35 Burst results for "Walter"

For Muslims in America, Eid al-Fitr comes as pandemic eases

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 4 d ago

For Muslims in America, Eid al-Fitr comes as pandemic eases

"For Muslims in America the eat holiday comes as the pandemic eases the holiday marks the end of the sacred month of Ramadan when Muslims abstain from food and drink from sunrise to sunset traditionally people gather for prayers visit family and friends and huddled together around festive meals but for those in America even as the observe iris precautions this year's eve comes as the pandemic eases its grip on the country it's a contrast with many other countries who are celebrating the holiday in a subdued mood for a second year under pandemic restrictions I Walter Ratliff

America Walter Ratliff
Vatican Warns US Bishops Over Get-Tough Communion Proposals

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 6 d ago

Vatican Warns US Bishops Over Get-Tough Communion Proposals

"The Vatican is warning U. S. bishops over there get tough communion proposals the head of the Vatican's doctrine office is warning U. S. bishops to deliberate carefully and minimize divisions before proceeding with a possible plan to rebuke Roman Catholic politicians who support abortion rights before receiving communion there's division among the bishops with some pressing for president by did another Catholic public figures to be excluded from communion over their abortion stance and other bishops warning that such a move could be politically polarizing cardinal Wilton Gregory has made it clear that Biden is welcome to receive communion at churches in the Washington DC archdiocese I Walter Ratliff

Vatican's Doctrine Office Vatican Cardinal Wilton Gregory Biden Washington Dc Walter Ratliff
Cernak Has Goal and 2 Assists, Lightning Beat Stars 6-2

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | Last week

Cernak Has Goal and 2 Assists, Lightning Beat Stars 6-2

"The Tampa Bay Lightning defeated the Dallas Stars six to Wednesday night in their seventh of eight meetings this season Dallas fighting for their playoff lives could only muster twenty two shots on under about celebrity return to the net for his three hundredth career game after two game respite Tyler Johnson broke the ice for Tampa Bay in the opening minutes you know we need asking to be a desperate team with you know where they are in the standings and what they need so we wanted to get out to get started we're able to do that and you know kind of keep it from there Tyler Sagan playing in just his second game this season tied the score in the final seconds of the first Alex killorn Brayden point scored to make it three one before Andrei Sakharov drew the stars to within one again Eric turned actor golden two assists Ross Colton and Mikhail Sergachev with the empty netters Walter Marcia can Tampa

Tyler Johnson Tampa Bay Lightning Dallas Stars Tyler Sagan Dallas Tampa Bay Alex Killorn Brayden Andrei Sakharov Ross Colton Mikhail Sergachev Eric Walter Marcia Tampa
Pope Sets 40-Euro Vatican Gift Cap in Corruption Crackdown

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 2 weeks ago

Pope Sets 40-Euro Vatican Gift Cap in Corruption Crackdown

"Pope Francis aims to cut down on corruption among Vatican managers pope Francis has issued tough new anti corruption regulations to ensure is on cardinals and managers are clean and honest a new law requires them to periodically to clear their investing only in funds consistent with Catholic doctrine and they're not under criminal investigation or stashing money in tax havens the law also prohibits any Vatican employee from receiving work related gifts with a value of over forty eight dollars its aim to cutting down on the sometimes lavish gives that Vatican officials are accustomed to receiving from wealthy benefactors friends and fellow clerics I'm Walter Ratliff

Pope Francis Cardinals Vatican Walter Ratliff
US Catholic Bishops May Press Biden to Stop Taking Communion

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 2 weeks ago

US Catholic Bishops May Press Biden to Stop Taking Communion

"U. S. Catholic bishops may press president Biden to stop taking communion when U. S. Catholic bishops older next national meeting in June they'll be deciding whether to send a tougher than ever message to president Joe Biden and other Catholic politicians the gist of that possible message don't receive communion if you persist in public advocacy of abortion rights the aim is to clarify the church's stance on an issue that has repeatedly vexed the bishops it's taken on a new urgency now in the eyes of many bishops because Biden is the first Catholic to hold the presidency while openly supporting abortion rights I'm Walter Ratliff

President Biden President Joe Biden Biden Walter Ratliff
Former Researcher Who Sold Trade Secrets to China Gets 33 Months

Seattle's Morning News with Dave Ross

00:09 sec | 3 weeks ago

Former Researcher Who Sold Trade Secrets to China Gets 33 Months

"Path of Walter Mondale First Walk. A former researcher at Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, has been sentenced to 33 months in prison for conspiring to

Walter Mondale Children's Hospital Columbus Ohio
Walter Mondale, Former Vice President, Dies at 93

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:08 min | 3 weeks ago

Walter Mondale, Former Vice President, Dies at 93

"For his time in Washington and in the national political spotlight, including his years in the U. S Senate and later as U. S ambassador to Japan, former Vice President Walter Fritz Mondale has died at the age of 93. Here, CBS White House correspondent Ed O'Keefe. He ran for president against Ronald Reagan and 1984 made history by choosing a female running way. Geraldine Ferraro, I looked The best vice president and I found her and Gerry Ferraro to waged a spirited campaign. But as Democrats trying to make Reagan's age an issue He memorably shot back and Monday. I will not make age an issue of this campaign. I am not going to exploit for political purposes, my opponent's youth and inexperience, Reagan trounced Mondale in a historic landslide. President Biden in remembering the late vice president, said Walter Mondale, defined of the vice presidency as a full partnership and help provide a model for his service.

Vice President Walter Fritz Mo Gerry Ferraro U. Ed O'keefe Ronald Reagan CBS Senate Washington White House Reagan Japan President Biden Mondale Walter Mondale
Walter Mondale, Jimmy Carter's Vice President, Dies at 93

WBZ Morning News

00:28 sec | 3 weeks ago

Walter Mondale, Jimmy Carter's Vice President, Dies at 93

"Of American politics, has died. Former vice president Walter Mondale was 93 President Jimmy Carter tweets that he considers Walter Mondale the best vice president in our country's history. Minnesota's current U. S. Senators are also mourning the man who preceded them. In the Senate, Amy Klobuchar says Mondale taught her that getting things done for people was an essential part of leadership. Tina Smith says Mondale provided a strong, compassionate, clear and fearless voice to the world throughout his life.

Walter Mondale President Jimmy Carter Mondale Amy Klobuchar Minnesota Tina Smith Senate
Walter Mondale, Former Vice President, Dead at 93

Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

00:27 sec | 3 weeks ago

Walter Mondale, Former Vice President, Dead at 93

"Walter Mondale dead at the age of 93. NBC's Kris Clack of takes a look back Minnesota Progressive who brought a new standard to the vice presidency, Walter Fritz Mondale catapulted to the national political spotlight. In the 19 seventies and eighties Mondale Mondale was U. S senator from Minnesota before serving as vice president under Jimmy Carter from 1977 to 1981 on, Dale ran for the White House in 1984 but lost to Ronald Reagan in a landslide. The owner of the Colorado

Walter Mondale Kris Clack Mondale Mondale Minnesota NBC Jimmy Carter Dale White House Ronald Reagan Colorado
Walter Mondale, Carter's vice president, dies at 93

First Morning News

00:37 sec | 3 weeks ago

Walter Mondale, Carter's vice president, dies at 93

"The country is remembering Walter Mondale, the former vice president died at the age of 93 1976. Mondale became a national figure in the Democratic presidential nominee, Jimmy Carter asked him to join the ticket as his running mate, The Carter Mondale, take it lost the White House in 1982, Ronald Reagan, George Bush. 1984 bundles choice for a running mate Rock the election. New York Congresswoman Geraldine Ferraro, the first woman on the presidential ticket, but the campaign struggled to overcome a double digit deficit in the polls. Mondale served his country for more than 50 years. Karen Travers, ABC News Washington

Walter Mondale Carter Mondale Mondale Jimmy Carter Ronald Reagan George Bush Geraldine Ferraro White House New York Karen Travers Abc News Washington
Walter Mondale, former vice president, dies at 93

Mornings on the Mall with Brian Wilson

00:31 sec | 3 weeks ago

Walter Mondale, former vice president, dies at 93

"Jimmy Carter, has died. Word out of Minnesota. The former vice president Walter Mondale, has died. The liberal icon served Minnesota as attorney general and US senator then as vice president under Jimmy Carter, from 1977 to 1981. Mondale's own try for the White House in 1984 was shadowed by Ronald Reagan's popularity, but he made a different kind of history by choosing the first female running mate on a major party ticket. Geraldine Ferraro, Walter Mondale was 93 Fox News Trace Gallagher,

Jimmy Carter Minnesota Walter Mondale Mondale Ronald Reagan White House United States Geraldine Ferraro Fox News Trace Gallagher
Former Vice President Walter Mondale Dies at Age 93

AP 24 Hour News

00:22 sec | 3 weeks ago

Former Vice President Walter Mondale Dies at Age 93

"Former Vice President Walter Mondale, who lost the nation's most lopsided presidential election, is dead at 93. Mondale served as Jimmy Carter's vice president. His own bid for the White House came in 1984 when he won on Lee, his home state, Minnesota and Washington, D. C against Ronald Reagan. I'm Tim McGuire, former vice president Walter Mondale's died at the age of

Former Vice President Walter M Mondale Jimmy Carter White House Tim Mcguire LEE Minnesota Ronald Reagan Washington Walter Mondale
Walter Mondale, Former Vice President, Has Died at Age 93

BBC Newsday

00:20 sec | 3 weeks ago

Walter Mondale, Former Vice President, Has Died at Age 93

"Has died at his home in Minneapolis at the age of 93. Mr Mondo was President Jimmy Carter's running made for his successful presidential bid in 1976 8. Years later, he suffered the worst defeat of any presidential candidate trounced by Ronald Reagan. Baby saying use

Mr Mondo Minneapolis Jimmy Carter Ronald Reagan
Former Vice President Walter Mondale Dies At 93

BBC World Service

00:45 sec | 3 weeks ago

Former Vice President Walter Mondale Dies At 93

"Historic 1984 run for the White House. When the name New York Congresswoman Geraldine Ferraro to be his vice presidential running mate, the first woman on a major party presidential ticket. I'm delighted to announce But I will ask the Democratic convention. To nominate Geraldine Ferraro of New York to run with me for the White House. Mondale lost that election in a landslide to Ronald Reagan, carrying only his home state of Minnesota and Washington, D C after he pledged to raise taxes during his acceptance speech. Mondale's family says he died Monday. Minneapolis He was 93 The White House says it's in contact with local officials in Minnesota, head of

Geraldine Ferraro Mondale New York White House Ronald Reagan Minnesota Washington Minneapolis
Gourde Scores in OT to Lift Lightning Over Hurricanes 3-2

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 3 weeks ago

Gourde Scores in OT to Lift Lightning Over Hurricanes 3-2

"Yanni Gourde scored in overtime to give the Tampa Bay Lightning a three two win over the visiting Carolina hurricanes Tampa Bay took the early lead when Tyler Johnson said Alex killorn streaking across Carolinas blue line the warm roof is back and shot up over an outstretched Peter moresque he would end the night with the goal assist and a fight or what's become known as a Gordie Howe hat trick I haven't had a ton of fighting each other whenever you get a fight you're always hoping that you can get it going assistant to get it on on on the game winner in overtime really special they gave me the puck everything's the club's traded power play goals in the second period Brayden point netting is nineteenth of the season and Andrei Svechnikov goes thirteen marker for the hurricanes Carolina's Brady Shea evened the score in the third but neither team could get the deciding tally in regulation forcing overtime Walter Marcia Cano Tampa

Yanni Gourde Tyler Johnson Alex Killorn Peter Moresque Tampa Bay Lightning Carolinas Tampa Bay Gordie Howe Carolina Andrei Svechnikov Brayden Brady Shea Walter Marcia Cano Tampa
Former U.S. Vice President Walter Mondale Dies at 93

Lars Larson

00:36 sec | 3 weeks ago

Former U.S. Vice President Walter Mondale Dies at 93

"Civil rights advocate and former vice president Walter Mondale dies and I am proud. Go to Washington. Mondale twice winning reelection to the Senate, then in 76. When Georgia Governor Jimmy Carter captured the Democratic presidential nomination, Mondale got a call. We had a talk about what he Had in mind. And so the grits and French ticket was born. The Carter Mondale administration would face for extremely difficult years. Tough times paved the way for Republican challenger Ronald Reagan to win the White House in 1980 bucks is Mike Tobin. Mr Mondale died at 93 at home in

Mondale Walter Mondale Carter Mondale Administration Jimmy Carter Senate Washington Georgia Ronald Reagan Mike Tobin Mr Mondale White House Bucks
Walter Mondale, Former Vice President Has Died

Broncos Country Tonight

00:35 sec | 3 weeks ago

Walter Mondale, Former Vice President Has Died

"Former vice president Walter Mondale has died. Despite a long liberal political career. This may be one of Walter Mondale's most remembered lines. When I hear your new ideas, I'm reminded of that ad. Where's the beef? Yeah, Vice President Mondale, running for president in the primaries and suffering a landslide lost to Ronald Reagan. He served his Minnesota senator. Through it all. He was proud to wear the liberal label. It became a word that had a sting to it, whereas people started coming self progressive. I think the same thing Walter Mondale, the nation's longest retired vice president, for more than 30

Walter Mondale Ronald Reagan Minnesota
Walter Mondale, Former US Vice-President and Celebrated Liberal, Dies Aged 93

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:22 sec | 3 weeks ago

Walter Mondale, Former US Vice-President and Celebrated Liberal, Dies Aged 93

"Vice President Walter Mondale tonight, also presidential candidate and nominee in 1984, But he served in Jimmy Carter's administration as vice president. He was 93 years old. We will continue to see some responses pouring in tonight on social media and bring you some reflect Sins of his political career. Walter Mondale Dead at 93. We're focused on

Vice President Walter Mondale Jimmy Carter Walter Mondale
"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

04:38 min | 2 months ago

"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"And you've you've developed her quite well. A yearbook codebreaker. How is she similar or issue similar to ben franklin or leonardo da vinci or einstein. All of whom you've written about. Well i think the two great similarities one is curiosity you know when we were young and our wonder years. We were curious about everything like why the sky is blue and eventually people knock that out of us by saying quit asking so many questions but the thing that You know impresses me about ben. Franklin about the dowden about einstein is they never outgrew their wander years. When ben franklin is a young kid and goes to england for the first time he measures the temperature of the water because he shined figure out the gulfstream. But which really amazing to me is near age. Eighty he's coming back for the last time after five journeys any still measuring the water and charting. The gulf shrimp likewise jennifer dowden wasn't setting out to invent a gene editing technology. She was just curious about this phenomena. In would you clustered repeated sequences called crisper in bacteria and as she learned more about it. You realize oh. This could be a useful tool. And i think that's true with leonardo da vinci was interested in basic science but then translating it into tools. And they all did it through curiosity. Just asking those questions. And the other thing that they share leonardo's the exemplar of it. Is they stand at the intersection of the arts and the sciences. They love both humanities and technology. That's what that drawing of a trivia and man you know the naked guy. Doing a jackson the circle and square that leonardo da vinci dead it's supposed to symbolize the notion of the connection of art and science and for jennifer nasheed loved french literature. She loved poetry and so when she does science. She's always connecting it to the humanities in terms of helping the human race there are many people around the world. Now using the breakthroughs led by jennifer doubt but in basic terms. What are the dangers..

ben franklin leonardo da vinci einstein jennifer england jennifer dowden ben. Franklin leonardo both first time one jennifer nasheed Eighty two great similarities five journeys many questions french
"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

03:08 min | 10 months ago

"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"Everyone loves beer. Everyone loves at the moment. these things come together where we could use machine learning to self improve the physical products based on customer feedback so fundamentally. What intelligent X is all about is listening to customers taking action on their feedback. They developed a Facebook Messenger Bob. which they used to survey beer drinkers that the types of beer they enjoy the AI aggregate. The data analyzes it and produces a set of recommendations about how the beer should evolve, but they're a I doesn't make the beer. Brewing remains distinctly human craft. The intelligent expert master takes the analysis performed by the Algorithm and decides had to adapt the recipe for Golden Ale. The Algorithm thought it would be quite interesting to try and see if we added grapefruit. That particular recipe would it work? Wouldn't it work? The Human Bird looked at. It assessed the recipe to see if it was generally in line with what beer is shipped should be doing. And then broody and the feedback. We got extremely positive. They loved it and so the Algorithm and learnt that putting grapefruit and beer was a good thing. Like the way Netflix's all rhythm analyzes your past experience to recommend your next film intelligent ex can take your preferences and those of others like you to recommend your next drink. It's all about responding to the evolution of taste. In the short time, it takes to be a single batch of beer and what we love about. It is the fact that it could it wrong. But. That would have been good to. then. The system would have learned that that was something that shouldn't do. And really this whole thing is about experimentation. Even after many generations of Ales and lagers intelligent acts continues to evolve. Because I thirst for beer evolves to. From Michael Com bruhns beer laboratory to hyun lease algorithm. The technological evolution of beer has been squarely focused on one ultimate outcome. Tastier more consistent beer in your hand. So whether you've got a London porter in your hand, a Chris Berman lager are frothy. American IFA raise your glass to the Great Trail Blazers of Roy has little. And every pint. I'm Walter Isaacson and you've been listening to trail blazers and original podcast from Dell Technologies. I'd love to hear what you think of the show. Leave us a review on Apple, podcasts or wherever you listen to today's episode. Thanks for listening..

Great Trail Blazers Facebook Walter Isaacson Golden Ale Netflix AI Chris Berman Michael Com Bob. Dell Technologies Apple London Roy
"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

13:44 min | 1 year ago

"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"Special episode of Trailblazers. We're going through a unique and difficult time right now physically distancing when we leave the house and many of us including myself a working from home. No one is sure when things will get back to normal and it's quite likely they'll be a brand new normal when all of this is over in this time of so many unknowns the only thing we do know for certain is that innovation in all of its many forms is the only way out of this today on the show. We're talking to Michael. Dell CEO and founder of Dell Technologies. I've known Michael for thirty years. I've watched them form a company. Then step aside ZANU leaders could take over and then return in order to save it when our new wave of innovation threatened to disrupt it and have admired as he and his wife. Susan created a foundation focusing on education and health that reflects the values instilled in him by his parents. Lorraine and Alex del Orig- Michael at his home in Texas. Walter how you doing Michael. I'm doing fine. How are you pretty good? Pretty good has a family. Has Susan Good? How about your family learn New Orleans? We're doing fine. What hunker down a bit understand? Yup while we're we're hunkered down here in Austin so Michael explained to me what you do each day doing in this crisis. Well you know I get up in the morning and and obviously working at home go throughout my normal meetings and I would have. They're all online. They're all video meetings trying to get outside and go for long walks and reflect on what's going on Check in with people more frequently staying close to my family. My loved ones and making sure everyone knows that you know. We're here for them. And that sort of thing do you. Miss Me Interactions. That used to come when you traveled so much. I guess I don't really missed the travel that much I'm not. I miss the interaction with people around the country and around around the world. But I have to say. I don't really miss getting on the airplanes as much. You know this is like nothing we've ever experienced in health is our biggest concern now but I'm also worried about people losing their jobs and I'm worried about the toll on folks that comes from having to stay isolated. How of you and your colleagues been adapting. Well first of all. I think you know the full impact of this is uncertain and it certainly has far reaching effects on almost every person every family every community. And like you said there's a concern that it's left us isolated and the emotional effects of that. I actually think in some ways were emotionally more united. We've ever been that. There's no denying the detrimental effects since having on the economy. But I think there is another story. That is actually quite inspiring. I'm very impressed. With the way our team has adapted to the new realities and I think we might be experiencing a kind of human transformation with empathy generosity and gratefulness and selflessness humility. Our companies are becoming more human. We've got children and dogs popping up in our conference calls and even more remote or more connected In ways than we've ever been yesterday was the traditional. Take your kids to work day and did it online. We add coating classes and arts and crafts and I was reading a story story time to the kids and answering questions. And so you know. We're we're over communicating and trying to keep everybody connected and also reminding them of important work that they're doing to keep running in now. We love the physical presence of people being around them. And I know we're all missing that but what are some of the upsides that you see of the way of doing business remotely being able to do things quickly and efficiently as we've had interactions with customers. I think what we found is that we probably didn't need all the travel that we were doing and online meetings can be super productive. And so I think that's a a big upside. It does get old after a while sitting in a room and just having meeting after meeting by video chat you know as as we think about the flexibility that we provide our teams and we started work from home at Dell over a decade ago. And we did that. Really to provide flexibility for our workforce as a good thing. We did now when we turned it on over a weekend and said one hundred sixty thousand people work from home. It action worked surprisingly well so I think that's going to create all kinds of new opportunities. How's the situation changed the way you act as a raider well over tuning occasion is super important and we started gone from quarterly meetings to weekly meetings and sharing the stories with our team of how our technology is helping to address the crisis on the front lines. And I think you know when you're in a crisis you've really got to do three things. I you gotTa make your team feel safe and protected and ensure they have the resources to be productive. And as I said I'm inspired by the where teams are able to deal with this and adapted their juggling the various responsibilities of their lives. Whether it's taking care of kids or elderly parents that are that are vulnerable. I think the second thing is customers will remember how you help them during a crisis. And they'll remember that forever. And so you know. We're certainly over communicating with our customers reaching out to them more often. I find the conversations with customers are at one level very personal while at the same time. We're focused on how we can help them. Keep businesses running and keep society moving. And then you you've got to make sure that your business financially strong are able to navigate the environment stay focused on the future and I think the companies that can do both of those things will come out of the stronger. The the effects are going to be very different. Obviously by industry by company size even location. But you've gotta get out in front of it over communicate with empathy. Explain what you're doing why you're doing it and the quicker than you communicate. The better in our country was definitely not prepared for this. What cracks or inefficiencies has situation exposed in our society I think is certainly exposed and exacerbated gaps in access to technology infrastructure education care and economic security in. And we do it. Right could be a chance to address those challenges as we look to come out on the other side of this. You know. There's no playbook for anybody in this and one of the common themes that we've seen is the credible speed at which digital transformation is now occurring. What companies fight if done in two or three years doing in two or three months and just imagine for a second if this had happened ten or fifteen years ago without all the connectivity and the technology that we have today and so while there's certainly a story about the horrible economic effects of this? I think there's another story about the incredible amount of economic activity that we've been able to continue and you sort of asked the question. What happens if everybody works for all while we're finding out? Organizations are able to adapt pretty well. It successfully transition. Most of their workforce to working from home. We're seeing all kinds of organizations from small to large public sector. Schools are being redefined grocery stores or adding to restructure their workflow and it's inspiring to see the resourcefulness in the innovation. And Look I think. Technology is going to continue to reinvent the way we work at learn conduct business and find solutions to the problems out there and I think technology will accelerate the way we address those gaps in society resets. My Hope Dell Technologies as well as the Michael and Susan Dell Foundation have been very involved in education. How do you think this may change education? Well certainly in a remote learning. We got a great experiment right now with all of the students in a giant remote learning experiment. I think the ability to access the highest volley resources online. It certainly changes the whole dynamic of access to education at look. There's kind of a focus from doing it fast to doing it right in all these domains and we have to put the right tools in place to be able to do. Efficiently make sure nursing gauge mind. I again I'm optimistic. I think there will be incredible. Things that come out of this I think. Many of the institutions of higher education will adapt and have to change as a result of this. The idea of doing things over over four years on on a set schedule sort of goes out the window. When everything is online you can chaotic moments in history often breed disruption and they often breed innovation as. Well what do you see as the biggest changes in society coming out covert nineteen? Well so many I mean to your point. Is You look back in previous crises. You know it was a time of incredible and many new companies were created. I think somebody wants said we went into World War Two on horseback when we came out your splitting the atom or something like that. The focus of of the world is starting to move to. How do we recover? You know it's A. It's a delicate dance obviously. I think I'm inspired that. Medical Science is hot on the trail. Here with seventy plus vaccines in development all kinds of therapeutics being tested. And you know another interesting aspect of this. I think we're finding environmental benefits. Certainly all the vehicles and airplanes that were used to move people around those were large sources of greenhouse gas emissions. Businesses are finding that they didn't need all those things and we can. I realize more travel interaction. Collaboration and become cleaner greener a society. And I think now's the time to reflect on all the things that we learned during the crisis we're finding we can be quite productive and we're actively planning to say how can we have. Can we take a number of these lessons? Going forward? I many companies are are doing that. So we'll see how much this we carry forward but I believe there will be lasting. Positive results should mess and I believe there will be many new innovative companies innovations that come out of this also think you know. It will accelerate a lot of the technology trends that were going on digital transformation. Five G. The Internet of things and will use this as an opportunity to embrace the things that were already happening. And I'm I'm an optimist I think There will be great things. Come out of this and were learning as we go and at believe we put people first. The world's can emerge stronger fingers crisis. Thank you Michael and Stay Healthy Sandy. You thank you very much. Thanks for listening. We'll be back in June with all new episodes of trailblazers until then stay safe..

Alex del Orig- Michael Dell Dell Technologies ZANU Susan Austin Susan Good Walter New Orleans Lorraine Texas Susan Dell Foundation CEO founder
"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

07:29 min | 1 year ago

"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"Far as all of the checks and balances you need to make sure that a trusted insider a mole a spy like Hanson. Ken Operate from within the agency. Mere months after Hansen's arrest the United States would face an entirely new intelligence challenge. One that would make the. Cold War seem like a distant memory the terrorist attacks of September eleventh two thousand and one called for a very different response than the conflict with the Soviet Union. There was no al-Qaeda embassy in Washington to bug no diplomats that could be tempted to the American side with the promise of money and a new life in the USA and technology would have to quickly adapt to the Changing Times. Robert Wallace were we position. Technically to deal with that. I'd like to say yes we we were because we had worked on systems that specifically would be beneficial end the war on terrorism but because we we had systems that could be rapidly adapted to those needs specifically those were the GEO location systems. We could find the people they were the communications intercept systems that we had we could hear the people and third. We had the drones that gave us the capability to attack the systems overtly and and silently in a way that had never been done before all three of those technologies and those systems were developed in the nineteen nineties prior to nine eleven and they were ready for use when that occurred one developing technology that proved essential to identifying the CIA as person of interest was facial recognition digital technologies enabled us to have the kinds of digital photography with the resolution or the pixel distribution that made clear matching both possible as well as reliable. We were collecting variety of possible people from around the world who might be of interest and when the CIA joint operation captured the first high value terrorist in two thousand two. He was identified conclusively as the right person by the facial recognition technology but like all technologies. This can be a double edged sword facial recognition software is now so easily accessible that it's actually making it much harder to be a CIA agent in the field. Jim Elson are clandestine. Task of operating overseas has really been complicated by what our adversaries can throw against us. In terms of technology you know things like facial recognition and the fact that there are cameras everywhere pudding pinhole cameras. I remember when I was on active duty for example that I could cross international borders with relative ease even with false documents in an alias. Because at that time you would have kind of a board airport official or a passport clerk kind of glance at you and then stamp your passport and your in. That's all changed today because of technology because even small third world countries have scanners they have databases. They can instantly check your addresses. Your phone numbers your place of employment Sometimes your family members the requirement for us. They have much deeper backstopping for our alias. Documentation is really change. How we do our business. We can still do it. But it's a lot harder than it used to be. Nine eleven also forced the country sometimes competitive intelligence agencies to share information and to collaborate in ways they never had before. Let me look back at that time period after September Eleventh. We had to change. Cassandra Chandler is a CEO a video alliance and a former FBI assistant director prior to that time period the CIA did have significant amount of intelligence the F. B. I. Had A great deal of intelligence in essay and other players and the deny are the director of National Intelligence had community with a lot of disparate components providing what intelligence or information they thought was relevant to the other component. Now an after nine eleven it became more of a very integrated intelligence collection and sharing capability. Threats continued to evolve in an era with virtually all communication is going online. Espionage is not far behind and the line between CYBERCRIME and government orchestrated. Spying is very blurry one. What is rapidly becoming a problem for us in the CYBERCRIME? Realm is that some of the cybercrimes are backed or supported or encouraged through st sponsors. And with these state sponsors. There's a lot of power and authority given a lot more access in two places and what's needed to take that on? Experts agree is education. Anyone who isn't careful can lose control of their personal data and the consequences can be devastating whether it's a state secret or not I think was most important as for people to not become complacent with seeing things and thinking. Everything's Okay it's it's just not anymore electronic capabilities in the Internet of things cyber capabilities. Artificial intelligence is capable of manipulating. So much that you have to look at every bit that comes across your screen on the computer or croshere telephone. That's presently something like twenty. Seven billion mobile phones are now connected across the world. We've got to start looking at everything with a Kanai and a bit of suspicion. The Internet has given almost anyone the ability to connect across its global networks. Anyone with the right. No how can be a spy with little education? That doesn't mean everyone needs to be a target. I'm Walter Isaacson and you've been listening to trail blazers. An original podcast from technologies for more information on any of our guests. Go to our website. Dell technologies dot com slash trailblazers. Thanks for listening..

CIA United States Soviet Union Ken Operate al-Qaeda Hanson Washington Walter Isaacson Hansen National Intelligence Changing Times Jim Elson Robert Wallace CYBERCRIME Dell
"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

05:36 min | 1 year ago

"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"Passage you are. You are in bike. There's no doubt about that. You don't see any Trees I don't see any derives you are that and and yeah you ain't London and wizard and you're going to have an amazing magical time. The two found that creating visual illusions for movies was vastly different than creating an interactive three-dimensional world unlike film where you might spend the same amount of time as we did the theme Park Designing Pieces and bits of graphics for the scenery. We never have any control as to what we'll actually get seen and for how long it will be seen onscreen whereas in a theme park situation. Suddenly we were designing for an audience. Who could spend as much time as they wanted in front of one thing or ten things will know things and suddenly the audience had control over how much they would see but handing control over to the audience allowed for a depth of interactive storytelling that Walt Disney could only have dreamed of the personalized ones. That puck goers by Alexander's. Not only look just like the beloved props from the film but have real. Technology assisted magic powers of their own. The marriage of technology and design helps take fanned one step deeper into the fantasy world of their dreams. You could find one that had the ability to activate magic in certain shop windows and situations so we will have an involved in the design of how the the movement of the ones would be represented in a frosty so it was embedded in the in the floor and also a map that comes with the one to describe where you can find these accusations but ironically and actually we've so nice for us because the brief was to create a map that felt completely immersive. And whenever I see people walking around the park with it I'm actually wondering how they how they can get from A to b because it's very complicated in the way that we always complicated a lot of the graphics for this Alternative Universe but it was great that the produces wanted to for every single element of experience to feel a massive from the world that people have become familiar with the wizard ing world of Harry Potter may have been the first but seeing its success. The rest of the industry is quickly followed. Sin Recent years have seen the highly anticipated opening of pox like Star Wars Galaxies ad and Pandora World of Avatar and. There are many more worlds to fans get lost in soon to come. It's kind of a new direction that the really was started by universal with Harry Potter. And that's to move away from having individual attractions in an area or a land That were based on a franchise and instead having an entire land based on a single franchise so For instance Disneyland in Tomorrowland of you go there. Now you'll find Nemo you'll find buzz light year you'll find star wars. You know all these different franchises in a single area but when you go to the planet about two which is what got work. Alexy's edge takes place. You are suddenly immersed in this whole culture so to speak so you you a evolve into the star wars culture and it's similar thing With the toy story lands that have opened and with the the cars land at California adventure in that. Once you go in. You do not feel like you're in the rest of the park. You feel like you have entered a separate realm altogether. You can take a ride in a perfect recreation of the Millennium Falcon or fly a banshee through the skies of Pandora. But the coming years. We'll see parks themed after Nintendo Nickelodeon and even in Japan Godzilla featuring a replica of the famous movie monster designed to his exact enormous dimensions. It's no surprise that these attractions continue to gain popularity as Disney parks alone brought in a staggering twenty billion dollars and just twenty eighteen. Walt Disney once. Sad Disneyland would never be completed that we continue to grow as long as there was imagination left in the world but even the visionary trailblazer like never have imagined just how powerful to mention profitable that imagination could become. I'm Walter Isaacson and you've been listening to trail blazers original podcast from Dell technologies for more on any of the guests on today's show. You can head to our website at Dell technologies dot com slash trailblazers. Thanks for listening..

Walt Disney Harry Potter Dell Walter Isaacson Pandora Disney California Alexander Alexy Tomorrowland Nintendo blazers Japan
"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

07:51 min | 1 year ago

"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"Meat. I'm Mark Post Post. I am chief scientific officer of Motza meet startup that aims to commercialize cultures mute remembered the prediction that Winston Churchill may back in nineteen thirty one. One that could be grown in a lab. You might say that Mark Post is a man who's taken up that challenge. poche was a professor fester in the medical school at University in the Netherlands in two thousand and sex when he was asked to help out with a study that was being funded by the Dutch government lament the idea was to place muscle cells in a nutrient rich serum and encouraged US cells to grow into muscle so like fibers are many medical applications for this. What but the Dutch researchers looking beyond Madison? They he believed that. If you can turn animals stem cells into muscle fibers. You can actually grow synthetic meet in the lab. It could be the best has to both work real neat. That doesn't require a real animal now. I thought it was a great idea and I was also ready involved in tissue engineering for medical purposes and the more I learned about the problems with meat production in the next thirty five years. The more enthusiastic I became about this entire project not only scientifically but also for its suicidal impact. There were scientific hurdles that still had to be overcome but the main obstacle was money. They would need lots of it to scale up produced cell base meat for commercial mass consumption. It didn't help when in two thousand hasn't nine. The Dutch government withdrew funding for the project and basically the language that the government used. We don't see any commercial interest from companies companies in this kind of triggered me. I said well you know this is such a great idea. We need to be able to get this across the general population. So let's make make a sausage from a pig presented to the press while the pig is honking around on the stage and so that was kind of the image was for me was a very unusual kind I thought because I I just basically was a biomedical scientists but I was so frustrated. Is You know W- we'll show them. We needed quite a bit of money to do that. That wasn't really lying around so we had to wait until we got that money and then kind of out of the blue. That was a year and a half or two years later the office of Sergei Brin approached. Just me and said we want to talk to you about this project that you're doing and when we come over Sergei brand is one of the co founders of Google but while marked post had of course heard of people you've never heard of Sergei Graham so when Brennan's representative came came calling post had no idea who he was dealing with post told his visitor about his idea of creating a so based sausage and holding a press conference or the pig on the stage and the representative of Sergei Brennan said. Oh Yeah we will support that. How much money do you need and body set off a couple plus million would be fine Indian? We got the money that we needed to make. That event happened so suddenly Mark Post I had all the money he needed to make his cell meet prototype and the money came with only one string attached tugay brand. Dan wanted a hamburger on the stage. Not a sausage well that was basically a not a request but the demand from Sergei Britain. If you're going to do this it has to be a hamburger not sausage. It's an American thing and that was actually quite fortunate. I think because environmental impact impact of beef is actually a lot higher than that of pork and so on August fifth twenty thirteen. The first I sell Burger was ready to be unveiled at a press conference in London. The event was carried live around the world and included a taste test by food critic. Who of course very gratifying moment? That you because you you have been living up to this for two three years and to finally make that happen was was the big thing so I was pretty happy throughout. It was also a little bit nerve wracking because we had no idea how to tasters basically would respond onto it if they would spit out. Say Yuck this is nothing like we expected or if they would be at least somewhat positive about it we had no idea so that was nerve wracking thing but all in all the whole event went pretty well and I wasn't even noticeably nervous but somebody told me I was tapping my fingers continuously on a desk so Hawaii. Apparently I was the world's first. Cellular Burger got good reviews from the food critic but most of the press coverage focused on cost cost not taste the price tag on. That Burger was three hundred and thirty thousand dollars so mark mark post needed to find a way to drive down costs significantly or his cell Burger would remain an interesting science experiment with no commercial potential and more importantly no potential to solve the environmental challenges caused by animal based meat production. So one of the things that makes cell culture extremely expensive is factors Proteins that stimulate cells to grow and day cost like a million euro per gram. Unfortunately you need only very very small amounts but still if you start to grow at large scale. This is US prohibitive but I learned pretty quickly that end feed industry in a completely different industry not the biomedical part. But the feed industry people people are making similar proteins with similar technology for five. You're a programmer for Europe Aram. I thought well if we can do that. And I and the price of the cell culture drops tremendously and then we started to look at more components of this feat for cells. And we realized realized that if you source differently and you make it a little bit of a different composition you can actually make these very cheap type of Takashi in two thousand fifteen mark post started his own company called motion meet to continue his quest to develop affordable cellular alert meet at a commercial scale. Today he says the price of a Cell Burger is down to about fifteen eighteen dollars still too expensive song grocery three stores but he hopes to be able to increase meat production to the point. We can offer it in some higher end restaurants but then a couple of years post and Brown a two of the trailblazer. We're trying to address the enormous enormous environmental challenges. We are facing by leading what could be doric transformation in our eating at indeed indeed the biggest dietary revolution since humans for started eating me two point five million years ago. I'm Walter Walter Isaacson and you've been listening to trailblazers original podcast from Dell technologies for more on any of the guests on today's show. You can head to our website at Dell technologies dot com slash trailblazers. Thanks for listening..

Mark Post Sergei Brennan Sergei Brin Dell representative Sergei Britain Walter Walter Isaacson Winston Churchill Dutch government Burger chief scientific officer Sergei US Madison Netherlands Motza Sergei Graham professor Hawaii
"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

07:01 min | 1 year ago

"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"And gives you suggestions. How do you make it tone neutral? How do you make diversity open? And it's not using words. SAT are common for one gender for one ethnic diversity or racially in any way bias in the nineteen seventies. It was still common for applicants to list their race. Ace and their weight on their resumes and diversity was far from being the sought after goal. It is today getting a top job in corporate America was sadly for anyone not white male a distant dream. But that's all changing and careerbuilder isn't the only tech company company looking to combat a lack of diversity in the workforce buys is a real big problem in recruiting industry. Because up until now it's it's to being really an area that is hard to measure and it's hard to really act someone. Mundell is a CO founder of ideal dot com an okay. I powered recruiting software company. So for example fiasco big company hire recruiters picking people well. It's it's kind of the black box. Actually don't know which recruiters are selecting. Which people is it representative of the people that you're attracting? Are you hiring during the same number of men and women based on the people you're attracting figuring out that data is actually very difficult so a lot of times in the world of recruiting shooting. We're building technology. That's just automating mundane tasks. We know theoretically if you had a lot of people to do certain tasks you could do them but figuring out. Are you introducing a bias. Are you hiring certain demographics and other. That's actually a problem that really really humans can spend a ton of time and just figure out so we're now at a point where we do have the technology to figure out that data and to report on it and to make sure that we can improve the idea for ideal came out of MANDL's own experience in hiring the first I company he had founded created software to manage safety compliance in the energy industry. The company grew to a point where he spent a good deal all this time hiring sales people for us hiring people a week. That was a huge deal and we were making the classic mistakes. We were hiring people role because they played sports. We assume that they would be good. At being sales people. We hired people that went to our universities because we thought oh they would be a great fit because they went to a great school. We did two things wrong. We made we are highly inaccurate. We got to a point where we're hiring to people knowing that one would be. Let go and we're making decisions full of bias. Bias in hiring can be difficult to spot even for the well intentioned almost always it some sort of personal or cultural blindspot and identifying them dimension combating them is difficult nope no matter how well intentioned one is thirty two types of biases about seventy percent of bias comes from age name and sex so for example my name Selman. I'm a less likely to interview them. Business Partner Sean. So those the real negative biases but then there are other types of biases that that people don't always realize for example picking people that went to U Your University or college so a Lotta Times companies will say you know I love hiring people from mit or Harvard. They're the best schools roles and they're gonNA make the best employees well. How do we know if that's true? Ideals software strips out the data points and job applications we're bias is most pervasive age name and sex. We'll also abstract the name of the school you attended or the company company. Will you worked so that the human recruiter can make fairer assessment of your experience instead of rejecting you out of hand for working for from. They've never heard of Lincoln. Software takes a similar approach. Mark Lebowski we recently launched you you know assessments program where members can Take a core. Take a test to be able to assess whether they have a skill in python or Java Avenue and then based upon that they can add that to their profile that would then show up in a recruiter search to be able to find a candidate that maybe just in a go go to a four year school but has the skills hard skills to be able to do the job and so that's one example of something. We're doing to help improve people from non on traditional background to be able to get roles not just those that have gone to four year institutions and while I can raise a scary specter ideals. Someone sees it not as a way to remove humans from the recruiting process but to make their lives easier and help them make better better fairer decisions. I'm the first person to say that we need humans in the hiring process. Computers can't do everything the problem that we're facing and that we're trying to solve. Is that many of our customers. Ignore about eighty percent of the candidates that that they receive so that's a whole other problem. They're not even in getting to the right candidates because they have too much volume because the job boards and Lincoln have made it so easy to apply to a job that there's a lot of noise and his heart. It's hard to connect take the signal out of that noise tech foams like ideal in length. Dan Aren't alone in seeing the technological solution Lucien to the very human problem of bias in hiring earlier this year the California legislature passed a bill that urges is the government to explore ways to use technology to reduce bias and discrimination in hiring specifically calling out artificial intelligence an algorithm based solutions and while it's becoming apparent in recent years that tech can't solve all of our very human problems. If pointed in in the right direction it could be a star online job. Boards started as a way to help the unemployed get hired but in the future it could be a step two more inclusive workplace for all. I'm Walter Isaacson and you've been listening to trail blazers an original podcast from Dell technologies. If you'd like to find out more about any of the guests on today's show. Please visit our website at Dell technologies dot com slash trailblazers. We'll be taking a break for the holidays but we'll be back in the new year with brand new. Oh episodes of this show until then. Thanks for listening.

Lincoln Dell Walter Isaacson America Mundell careerbuilder Mark Lebowski Harvard U Your University specter California Dan
"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"By the third of June eighteen sixty one America was war as the echoes of Kevin Hire Faded at Fort Sumter thousands of southerners joined the confederate army among them was an eighteen year old engineering student in another way after serving today's world was turned upside down that day and Philip by Virginia Hangar was captured after cannonball tore through his leg a union surgeon amputated his back after which hanging is freed in a prisoner exchange and return to his family home seemingly crippled for life mm-hmm the kind of goes into his room for three months and his family sit down in the Paula of their house a May worry about him a lot of noise there's a lot of banging shuffling back and forth and I think they're generally concerned about his condition emily mayhew is a historian at London's in Cereal College before the civil war she says a battlefield amputees prospects were Graham the chances are they won't be able to have aesthetic fitted by going to have a short relatively miserable life on crutches boesak somewhere where they can't really move they're all wheelchairs but then also available to people we don't have any money shrouded in worry James hangers family listen and wait it then on the day that I think of as being this real turning point they hear his door open and then they hear something extraordinary and it's James Hanger on the prosthetic leg back with a knee joint that he is an engineer has designed and he's coming down status because he's designed leg where the knee can bend and if the can bend he can lift it with his muscles it means that he can hold onto a banister but he can come downstairs on although it's not digital it's or a dime shift and I think that sound of this young engineer coming downstairs and being able to walk into his parents parlor and everything changes it was a genesis moment in modern prosthetics hangar was determined that unlike the straight un-imaginative peg legs of his era his prosthetic would mimic a natural limb his wooden leg car from the wood used to make Balance Inc rubber bumpers with a hinge knee and ankle for James Hanger the first recorded amputee of the civil war it was the beginning of the global enterprise that he would oversee until his death in nineteen nineteen and which still bears his name today hanger would go on to develop market the first mass produced affordable prosthetic lamp. I'm Walter Isaacson and you're listening into trail blazers and original podcast from Dell Technologies might say Craig Hutto is part by McMahon arms legs over three million amputees every year who need a new or replacement Kareem comes true I went from being able to somebody that might even be super abled.

James Hanger Graham confederate army Fort Sumter Virginia Hangar engineer emily mayhew Paula London Walter Isaacson Kevin Hire America Cereal College Craig Hutto Philip Balance Inc Kareem Dell Technologies McMahon
"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"As videos go it's not much to look at it's only eighteen seconds long and it features a twenty five year world man named Javid Corinne standing in front of the elephant enclosure at the San Diego's speaking directly only to the camera Corinne comments on how elephants tend to have long trunks and then wraps it up with that's pretty much. All there is to say the video is called appropriately enough me at the zoo would makes me at the zoo. Special isn't the shaky cinematography or Kareem somewhat obvious commentary on the elephants anatomy. It's the fact that applauded in April two thousand five. It was the first video ever posted to a brand new video sharing site known as Youtube Youtube Kareem just happened to be the sites co-founder regular person not a celebrity by any means in a regular location not talking straight into the camera about something mundane that short shaky very first video contain the seeds of what would become a revolution with the potential to change the very nature took a fame as we know it. Andy Warhol was once famously quoted as saying in the future. Everybody will be famous for fifteen minutes and with platforms like Youtube and Instagram it turns out he might not have been far Laura. I'm Walter Isaacson and this is trail blazers original podcast from Dell technologies.

Javid Corinne Youtube Andy Warhol Kareem Walter Isaacson San Diego blazers co-founder Dell Instagram eighteen seconds twenty five year fifteen minutes
"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"And then he hears the sound of wimpering coming from the Senator of that famous couple Clark Gable and Carole Lombard the two stars a crime. And so as the audience around. Everyone is in tears. It took that moment. That Walt Disney knows that he's created clue. Artful one that will change hop culture. Forever. I'm Walter Isaacson. And you're listening to Trail Blazers an original podcast from Dell technologies. Graham and dumping off. Wait boy going on a while. Chart which all? What? It's been almost a century. Since Walt Disney I set up the laugh Graham studio in Kansas City, the young animator would go on much bigger things. And so with the art form he pioneer from Snow White to the Simpsons to Toy Story animation has always been one of America's most popular and most innovative forms of creative expression and its preeminent shows. No sign of slowing down..

Walt Disney Carole Lombard Graham Walter Isaacson Clark Gable Trail Blazers Senator Snow White Kansas City Dell Simpsons America
"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"It's December twenty first nineteen thirty seven and the scene at the Carthy circle theatre. Los Angeles is pandemonium flashbulbs Papa celebrity stream into the cinema. Clark Gable Carole lumbar, Charlie Chaplin, Cary Grant, and other luminaries of Hollywood golden age outside more than thirty thousand fans turned out for one of the year's most anticipated film premieres and anxiously in the middle of it all is a man without who's creative genius and cheer force of will this night would never have happened. Walter Elias, Disney his mind is on the glitz and the glamour on the cheering crowds and world famous movie stars one urgent question occupies him will as gamble. A off. For four years. Now his team at the Walt Disney company has been working on their most ambitious costly project ever the world's first feature. Length animated, film, Snow White and the seven dwarfs he's come close to bankrupting the company with this grand dream. But he knows that if it works if he can forge in a motion connection with his audience animation will transcend, its humble comedic beginnings and finally be taken seriously as an art form. Sitting in the audience Disney. Nova sleet, observes, the movie goers, as the film approaches, it's emotional climax. It's the part when Snow White poisoned by the evil. Queen's enchanted apple lies in a glass coffin surrounded by the seven grieving doors..

Walt Disney company Disney Carthy circle theatre Walter Elias Los Angeles Nova sleet Clark Gable Cary Grant apple Charlie Chaplin four years
"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

06:10 min | 2 years ago

"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"It was announced almost no one knew anything about it, even within the company. The project was hush hush. Kushenko was the design one of the iphone most important assets, the key board, and while the team didn't immediately know what that keyboard with look like they knew one thing every interaction would take place on a flat glass scream, there'd be no hardware. Keyboard by the popular blackberry phones dominated sales instead in total secrecy, the company had to develop an entirely new interface. When we were designing the software. We wanted the experience to be comfortable. And so we built in these little Ford Ince's and surest IX into the software to help you to figure out what it was that you probably wanted when you touch the screen and then give you that. So that the experience of using the iphone felt like the device was was on your side that it was with you that it was going to help you rather than hinder you every step of the way, then after years of laboring total secrecy. The team is Steve Jobs introduced the iphone at the MacWorld expo on January nine two thousand seven Ken Cassinga on the day of the announcement of the iphone in we. We were all worried that people were going to like what we did. We didn't really know the project was such a secret. And so few people I actually tried out what we had made that we weren't sure that the world as a whole would like what we did the secrecy on the project was so tight that. I didn't even know that it was going to be called the iphone until Steve Senate on stage. I simply didn't need to know. So I wasn't told. I mean, it gives you a sense of how much secrecy was. Oh up in what we were doing. And what the project culture was like that. He need not of word when it's first that gate apple sold. An astounding one point two billion iphone and the ripple effect were far region. Computers were no longer confined to our desk or even toted around in back bat, they want chain cables of wifi networks, having an iphone meant that anyone that have access to internet connected computing, power entire industries from photography to navigation to personal communication would disrupt. It. This was great news for apple but devastating for Nokia which saw the market share plummet as they struggled to keep up. The company's very survival was in question. But as did many times over one hundred and fifty years Nokia found a way to reshape itself jettisoning, it's old business model and embracing the connected future Nokia chairman restuffed so Las Ma today. Knock as a digital infrastructure company. We can deliver the world's most complicated or demanding and to networks, meaning that we factor all the components, both the hardware and software components for fixed line networks be they got Bor coaxial cable. Hoped? Ical wireless networks from do G to five G, and we are the only network infrastructure player in the world that delivers these networks on a global scale. Anybody who sends a bit to the internet an Email or what she's video will be using Nokia software and okay equipment for that bit to to travel where it needs to go anywhere in the world. And then a delightful bit of historical era when Nokia acquired telecommunications company Alcatel Lucent in twenty sixteen it came with the venerable sto kicking labs still going at it. A hundred years after it was founded still winning Nobel prizes. The telephone has come a long way in the century that took us from the vacuum to to the Dutch street, but underlying it all is I desire to reach out and connect with each other with the help of high speed high capacity network technologies such as LT in the upcoming five G were no longer restricted to just sending our voices around the world video college has gone from science fiction to being just as commonplace. As voice was a few short decades ago. Our hunger for communication drives the innovations that shape us as a society, and whatever comes next after voice, text and video. We'll certainly bring us even closer together. I'm Walter Isaacson. And you've been listening to trailblazer original podcast from Dell technologies. Yes. Thank you. Goodbye.

Nokia Steve Senate apple Kushenko Walter Isaacson Steve Jobs Ford Ince Alcatel Lucent Dell Ken Cassinga Las Ma chairman
"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

03:24 min | 3 years ago

"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"It uses computer vision systems to dentist whether the apple is right then if it is then it moves a robotic arm into place and it removes it actually with the vacuum it sucks it off of the tree it can work twenty four hours a day it doesn't get tired it over time a lot of the changes i believe are going to come in the form of the the vision systems and software that are running it whether that's machine learning artificial intelligence is not enough to just identify that's an apple or it's red but is it right it doesn't have disease is it misshapen is there a bruise or damage then you start getting to higher levels of of actually mimicking what human would do in the field robot a one way of addressing the problem of food waste if you can pick fruits and vegetables more quickly and efficiently you'll increase the chances that the produce will end up in someone's stomach rather than in the landfill according to the department of agriculture about forty percent of all the food grown in the us never gets eaten that's about one hundred and thirty three billion pounds of food wasted each year or about one hundred sixty billion dollars worth the challenge over the next few decades is very clear increase food production to feed a global population that's expected to grow by more than two billion people we'll get there by reducing food waste improving distribution and ensuring that the food we'd is safe and precision farming well butts urban agriculture are just some of the areas that farmers engineers scientists technologists and investors are exploring to meet that challenge we've been here before in the nineteenth century john deere's steel plow and cyrus mccormick's thrasher helped overcome thomas mouth asus dire prediction of mass death caused by a food supply that couldn't keep pace with population growth in the twentieth century genetic engineering and chemical fertilizers help prevent mass starvation in the developing world but in the twenty first century we can't simply continue on the path we've been on and hope it all works out we need to correct some of the mistakes of the past we have to grow healthier safer food more sustainably in a way that doesn't harm our air land and water we have perhaps been too slow to recognize the magnitude and the urgency of the problem but now some very smart people that by some very big money and armed with all the latest technology a fully engaged in the struggle and striving for solutions i'm walter isaacson and you've been listening to trail blazers and original podcast from dow technologies and the next episode taking on the world of politics and examining the disruption that digital technology has

apple john deere cyrus mccormick walter isaacson dow technologies department of agriculture one hundred sixty billion doll thirty three billion pounds twenty four hours forty percent
"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

02:55 min | 3 years ago

"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"Situation in particular it's it's just the it says so much that they hired margo george addis who again was a a long time uh gugel executive they hired her to be their new ceo and this is a really really traditional toymaker um you know they've they've been around for over seventy years and it's not just that the products are our traditional it's a traditional company the culture is is just very kind of old school and the fact that they took a a chance on someone who comes from google and doesn't have any prior experience in toys is really interesting fortune magazine reports that global sales of toys have fallen thirteen percent from a year ago mattel ceo margaret georgy artis connects that trend directly to the bankruptcy of the oncemighty toys or us but while the supply chain has changed the need for play hasn't toy makers who survived the 80s benefit today from hardfought lessons about the eternal joy that comes from play and from imagination in the digital age toy giants or embracing tv and feature films not to disrupt young imagine nations but to stimulate them a hundred and thirty years since edison was traumatising kid with his talking doll the toy industry may finally be finding ways for technology and imagination to playing nicely together i'm walter isaacson and this is trail blazers and original podcast from dell technologies this marks the last episode of our first season we'll be back with brand new episodes in january you can subscribe to our show and apple podcast over after you get your podcast and new episodes will automatically be downloaded for you just as soon as they're released and as we plan the shows for season to we'd love to hear what you think of this show the best way to do that is a lever review for us on apple podcast we read all the reviews you right and truly appreciate everything you have to say it really helped us shaped the show and if you want more information on the toy industry you can go do dealt technologiescomtrailblazers until the new year thanks for listening.

executive ceo google margaret georgy artis supply chain edison walter isaacson margo george addis fortune magazine dell apple thirteen percent seventy years thirty years
"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

02:59 min | 3 years ago

"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"The arrival of parcel post was one of the first great disruptions in the package delivery business there have of course many more sense than you can't ship children through the mail anymore that practice was outlawed in '19 '20 but you can shift just about everything else in every way imaginable both plane train truck klar fight and now even drought today with about eighty percent of americans doing at least some of their shopping online spending about three hundred fifty billion this year the stakes have never been higher there's no quick away to turn off a potential online customer than delivery that's too slow too expensive and too unreliable giant shipping companies like ups fat acts and probably no surprise here amazon are spending billions of dollars on new equipment plants and technology to meet the demands of increasingly impatient shoppers who are now measuring their wait time thymine hours not days this is not a business for the faint of heart i'm walter isaacson and you're listening to trail blazers and original podcast from dealt technologies then mayo mountains it the letters will go to many different ways i got a letter here for somebody from springfield sprang bailed letters newspapers and magazines many boxes and packages to it'll be a redletter day when the post miami blows male call moved in april in the days before the railway tied the country together americans had to be a lot more patient when it came to package delivery if you wanted to send a package from new york to california and the eighteen 50s you'd loaded on a steamship to panama from their horses which carried across the isthmus of panama and then another ship were transported to the pacific coast even when an overland route was established in the 1860s by companies with names like wells fargo and american express it would still take about three weeks to get a package from st louis to san francisco using a combination of stage coaches and pony express the establishment of a transcontinental rail link in the 1870s cut delivery time from weeks today's but it was a 19year old in seattle washington who really laid the groundwork for the.

shopping online walter isaacson springfield new york california panama san francisco washington amazon miami seattle eighty percent three weeks 19year
"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

01:42 min | 4 years ago

"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"It may be that over time neither bitcoin nor any one of the new cryptocurrencies reign supreme it could be something else entirely but what is undeniable is that we are in the middle of an unstoppable power ship money is being democratize friction and barriers to payment of vanishing banks in traditional financial institution a beginning to reimagined their future as striking innovators go it's fair to say that sect oshii nakamoto is one of the most disruptive i'm walter isaacson and this is trailblazers original podcast from dell technologies if you enjoyed the show it wanna hear more my thoughts on potential ways that cryptocurrencies like fit coin can change the way media creators get hey visit cell technologies dot com slash trailblazers not that trailblazers than the number nine next episode we'll be looking at the world of mapping and how a technology like gps is not only changing the way we locate ourselves in the world but how we communicate with each other as well you can subscribe the trail blazers an apple podcast over every get your podcasts and if you like it please leave us of raising in a review it helps who listeners discover the show thanks for listening.

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"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

02:08 min | 4 years ago

"walter" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"On the other hand there are a lot of artists who have had a difficulty surviving in the transition from dollar denominated sales to a market that spaced really on attention and fractions of pennies repeated a million times i think the industry in general but particularly rights holders and collectives were not well situated for the rapid ascension of the streaming marketplace in as a result a lot of money got lost in the cracks in the early stages of this business and typically when you see that happened the artists are always at the bottom of the pile with the next major technological disruption will be is anyone's guess but if there's anything that we've learned since addison set this whole thing in motion it's that there will always be a demand for music and always be people ready to satisfy that demand everything else is up for grabs teams i'm walter isaacson and you've been listening to trailblazers and original podcast from dealt technologies if you enjoyed the show and one of your core of by thoughts about what we in the media and journalism industry can learn from the disruption in the music industry visit dealt technologies dot com slash trailblazers eight that's trailblazers than the number eight next episode will be looking at the world of money and how cryptocurrencies like pulling are aiming to disrupt the economic engines that run our world you can subscribe to trailblazers and apple podcast or wherever you get your podcasts if you like it please lead us a rating under review it helps new listeners discover the show.

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