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Poll: About 7 in 10 white evangelicals approve of Trump

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 3 d ago

Poll: About 7 in 10 white evangelicals approve of Trump

"A new poll shows about seven in ten white evangelicals approval president trump a new survey from the nonpartisan pew research center shows about seven in ten white evangelical Protestants approve of how president Donald Trump is handling his job that's support from a cornerstone of his political base has remained strong following a polarizing church visit any Supreme Court ruling on LGBT discrimination that disheartened some conservatives trump seventy two percent approval among white evangelicals in June represents a fall of six percentage points since a similar survey two months ago the survey's findings are in line with the ball in his general approval among all Americans which declined from forty four percent in April to thirty nine percent in June I'm Walter Ratliff

President Trump Pew Research Center Donald Trump Supreme Court Walter Ratliff
Jacks left hand

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:34 min | 5 d ago

Jacks left hand

"I'm your host. Kit, crumb. Today. Jack The ripper left hand. There are certain mysteries. Stand out and remain known answer. What happened to Amelia Earhart? How did Panamerican huge flying? Boat Hawaii Clipper disappeared without a trace and who was jack the ripper. Between August and November eighteen, eighty eight, at least six women were murdered in London's White Chapel district. But it was the gruesome nature, the murders that brought about panic and fear in the area for months finally spreading like the plague across London where the press picked up on the cereal, aspects of the deaths and dubbed the killer Jack The ripper. There are currently dozens of organizations that debate evidence surrounding the eighteen eighty eight white chapel murders attributed to Jack. The, ripper. There is speculation that there were two killers. Some experts attribute six victims to Jack The ripper. Others say eleven. The list of suspects exceeds five hundred ranging from royalty to doctors and one jill the ripper. As of this writing the number of nonfiction books on Jack, The ripper is closing in on two hundred and that's nonfiction. Without a doubt, the most highly publicized rip book to Come Out in recent years was written by Patricia Cornwell portrait of a killer Jack The ripper case closed. Cornwell claims to have found DNA evidence linking Walter Skirt to a small number of ripper letters. Her book rapidly climbed the Bestseller List and was the subject of numerous radio and television programs around the World Cornwell may have found evidence to suggest that Walter Skirt hoechst one more ripple letters, but the fact remains said skirt was in France on the night of at least four of the five ripper murders was not jack the ripper cornwell use twenty-first-century technology, including DNA to come up with skirt as Jack. Jack The ripper even though as mentioned. He was in France during a number of the murders on the other hand. James Tully author of the Book Prisoner Eleven Sixty, seven, the mad man who was Jack The ripper spent over thirty years, investigating the white chapel murders totally poses many questions about criminally insane inmate James Kelly who escaped from Broadmoor criminal lunatic asylum and evaded capture for over forty years. Specifically question why prisoner eleven sixty seven's government files are still classified and will remain sealed until twenty thirty. That's an interesting secret. Finally no collection of books on the why chapel murders would be complete without the nineteen hundred ninety volume Jack The ripper, first American serial killer. This highly research books speculation Jack The ripper may have been an American doctor Francis Tumblety who had a criminal record, and both sides of the Atlantic, and in fact was arrested eighteen, eighty, eight as a suspect in the white chapel murders. Their, theory is based on a recent discovery of a letter written by a Scotland Yard inspector. Authors Stuart Evans Paul. Gainey claim that Jack The ripper died in nineteen three, when tumble tease heart stopped shortly after I finish the research for the story, I received a letter with a fingerprint at the top that the author Ledge was taken off one of the letters received by Scotland Yard and determined to be from the thumb of the left hand of Jack the, ripper, he claimed the original was among the files of Broadmoor, criminal lunatic asylum prisoner eleven sixty seven, which would remain sealed until twenty thirty. The letter was signed anonymous, and curiously there was no postmark. The letter seemed validate author James. tolleys assertion that James Kelly's files were classified. But if at the time of the murders Scotland Yard had acquired the killer's fingerprint wind up, make an arrest. If however the print is that of James. Kelly was not say so.

Jack The James Kelly Walter Skirt Patricia Cornwell White Chapel District Scotland Yard White Chapel France Broadmoor Amelia Earhart London Francis Tumblety James James Tully Stuart Evans Bestseller List Atlantic Gainey James.
Faith leaders push Congress for bigger global virus response

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | Last week

Faith leaders push Congress for bigger global virus response

"Faith leaders are pushing Congress for a larger global response to the pandemic a group of faith leaders from all fifty states is urging the Senate to bolster its next pandemic relief bill with a multi billion dollar investment in the global response to the coronavirus the open letter to senators was co authored by Christian musician Michael W. Smith the letter was spearheaded by the one campaign with assistance from faith based international aid nonprofits including compassion international and world vision worldwide the corona viruses linked to more than four hundred eighty thousand deaths and nine point four million confirmed infections according to account maintained by Johns Hopkins University I'm Walter Ratliff

Congress Senate Michael W. Smith Johns Hopkins University Walter Ratliff
Media, power, and political communication

Pat McDonough

04:16 min | 2 weeks ago

Media, power, and political communication

"Let's talk about the media yeah the media is a powerful Trojan horse seven mereka if it's not a and I mean they have attacked president trump relentlessly yeah and the problem we have is we have fox okay yeah now fox is okay but Rupert Murdoch is ninety years old right and his two sons are liberals okay we have newsmax rage has been growing and that's a good thing yeah we have one America right which is a good thing but these are national programs they don't get into Vince's crab house they don't get in the fells point being close they don't get into those things go and they don't get into helping our people who need help to fight against the beast and as you pointed out the Baltimore sun doesn't report on any of these issues involving her son is one of them yeah right exactly the Baltimore sun is part of the super shadow government yeah they protect them yeah people say that the media has fallen in the tank for the left they fell in the tank for the Obama no the media never found the check for anybody the media are leaders in this offensive they are legally are part of the natural America they were and and they were targeted specifically for that purpose because of the vast influence they have they were targeted for subversion and infiltration by the Soviet Union in the nineteen thirties and we could go on for hours about how that happened and who infiltrated but just for example one person remember Edward R. Murrow of CBS Edward R. Murrow is one of the people primarily responsible for bringing communist it's two Columbia teachers college to begin inserting all of these destructive America narratives into our universities he was responsible for bringing those people over and he worked with a guy named Laurence Duggan whose son was an actual Soviet agent and he was friends with his son and he became a news anchor for CBS that's just one example there are many many trusted a man in America yeah right right he he gave the Vietnam War at eight a story that was a hundred and eighty degrees from what the truth was riled tell your doctor about with Walter Cronkite yeah that young people don't know who has what we member we only had three major networks in this country now I can tell you let me say some about yeah because the networks are required by FCC regulation as part of their contract to provide unbiased news nobody has ever called him that if I were in a position to do so I would pull their FCC licenses tomorrow and tell them that they better straighten out their newsrooms and start reporting what's going on because they should be challenged in the courts right absolutely be challenged because they have been really but they have such power and such influence and Americans have to get a constitutional public there operates through elections has to be given the facts at what's happened instead is they've been given the left narrative for sixty eighty years in World War two The New York Times was engaged in treason it was exposing things mark Levin's book yeah I mean it's just stunning it's stunning when CNN first started Ted Turner used to go on a show and he would bring some five Soviet KGB agents on the show with him had a first among them was Georgy Arbatov who is the head of member for US and Canada old KGB agent they would talk down president Reagan they would just sit there and terror attacks president right that was C. N. N. the communist news

Turning Proteins into Device Coatings that Provide Therapeutic Benefits

The Bio Report

05:57 min | 2 weeks ago

Turning Proteins into Device Coatings that Provide Therapeutic Benefits

"Lou Alvarez a West Point graduate who earned a PhD in bioengineering from Mit served twenty years in the military including time as an intelligence officer in Iraq, he saw injured soldiers, who doctors were able to save only to later have their limbs amputated because of the inability for injuries to heal properly, the experience led him to develop a means of turning recombinant proteins into a form that allows them to be used as coatings that act like paint can be applied to implants to promote growth and other benefits. We spoke to Alvarez founder of their adaptive about his journey from the battlefield, the lab how his company's platform technology works and the range of applications to which it may be applied. Lou thanks for joining us. It's great to be here. We're GONNA talk about Regenerative Medicine Third DA- positive and your efforts to improve the ability of bones to heal. I'd like to start with your own journey and how you became involved in the field of regenerative medicine. A West Point graduate. Masters in Chemical Engineering in a PhD in biological engineering from MIT. You've also got twenty years of active military service and earned both a combat action badge and a Bronze Star medal. How did you come to West Point? When did your interest in science begin? Were A. it's an interesting trajectory. One would necessarily recommend to others perceive career in science, but It's been quite a right unless but the. Interest really started the early school. In I always knew I wanted to devote my life to science, but about round the time that I was graduating high school light. I got an niche to prove myself physically maybe militarily, so I I decided to go to West Point. Actually provided a very good foundation for my Further studies later on in science had the bigger and and kind of engineering focus, West Point, being engineering school originally, and still is, so. It provided a good backdrop for me to continue my studies after. After finishing a West Point. Military service included time in Iraq. How much of your time was an active military zone? Right so after finishing west point. Miami actually was lucky enough to receive a hertz, Foundation Fellowship, this foundation that that pays for regular school in the in the sciences. And that allowed me to remain on active duty, but to pursue graduate school, and then after that. Two years than I was reassigned to units were traditionally tactical. Army units, and that included time both US industry said in Iraq so I a deployed with the First Cavalry Division to Iraq as an intelligence officer and. That tour was a little over a year, but that period of time between the masters in the was about a five year period of time. What was your experience in Iraq? So. It was actually in Iraq that that I think this idea crystallized in my mind. You know what it is that I. WanNa do in science. A lot of people come in. To a scientific field and maybe have a question about what direction to take so many options, but. What I saw there and what I almost nearly experienced myself several times. You know these injuries that lead to lifelong. Disability. Several if he was serving with head injuries. For example to the limbs lower limbs. I'M GONNA. Get back to the states. Medical scientists able to save their lives, but some of them suffered amputation, and the now have lifelong disability, and all that was due to the fact that there really wasn't anything out there to regenerate tissues, so that that ideas what motivated when I got back from Iraq to to go back to mit again under the leadership to the the focus on this idea, precise tissue regeneration. How much contact had you had with with people who who became amputee? Well after I got back, I did have a lot more interactions with folks in the region near the Walter Reed. Military Medical Hospital. Just others that had served with who who had suffered injuries so. It was a period of time in two, thousand, five, six, seven, eight. Where you know, there were really a surgeon so more and more people that had served with people that they knew. Were suffering injury. So you know it's a close knit community end up. Seeing many of them again. You returned to mit to earn a PhD in biological engineering. What was the work you did there? How did it connect? Sure so when I went back, the army gives you three years basically to do a PhD so I knew I had to hit the ground running. And and have a plan for what to do and MIT's department of biological engineering was very. Welcoming and said you don't pick the professor that you want to work with also a worked with Linda, Griffith, who is really Tinier in the field of regenerative? Medicine Tissue Engineering. Actually! She was a post doc in the Bob Langer's lap. Developed the ear on the back of the mass back in the ninety S. So you know real rich tradition of tissue engineering there it was on her group that I was able to focus on this idea for good delivery of proteins to induce the body to regenerate tissue.

Iraq West Point MIT Lou Alvarez Tissue Engineering Regenerative Medicine Third Officer Army Military Medical Hospital Founder Linda Foundation Fellowship Miami Walter Reed Bob Langer Professor
Turning Proteins into Device Coatings that Provide Therapeutic Benefits

The Bio Report

06:16 min | 2 weeks ago

Turning Proteins into Device Coatings that Provide Therapeutic Benefits

"Lou thanks for joining us. It's great to be here. We're GONNA talk about Regenerative Medicine Third DA- positive and your efforts to improve the ability of bones to heal. I'd like to start with your own journey and how you became involved in the field of regenerative medicine. A West Point graduate. Masters in Chemical Engineering in a PhD in biological engineering from MIT. You've also got twenty years of active military service and earned both a combat action badge and a Bronze Star medal. How did you come to West Point? When did your interest in science begin? Were A. it's an interesting trajectory. One would necessarily recommend to others perceive career in science, but It's been quite a right unless but the. Interest really started the early school. In I always knew I wanted to devote my life to science, but about round the time that I was graduating high school light. I got an niche to prove myself physically maybe militarily, so I I decided to go to West Point. Actually provided a very good foundation for my Further studies later on in science had the bigger and and kind of engineering focus, West Point, being engineering school originally, and still is, so. It provided a good backdrop for me to continue my studies after. After finishing a West Point. Military service included time in Iraq. How much of your time was an active military zone? Right so after finishing west point. Miami actually was lucky enough to receive a hertz, Foundation Fellowship, this foundation that that pays for regular school in the in the sciences. And that allowed me to remain on active duty, but to pursue graduate school, and then after that. Two years than I was reassigned to units were traditionally tactical. Army units, and that included time both US industry said in Iraq so I a deployed with the First Cavalry Division to Iraq as an intelligence officer and. That tour was a little over a year, but that period of time between the masters in the was about a five year period of time. What was your experience in Iraq? So. It was actually in Iraq that that I think this idea crystallized in my mind. You know what it is that I. WanNa do in science. A lot of people come in. To a scientific field and maybe have a question about what direction to take so many options, but. What I saw there and what I almost nearly experienced myself several times. You know these injuries that lead to lifelong. Disability. Several if he was serving with head injuries. For example to the limbs lower limbs. I'M GONNA. Get back to the states. Medical scientists able to save their lives, but some of them suffered amputation, and the now have lifelong disability, and all that was due to the fact that there really wasn't anything out there to regenerate tissues, so that that ideas what motivated when I got back from Iraq to to go back to mit again under the leadership to the the focus on this idea, precise tissue regeneration. How much contact had you had with with people who who became amputee? Well after I got back, I did have a lot more interactions with folks in the region near the Walter Reed. Military Medical Hospital. Just others that had served with who who had suffered injuries so. It was a period of time in two, thousand, five, six, seven, eight. Where you know, there were really a surgeon so more and more people that had served with people that they knew. Were suffering injury. So you know it's a close knit community end up. Seeing many of them again. You returned to mit to earn a PhD in biological engineering. What was the work you did there? How did it connect? Sure so when I went back, the army gives you three years basically to do a PhD so I knew I had to hit the ground running. And and have a plan for what to do and MIT's department of biological engineering was very. Welcoming and said you don't pick the professor that you want to work with also a worked with Linda, Griffith, who is really Tinier in the field of regenerative? Medicine Tissue Engineering. Actually! She was a post doc in the Bob Langer's lap. Developed the ear on the back of the mass back in the ninety S. So you know real rich tradition of tissue engineering there it was on her group that I was able to focus on this idea for good delivery of proteins to induce the body to regenerate tissue. was well understood why these? Soldiers. Who would come home would. have their lives save, but then end up losing limbs. That's a great question. It's something that maybe doesn't get a lot of attention so if you injure limb. Normally. That injury affects bone. Can AFFEC-, nerves and vessels, if any one of those tissues doesn't heal properly. Then you end up with a limb? That isn't usable. Actually becomes a burden to you and the medical guidance is that what's recommended? Amputation, which is a? This is amazing to me that you would. Basically discard limp because one of the wires is not the NACCHIO correct Civis, so to me I wanted to. Address a problem on a very detailed level this Aitken we regenerate? Let's say bone so now. You can save a bit if if the problem is that the bonus inhale. So. It's a piece wise approach to try to salvage alums. What are bone void fillers? And how are they used

Iraq West Point MIT Regenerative Medicine Third Army Tissue Engineering LOU Military Medical Hospital Bob Langer Aitken Foundation Fellowship Walter Reed Miami United States First Cavalry Division Officer
Adding Style or Updating with Temporary Wallpaper

Home Space and Reason

06:53 min | 2 weeks ago

Adding Style or Updating with Temporary Wallpaper

"Discuss home aesthetics, specifically, adding character or updating things like kitchen, cabinets and bookshelves using temporary wallpaper. Note that this is also a renter friendly suggestion in the event that you don't own your own home yet. Also this is a concept to chew on for updating a space without completely overhauling it. When we built our home I, really wanted a different color island than our main bank of Cabinets. But Alas are upgrades were already fast, approaching thirty thousand dollars and I decided that it wasn't something I had to have at least right now. Fast forward five years, and I was still toying with the idea of painting the back side of the island. That faces are living space. But man painting is so permanent. I mean I know you can undo it, but it's difficult to undo if we wanted to return to stain cabinets at some point. So I kept stalling. Thinking on it rolling it over and over in my mind. then. I was paging through instagram recently, and I saw post by chasing paper and had an epiphany. Why couldn't I simply use temporary wallpaper on the one side imitating tile, which would add both color that I desired and a pattern to for just one hundred and seventy five dollars and four hours of our own labor. We have a refreshed kitchen that I am loving so very much. Remember there's no such thing as perfect even with custom built cabinetry, so our biggest lesson was that when we measured are island from countertop to the baseboard top. There was a variance of of an inch from the left side to the far right side, so we had to cut the larger size and then trim it after hanging it to accommodate the imperfection. The chasing paper product is basically like a giant sticker. We peel off the backing starting at the top and gradually pull it down from behind as we work our way out pushing the air bubbles out and smoothing it from the center to the edges. We were challenged as we got to the left and the far right side, because we couldn't use a razor blade to cut vertically on the edge of the island without scraping the would. We opted to tape it up with masking tape, so we kind of did it like a mock hang while the backing was still on it, so we can draw a vertical cutline and cut it before peeling the backing off one person held up a large cutting matt against the wallpaper to hold it in place, while the other person drew a cutline on the edge of the backside. Sure enough once we pulled it away, the top and bottom were not a perfectly straight line, so if we had simply measured it and cut it. It would not have been as precise. We have custom cabinets, and they look perfect, but they are not actually because there's no such thing as perfect and sometimes things are off here and there a sixteenth of an inch. We also put temporary wallpaper in the back of our Bilton bookshelves, many years back to add depth and interest. We love it, and now that five years has passed. I'm thrilled. I could change it out easily and put up something different in their without repainting. Temporary wallpaper rocks my friends. It's worth noting though that it does best on smooth surfaces, which means walls that have texture are going to be less wallpaper friendly, and you'll likely see the texture visible through the wallpaper. Since we did the back of our Bilton bookshelves and the back of our island, neither were walls, so we didn't have to worry about the wall texture. There's no glues or mess necessary. There are several companies out there offering wonderful modern patterns and designs. Here are a few that sell it although I'm sure there are more. Chasing paper is who I bought from WHO got and West. Walls need. Love Spoon, Flower Wall, candy it's West Elm. Temp Paper Blick Walter `natives, new paper by wall POPs Carter in Maine and Kate Zaremba. Company of course I will put a list on the facebook group page. If you're not yet a member, look up, home, space and reason. We have a few extra bits leftover from our main project and are thinking of lining the inside of a couple. Small nightstand drawers it upstairs. For a lovely little surprise inside when you open it up I've also seen people. Put this in the back of cupboards that have glass on the fronts, so the POPs of color offset the dishes and adds color to the kitchen. Now. Let's talk about what you'll need. You'll need to start with some simple green cleaner to wipe down the surface a few hours before to make sure it's dust, free and goop free, sticky, free grease free all the stuff. It needs to dry, complete Li like for reals. Maybe even do this a day before if you have the patience to wait. You'll need a long metal straight edge for cutting an EXACTO BLADE, sharp and new and a large self-healing cut. Matt often found in fabric stores. I use mine all the time. We also ended up using masking tape for making sure. Our measurements were right before committing to taking off the backing. And we also used a thin sharpy to make that line. We used a credit card a few times for pushing tiny edges up into the corners where fingers wouldn't fit. We also used a work light from the garage for shining directly directly at prospect since there was some shadowing from the countertop overhang.

Facebook West Elm Matt Kate Zaremba LI Carter Maine
How to fix phone screen burn-in or discoloration

Leo Laporte

05:40 min | 2 weeks ago

How to fix phone screen burn-in or discoloration

"On the line from Weeki Wachee Florida Tim hello Tim anyway I got a young clerk about android when the screen burn in an email to us they want to put the status there will be a bright light and it's always there huh so is there you know the phones at like a test pattern we can look at all the pixels you look at red green and blue yeah the red ones of never burn in the red phosphor very stable yeah there's no way to go on android say look look at top displays read only I wish I wish I didn't know there was a truck I didn't know there might be a way to do it if you use a custom launcher C. many launchers have a lot of customisations you're using which what phone are you using a Samsung eight twenty okay for instance I'm using right now a launcher I really like called active launcher think I'm isn't actually I don't remember thinking he's an active larger and the status bar in my android is actually clear so I just see the information but there is no white bar at all it's just the the what Walter that paper in the background but that's also fully customizable I mean you're never you know so the default launchers the Sampson launcher may not have that customizability but if you are downloading that's a larger thing yeah it's in the launcher exactly so if you download another launcher I'm using as I said active launcher which I really like there's something called lawn chair get it on there's Nova launcher which I like a lot almost all of these have have seemingly they have things that you can do to change to customize it and one of the things absolutely in the same would be to change that status bar you can even turn off completely inactive lunch and have no status bar at all I mean I happen to think it's useful but that's one way to get rid of it I'm I'm sorry it's burning in like that it if it's a Samsung phone is probably in all its screen well I got a new phone that's why it was like you know my other phone the Morgan Adams I got was a bird in the hand that's two or two later since I got here we go with another phone again was gonna get burned in the end yeah I you know I never use the default Sampson launcher I mean I know it's easiest to use on I'm this is a pixel phone I'm not using Google's pixel launcher either I almost always install a different launcher not because of the burning and I've actually never had burned and I'm kind of surprised to hear that but just because I I I like to customize a lot more than the stock washers will do I'm gonna put somebody in the chat room has put a a link from a site I've never heard of called android pit that's not a big not a good name but on how to handle Burnin onna analyst or LCD display there are some things doing initially has some kind of pixel tracker where they could count on in the background like how long each pixel binning running at eighty percent you know what time it is kind of this they they reckon mentor program for lead called Oleg tools is in the Google play store it'll sequence through colors theory is going to restore burned in colors and there's also one for LCDs called LCD Burnin wiper I'm guessing I don't remember the a a bit of most all Samsung phones early these days I looked at them all they do is they they blast all the tricks of the yeah Mr while yeah they try to try to try to use them up yeah yeah it may not it may not fix it I mean Vernon's burn in but yeah I haven't seen a lot of I have not seen a lot of burning on a lead so that's why I'm surprised about it but there's they can occur insidery doubling the green layer is like when we had those old analog yells grander green screens up and you could see what everybody left yeah those down those were burning all man yeah if you look at the terminal like at an airport or something that's been on for a second screen for years you could turn the screen off still read it yeah when I went back to the E. commerce sixty four is seen clearly my tragedy was the one that had driven cable out of the day every time you wait a minute when will I remember those there weren't there were a series of them that were so sensitive to static electricity if you rub your feet on the carpet and then touch the keyboard you kill it you actually kill the computer that's a fun jokes planned friends family friendly mom works every time we step up to the counter and burned out should exchange lord those are the days those are the days my pleasure I'm glad the glad you called I appreciate it yeah I honestly one of the main reasons I like android effect really pretty much the only reason is unlike the iPhone you can change your home screen you can change your screen looks like the iPhone you're stuck it's great it's what they called springboard apple causes springboard there are rumors we'll find out a week from Monday that they're going to allow us to customize a little more on iOS fourteen I hope that rumors true because as you know if you look at my some help I'll post all this with you look at my android screen it's got widgets of widgets and widgets and it's you know it's highly customized use spring folders loaded folder so that I only see one icon on the screen but if I swipe down on that icon I can see all the icons under there's a lot of nice things you can do with android phones thanks to the fact that you could put in any launcher you want I think that's a nice feature I don't apple's avoided that since two thousand seven maybe they're gonna change it I

TIM Weeki Wachee Florida
Bonnie Pointer, early member of Pointer Sisters, dies at 69

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 3 weeks ago

Bonnie Pointer, early member of Pointer Sisters, dies at 69

"Mourners hi Mike a founding Rossi pay member their of a a respects reporting popular a to federal Grammy George appeals winning Floyd group court whose orders has body died was the dismissal on view of in an challenges open casket to the trump at administration's a church in his Muslim hometown travel of Houston ban people one who a didn't point three know judge two Floyd has panel died paused of the her fourth briefly publicist US circuit to said view court she died his of appeals body of cardiac has arrest ordered felt really the in dismissal Los Angeles emotional of legal challenges Anita to pointer see him to says president for if those it wasn't Donald who knew trump's for him Bonnie like ban Walter on we travelers Jefferson never would from have heard they predominantly didn't of the pointer call Muslim him sisters George countries Floyd Persib the panel we will says ruled call it on was a the federal floor Bonnie judge he in call who Maryland after Floyd leaving made inspirational a high mistake school wanted when he to a refused leave joyful off from to dismiss spirit singing three to in lawsuits church the gym jam after and go at the pro home Supreme affairs with Court their sisters upheld the ban I two say in twenty of he whom eighteen should were already offer that married in could a be separate case and the even meeting filed had kids in Hawaii at the whatever time the you want ban was the in a put gamble in given place paid city in off January Jefferson the group twenty went says on seventeen to it's record hard hits to see like just yes what a week happened we can after can to trump his friend took I'm office so excited but he it is applies serving jump to a travelers and better slow purpose from hand Iran he is Bonnie spread Libya pointer the word Somalia was sixty Syria all nine over the and world Yemen but I'm actually Oscar travelers begin wells him from right Gabriel North now Texas Korea and governor some Greg Venezuelan Abbott says government George officials Floyd and has their not families died in are vain also he's affected going to change Mike the Rossi arc a of Washington the future of the United States I'm at Donahue

Syria Yemen Anita Los Angeles Houston Grammy George Donahue United States Washington Rossi Greg Venezuelan Abbott Texas Korea Gabriel North Mike Somalia Iran Hawaii Maryland Floyd Persib Jefferson
Court orders dismissal of Trump Muslim travel ban challenges

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 3 weeks ago

Court orders dismissal of Trump Muslim travel ban challenges

"Mourners hi Mike Rossi pay their a respects reporting a to federal George appeals Floyd court whose orders body was the dismissal on view of in an challenges open casket to the trump at administration's a church in his Muslim hometown travel of Houston ban people who a didn't three know judge Floyd panel paused of the fourth briefly US circuit to view court his of appeals body has ordered felt really the dismissal emotional of legal challenges to see him to president for those Donald who knew trump's him like ban Walter on travelers Jefferson from they predominantly didn't call Muslim him George countries Floyd the panel we will ruled call on a the federal floor judge he in call Maryland Floyd made inspirational a mistake when he a refused joyful to dismiss spirit three to lawsuits the gym jam after at the home Supreme affairs Court upheld the ban I say in twenty he eighteen should offer that in could a be separate case the meeting filed in Hawaii whatever the you want ban was in a put in given place city in January Jefferson twenty says seventeen it's hard to see just what a week happened after to trump his friend took office but he it is applies serving to a travelers better purpose from Iran he is spread Libya the word Somalia Syria all over the and world Yemen but actually travelers begin him from right North now Texas Korea and governor some Greg Venezuelan Abbott says government George officials Floyd and has their not families died in are vain also he's affected going to change Mike the Rossi arc a of Washington the future of the United States I'm at Donahue

Donahue Texas Korea Yemen Somalia Libya Supreme Affairs Court Jefferson Walter President Trump Houston George Mike Rossi United States Washington Greg Venezuelan Abbott Iran Hawaii Maryland Donald Trump
Court orders dismissal of Trump Muslim travel ban challenges

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 3 weeks ago

Court orders dismissal of Trump Muslim travel ban challenges

"New mourners hi Mike York City Rossi pay their is a respects starting reporting phase a to federal George one appeals Floyd of its court corona whose orders body virus was the dismissal on re view opening of in an challenges wearing open a casket mask to the trump New at York administration's a church governor Andrew in his Muslim hometown Cuomo travel marked of Houston ban the occasion people who by a didn't three riding know judge Floyd the subway panel paused of the fourth briefly US circuit to view court his of appeals body has ordered felt really the dismissal emotional of the legal governor challenges says he to wouldn't see ask him to president anyone for those Donald who to knew do anything trump's him like ban Walter he on travelers Jefferson wouldn't do from himself they predominantly didn't call Muslim him George countries Floyd the New the York panel we will ruled call on a the federal floor judge he you in call can Maryland see Floyd people made inspirational are excited a mistake to when he a refused joyful retailers to dismiss spirit can three re to lawsuits open the gym for jam delivery after at the home Supreme and pickup affairs Court no upheld customers the ban inside I say in twenty he yet eighteen should offer that mayor in could a bill be separate de Blasio case the meeting filed does in Hawaii not whatever want a the you set want ban was in back a put in given place we're city going in to January be Jefferson really twenty says seventeen it's aggressive hard to see about just what a week fighting happened after back to trump his this friend disease took office but so he it is we applies serving can get the phase to a travelers better two purpose from phase Iran three he is spread Libya phase the word four Somalia I Syria have all confidence over the and world we Yemen can but do it actually construction travelers begin him from manufacturing right North now Texas Korea and and governor wholesalers some Greg Venezuelan Abbott in New York says government George can officials Floyd resume and has work their not families died I'm a in are Donahue vain also he's affected going to change Mike the Rossi arc a of Washington the future of the United States I'm at Donahue

United States Texas Korea Libya De Blasio Pickup Affairs Court Maryland Donald Trump Houston Cuomo Andrew York Floyd Mike York Donahue President Trump Washington Rossi George New York Greg Venezuelan Abbott
Thousands mourn George Floyd in Texas amid calls for reform

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 3 weeks ago

Thousands mourn George Floyd in Texas amid calls for reform

"Mourners pay their respects to George Floyd whose body was on view in an open casket at a church in his hometown of Houston people who didn't know Floyd paused briefly to view his body felt really emotional to see him for those who knew him like Walter Jefferson they didn't call him George Floyd we will call on the floor he call Floyd inspirational a joyful spirit to the gym jam at home affairs I say he should offer that could be the meeting whatever you want in a given city Jefferson says it's hard to see what happened to his friend but he is serving a better purpose he is spread the word all over the world but actually begin him right now Texas governor Greg Abbott says George Floyd has not died in vain he's going to change the arc of the future of the United States I'm at Donahue

George Floyd Walter Jefferson Greg Abbott United States Donahue Texas
Thousands mourn George Floyd in Texas amid calls for reform

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 3 weeks ago

Thousands mourn George Floyd in Texas amid calls for reform

"Mourners pay their respects to George Floyd whose body was on view in an open casket at a church in his hometown of Houston people who didn't know Floyd paused briefly to view his body felt really emotional to see him for those who knew him like Walter Jefferson they didn't call him George Floyd we will call on the floor he call Floyd inspirational a joyful spirit to the gym jam at home affairs I say he should offer that could be the meeting whatever you want in a given city Jefferson says it's hard to see what happened to his friend but he is serving a better purpose he is spread the word all over the world but actually begin him right now Texas governor Greg Abbott says George Floyd has not died in vain he's going to change the arc of the future of the United States I'm at Donahue

George Floyd Walter Jefferson Greg Abbott United States Donahue Texas
Thousands mourn George Floyd in Texas amid calls for reform

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 3 weeks ago

Thousands mourn George Floyd in Texas amid calls for reform

"New mourners York City pay their is respects starting phase to George one Floyd of its corona whose body virus was on re view opening in an wearing open a casket mask New at York a church governor Andrew in his hometown Cuomo marked of Houston the occasion people who by didn't riding know Floyd the subway paused briefly to view his body felt really emotional the governor says he to wouldn't see ask him anyone for those who to knew do anything him like Walter he Jefferson wouldn't do himself they didn't call him George Floyd the New York we will call on the floor he you call can see Floyd people inspirational are excited to a joyful retailers spirit can re to open the gym for jam delivery at home and pickup affairs no customers inside I say he yet should offer that mayor could bill be de Blasio the meeting does not whatever want a you set want in back a given we're city going to be Jefferson really says it's aggressive hard to see about what fighting happened back to his this friend disease but so he is we serving can get the phase a better two purpose phase three he is spread phase the word four I have all confidence over the world we can but do it actually construction begin him manufacturing right now Texas and governor wholesalers Greg Abbott in New York says George can Floyd resume has work not died I'm a in Donahue vain he's going to change the arc of the future of the United States I'm at Donahue

York City York Cuomo Houston Walter Jefferson George Floyd New York Texas Greg Abbott Donahue United States Andrew
Thousands mourn George Floyd in Texas amid calls for reform

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 3 weeks ago

Thousands mourn George Floyd in Texas amid calls for reform

"Mourners pay their respects to George Floyd whose body was on view in an open casket at a church in his hometown of Houston people who didn't know Floyd paused briefly to view his body felt really emotional to see him for those who knew him like Walter Jefferson they didn't call him George Floyd we will call on the floor he call Floyd inspirational a joyful spirit to the gym jam at home affairs I say he should offer that could be the meeting whatever you want in a given city Jefferson says it's hard to see what happened to his friend but he is serving a better purpose he is spread the word all over the world but actually begin him right now Texas governor Greg Abbott says George Floyd has not died in vain he's going to change the arc of the future of the United States I'm at Donahue

George Floyd Walter Jefferson Greg Abbott United States Donahue Texas
Bayard Rustin

Making Gay History

05:20 min | Last month

Bayard Rustin

"It's been a week of anger, anguish and heartbreak here in New York City. And across the country. Massive protests over George Loyd's murder under the knee of a police officer. had been met with repeated widespread violence by militarized police. The threat of active duty military being deployed to control citizens exercising their constitutional rights. The ongoing drumbeat of white supremacy coming from the White House. The People's House now, an embattled presidency fortress peaceful protesters described as terrorists. From day to day and hour to hour, I've been alternately sickened and heartened. Filled with despair, and then lifted up by the voices of people across the country, demanding revolutionary change because black lives matter. And making a history, we're proud and humbled to stand with them. All black lives matter. LGBTQ black lives matter. On Wednesday afternoon I was sitting at my desk and heard noise I couldn't identify coming through my open window. My partner born and I went outside to see what was going on. Thousands of protesters marching of Ninth Avenue as far as the I could see wearing masks, carrying signs and chanting. They were heading north, and in a few blocks be passing the apartment complex where fired Rushton once lived. He was a principal architect of the march on Washington for jobs and freedom. In August nine hundred and sixty three, a quarter of a million Americans massed in Washington D. C. at the foot of the Lincoln memorial to demand an end to state sanctioned racism. In this revisiting the archive episode, you'll hear buyers Rushton in his own words. In, addition to coordinating the nineteen sixty three march on Washington, fired was one of the organizers of the very first freedom ride through the American south in one, thousand, nine, hundred, forty seven. And was mentor to Dr. Martin Luther, King Junior from the time of the Montgomery bus boycott. Barred Rushton was a proud black gay man who paid a high price for proclaiming who he was long before. It was remotely safe to do so. He put himself in harm's way over and over again subjected to attacks by white supremacists who uses race and sexuality to try to destroy him. But not only resisted triumphed. You're about to hear. An interview fired rust and gave on February fifth nineteen, eighty, six a year and a half before he died. The reporter was young peg Byron who was freelancing for DC based GAY newspaper? The, Washington, Blade. Pay conducted the interview in buyers, office and Lower Park Avenue New, York City just across town from where he lived in Chelsea with his partner Walter Naegle. Walter was also buyers assistant, and you can hear the sound of him in the next room through much of the interview. It's thanks to Walter who recorded the conversation and save it for decades in a box under their bed that we're able to hear Byron speak in this rare interview about the impact of his sexuality on his work in the civil rights movement. So, let's join peg Byron admired rusting desk and listen to history from a man who changed its course. To know mind now, let's play all right. Walters doing some research. On me. Therefore, he tapes Manipur. Anybody else does that check on. Wall. With this shows is that. Stop now this is still going. has there ever been Some projects are involved. We're. Not, that being gay was necessarily an issue, but did you ever feel frustration about? I. You know I was an associate adopt live. Luther King's for a number of years. And actually I the person who drew up plans for his southern Christian leadership conference. Given. It was so much pressure on Dr. King's about my game. And particularly I would not be denied. That he set up a committee to explore whether you'd be changes, but To you working again? After eight years, that committee came decision would be dangerous. The Q. Midi seems eight years now. After I had worked for him. He's year. The! J. Edgar Hoover. Began to circulate all kinds of stories about Luther King. One which was? that he wants a friend of mine, hinting that somehow there might be some homosexual relationship going on between us.

Walter Naegle Luther King Principal Architect Washington Byron White House New York City George Loyd Partner Dr. Martin Luther J. Edgar Hoover Murder Lincoln Memorial Officer. Montgomery Manipur Reporter York City
A Decade Of Watching Black People Die

Short Wave

05:54 min | Last month

A Decade Of Watching Black People Die

"Family of Kentucky Woman, shot and killed by police is demanding answers. The former, his son both white are accused of killing the unarmed black man again with the breaking news for Minneapolis violent protests raged for a second straight night, following the death of George Floyd after being arrested by a Minneapolis police officer last night, protesters turned their attention to the city's. The last few weeks have been filled with devastating news stories about police killing black people. And what is sick is that these stories have become the kind of news that we in the business call evergreen their stories that are always relevant and always in season, these calamities are so familiar. This point they're details have begun to echo each other July. Twenty fourteen, a cell phone video captured some of Eric Garner's final words as New York City Police officers sat on his head and pinned him to the ground on a city sidewalk. I can't breathe. Or May twenty fifth of this year those same words were spoken by George Floyd. Just before he died, he pleaded for release, as an officer kneeled on his neck in pins of the ground on a Minneapolis City Street, so we're at the point with verbiage, people used to plead for their lives can be re purposed as shorthand for completely different stories and part of our job here coast, which is to conceptualize and make sense of news like this. But genus is hard to come up with something new to say you know things we haven't already said or things we have already recorded protesters saying when we were both in Ferguson in August of twenty fourteen after Michael. Brown was killed by the police or when we were in Baltimore after Freddie Gray's death. I spent the day with junior. High school kids in West. Baltimore where Freddie Gray was from on the first day. Let kids return to school after all the protests and I will never forget the eighth grade boy who raised his hand to ask. Why have white people been killing us in slavery and they're still killing us. He said that on Wednesday April Twenty Ninth Twenty fifteen. Since it's so hard to come up with any fresh insights about this phenomenon. We thought we would look back to another time. When the nation turned collective attention to this perpetual problem. Jamile Smith Senior Writer for Rolling Stone magazine. In when I was at the new republic. wrote an article entitled. What does seeing black men die? Do for you. It was published on April Thirteenth Two Thousand Fifteen. We get to see black men tortured or killed by police a lot more often these days. So, it's worth recalling why a generation ago. It mattered so much to see what happened to Rodney King. Now the story that might never have surfaced if someone hadn't picked up his home video camera. We've all seen. We have certainly seen the black and white photographs and videos depicting police abuse of African Americans. And we'd seen the grainy images of lynchings passed. But the conventional ignorance was that this wasn't the America. We lived in now. Officers beating a man they had just pulled over. This was the early nineties after all. This was in America that viewed law enforcement in the context of the popular reality, show cops, and were Morton Downey Junior tabloid television style made uncensored aggression a form of entertainment. But when George Holidays video surface chuck him with batons of between fifty three and fifty six times signal to a lot of citizens, just how bad police violence visited upon marginalized communities, actually was six kicks and one officer one kick people either didn't know what was happening. or willfully ignorant of it. They needed to wake up. Say The Los. Angeles Police Department has a history of brutality and misconduct that goes back a quarter of a century day. We are not sure that the police is there to protect us. The fear of becoming the next Rodney King is still here. But what has changed is how often we are viewing that fear being realized. Jamal goes on to write that the ubiquity of cell phone cameras and dashboard cameras means this uncensored horror has become available on demand. He says he watched twenty two year old Oscar grant get shot and killed by a police officer on Youtube before it made it to broadcast news. That happened in Oakland in two thousand, nine on New Year's Day. And it really marked the beginning of this grim genre, in which the slain become memorialized as Hashtags Hashtag justice for Oscar grant and remember Walters Gun Eric Harris, Jomo rights videos of them, being killed became public almost back to back in two thousand fifteen. Both men were running away when the shots were fired. Walter Scott Fifty was trying to escape North Charleston police officer Michael slager. Who Shot him eight times in the back? Before planning evidence near his body to support a false account of the incident. Eric Harris was running from a team of Tulsa County deputies when Elderly Insurance Executive Robert Bates. WHO's donations to the SHERIFF'S OFFICE IN MODICUM? Training earned him the title of Reserve Deputy. Shot him dead.

Officer Rodney King George Floyd Minneapolis Michael Slager Angeles Police Department Eric Garner America New York City Freddie Gray Kentucky White Walter Scott Fifty Baltimore Rolling Stone Magazine Eric Harris Oscar Ferguson Morton Downey Sheriff's Office
A Philadelphia Man is Finally Free After Almost 3 Decades in Prison

KYW 24 Hour News

01:09 min | Last month

A Philadelphia Man is Finally Free After Almost 3 Decades in Prison

"He's been behind bars for three decades for the death of a four year old girl a murder he insists he did not commit and now it appears Philadelphia prosecutors agreed because Walter garages of Freeman story from K. Y. W. community affairs reporter Jeremy gray I'm sorry it took twenty years for us to listen to what Barbara Jean was trying to tell us that you are innocent Philadelphia eighty eight Kerry wood gave that apology to Walter o'brien and his family as well as to the family of four year old Barbara Jean horn bring up virtual court hearing on June that we not only stole twenty eight years of your life but we threatened to execute you based on falsehoods moments later judge Robbins new ordered a new trial in the case citing evidence of police misconduct including two false confessions as well as prosecutorial misconduct that led to rights conviction and death sentence they're now being overturned he one is going to be this is Sherin Fahey is Barbara Jean's mother and says they've been lied to when the murder happened the truth which is hard that's so true Greg Keim of usually all

Murder Barbara Jean Walter O'brien Robbins Sherin Fahey Greg Keim Philadelphia Freeman K. Y. W. Community Reporter Jeremy Gray Kerry Barbara Jean Horn
"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

13:44 min | 2 months ago

"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"Special episode of Trailblazers. We're going through a unique and difficult time right now physically distancing when we leave the house and many of us including myself a working from home. No one is sure when things will get back to normal and it's quite likely they'll be a brand new normal when all of this is over in this time of so many unknowns the only thing we do know for certain is that innovation in all of its many forms is the only way out of this today on the show. We're talking to Michael. Dell CEO and founder of Dell Technologies. I've known Michael for thirty years. I've watched them form a company. Then step aside ZANU leaders could take over and then return in order to save it when our new wave of innovation threatened to disrupt it and have admired as he and his wife. Susan created a foundation focusing on education and health that reflects the values instilled in him by his parents. Lorraine and Alex del Orig- Michael at his home in Texas. Walter how you doing Michael. I'm doing fine. How are you pretty good? Pretty good has a family. Has Susan Good? How about your family learn New Orleans? We're doing fine. What hunker down a bit understand? Yup while we're we're hunkered down here in Austin so Michael explained to me what you do each day doing in this crisis. Well you know I get up in the morning and and obviously working at home go throughout my normal meetings and I would have. They're all online. They're all video meetings trying to get outside and go for long walks and reflect on what's going on Check in with people more frequently staying close to my family. My loved ones and making sure everyone knows that you know. We're here for them. And that sort of thing do you. Miss Me Interactions. That used to come when you traveled so much. I guess I don't really missed the travel that much I'm not. I miss the interaction with people around the country and around around the world. But I have to say. I don't really miss getting on the airplanes as much. You know this is like nothing we've ever experienced in health is our biggest concern now but I'm also worried about people losing their jobs and I'm worried about the toll on folks that comes from having to stay isolated. How of you and your colleagues been adapting. Well first of all. I think you know the full impact of this is uncertain and it certainly has far reaching effects on almost every person every family every community. And like you said there's a concern that it's left us isolated and the emotional effects of that. I actually think in some ways were emotionally more united. We've ever been that. There's no denying the detrimental effects since having on the economy. But I think there is another story. That is actually quite inspiring. I'm very impressed. With the way our team has adapted to the new realities and I think we might be experiencing a kind of human transformation with empathy generosity and gratefulness and selflessness humility. Our companies are becoming more human. We've got children and dogs popping up in our conference calls and even more remote or more connected In ways than we've ever been yesterday was the traditional. Take your kids to work day and did it online. We add coating classes and arts and crafts and I was reading a story story time to the kids and answering questions. And so you know. We're we're over communicating and trying to keep everybody connected and also reminding them of important work that they're doing to keep running in now. We love the physical presence of people being around them. And I know we're all missing that but what are some of the upsides that you see of the way of doing business remotely being able to do things quickly and efficiently as we've had interactions with customers. I think what we found is that we probably didn't need all the travel that we were doing and online meetings can be super productive. And so I think that's a a big upside. It does get old after a while sitting in a room and just having meeting after meeting by video chat you know as as we think about the flexibility that we provide our teams and we started work from home at Dell over a decade ago. And we did that. Really to provide flexibility for our workforce as a good thing. We did now when we turned it on over a weekend and said one hundred sixty thousand people work from home. It action worked surprisingly well so I think that's going to create all kinds of new opportunities. How's the situation changed the way you act as a raider well over tuning occasion is super important and we started gone from quarterly meetings to weekly meetings and sharing the stories with our team of how our technology is helping to address the crisis on the front lines. And I think you know when you're in a crisis you've really got to do three things. I you gotTa make your team feel safe and protected and ensure they have the resources to be productive. And as I said I'm inspired by the where teams are able to deal with this and adapted their juggling the various responsibilities of their lives. Whether it's taking care of kids or elderly parents that are that are vulnerable. I think the second thing is customers will remember how you help them during a crisis. And they'll remember that forever. And so you know. We're certainly over communicating with our customers reaching out to them more often. I find the conversations with customers are at one level very personal while at the same time. We're focused on how we can help them. Keep businesses running and keep society moving. And then you you've got to make sure that your business financially strong are able to navigate the environment stay focused on the future and I think the companies that can do both of those things will come out of the stronger. The the effects are going to be very different. Obviously by industry by company size even location. But you've gotta get out in front of it over communicate with empathy. Explain what you're doing why you're doing it and the quicker than you communicate. The better in our country was definitely not prepared for this. What cracks or inefficiencies has situation exposed in our society I think is certainly exposed and exacerbated gaps in access to technology infrastructure education care and economic security in. And we do it. Right could be a chance to address those challenges as we look to come out on the other side of this. You know. There's no playbook for anybody in this and one of the common themes that we've seen is the credible speed at which digital transformation is now occurring. What companies fight if done in two or three years doing in two or three months and just imagine for a second if this had happened ten or fifteen years ago without all the connectivity and the technology that we have today and so while there's certainly a story about the horrible economic effects of this? I think there's another story about the incredible amount of economic activity that we've been able to continue and you sort of asked the question. What happens if everybody works for all while we're finding out? Organizations are able to adapt pretty well. It successfully transition. Most of their workforce to working from home. We're seeing all kinds of organizations from small to large public sector. Schools are being redefined grocery stores or adding to restructure their workflow and it's inspiring to see the resourcefulness in the innovation. And Look I think. Technology is going to continue to reinvent the way we work at learn conduct business and find solutions to the problems out there and I think technology will accelerate the way we address those gaps in society resets. My Hope Dell Technologies as well as the Michael and Susan Dell Foundation have been very involved in education. How do you think this may change education? Well certainly in a remote learning. We got a great experiment right now with all of the students in a giant remote learning experiment. I think the ability to access the highest volley resources online. It certainly changes the whole dynamic of access to education at look. There's kind of a focus from doing it fast to doing it right in all these domains and we have to put the right tools in place to be able to do. Efficiently make sure nursing gauge mind. I again I'm optimistic. I think there will be incredible. Things that come out of this I think. Many of the institutions of higher education will adapt and have to change as a result of this. The idea of doing things over over four years on on a set schedule sort of goes out the window. When everything is online you can chaotic moments in history often breed disruption and they often breed innovation as. Well what do you see as the biggest changes in society coming out covert nineteen? Well so many I mean to your point. Is You look back in previous crises. You know it was a time of incredible and many new companies were created. I think somebody wants said we went into World War Two on horseback when we came out your splitting the atom or something like that. The focus of of the world is starting to move to. How do we recover? You know it's A. It's a delicate dance obviously. I think I'm inspired that. Medical Science is hot on the trail. Here with seventy plus vaccines in development all kinds of therapeutics being tested. And you know another interesting aspect of this. I think we're finding environmental benefits. Certainly all the vehicles and airplanes that were used to move people around those were large sources of greenhouse gas emissions. Businesses are finding that they didn't need all those things and we can. I realize more travel interaction. Collaboration and become cleaner greener a society. And I think now's the time to reflect on all the things that we learned during the crisis we're finding we can be quite productive and we're actively planning to say how can we have. Can we take a number of these lessons? Going forward? I many companies are are doing that. So we'll see how much this we carry forward but I believe there will be lasting. Positive results should mess and I believe there will be many new innovative companies innovations that come out of this also think you know. It will accelerate a lot of the technology trends that were going on digital transformation. Five G. The Internet of things and will use this as an opportunity to embrace the things that were already happening. And I'm I'm an optimist I think There will be great things. Come out of this and were learning as we go and at believe we put people first. The world's can emerge stronger fingers crisis. Thank you Michael and Stay Healthy Sandy. You thank you very much. Thanks for listening. We'll be back in June with all new episodes of trailblazers until then stay safe..

Alex del Orig- Michael Dell Dell Technologies ZANU Susan Austin Susan Good Walter New Orleans Lorraine Texas Susan Dell Foundation CEO founder
"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

06:16 min | 4 months ago

"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"It's a wintery day in early. Two Thousand One and FBI headquarters in Washington DC and NAVA spy Hunter Erica. Neil can't remember which bag pocket. His boss keeps his palm pilot normally. This would not be the kind of thing that would unduly concerned an FBI agent. But this isn't a normal day and his boss. Robert Hanssen is a normal boss. Hanson is a long standing veteran counter intelligence agent but the FBI suspects him of something else that for decades. He's been selling out vital intelligence secrets to the Russians in exchange for cash with handsome due to retire in a matter of months. There's precious little time to catch. The suspected trader in the at today is the day to strike a colleague is keeping Hanson distracted at the FBI shooting range while O'Neal working undercover as assistant swipes the palm pilot containing the man's secrets from his back and delivers it to a technical team a few floors away to download its contents. But things haven't gone entirely according to plan. Hanson unexpected me lease the shooting range oral. Neil gets word that he's minutes away from his office if he doesn't get the palm pilot back into his boss's bag before he returns he risked not only the government's entire case but his own like Hanson is a ratty always armed and there's no telling what he'll do if he's discovered O.`Neil Racist back to the office just in time but suddenly he realizes he can't remember which of the four bag pockets. The organizers goes in Hanson is detailed oriented and Graham. He'd noticed if his precious palm pilot was misplaced making his best bet. O.`Neil pickpocket gets the organizer back in the bag and his back at his desk moments before hands opens the door. Did he get it right? I'm Walter Isaacson. And you're listening to trailblazers. Original podcast from Dell Technologies. Foreign intelligence services have wide ranges of intelligence collection capabilities at their disposal designed to have safeguards in the nation by carefully prepared sneak attack the foreign intelligence threat Israel and their principal target is the story of modern technology enhanced. Espionage starts during a conflict that would define and reshape almost everything about the twentieth century and begins not on a battlefield or in some heavily guarded underground bunker but a lovely manner in the English countryside. I think the Second World War created multi intelligence as we would recognize today. Calder Walton is the assistant director of the Applied History Project at the Harvard Kennedy School and the author of empire of secrets British intelligence the Cold War and the twilight vampire. So I'm talking really about the British and allied codebreakers at Britain's Bletchley Park. That cracked the enigma code during the Second World War and created for the first time computerized intelligence gathering. If you look at the careers of the people at Bletchley Park. They were eccentric. People that fought outside the box brought together and through their combined. Efforts whittled away at cracking German. Supposedly Unquenchable ciphers the enigma code. The enigma was a cipher. Machine used by access powers to communicate during the war reports from the front orders to the German U Boat Fleet could be intercepted by the Allies. But they were encrypted in such a way as to make them unreadable without an enigma device. Cracking the code was critical. To the war. It took the combined. Genius of the Ultra Code Breaking grow which included computing pioneer. Alan Turing to decipher the formerly unbreakable code as well as other more advanced corruption that the Germans developed over the course of the conflict but the resulting intelligence was invaluable. The level of collection and deciphering really is extraordinary from our perspective today. Some of the messages that were traveling from the German eastern front in Soviet Russia back to Berlin actually arrived on Churchill's desk in London after being intercepted and decrypted before they reached hit in Berlin. It's an absolutely extraordinary phenomenon. In September of nineteen forty five president. Truman disbanded the office of strategic services are OS which was America's wartime intelligence agency. Japan had surrendered. The war was over and the world's major powers were at peace. There was no need for espionage on the scale conducted during the Second World War or was there what became rapidly apparent was that there was a new conflict underway one that would be fought almost entirely by covert means a Cold War against America's former uneasy ally the Soviet.

Hanson FBI Neil Bletchley Park Robert Hanssen Walter Isaacson Washington Hunter Erica NAVA Japan Dell Technologies Graham America Soviet Russia president Truman O'Neal
"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

05:36 min | 4 months ago

"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"Passage you are. You are in bike. There's no doubt about that. You don't see any Trees I don't see any derives you are that and and yeah you ain't London and wizard and you're going to have an amazing magical time. The two found that creating visual illusions for movies was vastly different than creating an interactive three-dimensional world unlike film where you might spend the same amount of time as we did the theme Park Designing Pieces and bits of graphics for the scenery. We never have any control as to what we'll actually get seen and for how long it will be seen onscreen whereas in a theme park situation. Suddenly we were designing for an audience. Who could spend as much time as they wanted in front of one thing or ten things will know things and suddenly the audience had control over how much they would see but handing control over to the audience allowed for a depth of interactive storytelling that Walt Disney could only have dreamed of the personalized ones. That puck goers by Alexander's. Not only look just like the beloved props from the film but have real. Technology assisted magic powers of their own. The marriage of technology and design helps take fanned one step deeper into the fantasy world of their dreams. You could find one that had the ability to activate magic in certain shop windows and situations so we will have an involved in the design of how the the movement of the ones would be represented in a frosty so it was embedded in the in the floor and also a map that comes with the one to describe where you can find these accusations but ironically and actually we've so nice for us because the brief was to create a map that felt completely immersive. And whenever I see people walking around the park with it I'm actually wondering how they how they can get from A to b because it's very complicated in the way that we always complicated a lot of the graphics for this Alternative Universe but it was great that the produces wanted to for every single element of experience to feel a massive from the world that people have become familiar with the wizard ing world of Harry Potter may have been the first but seeing its success. The rest of the industry is quickly followed. Sin Recent years have seen the highly anticipated opening of pox like Star Wars Galaxies ad and Pandora World of Avatar and. There are many more worlds to fans get lost in soon to come. It's kind of a new direction that the really was started by universal with Harry Potter. And that's to move away from having individual attractions in an area or a land That were based on a franchise and instead having an entire land based on a single franchise so For instance Disneyland in Tomorrowland of you go there. Now you'll find Nemo you'll find buzz light year you'll find star wars. You know all these different franchises in a single area but when you go to the planet about two which is what got work. Alexy's edge takes place. You are suddenly immersed in this whole culture so to speak so you you a evolve into the star wars culture and it's similar thing With the toy story lands that have opened and with the the cars land at California adventure in that. Once you go in. You do not feel like you're in the rest of the park. You feel like you have entered a separate realm altogether. You can take a ride in a perfect recreation of the Millennium Falcon or fly a banshee through the skies of Pandora. But the coming years. We'll see parks themed after Nintendo Nickelodeon and even in Japan Godzilla featuring a replica of the famous movie monster designed to his exact enormous dimensions. It's no surprise that these attractions continue to gain popularity as Disney parks alone brought in a staggering twenty billion dollars and just twenty eighteen. Walt Disney once. Sad Disneyland would never be completed that we continue to grow as long as there was imagination left in the world but even the visionary trailblazer like never have imagined just how powerful to mention profitable that imagination could become. I'm Walter Isaacson and you've been listening to trail blazers original podcast from Dell technologies for more on any of the guests on today's show. You can head to our website at Dell technologies dot com slash trailblazers. Thanks for listening..

Walt Disney Harry Potter Dell Walter Isaacson Pandora Disney California Alexander Alexy Tomorrowland Nintendo blazers Japan
"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

07:51 min | 5 months ago

"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"Meat. I'm Mark Post Post. I am chief scientific officer of Motza meet startup that aims to commercialize cultures mute remembered the prediction that Winston Churchill may back in nineteen thirty one. One that could be grown in a lab. You might say that Mark Post is a man who's taken up that challenge. poche was a professor fester in the medical school at University in the Netherlands in two thousand and sex when he was asked to help out with a study that was being funded by the Dutch government lament the idea was to place muscle cells in a nutrient rich serum and encouraged US cells to grow into muscle so like fibers are many medical applications for this. What but the Dutch researchers looking beyond Madison? They he believed that. If you can turn animals stem cells into muscle fibers. You can actually grow synthetic meet in the lab. It could be the best has to both work real neat. That doesn't require a real animal now. I thought it was a great idea and I was also ready involved in tissue engineering for medical purposes and the more I learned about the problems with meat production in the next thirty five years. The more enthusiastic I became about this entire project not only scientifically but also for its suicidal impact. There were scientific hurdles that still had to be overcome but the main obstacle was money. They would need lots of it to scale up produced cell base meat for commercial mass consumption. It didn't help when in two thousand hasn't nine. The Dutch government withdrew funding for the project and basically the language that the government used. We don't see any commercial interest from companies companies in this kind of triggered me. I said well you know this is such a great idea. We need to be able to get this across the general population. So let's make make a sausage from a pig presented to the press while the pig is honking around on the stage and so that was kind of the image was for me was a very unusual kind I thought because I I just basically was a biomedical scientists but I was so frustrated. Is You know W- we'll show them. We needed quite a bit of money to do that. That wasn't really lying around so we had to wait until we got that money and then kind of out of the blue. That was a year and a half or two years later the office of Sergei Brin approached. Just me and said we want to talk to you about this project that you're doing and when we come over Sergei brand is one of the co founders of Google but while marked post had of course heard of people you've never heard of Sergei Graham so when Brennan's representative came came calling post had no idea who he was dealing with post told his visitor about his idea of creating a so based sausage and holding a press conference or the pig on the stage and the representative of Sergei Brennan said. Oh Yeah we will support that. How much money do you need and body set off a couple plus million would be fine Indian? We got the money that we needed to make. That event happened so suddenly Mark Post I had all the money he needed to make his cell meet prototype and the money came with only one string attached tugay brand. Dan wanted a hamburger on the stage. Not a sausage well that was basically a not a request but the demand from Sergei Britain. If you're going to do this it has to be a hamburger not sausage. It's an American thing and that was actually quite fortunate. I think because environmental impact impact of beef is actually a lot higher than that of pork and so on August fifth twenty thirteen. The first I sell Burger was ready to be unveiled at a press conference in London. The event was carried live around the world and included a taste test by food critic. Who of course very gratifying moment? That you because you you have been living up to this for two three years and to finally make that happen was was the big thing so I was pretty happy throughout. It was also a little bit nerve wracking because we had no idea how to tasters basically would respond onto it if they would spit out. Say Yuck this is nothing like we expected or if they would be at least somewhat positive about it we had no idea so that was nerve wracking thing but all in all the whole event went pretty well and I wasn't even noticeably nervous but somebody told me I was tapping my fingers continuously on a desk so Hawaii. Apparently I was the world's first. Cellular Burger got good reviews from the food critic but most of the press coverage focused on cost cost not taste the price tag on. That Burger was three hundred and thirty thousand dollars so mark mark post needed to find a way to drive down costs significantly or his cell Burger would remain an interesting science experiment with no commercial potential and more importantly no potential to solve the environmental challenges caused by animal based meat production. So one of the things that makes cell culture extremely expensive is factors Proteins that stimulate cells to grow and day cost like a million euro per gram. Unfortunately you need only very very small amounts but still if you start to grow at large scale. This is US prohibitive but I learned pretty quickly that end feed industry in a completely different industry not the biomedical part. But the feed industry people people are making similar proteins with similar technology for five. You're a programmer for Europe Aram. I thought well if we can do that. And I and the price of the cell culture drops tremendously and then we started to look at more components of this feat for cells. And we realized realized that if you source differently and you make it a little bit of a different composition you can actually make these very cheap type of Takashi in two thousand fifteen mark post started his own company called motion meet to continue his quest to develop affordable cellular alert meet at a commercial scale. Today he says the price of a Cell Burger is down to about fifteen eighteen dollars still too expensive song grocery three stores but he hopes to be able to increase meat production to the point. We can offer it in some higher end restaurants but then a couple of years post and Brown a two of the trailblazer. We're trying to address the enormous enormous environmental challenges. We are facing by leading what could be doric transformation in our eating at indeed indeed the biggest dietary revolution since humans for started eating me two point five million years ago. I'm Walter Walter Isaacson and you've been listening to trailblazers original podcast from Dell technologies for more on any of the guests on today's show. You can head to our website at Dell technologies dot com slash trailblazers. Thanks for listening..

Mark Post Sergei Brennan Sergei Brin Dell representative Sergei Britain Walter Walter Isaacson Winston Churchill Dutch government Burger chief scientific officer Sergei US Madison Netherlands Motza Sergei Graham professor Hawaii
"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

07:01 min | 7 months ago

"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"And gives you suggestions. How do you make it tone neutral? How do you make diversity open? And it's not using words. SAT are common for one gender for one ethnic diversity or racially in any way bias in the nineteen seventies. It was still common for applicants to list their race. Ace and their weight on their resumes and diversity was far from being the sought after goal. It is today getting a top job in corporate America was sadly for anyone not white male a distant dream. But that's all changing and careerbuilder isn't the only tech company company looking to combat a lack of diversity in the workforce buys is a real big problem in recruiting industry. Because up until now it's it's to being really an area that is hard to measure and it's hard to really act someone. Mundell is a CO founder of ideal dot com an okay. I powered recruiting software company. So for example fiasco big company hire recruiters picking people well. It's it's kind of the black box. Actually don't know which recruiters are selecting. Which people is it representative of the people that you're attracting? Are you hiring during the same number of men and women based on the people you're attracting figuring out that data is actually very difficult so a lot of times in the world of recruiting shooting. We're building technology. That's just automating mundane tasks. We know theoretically if you had a lot of people to do certain tasks you could do them but figuring out. Are you introducing a bias. Are you hiring certain demographics and other. That's actually a problem that really really humans can spend a ton of time and just figure out so we're now at a point where we do have the technology to figure out that data and to report on it and to make sure that we can improve the idea for ideal came out of MANDL's own experience in hiring the first I company he had founded created software to manage safety compliance in the energy industry. The company grew to a point where he spent a good deal all this time hiring sales people for us hiring people a week. That was a huge deal and we were making the classic mistakes. We were hiring people role because they played sports. We assume that they would be good. At being sales people. We hired people that went to our universities because we thought oh they would be a great fit because they went to a great school. We did two things wrong. We made we are highly inaccurate. We got to a point where we're hiring to people knowing that one would be. Let go and we're making decisions full of bias. Bias in hiring can be difficult to spot even for the well intentioned almost always it some sort of personal or cultural blindspot and identifying them dimension combating them is difficult nope no matter how well intentioned one is thirty two types of biases about seventy percent of bias comes from age name and sex so for example my name Selman. I'm a less likely to interview them. Business Partner Sean. So those the real negative biases but then there are other types of biases that that people don't always realize for example picking people that went to U Your University or college so a Lotta Times companies will say you know I love hiring people from mit or Harvard. They're the best schools roles and they're gonNA make the best employees well. How do we know if that's true? Ideals software strips out the data points and job applications we're bias is most pervasive age name and sex. We'll also abstract the name of the school you attended or the company company. Will you worked so that the human recruiter can make fairer assessment of your experience instead of rejecting you out of hand for working for from. They've never heard of Lincoln. Software takes a similar approach. Mark Lebowski we recently launched you you know assessments program where members can Take a core. Take a test to be able to assess whether they have a skill in python or Java Avenue and then based upon that they can add that to their profile that would then show up in a recruiter search to be able to find a candidate that maybe just in a go go to a four year school but has the skills hard skills to be able to do the job and so that's one example of something. We're doing to help improve people from non on traditional background to be able to get roles not just those that have gone to four year institutions and while I can raise a scary specter ideals. Someone sees it not as a way to remove humans from the recruiting process but to make their lives easier and help them make better better fairer decisions. I'm the first person to say that we need humans in the hiring process. Computers can't do everything the problem that we're facing and that we're trying to solve. Is that many of our customers. Ignore about eighty percent of the candidates that that they receive so that's a whole other problem. They're not even in getting to the right candidates because they have too much volume because the job boards and Lincoln have made it so easy to apply to a job that there's a lot of noise and his heart. It's hard to connect take the signal out of that noise tech foams like ideal in length. Dan Aren't alone in seeing the technological solution Lucien to the very human problem of bias in hiring earlier this year the California legislature passed a bill that urges is the government to explore ways to use technology to reduce bias and discrimination in hiring specifically calling out artificial intelligence an algorithm based solutions and while it's becoming apparent in recent years that tech can't solve all of our very human problems. If pointed in in the right direction it could be a star online job. Boards started as a way to help the unemployed get hired but in the future it could be a step two more inclusive workplace for all. I'm Walter Isaacson and you've been listening to trail blazers an original podcast from Dell technologies. If you'd like to find out more about any of the guests on today's show. Please visit our website at Dell technologies dot com slash trailblazers. We'll be taking a break for the holidays but we'll be back in the new year with brand new. Oh episodes of this show until then. Thanks for listening.

Lincoln Dell Walter Isaacson America Mundell careerbuilder Mark Lebowski Harvard U Your University specter California Dan
"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

03:03 min | 9 months ago

"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"Adobe Twenty Third Nineteen Twenty nine the height of the roaring twenties in New York and nine hundred above the streets of Manhattan the VERTEX is about to be unveiled to an unwitting public very few people know about the Vertex or even what a Vertex in and still under construction Chrysler building an icon of the New York Skyline today the Chrysler the building was at the time a participant in a furious race to the heavens its competitor the Bank of Manhattan Trust building at Forty Wall Street the builders of each were determined that their skyscraper would be the tallest building in world and what made the competition even more heated was that the two visionary architects behind the Buildings William Van Allen for the Chrysler building and h Craig severance the Manhattan Bank building with former partners turned into bitter rivals all of New York seem to be watching as the two men duked it out altering their plans in mid construction each determined triumph over the other by constructing talk all or building fan Allen kept his secret weapon under wraps until the Bank of Manhattan Buildings Height at nine hundred twenty seven feet was officially announce them the newspaper along with the claim that his archenemy severance had won the competition and then on October twenty third in a feat of incredible engineering and daring is workers remove the pieces of the vertex from inside the Chrysler building and assembled it in mid air the Chrysler building was now the tallest building in the world world but Van Allen's triumph would be bittersweet as monumental as they were the Bank of Manhattan Trust Building and the Chrysler building couldn't escape the fact that the very next day after the VERTEX was raised the stock market crashed the Great Depression had begun these monumental skyscrapers soaring symbols of the the jazz age we're about to nearly bankrupt their owners but the impression that they left on the public would define cities for a century I'm Walter Isaacson and you're listening to trail blazers an original podcast from deltec allergies.

Adobe Manhattan Chrysler Craig Van Allen Walter Isaacson Bank of Manhattan Trust William Van Allen Manhattan Bank Allen Bank of Manhattan Trust Buildi nine hundred twenty seven feet
"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

03:47 min | 9 months ago

"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"By the third of June eighteen sixty one America was war as the echoes of Kevin Hire Faded at Fort Sumter thousands of southerners joined the confederate army among them was an eighteen year old engineering student in another way after serving today's world was turned upside down that day and Philip by Virginia Hangar was captured after cannonball tore through his leg a union surgeon amputated his back after which hanging is freed in a prisoner exchange and return to his family home seemingly crippled for life mm-hmm the kind of goes into his room for three months and his family sit down in the Paula of their house a May worry about him a lot of noise there's a lot of banging shuffling back and forth and I think they're generally concerned about his condition emily mayhew is a historian at London's in Cereal College before the civil war she says a battlefield amputees prospects were Graham the chances are they won't be able to have aesthetic fitted by going to have a short relatively miserable life on crutches boesak somewhere where they can't really move they're all wheelchairs but then also available to people we don't have any money shrouded in worry James hangers family listen and wait it then on the day that I think of as being this real turning point they hear his door open and then they hear something extraordinary and it's James Hanger on the prosthetic leg back with a knee joint that he is an engineer has designed and he's coming down status because he's designed leg where the knee can bend and if the can bend he can lift it with his muscles it means that he can hold onto a banister but he can come downstairs on although it's not digital it's or a dime shift and I think that sound of this young engineer coming downstairs and being able to walk into his parents parlor and everything changes it was a genesis moment in modern prosthetics hangar was determined that unlike the straight un-imaginative peg legs of his era his prosthetic would mimic a natural limb his wooden leg car from the wood used to make Balance Inc rubber bumpers with a hinge knee and ankle for James Hanger the first recorded amputee of the civil war it was the beginning of the global enterprise that he would oversee until his death in nineteen nineteen and which still bears his name today hanger would go on to develop market the first mass produced affordable prosthetic lamp. I'm Walter Isaacson and you're listening into trail blazers and original podcast from Dell Technologies might say Craig Hutto is part by McMahon arms legs over three million amputees every year who need a new or replacement Kareem comes true I went from being able to somebody that might even be super abled.

James Hanger Graham confederate army Fort Sumter Virginia Hangar engineer emily mayhew Paula London Walter Isaacson Kevin Hire America Cereal College Craig Hutto Philip Balance Inc Kareem Dell Technologies McMahon
"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

01:58 min | 10 months ago

"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"As videos go it's not much to look at it's only eighteen seconds long and it features a twenty five year world man named Javid Corinne standing in front of the elephant enclosure at the San Diego's speaking directly only to the camera Corinne comments on how elephants tend to have long trunks and then wraps it up with that's pretty much. All there is to say the video is called appropriately enough me at the zoo would makes me at the zoo. Special isn't the shaky cinematography or Kareem somewhat obvious commentary on the elephants anatomy. It's the fact that applauded in April two thousand five. It was the first video ever posted to a brand new video sharing site known as Youtube Youtube Kareem just happened to be the sites co-founder regular person not a celebrity by any means in a regular location not talking straight into the camera about something mundane that short shaky very first video contain the seeds of what would become a revolution with the potential to change the very nature took a fame as we know it. Andy Warhol was once famously quoted as saying in the future. Everybody will be famous for fifteen minutes and with platforms like Youtube and Instagram it turns out he might not have been far Laura. I'm Walter Isaacson and this is trail blazers original podcast from Dell technologies.

Javid Corinne Youtube Andy Warhol Kareem Walter Isaacson San Diego blazers co-founder Dell Instagram eighteen seconds twenty five year fifteen minutes
"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"And then he hears the sound of wimpering coming from the Senator of that famous couple Clark Gable and Carole Lombard the two stars a crime. And so as the audience around. Everyone is in tears. It took that moment. That Walt Disney knows that he's created clue. Artful one that will change hop culture. Forever. I'm Walter Isaacson. And you're listening to Trail Blazers an original podcast from Dell technologies. Graham and dumping off. Wait boy going on a while. Chart which all? What? It's been almost a century. Since Walt Disney I set up the laugh Graham studio in Kansas City, the young animator would go on much bigger things. And so with the art form he pioneer from Snow White to the Simpsons to Toy Story animation has always been one of America's most popular and most innovative forms of creative expression and its preeminent shows. No sign of slowing down..

Walt Disney Carole Lombard Graham Walter Isaacson Clark Gable Trail Blazers Senator Snow White Kansas City Dell Simpsons America
"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"It's December twenty first nineteen thirty seven and the scene at the Carthy circle theatre. Los Angeles is pandemonium flashbulbs Papa celebrity stream into the cinema. Clark Gable Carole lumbar, Charlie Chaplin, Cary Grant, and other luminaries of Hollywood golden age outside more than thirty thousand fans turned out for one of the year's most anticipated film premieres and anxiously in the middle of it all is a man without who's creative genius and cheer force of will this night would never have happened. Walter Elias, Disney his mind is on the glitz and the glamour on the cheering crowds and world famous movie stars one urgent question occupies him will as gamble. A off. For four years. Now his team at the Walt Disney company has been working on their most ambitious costly project ever the world's first feature. Length animated, film, Snow White and the seven dwarfs he's come close to bankrupting the company with this grand dream. But he knows that if it works if he can forge in a motion connection with his audience animation will transcend, its humble comedic beginnings and finally be taken seriously as an art form. Sitting in the audience Disney. Nova sleet, observes, the movie goers, as the film approaches, it's emotional climax. It's the part when Snow White poisoned by the evil. Queen's enchanted apple lies in a glass coffin surrounded by the seven grieving doors..

Walt Disney company Disney Carthy circle theatre Walter Elias Los Angeles Nova sleet Clark Gable Cary Grant apple Charlie Chaplin four years
"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

06:10 min | 1 year ago

"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"It was announced almost no one knew anything about it, even within the company. The project was hush hush. Kushenko was the design one of the iphone most important assets, the key board, and while the team didn't immediately know what that keyboard with look like they knew one thing every interaction would take place on a flat glass scream, there'd be no hardware. Keyboard by the popular blackberry phones dominated sales instead in total secrecy, the company had to develop an entirely new interface. When we were designing the software. We wanted the experience to be comfortable. And so we built in these little Ford Ince's and surest IX into the software to help you to figure out what it was that you probably wanted when you touch the screen and then give you that. So that the experience of using the iphone felt like the device was was on your side that it was with you that it was going to help you rather than hinder you every step of the way, then after years of laboring total secrecy. The team is Steve Jobs introduced the iphone at the MacWorld expo on January nine two thousand seven Ken Cassinga on the day of the announcement of the iphone in we. We were all worried that people were going to like what we did. We didn't really know the project was such a secret. And so few people I actually tried out what we had made that we weren't sure that the world as a whole would like what we did the secrecy on the project was so tight that. I didn't even know that it was going to be called the iphone until Steve Senate on stage. I simply didn't need to know. So I wasn't told. I mean, it gives you a sense of how much secrecy was. Oh up in what we were doing. And what the project culture was like that. He need not of word when it's first that gate apple sold. An astounding one point two billion iphone and the ripple effect were far region. Computers were no longer confined to our desk or even toted around in back bat, they want chain cables of wifi networks, having an iphone meant that anyone that have access to internet connected computing, power entire industries from photography to navigation to personal communication would disrupt. It. This was great news for apple but devastating for Nokia which saw the market share plummet as they struggled to keep up. The company's very survival was in question. But as did many times over one hundred and fifty years Nokia found a way to reshape itself jettisoning, it's old business model and embracing the connected future Nokia chairman restuffed so Las Ma today. Knock as a digital infrastructure company. We can deliver the world's most complicated or demanding and to networks, meaning that we factor all the components, both the hardware and software components for fixed line networks be they got Bor coaxial cable. Hoped? Ical wireless networks from do G to five G, and we are the only network infrastructure player in the world that delivers these networks on a global scale. Anybody who sends a bit to the internet an Email or what she's video will be using Nokia software and okay equipment for that bit to to travel where it needs to go anywhere in the world. And then a delightful bit of historical era when Nokia acquired telecommunications company Alcatel Lucent in twenty sixteen it came with the venerable sto kicking labs still going at it. A hundred years after it was founded still winning Nobel prizes. The telephone has come a long way in the century that took us from the vacuum to to the Dutch street, but underlying it all is I desire to reach out and connect with each other with the help of high speed high capacity network technologies such as LT in the upcoming five G were no longer restricted to just sending our voices around the world video college has gone from science fiction to being just as commonplace. As voice was a few short decades ago. Our hunger for communication drives the innovations that shape us as a society, and whatever comes next after voice, text and video. We'll certainly bring us even closer together. I'm Walter Isaacson. And you've been listening to trailblazer original podcast from Dell technologies. Yes. Thank you. Goodbye.

Nokia Steve Senate apple Kushenko Walter Isaacson Steve Jobs Ford Ince Alcatel Lucent Dell Ken Cassinga Las Ma chairman
"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"Quantities of power. He also saw that the expensive breakable mechanical switches also needed a better solution. John gutten, so we have these two flawed technologies. Switches and tubes that are essential for the functioning phone system. But which don't really have any kind of replacement in the pipeline. Shortly after the second World War. Kelly developed the solid state group at bell labs to look into the potential of a relatively new technology. The semiconductor they focused on a material called germanium. It was a pain staking process. One of the physicists working. There would say, you know, just felt like we were groping Dr. But in nineteen forty seven to the physicist working on the solid state team, Walter Bratton and John bar dean took this tiny piece of germanium that had a very slight impurity in it. And they found that if they put two points into that slab germanium they could put a phone signal through that slight impurity that that small piece of germanium and they can amplify that phone signal significant something like sixteen to eighteen times. And they also found that they could switch it on. And. Off instantaneously. The device use a tiny amount of energy compared to vacuum tubes. And unlike the clunky switches, then in use by the phone company. These didn't have any breakable parts, and they will incredibly small the invention for which the scientists would eventually share the Nobel prize would be called the transistor. The transistor changed the way electron ICs were manufactured allowing for smaller less expensive and more powerful devices, the computer, as we know it would have been unthinkable if we were still relying on mechanical switches and vacuum tubes. The transistor's is probably the greatest invention of the twentieth century. And I think the only thing we might compare it to in terms of impact is the atomic bomb. It changed everything I think about electron IX in modern life and cry. Gated entirely new industries for everything from telecommunications to computing, and you've we've all used billions of transistors by the time we get to work, whether it's an our coffeemaker and our automobiles on our subway trains on our telephones. It's the essential and fundamental element of the electron engage without the pioneering works of AT and T in the scientists bell labs, the world of global communications as we know. It would never have come to be ironic -ly that very same company nearly killed the mobile phone. On a sunny day in early nineteen seventy three Martin Cooper. A Motorola engineer is standing on a corner near central park hordes of New Yorkers stare at him with curiosity. They are focused on the strange looking object in his hand about the size and weight of a brick is that a telephone. Here's martin. Well, we first of all believe that people are fundamentally view, you just think about it or the airport. Look at the freeway seems like everybody is not where they want to be everybody's going somewhere else. So the idea of having a telephone tied to the wall didn't make a great deal of sense to us. There was some mobile phones at the time that they would big wildly expensive. And worst of all totally unreliable AT and T had a solution. It happened to be one that fit very well with their own interests at that time in the nineteen sixty nine AT and T approached the Federal Communications Commission and told them that they had a new wonderful system they called so either. And that was going to solve this problem. All the to do was to give them the, Dan. And with seventy beggar spectrum they would use exclusively to provide a service. Yeah. States. In other words, they will promising to build out the mobile infrastructure in exchange for very convenient monopoly. Just like they did some six decades earlier. Understandably coober did not like this plan. Neither did he like AT and T vision for the mobile future which involved a small number of very expensive phones and ones that would not defend your hand. But rather in the trunk of a car so Cooper and his Motorola college took on the task of creating a truly hand-held mobile. Telephone it involved a bevy of challenges from communicating on a frequency band. Never used before to cramming hundreds of radio channel into a single handset dynamic portable. Empha- was about ten inches tall internet wide about forages deep and fence ounce, huge to my modern standard..

AT physicist Martin Cooper Motorola John gutten bell labs Nobel prize Dr. But Federal Communications Commiss Kelly Empha Walter Bratton Dan John bar dean engineer six decades ten inches
"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"It uses computer vision systems to dentist whether the apple is right then if it is then it moves a robotic arm into place and it removes it actually with the vacuum it sucks it off of the tree it can work twenty four hours a day it doesn't get tired it over time a lot of the changes i believe are going to come in the form of the the vision systems and software that are running it whether that's machine learning artificial intelligence is not enough to just identify that's an apple or it's red but is it right it doesn't have disease is it misshapen is there a bruise or damage then you start getting to higher levels of of actually mimicking what human would do in the field robot a one way of addressing the problem of food waste if you can pick fruits and vegetables more quickly and efficiently you'll increase the chances that the produce will end up in someone's stomach rather than in the landfill according to the department of agriculture about forty percent of all the food grown in the us never gets eaten that's about one hundred and thirty three billion pounds of food wasted each year or about one hundred sixty billion dollars worth the challenge over the next few decades is very clear increase food production to feed a global population that's expected to grow by more than two billion people we'll get there by reducing food waste improving distribution and ensuring that the food we'd is safe and precision farming well butts urban agriculture are just some of the areas that farmers engineers scientists technologists and investors are exploring to meet that challenge we've been here before in the nineteenth century john deere's steel plow and cyrus mccormick's thrasher helped overcome thomas mouth asus dire prediction of mass death caused by a food supply that couldn't keep pace with population growth in the twentieth century genetic engineering and chemical fertilizers help prevent mass starvation in the developing world but in the twenty first century we can't simply continue on the path we've been on and hope it all works out we need to correct some of the mistakes of the past we have to grow healthier safer food more sustainably in a way that doesn't harm our air land and water we have perhaps been too slow to recognize the magnitude and the urgency of the problem but now some very smart people that by some very big money and armed with all the latest technology a fully engaged in the struggle and striving for solutions i'm walter isaacson and you've been listening to trail blazers and original podcast from dow technologies and the next episode taking on the world of politics and examining the disruption that digital technology has

apple john deere cyrus mccormick walter isaacson dow technologies department of agriculture one hundred sixty billion doll thirty three billion pounds twenty four hours forty percent
"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"Situation in particular it's it's just the it says so much that they hired margo george addis who again was a a long time uh gugel executive they hired her to be their new ceo and this is a really really traditional toymaker um you know they've they've been around for over seventy years and it's not just that the products are our traditional it's a traditional company the culture is is just very kind of old school and the fact that they took a a chance on someone who comes from google and doesn't have any prior experience in toys is really interesting fortune magazine reports that global sales of toys have fallen thirteen percent from a year ago mattel ceo margaret georgy artis connects that trend directly to the bankruptcy of the oncemighty toys or us but while the supply chain has changed the need for play hasn't toy makers who survived the 80s benefit today from hardfought lessons about the eternal joy that comes from play and from imagination in the digital age toy giants or embracing tv and feature films not to disrupt young imagine nations but to stimulate them a hundred and thirty years since edison was traumatising kid with his talking doll the toy industry may finally be finding ways for technology and imagination to playing nicely together i'm walter isaacson and this is trail blazers and original podcast from dell technologies this marks the last episode of our first season we'll be back with brand new episodes in january you can subscribe to our show and apple podcast over after you get your podcast and new episodes will automatically be downloaded for you just as soon as they're released and as we plan the shows for season to we'd love to hear what you think of this show the best way to do that is a lever review for us on apple podcast we read all the reviews you right and truly appreciate everything you have to say it really helped us shaped the show and if you want more information on the toy industry you can go do dealt technologiescomtrailblazers until the new year thanks for listening.

executive ceo google margaret georgy artis supply chain edison walter isaacson margo george addis fortune magazine dell apple thirteen percent seventy years thirty years
"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"The arrival of parcel post was one of the first great disruptions in the package delivery business there have of course many more sense than you can't ship children through the mail anymore that practice was outlawed in '19 '20 but you can shift just about everything else in every way imaginable both plane train truck klar fight and now even drought today with about eighty percent of americans doing at least some of their shopping online spending about three hundred fifty billion this year the stakes have never been higher there's no quick away to turn off a potential online customer than delivery that's too slow too expensive and too unreliable giant shipping companies like ups fat acts and probably no surprise here amazon are spending billions of dollars on new equipment plants and technology to meet the demands of increasingly impatient shoppers who are now measuring their wait time thymine hours not days this is not a business for the faint of heart i'm walter isaacson and you're listening to trail blazers and original podcast from dealt technologies then mayo mountains it the letters will go to many different ways i got a letter here for somebody from springfield sprang bailed letters newspapers and magazines many boxes and packages to it'll be a redletter day when the post miami blows male call moved in april in the days before the railway tied the country together americans had to be a lot more patient when it came to package delivery if you wanted to send a package from new york to california and the eighteen 50s you'd loaded on a steamship to panama from their horses which carried across the isthmus of panama and then another ship were transported to the pacific coast even when an overland route was established in the 1860s by companies with names like wells fargo and american express it would still take about three weeks to get a package from st louis to san francisco using a combination of stage coaches and pony express the establishment of a transcontinental rail link in the 1870s cut delivery time from weeks today's but it was a 19year old in seattle washington who really laid the groundwork for the.

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"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"It may be that over time neither bitcoin nor any one of the new cryptocurrencies reign supreme it could be something else entirely but what is undeniable is that we are in the middle of an unstoppable power ship money is being democratize friction and barriers to payment of vanishing banks in traditional financial institution a beginning to reimagined their future as striking innovators go it's fair to say that sect oshii nakamoto is one of the most disruptive i'm walter isaacson and this is trailblazers original podcast from dell technologies if you enjoyed the show it wanna hear more my thoughts on potential ways that cryptocurrencies like fit coin can change the way media creators get hey visit cell technologies dot com slash trailblazers not that trailblazers than the number nine next episode we'll be looking at the world of mapping and how a technology like gps is not only changing the way we locate ourselves in the world but how we communicate with each other as well you can subscribe the trail blazers an apple podcast over every get your podcasts and if you like it please leave us of raising in a review it helps who listeners discover the show thanks for listening.

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"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"On the other hand there are a lot of artists who have had a difficulty surviving in the transition from dollar denominated sales to a market that spaced really on attention and fractions of pennies repeated a million times i think the industry in general but particularly rights holders and collectives were not well situated for the rapid ascension of the streaming marketplace in as a result a lot of money got lost in the cracks in the early stages of this business and typically when you see that happened the artists are always at the bottom of the pile with the next major technological disruption will be is anyone's guess but if there's anything that we've learned since addison set this whole thing in motion it's that there will always be a demand for music and always be people ready to satisfy that demand everything else is up for grabs teams i'm walter isaacson and you've been listening to trailblazers and original podcast from dealt technologies if you enjoyed the show and one of your core of by thoughts about what we in the media and journalism industry can learn from the disruption in the music industry visit dealt technologies dot com slash trailblazers eight that's trailblazers than the number eight next episode will be looking at the world of money and how cryptocurrencies like pulling are aiming to disrupt the economic engines that run our world you can subscribe to trailblazers and apple podcast or wherever you get your podcasts if you like it please lead us a rating under review it helps new listeners discover the show.

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