38 Burst results for "Wales"

Fresh update on "wales" discussed on Prime Minister's Questions

Prime Minister's Questions

00:49 min | 14 hrs ago

Fresh update on "wales" discussed on Prime Minister's Questions

"What might be the reason Yes, we think about that a lot, And clearly there are things that we do is we get along to keep learning from what's going on in regular contact with many international partners, Chris, which is set for it's very difficult to know exactly where we stand. At the moment. It's clear that the outcome is not being good in the UK we could be absolutely clear about that. Sir Patrick Balance England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland all entered locked down together in March. There was much talk of our four nations approach, but with different parties in charge of the lock down rules in the four different nations, the UK began to look like a federal state. Some of the issues were familiar. Wherever you live in Scotland, more people died from the virus and care homes than in hospitals. Mistakes were made at the start, and they have led to the excess. Deaths We see today, Westminster in light of the tragedy in cutting stone and others. Do you agree that when it comes to testing and care homes, that by any standards, this is a failure. A new and I don't. I mean, I'm not even speaking his first minister here, I'm speaking as a human being. I deeply regret every single day from this virus, and I think all of us in that position, but I don't know. And I said, I think the very first time Chamber and talked about what we were dealing with. I said that mistakes would be meat. I said I would meet misleads the government would make mistakes. We're dealing with an unprecedented situation. And I am sure that is the case. That is no Idea. That's probably why I never goes right now what I do in question myself. I don't agonize over the decisions were taken to make sure that we're learning as we go and we're getting these decisions is possible. And I suspect everybody hope everybody in a leadership position at the world over right now is going through that same processes on Nikola Sturgeon turned that questioning approach to her counterpart in Downing Street. And when so much is at stake as it is right now, we can't allow ourselves to be dragged along in the week off another governments to be quite frank about it shambolic decisionmaking process as the pressure grew to lift the lock down in Northern Ireland, the Democratic Unionist first minister on the Shin Fein, deputy First minister gave a red joint statement that storm as of today, we remained subject to restrictions, which no one wants to last a day longer than is absolutely necessary. These air measures we would not contemplate in normal times. We know that they're having a significant effect on people's ability to live their lives the way they we want. We're appealing to the public to place to be patient. We understand that you want your family to visit and socialize with your friends on your families to give your grandchildren The differences between the four countries were most apparent is the lock down was lifted with Scotland and Wales more cautious than the UK government in England. Careful approach in terms of the easing of restrictions has served well in many ways, But, you know, I think risk treading the line between being too cautious on being too slow on this issue. Why is will's lagging behind consume? Many other countries have acted so decisive? This is the BBC's review of the British parliaments. Recent session just reject the language of lagging behind. We are doing the things that are right for ways that does not mean following anybody else just because they have done something that we have decided not to do. Mark Drakeford, Westminster on the U. K's other parliament's continue to adjust to the new normal Select committees carried on largely virtually with some Unusual cameos on the BBC are also now racing this Why are you doing this? The hybrid Parliament still allowed MPs and here's to contribute from their home that office or wherever they happen to be. I wonder if I might ask my noble friend what engagement she has had with the devolved administrations regarding any participation and any future skim. I'm.

Scotland UK Westminster Northern Ireland Wales BBC Sir Patrick Balance England Parliament Mark Drakeford Chris Democratic Unionist Nikola Sturgeon Chamber Shin Fein U. K England
Elaine Pearson on free speech at UNSW

Between The Lines

08:26 min | 4 d ago

Elaine Pearson on free speech at UNSW

"Battle of free speech on Australian University campuses. Allying piece was interviewed by the Media Department at the University of new. South. Wales about the human rights implications of Hong. Kong's new national security role as. Director at Human Rights Watch and an adjunct law lecturer at the university. She expressed concern about the laws and called on the United Nations Secretary General to appoint a special envoy in Hong Kong. Well, it's hardly a very controversial stuff in democracy lock Australia Russia. Will sell you think. We'll after the article, win online the pro. Chinese Communist Party students at the university they demanded the article be removed. You see caused a fence it was hurtful to the communist government in China. The university caved in and pulled the article. Only. After an outcry in the press was the article riposted. So. How did we get to the point when one of Australia's leading universities agrees to political censorship in favor of another nation state? Elaine. Joins me now aligned welcome to between the lines. Great to have you on the program. Thanks Tom. Now, the article is back on the University of New South Wales website but with caveats that the views expressed do not represent the views of the university you happy with this outcome. Well I'm glad that they put it back up. But I am pretty disappointed at the university's response I mean I think you know the views expressed in that article of us about the human rights situation in Hong Kong and I think that shouldn't be something that should be controversial and I was a bit surprised actually that the university was so quick to distance themselves from those views and I think you know I presumed that the ferocity of the campaign by the Pro Chinese Communist Party. Students really took them by surprise. But I think now the question really is how is Going to respond to this and I, think the students you know really are looking to see what is going to be the public response and what next is the university going to do to address these shoes mind you. This is not the only incident of academic freedom being compromised. Can you tell us about some of the other cases? Yeah, Human Rights Watch has actually been documenting Chinese document lit threats to academic freedom since two thousand fifteen not just in Australia about universities all around the world we've looked cases in the US the UK Canada France and right here, and what we've seen is that there is A universities are in a tight bind because the become quite dependent on foreign students. Many of those students coming from China those students have a very different world view, many of them and when they come here. Obviously you know coming here should come with a guarantee of academic freedom and what these should be quite basic things for an Australian university education. But in reality if those students try and for instance, join protests on campus about Hong Kong or Fin Jiang they are often then reported to the Chinese consulates So they are very afraid of doing anything like that they just. Try and keep the hits down and you know you only have to look at the controversy that's happened on Q. Withdrew Pavlou and how he has been treated to see that you know we you know it's not a very impressive response from the universities to to say, Scott Free speech and academic freedom only sorts of sensitive topics like shin-jang like Hong Kong, and like human rights in China. Now you mentioned drew heavily, he was expelled from the University of Queensland in part. For, organizing, what was it very noisy pro Hong Kong protests is that right? Well, he's been suspended. So I, think you know the industry who six months suspension six month suspension so He has been you know he's had been a pretty provocative campaigner. Some of these methods may have been a bit unorthodox, but at the end of the day, look at what happened to him on on that campus I. Mean there were fistfights erupting you cue between the different student groups you had in our pro CCP's students you know supporting the Communist Party trying to tear down. The messages from? Hong, Kong democracy supporters and the only person who's actually suffered any retaliation or reprisals is is drew himself, and so we wanna see universities really safeguard academic freedom and free speech and I think that means also acting against those who are intimidating or harassing all those on campus and making the campus a safe space to express all sorts of different views. Now in your case, a lot of the outrage amongst the Chinese students was expressed and organized I understand on Chinese soil media platforms way chat. which are now apparently watched by Beijing and to what extent you concerned about those platforms like we had and I think the other one is is a waiver we Yes that's right. Yeah I mean. These were the platforms where they organize. Look if students want to express different view an opposing you that's fine I think. I'm concerned is the extent to which this campaign became one of intimidating and harassing other students who expressed different views and as I understand it were threats made that they would report people to the Chinese consulate. For expressing excuse so I think the universities actually really need to monitor. Their social media channels and not just use them as a means of advertising for you know potential new students come to the university but also make sure that those channels are being you know being up being watched not to to censor free speech. But as I said, you know where that free speech is crossing the line. I also think they just need to be clear to the students. You know what what that means that it means. Going to a means being exposed to two different views and a free to discuss and debate those issues, but you're not free to shut down. The views of others. Of course, a line universities in Australia and this is cried sacred I've become increasingly dependent on. Overseas students for their budgets. Some have more diversified student bodies but others locked. University of new, South, Wales away opposite talking about University of New South Wales because of your special case this week they heavily concentrated on the Chinese market now since covert. US W has been one of the hardest hit by travel restrictions at recently made nearly I think five hundred staff redundant. Do you think this budget anxiety affected their handling of the issue align peace and? Yes I've been I think this reliance on the revenue from foreign students is something that you know all universities are facing now and so it it is putting them in a difficult position but I think that's why actually universities need to have a unified front. I think they really need to look at their existing. Codes of conduct they don't actually deal with these issues of foreign students might come from very different oil you, and so you know what I've suggested to you, and it's still view and to many other universities in Australia is to adopt a twelve point code of conduct specifically on these issues and they need to be alive to these issues. They need to incorporate it more into the orientation when you foreign students coming to campus so that they really understand what academic freedom means with our and they need to sort of monitor and. Safeguard, for you know acts of intimidation or harassment because I'm not so worried about myself but I'm more worried about other students on campus who will see how the situation has developed and then they might be too scared to speak out on. Hong Kong will fit in the classroom or other academics who might think twice about taking a meteorological on Hong Kong because they'll be worried about the potential backlash. So you know I think universities really need to take a stand on this and you know it needs to be done. You know jointly. By by all USTRALIAN universities.

Hong Kong Australia University Of New South Wales Human Rights Watch University Of New Chinese Communist Party Australian University Chinese Consulate China Hong Pro Chinese Communist Party University Of Queensland Wales United Nations Communist Government Media Department Director
Fresh update on "wales" discussed on Prime Minister's Questions

Prime Minister's Questions

01:19 min | 15 hrs ago

Fresh update on "wales" discussed on Prime Minister's Questions

"In Bristol. A statue of Edward Colston, a prominent 17th century slave trader was ripped down and thrown into the attacks on police were strongly condemned by the home secretary. There is no excuse for pulsing players of brave officers throwing bites at police forces. Attempted to disrespect the senator or vandalizing statue of Winston Churchill behind secretary recognized that there structural inequality, discrimination and racism in our country. This behind. Secretary recognized that people want to see action from this government. My son turned three yesterday. I do not want to have to wait until he's a teenager. Before we see changes in this country. The home secretary used graphic language to recall racism sheet faced. I'm really saddened that the lady has effectively said that this government doesn't understand racial inequality. On that basis, Madam, do you speak? It must be in a very different time Secretary who was the child was frequently called a pocket in the playground. Different time secretary was racially abused industries even advice to drop down and use our husbands in order to advance her career. So when it comes to racism, sexism, tolerance for social justice. I will not take lectures in the other side of the house. Now, let's take a quick look at some of the bills that got through Parliament this year. Legislation to reduce mud slinging between divorcing couples in England and Wales became the divorce, dissolution and separation bill was the biggest shakeup in 50 years. Previously one spouse had to allege adultery, unreasonable behaviour or separation. Now they only have to state that the marriage or civil partnership has broken down. Irretrievably emergency legislation was passed to end the release of convicted terrorists halfway through their sentence. The measures were drawn up after attacks, including one at fishmongers hold on London Bridge in.

Secretary Edward Colston Bristol Winston Churchill Parliament London Bridge Senator Wales England
Coronavirus: Queensland to close border to New South Wales

BTV Simulcast

00:25 sec | 5 d ago

Coronavirus: Queensland to close border to New South Wales

"Of Victoria has reported a record 725 new cases of the coronavirus on 15 deaths. Most of those when Melvin, which is in love down and most of the victims. We're at age K h care homes. Rising concern about the disease, is prompting Queensland to close his borders with New South Wales on the Capitol territory from early Saturday morning. It's already closed to Victorians. A

Melvin South Wales Victoria Queensland
Fresh update on "wales" discussed on Conversations

Conversations

02:26 min | 15 hrs ago

Fresh update on "wales" discussed on Conversations

"This is an ABC podcast. In the year nineteen sixty. Peter. O'Brien was billy out of teachers college when he was posted to a tiny one teacher school. In! Country New South Wales The town of we go wasn't even a town. It was too small even to be called the village. The countryside was incredibly beautiful but we know Bunga. Was Threadbare. And Hod scrabble. The Post economic boom had pasta by. People were still living as they had in the Great Depression. No electricity no running water. Sewerage Peter found the living hard in we along but the job the job is incredibly sweet. He was in charge of eighteen kids between the ages of five and fifteen teaching all of them in the same classroom, he encouraged the kid's creativity and to apply the lessons that he taught them to their everyday lives. But to take up this two year appointments in the country, Peter had had to leave behind the woman he wanted to marry. Betas memoir if he's two year stint in, we are called Bush school. Hello Richard this book. Is the story of Bush school but? In and around it is a love story. It's the story of how you met and fell in love with Patricia. Still your wife had it. You Make Patricia we mentioned at the Sarajevo Dan's hold on city road opposite the university it was a wonderful dance home. It had a sprung floor. It had a fifteen piece big band. And two singers or male singer and a female singer it was just a terrific place to dance and to mayt people, and that's where Amid Patricia and that she make a striking first impression on you very how so She was probably beautiful, very outgoing, very easy to talk to. The routine was that you actually main are so women for a dance woman never asked demand for it dance. So you would ask various goals for a dance and during the evening, you would make one that you very much locked and you would arrange to have the last stance. If the goal accepted the last Senate meant you would take. No just imagine none of us had vehicles not one of US had a car. We all had to go home on public transport or if we could afford it a taxi. So ago, having a young man to take home was really quash important it wasn't Joseph Romance. It was for safety apart from any fatone. So one not I had an early dance with Patricia for this is quite interesting girl Alaska for the last stance and she accepted..

Patricia Bush School Peter ABC O'brien United States South Wales Sarajevo Joseph Romance Senate Billy Richard Alaska
One of Stonehenge's most ancient secrets solved: Where the biggest stones came from

WBBM Late Morning News

00:27 sec | Last week

One of Stonehenge's most ancient secrets solved: Where the biggest stones came from

"Archaeologists believe they have discovered the source of the giant Standing stones at Stonehenge in England. Researchers say the huge objects most likely came from the West Woods that's a woodland area just 15 miles away near the town of Marlboro. The Stone Circle Monument also features smaller slabs known as blue stones, which are known to have come from the southwest of Wales. The standing stones weigh up to 30 tons and stand nearly 23 feet

Stone Circle Monument West Woods Marlboro England Wales
Archaeologists discover the likely source of Stonehenge's giant sarsen stones

WBBM Morning News

00:28 sec | Last week

Archaeologists discover the likely source of Stonehenge's giant sarsen stones

"Believe they have discovered the source of the giant Standing stones at Stonehenge in England. Researchers say the huge objects most likely came from the West Woods. A woodland area just 15 miles away near the town of Marlboro. The Stone Circle Monument also features smaller slabs known as Blue stones, which are known to have come from South West Wales. The standing Stones weigh up to 30 tons and stand nearly 23 feet tall.

Stone Circle Monument West Woods South West Wales Marlboro England
Orca who carried her dead calf for 1,000 miles is pregnant

Seattle Now

08:31 min | Last week

Orca who carried her dead calf for 1,000 miles is pregnant

"Pregnancies are good news for the southern resident killer whales and right now, it looks like there are three whales including j thirty five who could give birth. But there's a long way to go today. We're GONNA talk about the lives of these orcas and our complicated relationship with them here to do that with us is Linda makes she's the environment reporter at the Seattle Times Linda. Thanks for joining us. Thank you, Trish. So give us a quick recap on J. Thirty five for people who weren't here maybe when her calf died. So J thirty five or Takuma really is the ORCA whale who changed the conversation about this very small population of whales and very sadly trish as I talked to today that population is even smaller than it was two years ago when she gave birth to a female calf and it live for only one half hour, and then she did something that scientists know these animals do as well as other, very, highly intelligent. Socially, bonded animals they grieve and she just refused to let that baby go. Now, this calf is probably six feet. Long weighs about three hundred pounds, and for seventeen days, she just refused to let it go and she had to decide to retire. She went down for breath to pick it up once again and carry it some more, and it really did touch the hearts. People around the world and even though these southern resident orcas have been listed as dangerous since two thousand and five. Suddenly people really did understand for the first time, just how fragile they are, and the fact that these aren't just random black and white wildlife. These are families with very, very close bonds. And why do you think that we feel so attached to these orca because I grew up in the Eighties and Wales were such a big deal. You know every girl had little whale necklace and why do we feel so attached I'm gonNA, make a sound for you inherit comes. That is sound of a whale breathing. They are mammals like us, and that's sound when you hear it, it's like a sound from the beginning of the world. It's It's a magnificent presence to be with these whales and you and you understand as you observe their family bond says, you see the way they take care of one another. You know they're so superior to people they. They have brilliant diplomacy. They share space in the ocean without ever warring or committing any acts of aggression against one another. They've families together for life. It's really quite remarkable and they've been around don't forget this for six million years as a species. So these are in every way our elders and mentors for how to run a successful society and don't forget this. They were doing just fine until we showed up. How do we raise up the cause of the ORCA of the environment here without doing the thing that we tend to do a lot of as humans, which is just the help that hurts, how do we walk that line? Actually, this is easier than ever I mean, let's remember how we got to know these southern resident whales. Well, it was the capture era which by the way was not that long ago. Free, willy. Oh. Yeah. Anybody could go out and catch themselves a killer whale for an aquarium or for that matter, sell it for profit anouar in the world until as recently as are you ready Nineteen, seventy six. So wow, that's really recent. Recent and the only while who've had survived that time is still alive and she's still at the Miami Seaquarium and the fiftieth anniversary of her capture and Penn cove is on August seventh. Wow. This is recent time and ironically it was through seeing these so-called killer whales up close in captivity and realizing their incredible intelligence and they're gentle personalities that people went through a whole change in their understanding about these animals and today they're not only revered but protected and I said it's easier than ever to love these animals without loving them to death God look at what you can watch the documentary footage that's out there to enjoy these animals is so much. Better than anything that has ever been available. The amount of knowledge we have about them is superb growing by the day and you know you can watch them from shore. The idea that you need to spend the money by the way and get on a boat. Go after them. You know that's not the only way to enjoy these whales and I think that it's important to. Show some restraint and also some respect for their space. So. J thirty five is pregnant. Again, this is a good sign but two thirds of pregnancies in this population are lost. I learned this lesson with birds in my backyard last year in a nest so. This is not the time for a baby shower. We have a long way to go here. That's so well said. I would think about it. This way this time to hold space for these oils to hold them in your mind and think about what you can do to help whether it's something that might feel small but adds up such as be involved in local land use decisions in your community. That's where all this getting decided about how much of the puget sound lowlands we retain and how much we pay of over. You know these tedious things that we don't think matter like Oh, the king, county flood control district. Well, you know what they're up to. They're thinking about the future of the Green. River. which is upstream from the Duwamish, the green flows into the duwamish Seattle's only river. It's very important Salmon River for the whales and so things like paying attention to what's the local flood district doing what is going on in my local community? By Way of development? All of these things make a difference especially if all of us do. and. Read learn about these animals become informed. Educate Yourself. You know there are lots of ways to get involved and stay involved and play heart in whether. Tele. Calf actually. Does get born and does survive. To me, that's our work song as a region. May Her next calf with? So J thirty five. How will scientists track her pregnancy? Will very remotely fortunately. The scientists who do this work are John, Durbin? And Holly Fehrenbach, and they're they're a team of scientists who came up with a new method. using drones to photograph these Wales from at least one hundred, few of them and remote Louis activated. So they're far from the whales. So nowhere near them, the whales don't seem to show any notice of these drums when they're flying. And they take suspect hack your pictures, and there's something about the angle from above That's very different from a boat. You can see not only the shape of the whales. You can watch their behavior, their families. I. Make It takes your breath away and it is an entirely new view of the lives of these Wales and when it comes to keep track of j thirty five and the other pregnant whales. They're going to do is take another peek in September. DID THEY FATTEN UP? Did they pump up or are they going into winter in good shape? Are they look stressed or are they looking skinny? Most importantly with regard to her? Is She nice fat around? They'd like to see her a lot rounder in September than she is now for early in her pregnancy, these whales carry their babies, believe it or not for eighteen eighteen months Linda I read that and I thought. Oh. My Gosh Holy. Mackerel A. And actually then the real work starts because they've got to feed not only themselves, but they've got a lactate and that's a very, very high fat milk. So she's got her work cut out for her so they'll immature September and we will all cross our fingers that she's even bigger. And then you know she's either. Going to be carrying another kappa which time. I, don't know what I'll do. Or, we'll see her romping with a baby. You know We'll see what happens next I. do think that we ought to kind of hold our breath. A little bit chances are are high that things won't go well, but it doesn't mean that she couldn't surprise us and we might have some more good news. Let's remember there have been two berths to southern residents and let's remember Linda are bar for hope, is pretty low. Sleep. Vote through. Isn't it for the? Thought, I'd get a good peach these days and I'm just thrilled. Good Peach. Tomato. I'm good.

Linda Orca Wales Trish Seattle Times Takuma Puget Sound Reporter Miami Duwamish Salmon River Seattle Penn Cove Holly Fehrenbach John Louis Durbin
Mounting COVID-19 Deaths Expose Deep Crisis in Australian Aged Care Homes

Coronacast

02:56 min | Last week

Mounting COVID-19 Deaths Expose Deep Crisis in Australian Aged Care Homes

"We're seeing a lot of cases of covid nineteen linked to age facilities now, which obviously a huge worry, because H K this lady's a high to very vulnerable people in terms of infection from the virus, and often the people who work there of vulnerable in different ways perhaps have less income security than they would like. So how do we manage this problem of in aged care? Become a political issue. The is largely in private age. CARE facilities in Victoria which come under the responsibility of Komo of government, the Commonwealth Minister Senator Kobe said well, there's really not this is not a systematic problem with these centers, sending in help to boast or furloughed staff, and so on, but the fact of the matter is, you can't have sixty age care facilities with problems and not have some sort of common issue across facilities, and it's likely to be although still to be shown I mean we've got an each care. Care Role Commission going on. Australia, we've had significant problems to do with residential care and complaints by residents and their families prior to Covid nineteen, and now here we have with covid nineteen, a very large outbreak in new, south Wales, and we not have multiple outbreaks or clusters or centers of infection in Victoria sixty more than sixty. In fact, so this suggests something common to these care facilities, and we're not seeing them in public facilities to the same extent in Victoria. So what is that about? And you can only speculate, and you can speculate that they haven't invested necessarily in expertise in healthcare support registered nurses in training in having PP available, and you're hearing rumors rather van concrete information You hear that h care facilities have their covid nineteen plan, but they've not implemented. It's just a piece of paper. In case, somebody comes around and checks or the not knowing how to implement it. Must indicate just cannot be anything other than an indication that there's something seriously wrong with the way the run H care residential facilities. What is the K. differences between public and private facilities? Do we know again? It's speculation, but what you hear is that public facilities residential homes in Victoria are more likely to have on staff are available to them. Some medical and nursing expertise, particularly nursing expertise, whereas private facilities may not, and it's about costs investments. May, be a situation where you can actually blame the individual home. If you've got across sixty, it may well be that the system of funding care is is at fault and that these age care facilities just unable to ride safe environments. If you're getting in one sector and not in another, there's something going wrong and we need to find that out.

Victoria Covid Senator Kobe Role Commission Komo Australia South Wales
Stone tools suggest earlier human presence in North America

Nature Podcast

09:44 min | 2 weeks ago

Stone tools suggest earlier human presence in North America

"Coming up I, though he's been looking into some stone tools, new muddling analyses suggest humans may have lived in the Americas thousands of years earlier. The many people bolts. Now the of when humans first arrived in the Americas is a hot debate for archaeologists. Well, it's actually a long debated topic as well. This is an issue that arose in the Americas in the eighteen seventies. This is David Meltzer an archeologist who investigates when humans arrived the Americas. Of the past hundred years, or so since archaeologists have gone back and forth on when this might have happened. More recently, thanks to additional archaeological, Ngoma evidence research, his off, starting to converge, go window from when humans first stepped foot on the America's. What we have coming out of archaeology is a number of sites that are sort of in the fifteen thousand years ago range. And so that gives us a minimum age. We know the people were here by that date the ancient. Is pointing to a split. Between Northeast Asian populations and those groups that would come into the Americas happening around Oh twenty, three twenty four thousand years ago, and that kind of gives us a maximum age so somewhere between that twenty, three, twenty four and fifteen is probably the window within which we got people leaving Northeast Asia crossing the Land Bridge and coming into the Americas within this window for many archaeologists. Archaeologists is most likely. The people entered the America's around sixteen thousand years ago. This is due to the prevailing well-established archaeological evidence, which is also backed up by climatic conditions before this time between sixteen thousand and twenty thousand years ago, it would have been difficult for humans to migrate across the Land Bridge from Asia Ju to the presence of giant bowls of ice in North America. This was a time period within the last ice age known as the last glacial maximum or L. GM. If you get to Alaska during the last glacial maximum your in a cola SAC, and so you've got basically two massive ice sheets better blocking your way out, but this week in nature there are two papers that pushed the date of human arrival back thousands of years before sixteen thousand years ago. One has examined the cave deep in the desert Mexico known as cheeky to the oldest dates. We have our somewhere around thirty thousand years ago. This is sipping our delion, the lead archaeologist examining the cave. Hundred years ago would push back human arrival to well before the last glacial maximum when blocked entry into North America. There were some clues that that cave have something. In those layers belonging to the GM that seemed to suggest humans and I was very skeptical, bought Chiquita Cave. If you go deeper and deeper into excavations without stopping when you hit. The Marker. Of the fourteen thousand orbiting thousand, you may get lucky. You may get into something that's been invisible for quite a while with evidence of human during the last glacial maximum, Ciprian was encouraged to look beyond the SPIRA and dig deeper to older sediments. By taking. SCIPION found an array of unusual stone tools that he thinks made by people that inhabited the cave. flaked stone tools made a very peculiar material, which is re crystallized green limestone. So they searched for this particular kinds of stone around the cave, and they consistently picked the Greens variety and used it to to make very good. Looking artifacts that are already shaped, so it's not the typical flint or obsidian. He would find many places during the Now this isn't the first evidence suggested that humans have been in the Americas this early. That oversights weather have been claims of human occupation born twenty thousand years ago, but these are being disputed by some archaeologists. Also there are comparatively few sites of this age in the US or Canada so far. If, we seem that people initially crossed into Alaska across the lumberjack known as Berangere, and then migrated south would expect to find more traces of them. Well. That's where the second paper in nature this week comes in is offered by one of the researchers who's been investigating Cheeky Wheaty Loretta Devia so we were looking at archaeological and colonel metric, so that's essentially radiocarbon dates, luminescence dates from forty two archaeological sides from north, America and Brinda by collecting and analyzing Archaeological Evidence News Associated Dates Loretta, and her co author were able to build a model of human dispersal as populations found out from Alaska across North America. Whilst? This model doesn't find new dates for out of fax. It uses known dice to suggest when people would have I reached the different sites across North America. We were able to see that. Humans were present in North America before during and after the. Maximum, but that human expansion didn't actually occur until later during a period of abrupt sort of global warming, this only did the populations were low during the last glacial maximum, and then rapidly expanded once things go warmer is also backed up by scipion archaeological evidence from the cave in Mexico as soon as you reach the layers in the deposits of the case that day to about. Eighteen, sixteen thousand you the number forty facts just. triplicated number scipion also things this could help explain what was so little evidence of humans during before the last glacial maximum. It's almost impossible to find them I. mean you have such a huge chunk of our planet with just a few footsteps on it? That's that's how I looked like I mean you can barely coli to. populated, continent, but do these papers roll back the daytime when humans were present in the Americas. Well. It may be too early to tell for David. Meltzer you heard from earlier. It wasn't involved in this research. When it comes to the cave, he thinks of a still questions be asked about the tools that were found based on radiocarbon dates that they have I think the radiocarbon dates look awfully solid. It appears as though this technology lasted for minimally according to the dates around sixteen thousand years with a stone tool tradition bat, long lasting one would expect it to have been far more widespread in the region instead of being localized to this this one cave David. Perhaps archaeologist just haven't found stone tools like this. Unless could account for why they don't appear to be widespread. He did have questions as well regarding wind don't to change over the sixteen thousand year period. They were found. The him is quite strange. CIPRIAN however argues the. Maybe that isn't so unusual. If you look at other places in the world during the Ice Age, the stone technologies did the remain the same for many thousands of years without significant changes. So that's what happens that she reach. It behaves more like stone tool industries in the old world where they remain unchanged for thousands of years for the second. Paper David Vote, but Laurynas analysis was sound. He did have some questions regarding some the sites that were included in the analysis. In some cases, these sites themselves, the data is highly ambiguous, so you've got a well dated site, but the artifacts or the indications of a human presence may just be shattered, bone or cut mark bone, and those of us that do field work that deal with this kind of thing know that there are a lot of natural processes that can mimic human actions on bone or stone, the debate surrounding when humans first came to the Americas is far from solved this newspapers at evidence to it been many ways. They raise a lot of questions as well. Perhaps though they will inspire archaeologist to dig deeper to find the first Americans at the moment subject to change if you look at the converging genomic and archaeological evidence, it looks as though people are coming in soon after the less maximum. So Sixteen fifteen and a half thousand years ago. Could they have been there earlier? Absolutely? But if you're going to make the argument, it's going to require you know well laid out case. That was David Meltzer. From Southern Methodist University in the US you also heard from Cipriani Audet Leeann from the University of Texas in Mexico and Lorena, Sarah Devia from the University of Oxford here in the UK and the University of New South, Wales in Australia, we'll put a link to the papers. Discussed in the show notes

Americas North America David Meltzer Alaska GM David Land Bridge Mexico United States Chiquita Cave Loretta Devia Ciprian Desert Mexico Scipion Southern Methodist University University Of Oxford
London Police Urged to Apologize After Officer Knelt on Man’s Neck

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:40 sec | 3 weeks ago

London Police Urged to Apologize After Officer Knelt on Man’s Neck

"Officer is suspended another on restricted duty after a video of an arrest appeared to show on officer kneeling on a black man's neck. Footage of the rest in north London shows two officers holding down the handcuffed man At the beginning of the two minutes and 22nd clip. One of the officers appears to be applying pressure to the man's neck with his knee. The officer's hand is on the head of the man who's on the payment lying on his side. The incident was referred to the independent Office for Police conduct, which obviously is complaints involving the police forces in England and Wales. The police Department said in a statement that the two officers were responding to a report of a fight. Syria,

Officer Office For Police Conduct Police Department London Syria Wales England
Coronavirus Around The World: How Countries Are Coping With COVID-19 Surges

BTV Simulcast

03:58 min | 3 weeks ago

Coronavirus Around The World: How Countries Are Coping With COVID-19 Surges

"Back to the Corona virus as a continuous has said too grim and unwelcome records. Global cases and I above 13.5 1,000,000 got Brazil topping two million alone and India one million elsewhere in Asia, Hong Kong and Japan and likewise reporting record numbers. Let's get more as we cross over to our senior international editor, Jody Schneider. 30 in this part of the world cases continue to go up on Japan and Hong Kong. We did have a feeling that the virus has been contained, but think there's those feelings were misplaced. Tell us about what's happening. Yeah, Rich has really no good news across Asia. Now we're seeing places like Manila, which had a lock down, which he's now it may return to a lock down that they have a case of Dr Same thing in Jakarta, Indonesia. They're keeping their social difference in measures that were set to fire and she notes in Japan and Tokyo and Hong Kong places where things have seen relatively good seeing surges in cases, including ah, locally transmitted cases, But that's a welcome from there, not just from Top people travelling back travelling back indicates the Hong Kong so measures are now being re imposed in Hong Kong are coping. Everything. After six PM all restaurants and bars and finding people who don't wear facemasks on other transportation we're seeing in Australia now. You could turn their most happy with state. South Wales is going further tighten restrictions on one of the second part of the state of Victoria in the second day of fighting cases capital Melbourne onto gripped by direct the second wave of infection for the second and third way concerning the expert. And Judy. What about India, where the virus seems widespread. What's the latest there? What's the government doing? Yeah, there it has already hit officially hit. The one million market is expected very soon. And that's of course very concerning. This is a place that had a very, very strict locked out. People were famously what tongue to their villages left cities. And they were just starting to feel like they had gotten ahead of them, and now they're really does seem to be no end in sight, and it's very hard to contain that such a large country. It's a large population. How many in a very densely populated areas of India is one of the real concerns in the region. And on the possibility of a vaccine. We've got toe Britain. The U. S on Canadian government, all alleging the Russian state intelligence is hacking research centers were trying to develop a vaccine. But what do we know about this and have any of these vaccine program's been set back? Yeah, That's the real question, which is unclear whether the research facilities back were hacked into apparently had damaged war. The back programs have been set back a zoo result of the hacks. Officials are warning that the cyber attacks are ongoing, so it is a real concern and this is now the UK, US and Canadian government have all said in dramatic statement. On a particularly you came in first setback scene and therapeutic sectors. Multiple countries have been targeted by this good that it's on was certainly according to U K part of Russian State intelligence. But the real question is, did you know in fact the vaccine production or testing, which has been going forward? That's been one of the bright spots like you would think that go ahead. The question is how much of this has been affected. Senior international editor Jody Schneider in Hong Kong.

Hong Kong India Japan Jody Schneider. Asia Editor Rich Manila Brazil Australia Jakarta TOP Indonesia South Wales Judy Melbourne UK Tokyo Victoria
Are pubs petri dishes that should be shut down and avoided?

Coronacast

03:12 min | 3 weeks ago

Are pubs petri dishes that should be shut down and avoided?

"So no one. Can we talk today about pubs? Because there's a pub in Sydney that's the epicenter of the outbreak there, which is admittedly a lot smaller than what's happening in Victoria, but it's significant and there was another pop down the road from there. There that was being investigated hasn't had any confirmed cases yet. Though, but if you start thinking about hubs, you can see how they could be places where it would be easy for the virus is spread. You've got a lot of people close quarters, maybe talking loudly, maybe letting their guard down a little bit. Should we be avoiding pubs? I think. This is a question that really needs to be addressed because. Our tensely super spreading environments for exactly the reasons. You just said Teagan. When people speak aerosols, come out of your mouth in other words micro doppler. She don't have to sneeze or cough. You just go to speak an pop. You speak more loudly because you've got to be haired. The five thousand people in that various times and you are drinking. Therefore you're disinherited, and you're more likely to be laughing. Channing to you mates, etcetera, etcetera is just the environment. Where if you've got the virus, it's coming out and it's going significant distances and I think that social distancing and pops may help. It may help reducing the numbers and pops because that statistically would reduce the chances that somebody's covid nineteen, but in areas where you are seeing spread, it may be one of the first things that you shot his pubs because there's just so to control well, there's a paper that came out recently about when people speak more loudly. They more likely to spread droplets further. This was a paper in nature, and it was particularly looking at aerosol spread, which is micro droplets that you can't see. Could be seen under micro a microscope, and these are the droplets that can carry virus, and can carry them quite far away. We can also carry TB by the way hubs, the only place where people speak loudly and a close to each other, but I suppose if we're trying to look for ways to reduce the spread. That's maybe one place. We could look at the only place. We should be looking. No, you start to look at the home and how many people you can actually bring into your home. The more people you bring, the more risk you're taking. There's going to be somebody there who is carrying the COVID, nineteen virus and again even though you might keep social. Social distance in your front room. If you're there for long enough in one person has actually got covered nineteen spray high chance, though spread it to the other people in the room, just because there long enough and these aerosols spread throughout the room over time. Unless room is hyper, ventilated This is a high risk. Sir, we may be quick in reopening pubs, and should we be open to not keeping them open while I think it can be very clever. In retrospect, it is what it is, but I think that in Victoria and use is Wales. They should give serious consideration to pops closing down again. They're restricting the numbers POPs New South Wales and overstate Victoria's in lockdown. But Really it an issue in areas where it's spreading an why take that risk and Equally careful in restaurants much as we like going out with her areas where it's spreading, I think these are places where you've just got to be careful as you gotta be careful as well

Victoria Teagan Wales Sydney South Wales Channing TB
Teen surfer dies in suspected shark attack in Australia

Mo'Kelly

00:20 sec | Last month

Teen surfer dies in suspected shark attack in Australia

"A 17 year old surfer has been killed in a shark attack off the coast of Australia and your new South Wales. This is the second person to be killed by a shark of the past week, a teen was surfing at Will he be when he was mauled. The attack left him with severe bite injuries to his legs. It was held to the beat by fellow surfers where he was given medical aid and CPR, but He later died at the

South Wales CPR Australia
Australia to shut state border as Melbourne infections surge

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | Last month

Australia to shut state border as Melbourne infections surge

"Australian authorities a closing the border between the country's two largest states as Milborne records two deaths and its highest ever daily increase in infections the border between the states of New South Wales and Victoria is due to be shot late Tuesday with a senior official saying the situation well below is unprecedented with the pandemic in a new phase the overwhelming majority of new infections detected that in recent weeks come from a community transmission elsewhere in Australia the vast majority who tested positive when fifty overseas would be affected by a return to traveler the Victorian government has locked down thirty six of the most violence prone mobile in the suburbs last week into the weekend I did another full I'm Charles de Ledesma

South Wales Victoria Official Australia Victorian Government Charles De Ledesma Milborne
Australia to shut state border as Melbourne infections surge

BBC World Service

00:51 sec | Last month

Australia to shut state border as Melbourne infections surge

"And New South Wales, two of the country's most populous are shutting their joint border to contain a resurgence of Corona virus infections in Victoria. It's the first border closures since the Spanish flu pandemic a century ago. Officials in the Victorian capital Melbourne have placed nine public housing estates with 3000 residents in lock down. This man's mother is one of them. There is no consideration for a ll the people people that like our mother, who's about 75 years. Of H in a dark ation is medication. Of course on we kind of have access to her. Yes, we understand 19 but not this right. This restrictions on just look down could be better than this. British museums galleries

South Wales Melbourne Victoria
Will the Fires That Made Centralia a Ghost Town Ever Go Out?

BrainStuff

06:57 min | Last month

Will the Fires That Made Centralia a Ghost Town Ever Go Out?

"The smallest municipality in Pennsylvania is Centralia a former mining community located about two hours north west of Philadelphia. Records tell US had one thousand, four, hundred and thirty five residents in the year nineteen sixty. Today fewer than ten people still live there. The US Postal. Service revoked and trailer Zip Code in two thousand two and the local portion of state route sixty one was permanently closed off nine years before that. We can't blame. The areas decline on the usual socioeconomic suspects. Its problems run deeper literally since at least nineteen sixty to a coal seam fire has been smoldering right below the town. Yes, in. The Earth has been smoking. An ash has been raining down for over fifty years. No one knows exactly how the coal fire got started, but whatever set the thing off this long lived. Blaze isn't some kind of one off luke. Naturally occurring coal deposits are called seems in the mining industry, and wherever such veins occur whole seem fires like the one under Centralia may break out and commonly do. China's three thousand mile or five thousand kilometer coal mining belt is notorious for its seemed fires a so as a town in India where fires have claimed about forty one million tons of coal since nineteen eighteen. We spoke by email with a new TMA per cash, a geologist at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. She said the issue is more prevalent in areas. Where coal was extracted in the past with limited efforts to ensure that the whole left, the extraction was filled up. She explained that mines that don't provide structural support to keep ground from collapsing. Likewise risk seem fire outbreaks. Granted humans aren't always responsible. Though down in new, south Wales Australia, there's a famous coal seam that's been burning for six thousand years straight scientists think it was first ignited by an ancient brushfire or lightning strike. A coal doesn't need much encouragement to catch fire under the right circumstances, the material can actually light itself ablaze through spontaneous combustion. We also spoke by with research geologist Alain Coker. He explained the decomposition of Pyrite President in coal produces heat, and in some cases, the self heating can start the coal on fire. This is a problem even where coal is transported long distances and ships. By most accounts, Centralia great fire began at a dump near the local odd fellows cemetery on May, twenty seventh of nineteen, sixty two. This landfill was intentionally set ablaze was six volunteer firefighters, standing by. It was all part of a yearly cleanup effort by the local government. Controlled Burns were popular garbage disposal technique back then, but things didn't always go according to plan. Perhaps this fire ran deeper into the trash than anybody realized if so, it could have spread through the refuse and entered the nearest coal mine pit with no one being the wiser. Than again, be the town. Government had nothing to do with it. Some have argued that different garbage fire at the same site. A lit by an unidentified truck driver is what really sealed Centralia fate. Another less popular theory claims the coal seam fire started all the way back in the Great Depression and went unextinguished for decades before the nineteen sixties gave it a new lease on life. Regardless. The inferno made itself right at home, sweeping through mine tunnels and coal seams, flames descended as far as three hundred feet, ninety meters below the ground, sometimes nearing temperatures of one, thousand, three hundred fifty degrees, Fahrenheit or seven hundred thirty Celsius. According to an investigation in two thousand twelve has a tway's underlying. Some four hundred acres or sixty hectares of land, had been touched by the blaze at sometime or other. Coker said uncontrolled coalfires have all the potential environmental impacts of burning coal for power generation with none of the benefits in addition to emitting carbon dioxide, trace metals, such as mercury and harmful. Fine particles are emitted. Per, cash noted that methane and sulfur dioxide are also common and so distinctive that just talking about these fires virtually floods her with memories of the sent. To this day, smoke rises from the earth through fishers around Centralia. Meanwhile, the terrain has become perilously unstable over time. Her cash said these fires are dangerous as land can suddenly collapsed or sink as the fire just eats up the ground underneath such collapses can damaged houses roads. Train tracks etc.. That's why Pennsylvania closed off four thousand feet, or about one thousand two hundred meters of route sixty one back in nineteen, ninety-three subterranean pillars held up the pavement, were destroyed or weakened by the flames, making the roadway totally unsuitable for motorists. So Wilson Trail is fire ever burn out? Extinguishing so-far haven't paid off. Between nineteen sixty to nineteen eighty-two assorted government agencies spent seven million dollars fighting. This entrails a qualifier openings sealed trenches were dug, and the minds were stuffed with non-combustible. And crushed rocks, but nothing worked. Nearly all of Centralia former residents are long gone. Many took advantage of a forty two million dollar tax payer funded relocation initiative, which saw five hundred buildings destroyed. The final holdouts have been granted permission to spend the rest of their lives in the town as per eight thousand thirteen settlement with the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. According to the state's Department of Environmental, protection the fire might keep on raging for over a hundred years yet to come. But as bad as they can get coal seam, buyers aren't invincible. Kosh said good policies on mining safety and reclamation go a long way as preventative measure, if a fire does start taking quick action to contain it by isolating the fire, dousing the fire, cooling the area and continued monitoring to ensure that the fire does not start again are important measures. Centralia? Hellish effect made it part of the inspiration for the two thousand six horror film silent. The departure from the video game series that it was adapted from. And over the past thirty odd years town Centralia not silent hill has become an unlikely tourist destination. One former attraction was the abandoned stretch of route sixty one dubbed the graffiti highway at attracted masses of street artists who added a rainbow of cartoons and signatures to the pavement. However in two thousand twenty, the corporation that owns the undrivable road, had covered up with piles of dirt. Dissuade visitors from swinging by during the covid nineteen pandemic.

Centralia Pennsylvania United States Alain Coker Philadelphia Blaze China University Of Alaska Fairbanks Geologist South Wales Australia Research Geologist Kosh President Trump Wilson Trail India Department Of Environmental
The Latest: VP Pence calls off campaign bus tour of Florida

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | Last month

The Latest: VP Pence calls off campaign bus tour of Florida

"Vice president Mike pence's calling off a campaign bus tour to Florida as the state experiences a surgeon confirmed coronavirus cases the White House says the vice president will still travel to Florida where he'll meet with governor Ron DeSantis and his health care teams pence had been scheduled to appear in lake Wales at an event organized by the pro trump group America first policies part of what was billed as the great American comeback tour but the group says the event is being postponed out of an abundance of caution pence said Friday he plans to visit Florida Texas and Arizona this week three states were covered nineteen cases have been spiking to get a ground report Ben Thomas Washington

Vice President Mike Pence Florida White House Ron Desantis Lake Wales America Texas Ben Thomas Washington Arizona
PodLP: a new podcast app for the next billion listeners

podnews

03:04 min | Last month

PodLP: a new podcast app for the next billion listeners

"Well, it's next stop to S. an ANDROID Kawhi s is the third most popular mobile operating system in the world, aiming to help the three and a half billion people along US connected in India. Seventy million kaiwas s phones have been cells. They cost seven dollars each. Pain, is the first podcast. APP for the platform Thomas Barosso pod that Nigeria Uganda and Tanzania are among the top countries using the APP so far. Free podcast hosts sounder has launched these sounder discovery suites, which they call the first-ever Keyword based analytics tool along with audio seo and sound bite sharing all free for creators. Be, W scripts is apparently looking at setting stitcher poppies told by someone familiar with the matter that the company has been looking for buyers for some time, audio craft and Australian Broadcasting Conference has announced its first set of speakers. We linked to those today. The event normally held in Sydney in New South. Wales will be virtual this year. IHEARTMEDIA and vice news it's produce a new show called Vice News reports a weekly investigative series, covering critical new subjects from around the world at launch, next quarter Conde nast as also announced a podcast network. The Independent Filmmaker Project has extended its twenty two thousand submissions process to on July the first. They're looking for innovative audio. Audio creators in any stage of development is a link in our show notes and newsletter today. Fox is planning a podcast. Advertising Industry summitted free to virtually attend, and on June the thirtieth for one eastern time whereas I in your podcast stats, probably nowhere, I'm guessing there's good news I've vokes -application currently used an anonymous user identifier and don't have their own user agents, but they plan to implement one soon. Hariri megaphone is now hosting podcasts from noisier, a Bristol based production company. My lover that I show real narcos has topped the charts in many different countries zoom offers end to end encryption to all of its users after work by the F.. F.! Paula Rogo is to write a regular column on medium about the African podcasting scene. In focused news marketplace minutes is a new show from Westwood One and marketplace. It's a sixty seconds reports updated three times a day for smart speakers and podcast also air on commercial radio in the US from Gimblett, the latest episode of science versus has a return guests Dr Anthony. FAO CI the Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, giving an update on the spread of the pandemic in the US. Bloomberg has a new serialized podcast called foundering out. It'll bring. It's listeners inside one big story from Silicon Valley each season the first season we work and launching today all hands talks with CEO's and other sea level leaders about how being people I. Company is a strategic advantage.

United States Vice News National Institute Of Allergy Pain Bloomberg Paula Rogo Australian Broadcasting Confer Wales Conde Nast Thomas Barosso Westwood One Silicon Valley Hariri India Nigeria Bristol FOX
Why Can't We Breathe Underwater?

BrainStuff

03:17 min | Last month

Why Can't We Breathe Underwater?

"Can't we breathe underwater I haven't met everybody but everyone that I have met has not been able to breathe underwater, except for Aquaman of course, and it's a good question when you think about it. Because water is made up of hydrogen and oxygen right well, it goes in the chemicals. There's one thing we need to remember. Though about those chemicals, it's that once they react. In certain ways, they form compounds that are often nothing like their original elements think of to solo artists from different bands, and they get together, and they make an album that sounds. Sounds nothing like the original music for example. If you react carbon, hydrogen and oxygen together one way you get glucose, but if you react them together another way you get vinegar, and if you react to them yet another way you get fat, and if you react them yet, another way you get ethanol and glucose, fat, ethanol and vinegar are nothing like each other, but they're all made from the same elements in the case of hydrogen and Oxygen Gas. You react them together. One way you get liquid water and the reason we can't breathe. Liquid water is because the oxygen used to make water is bound to two hydrogen. and. We can't breathe that resulting liquid. The oxygen that fish breathe is not the oxygen that's in H.. Two O. Instead, the fish are breathing oa-to oxygen gas and nats dissolved in that water. Many different gases dissolve in liquids, and we can see an example of this all the time with carbonated beverages in knees beverages. There's so much carbon dioxide gas dissolved in the water that it rushes out in the. The form of bubbles fish breathe that dissolved oxygen out of the water, using their gills, and it turns out that extracting the oxygen. Isn't that easy? Air Has something like twenty times more oxygen in it than the same volume of water, plus let's remember that water is a lot heavier and thicker than air, so it takes a lot more work to move it around the main reason that Gilles work. Work for fish is the fact that fish are cold blooded. This reduces their oxygen demands tremendously warm, blooded animals like Wales breathe air like people do because it would be hard to extract oxygen using kills human beings can't breathe underwater because our lungs don't have enough surface area to absorb enough oxygen from water in the lining of our lungs is adapted to handle air instead of water. However, there have. have been experiments with humans breathing other liquids like fluorocarbons, fluorocarbons can dissolve enough oxygen, and our lungs can draw that oxygen out. It's just that first breath where you suck in the fluorocarbons and the enter your lungs. That is not very pleasant, but it is possible and look. Please nobody out there. Try to breathe underwater, because unless you're an extraordinary person or maybe a mutant. You're probably going to drown.

Oxygen Gas Gilles Wales
Road-tripping Post COVID-19

The World Nomads Podcast

04:56 min | Last month

Road-tripping Post COVID-19

"Hi. It's Kim and fill with you a huge thanks for joining into a spatial episode exploring road tripping, and in this episode we discuss specific routes necessarily, but rather tuning to four experts, discussing the rise of road travel as broad as open and travel restrictions begins, as it made covid nineteen, and it is worth. Noting as the US started opening up their economies covid cases began to spike again in some areas by as much as twenty five percent, according to Alfred Christina Tunnel hit of World Medicine for the Americas. Then, Spain the has to be some sort of consideration in how people do a rug trip to minimize further spread. Well, that's what's attractive about Roger Christina's places with campsites and inherits social, distancing like national and state parks will be the preferred destinations. She also says many are allowing people in only by strict daily caps and reservations in some filler, even denying entry to out of state visit you normal, isn't it? Yeah, our first chat is with Joe from harvest hosts which will explain about shortly, but we should put it out there as it pops up during this episode. Commute a huge fan of Roger. I am indeed now we converted, and they'll DVD. G Ten diesel delivery van. And sadly it was just before the pandemic, so emmy use it, but since managed one road trip is restrictions lifted here in New South Wales in Australia. We went to cattle. Farm near applies cold Mudgee, which is nine for its produce in its wine now set up. Is The lady image on the website for these episode by the way, so you can have a look, but they had social distancing rules in place, Ville especially around the drop toilets, where everything had to be wiped down after used it with sanitizer, and if you were lining up for the lose your head to maintain that one point five major distance, but as for the site itself, it's a cattle farm. It was huge. It was so big. It was easy to Cape Away from his. Anyway. That's my story. We kicked up asking Joe. It's not about me if twenty twenty is a banner year for ride travel. Yes hard stop interviews over. Rarely is their question was such an easy answer? I think it was very speculative back in March. It was a lot of up in the air like Whoa. What's going to happen? Never win. Kinda paused. We saw memberships. New memberships really dropped off a cliff. Everyone was kind of nervous about the unknown. What we're seeing now. Is that everything's exploding in the RV world, so our business is up four hundred percent, or versus this time last year we're seeing rental companies like outdoorsy and RV share also up four hundred percent. So I think people are number one. They're ready to get back to traveling and number two. Are Beings a very safe way to do it. Even amidst this Cova crisis. What is safe for them being in your own RV in a spacious area. You know without crowds, so yes, I think this is the year I think this is the year, and I hope it lasts because you and I probably agree are pretty wonderful thing to do. Schori's in fact as offset. Every month during this covered lockdown I want to avoid anything that's hectic and I want to avoid expectation so jumping in the van for me, and just disappearing somewhere is is what I'm GonNa do the racist of the and moving forward. If I can be convinced, my husband to leave, he's job. Man That's so funny. We're about the same I I'm trying to convince my wife to leave her job for the same reasons, unlike this is our opportunity, just like be nomads and and travel right so. I wish you best of luck and. Thanks for that otherwise we could meet halfway. Just travel buddies so. You. You've done it for years just for those that haven't an dabbling NATO's in this world vein. What is the attraction freedom I? Mean again like it's a one word answer, but I think it really captures it for us from my wife and I. We got into are being. Like six years ago and the concept when our heads were like well, wouldn't it be nice to a road trip? It seems so freeing and like open an exciting. When we did it, we fell in love with it. I mean it really is like true unbridled freedom. You make a decision every day about whether you want goanywhere or not, where you WanNa go do you WanNa? Go East West North South. It's great right and for people like US I love traveling, but I don't like sticking to strict plans, Riley. I feel like travels most exciting where you let it take you at once and air travel doesn't do that hotel travel doesn't do that. You have to be very structured about where you're going to be in win, and in the RV like you wake up every morning and make your destiny

JOE Roger Christina Spain United States Alfred Christina Tunnel Mudgee KIM World Medicine Cape Away Americas New South Wales Australia Cova Schori Riley Nato Twenty Twenty
"wales" Discussed on Emma

Emma

05:01 min | 2 months ago

"wales" Discussed on Emma

"And hello welcome back everybody. We have got a special international episode for you today as we have to international guests they don't just guess they are actually current students on PG secondary impeach see primary programs. He called Matt. And I'm going to ask them to introduce themselves to you one. Welcome thank you. I'm Rachel I'm on the PG see primary. Welcome Rachel Hi I'm Ben. I'm the PG secondary doing geography fantastic. Well it's really good to have you both with us today. I'm what we would like to get from you get from this interview and I'm hopefully will art listeners. Will find interesting is the journey that brought you want to train to be teachers in international context. So in your own time individually maybe together you might want to give us an insight into your kind of road to Wales Rachel. Stassen with you may be what brought you here. Why did you want train to be a teacher? He reveals sure so. I didn't always know I wanted to be teacher so I think that in terms of finding out what I really wanted to do. I try teaching. I taught in Korea for two years I did a bunch of traveling. I volunteer in Lao also teaching And then in Tanzania as well get it yeah so after those years of experience I was okay now. I'm finally ready to undertake that teacher training. I was pretty set on it and I wanted to deepen my international experience by studying abroad as well and the program here at Cardiff met offered that international experience and it was. It was nice to have that kind of condensed into one year whereas opposed to back in Canada. It would be over two years or for me. Since I have a three year bachelor's degree it would be actually three years so it's quite a. It's quite a long road teaching. If you chose training Canada I see a New York both kind of unique in unify in your journey. Because you've both had other international teaching Experience Them. What about you? Yes so I also had a bit of a similar journey to Rachel where I tried out teaching by going to Korea. I taught there for five years and I just found that as I progressed in that career and took Jobs that gave me more and more responsibility I just enjoyed it more and more and eventually I was convinced that teaching was the right path for me And then I decided to train and was not yet ready to return to Canada and settled down. You know I'm I'm still young. And Wales offers an opportunity. I'd spent a long time really far away from my family. In Korea was very difficult to skype or to visit and so I chose Wales because of the proximity to Canada..

Wales Rachel Canada Rachel I PG Korea Wales Matt Tanzania skype Cardiff New York
"wales" Discussed on Weird Wacky Wonderful Stories Podcast

Weird Wacky Wonderful Stories Podcast

11:56 min | 3 months ago

"wales" Discussed on Weird Wacky Wonderful Stories Podcast

"Expert for national and international media including the BBC He's arguably Wales's leading authority on the curious and paranormal aspects of the country's history. He's also a funny genuine and Nice bloke. Please welcome back by popular demand. Marcus I'm mark. Hello Walked the I. I'm up here via read out aloud. 'cause I've I've seen my publisher used Pittsburgh things but it sounds. It's embarrassing when you're at right back to you have to tell them that down. I'm sorry then Gracie's rubbish really say that you're just trying to butter him up for something but we don't know that something is true lies that's the best the best introduction at Arrowhead and USO. Thank you very much. So you've been busy anyway since we last spoke very very busy. Yes to book since we last spoke only one of them's hit the shelves SOFA which paranormal whales. And thanks to the whole lockdown situation. I'm I'm writing a third book as well at the moment so busy. Busy busy times while I was going to ask you both actually because some of the authors that we spoken to said so this is actually giving them the time. They need to Roy almost without distraction. Another say they just can't seem to write a word despite being locked in the house. I mean my my plan for this year after finishing the last book wants to take a break because out recently and it's weird how things happen is the. I finished the last book and Said Right. That's me done for the you and now I'm locked in the house. Nothing else to do so I'm straight back into it and it's perfect because I am I. I think if you're right you've got to be a bit an antisocial sword. Anyway sit in the House on your own all the time. So being locked in isn't isn't that bad. I mean I'm quite lucky to live in a rural part Wales. So you know it's going to walk in the forests. Come home to some right in so touch word. It's working out quite nicely for me. See I Lake Gung Ho and busy the first couple of weeks. Now I don't care. She creates lists which called honeydews. And it's basically a list of says. Honeydew this honey do that. I and so yes I've had my lists and luckily because she's lost interest in sort of all. All Things House related my list of waned as well. So I'm I'm feeling great. I'm loving life. Houses is spotless now. Then let's been cleared and you've you've done everything that needs at jewel this it's called me being lazy. There's two things I need to do the left to do is I'll get done within a day if my mind to it but I just haven't put my mind to give you a nice prom about it. The other day by painting the whole stays in London. I'll tell you what you saw the two things left and I and I said what are you going to do today and you said something and I said okay. Well I guess we. We won't do that today then or that today than in your late. Now that was that was a reverse psychology thing. You're expecting me to take that where you and say no. I'm going to anyway but I should've known because psychology is study of the mind and well thank you very much. We'll just think about mark. I think you're going to be a busy man this. I think back to work exactly. I'm going to have to get the jobs done just so that I can shut your up anyway. Let's get back onto the book. In the description of the book on Amazon It mentions Wales as being the most haunted country in the world. Is that a true statement. And if so why do you say that so it kind of is although that statement is backed to to the button on the backside a few times now and? I wish I'd left tab I wrote when I was first. Sort of pitching the book to the publish. The idea was is. It's just like a greatest hits of whales as famous supposedly haunted places. It is claimed that Welles is the most haunted place in the universe but it's not quite a straightforward as that it's based on things like Wales is supposed to have the most castles willed Europe or whatever it is and so based on that if everyone of those costs ghost in it then it would be the most haunted place in the world with those told Castles. If you can follow that kind of that kind of roots and they probably all do have some sorta aspect of it don't they. There's always a story. Oh so and so this and I went there and I tripped on the second. Step coming down and it was a ghost that did it because somewhere in its history. Something happened on that. Staircase or whatever. So Yeah I get it. Yeah that's where the Norman Lords had his head chopped off another ladies pushing me down the steps. Yes you kind of argue that whales the most. Hold your country in the world but. I'm pretty sure you used that example somebody in in in Ireland or France wherever you might be probably put a good argument as well Wales. Wales is the most of the world today in the book. There's loads of amazing stories in and you've broken the book into sections new. Yes well it starts with the appropriate. Nfl CASTLES CAUSES. A big part. Whales to be honest I could have quite easily filled. Entire Booklet Castles. But that wasn't that wasn't the brief so then another section on sort of places with historical context to Wales. I mean obviously castles restorick places like those are the connection to our our industrial heritage. This is the places that really make Wales known one on Thompson. Hotels very popular place for Ghost to go pubs and hotels. Let's make the old joke about two kinds of spirits in the pub. Every time I mentioned pubs one on the grants that are mansions and the the visit of real places. The the elite would have lived in in the past which usually national trust properties and wrapped it up with one on cultural landmarks. That's places like the theater and places we're just supposed to be haunted by opera stars and artists and then that side of things you talk about an amazing story in section about Rutland Castle. A legend based around a real data is it and it's a beautiful and yet tragic tale. That actually sort of encompasses a supernatural and paranormal. Can you tell our listeners? A little bit by story. Yeah well in the late eighteenth century when the first gothic piece of fiction was published by Horace Walpole it was published anonymously and the idea was these works of fiction because it was a work of fiction. We're sort of long lost tales that somebody had found put out into the world to sort of schedule with and in Wales. We had this book of Welsh legends. Which was published anonymously in eighteen? O Two it was written by someone called William Hill. It was probably written as a work of fiction. But as with these things you can never know pursuit in or whether it was based in reality and the story is as you mentioned tragic one. I'll also the down slightly for the sake of this podcast but the princess throng. The castle came across this very mysterious night. Use called the night of the blood red plan because he had a blood red plume in the top of his arm old black and he was described as very much like the hero in Rom Com. Or something you know you had those. GonNa Treat me is and that. Kinda thing and when she saw him it was just I. Can you know that magical? Something scary but something. What appeal in about this night but they had a feat and visit. She was singing or playing music. Whatever she was doing all the night and he was gone now she was due to be married and it was quite an important marriage because it had been arranged by the parents by the kings and this marriage would unite whales at the time. Wales was broken up by feuding warlords. Warlords feud in parts of Wales. And the idea was that by her Marianna prince that would unite to parts of Wales however she been distracted by this night with. Greenie is and just just couldn't get this man out of your head as a way to distract us up. She went hunting and who hunting and she was pretty good and she caught a deer with who I think was narrow. T- could deer but didn't kill it in the run off into the forest she gave chase on your host and by the time she found this night had fallen and she found herself lost in the forest totally alone until who should turn up surprise surprise but this night with a blood drive clue emerged from the trees saw this damsel in distress and offered to take her home so when he took it back to the castle and he met the king and the king was very very pleased that this kind gentlemen night had gone out of his way to bring his daughter back safely to him. He was invited to stay in the castle now. Obviously having the two of them together and not castle didn't do much good for helping you know. Forget about this and it was the opposite in the end he said look. I'd I'd better go because your husband vs on his way. This is quite a big word in. I can't I can't stick around a mess this up for you. He gave her a ring. This is what things do get Pasco. You gave her a ring and said look. If you ever need me you can summon me with this ring. And the idea was if she was in trouble in years to come do that. She couldn't use that waited. Minute's pretty much so he went. She called him back and he said look okay. I'm here now. We're going to have to escape. We're GONNA have to elope after runaway because there's no way they're gonNa let us be together that night under the cover of darkness. Ek sneaked out of their room and they decided to then decide. He had a cargo on the revenue by going to escape onto the was. It sneak out the guards. Run down to the corker and sailoff. Didn't take them long. Though until God's were looted they were trying to sneak off and a party of its of dogs and everything's chasing after them and they ran as quickly as they could towards the river as they got their chief felt a hand. The princess felt a hand on her back and turned around to see who had caught her. One of the chases at calder world. Give a knife to defy. Should've mentioned this earlier. Actually worked will get a knife to defend yourself with. I want you tuned without thinking. He shouted stab him and she stabbed this man with the knife killing him. She Killed The pursuer. This is much more dramatic in the real story that turns out it was a father that she just killed jumped on the car. Rental and the two of them sailed off that escaped putting tragic circumstance. Because you know she. She'd killed her father trying to escape and as she was on the Carl. Cryan obviously quite upset. But what happens with world? Just laughter didn't consoler. He was laughing. And it wasn't your normal. It was quite a demonic and turns out he then transformed into a diva who is mission. I know that this probably isn't real but he turned into this team. Yes he pretty much said that. Look this whole thing was a setup and the reason I did it is to make sure that whales fighting with itself. Wales's at war that's more people killing themselves killing each other. That's more deaths. That's all music for the data. That's exactly what he wants and with that he stuck his trident into the princess through.

Wales USO Pittsburgh publisher Marcus Roy Gracie BBC Lake Gung Ho Entire Booklet Castles Horace Walpole Amazon Rutland Castle Europe mark London Cryan Norman Lords Ireland
"wales" Discussed on Pass It On

Pass It On

05:26 min | 6 months ago

"wales" Discussed on Pass It On

"Drying hint. Screw for Five Cup Kooks into the open ends of the clued sauce hung small articles on hooks. And the speed on real for big government. Mrs G Evans One to Olive Grove. Robin Wrexham does a solid Salta. She's a tip sort of some because I was thinking. High Deep Wooden. Yeah but but but close point. How'd you knew the knew each other? Because holidays in for seven years and then June begins to an elusive but SLA hunted Yeltsin. Pant and I'm thinking of I or the Jig was up somebody. Some retailers realized that how it didn't exist Harriet didn't exist toll hasn't sheen off off into Sunday Post. He's doing elementary confirmed. Oh I've no told the women. Nazis stop it doing system effective when island in puffed sleeves on a child's dress covering dumbing mushroom with soft clean material and island over it again John Evans. One one to Alba goof. Don't know what darning mushroom as I can guess obviously going. Oh I shouldn't shape darning egg. It's a slightly smaller thumbing. Egg smallest small L. The very small jobs like gloves perhaps Dune above one-upmanship on Holly. Who suggested did you like. I mean how they had a thing going on. Did you know that. None of highest hips and fairness that get excited material. No no no true but I mean not one phone join wasn't June wasn't exactly I did. I did like Billy I one does. Chanel are really really good. One should doesn't alluded off several. Move from Wrexham I think. Wrexham become a must have become on tips because they attack they are joined by miss e Williams lethal even yet towards fifty fifty nine. But she's actually from summerhill which isn't really that close to Robin. I think is funny. How people's lives am blamed and Intrigued into other bits of the world. If you think about it you could in theory track Harry. It's life through things like that. That's when she started as a as a homeowner is a housewife. The tips might have been a basically wherever and then she finds him interest and then she will have stopped. Running hostal died. And it's GonNa Weird had these little areas of your life in in different places. I am honestly fascinated by stuff like this and looking Bach. Like my grandma's House we've discussed it and seeing them in their normal life. Nora's remember people but then functioning as people and I absolutely love this and although I don't know Har- It never will I kinda much. Will he ever healed? He is from a gun. Sunol GONDA or anything bomb. I like Hyatt Unlike Jones. Well I think they will come together. Yes with husbands and good for T- That's that's Clayton want isn't it? I just find fascinating just as a little. You'll need to know five people to know everyone in the world. Six degrees of Kevin can let till eight mind blown sesame. Am Six degrees of separation. Isn't that I'm not entirely sure thing. That doesn't actually turn to unify. Is No absolute? Don't know say five. Six seven doesn't matter you know if you think people you know my just find that mantle. I know I I make sense but I started women and also boat. No it's just boil when so much. There's no pointless in this podcast anymore. Not telling you anything. Because we're waiting on you to tell someone about your from Wales Ashley. In fact time because you've gibbered on about you women from wills highly it. Lovely honey is nice. That can the whole mission to pass on. Tips was about elevating humanizing the elevating the ordinary person into something special. Because of course the ordinary bar special and this name has echoed only a couple of generations. Dighton maybe not far but it has this recording as part of our culture and our our legacy and had it not been Sunday posting types who we might never been a chance for Harry to hover name published an unrecorded. I hope it's Cheetahs watching us from from the show some. I think it's quite Olympic to join us again. Next time we're we will have more genius or possibly madness from The Hague salts of Scotland in the nineteen fifties on far more nonsense. Jameson Scotland Today..

Robin Wrexham Mrs G Evans Harry Cheetahs Kevin Pant Salta Scotland Olive Grove e Williams Sunol GONDA hunted Yeltsin Harriet SLA Alba Chanel Billy Wales Ashley Nora Bach
"wales" Discussed on Pass It On

Pass It On

04:42 min | 6 months ago

"wales" Discussed on Pass It On

"What's knowing if you break the steam flow bondage the bleak with a piece of it he's deep and it will last as long as the boss. Oh why not just throw out on my one. Coni LOT SAYS SUMO CHIPPER. You you go lovely bunch of flows given to you by some flowers delivered last did you. Did people think it was? You know people thought who they're far from. I do like having COUPLA basically never do so ridiculous we have the money. Ideally COUPLA. There was a thing within the story. Elton John Spending. It was something. There's a million a year number of I think if you're very rich person and you WanNa find it house with flowers you Gogo. I guess slightly confused when women visit other women. Take sloths gift of something. A number of a customer to do that. I went to like if you're going to see one of your chumps. Even if me and my wife will visit somebody else in your wife I might take a white info was up so if evening but if you just going to visit them just go evening screaming and it was a building. Yeah he takes me. I'm glad I'm not young like luck of muddle. Earth Phallic combines cases as well and a member thought saw but will you remember the word Eunuch. Yes goods if I can I think he used to be a tennis Fulham. Leyton Seventieth Right Gilan another one onions peel onions and police and assault spun with just enough water to cover them. Boil for three minutes. Then strain slice and fly. I find the quickly. Become Golden Brown. Don't burn against Mrs Smith's usually stay then probably does something with the onion water. It's on our plants are something. She's our windows gazes as an air fish. It's a tub in. Has it further sip than income on a good? That's a good thing for polishing onions. Making sure you onions fly golden. But I I couldn't be bothered. No any come on guys onion rings from the Rankin of them in the you know the idea of having onions onions. The idea of free boiling on your Friday couldn't bothered Manatt. Can I also says reason here there is. I have just got the coldest drive so I'll be butterfly mind. This is not what you did you go. There is a conspiracy of silence. Arraigned caramelized onions. This time like no conspiracy oops island. So what is I so insider secret or open secret? I should say among chefs that to properly caramelized onions. It takes the strong but is I think an hour or more to probably develop thing everyone all shapes right the recipes to see you know frying for five minutes to caramelized them 'cause oversee nobody's really going to Spain our more gently starring onions on this. Yes caramelized onions. Actually takes available in all time allies on Jons. Yeah Oh Cottam is onion Chutney. Mg Delicious. Okay we're just GONNA take a quick break and turn the heating up. Thank you very much. That are those topics of conversation these pasta on books that we based podcast on you know and we sell them just go to DC Thompson shop dot Ku dot UK and checkout. Enter the Code Darning to get twenty percents off. Here's your bonus. Outbreak tip Weinstein's should Wayne get spilled on your tablecloth sprinkle at once with potard starch and leave on for two hours chick off washing cold water and the stains disappear..

Fulham DC Thompson Elton John Spending Spain Mrs Smith Leyton Jons assault Rankin Manatt Weinstein tennis Wayne
"wales" Discussed on Pass It On

Pass It On

02:23 min | 6 months ago

"wales" Discussed on Pass It On

"Foam the site. Yeah okay so what's The darning egg an egg that you would saux to have an an Against Okay. Yeah Oh coney doing stuff shock darn wouldn't have been an egg. Presumed been surrounding cam not porcelain. But yet like MC. Thank you know you can buy themselves like a hard plastic of course? The House of disppointed spoon recent my primary school the were ceramic eggs Russell. Like no fine. Decorated my skill Labor Robert eggs which caused how hilarious might have a lot of when you talk them because you can never catch the most competitive thing I've ever seen in. The sporting world was a follows dodds race adults. I think the worst people in the world are swimming pool. Dads will this new through kids around haller in off. What's your wrist or leave me. I was involved in juvenile football and follows tell the sons hopefully fruitful as an ugly experience. I have to tell you is horrible. Icing some things that set up terrible have. Let's clock on because of just notice. What the next tip is from. Mrs Smith before Laino also a little linseed oil rubbed whale into Lino gives an excellent Polish. Doesn't leave the suffer slippy. I got some in there. If you love it but I did race of you will notice from my Timbale that my I did stress. The the roped whalen. Yeah but do you have Shiny Lane? Talk Plano trying. I get yeah. I think the kitchen in the house we rent Publiz Lino. It's looks like sleet but is I think if you try linseed oil from relegation thank. You should stick to sour milk. Everybody else exactly see duo saints. Full people turn yourself milk. Obviously.

haller Publiz Lino dodds Mrs Smith whalen Plano football Laino
"wales" Discussed on Pass It On

Pass It On

05:04 min | 6 months ago

"wales" Discussed on Pass It On

"Tone wisdom shared by The Hague's face and occasional host husband of Scotland in the pages of the Sunday post in the nineteen fifties ever. We'll be today Lohan. Welcome back to another episode of passed it on podcasts. With Me Steve. And Chests Steve. Wants to talk about a women in Wales. Ooh down signed. I have the lovely Mrs Harriet Smith a fourteen John Street now. No none. Tyler should have an isis ribbon of U. A. B. O. N. NEAR WREXHAM UP. Somebody could help me with that as probably Robin you think. I'm still waiting for some sort of poitou merchandise. Says offense tune you she is Mrs Hadid Smith Footing Johnson Rayburn near Wrexham and. She is the positive on the Sunday. Post posit on tips books champion. She's the superlight contender of PASA on exactly that I do that means but probably not the she has eight tips planet and the puzzle on didn't win all of her tips. She's the she's the most prolific writer. I'm titles we all. You didn't only get tolls some. You did also get Ten showings even if you're tip was nor the start of the week so you got money for lighting in so you you have ten if it was printed. I think luckily I believe so. Yes ten chills feel what? Oh Tanta links would be an eighth of a working. Man's we'd films you buy your week shopping on that. Throw in not no not in top of week shopping. It'd be half your reach children. Yes hello the question is is. Harriet of we shall no call. Was She just a wonderful brilliant tips? Give over she only in it for the money or was she at entire a confection kick. Was you just couldn't conspiracy spit a safety using Google maps? I have gone looked whole address. And she has a very tidy little red brick house down in near Wrexham Ruben. As and I believe I want to believe that she was a festival with lots of tips and lots of she was Villes and not. Just meet up find the Sunday post because in fairness I'm being daft no reason why she wouldn't do. I don't think the problem was too few tips. Aren't we certainly not in the nineteen fifties go little bit sticky? When it came to. I can eat teeth. Which was sometime. Letham WHOAH WE'RE GONNA get through hopefully all of Harry. It's eat tips off and we're going to find out what sort of women is okay Coyne. He's anxious modern patient. Testy I think one thing I know do you. Do you write going through hearts tips and find out what sort of women. She was Blunkett's when eating blankets and bedspreads hung them with their wit distributed over two lanes. I find this prevents them stretching and of course that was from Mrs Smith Footing John Street Reba N- near Wrexham. So I mean. Do you think hanging your blankets. And bedspreads over. Two lines would help so he separated them presuming bite by some distance. I'm it'd be over the top to them so rather than being a single line with the sheet coming to end of it. Yup tramline of two lanes perhaps under a very wet the the windy stretch. It would also help them dry quicker because he's touching each other makes it more difficult for. It's drawing operator not in the best thing for her to it's not hard. I think. None of the base thing. You've they'll we'll try another one wonderful used this. Maybe maybe not safe the swings any bounce handy use a model as a miniature donning ekg when mending fingertips of gloves this. Smith's footing John. You know the rest. Yeah we have had no not one. I think so I well. It was so excited questions so so this was up insight into the glove and does.

Mrs Harriet Smith WREXHAM Robin Wrexham Ruben Coyne Lohan Mrs Smith Harriet Scotland poitou Wales writer Tyler Blunkett Harry U. A. B. O. N.
"wales" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

05:38 min | 7 months ago

"wales" Discussed on How I Built This

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from the Walton Family Foundation where opportunity takes root more information is available at Walton Family Foundation Dot. Org many of us have imaginary friends as children. But for some of US these invisible companions. Don't go away. She was real to me as my friend next to me AAC this week on hidden brain from NPR. Hey thanks so much for sticking around because it's time now for how you built that and to date. Were updating a story. We did about a year ago about a dating APP but not just any dating APP. I'm a single dad of a sweet wheaten. Terrier who loves was to play and this is a dating APP with profiles of people and their dogs very friendly and well educated never bites always wagging his tail. Let's go to the park and let's get our dogs to play so the voice you just heard is lead. The Angelo and lease story starts in two thousand sixteen when her younger sister. Casey had just gone through through a break up. She was dating a guy who tried to be a dog person for her but by the end of the relationship. He didn't want the dog in his apartment. He would put towels down on the couch. So the dog didn't touch anything and she came to me and said I wish I just knew from the start that this wasn't going to work because of my dog and so oh the sisters thought. Could there be dating APP. That might solve this problem an APP where someone like. Casey could say up front me and my dogs. We are a package deal. She has a Cavu. I mean there's truly nothing that looks more like a teddy bear than her dog and so we said you know if someone can't like this then clearly you know you you need to find someone with a at least a little bit more dog person in them so they started to kick around this idea. The realized the way people take care of their dogs folks can say a lot about their personalities. How much money do you spend on your pet sir? Other things in the house you know. How clean do you keep your house? Things like that might predict whether to dog owners are really compatible. Does your sleep in the better out of the bed. Do you let your dogs on furniture. Do you always pick up dog poop on the walk. That's a big one. That's big one and by the way if you are listening and you have a dog. Please do pick up the dog poop off the sidewalk just a favor. I'm asking anyway in July of have twenty seventeen. The sisters began developing their APP. Now Lee has a background in journalism. And Casey works in advertising design. They had never done anything like this before so i. They pulled their money together and their dad put in a little bit too and then the got into an accelerator program. They found a chief if tech officer and a team of developers to help them build the APP we actually went through four development teams. Because Leeann case you had a hard time finding just the right match it can be very scary when you have a limited amount of money to build this product and you see it either taking forever or they're not looking the way you want it to end watching your money drain at the same time. But after seven months their dating APPS was ready and they launched it on Valentine's survey. We weren't the first dating APP out there so we were able to learn from a lot of other people's mistakes there have been interesting dating apps that have tried to launch nationally. And they get a lot of attention really quickly but because you need a lot of people in one place in order for dating APP to work. They just fell apart art selene. Casey decided to get the word out city by city. Starting in New York Lee hosted events in each city. These big dog friendly parties ped- companies paid to set up booths that meant revenue and owners. Well they would come and stay and mingle and after each launch Leeann Casey. He saw a spike in new users. We knew there was nothing more valuable than getting a lot of people in the APP so our users could find more people to match with the APP his called dig and since we first ran the story. It's launched in fifteen cities and now has nearly a hundred and thirty five thousand users Leeann. Casey also also got a fifty thousand dollars start up grant from Purina to help with marketing and the even celebrated the first engagement of a couple who met on dig and yes Lee. Lee knows what some of you single people with cats are thinking. Where's my APP? Oh Yeah we get the cat question all the time you know. Surprisingly we actually get the horse question all the time. Course people definitely need to have their own conversations to but for now stieg is all about the dogs and the people who love them if you want to find out more about dig or here previous episodes head to our podcast page how I built this. NPR Dot Org. And of course if you WANNA tells host or story going to build that. NPR Dot Org and thanks so much for listening to the show this week. You can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. And while you're there please do give give us review you could also write to US IBI AT NPR DOT Org. And if you wanted a tweet it's at how I built this or at Cairo's our show is produced this week by Casey Herman Music composed by routine Bluey. Thanks also to Sequoia Carrillo Candice Limb Julia Carney Neva grant and Jeff Rodgers our intern. It's rainy Tall Guy Rise and you've been listening.

Leeann Casey Lee NPR Walton Family Foundation Dot Walton Family Foundation Casey Herman Music Sequoia Carrillo Candice Limb Cavu Angelo Cairo officer Valentine Purina stieg New York intern Julia Carney Jeff Rodgers
"wales" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

10:31 min | 7 months ago

"wales" Discussed on How I Built This

"Of this. I mean it's amazing because we compete on a day-to-day basis. Everyone use I use it. Everybody uses I use it but I remember at that time that John Siegenthaler article two thousand five. NPR We were not allowed to use wikipedia as a source and it wasn't just NPR's was was all news organizations like e we compete. It was not considered reliable source and it just shows you sort of. Yeah well I mean I think that should still be your policy Wikipedia is quite good. It is definitely not perfect and what I always say is. WIKIPEDIA is the place to go to get the questions. Not The answers is the way to get yourself oriented in context and I always say go on the talk page of any article and see what are the wikipedia and struggling with. If they're saying Gee oh you know this source says this and these sources say that and there seems to be a conflict. Hey that might be the most interesting question you can ask because let's get to the bottom of this. There's conflicting information out there. And also so you know if you want to use wikipedia as a starting point then you can always go to the footnotes in the actual source. And that's what you should do. So she meet of just cannot imagine like running this volunteer organization with hundreds of thousands. Maybe millions of people today certainly millions who were voluntarily editing editing sites and did average like get you so wound up that you just want to do it any mirror. No not really You you know the the interesting thing is I remember in the very early days I would get up at night and check the site is I was convinced that somebody who's GonNa come in and trash it overnight which never happened and then quickly actually I realized like Oh yes vandal did show up at three. Am My time last night. But guess what somebody who's a known community member was up in Australia and actually block the person and fix the problem And so you you. I began to understand like communities do inherently scale and I think that is part of what helped me not be overwhelmed by anything. So we're now in this phase in the history of the Internet people call fake news. I don't like that term obvious reasons but So much information that looks real. That's not real. This is not new. I mean this is happened throughout human history but now because there is so much information available sometimes it's difficult for people to discern what's real and what's not an I and I wonder whether one of the challenges with Wiki is reasonable people are disagreeing agreeing about basic facts. So how do you reconcile at as has wikipedia deal with that. I mean a few of the elements so one When we think about the quality of sources That's a really core thing in wikipedia and we have a lot of discussions debates and I think a fairly sophisticated approach to thinking about the quality of sources. And I agree with you. I don't like the term fake news but the original use of the term was really about clearly completely completely made up websites that look like new sites with no concern for the truth with outrageous headlines and so on and those kinds of sites have had almost zero impact wikipedia. Because while you know that might do well to share on facebook something that comes from a publication called the Denver Guardian because it looks like a new you cite and Denver. Everybody knows Denver. City in America and Guardian. Sounds like a newspaper so it seems plausible as we Gideon's would take one look at it and say I've never heard of that paper. That stuff doesn't really get into Pedia a broader problem that I am concerned about is right now the the trust in media media in the US but also around the world but in the US is really at an all time low It's a tough problem and I think it's a societal problem to say. Look we really do need quality information. Most people are very passionate about wanting to be told the truth. You know the the best way to prepare people for you're authoritarian. Rule is not to indoctrinate them into an authoritarian philosophy but to make them believe that there is no such thing as truth. And that's that's a trend that I'm not not happy. About how many times do you know how many wikipedia pages there are today in English for example There's over five million in English English last. I checked so total. Probably all languages Zebbie forty million. How close to fifty close to fifty? Do you even know how many people contribute to wikipedia around the world. It's something around seventy five thousand people every month Who Make at least five edits? It's probably three to five thousand. Is the core community of people who are making a hundred or more at its And so that's that's quite a lot of people but it's not as many people as some might think Now of course making five edits in a month. That's not a huge amount of participation. But you're pretty you know around And there'll be a lot more people who just make one at a year but in terms of the real community. It's probably that seventy five thousand Jimmy. Wet Let motivates seventy five thousand people or a few hundred thousand people to donate hundreds of hours of time every year for free to do this. Yeah I think it's two things so I you know the mission. A free encyclopedia for everyone in the world is is meaningful. I mean you could spend your hobby. Time playing grand theft auto or doing something else and the world wouldn't be any better off when you're done and if you spend spend a few hours editing wikipedia you can go to sleep and things. Yeah I it was productive. The world is a little bit better than it was and someone somewhere will benefit from that. And that's great and then also just fun people you get to meet. People are interested in things. You're interested in no matter. How obscure the ethos of the community is to say look no personal attacks? We're here to discuss the content if you go on the discussion page for a controversial topic. You're not there to debate that topic You can do that. Lots of place on the Internet. What you get it wikipedia debate about? How do we improve this article? And that's just a refreshing kind of feeling and so a lot of people really find. It suits their personality. Do you know what the revenue is like any revenue for Wikipedia from donations. Yeah a revenue new. I should know the number exactly the head but I don't But I think last year was around. Eighty five million dollars. Wow just from donations just from donations. Incredible credible primarily from small donors. That's important to understand that when the community gets together to debate something about what they WanNa have. Wikipedia say what policies should be. There's never a question of will. What will the funders thing? Yeah and over the years. We've really tried to run the organization in a very financially conservative way. Every year we try to build a reserves a lot of our donors one of the things that they really want from wikipedia is that we pedia be safe and so that drives rises to say okay. They don't want us to run on a shoestring they don't want us to run. Nearly a break even in nearly going broke every year we need to be stable. And that's been a real value for many years when you think about this thing that you built and your role in the history of the Internet. How much of the success of Wikipedia do you think because of your brilliance and your hard work? And how much do you think is simply safe. Lock a huge amount due to lock brilliance and hard work. Okay maybe not so much I do think a component of the success of wikipedia is that I'm very friendly and Nice person and I'm very laid back back and so therefore I was able to work in a community environment where people basically yell at you and you just have to kind of roll with it and you're in some sense a leader but you can't tell anyone what to do volunteer so you have to work with love and reason to kind of move people along in in a useful fool way so I do think that I'm not irrelevant to the process but I also think that you know the community is amazing and the luck of the timing of really hitting that moment when it was possible to bill wikipedia. Jimmy you've seen The estimates that you know that if we you were a for profit it could be worth at least five billion dollars maybe more. Yeah doesn't mean anything to you no not really. I mean it's you know people They love to write about Jimmy. Wales is not a billionaire. I think there's actually actually their articles with that headline Jimmy exactly and for me. That's all a bit odd because you know. My life is unbelievably interesting. I have the ability to meet almost anyone in the world who I want to meet and usually I introduce myself. I'm Jimmy Wales founder. gave me and they go. Oh Wow right. Yeah and if I say oh I'm Jimmy Wales. I own the largest chain of car dealers across southern part of America. Okay whenever like not that interesting at least in that regard I do. I do think that no one will remember me and five hundred years but they will definitely remember wikipedia. And that's really. I mean it's really something I mean. That's something that you can really hardly get your mind around there. In comparison to the Gutenberg Press Right and this is the biggest sort of dissemination of knowledge in in modern world history but I duNno. It's been embarrassing to talk about it that way. I'm just trying to have fun. That's Jimmy Wales else. Founder of Wikipedia by the way a few years ago. Jimmy Got Grief for trying to change his own wikipedia. Entry which big No-no his entry you showed. He was born on August eighth nineteen sixty six. which is what is birth certificate also says but that was a mistake because according to his mother? Jimmy was actually born shortly before midnight on August seventh so he made the change only to be confronted by angry. wikipedia editors who demanded documentary evidence which of course could not furnish because he had to go on his mother's version of what had happened anyway. Or the record we just double check the page. And according to Wikipedia the man who created it could be the fact.

wikipedia Jimmy Wales John Siegenthaler America NPR Gideon facebook US Pedia Denver Denver Guardian Australia Gutenberg Press theft Founder Wales founder.
"wales" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

02:02 min | 7 months ago

"wales" Discussed on How I Built This

"Hey everyone just a quick thanks to two of our sponsors who help make this podcast possible I to legalzoom. It's easy to make the same old New Year's resolutions that won't stick so change it up this year with legalzoom for over nineteen years legalzoom has helped more than four million people resolve personal and business legal needs. It's legal. Zoom isn't a law firm so you can count on their network of independent attorneys for advice. Go to legalzoom dot com and use code built for special special savings legalzoom where life meets legal. Thanks also to Microsoft. We all know meetings struggling to pay attention. Byles seem possible to find. And if you're not in the room you're not in the know. Welcome to the new way to work together. Microsoft teams where you can contribute to meetings from anywhere chat that with coworkers. Here never out of loop and find all your files and even edit them in real time in one convenient place when you're ready to unleash the power of your team. mm-hmm open teams learn more Microsoft dot com slash teams the night before his first scene with Catherine O'Hara Dan Levy was a little freaked out. This is my first time acting since a lifetime movie that I did with me and the stories behind the celebrities every Tuesday on it's been a minute from NPR. Welcome back to how I built this from NPR. I'm Iras so in the early days. Jimmy Wales was able to get wikipedia up and running running and he was funding it with money from his first Internet. Startup Bama's Obama's was running ads. Dot Com boom was in high gear but then of course came the dot com crash and all that ad money dried up pretty fast and Bama's would eventually have to shutdown completely.

Microsoft Catherine O'Hara Dan Levy Bama NPR Jimmy Wales legalzoom Byles Obama
"wales" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

02:15 min | 7 months ago

"wales" Discussed on How I Built This

"Guy Roz on today. Show the story of how Jimmy Wales started an online encyclopedia as a side project project and watched it grow into one of the pillars of the Internet. Okay so I'm looking at a list of the most viewed websites in the world number one. Of course probably know so. Is Google also at the top of the list Youtube and of course facebook also a handful of Chinese websites like by do and then clocking clocking in somewhere around number Ken Wikipedia so imagine for a moment that you are the founder of one of these enormous websites well Forbes puts out an annual list of their net worth. And here's what we found. Larry Page founder of Google. It's about sixty six billion dollars. Mark Zuckerberg edges him out with about eighty two billion dollars. One of the founders of BINU is worth around ten billion dollars and the founder of wikipedia Jimmy Wales else. He's not listed by Forbes but judging from media reports Jimmy's net worth is nowhere near the billions. In fact it's likely in and low millions in other words. Jimmy Wales is quite possibly the least rich Internet Titan in the world but unlike a lot of famous founders Jimmy Wales legacy is likely to live on for centuries because in some ways he's like a Modern Day Youhana's Gutenberg and just it's like Gutenberg's press made it possible to spread knowledge beyond village or town. wikipedia made it possible for every single person on earth with an Internet Internet connection to gain access to probably the biggest collection of knowledge ever assembled online and like a lot of the entrepreneurs we interview on the show. The story starts with influential people and important events that happened pretty early in life. He grew up in Huntsville Alabama where his uncle owned a shop that sold old early personal computers and Jimmy worked there part time and it's too big hobbies tinkering with computers.

Jimmy Wales founder Ken Wikipedia Google Forbes Guy Roz Mark Zuckerberg Larry Page Alabama Huntsville Youtube facebook BINU
"wales" Discussed on ESPN FC

ESPN FC

02:01 min | 9 months ago

"wales" Discussed on ESPN FC

"The pitch it back in the dressing room. After a game that the Russian goalkeeper Dmitri Karen who loved the lot had scuffed Gokak from the sex line to the edge of the box which leads further non. Julie despised spots in the back of that came in and Dmitri. We don't know depressed cuddly here next thing you know has this just let's just messy someone smarter than the world followed by some not so lovely ones in a good job. It never happened with the the all the old days because the star we're at right. Yeah remember that. Just up in the premier league that made headlines to seemingly years peachy food pizza ninety nine go well. Here's another alleged. Assail aged I I must say alleged here. I think there is a clear allegedly at might be creek. Bail me some the swollen golf. Ah Jordan on the recess. Yeah however one wasn't the trading field because it's not the thing you'll get done. My soul can put a four early on the porch and Bellamy famously. Celebrate the goal by swinging clubs right after yes question referred to wildlife. Yes there's not much you can do on the field and the pizza was down. The tunnel wasn't a few minor honor. You can toss. Nobody's using it so that you go to Toronto being told also threw a shoe so all right there's a whole row assu gallery of rogues who from shoes Kevin wants to know where the alleys considered a Venezuelan Hall of fame. I like Shankar is in Trinidad. All Oh Craig is in In Celtic Glasgow is there Venezuela Football Hall of fame..

Dmitri Karen Venezuela Football Hall of fam Venezuelan Hall of fame Gokak Bellamy Julie Shankar Toronto Trinidad Glasgow Craig Kevin
"wales" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"wales" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Couldn't back down and so the wedding went forward as planned on july twenty ninth nineteen eighty one the day of the wedding the streets around saint paul's cathedral were lined with over six hundred thousand spectators trying to catch a glimpse of diana in her wedding gown seven hundred and fifty million more watched the event from their televisions at eleven twenty a m diana entered the cathedral wearing an ivory avary dress designed by famed dress makers david and elizabeth emanuel it featured a twenty five foot train and ten thousand a hand sewn pearls to put it simply. The dress was bold. The twenty five foot train was seen by some tabloid writers as ostentatious and counter intuitive in that address seemed to draw attention to itself rather than the future princess who is wearing it but that blip of controversy was quickly snuffed <unk> out by the massive popularity of copycat styles from her very first day as the princess of wales diana had established herself as a fashion icon once she was in the church diana knelt before the altar and pledged herself to her new husband and the british monarchy honor key diana from i take the child's philip author george charleston drew with that twenty year old diana became the princess of wales and the third highest biased ranking woman in the royal family following the wedding thirty two year old prince charles and the new princess of wales moved to kensington into palace a grandiose royal residence overlooking kensington gardens in london now married diana had one very important task to produce the next british air on november fifth nineteen eighty-one less than four months. After the wedding princess diana revealed she was pregnant with their first child but the pressures of royal life were still mounting. Diana was expected to accompany charles to royal events around the world old at the same time she had to prepare to give birth to the heir to the british throne and do so without ever seeming tents or strained. This stress was so intense. Diana actually attempted injure herself early in the marriage when she was twelve weeks pregnant. She threw herself down a staircase in her home. At the time. There was some debate as to whether this event was merely an accident but diana herself came forward years later to say she she did it because she felt so inadequate in the royal family. She didn't try to hurt herself again. At least not in any way publicly known unsourced quotes indicate that she engaged in other methods of self harm like cutting and may have even considered suicide but it's difficult to determine where we're the rumors end and the facts begin regardless from early on in her marriage. Diana felt suffocated by the tight hold that the royal family had on her life. She courted more controversy. When she gave birth to her. First child on traditionally in england a royal child was born at home mm-hmm but diana wanted her child to have the best medical treatment so on june twenty first nineteen eighty two. She gave birth to her first son william in the lindo wing of saint mary's hospital in london. This was the first time in history that an heir to the throne was born in a hospital queen elizabeth elizabeth. The second was upset about this decision but diana was uncompromising. She gave birth the way she felt was best animosity..

diana elizabeth elizabeth elizabeth emanuel charles saint paul london wales saint mary david england philip william george charleston twenty five foot thirty two year twelve weeks four months twenty year
"wales" Discussed on Whimsically Volatile

Whimsically Volatile

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"wales" Discussed on Whimsically Volatile

"Yeah. I mean that NGO is you know. Yeah. And I mean budgeters so small that we have to just do it was much as we can Sureau. Yeah. So yeah. So real fucking which is maybe my favorite thing that we've ever done that I've ever done. Yeah. So let's get into some plugs. What would you like people to go check out? I mean, I don't know. Do I have anything? I mean, you can watch the new public disgrace series. It's instead of horrifying people. I tried to do a more ethical spin on it. But it's a really hard what site to shoot because it's public hardcore BBS and humiliation. You know, like just believe China. We didn't we did our best to keep it within like the parameters like not horrify. We didn't shoot in front of children or anything. Disappointed. I know, but and then yeah. Real fucking girls, which is a wonderful line that I produce where trans women come up with their own fantasies in our labs. Excellent in whatever they would like. Yeah. And. What else I feel? I could just did something. But anyway, my websites are like Mona Wales XXX dot com. I'll, but really my favorite thing is just when people send me money they had stuff and mode dot com. Okay. Mona wales. XXX send me, oh, a WALE s x x accent just send me money. I just do that. Or, you know, book me, my men Wales book known away for for, you know, the sexy in-person time Brunner think die. Appreciate you getting into song with the music, but. Is Mona she's a waylay? To the night. All you'll money'll book. Just hey. Be reasonable free for you. And me she is the provider of unconventional services for the discerning client at an affordable price. Most action guaranteed. That are nice. You never seen before public disgrace. Shame guilt. Lifetime. No shit, though death. Except on the dark web..

Mona wales Sureau Wales China Brunner
"wales" Discussed on Channel 955

Channel 955

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"wales" Discussed on Channel 955

"Wales on you ready nice for what band baby days to test in the past tense you already finished round five dog days but saturday got into club now's dot watch the breakdown nice.

Wales
"wales" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"wales" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Wales yup i she no china but shape of you mama she no i'm trying but making oh my hey you know we making family bills pay me you actually the say hey this cake.

Wales
"wales" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"wales" Discussed on How I Built This

"The the idea that you could actually change something this was all being run out of wear like did you have an office in san diego or was it assure apartment or what you yet small office we this was during the bomber stay so we had a few programmers and sort of cheap office in a warehouse space this is the period of time win had revenue was good so we were able to gis heart some people and get started a i guess you very quickly realized that would pds can p could potentially be huge liked it seemed clear like within the first months or a year yeah it did it did i mean it you know i remember looking at a list of the top websites at the time and there was an encyclopedia reference kind of sight at ranked number fifty and i thought g if we do a really good job we might be a number one hundred hour may be even in the top fifty but there was always this idea of like this could be a big thing if we can figure out how to do it he could have a huge impact in just a minute when jimmy wales was faced with the question of how we can pedia was gonna make money he decided that it wasn't stay with us i'm guy rosni you're listening to how i built this from npr hey everyone just a quick thanks to two of our sponsors who help make this podcast possible first to fresh books small business owners fresh books wants to make dealing with your daytoday paperwork ridiculously quick and easy use fresh books to create a perfectly crafted invoice in under thirty seconds then set yourself up to receive online payments with just two cliques and then magically see whether or not your client has looked at the envoys you've just emailed for your 30day free trial good afresh books dot com slash built and enter how i built this in the how did you hear about a section.

jimmy wales san diego one hundred hour thirty seconds 30day
"wales" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"wales" Discussed on How I Built This

"The world his personal fortune is estimated to be not much more than one million dollars he is quite possibly the least rich internet titan in the world but unlike a lot of famous founders are entrepreneurs jimmy wales legacy is likely to live on for centuries because he is in some ways like a modernday yohannes gutenberg and just like gutenberg's press made it possible to spread knowledge beyond a village or town wikipedia made it possible for every single person on earth with an internet connection to gain access to probably the biggest collection of knowledge ever assembled and like a lot of the entrepreneur's we interview on the show jimmy wales story starts with influential people and important events that happened pretty early in life he grew up in huntsville alabama where his uncle owned a shop that sold early personal computers in his two big high these word tinkering with computers and greeting reading just about anything he found interesting sara basically anything in my hands on her including until i was reading encyclopedia you know you hear about something and you wanna learn more and you're gonna these are competing in find the article and read that and yeah it was it was a beloved thing in our house that we have the encyclopedia and we will all use it did you buy in the store or did that somebody like come to your house and zone north already came to the house doortodoor when i was a baby as the family legend goes that somebody came to the house and sold it to my mother and every year they would send out an annual update yeah for example the article on the moon was updated when someone landed on the moon and so they they were all these stickers and he would take the sticker out and you would go to look up m moon and you would find the old article on the moon and you put in the sticker saying there's an update my mom and i would do that every year when the stickers came in my first editing and encyclopedia.

gutenberg alabama m moon jimmy wales huntsville one million dollars