21 Burst results for "Wallace Foundation"

"wallace foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:21 min | 6 months ago

"wallace foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Everyone, ideas and information at Wallace Foundation daughter Warg. On a Monday. It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington and I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles. President Trump tried to stage a cliffhanger over the government's pandemic relief bill, but the ending turned out to be a bit anti climactic. In the end, the president signed the $900 billion bill, but not before a delay that could prove costly for millions of jobless Americans. NPR's Scott Horsley joins us now with more Hey, Scott. Good evening. All right, so there were two emergency unemployment programs that expired this weekend before the president even decided to sign this relief bill. Can you just tell us what that means for people who are out of work now and who have been relying on this aid? Well, it could mean an interruption in their jobless benefits for the millions of people who can least afford it. The two programs we're talking about here cover gig workers and the self employed as well as those who have exhausted their ordinary state unemployment benefits, which typically last just six months. Obviously, the pandemics been dragging on a lot longer than that. It may take some time to restart those programs. Although some states are now saying they'll keep making payments with no interruption. The president's foot dragging is also likely to affect the supplemental unemployment benefits in this relief package that are worth $300 a week. People who are unemployed will likely get that extra money for just 10 weeks now, instead of 11. I talked to Chris Snyder. She's a musician in Pennsylvania who used to perform it nursing homes until the pandemic made that impossible. And she told me it's been really frustrating. Watching this aid package take so long to come into fact, and her blood pressure really soared last week as she watched the president's actions. At this point, I really saw all the politicians or grandstanding and forgetting that real people are being hurt. Unfortunate. I still have a roof over my head. I still have food, and there are people that are still in danger of losing their homes like a lot of people. Snyder is anxious to get the covert vaccine and get back to working the way she used to, But she's really uncertain how long that's gonna take, and she's nervous about paying the bills. In the meantime. Yeah, well, this bill does provide direct $600 payments to most Americans. And and that was President Trump's biggest complaint right, like he demanded bigger payments of $2000. But then he backtracked. And you just explain what happened there. Have. The president evidently thought he could play Santa Claus by demanding $2000 payments. But he was in danger of looking like the grants, destroying not only the relief package, but the larger government spending bill that was attached to on that might have led to a government shut down right in the middle of winter and with Corona virus infections raging out of control. Republican Senator Pat Toomey warned yesterday that in his effort to be remembered as the guy who demanded more generous checks, Trump was instead at risk of winding up remembered as the guy who brought chaos and misery. So ultimately the president blanked, Hey, signed the bill at his private resort in Florida last night. Trump insisted he'd won some important concessions during the process. But that was just a fig leaf. This is In effect that the bill that Congress negotiated while the president was preoccupied with the loss election. Well, can you tell us what What else does this bill do for families and for businesses that are struggling right now? Well, there are those one time payment of $600 that's going to go to everyone making up to $75,000 and people who make between 75 $99,000 will get a little less than that. The Treasure Department expects to start making those payments via direct deposit as early as this week. There is also a new round of forgivable loans to small businesses. There's more money for food stamps there's might help distribute the new vaccines. And one of the really important pieces in this in this bill is that extra 300 bucks a week in supplemental unemployment benefits Now that's only half what the federal government was paying back in the spring and early summer. But it's still a big boost for people like Nick Mancuso, who lost his job with a metal fabricating company back in March. It makes a difference. You know, we've been sitting around just on the basic 270 bucks that they give you in New York, and it's that's kind of hard to do. It helps a lot, you know is better than nothing That's for sure. Thank you's got another rent payment due next week, and he's having to contend with a cold and snowy winter in upstate New York, where he lives. They got about 3 Ft of snow just before Christmas, and he's cutting himself lucky that the electric company is not gonna cut off his heat. Yeah. That is NPR's Scott Horsley. Thank you, Scott. You're welcome. To another story. Now one of the world's most renowned experts on the Latin language died on Christmas Day in Milwaukee for four decades at the Vatican father, Reginald Foster translated papal speeches into Latin. He also made it his mission to install to instill a passion in his students for the lingua franca of the Roman Empire. NPR's Sylvia Poggioli has this remembrance. Reginald Foster was born in Milwaukee, the son of a plumber. He became a Carmelite monk and went on to serve four Popes as the Vatican's foremost Latin n'est until he retired in 2009. 1998. I joined him on a field trip to the seaside villa of the Roman orator Cicero, where he gave a toast to the master of rhetorical speech and to all lovers of Latin tutor Novas. Teaching Toni and on Lee was teach Your owner's A leech and I are from Latin album A mandibles religion. Religion don't know students came from all over the world to attend Foster's classes at Rome's Pontifical Gregorian University. Daniel Gallagher studied with Foster for five years and later succeeded him at the Vatican's Latin office. He now teaches classics at Cornell. Gallagher says Foster's teaching style was unique because he threw out all the textbooks. He insisted that Latin be taught and learned with real Latin texts. And from day one. You had your nose in Ovid and Cicero, The Gregorian fired Foster in 2006 for allowing students to attend for free. So his classes moved to Roman cafes. There was nothing stuffy about the man Vatican radio called the Latin lover. His students called him Reginald Gousse, but he insisted on Reggie He refused to wear a Roman collar and was always attired in blue polyester overalls from J. C. Penney at the Vatican, says Gallagher. Foster was perceived as a Latin genius. He didn't want anything to do with the Vatican culture. So he was viewed as a little bit rebellious, I suppose, but still with an enormous amount of respect. Foster had no patience. For those who say the language of dead white European males is difficult. He'd point out that every bomb and prostitute in ancient Rome was fluent. And when I asked him over a bottle of wine at a restaurant. Why a young person today should study Latin. He exploded. It's everything. What are you talking about? This is what life is about This. What cultures About with the formation of your mind is about God with ideas are about with the continuity of the human race, you know, with with contact with brothers and sisters.

president Reginald Foster President Trump NPR Scott Horsley Chris Snyder Daniel Gallagher New York Rome Mary Louise Kelly Wallace Foundation Senator Pat Toomey Los Angeles Washington federal government Pennsylvania Nick Mancuso Elsa Chang
"wallace foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:31 min | 7 months ago

"wallace foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Mellon Foundation, guided by the belief that the arts and humanities are essential to the well being of diverse and democratic societies. Learn more at Melun daughter work. From the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a private corporation funded by the American people. And from the Wallace Foundation, working to develop in share practices that can improve learning and enrichment for young people and the vitality of the arts for everyone, ideas and information at Wallace Foundation daughter work You're listening to. It's been a minute from NPR. I'm Sam Sanders. You know, I think these last few weeks with the pandemic in the election cycle and honestly all 2020, it's may be tired. And so in my free time after work, all I want to do is see and hear and watch and read, fun stuff, uplifting stuff stuff that makes me laugh so help with that. I'm happy to introduce my next guest who makes very fun stuff for a living. He's also very fun himself. He literally breaks into song on the regular when he speaks. Matt Rogers. Hi. Thank you so much for having me so good. I'm so excited to be on the show. It's good day. So Matt does a lot. He hosts a dog makeover show. I know a dog makeover show on HBO Max called Hot Dog H A U T e Welcome to the world's most adorable dog grooming competition with trade and on quickie. He hosted a game show called Game Show G A. Y M. It's.

Sam Sanders Matt Rogers Wallace Foundation Mellon Foundation Melun Corporation for Public Broadca HBO NPR
"wallace foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:24 min | 8 months ago

"wallace foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"For everyone. Ideas and information at Wallace Foundation dot org's another. Spare the air alert in effect tomorrow, and it'll be partly cloudy along the coast and bay in the morning. Turning mostly sunny with temperatures ranging from thie seventies along the coast to the well low nineties. Inland. Livermore should see 91 tomorrow. 89 expected in Santa Rosa 69 Mountain View. Concord, 91. Tomorrow and in San Francisco, 77 is expected. This is one, eh? I'm Jen White in Washington. Some of the fiercest fights in this presidential campaign are taking place in America suburbs. We got a little taste of this fight in the first presidential debate. If he ever got to run this country, and they ran it the way he would want to run it. We would have our summer on by the way, our suburbs would begun. And you would see problems like suburb unless he took a wrong turn or no supper, waiting. In the suburbs. This's not 1950 all these dog whistles and racism, not work anymore. Roughly half of all voters live in the suburbs, but they're more than a political prize. As November nears, we're featuring a range of special reports that go beyond the traditional idea of the suburbs is picket fences and nuclear families. For our Siri's wide streets. Narrow margins were visiting a range of different types of suburbs to meet the people who live there. And to hear about the issues that resonate with them. For our second installment, we visit a middle suburb. Here's one A's across America reporter James Morrison, Burlington, North Carolina sits between two major metropolitan areas. Raleigh Durham, Chapel Hill Research Triangle to the East in the Winston Salem, High Point, Greensboro, Triad to the West. Middle suburbs like Burlington are where deep red rural areas mixed with the outer fringes of bright blue urban centers. Meghan Squire has lived here for nearly two decades just will go through this intersection and do that. Okay. You know what else is there beautiful, all kind of brick with my size lawns..

Jen White Wallace Foundation dot org America Burlington Meghan Squire Santa Rosa Livermore Siri Concord San Francisco Chapel Hill Research Triangle James Morrison North Carolina Washington Winston Salem Raleigh reporter High Point
"wallace foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:44 min | 9 months ago

"wallace foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And share practices that can improve learning an enrichment for young people and the vitality of the arts. For everyone, ideas and information at Wallace foundation dot or GE. You're listening to all things Considered here on W N Y C. I'm David. First New York City schools are opening up for in person learning this week. Indoor dining starts tomorrow, and now we're learning that after hovering around 1% for weeks, the city's daily Corona virus positivity rate is up to 3.25%, and it's clustered in certain neighborhoods. Mayor de Blasio says nine ZIP codes in Brooklyn and Queens, which are home to about 7% of the city's population account. For 25% of the covert case is here to explain what this means is Gothamist senior editor Elizabeth Kim, who joins us via Skype. Lizzie, give us some context for this number. What is a positivity rate? Why is it something that officials are watching so closely? And what exactly is it measuring daily or weekly tests? How does it work? Right, So a positivity rate basically measures the share of people who are testing positive for Cove it in the city. It's often equated with an infection rate, although it's not precisely that. Because the number is based on those who are getting tested. You can't assume that everybody with the infection has been tested. But with the city having expanded testing to such a large degree, the positivity rate has become what experts feel is a pretty reliable indicator of how much covert there is in this city. So when we say the positivity rate is now 3.25% we mean that that's one day's worth of tests. That's a daily indicator. But, as you said earlier for more than two months, we've been hovering around 1% and that 1% bodice a lot of confidence in how we lived our lives and, more importantly, how the city plan to reopen. Right. So how has this city been using this number? Is the mayor planning to back away from school Re openings, for example, restaurant re openings. At the end of July, Mayor de Blasio announced that schools would not reopen if the positivity rate hit 3%. But he made it very important distinction. He said that the positivity rate must be based on a seven day rolling average, so not just one day's positivity rate. But what's been confusing for some of us is that the rate that he actually reads out during his daily press briefings is the daily positively rate. So today, he announced that going forward he's going to include that average positivity rate, which is currently around 1.4%. So we're not at that 3%. To answer your other questions. No, he's not planning to close public schools, at least not at this point. It should be noted, though, that Michael Mulgrew, the head of the teacher's union, today expressed a lot of concern about schools in those Brooklyn neighborhoods. So you might expect him and maybe some other educators to begin pushing back on a full re opening. You know, restaurants are still planning to open. They're goingto have some limited opening tomorrow. But Mayor de Blasio said that other measures were on the table, including closing private schools. Non essential businesses in those affected ZIP codes. Think about what the city did during last year's measles outbreak, and it's very similar policy. How concerned are city officials about this increase? Have they identified the source and what are they planning to do? City. Health officials have clearly been alarmed. They've been alerting the media about thie spikes since early last week, and they are sending out daily updates on the situation. Today. Mayor de Blasio said that people who refused to wear a mask when offered one were subject to finds. This was something that was previously being done on Lee on this transit system. And he also said that any private school that fails to comply with city health rules could be shut down. The city is also planning to expand testing and outreach in those nine neighborhoods and will have hundreds of people handing out masks. Many of the neighborhood's affected, particularly those in South Brooklyn have AH, very large Orthodox Jewish population. Health officials have been pretty open about how they're directing a lot of their outreach efforts within that community. But the mayor so far has declined to really point fingers you might remember. In April he was criticized after he sent a pretty stern tweet directed at the Jewish community after there was a large Orthodox funeral, that kind of got out of control in Brooklyn. We've been speaking with Gothamist Editor Liz Kim. Liz. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you, David. Some rural school district's in Oregon are starting online learning this week after it was postponed twice by the worst wildfires on record. But as Elizabeth Gabriel with member station KLCC reports, the school district's road to recovery is only just beginning. The small rural community of Blue River is one of the hardest hit by one of the biggest wildfires in Oregon this summer about 1000 people live in the town, a couple hours east of Eugene, the fast moving holiday farm fire destroyed more than 400 homes in the area. But the start of online classes mean students are finally gaining some normalcy. So good Tio Look at that Hair is the same length is money that's high school government teacher Corey Christiansen remotely welcoming her senior class. It's been a minute it has been six or seven months. So despite the last the community has been through a lot over the past few weeks, there's about 220 students in the school district, and roughly three quarters were displaced by the wildfires are livin evacuation zones. Ah, majority of the district staff members were also evacuated and about half of them lost their homes. Superintendent Lane, Tonkin says, at least for now, teachers may focus primarily on the emotional well being of their students. They're going to be showing up and supporting. For students and families. As they start working through this and that that will be their focus These next few days. Content might take a backseat for a while, and that's okay. We just need to make sure our kiddos air are doing well and we will reach out and help them as best they can. But that may be difficult for some students who have been unable to return home. McKinzie School board member Elissa Brownlee says students who have been able to return have not received mail, let alone Internet access or cellphone service due to burned or disconnected phone lines. You know, you've got people who don't have homes now and who are living in motels in 19. And getting ready to be displaced from those you know, with no place else to go, and the prospect of coming home means you know, living in a place where there is no infrastructure for communication. They're going to be ongoing road closures. So you know, I think for a lot of people school sort of the lowest priority right now, Brownlee says her house wasn't caught in the fire. But the fire means there's no Internet at her house. So even though she would rather have her daughter at home for her last year of high school that may not be possible. For now, Brownlee's daughter will spend the first week of the school year with family friends about an hour and a half away in Bend. But since it might be months before the area has Internet access, her daughter may temper rarely moved to Chicago to live with her aunt. It's heartbreaking to have to make that decision, you know, but I have to think about what's best for her. And you know, I also at the same time I feel like You know, I'm really lucky I have I have the resources to send her and pay for her to live with somebody else. I have that option, and you know, a lot of people up here. Don't in the lack of connectivity is just one of many challenges for the district if parents are unable to rebuild their homes and businesses that Kamina loss of enrollment in school funding, and if teachers and staff members are unable to find housing in the area that could make it harder for the district to retain staff. For NPR News. I'm Elizabeth Gabriel and Eugene, Oregon. Marketplace is coming up next here on W. When I see on the show this evening, many universities have a pretty big incentive to keep students on campus about 80% of their revenue.

Mayor de Blasio Elissa Brownlee Oregon Brooklyn New York City David Elizabeth Gabriel Eugene Elizabeth Kim Liz Kim senior editor Lizzie Wallace foundation GE measles NPR News Michael Mulgrew Queens
"wallace foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:38 min | 9 months ago

"wallace foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Month's controversial re election of President Alexander Lukashenko. Officials say at least 250 people have been arrested and Tropical Storm Sally is expected to make landfall as a Category two hurricane along the Louisiana coast early this week. Hurricane and Storm Watch is along with some evacuation orders have already been issued for New Orleans. I'm Janine Herbst. NPR news Support for NPR comes from rocket mortgage working to help home buyers find a home loan that fits their budget. Home buyers can adjust payments, C tax estimates and closing costs all in real time. Rocket mortgage rocket can Wallace Foundation, working to develop and share practices that could improve learning and enrichment for young people and the vitality of the arts for everyone, ideas and information at Wallace Foundation. Don or GE. And from the listeners of public radio. This is all things considered from NPR news on Michelle Martin as a 2020 presidential campaign enters in what will certainly be an intense final seven weeks. We're going to focus in this part of the program on two factors that could influence the outcome. Efforts to get people signed up to vote and efforts to persuade them not to. In a few minutes. We'll get perspective on what civil rights activists say our efforts to suppress the vote at least some people's.

NPR Wallace Foundation Janine Herbst Hurricane Alexander Lukashenko Louisiana President New Orleans Michelle Martin GE Don
"wallace foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:41 min | 11 months ago

"wallace foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Wallace foundation dot or GE. On a Tuesday. It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Ari Shapiro. President Trump signed some executive actions over the weekend, and we're going to spend this part of the program exploring how much they might do to boost the economy. In a moment, we'll hear from a top White House economist First. NPR's chief economics correspondent Scott Horsley, is here to give us an overview. Hi, Scott. Good Be with ur What's the big picture of what the U. S economy looks like right now? Five months into the pandemic. Are the economy fell into a very deep hole back in March and April, and so far we have climbed on ly part way out of it. The US lost more than 22 million payroll jobs in the early months of the pandemic. We have since regained about nine million job so Still a long way to go. And the recovery appears to have slowed or even stalled in recent weeks as the virus has picked up steam. What's more, the very aggressive government support that Congress and the administration authorized early on for the economy has largely been exhausted, and so far there's been no agreement on how to extend it. That's sort of the backdrop for the actions the president announced over the weekend, and the steps he ordered. Do provide a modest prop for the economy, but less than many forecasters say is needed. We'll stay with us because I want to bring in a voice from the White House. Joe LaVorgna is chief economist for the National Economic Council and Special assistant to President Trump. And we appreciate you joining us. Thanks for being here. Thank you. Thank you very much for having let's talk about one of the executive actions. President Trump signed deferring payroll taxes. Its benefits People who are working not the tens of millions who are out of a job. And since it is a deferral, workers or their employers will eventually have to pay those taxes at some point in your few. Why is that? What's needed right now? Look, first of all in terms of the economy slowing You have to keep in mind that the economy to this point has far out past consensus Expectations are many private forecasters, who were expecting in memory to write 20%. Course he never got there rose a lot, but it didn't write 20 and it isn't Come down and look at what the market was expecting. We? We had basically 12 million more jobs. In the last three months. What From what forecasters expect? What about the concern that this assistance is not targeted for those from the meeting place out of the way? I think, you know, I think that point is, you have to look at the context. When the market has been surprised in private forecasters have been so surprised. The economy is easy for them to say that world is gonna weekend after I think contact has to be proper and that is there's a lot more work to do. But the numbers You look much better than anybody thought terms of okay. Yeah. I mean, this is one of the few areas where Republicans and Democrats in Congress have both opposed the measure. The White House thinks it's the right step. Why Look, it's what it is. It's a broad based approach. It's not just They were attacked. It's also getting money into workers pocket through federal Unemployment benefits, which which are going to go up from where they are now, which is now zero from from where they expire. So you can't look at just one thing in isolation is a broad package that Bunch of different angles, and we believe the payroll tax will be effective and encouraging companies to re hire people back and people going to work. It's it's a tax cut, and there's a decent chance that maybe that Is ultimately forgiven, so I wouldn't want a highlight or isolate. Just one factor is well, let's talk about another island. You mentioned the federal unemployment benefit, which had been $600 a week that expired. Now through this executive action. It's $400 a week, 1/4 of which is to be paid by states. And, you know, many states have huge budget shortfalls. What do you say to governors who are telling you? They don't have the money for this? Well, according to what? The inspector General of the Treasury that there was roughly eight sorry, roughly $80 billion of remaining money so Again. This is just something I had a perfect world There will be there will be a deal. In the short term. The president is doing what he can to try to get the economy moving and the best way that we possibly can. And under this system, states are also required to set up new systems to pay out this $400 a week benefit. And, as you know, many states are struggling to process claims under their existing systems. Are you concerned? The money might not quickly get to people in need? No, because that was the argument back way back in March. Money got people so no, I don't. I don't think that's an issue. No, I think that's A bit misleading. I mean, you say the money got to people, but in many cases it did take several weeks. And the fun that the president is tapping into only has enough money to last about five weeks. And what helped by some estimates made? It depends. I mean, look, the president Not the cares act through, literally in record time. It was unanimous and money went out. I believe the first week of April. I mean, we're talking several weeks. This was that lightning. Lighting again put into contact. There was a way we move very rapidly and talk. Even at the outset about the consumer running out of money to savings rate in the second quarter was 25%. I mean, some people definitely need more work there. 60 million people who 16 million people are unemployed. That's too high. But we've made a lot of progress. We're making progress. And we need to focus on the positive and not just everything that's negative to take a step back. You've predicted a V shaped economic recovery..

president President Trump executive White House Congress Scott Horsley NPR Mary Louise Kelly US GE Ari Shapiro Wallace U. S Treasury chief economist Joe LaVorgna National Economic Council Special assistant
"wallace foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:31 min | 11 months ago

"wallace foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Arts. For everyone, ideas and information at Wallace foundation dot or GE. This is weekend edition from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Operation Warp speed is the federal government's push to get a Corona virus vaccine by January. The U. S is spending billions of dollars to try to do that. Multiple vaccines are still in the clinical trial phase. But what kind of price tags can we expect to see once there is a working vaccine? NPR's pharmaceuticals correspondent Sidney Lumpkin joins us, Sydney. Thanks so much for being with us. Sure. Hi, Scott. Why are we talking about priced already? That usually happens after we know something is going to work. We usually don't get a price on a product until after it's been approved, But the pandemic changes things. For example, drug companies are also already starting to manufacture their vaccines, even though they're still testing them to make sure they're safe and effective. So governments are already signing deals to purchase them. What kind of prices are people talking about now? So doing the math on vaccine procurement contracts in the United States? So far, we can figure out that drug makers are charging between four and $20 a dose. But the CEO of Moderna, which is one of the leading companies in the vaccine race. Said that its Corona virus vaccine was priced at between 32 $37 produced in some agreements with countries outside the U. S. But that's much higher than the prices we've seen so far, and people will likely need two doses of the vaccine for protection against the virus. Countries purchasing larger volumes. Presumably the United States would get a lower price. Still, that really ruffled some feathers among consumer advocates. At the same time. Obviously those numbers son look compared to some of the truly staggering drug prices we've seen in the last few years right, but because in the pandemic, we're spending differently on bio pharmaceutical development than we normally dio. Usually, the government will fund basic research and the drug maker will foot the big bill on late phase clinical trials and getting the drug over. The FDA is finish line now the U. S government taxpayers Our spending on a whole lot more on research, development and manufacturing and consumer advocates want to make sure the country gets a fair price considering that large upfront investment Sydney how much is the US paying Moderna for its work on the vaccine? Madonna got its first contract from the Federal Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority, or Farda, back in mid April for $483 million. Now that doesn't include a purchase for any vaccine doses. It's eight to fund our Andy and scale up manufacturing, and that amount could actually get bumped up to almost a $1,000,000,000 if the company meets all its goals under the contract. But government spending on modernise vaccine doesn't end there. Madonna has been developing its Corona virus vaccine with the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the It says it's spending an additional $410 million on the maternal studies from pre clinical work all the way to the Phase three clinical trial that started on July 27th and is expected to include 30,000 people. So all totaled. The government could wind up spending in well over a 1,000,000,000 taxpayer dollars on just this vaccine, and that doesn't include the cost of buying. That's right. What's next, then? Well, we're waiting to find out how much the US will spend on the modern a vaccine when it's ready, and we have to see which of the vaccines will pass muster with the Food and Drug Administration. NPR's pharmaceuticals correspondent Sidney Lumpkin. Thanks so much for being with us. You bet. Jarvis J. Masters, is a convicted murderer and admired practitioner and teacher Buddhism who sits on death row. David Chef has written a book. That's not just about the crime, of which Jarvis J. Masters was convicted and strong doubts raised about the case. But What amounts to the remaking of a man's soul and a forbidding place. The Buddhist on Death Row. How one man found light in the darkest place on David Sheff, the author of previous bestsellers that include Beautiful Boy joins US from Inverness, California Thanks so much for being with us again. Scott. Thank you so much for having me. And we're also connected with Jarvis J. Masters from Death Row in San Quentin. We should expect periodic automatic interruptions on the line, Mr Masters. Thank you for being with us. No problem. No problem. Well, I understand you've just been sick with Cove it right? Oh, yeah. Yeah, I've had it and it's a terrible, terrible 33 weeks for me with and yeah, I got sick, very sick, and it's just it was like in every other cell. Of David Sheff course we want to talk about your book and Mr Masters story the Buddhist on death Row. What did you see in the Jarvis J Master story? Well, I've heard about Jarvis from friends who were in the Buddhist community and the two things that I kept hearing over and over was this man who is framed shouldn't be on death row and in spite of the fact that he was there And now it's been, you know, 30 years and 22 years in solitary confinement. He was one of the most extraordinary people that they had met. His story was really about how a person changes in the remarkable transformation because he was a person who could be as bitter, angry as anybody could be. And yet he was the opposite. He was this light in the lives of many, many people. Mr Masters. We do want to talk about that spiritually journey, But I think you'll understand. We don't want to lose. Lose the fact that you are on death row whether you agree with the conviction or sentence or not, because you were convicted of assisting in the stabbing death of a prison guard named Dean Burchfield, right in 1985. Yeah, absolutely Legal. In that year, I was charged with two other guys and we stood end up standing trial in 19. I think it was 1989 91 call and your telephone number will be monitored and recorded. And we were all three convicted and I was the only one who sentenced to death and Justin, this is where I've been. How did you find Buddhism? I got in trouble. You know, I got in more trouble than I ever been in. To start off with me waiting for a death sentence. Actually, I was.

Jarvis J. Masters United States Scott Simon Food and Drug Administration NPR David Sheff Sidney Lumpkin NPR News Moderna National Institute of Allergy Jarvis J Master Sydney Madonna Wallace foundation Federal Biomedical Advanced Re Jarvis GE Mr Masters CEO David Chef
"wallace foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:17 min | 11 months ago

"wallace foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We're just finishing everything up. As we said on Friday. We have a fundamental understanding and we just want to make sure All the paperwork's ready and finish so could be introduced on Monday. Mnuchin says the president will support the plan, which is to include extra federal unemployment. Been offense. The current supplemental Ade, $600 a week is expiring. Lucien says the new assistance will not be that high but might be a SIA. 70% of workers previous pay. You're listening to NPR news. Brazil's president says he no longer has Covad 19 NPR's Phillip Reese says you're both. So Naro made the announcement on Twitter. When Bolson Otto said he'd caught the virus 2.5 weeks ago, few experts were surprised he'd repeatedly ignored social distancing rules appearing in public without a mask. Now Boston. Otto says he's tested negative without saying when that test took place, Brazil has more confirmed cases and deaths than any country except the U. S. Trustees of Vermont law School and royalty in one of your old depicting the state's role in the underground railroad removed because they say it's racially insensitive. John Kayla's reports Admiral's been on display for more than 25 years. On Friday, the school's board of trustees gave artists same curse in 90 days to remove the mural or the school will either paint over the art worker take it down. Most recent questions over the mural come in the aftermath of the George Floyd killing and protests against racism that have swept the nation sins to Vermont law. Students denounced the mural for what they say are it's over exaggerated black features, but Kirsten says his images are not racist. They're just stone in an expressionist folk art style. Person says he's not sure what he will do next. For NPR news. I'm John Kalish late Congressman John Lewis will cross. Thelma's had been Pettus Bridge for the final time this morning. His casket Will be carried across the bridge where he and other civil rights marches were beaten by police 55 years ago. His body within Lion State today at Alabama's capital trial. Snyder NPR news Support for NPR comes from the Wallace Foundation, fostering improvements.

Bolson Otto NPR president George Floyd Brazil Pettus Bridge Lucien U. S. Trustees of Vermont law John Kalish John Kayla Thelma Ade Boston Congressman John Lewis Naro Twitter Vermont Covad Mnuchin
"wallace foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:25 min | 1 year ago

"wallace foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Vitality of the arts for everyone ideas that Wallace foundation dot org and the listeners of KQED some low hanging fog and clouds this morning and will have some sunshine later on today warmer temperatures getting into the upper eighties inland this is weekend edition from NPR news on the course and of our physical threats personal attacks on social media lack of support from politicians public health officials are dealing with an onslaught of anger as they try and deal with this pandemic the United States already has a poorly funded and patchwork public health system and its officials organize the infrastructure that allows it to work now an alarming number of them are either leaving or being forced out of their jobs when the country needs them the most a review by Kaiser health news and the Associated Press found that at least twenty seven state and local health leaders have resigned retired or were fired since April across thirteen states and one of those health officials is Emily brown she was let go as the director of the Rio Grande county public health department last month we reached her in del Norte Colorado welcome to the program hi thank you so much for having me to tell me about your experience what kind of pressure did you face when this pandemic was underway I think the biggest piece was just trying to take in and understand just the onslaught of information that was constantly changing and then trying to take that information and translate it back to our community and then as there started to be restrictions put in place at the state level there was an initial reaction of a lot of support and people coming together and then as this went along and then especially as different communities and counties across the state started open back up there just was this rise of victory all throughout the community to get back to normal living and it was extremely intense and scary to navigate at some points tell me when you say scary can you give me an example it was really interesting timing that our state public health directors association and held a meeting about a week before I had gotten more personal threats and our state agency director said that about eighty percent of the directors that were on this call noted that they had received some sort of personal threat to themselves or to their property eighty percent it was a huge number and about a week later we had seen a picture of the six of our public health directors posted on a Facebook page that was about re opening businesses and there was threats around firearms and around stringing people up comments about the fact that we were women or the fact that I'm just based on what we look like we obviously weren't health experts and shouldn't be listened to but there was so much stress on our system that to be a tax that personally just added to the struggle of trying to go on with the behind the scenes pandemic response what happened during the meeting when you were told you were being let go I was asked to come into the meeting I was told things weren't working out and that I either needed to step down or that would need to be fired whenever there's a public health situation is often gets political and this pandemic response for corona virus has just been unprecedented and I could really see for myself that from very early on with my board of health what I thought were important steps to take some of those times that was either uncomfortable or not the direction that our leadership wanted to go and I'm going to say I just finally pushed too hard are you worried about what you're saying is a former public health official it's it's very scary the state of Colorado over the last several years has acknowledged how poorly funded the public health infrastructure is nationally and in Colorado and at the very start of the pandemic early March I had some optimism that this would be an opportunity for the broader public to see the value of what public health does and hopefully push for a better system that we would transform the system and at this point I worry that things will be cut it even more and there will be even less willingness to have a strong infrastructure Emily brown is the former director of the Rio Grande county public health department in rural Colorado thank you very much thank you so much tomorrow on morning edition it may not always feel like it but the threat from the corona virus is still very real as we've been hearing and as many states start to re open gyms daycare centers and summer camps coronavirus hot spots are emerging across the country Houston's emergency response leader.

Wallace foundation
"wallace foundation" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"wallace foundation" Discussed on KCRW

"I love the music I love all the personality if my pain and I'm so grateful thank you very much we appreciate you listening to a case or to be throughout all of these trying times and that we will continue to be here for you thanks so much stay with us support for NPR does come from the public welfare foundation committed to advancing a transformative approach to justice that is community led restorative and racially just learn more public welfare dot org and the Wallace foundation fostering improvements in learning and enrichment for disadvantaged children and the vitality of the arts for everyone ideas F. Wallace foundation dot org it's five forty five it's morning edition from NPR news I'm no well king and I'm Rachel Martin the second season of the Netflix animated series keep well and the age of wonder B. C. is out today on Netflix it might not seem like a great time to dip into an animated series about the last of humanity struggling to survive but in pure critic Glen Weldon says it tells a sprawling colourful imaginative tale that makes the apocalypse look sort of fun cities lie in ruin the surface of the earth is overgrown with plants end with overgrown animals mutated beasts three hundred feet tall stomp across the land hunting for prey which is to say for humans who have taken the living underground invest burrows to protect themselves sounds bleak no even depressing and I haven't even mentioned the violent gangs of mutated animals who make the earth's surface the deadly place for the few humans who still live there but keep and the age of wonder beast manages.

NPR Wallace foundation Rachel Martin Netflix B. C. Glen Weldon F. Wallace foundation
"wallace foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"wallace foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Rockaway beach New York state beaches are open but only at fifty percent capacity governor Cuomo was at Jones beach today where he said the crowds were not at capacity in the day the daily death toll in hospitalizations from the corona virus continue to fall in New York by governor Cuomo says too many people are going hungry we encourage people who want to make donations philanthropies that want to make donations to make them for the purpose of food banks Cuomo says the demand on new York's food banks has skyrocketed and Cuomo says veterinary practices can fully re opened Tuesday Dr Peter sober off of New York cat hospital in Manhattan says even the vets have been able to treat pets in urgent need of care opening up for routine visits like rabies shots is important so many of those rabies vaccines are now overdue it is very welcome news that we can and will be able to catch up and get the care patients we're supposed to be he says veterinary clinics will continue to collect animals at the door and communicate with their owners by phone or video chat sixty degrees now fifty five overnights mostly cloudy seventy one for Memorial Day support for NPR comes from the Wallace foundation fostering improvements in learning and enrichment for disadvantaged children and the vitality of the arts for everyone ideas at Wallace foundation dot org coming to you from my house in Los Angeles it's bulls eye I'm Jesse thorn well folks what you're about to hear is an interview with Tina fey Robert Carlock two of my actual comedy heroes they co created thirty rock of course a show that revolutionized TV comedy show with more great jokes per minute than basically anything that came before it show that still might be the funniest thing ever to run on TV and I show that for better or worse immortalized the phrase I want to go to there after it ended in two thousand eleven fey and Carlock followed up thirty rock with unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt you know that show right the sitcom about a woman who spent much of her childhood captive in a bunker run by a cult leader it's also hilarious and brilliant there can be some don't care I spent fifteen years in that bunker eating beans out of the Florida Marlins caps or lids Tytus there that noise the way you're looking at me like I'm a freak right up and see them all woman she made a pact at a dryer lint McPherson was bad unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt wrapped its fourth and final season early last year but it's back Tina and Robert reunited the cast for a special called Kimi verses the reverent and in it you get to decide Kimi's fate it's interactive like a choose your own adventure book but on TV should Titus her roommate taken uber or walk for example this came me wanna make out with their guy your planner wedding what kind of wedding dress will kill me where yes Sir Kimmy is getting married to a fancy prince played by Daniel Radcliffe now this is the fancy options like what Mrs peanut would get married and do you think Mr Pena is strict and this is the other option but that one's just fun like a pull flip.

New York
"wallace foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"wallace foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Improvements in learning and enrichment for disadvantaged children and the vitality of the arts for everyone ideas that Wallace foundation dot org and from the listeners of KQED FM eighty eight point five San Francisco thank you we I. FM eighty nine point three north highlands Sacramento this is the national conversation with All Things Considered I'm Michelle Martin basic medical decisions when to call an ambulance when to go to the emergency room or to urgent care or even your regular physician are all more difficult these days because of covered nineteen last night Dr Alyssa porn in a primary care physician and professor of internal medicine at the university of Washington school of medicine join us to help us answer those questions and there were a lot of them so she was nice enough to agree to come back tonight to tackle a few more Dr permit thanks so much for joining us once again I think you could clarify something it's been reported that some E. ours have seen a drop in visits related to heart attacks and strokes apparently because those patients potential patients fear at the corona virus when should people go to the emergency room or call an ambulance I'm so glad that you brought that up because a lot of death and injuries that we're seeing now are not directly from the corona virus but because people are afraid to access care so I think the same things that would bring you to an emergency room in a normal situation should prompt you to call an ambulance or talk to your primary care doctor so if you have chest pain if you're short of breath if you really feel like something is wrong you know I would get in touch with medical personnel so they can help you decide what to do next and another question that we have that we didn't get to go to lessons what about people who don't have a regular physician yeah that's a very difficult issue and you know as your listeners probably know half of the people in this country before the pandemic were uninsured or underinsured and now millions more are going to be joining those are so I think that that's a big problem for a lot of people and but you know many offices have a nursing line that you can talk to you you can always call nine one one and many departments of health also have of retired physicians and other health care personnel who are willing to take your calls well that's helpful so thanks for that so let's get to the questions from listeners Jeremy in Portland wants to know what constitutes an underlying condition first of all I'm sixty seven Geraldine in in pretty good health but I'm going to be officially diabetic now and the other thing is twenty five years ago I I spent a summer on the floor for mold and ended up with walking pneumonia and I still my lungs were like mildly damaged by that so I I just you know wonder if the combination of these things all may be at greater risk than their normal sixty seven on sometimes I have to tell you that we've been getting a lot of questions from people who are wondering like what condition should they be concerned about so what what can you tell us yeah I mean in this country the biggest rex factors for death of from corona virus our age underlying health conditions and poverty and for age really what we see as the race goes off at about the age of fifty and continues to rise I'm with every year in terms of health conditions it's really from early data and I and I want to stress that you know like a lot of things this can change but what we're seeing is that heart disease diabetes and certain types of cancer really seem to be putting people at the highest risk especially if those are not well controlled so I think if Jeremy is working with his doctor he's probably okay but for his age I would certainly recommend that he continued to social distance our next question is about what happens to the immune system when you stay home for an extended period let's listen my name is Melanie Sullivan they're staying home and sheltering in place negatively affect your overall immune health there's been some discussion that's because the new unity is based on exposure not being exposed to the outside world and all the bacteria and flora of the environment is actually negatively affecting a person's overall immune house during this crisis thank you is there any evidence that this is true you know I don't think that there is any evidence that you know being at home for a few weeks or a few months even is going to negatively impact your immune system but there are some things that well I like not exercising which you know certainly is an issue if you're not moving around as much not sleeping well and definitely an increase in alcohol consumption which are a lot of us are definitely seen so I do talk to patients about how to stay healthy when their shelter in place if you have a question for doctor was apartment you can send it to us at NPR dot org slash national conversation you can share it on social media using the hashtag NPR conversation or you can call us and leave a.

Wallace foundation
"wallace foundation" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"wallace foundation" Discussed on KCRW

"Wallace foundation dot O. R. G. it's five forty five it's morning edition from NPR news I'm no well king and I'm Steve Inskeep two defense department officials have told NPR news that the Pentagon is sending an additional fifteen hundred troops to the northern and southern borders this comes after the trump administration closed the borders with Mexico and Canada so what is life like on the southern border now NPR's John Burnett reports as I walk out on the streets of Laredo they are deserted for decades the downtown retail district has been geared to Mexican shoppers coming across the bridge from the wave on the radio but today stores like Cindy's electronics classic perfumes and casa Roble men's clothes are shuttered I wouldn't know how much I don't know what the percentage of them as is the victim of them not to be deadly minha sells empanadas turnovers and donuts at Pancho's bakery she says sales are down as much as ninety percent because all their business from across the river is dead in the long history of these twin frontier cities there's never been anything like the coronavirus border shut down never not even after nine eleven as the U. S. government closed at seventy five hundred miles of border with Mexico and Canada former border patrol chief Ron Battelle of spent thirty three years protecting the nation's borders in that time they closed individual ports of entry because the floods protests and unruly migrants and in those limited areas local community suffered but nothing on the scale of what we're seeing now in my experience when the borders close it is going to be difficult for the region the communities out along the border are interdependent as it relates to culture trade and just how business is conducted this week Mexican protesters in Nogales blocked the border crossing with Arizona and held up signs reading stay at home they demanded their government screen all.

Pentagon Mexico Canada John Burnett Laredo Cindy Pancho Ron Battelle Nogales Arizona Wallace foundation NPR Steve Inskeep casa Roble border patrol
"wallace foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"wallace foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Forward to infer that story on ninety three point nine FM am eight twenty or ask your smart speaker to play W. NYC tonight will be mostly cloudy will have a low around thirty five degrees it will be windy to ask us between twenty five thirty miles per hour tomorrow Wednesday mostly sunny highs in the mid forties currently at forty seven degrees but it's overcast in Central Park at six twenty support for NPR comes from member stations and from pro quest whose proquest one literature is a single destination for literary research teaching and learning with a focus on diversity propuesta com slash goes slash and PR and the Wallace foundation fostering improvements in learning and enrichment for disadvantaged children and the vitality of the arts for everyone ideas that Wallace foundation dot org you're listening to W. NYC I'm Jamie Floyd a five year old recording a former New York City mayor and current presidential candidate Mike Bloomberg has resurfaced in the tape uber can be heard making why generalizations about young black and Latino men in New York City and justifying the NYPD's stop and frisk policies in the harshest terms here's one clip in which he says ninety five percent of murders and murder victims fit one quote unquote MO Hey this is great Xerox that half of all the pop they are male might already fifty one with the orchestra yeah he says you can just take the description Xerox it and pass it out to all the cops they're males they're minorities in New York and in virtually every city.

Central Park NPR Wallace foundation Jamie Floyd Mike Bloomberg New York City NYPD Xerox murder
"wallace foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"wallace foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Everyone ideas that Wallace foundation dot org it's morning edition from NPR news I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm no well king the corona virus was first directed it detected in people who had connections to a seafood market in Wuhan China it's known as a wet market is this complex of stalls where people sell live fish meat and wild animals researchers think this virus probably mutated from a strain that's common in animals and then jumped over to humans in that market and peers Jason Beaubien went to check out a wet market in Hong Kong any brought us this once you walk into one of these places it's quite obvious why the life fishing open tubs or splashing water all over the place the counter tops of the stalls are red with blood this Fisher got it in full laid right in front of the customer's eyes there live turtles for stations climb over each other and fox is melting please add to the slush on the floor so things are way tell us are from Japan a woman selling clams and abalone and scallops hypermarket only wants to give her name is Mrs Wong some people blame what markets like this one for spreading disease which she says is unfair one doesn't think she's any more likely to get sick here and some other crowded place judge in in a ton of it yet she is not really that worried because you things that much cleaner and Hong Kong market is so different I don't know what's happening in the mainland markets like this all over the world for fish poultry in other animals are slaughtered and butchered right on the premises researchers say the wet markets in mainland China however problematic for several reasons first they often have many different kinds of exotic animals the stress of captivity weakens the animal's immune systems and creates an varmint we're meeting viruses can slip from one species to another when that happens a new strain of the virus can occasionally get a foothold in humans as happened with sars in two thousand two and this current outbreak the variety of animals for sale the typo market in Hong Kong is relatively slim compared to the assortment of snakes animals and birds on offer in some markets in mainland China the only live poultry here are chickens water kept behind the butchered pork section of the market value hold a gold chain to John has been selling tickets here for more than ten years customers select a live bird John puts a plastic tag with the number on the chicken's foot gives the customer matching tag sort of like a coat check fifteen minutes later the shoppers can come back and pick up their chicken meat well yeah choices they do their best to keep the area clean they wash down the stalls regularly and disinfect them to stop germs from spreading he's one of the few people in the market who was not wearing a facemask almost everyone in Hong Kong now wears face masks in public since the corona virus outbreak started John just got back from China where he says people are terrified of the corona virus but not him all you've done almost on a local he says he always gets his annual vaccines any strong so he believes he's protected against this new disease there is no vaccine however available yet for this new illness John adds confidently these even I mean to sars for which there is also no commercial vaccine but he does keep his chicken stalls incredibly clean which public health officials say is an important step in stopping the spread of diseases so.

Steve Inskeep Wallace foundation NPR
"wallace foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"wallace foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Wallace foundation dot org, and by the listeners of. Okay key. We the time is now eight forty six it's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Steve Inskeep. And I'm Rachel Martin NATO is throwing a birthday party for itself in Washington DC. And there's one person on the guest list who is capable of putting a damper on celebrations. President Trump has had a fraught relationship with NATO from the beginning today. Trump will meet with NATO secretary general Jens Stoltenberg the question is whether or not the president decides to bring up his frequent complaints about the alliance. There are many countries to take advantage of us. Very seriously both at NATO in on trade, and we're paying for almost the entire cost of data were very very substantial portion far greater than what we want to protect them. But they got to pay their bills NPR White House reporter Asia Roscoe is with us this morning high show good morning. So what are they gonna talk about Trump and Stoltenberg? I mean, it's I can't imagine that the president's not going to bring up these these grievances. Well, clearly as you just heard one of President Trump's favorite subjects is the idea that allies need to carry their own weight financially. And when it comes to NATO that means paying two percent of GDP on defense spending that supposed to happen by twenty twenty four. The White House is saying that at this meeting with the secretary general the president wants to highlight what they view as a success. And that's that more members of NATO are increasing their defense. Budgets, right. We should point out though, this isn't exclusive to the Trump administration. I remember being at NATO headquarters in hearing Bob gates, then secretary of defense for President Obama issuing the same warning to NATO countries. It's just that this time, it's the principle. It's President Trump who's making this demand that that is the big difference here in other administrations it was not the president. And it was not so blunt as you here with President Trump, and you do have the they are actually spending more. But the problem is the vast. Majority of members still have not met that two percent goal in some are not on track. To even meet that target by twenty twenty four in Germany, for example, who has kind of been on President Trump's bad side said that it would try to meet a target of one point five percent by twenty twenty four which is below two percent, obviously. But last month there were reports of falling tax revenue accompanied by projections that they wouldn't even meet that goal. So that's not something that Trump is going to be happy about and he's made a habit of calling out Germany, the US ambassador to NATO Kay Bailey. Hutchinson told reporters yesterday that she talked with German Chancellor Angela Merkel A N was assured that they will meet at least the one point five percent target. The other issue is that it's not just the money, right? That President Trump has a beef about he has called into question NATO's, very existence. Yes. He was saying before when he was running for president. He said that NATO was obsolete in basically, they were focused on the Cold War. They needed to be focused more on you know, other threats terrorism m that they were kind of antiquated. But now as president he's kind of changed his tune he says, thanks to him. They're no longer obsolete and publicly he said that the US is one hundred percent behind NATO. The problem is because he's focused on this kind of transaction type of relationship is rub some allies the wrong way. And so you've had some tensions.

President Trump Rachel Martin NATO president NATO President Obama NPR Jens Stoltenberg Steve Inskeep White House Wallace Kay Bailey Germany Washington DC twenty twenty US secretary Bob gates Chancellor Angela Merkel
"wallace foundation" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"wallace foundation" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Government must remove muster move clearly once and for all the prospect of the catastrophe of a no jail breaks all the chaos that would come as a result of that may has until Monday to come. Up with the new Brexit plan. Frank Langfitt, NPR news, London. The White House is condemning a bombing attack in Syria today that killed four Americans in northern Syria the attack, which the Islamic state is claiming responsibility for comes just weeks. After President Trump said the group had been defeated their US recently began the process of pulling all American troops out of the region. Democratic Senator Chris Coon says the latest tragic attack shows ISIS still has reach in Syria. This is a reminder that the fight against ISIS is not over. Isis remains a lethal deadly terrorist force MS state affiliated site says the blast was the work of a suicide bomber speaking in annual policy meeting today. Vice president Pence did not mention the bombing though. In a statement. He said as we begin to bring our troops home. We will never allow the remnants of ISIS to reestablish their evil and murderous counterfeit. Senate Democrats today grilled President Trump's pick to head the Environmental Protection Agency saying he's not doing enough to address climate change. Andrew wheelers. The acting EPA chief and NPR's. Jennifer ludden reports he's likely to be confirmed. Andrew Wheeler touted EPA's efforts to clean up Superfund sites. And other moves to address water and air pollution is that he's proud that. Under President Trump. The agency has finalized thirty three major rollbacks Obama era rules. The Trump administration is proving that burdensome federal regulations are not necessary to drive environmental progress. But Democrats, including Senator Sheldon Whitehouse complained that some proposed rollbacks will increase climate warming carbon emissions in the case of coal plants by tens of millions of tons every single year. Still even his critics praised Wheeler's professionalism saying he's an improvement over his scandal-plagued predecessor, Scott Pruitt. Jennifer ludden NPR news, Washington better than expected financial results from Goldman Sachs helped send shares of the nation's fifth-biggest Bank up nearly ten percent at one point today. Stocks also closed higher the Dow gained one hundred and forty-one points. The NASDAQ was up ten points today. You're listening. To NPR. It may be possible to protect your brain against age related damage by just moving more, either daily, exercise or less structured activities like housework. That's the finding of a study published online in the journal of the American Academy neurology. NPR's penny name and has the story. Researchers looked at activity levels in brain health among four hundred and fifty four older adults. The studies unique because all participants who were seventy or older when the study began agreed to donate their brains for research after their death this enabled scientists to examine brain tissue under the microscope. They found people who moved more either with routine, exercise or simple housework had a lower rate of cognitive decline. Most surprising. This was true. Even for people with evidence of age related brain damage on autopsy things like amyloid, plaques and tangles. Researchers say anything an older person can do increase activity may help protect their brain, Patty name and NPR news. And what is beginning to look like a massive match. Fixing scheme. French authorities say four tennis players are in custody. They're accused of helping an organized gambling syndicate fix hundreds of lower tier matches thirty say the four suspected working for an Armenian new police have dubbed, the maestro. They say the Belgian base kingpin is believed have paid more than one hundred players from at least half a dozen countries. Sources near the investigation tell the Associated Press at least one suspect has told investigators he fixed around two dozen tennis matches players around Europe are being questioned. Crude oil futures prices continue to move higher oil was up four tenths of a percent to end the session at fifty two thirty one a barrel in New York. I'm Jack Speer. NPR news in Washington. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include the Wallace foundation, fostering improvements in learning and enrichment for disadvantaged children and the vitality of the arts for everyone ideas at Wallace foundation dot org, and the listeners who support this NPR station. Good afternoon and.

NPR President Trump Andrew Wheeler Syria Environmental Protection Agenc Jennifer ludden President Washington US Isis Vice president Senator Chris Coon tennis Pence Senator Sheldon Whitehouse Frank Langfitt
Donald Trump to meet EU president Jean-Claude Juncker for White House talks as tensions rise

11572 Show

04:54 min | 3 years ago

Donald Trump to meet EU president Jean-Claude Juncker for White House talks as tensions rise

"Live from NPR news in Washington I'm Louise Schiavone the. Trump administration has released, some, of. The documents from an FBI request for permission to survey of former Trump campaign aide. NPR's Windsor Johnston, reports the agency had suspected quarter page of collaborating and conspiring with Russia the FBI had requested. Pages surveillance as part of this. Special counsels Russia investigation speaking on CNN. Page said he was never an agent of a foreign power and the documents overstate his ties to Russia I might have. Participated in a few meetings that a lot of people including people from the Obama. Administration we're sitting in Geneva Peres, etc but I've, never, been, anywhere near what's being, described here in a series of tweets President Trump said the documents are proof that. The FBI was bias against him during the two thousand sixteen campaign Pain but offered no evidence to support his assertion Windsor Johnston NPR. News Washington one idea that emerged from the Helsinki summit last week was that the US and Russia might. Work together to help, Syrian, refugees. Return to their war-torn country but the head of US central command general Joseph hotel. Told ABC news, that he's not convinced that US worship cooperation should expand beyond the car coordination over Syrian airspace We should. Be doing anything more with Russia right now I have not asked for that I don't think that we ought to be Militarily with them right now Beyond what we are currently we're currently doing votes l. told ABC news and the Wall Street Journal that Russia's support of the Syrian. Regime gives him significant pause the president of the European Union commissioned is due at, the White House this week even as German industry groups warned, the Trump administration, against Moore tariffs as me Nicholson has more detail Kemp chair of Germany's largest industry association warned that the United States will end up harming itself with tariffs on. European cars and car parts he added that the German auto industry alone employs more than one hundred eighteen thousand people in the US and that sixty percent of cars produced. Or exported Germany's economy minister. Peter is Maya said Sunday he hopes the solution can be found because trade between Europe and the United States makes up a. Third of, all plausible trade he said while tariffs on aluminium and still, had a volume of Justice six billion euros annually Car tariffs would. Amount to ten times that. Figure for NPR news I'm SMU Nicholson in Berlin Chinese president Xi Jinping has arrived in Rwanda the second stop in his tour. Of Africa, he is the first Chinese president to visit the East African, country this is NPR An Afghan. Interior ministry spokesman says that fourteen people including both civilians and military. Forces have been killed in, the suicide attack air Kabul's airport shortly after. The country's controversial I vice president landed on. His return from abroad fifty other people were wounded the Islamic state. Group claimed responsibility Sweden continues to battle dozens of wildfires as a massive heat wave. And historic, drought grips northern Europe Teri Schultz, has details firefighters from around Europe worked overnight to try to get some eighty four spires under control. In Sweden which is experiencing record drought they've managed to cut the number of blazes roughly in, half, the director of Sweden's civil contingencies agency says while there has been some progress there's no reason to be. Too optimistic unusually hot, temperatures are due to rise even higher this. Week Sweden's mobilized its armed forces against the blazes and asked its European Union partners for backup France Germany Italy and Lithuania have sent. Water bombing aircraft Denmark and Poland have dispatched firefighters in vehicles with other countries on standby in case the situation continues. To worsen for NPR news, I'm Teri Schultz in Brussels tonight Branson Missouri around. Two. Hundred people attended a. Community memorial service for the seventeen People killed when a duck boat sank in a Missouri lake during a sudden storm Thursday At Williams chapel at college of the Ozarks the. Joplin globe reports a church, bell chimed seventeen times today to honor each. Of the victims I'm Louise Schiavone, NPR news Washington support for NPR comes from NPR stations other contributors include the Wallace foundation fostering improvements in learning and enrichment for, disadvantaged children and the vitality of the arts for everyone ideas at Wallace foundation dot ORG and.

NPR Donald Trump Russia FBI United States Windsor Johnston President Trump Washington Louise Schiavone Sweden Europe European Union Smu Nicholson Abc News Germany Xi Jinping Vice President Barack Obama Teri Schultz
Woman takes in father, newborn stranded by Frontier Airlines

01:02 min | 3 years ago

Woman takes in father, newborn stranded by Frontier Airlines

"Schools open unquote he says all deer valley schools will be closed indefinitely until they can be sure that seventy five percent will return to work governor doug ducey has promised a twenty percent raise for teachers by twenty twenty but critics question if there's money in the budget to do it for npr news i'm bridget dowd in phoenix a woman believed to be the world's oldest person has died japan's kyodo news agency says nabi taiji ma died at a hospital in southern japan at the age of one hundred seventeen she's thought to be the last known person born in the nineteenth century asian markets are trading in mixed territory this hour the nikkei in japan down about a quarter of a percent the asia dow up a fraction i'm janine herbst npr news in washington support for npr comes from npr stations other contributors include the wallace foundation fostering improvements and learning and enrichment for disadvantaged children and the vitality of the arts for everyone ideas at wallace foundation dot org and the.

Doug Ducey Bridget Dowd Japan Nikkei NPR Wallace Foundation Deer Valley Phoenix Janine Herbst Washington Seventy Five Percent Twenty Percent
Fox's Ingraham to take week off as advertisers flee amid controversy

All Things Considered

00:56 sec | 3 years ago

Fox's Ingraham to take week off as advertisers flee amid controversy

"Vitality of the arts for everyone ideas that wallace foundation dot org it's all things considered from npr news i'm ari shapiro nelson chang the cable television host laura ingram has had a bad forty eight hours it began when the fox news personality called out david hogg a survivor of the parkland shooting on twitter for quote whining about being rejected from four colleges ingram was widely criticized for the tweet but the object of criticism david hogg responded differently he tweeted to ingram asking her to name her biggest advertisers numerous twitter followers obliged and in the ensuing hours at least eight of those advertisers have pulled their sponsorship from her program the ingram angle to talk more about what that means for ingram and fox joined by npr media correspondent david folkenflik hey david hale's so cute just briefly walk us through some of the advertisers who pulled their sponsorship as of now.

Laura Ingram David Hogg Twitter FOX NPR Ari Shapiro Nelson Chang Npr Media David Folkenflik David Hale Forty Eight Hours
Crowds clash with riot police in Barcelona as ex-Catalan leader Carles Puigdemont detained in Germany

On The Media

02:47 min | 3 years ago

Crowds clash with riot police in Barcelona as ex-Catalan leader Carles Puigdemont detained in Germany

"Catalan capital barcelona has been filled with protests this weekend break out in barcelona between protesters and police after spain's supreme court ruled that twenty five catalan separatists would be put on trial for rebellion and for disobeying the state they helped organize referendum last year and then declared independence a move spain considered illegal many have been behind bars since then now they're separatist leader carlos pooch demont has been detained as well in germany he's been in exile in neighboring belgium and spain had issued a new european arrest warrant it's up to germany now to extradite him pooch mont faces thirty years in prison if convicted in spain for npr news i'm laren fryer in madrid and from washington you're listening to npr news this is wnyc i'm shumita basu in new york tens of thousands of people thronged midtown manhattan yesterday to protest gun violence as part of the global march for our lives movement one of those joining in was palam resident mary lou montalto her fourteen year old granddaughter genome on tall tow was killed in last month's mass shooting at marjory stoneman douglas high school in parkland florida today to celebrate her life and because i know that being the caring loving person that she was she would want everyone to put down their guns she said the days message was a simple one vote to make our school safer yesterday's events also included a rally and a voter registration drive poor new jersey immigrants facing deportation could get access to legal aid under a two point one million dollar cash infusion in democratic governor phil murphy's proposed budget progressive groups and advocates for legal aid have applauded the proposal while some republicans question it's affordability if it is approved new jersey could join other democrat lead states like new york and california that are providing legal help to poor immigrants new york last year announced a public private partnership aimed at helping imigrants california pledged thirty million dollars mostly in legal help for young immigrants there's a chance we'll see snow showers as the day get started that'll turn into a chance of rain this afternoon highs near forty three degrees tonight lows around thirty two it's forty degrees out right now at ten six support for npr comes from the wallace foundation fostering improvements in learning and enrichment for disadvantaged children and the vitality of the arts for everyone ideas at wallace foundation dot org.

New York Marjory Stoneman Douglas High Palam Madrid Germany Wallace Foundation NPR California Barcelona Phil Murphy Florida Mary Lou Manhattan Shumita Basu Washington Belgium Spain Thirty Million Dollars Forty Three Degrees