kinds of life experiences. Make the best journalists sir, you're stealing the arguments in your own words, of course, moving them around from Walter Lippmann can't you even give him credit for what you're regurgitating, but that does mean that they have a peculiar way of seeing the world, and they would be much less susceptible to attacks from the Mark Levine's of the world. They abandoned the pose of objectivity that opens them up to attack. So what he's arguing for is stop pretending to be objective. Just reveal who you are. Because we're smarter. Because we're wiser because we'll deliver the news and we happen to be right. This guy is exactly the point of my book on freedom of the press. He's exactly the point. He's a foil. He's an illustration. He's an example. He's an ass. I'll be right back. Levin. Life is filled with moments that inspire one to awaken. Perfect. To see the world as it really is. The head and around here, those moments out in every day, what's worst illegal immigration to give our kids are being indoctrinated.

Walter Lippmann Mark Levine United States Levin
"walter lippmann" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"walter lippmann" Discussed on KTRH

"But I make my own way professor, and I know that upsets you people by the book, they don't buy the book, but in your case, those of us who find you to be so loathsome. We have to pay your salary in your way no matter what. But they're critique is often overly simplistic UC. He writes the New York Times, and the Washington Post or not liberal equivalents of Fox News. Oh. They're not partisan news outlets nor in the employees. The Democratic Party. Oh, yes, they are. I wonder if you are. This guy's a propagandist. Ladies and gentlemen, which is explains wise in the Washington Post. Let's go on yet. Many of the reporters do share a world view. Oh. More have university educations, most live in a large metropolitan area on the east coast, where they ride public transportation with people who aren't like did he just say, I shouldn't be generalizing rich? How many times has he done this? Whether I large minority populations analogy btcu neighborhoods, and restaurants. Serving the opium food or regional Chinese and which they can probably get delivered to their apartments at midnight when they're still working on a story project, much pal. But there's a big country out there. A big country out there. The you guys hate and ignore. And short the best journalists in the United States are, in many ways, more leat, and more cosmopolitan than the American public in general, is an east saying exactly what I said about the progressives. This is how they run the government you're stupid or at least you're busy. We'll handle things. That in and of itself is not a bad thing. Smart, people who are aware of different kinds of life experiences. Make the best journalists sir, you're stealing the arguments in your own words, of course, moving them around from Walter Lippmann can't you even give him credit for what you're regurgitating, but that does mean that they have a peculiar way of seeing the world, and they would be much less susceptible to attacks from the Mark Levine's of the world. They abandoned the pose of objectivity that opens them up to attack. So what he's arguing for is stop pretending to be objective. Jess reveal who you are. Because we're smarter. Because we're wiser because we'll deliver the news and we happen to be right. This guy is exactly the point of my book on freedom of the press. He's exactly the point. He's a foil. He's an illustration. He's an example. He's an ass. I'll be right back. Newsradio seven forty KTAR h. Insight with human extinction. Be a tragedy and.

Washington Post New York Times Walter Lippmann Mark Levine Democratic Party Fox News professor opium United States Jess
"walter lippmann" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"walter lippmann" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"How many times has he done this? Whether I large minority populations analogy btcu neighborhoods and restaurants, serving food, or regional Chinese and which they can probably get delivered to their apartments at midnight, when they're still working on a story project much Powell. But there's a big country out there. It big country out there. The you guys hate and ignore in short. The best journalists in the United States are, in many ways, more leat, and more cosmopolitan than the American public in general, is an e saying exactly what I said about the progressives. This is how they run the government you're stupid or at least you're busy. We'll handle things. That in and of itself is not a bad thing. Smart, people who are aware of different kinds of life experiences. Make the best journalists sir, you're stealing the arguments in your own words, of course, moving them around from Walter Lippmann can't you even give him credit for what you're regurgitating, but that does mean that they have a peculiar way of seeing the world, and they would be much less susceptible to attacks from the Mark Levine's of the world. They abandoned the pose of objectivity that opens them up to attack. So what he's arguing for is stop pretending to be objective. Yes. Reveal who you are. Because we're smarter. Because we're wiser because we'll deliver the news and we happen to be right. This guy is exactly the point of my book on freedom of the press. He's exactly the point. He's a foil. He's an illustration. He's an example. He's an ass. I'll be right back..

Walter Lippmann Mark Levine United States
"walter lippmann" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

08:44 min | 2 years ago

"walter lippmann" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"And his association with the media what happened. Linden jet all skipped. Almost. But Spiro Agnew UC's crucially important. Vice president Spiro Agnew was among the first national politicians when the right to exploit the division between the mainstream presses pose of object tippety in the clear viewpoints that were shaping journalists coverage part of Agnew's genius was to lump, all reporters and news. Organizations into a vast undifferentiated media didn't just talk tell us what was going on newsrooms plural. That conspired to produce a twisted account of the news, that little resemble the world is conservatives unit this portrayal undermine confidence in the press. More generally, no. Unfortunately Agnew would resign shame. It wasn't Agnew. It wasn't any politician. It was the modern mass media. That undermine confidence. In the press book such as TV guide writer Edith, ephrons, the news. Twisters published in nineteen seventy-one purported analyze the leftward, lean of the press, but they scholarly veneer and offered support for the administration's move to undercut the media's collective credibility. Dozens of books of followed in their wake, ladies and gentlemen. Ask a question of you read any of these books? No, the vast majority of Americans read any of these books. No. So he's talking about this. But that's didn't have any effect at all. Nineteen seventy-one Lucas. Join colleagues defined more a journalistic journalism review that tried to nudge, elite news organizations into a new set of practices values for the press ones that acknowledged to some extent, the inherent subjectivity of news. Reporting Moore's goal was to leave journalism less susceptible to criticism like Agnew's. Interestingly, the staff of more included for a time the young reporter Brit Hume, who has become an ideological Fox News, pundit, so Brit, Hume is now an ideological Fox News, pundit. Now, you may agree or disagree with with Brit, Hume comments Brit, Hume was an tremendous journalist at ABC and FOX and he provides very insightful commentary now not as a news reporter. But as commentator, but you see, he's dismissed by the professor, the professor is defending the indefensible this is why they hate my book. And this is why you obviously love my book. The financial success that newspapers and broadcast television experienced in the nineteen eighties papered over many of the arguments about objectivity that characterized the late sixties and seventies, this freed mainsteam mainstream news organizations to continue the outward, pose of neutrality that NYU journalism. Professor, Jay Rosen calls the view from nowhere at turn borrowed from philosopher, Thomas Nagel. Now, if this professor had read my book, listen, those of you. At have my book. You know that I quote, Jay Rosen in my book, more accurately, then this professor does because Jay Rosen is one of the ideologues for the last several decades who's been behind this social activism in journalism movement. Which apparently this professor supports, but he's not honest enough to say. So I'm loving every minute of this. I hope it's not boring. You. The failure to rethink this posture. Other words, ladies and gentlemen, to abandon objectivity for social activism, and progressivism. Twitty sang. Proved devastating in the internet Erez local newspapers began to fail reports became more Cantat concentrated in just a few American cities. This new geography of reporting revealed that the American press really does live in a sort of bubble interesting. I make that point statistically in the book follow some of the best reporters on Twitter today. It's easy to see how many of them no one another cross institutions. And so the cycle of the early seventies is repeating itself. Smart. But this ingenuous critics like Lavigne, the successors of Agnew right winger. Screed. Disingenuous successes of this man, doesn't, even know me. You see. This is how he engages. This is a professor tenured. I'm sure he's on the public dole pounce, on the gap between purported objectivity and an obvious point of view to provoke a crisis of confidence in American journalists. I'm not provoking anything you, clown. If you would look at the statistics if you read chapter one I put him there. So even Chris Cuomo can understand them. But apparently, you're dumber than quiz, Chroma. That's a new low standard. One from which many of them profit, handsomely, conservative media personalities. Well, you know, I could be tenured professor, where taxpayers are subsidizing my entire life subsidizing. My research subsidizing my writing subsidizing my pension subsidizing my medical care. You know, I could be like you professor on the public, dole your entire life, as you pontificate and show, the world you're in the training Ramos. But I make my own way professor, and I know that upsets you people by the book, they don't buy the book, but in your case, those of us who find you to be so loathsome. We have to pay your salary in your way no matter what. But they're critique is often overly simplistic UC, writes, the New York Times, and the Washington Post or not liberal equivalents of Fox News. Oh. They're not partisan news outlets nor in the employees. The Democratic Party. Oh, yes, they are. I wonder if you are. This guy's a propagandist. Ladies and gentlemen, which is explains wise in the Washington Post. Let's go on yet. Many of the reporters do share a world view. Oh. More have university educations, most live in a large metropolitan area on the east coast, where they ride public transportation with people aren't like did he just say, I shouldn't be generalizing rich? How many times has he done this? Whether I large minority populations algae BT, Q neighborhoods, and restaurants. Serving the opium food or regional Chinese and which they can probably get delivered to their apartments at midnight when they're still working on a story project, much pow. But there's a big country out there. A big country out there. The guys hate and ignore. And short the best journalists in the United States are many ways more leat, and more cosmopolitan than the American public in general, is he saying exactly what I said about the progressives. This is how they run the government you're stupid or at least you're busy. We'll handle things. That in and of itself is not a bad thing. Smart, people who are wear of different kinds of life experiences, make the best journalists, sir, you're stealing the arguments in your own words, of course, moving them around from Walter Lippmann can't you even give him credit for what you're regurgitating, but that does mean that they have a peculiar way of seeing the world, and they would be much less susceptible to attacks from the Mark Levine's of the world. They abandoned the pose of objectivity that opens them up to attack. So what he's arguing for is stop pretending to be objective. Jess reveal who you are. Because we're smarter. Because we're wiser because we'll deliver the news and we happen to be right. This guy is exactly the point of my book on freedom of the press. He's exactly the point. He's a foil. He's an illustration. He's an example. He's an ass. I'll be right back. Mark levin. As the warm weather returns, subdue mosquitoes, termites, and other annoying pests, tickets stand this year with a five star pest control experts at crop Metcalf. Their pest control technicians have the training and techniques to step.

professor Spiro Agnew Spiro Agnew UC Jay Rosen Fox News Brit Hume Washington Post Agnew Vice president NYU Chris Cuomo Twitter Cantat Democratic Party Thomas Nagel United States Lucas reporter Walter Lippmann
"walter lippmann" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"walter lippmann" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"I large minority populations analogy btcu neighborhoods and restaurants, serving food, or regional Chinese and which they can probably get delivered to their apartments at midnight when they're still working on a story project much pow. But there's a big country out there. A big country out there. The you guys hate and ignore in short. The best journalists in the United States are many ways more leat, and more cosmopolitan than the American public in general, is an e saying exactly what I said about the progressives. This is how they run the government you're stupid or at least you're busy. We'll handle things. That in and of itself is not a bad thing. Smart, people who are aware of different kinds of life experiences. Make the best journalists sir, you're stealing the arguments in your own words, of course, moving them around from Walter Lippmann can't you even give him credit for what you're regurgitating, but that does mean that they have a peculiar way of seeing the world, and they would be much less susceptible to attacks from the Mark Levine's of the world. They abandoned the pose of objectivity that opens them up to attack. So what he's arguing for is stop pretending to be objective. Jess reveal who you are. Because we're smarter. Because we're wiser because we'll deliver the news and we happen to be right. This guy is exactly the point of my book on freedom of the press. He's exactly the point. He's a foil. He's an illustration. He's an example. He's an ass. I'll be right back. Seventy seven w ABC. Seventy seven w ABC.

Walter Lippmann Mark Levine United States Jess Seventy seven w
"walter lippmann" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

05:11 min | 2 years ago

"walter lippmann" Discussed on KTOK

"NBC MSNBC's, obviously in appendage of NBC NBC and CNN are tied for the worst reporting in the first one hundred days of the Trump administration. What do I mean by that? Ninety percent of their stories where negative according to the Harvard Shorenstein center. Hardly a right wing organization. Ninety percent. And Joe Scarborough works for that network. Now, let me ask you something. Folks, if you were a real conservative any real Republican again, he's bailed on that. Because, you know, the Republican party left him good idea Republican party, by the way. I mean, he's left people. We might as well leave him. Where was oh. Yes. Ninety percent negative. The Scarborough show is probably one hundred percent negative. Does that sound like a conservative? You know? It sounds like a propagandist. You right. Because that's what he is. And that's what they are MSNBC and more and more. That's what the media the media. Are I told you the other day the media are one thing a free press? Another thing. A free precious. Another thing if by free press, we simply mean the government should not interfere fine. But if by a free press, we mean that it actually services the American people services, the American people with information and news that they ought to have as opposed to social activism and progressivism in the agenda the democrat party. We don't have it. We don't have such a press in this country. And I'll tell you what as I explained in the book, the press is destroying the press. And this is not a good thing. And this is not a good thing. There are a handful of people in the press who I really admire I admire Bret Baier. I admire David Brody. I do. I'd Meyer Paul there are a number who I do maybe twelve or so, but that's it. Because they try. Martha maccallum I admire her to I do again. There are others. I'm going to miss them. I'm sorry. But. But it's a relative handful. It's a small percentage of people. It's not it's not a significant number. When you look at the media in this country is explaining in an interview today is see different cycles. This is a very bad cycle. It's probably the worst cycle in American history. Probably the worst cycle in American history. We had the patriot press pre-revolution post revolution. With the party press from about eighteen hundred to the beginning of the civil war where newspapers align with specific parties specific candidate specific causes and frankly worked very closely with them were paid by them and so forth. Then you had. Yellow journalism, which I don't get into because we kind of have a today too. Then you had the progressive movement the late eighteen hundreds into the early nineteen hundreds that continues to this day, and they wanted to quote, unquote, professionalize, everything say you're too stupid to participate in your government. You're too stupid to participate in media. You're just too stupid. The people need to be managed by really smart, people who happen to share the progressive ideology. And this is true. If you read rediscovering Americanism at some length. While of course, they feel the same way about the media. Walter Lippmann who was an iconic writer back then. He basically said, and John Dewey said it before him. He basically said look the people are busy. They're too busy. You know to really understand what's going on in the world. They have their own lives. They live really in a myopic way. So it's up to a handful of us basically to really follow what's going on. And then explain it to them. Explain it to them. Rather than just report the damn news. Now that has been perverted today into well, we can explain it to them. But now, we have an agenda a social activism, progressive democrat party agenda, and it's going to bleed into the news. We're going to devour the news gathering process. We're going to devour the news reporting process, and this is what we're going to do. And some of their philosopher kings professors write about it. And explain it, which is what.

MSNBC democrat party Republican party Joe Scarborough NBC Harvard Shorenstein center CNN Bret Baier Walter Lippmann Martha maccallum David Brody Meyer Paul John Dewey writer Ninety percent one hundred percent one hundred days
"walter lippmann" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

05:12 min | 2 years ago

"walter lippmann" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"NBC MSNBC's, obviously appendage of NBC NBC and CNN are tied for the worst reporting in the first hundred days the Trump administration. What do I mean by then? Ninety percent of their stories where negative according to the Harvard Shorenstein center. Hardly a right wing organization. Ninety percent. And Joe Scarborough works for that network. Tell me something folks, if you're a real conservative any real Republican again, he's bailed on that. Because, you know, the Republican party left him good idea Republican party, by the way. I mean, he's left people. We might as well leave him. But where was yes. Ninety percent negative. The Scarborough show is probably one hundred percent negative. Does that sound like a conservative? You know? It's like a propagandist to you, right? Because that's what he is. And that's what they are MSNBC and more and more. That's what the media the media. Are I told you the other day the media are one thing? A free press is another thing. A free press. Another thing if by free press, we simply mean the government should not interfere fine. But if by a free press, we mean that it actually services the American people. Services. The American people with information and news that they ought to have as opposed to social activism and progressivism in the agenda, the democrat party, we don't have it. We don't have such a press in this country. And I'll tell you what as I explained in the book, the press is destroying the press. And this is not a good thing. And this is not a good thing. There are a handful of people in the press who I really admire admire Bret Baier. I admire David Brody. I do. I'd Meyer Paul Dr number who I do maybe twelve or so, but that's it. Because they try. Martha maccallum admire her to I do again. There are others. I'm gonna miss them. I'm sorry. But. But it's a relative handful. It's a small percentage of people. It's not it's not a significant number. When you look at the media in this country is explaining it. In interview today. You see different cycles. This is a very bad cycle. It's probably the worst cycle in American history. Probably the worst cycle in American history. The patriot press pre revolution post revolution. With the party press from about eighteen hundred to the beginning of the civil war where newspapers align with specific parties specific candidates specific causes, and frankly worked very closely with them, we're paid by them and so forth. Then you had. Yellow journalism, which I don't get into because we kind of have today too. Then you had the progressive movement the late eighteen hundreds into the early nineteen hundreds that continues to this day, and they wanted to quote, unquote, professionalize, everything see you're too stupid to participate in your government. You're too stupid to participate in media. You're just too stupid. The people need to be managed by really smart, people who happen to share the progressive ideology. And this is true. If you read rediscovering Americanism at some length. While of course, they feel the same way about the media. Walter Lippmann who was an iconic writer back then. He basically said, and John Dewey said it before him. He basically said look the people are busy. They're too busy. To really understand what's going on in the world. They have their own lives. They live really in a myopic way. So it's up to a handful of us basically to really follow what's going on. And then explain it to them. Explain it to them. Rather than just report the damn news. Now that has been perverted today into well, we can explain it to them. But now, we have an agenda a social activism, progressive democrat party agenda, and it's going to bleed into the news. We're going to devour the news gathering process. We're going to devour the news reporting process, and this is what we're gonna do. And some of their philosopher kings professors write about it. And explain it, which is what I show you in the.

MSNBC Republican party democrat party Joe Scarborough NBC Harvard Shorenstein center CNN Martha maccallum Bret Baier Walter Lippmann Meyer Paul Dr David Brody John Dewey writer Ninety percent one hundred percent hundred days
"walter lippmann" Discussed on Boston Herald Radio

Boston Herald Radio

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"walter lippmann" Discussed on Boston Herald Radio

"Of the Republican party. You know, we take the tenth amendment in the whole Bill of rights seriously. Donor. This is something I don't know we were going back and forth on before you joined us. And and I haven't really heard you weigh in on when it comes to justices. And obviously as somebody who knows. That sort of whole line of work. Really? Well, we were talking about the whole issue that Cavanaugh went through and also talking about Clarence Thomas because now Biden is facing pushback for that. What are your thoughts on those hearings, and the metoo movement are these sort of fair hearings or has this gotten too crazy? Well, I would have voted for Justice cavenaugh and Justice score such thought they were well-qualified obviously cavenaugh proceeding turned into kind of mass. But but I would have voted for for the Justice. I thought he was well qualified to issues and by the way, I don't have a metoo issue. Okay. But it's it's really amazing. And that's that's as much a fact of political life and everyday America, as you know, marriage equality is twenty years ago. I came out for marriage equality, and I pointed the woman who wrote the opinion holding that marriage equality, that's gay and lesbian marriages constitutionally compelled, and I was all by myself for two decades there. No. But now that's completely embedded. So things do change court seat comes open one that was occupied by liberal Justice. Do you think that the president should nominate a more moderate Justice? Well, I don't know. I think that too. He did nominate we're good. If I if I were there, I probably wouldn't confined myself to list supplied by the federalist society, but there's certainly plenty of people on that list. I don't think that is under any obliga- Shen to match the political views of departing Justice, appoint absolutely anybody. She's to appoint originalists would be your favor. Well, I you know, I carry around a copy of the constitution with me. So I set great store by the by the constitution. I'm not sure everything that's portended by the word originalist on my views in general, probably more more centrist than than those of a lot of people. But you know, so I'm a fiscal conservative on social much more open welcoming on so called social issues. But you know, I wouldn't insist on that. I wouldn't insist that anybody I point, you know, match my views entirely. I mean, some of the greatest justices have been kind of surprises. I mean, I think Hugo black who was a Senator from Alabama and his youth, a member of the Ku Klux Klan, he he and Justice Bill Douglas turned out to be just champion of individual liberties for decades on the court, and you wouldn't have thought that giving. Given the Justice blocks Arjun, but he was simply a great, man. I mean, I'm not even absolutely convinced that to be a great supreme court Justice. You have to be a lawyer there's Walter Lippmann who's a famous journalist back thirties was on everybody's short list for the supreme court. And he was just a wise, man. He wasn't even a lawyer. That's what you want is people with wisdom governor Bill weld challenger to President Donald Trump, of course, Republican candidate for president. Thank you so much for joining us today. But thank you all thank the Boston Herald. All right. We will hit a break. Keep it right here on Boston Herald radio.

Justice Justice cavenaugh Justice Bill Douglas Boston Herald supreme court president Republican party Bill weld Arjun President Donald Trump Ku Klux Klan federalist society Walter Lippmann originalists Clarence Thomas Cavanaugh America Shen Alabama Biden
Who Is The Neoliberal Shill Of The Year?

The Indicator from Planet Money

04:35 min | 3 years ago

Who Is The Neoliberal Shill Of The Year?

"Couple of weeks ago. I was talking to call him Mortimer. He's college student who runs a competition called the Neo liberal Schill of the year, the wet works. Is you go to the Twitter page at near liberal that's near liberal, but with zero for the O he's put together a bracket kind of like match madness. He's asking people to vote for who they think is the greatest neo-liberal Schill, and Colin told me that Stacy Vinik Smith and cod. If Garcia from the indicator they're going to be in the running, but cut if in Stacey didn't know. And I told khadafy Stacey that I'd love to speak with them in a studio. I didn't say why calling can you hear us? Yes. I can hear you. Colin what's going on can you reduce it south to us? So my name is Colin I am the co founder and executive director of the neo-liberal project. And when new liberalism, basically said was markets are not like an end markets are means to end, we want wanna harness markets to make everyone wealthier to make society more equitable and into make the world a better place, and you run a competition. What does that? So I run the neoliberal Schill bracket, which is an annual competition, which we highlight people that we believe contributed positively to economics and politics in the past year, Iran, the neoliberal Schill bracket. Yes, she'll sounds like not a compliment. She'll is a compliment show me. It's it's tongue-in-cheek. It's means that you shield for position that you stood up. And you said this is what I believe in. This thing is good. Okay. Side of right. And other words she'll for goodness show. That's exactly that's exactly what was Yoda like. Schill for the force iota was a show for the. Stacy I have some good news for you too. Okay. This year, you both been selected the apart the Neal show bracket, really. You both have I've mixed feelings. Committee deliberated Wong over it. And listen to hours of podcasts. And we look through your Twitter's read everything about you. Oh my gosh. So neoliberal is this really loaded word, what does even mean near liberals have been blamed for everything from lowering wages for US factory workers to killing turtles to some near liberalism, Maine's using markets and the government to make a soul, richer and half you to others. It's only made the rich wealthier at the expense of the rest of us. After the break. I'm going to explain what near liberalism, actually means and ask us, stay Cincotta. Neo-liberal Schillt's of the. Planet money indicator is made possible by CFP certified financial planner professionals who want you to know that certification makes a difference. A CFP professional is trained to create a holistic financial plan in your best interest. Learn more at let's make a plan dot org. Support also comes from ADT, America's trusted home security company can help protect you against break ins fires and carbon monoxide twenty four seven emergency response when you needed most more at ADT dot com to understand what neoliberalism means I caught up a historian. My name's Quinn's Loboda, and I teach history at Wellesley college Clin wrote a book about the birth of neoliberalism. He told me you can trace the word back to a handful of economics at one conference in France in nineteen thirty eight there was a gathering and Paris called the Walter Lippmann colloquium, and it was there that they that they took they chose this term neoliberalism to describe what they were doing which is trying to rethink liberalism. After the great depression, liberalism, not liberal in the way, we often talk about left wing liberals in the US, you know, people go online to own the libs, but classical liberalism, it's a collective where all those thinkers who like moving against the church after the nice on. David Hume, Adam Smith, David Ricardo. And and then associate those with political beliefs of free trade free markets are the rights individuals to see their self interests that kind of thing they organized a workshop in in Paris. And they all get got together there were intellectuals industrialists journalists politicians, what kind of things they believe in these imbedded groups of liberals there was a vision of an interconnected world economy that they felt needed to be kind of fought for and restored. They believed in the need for conditional free trade. They believed in the need for the free movement of capital over borders as a way to ensure kind of interdependence that would itself hopefully guarantee peace in the long run.

United States Colin I Twitter Stacy Vinik Smith Mortimer Khadafy Stacey Paris Cincotta CFP David Hume Garcia Iran ADT Neal Wong David Ricardo Walter Lippmann Wellesley College Clin