29 Burst results for "Waldman"

What We Can Learn From Microscopic Life In Antarctica

Short Wave

01:42 min | 2 weeks ago

What We Can Learn From Microscopic Life In Antarctica

"Thing that i feel like a lot of people don't know about antarctica is that it's really brimming with life and a lot of different locations. It's just that most of it is invisible to us. You would need to have a microscope in order to see them. This is ariel waldman. She's a wildlife filmmaker at the microbial scale. And i'm an adviser to nasa and i'm also in antarctic explorer aerial. I became interested in ant arctic microbes. Back in two thousand thirteen. She was working with nasa and she met astrobiologists who study and articles extreme conditions and the life forms. That actually thrived there. I had learned that a lot of biologists goto antarctica but they very rarely ever take any photos or videos of the creatures that they studied there. And so i kind of saw an opportunity to really help both scientists and help people around the world actually get to see all this amazing stuff so that realization. That is what inspired you to basically become the first filmmaker to document these hidden ecosystems. But how did you go from that inspiration to making it happen. Couldn't could not have been easy going to antarctica just required a lot of preparation. I prepared for months and this was after. It took me five years of applying to go to aunt hartika and working towards becoming a wildlife filmmaker at the microbial scale. And so i was self taught microscopy and then i ended up joining the san francisco microscopically society which i am now the president of

Antarctica Ariel Waldman Nasa Hartika San Francisco Microscopically
U.S. Labor Board accuses Google of spying on employees, discouraging worker organization, and retaliation

Daily Tech News Show

02:39 min | 4 months ago

U.S. Labor Board accuses Google of spying on employees, discouraging worker organization, and retaliation

"On wednesday. The us national label labor relations investigated the termination of several employees in november. Twenty nineteen as a result has issued a complaint alleging. Google violated the national labor relations act by surveilling employees and interfering restraining or coercing employees who tried to exercise rights under section seven. Google is accused of discouraging employees from forming joining or assisting a union this all centers around lawrence burland and catherine spires they filed a complaint with the rb claiming that they were fired for organizing around treatment of temporary vendor and contract workers as well as retaliation against workers protesting google's work with customs and border patrol in november twenty nine thousand nine berlin and rebecca rivers were placed on leave for allegedly sharon confidential documents not pertinent to their job a protest in support of the to lead. You rivers burland. Paul duke and sophie waldman being fired. The complaint will be evaluated by an administrative judge after which the nlrb will decide whether to prosecute google and pursue reinstatement and damages. But on the same day. Google fired it's co leader of ethical artificial intelligence. Tim knit gebru. Gebru sent an email that She said laid out to conditions. Those conditions have not been made known which if met would lead her taking her name off a paper if not she would work on a last date for employment gab. Bruce says in response one of her bosses a reports replied quote. We cannot agree to number one and number two is you are requesting. We request your decision to leave google as a result and we are accepting your resignation. However we believe the end of your employment should happen faster than your email reflects because certain aspects of the email you sent last night to non management employees in the brain group a behavior that is inconsistent with the expectations of a google manager unquote. That email was sent to google. Brain women and allies in email group for company researchers gabar studies bias and facial recognition among other things and is an alumni of the stanford artificial intelligence laboratory she worked on a landmark study in two thousand eighteen that showed facial recognition miss any dark skinned women thirty five percent of the time while working well for light skinned men

Google Lawrence Burland Catherine Spires Customs And Border Patrol Rebecca Rivers Burland Paul Duke Sophie Waldman Tim Knit Gebru Gebru Nlrb Berlin Sharon United States Bruce Stanford Artificial Intelligen
A Mothers Controversial Confession

The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

04:33 min | 5 months ago

A Mothers Controversial Confession

"I want you to brace yourselves. Because you're about to hear one mothers really controversial confession. She revealed it in a very provocative new york times article and in it she boldly proclaimed. I love my husband. More than i love my children. I yell at waldman. A mother of four also says her children are not the center of her universe and that is the key reason she says she and her husband have a very passionate sex life. She is a mother who says she loves her husband more than her kids and she is swinging from the chandeliers boy. Did she strike a nerve. How do you measure your passion for your children and your husband. I think this is a woman who clearly did not want to have children. And i think that she's doing a disservice to her children to her husband and two herself and especially the family unit as a whole. I thought that her point of view was sort of silly. You can't actually the type of law that exists between two grown adults and that bond between mother and child the way she puts her husband on a pedestal. It's dangerous because she loses him her whole world from what she said. It might say hurtful to our kids someday and she shouldn't have had children how she fill about having kids. I think i l. It's Has an obsessive relationship with her husband. I think i l really needs to reclaim a sense of south. I questioned i yell. It's security in her marriage. I thought i l article was goofy. My children are. I my husband and i come second. It makes me think you know what are her. Children chopped liver go okay. So i'm here with a group of mothers who have a lot to say about this. The woman who sparked controversy. I yell at walmart is here. I yell at is a harvard trained lawyer. Turn stay at home. Mother turned writer. Who has been married to pulitzer prize winning author michael shape on for twelve years and they have four children. So let me Read the passage. That has everybody up in arms. She says i have four children. But i'm not in love with any of them. I am in love with my husband if a good mother is one who loves her child more than anyone else in the world then. I'm not a good mother. I am in fact a bad mother. I love my husband more than my children. I yell it. You knew that you were going out on a limb did not want it. Well i did. I didn't quite know that star jones is gonna take off after me on the view. I didn't know i'd be sitting here next to you. I didn't know that i'd be facing down a group of angry mothers. But i did. You know i had been experiencing this again and again. Mom's groups i i. I'm like a lot of you. I spent a long time just to stay at home. Mom now. I work part time but i have four kids. I spend most of my day with my children. And i have felt for a long time very different. The most of the moms. Start the article talking about your mommy group and you noticed in the conversation. All the mother's talking about they're not having sex. Yeah absolutely i. The the interesting thing was i was talking to a mom and he was telling me about how she was trying to have a second kid. But it wasn't going very well. And i said you should try one of those electronic fertility monitors. Because they tell you when you ovulate like right that day and a great then. I won't have to have all that unnecessary sex. There's a reason that everyone is so angry. This is striking a chord. This is a real issue. Okay tear brown. Why do you say i yell at is doing a disservice to her family. Why well believe that children are such a gift. And i think that there is a healthy balance that can be formed with the family. Not necessarily putting one above the other per se. I think that's a really good point. And i think so. Many women today have become so focused on their children. They've developed these romantic entanglements with their children's lives and the husbands are secondary. They're left out and the romantic focus is on the children. I mean you guys know. Valentine's day at your kids schools. What happens on valentine's day. All the moms come in with you know. Perfect frosted pink cupcakes that they've made with their kids. What's valentine's day is valentine's day to make cupcakes with your children. Know valdez. Supposed to be a day about romantic love.

Michael Shape Waldman New York Times Pulitzer Prize Walmart Harvard Jones Brown Valentine Valdez
"waldman" Discussed on Gee Thanks, Just Bought It

Gee Thanks, Just Bought It

04:30 min | 7 months ago

"waldman" Discussed on Gee Thanks, Just Bought It

"And we started to see something. Very disturbing. But very recognizable. people were looking at themselves in the mayor and they were refusing to. To See, what was there They were like This is me right now there's a better me around the corner I'm going to be. Different I've I've started a diet. They they were almost like judging, there is not to actually see themselves in the mirror and hoping for a better self. So they were buying clothes that were either too small because they would fit into them in the future or they would delaying that satisfaction of buying something beautiful. That fits because the day they were in the mirror did not deserve it. The day that they were gonNA. Be You know that's the day that they were going to buy for? So we thought how can we? How can we disrupt this vicious cycle that we all I mean it doesn't matter if you're a size six and you suddenly have to wear a size eight dress. Women go into a panic. You know it's there such a a calcified hatred of bigger bodies and gaining weight. That it you know we are anxieties built into us from a very early age and It's you know it only gets worse when you're in a larger body and you can't find anything at all and then you really feel judged and it's a mess. So we thought look. Why don't you buy? Exactly. For yourself as you are now, exactly as you are now so that you feel great in it. Fine, you're going to be you know you're going to be a totally different person in two months. I understand that's past you've chosen. That's fine. But take what fits you now and when you get there if you get there. Just send us back the stuff that you bought, and we will send you a brand new size. Of the same thing for free. And it just you know this the the idea that you didn't have to worry about re spending the money. Or judge yourself constantly in the mirror, the idea that you could allow yourself that one year to for your body to change in whatever way of May, whether it's up or.

"waldman" Discussed on Gee Thanks, Just Bought It

Gee Thanks, Just Bought It

05:40 min | 7 months ago

"waldman" Discussed on Gee Thanks, Just Bought It

"Hey everyone will it's another week of drinks just bought at the podcast were talk about what we just bought and what you might need to buy next I'm your host Caroline Moss, and today we are joined by Alexandra Waldman or call her Alex She is the CO founder and creative director of our favorite brand universal standard Gee thanks just bought. It has been on the universal standard trained for a very long time It was like one of the first clothing brands I felt super comfortable recommending to listeners. It's inclusive. It's mindful. It's ethical. I own so much universal standard clothing, and so having Alex here is bit lake having a massive celebrity in my midst Alex welcome to G. Thanks just bought it. A G.. Thanks. That's high praise. Indeed, thank you very much. We're so happy to have you I was thinking back to trying to remember what the first piece of Universal Standard Clothing I bought and I think it was the overalls with like the gold button detail. Oh. Yes Yup. That was probably from was that from the Daniel Brooks collection I think it was yeah. Yeah. Those overalls are so those are like you could sleep in those overalls. Yes. We actually try really hard to make sure you can sleep in all of our close regardless of what they're meant to be used for whether you're going to board meeting you should also be able to sleep in it There's this kind of unspoken rule of comfort so we take a tremendous. Time and attention we pay a lot of attention to the fabrics that we use because. One of my biggest complaints and I live in a big body and I used to write about fashion. So as at this weird crossroads. But one of my biggest complaints was that. fashion was made. So indifferently for bigger bodies, you know like stretch was included in size four, but it was not included in a size. You know eighteen, it just made no sense to me. And so when we started our own brand that was one of the things that we tried to fix. Yeah we'll everything really is super comfortable and I talk about this a lot but you know I. My size has changed over the years like anyone's and you know I feel like all of a sudden I woke up and one day I wasn't a size ten I, was assigned twelve and all of a sudden I went to size sixteen and I was like I was never even a fourteen like how did this happen and having a brand that still has? A bigger body in mind and not like as an afterthought and also not as like A. A woke sort of performance Bingo Square to hit is really really nice and I think that it's been. Almost more comfortable to allow my body to change in a lot of ways because you know I'm no longer really just like struggling to find whatever the top size in straight industry size store is and who unlike crossing my fingers and hoping that fits, and that's a conversation. We have here all the time. So to know that you guys even that was just that was just how it was going to go, which is like Oh..

Alex She Caroline Moss Daniel Brooks Alexandra Waldman Bingo Square Gee CO founder director G.
A Low-Turnout Election is Solvable (Even During COVID-19)

Solvable

04:54 min | 10 months ago

A Low-Turnout Election is Solvable (Even During COVID-19)

"The stakes are extremely high for this year's election. Experts had anticipated the largest turn out in a century, states were registering voters and preparing their precincts, and then covid nineteen head. Priority suddenly shifted. You don't want governor being able to say Oh. I'M GONNA postpone an election. I mean we've had elections in this country under all kinds of dire circumstances, wars in fact, pandemics in the past having the paper ballot having that backup so that you can do an audit so that you can see if there was fraud so that you can do a recount that turns out to be the best system of all turn. Is there an argument other than the purely partisan one? That more voting may advantage one versus the other you more likely to be struck by lightning. Than commit in person voter impersonation in the United States. But. There are other real hurdles to this year's election. With millions of Americans vulnerable to a deadly pandemic. Social distancing measure is now a familiar part of life and the country facing what is perhaps the largest economic crisis in its history, the challenge of securing safe election with high rates of participation is huge. We can have an election that is participatory. With robust turn out in twenty twenty. This is a solvable problem. Michael Waldman is the author of the book the fight to vote. He's the president of the Brennan. Center, for Justice at Nyu. It's non-partisan law and Policy Institute that focuses on improving systems of democracy. Waldman's an expert in the practicalities of the democratic process. He's identified some straightforward solutions to this year's election challenges. My solvable is having an election. That is safe and secure and fully participatory in the middle of the coronavirus pandemic and might. We can't really predict what it's going to be like in November. What are the main things we as a country and as states need to do? You're right that we don't know what it's going to be like in November. The line is we need to? Upgrade how we run elections in the United States for twenty twenty, so that people have the option voting by mail so that there are safe in person options and ample early voting, so that people can register to vote safely and so that we count the ballots in a careful way recognizing that everything's changed. Vote by mail seems like a pretty simple and obvious solution. I mean I understand their legal obstacles in some states in their funding obstacles, but in your ideal world. Wouldn't we just send a prepaid? To everybody WHO's registered and encourage them to vote that way? We'll a lot of states already run their elections by vote by mail, Western states especially like a California and Oregon and Washington. And Colorado and Utah. That's pretty much how people vote right now it will be. Impossible to imagine the whole country. Moving to vote by mail in November. What we can do in the meantime is make it so that people are notified of their a opportunity to get a ballot and they don't need an excuse. They don't need a doctor's note, and we have every reason to think that most people right now will WanNa vote that way yeah I mean. You wrote a whole book about the history of voting and the expansion of voting rights in this. This country, the thing I don't understand about it. Older people who tend to be more conservative tend to vote with Republicans are the most in need of remote voting options and the most in jeopardy from having to go out to vote in person yet it seems to be conservatives who were fighting the vote by mail. Thing so, can you explain that to me well? You know there's lots of things. When it comes to voting. That are controversial with have been partisan fights. If you think about something like the debate over what kind of voter makes sense, that's pretty intense and has been. In the kind of Democrat. Republican left right way. Vote by mail has not been one of the controversial things. The further away you get from. The Fox News set or I guess the White House podium, the left part is in. This is trump. I said out loud. What you really not supposed to say, which is oh, we'll get levels voting there so high. That will never win. And then. After a few days he realized he'd gone off script and what he says. Oh I'm very worried about the specter of voter fraud, but he really made clear. The goal was to restrict. The electorate

United States Michael Waldman Twenty Twenty Fraud Policy Institute Fox News Colorado Brennan Utah Washington California Oregon White House
"waldman" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

06:12 min | 10 months ago

"waldman" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"In the fan. I am Susan Waldman. I'm up here in Westchester and down in Florida is my partner, Howie Rose. Is and we were talking about this day in Yankee history, and it was June 28th 1976 when the Yankees actually his first time we were all really aware of this rookie for the Detroit Tigers. Mark Fidrych, who was talking to the ball on the mound and all these great things that that he did, and in that lineup that day was too full for off a Fidrych wass. A two time All Star played 15 years for the New York Yankees and a two time World Series champion American League pennant Rin and one of the nicest people you have ever met your whole life. Roy White EIroy. It's Susan and how it here on the fan. How are you? Good. Great to be talking to some baseball people. Where you voice, right. I'm in New Jersey. Yeah. Okay. Let me ask you about that. Do you remember that? I'm looking at this lineup in its rivers and White May and Chambliss and Medals and Gamble and Hendrix and Randolph Randolph's betting seventh. It's so Grossman and do you remember seeing Mark Fidrych for the first time in what that was like? Oh, yeah. You know, we're all excited about having the opportunity to face him. I think he must have been. I don't know if he was 18 1 or something like that. You know, going into that game, and we all heard about him in All the goofy mannerisms that he had so so we were kind of really excited and looking forward to facing in that night. When you saw Roy, those goofy gyrations, he would go through on the mound, padding the mound in the baseball doing a 1,000,000 different, zany things, You know, just having a feel for what Major league players are alike. When it comes to somebody who's a little on the unusual sight, I could only imagine. But what could you share with us about some of the things you might have been saying on the bench when you saw this act for the first time? Ah, Jesus that I don't really recall. I think we all had seen film of You know what he had been doing. So we were kind of aware, you know that he would clean the mound of dirt on his hands and knees and brush it stuff like that. So we all got a big kick out of it, Really? It didn't bother us in any way or nobody was upset. You know that he was doing goopy stuff like that, because we have so many goofy characters on our own like Sparky Lyle. Right? So if there was a team for him to face that would have been the deep was barking with those guys and Nettles probably had a few things to say. What was it that he did? You're too for four. And Nettles was also too full for everybody else wasn't so hot against him. What? Exactly? And this was an his career obviously was cut short. He had all kinds of injuries. But what was it that you remember that he did Besides talking to the baseball of cleaning the mom? Well, you know, the fact that he was really a low ball pitcher was good for me because up on the left hand side of the plate. I love the ball, you know, from the belt down, so I was kind of getting balls that I'd like to swing it. So I think that's why I was successful with him that night, you know, going to for four. Well, you know, some of the other guys had a little bit more trouble, Nothing metals with another guy. It was probably a pretty good lowball hitter. So I think that the fact that I may be successful against him that night, Remember Thurman saying that he couldn't pick up the ball against the very well But for me, I I got a pretty good view. But he moved the ball in and out, and the ball was always moving. You know, you take it think it any and he had a good slider. So, uh, any work fast, you know, so there was a lot of fun plan against him. I think he'd beat it that night. I couldn't read that box score that I said you said, you know it was the water realized 5 to 15 to one. But we got revenge. He has. He showed up a few weeks later in New York, and I think we bob him and knocked him out. After 45 minutes. I hit a home run off that game. I think maybe Oscar Gamble. Might have hit it off with him, too. So, look, now we got some revenge again. Well, that was such a fun year for the Yankees. But I have to imagine it was especially gratifying for you who would come up with the Yankees right at the end of the dynasty in the mid sixties and finally made it to the big leagues for good a few years later, but to have gone through the amount of difficulty seasons you did with the Yankees, and then to be rewarded the way you were in the mid and late seventies, Just basically, when you look back on the entirety of your career, did all of what you went through. Early, make those few years at the end worth it. No doubt about it. You know that 1976 season was some of the most fun that I've ever had playing baseball. You know, That's what team I had really turned around. And finally, I was getting a chance to hit number two after for so many years, you know, five years I have clean up for the Yankees because we had nobody else. You know, That wasn't really my kind of game because I was kind of a speak I I could get on base. Like it, but so finally at Big Rivers ahead of me, you know we could hit Iran he could steal I could steal. And it was really fun Baseball, You know, so I enjoyed that season that all those years I was waiting to get to the World Series and we finally did that year. Even though we got beat by the Reds, But then we came back in 77 78 got to play my hometown Dodgers or a group out of Compton, California So So that was a thrill the beat those guys twice. And I get to be in the series that had my my parents, you know, see me perform out there. So so it was all worth it. After all those years of kind of suffering, you know, one of the things and people that never saw Roy playing there all kinds of things on YouTube now led American League outfielders and fielding percentage for four straight years. And, uh, I think where I went a lot of people I don't know..

New York Yankees baseball Roy White Mark Fidrych Susan Waldman American League Nettles Detroit Tigers Howie Rose Sparky Lyle Oscar Gamble New Jersey Big Rivers Westchester partner Reds YouTube Chambliss Florida
"waldman" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

06:00 min | 10 months ago

"waldman" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Susan Waldman along with how we were also going to switch gears a little bit we done some hockey talk with a lot of baseball talk and I'm going to switch to the NFL and the NFL must really be moving ahead because every time I've called Kim Jones in the last four days she's been on a zoom call with the NFL people so evidently they're still moving around so great reporter for NFL network and of course right here in the fan our friend a Kim Jones hi Kim it's Susan and how how are you I'm going to talk to both of you although I wish I was listening to both of you call a baseball game tell you that very much I miss your voice isn't just for those business the only down side of the dome is you're on the computer so long and it really actually does start to bother your eyes in a lot of them because you are you don't think you're the only person I know that it's working I mean you call everybody else what are you doing I don't know I'm planting some flowers or something and every time I call you NFL network or the NFL is having a conscience and by the way you wouldn't hurt me this afternoon because the Yankees would have been in Boston and we would obviously playing on a night game I mean there's no question about it so so you're going to live in a house in the afternoon and then tonight yes I will say this about the zoom you know we've all had to alter you know our course of work and and trying to get work done and everything and and by and large you know they've made players coaches available the ism and that sort of thing now some of my calls that I've talked to you about Susan are work related NFL network or with the NFL at large but when you talk about access this offseason that hasn't been what we usually expect but I think they'd at least tried I know they've at least tried to make some players available and and that's that part to appreciate it you know you don't want to just go away for an entire offseason heck you don't go away for a season which were seen as well but you know in that regard him has been very very helpful in making plans available what a concept so they're pretty good at there it is it is it is kind of full speed ahead right they are preparing as best they can for a season but are there any obstacles what so ever facing the players union as such as it is as well as the club owners anywhere near similar to what baseball's going through now well you know I would probably answer that differently except that you added a baseball going through now I mean I guess I'd start with the NFL Hallie and say let's be honest the NFL benefited schedule why from this virus because it didn't have the challenges the other sports dead you know yes Roger Goodell was criticizing me was told to hold off on the draft told off even on free agency to their credit I believe and I believe this at the time they went ahead with that in my opinion they had the best draft they may ever have and have had until this point it was the best it was the absolute best we got to see people on their real couches in their real T. shirts but they wear when they're watching TV and I loved every minute of it so the NFL benefited that way free agency to me would have always been a no brainer it you know you can do all of that obviously virtually you don't need to be in person for any of it and that the vast physical that had to happen you don't could wait and they did and they you know that that has not been a huge issue by any means so I do think the issue with the NFLPA is something that frankly we all not talked about enough in part because we're just not there yet but in terms of full speed ahead Halle I mean teams have been told preseason games will go on as scheduled I have talked to some coaches in particular and I think players probably feel this way but coaches in particular who say we can't bring all of these guys to training camp in late July St here we go fellas were preparing for a season as usual and not expect to have a rash of injuries there some injuries in the best of her of times with that sort of thing B. is in some cases because of just bad luck in some cases perhaps players aren't as prepared as they should be for training camp and and like I said a lot of that bad luck if you pull a hamstring but I I do think there's a chance that we see in this reported recently that they go from four to two preseason game the idea being that you're still in Tampa you're still working but you're not working in that against an opponent atmosphere where perhaps perhaps an injury is more likely so that if something like that how we in terms of like preseason games for the two I don't think would be a big surprise well it would be a shift on and why well there's also you know I'm monetary factor all of that as we now just not that big a deal when we talk about the challenges these other sports are facing you know and I I agree with you with the with the draft I loved it they had a lot of technical problems that baseball worked out when they finally got to their craft I loved it I loved it coming back and seeing Bella checks Houseki sitting on the chair I mean the dog Nike was one of the stars of the draft okay so it'll be awhile when you B. O. B. if you are bill Belichick stock credit for that but he wouldn't yeah I just thought and I thought it was great I said to how we before what I loved about this draft and the NFL draft I hate it when they're all sitting there at home and some guy doesn't get drafted in the scene and range just dries my heart breaks and then he gets drafted whatever but they're home with their families so you don't you don't see that now you've mentioned about injuries and all that thing how are they going to bring all these people in there still is a virus out there so how do you how are they.

Susan Waldman NFL Kim Jones hockey baseball
"waldman" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

07:18 min | 10 months ago

"waldman" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Susan Waldman when they're on the fan until one o'clock this afternoon Kim Jones is gonna join us at eleven Jim Maloney at twelve thirty we'll take your calls along the way I promise eight seven seven three three seven sixty six sixty six right now we are joined by the New York Mets director of amateur scouting marked for me to mark first off thanks for joining us but but my immediate question is it is just with regards to how unique this year's draft is because this is just been five rounds so you've got a lot of people right now out there who were draft eligible and likely to have been drafted somewhere along the line who essentially now are free agents so even though the draft is over is your work may be just beginning what well first off thank you for having me I really appreciate it I want to tell you how he's using that I I've heard worldwide after he got off the phone how I appreciate you having me yeah I was I've already been on the phone with a couple of players that were passed over all the discounts across sectors are on the phone right now trying to trying to sell this great okay both players and hopefully we can we can find some of those and get them an organization just like the five thirty six players that we took a picture strap okay I'm I don't think I have until they have until so I think so that means that the people that you know didn't get drafted and stuff they're a stencil Billy free agents and you and teams can sign them because I know people people's careers are over before they even started with the five rounds of the draft and not what it always was correct these players these players are are are eligible to sign with any club so essentially you're almost in a and he almost recruiting them to to come and sign with the New York Mets so that's what we're doing right now is making phone calls were telling them about the organization what we think we can do for them to get them to the big leagues as quickly as possible and talk about what type of plans we would have set up for them should they sign with us so that's what that's what we're doing all morning all afternoon today and in the coming days well let's talk about some of the Mets selections beginning with your very first one Pete crow Armstrong it all I had to do was here this kids speak for thirty seconds and you could tell he's got the personality to play in this town did that factor into it all the guy who appears impervious to the challenges that New York my present absolutely the two of you know as well as anybody how difficult it can be to play in New York and when we're evaluating players obviously talent comes first what the what the next most important it might even be more important times than than the town itself is the make up of the player when we took just an example I know Pete P. Alonso actually talked to peco Armstrong after the draft and you know it's it's one of the things you look at the alarms on how you command the clubhouse now yeah I think that's the type of young man P. Cole Armstrong will be I think the New York City I think the Mets fans will love this kid he is he's a very very mature I saw a quote the other day from the expert witness on Casey who had coached Pete one of the major showcase events in the summer and John said how how well he thought that he was set up for pro ball in terms of how he is thought process his make up the determination and grit and the kids such a grinder he he thought all of his traits and characteristics would be really really set up well for the grind that is a minor league baseball and getting and staying in the big leagues I'm playing at a high level so yes the answer question that that was a big part of of the specially taking somebody that high in the draft that you have to really nail down the make up and we really feel this kid has that Hey mark and to just go on for that a little bit more I had heard and everybody has to death you know compare everybody to everybody and I heard as a centerfielder could play now may be a Brett Gardner type leadoff kind hitter but just listening to him he seems to know who he is he seems to know what he can do and can't do and it sounded to me like he's really set with that how much does that you know he did he didn't say I'm going to come right there and I'm going to be the starting center fielder he knows what he has to do but I think the defense is what he's very is very very positive about what he can do also knows what he can't impeach somebody who's been on the radar screen since the Republic Porter he competed with it it was the only programs like team USA since that time he's been around other really good players he comes from a high school program that has numerous of big leaguers and Lucas G. lido Max free Jack Flaherty with the cardinals and so he has an understanding I think of what it takes to play in the big leagues from that perspective because he's seen guys that are just a few years older come from that school other players that you played with in team USA I think he does have an understanding and anytime you have that when you first step onto a professional baseball diamond those are the things that help you along the way so so yes absolutely he had that he had a very good understanding of that no there's always a projection that you have to do in the draft particularly with high school kids but what complicates it sometimes is how you think and hope that a player will recover from a serious injury now with the fifty second pick you were able to get a right handed pitcher at a Mississippi state by the name of J. eighteen again who had Tommy John surgery just a couple of months ago so let me ask even though he went fifty second where did you have him sort of slot it in before the Tommy John and what makes you confident that they'll be able to get through the surgery without any major complications right he was a J. he was a player that we had a high level of interest in high school he was one of the best right handed pitchers high school teachers in the country at that time he went he won the first round lead the first run to the doctor so we didn't get a crack at us and we just felt that this was the guy that had so much talent had he been fully healthy this year if you take a look at what he did as a freshman in the SEC he had an absolutely outstanding year discussion here if he was healthy this year we fully believe that he would have been taken in the first round by somebody made you know current who knows it could have been also whatever but he he has that type of talent and to get him in the second round we we just felt was too good to pass up we consulted with our doctors up your car doctor all check and they spoke with the surgeon that did to GQ's bitchy surgery and we feel that he is going to come back to it you know quite at full strength by the early to middle of next year but the only talking about how he was just he was just too good to pass up and again he's another kid was make up we love you know the thing that's interesting about that is that is that a bad thing drafting kids who either are going to have Tommy John or have had it Yankees have done that a lot I know Andrew Brackman that one didn't work out but Clarke Schmidt is gonna is gonna work out and you know you see that the difference and that is you know people drop because of that guys that have a top ten pick they don't want to take a chance but down below you can get some really good value and I think that's the way that that.

Susan Waldman Kim Jones Jim Maloney
"waldman" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

07:54 min | 11 months ago

"waldman" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"It is three thirty two in the afternoon how he rose and Susan Waldman with you on the fan until five o'clock still to come and a little after four o'clock we will check with the former broadcast partner of mine Tom McCarthy now the TV voice of the Philadelphia Phillies Jerry Mathers as the beaver is going to be with us at four twenty to reflect on his late friend Ken Osmond better known to the world as the inimitable iconic Eddie Haskell and that for forty five we'll hear from the TV voice of the world champion Washington nationals Bob carpenter but right now we are joined by a person who has worked in baseball in New York for the Mets since nineteen eighty and frankly I would the finances and I'm sure you'll agree with this I would defy anyone to have a bad word to say about J. Horowitz because I've never heard one and J. has finally put his forty years of experience into a book it's called Mr met Jacob deGrom did the forward J. Horowitz is the author and J. thanks for spending some time with us this afternoon what are we going to finally meet you guys well I appreciate you guys know it did hit double digits I'm proud of that because I know he had a stamp J. has been cajoled by everyone who's known him at least half of the forty years that he's been with the Mets and I'm certainly one of them who is said come on Jay got to read a book you got to write a book and J. always rejected out of hand he said no plan on doing that's not me what made you finally decide to do it you know art negative twenty three anymore I'm getting near the end of my career you know so my whole life and they always made to make people laugh to make fun of myself with no charge for it you always tell me if the boys didn't like you they wouldn't screw with your ends they must like me a little bit because this could make me a lot I mean what happened how funny stories what it's like to be part and it's a forty year that's right did some humorous story public people actors maybe cry a little bit couple parts of the book I just try to you know good time as any and every day flight ticket put a booklet can hurt anybody you know what to make anybody mad hello tell some funny stories and make myself the biologic jokes you know J. one of the things and I started I started reading that and you made me smile when I saw the name Arthur Richman home you know obviously after his long career with the Mets win over the Yankees and and he would always talk about you and and the fact that you just put in all the richer for people that don't know was the traveling secretary for the Mets for a hundred twenty years and then he came over to the Yankees in you told some great stories he knew everybody and my favorite then I don't know that you know this is that I was walking in the office once and his secretary said Arthur president bush is on the line and art there without a sub a moment said which one here and now that was the right yeah what we would Pittsburgh to get here he fell in the stadium anyway back to the hotel and the hotel the rating it was disconnection was on the phone from us because you have authorized by the time you want he was so good for me he introduced to Pete rose George grant Jones Joe Torrey what you chose restaurant by parties down the village's everybody are you manually he has a new PR guy denied it in order with so far is way to be nice to begin boxer with delightful couple an item that we did get it started for me he taught me about you get along the prickly he was a good good man he's a really good man you know when she started with the Mets in nineteen eighty the team it just been sold they have been a bad club for a few years certainly going back to the Tom Seaver trade in nineteen seventy seven and the attendance and interest in the Mets had fallen to really all time lows in franchise history so J. who had been a sports information director at Fairleigh Dickinson university needed to be creative to try and get some attention for the Mets at a period in time where the Yankees certainly ruled the city what's more the couple or three of the most creative things that you did with that when it's to get them some exposure air time or anything else that at least drew some attention to them what what got me started how we stock fully in which he signed a five year contract if the eighty he's in with a country western can you confirm with you start with the Oak Ridge boys so I came up with the idea let's hold this press conference in a in a country with a nightclub in Manhattan tricare should agree everybody wore about cowboys how to make snapped a picture right how does Donald repent he was on the back page of the Daily News the next day you look like Elmer Fudd we had no chance right okay what do you do what you got to protect me and I kind of surprised that you're in we do stories ugliness deleted ice skater up you know correct form while seeing Joel Youngblood shoot going hunting with bows and arrows if you like all my friends from college or high school the fact the press box in the early eighties with very very thank you press box at that time and he's not kidding Frank Cashen in a cowboy hat look like Yosemite Sam I mean that was the most it could one of my in a moment you know but here's when you talk about in the book you talk about moments and and maybe since you know the story or not when J. one for his job interview talk about almost not getting the job right what did you do that almost got you thrown out of the office or even sat down let me give credit back to four seconds I had accepted a job Michael used to be the N. F. I. T. might have called before the might get started really early eight you look me up to be the best staff Dr Tony Kubica joker at yolo I accepted the job maybe in January February but ten days later I get a call from somebody to I'm so much so for them that you like love your job the PR guy you would come in if you are hung up I hung up the phone on the guy who's a friend of mine three days later the guy calls back if you will but I will go down as the Petersburg I'm supposed to go to the Edgewater beach hotel I went to the Hilton hotel later in the interview so I got to the hotel right you sit near this little white tennis shorts are so nervous like what did you do this myself I knocked all the units to cater to all Jews or blacks as all my god it's not going well after about five minutes I went back to the airport I call my late mother Donna is no way I got the job you know forty years later I'm still here I don't know how close you know I'm one of the things in and there are great stories in here and the thing that everybody else that was not with the Mets really appreciated it was you know a lot of PR people well can you get me someone so wild thing I'm going to go ask him I don't know World Series two thousand I remember asking J. for a couple of people well okay I can get you you know Joe bird bath at two forty eight and I got okay standing there with my little bike about two forty eight outcomes J. J. you know that just doesn't happen in baseball and I remember the guys in Boston telling me about the eighty six World Series how you know that that the Boston club also is a tough place in those days and and but if J. Harwood said I'll get you Gary Carter at three thirty comes Gary Carter at three thirty so it's not just funny stories and how you'll agree with this you know this this man you know is at the top of the the PR mountain for is far as I'm concerned aye aye Charlie also has a heart as.

Susan Waldman partner
Hello, I'm scared of... crime books!

VINTAGE Podcast

10:50 min | 11 months ago

Hello, I'm scared of... crime books!

"I think. That's one of the kind of joys and the drawbacks of crime is zone and it's one of the things that annoys me when people always read pieces in the newspapers whereas it's someone making sweeping generalizations about crime this crime that and actually crime is a huge on. R- it's as big as you know it's like saying fiction is this like of course then some parts of fiction it is but crime spans the gamut from really intensely literary right through to kind of pure page-turners an really like terrifying stuff. That is way too hot for me. I'm quite a REC- readers. I chose reader. Yeah yeah that makes for better things stops me is that I'm like kind of scattered Dr. I'm an ex Christian but for some reason I still it kind of affects like how much I really believe in ghosts which is more people and let me say that your Senate Sky Dateline kind of chills and speak. He stuff like there's quite a lot of playing about with that in my books but what I really don't. I cannot read books that are kind of sold. Like people locked in basements or sexual torture or particularly stuff happening to kids. That's just like my my line You know no shade on people who write that. It's we need to explore all areas of human experience in fiction. And that's fine but it's not what I want to spend my evenings immersing myself in you know when you're not familiar with the genre as you say. Sometimes the jackets can similar when they kind of wildly different types of six and it is a bit of a learning curve. I think finding out sort of which bit because I I also have had this stuff about crime fiction through the ages where it's like often this get letting the thing that is scary in the book as a society. We're a little bit afraid of and that can make change throughout the decades but then it also means that on a personal level of the stuff that you're like I'm quite interested in exploring fair and then other stuff that is enjoyable to explore the new stuff. That's definitely I mean. The classic thing that is always talked about is the fact that the golden age of crime was in between the wars and Agatha Christie was writing all the way through the Second World War and wrote some of her best names route. Twelve books I think during the second mobile without stopping sometimes two books a year and people who wanted to read about this and even in the midst of kind of death and bereavement and destruction and bombs and huge uncertainty. They wanted crime and it becomes. Yeah they sort of. Are they exploring phase safely They wanted to live in a world where the impossible is solved. May Right and where bodies brought to justice. I don't know if there was easy. Onces like I would publish a thesis on it and become a PhD. If it's the same with you but like I say. I think that there's probably a lot misconceptions around crime and just named one of the crime writers that I know apart from nightmare modern switched our Agatha Christie and then shallow stuff like that's the only kind of two touch points a puffer Moton wrenches. The I know like what do you come up against misconceptions at variety forgot anymore misconceptions That you have but like do you come up against those things in the book and what which ones are true and which ones are like. Not Surgery are accurate. I think one thing I sometimes maybe misconception. On the hair is that they. They're not always believable and things. Sometimes people read to escape. Some people read to understand that life or the situational things going on in the world a little bit more and I think there are a lot. I know that there are a lot like that. I think that's not necessarily something I believe. I think that sometimes a bit of misconception that it sort of by so many things can happen to someone in the morning but life I watched enough kind of true crime dramas tonight actually extraordinary things do happen to people. That's why I might see rates because I've always struggled with that exact question of I don't want to write a procedural. I don't want to write about police officer because I don't inhabit that world and it's not my area of expertise and you do run up against the question of realistically. How many bodies can an ordinary person stumble? We're not Jessica Fletcher. We don't like Pandora in Cabot Cove and have a corpse waiting there every single day. So you know something that crime writers struggle with as well but I do. I firmly believe that it is completely possible. Implausible for one terrible unlikely incident to strike people in a lifetime. I think we've all been the victims of those and we know people who've had terrible extraordinary things happen to them so I don't think in itself that's but yet when it happens again and again and again. This is an interesting one because you can say that any genre like pick Saad poetry. And how sad can Waldman really be like you know like a little life is like? That's brutal like I think. We can fly that to to cry when actually we can say that about a lot of German. You're always going to be talking about the extraordinary end of ordinary. Even when you know even when it's just a regular life you're writing about it. In some kind of heightened artificial way. No one writes about life as it really happens because it would be incredibly tedious and full of sequiturs either. That's not how fiction works. We accept that it's a kind of construct but yes how far you'll cater for peds to to follow that construct but do you so. Do you read climate. All right if you read stuff and enjoyed it or you just never really got to grips with that. As as you know I have and I remember when I was younger. My Dad my dad is a big kind of threat breeze all the big American crime office and I remember the get that again. It's I remember picking up because I was on holiday and I ran. We ran out two books and I picked up a Ro Robert Ludlum book and I absolutely loved and for years it was the Sigma Protocol and it was one of my favorite books because it had this kind of I was so gripped by the narrative but also had this kind of the end of real big moral question kind of about ethics and I just found really fascinating but then I didn't pick up another one. So it's it's. It's a bit strange so I don't really know why because the ones I have read. I have enjoyed that. I think I also haven't I work in publishing and a low of my reading is dictated by what I work on. Haven't actually worked with any modern crime. Rights is so I don't know yeah. It's not that I haven't enjoyed them. I just think it's interesting like what we bookshop. What we go towards. Because it's what we see ourselves. I'm like I didn't really see myself as a crime rate even though I've read crime is that thing of like what settles in your head and doesn't right if you were going to pick up the next crime book. Let's find one for eight. What would you be looking for in a crime free Even the book. Yeah gives you elements and we'll diagnose. Okay will somewhere with a real sense of place that I can kind of stand on this because we're not going anywhere right now that we need some vivid sensitive travel escape my falls something historical but maybe more kind of twentieth century historical and something. I do think that raises questions. It makes you think differently about something so I kind of like moral ambiguity in well. I have three suggestions for you. If people are sort of struggling to find their way into genre I sometimes think it's helpful to have sort of stepping stone books. That kind of are not necessarily crime but crime adjacent and a book which I firmly believe is part of the psychological thriller Genre and I would probably be one of the best but isn't usually shoved as that regard it is that is Rebecca by definitely Maury Which I think has the amazing sense of place that you're after Obviously it also literary classics. So it's just a really good book to have read if what is adjusted in literary fiction because it's the touchstone for a lot of kind of literary fiction as well as a lot of crime fiction Another book which again is kind of Paul of the Classic Crime Cannon and I think has the kind of moral questioning and ambiguity. That may be talking about Would be the time. Mister Ripley by Patricia Highsmith She is just wonderful writer full stop. She writes very sparsely. She's amazing at creating character. She plunged irritate and it is a crime novel. You're kind of trying to figure out what's happening whether Ripley's GonNa get caught. But she sort of puts you on the opposite side most crime because you're in Ripley skin and you're rooting for him. Even as he's doing terrible terrible things but you also kind of at the same time want justice to catch up with him but in terms of Morton book which I think takes away your boxes including the historical one. I would highly recommend Alabama cheese Series which is set in the Indian raw and has to fantastic Cactus at the center of it. There's some who's an English man who's been kind of Dropped into colonial India in sort of Typically kind of bossing the locals around and then as he's kind of second in command and sidekicks the not who's an Indian And it's just it's brilliantly done and it tackles some really big questions alongside each time. A really cracking mystery in terms of you. WanNa find out whodunit. You WanNa you the detectives to solve it. You want everyone to be bang to rights but he's really grappling with big twentieth century. Questions that estill dogging us today in terms of the fact that we don't have solutions. These are still things the Iraqi going in the news today. I'm they're just cracking a good races

Agatha Christie Mister Ripley Senate Robert Ludlum Pandora India Jessica Fletcher Cabot Cove Saad Estill Morton Waldman Officer Alabama Paul Patricia Highsmith Rebecca Writer Maury
"waldman" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"waldman" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"Had blocked the effort to postpone the election So that people would be able to cast their ballots more safely on primary day. He was being interviewed by reporters saying. Oh no no no no. This is so safe for people to vote. People's had have no worries about going to vote and he was wearing a has met suit while insane. And you know that's that's kind of the the veep level reality of some of this a lot of stuff going on. What do you expect in terms of legal battles going forward? What are people going to be reading the newspapers case? After case after case state by state as rules altered or as people try to request vote by mail with the Supreme Court getting involved. The last minute. Are we going to see a million of these? You know I. I hope not but I think there's certainly can be a lot of hand to hand legal combat between now and November. I mean things have to really happen in almost three steps first. Congress needs to step up and fund. This only the federal government has the capacity right now to provide the resources that it'll take for states to make it so that their citizens can vote. The Brennan Center did a cost analysis. We found that it would cost at least two billion dollars and actually we've looked at it some more. The numbers actually higher now Congress to its credit with the leadership of Speaker Pelosi and Senator. Schumer did get four hundred million dollars in the most recent big a stimulus bill to give to states so that they could take the steps that they wanted to take it was not a federal mandate. It was really money because you know right now. Only the federal government can print money states have these balanced budget rules and they're strapped and they're facing crises and running around the country trying to buy ventilators and only the federal government can provide these resources. But they have to do more. There needs to be a few billion dollars in these trillion dollars. Stimulus bills to help states and this is something that again. Republican as well as democratic state officials have been really urgently asking for you know the further away you get from Washington the further away you get from the Fox News. Green Room the less. Partisan this is this is something where a state election officials from what we can see have really been trying to do the right thing. They're just kind of overwhelmed. I mean y Wisconsin. Don't forget had vote by mail. They need to change. The rule is just that the system buckled under the weight of the number of people who now wanted to use it it went from something like two hundred fifty thousand people and a typical primary up to like a million and a half in one week so the next step after Congress provides the money is the states. Need to do what they need to do. And some of them need to change their rules here in New York State. There's a state constitutional provisions that made it basically impossible to vote by mail but the governor has done an executive order reinterpreting their constitutional provision so that people can but states just need to print it. They need to print up the ballots. They need to get the polling places. Set up so that people can actually use them safely and in a in a sanitary way and things like that. I guess you weren't weren't o'clock now to the the clock is ticking right. Yes absolutely this is not something that can be done overnight. And we've got basically if a few weeks to go to get the funding to the states states needs to take these steps. People need to pressure states to make sure they do it. And unfortunately it's become clear as part of this. What seems to be a kind of concerted strategy to make it harder.

federal government Congress New York State Supreme Court Speaker Pelosi Wisconsin Schumer Brennan Center Fox News Washington Senator executive
"waldman" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"waldman" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"This is going to be a battle in the courts and it's just a look I think that trump is making a political error here of potentially significant proportions. People support making it possible for them to vote. People support by very high margins both Democrats and Republicans and independents early voting and opportunity. Vote by mail seventy eighty percent and all the polls. The Brennan Center did a poll the been several by news organizations in the last few weeks and I think that anger over the idea that in Wisconsin the Republicans were trying to make it hard for people to vote is part of what drove the turnout in that state to be as high as it was. People want to vote and they get mad when you try to take that right away and I think that sooner or later I'm hoping anyway that some of the politicians on the right we'll see that but that is the dynamic it's not even concerned about contracting virus. You see what the long lines are like if people have jobs where their employers don't give them the day off or you can't get childcare. Whatever other problems you have. It's an option that doesn't seem to be better or worse whether you're Democrat or republican system matter of convenience and now this year for the first time in a very serious way the matter of personal safety and health to for me one of one of the defining images of this whole fight right now is on election day. Primary Day in Wisconsin. The speaker of the Wisconsin House and remember the Republicans control the legislature in Wisconsin because of ruthless gerrymandering. Not Because of the way people are actually voting sort of a perpetual motion. Machine here But the speaker who.

Wisconsin Wisconsin House trump Brennan Center
"waldman" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"waldman" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"Always been the greatest and ugliest example. Where the idea of voting as right is mocked and it continues to be that way. We really didn't have kind of true democracy in this country until black people fought for and won the voting rights act of nineteen sixty five. Which really broaden the franchise to everybody? So let's talk about that. So Lyndon Johnson takes over the presidency after Kennedy's assassinated he gets elected in his own right in sixty four and then helped to usher through passage of the voting rights. Act of nineteen sixty five which people learn about in school and certainly learn about it in las will explain why that was such a seminal piece of legislation. What was its primary Genius well rules put in place in the eighteen nineties to make it so that black people couldn't vote. Were still in effect. All across the south in the early nineteen sixties and you really had very very little ability for black people to vote and participate and when they tried to register to vote. They were met with violence and murder and terrorism. And everyone knew that it was both the most important and the hardest thing civil rights movement could get because it would create the power that would change things in so many different ways and the story of how the Voting Rights Act was enacted. As you know something I think people have a better sense of now. That was the movie. Selma there's certainly an understanding but it was this really fascinating interplay between politics of protests and the politics of insider deal making and public leadership all of which was required to get it done so you know in nineteen sixty four. Johnson broke through the filibusters from the south and with the civil rights movement. They got the civil rights of nineteen sixty four and in early nineteen sixty five Dr King and others came to him and said we must do voting rights now in. Johnston said not yet. It's too soon. We we have to get the great society through Congress and the timing is not right And King said and there are tapes. You know of the two of them. These two brilliant masterful southern politicians Lyndon Johnson and Martin Luther King Very Different. But they were both. That's what they both were dancing with each other. And there's a call in March of nineteen sixty five and Johnson never tells king that he's actually ordered the Justice Department to write the Voting Rights Act. Because they're going to introduce it and King never tells Johnson. Oh Yeah Watch what we do in some of this weekend but they recognized that they were going to have to show the country and show the world Dr King and John Lewis and the other civil rights leaders recognized. They would have to show the world. The brutality to dramatize it so on bloody Sunday. Is You know people do know. There was a nonviolent march. Across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma Led by young John. Lewis and the state troopers and vigilantes attacked the marchers and sent so many to the hospital. John Lewis had skull fractured. It was all on television and that week there was a spontaneous nationwide mass movement for voting rights. All over the country and Johnson was both the the person that were pressuring but was also very savvy and letting the pressure build and then he did go before Congress a week later and propose the Voting Rights Act and gave one of the greatest speeches any presence ever given. He said but really. It's all of us. Who must overcome the crippling legacy of bigotry and injustice and we shall overcome shall overcome used the slogan the song of the protesters and It was extraordinary and they passed the Voting Rights Act.

Lyndon Johnson Dr King John Lewis Congress Selma Edmund Pettus Bridge murder Selma Led Johnston Kennedy Justice Department
"waldman" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"waldman" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"The Brennan Center Part Think Tank and advocacy organization. This policy institute focuses on protecting issues at the core of our democracy. Waldman has been a guest of the show before and helped us understand the tense debate around gun rights and the Second Amendment in America. Today he's back for a primer on voting perennially important topic but especially now with the presidential election in November and an ongoing pandemic we talk about how the Voting Rights Act of nineteen sixty five pave the way for a true democracy. Why the Roberts court has taken a backward stance on voting rights issues and how to protect the integrity of our elections without falling into the misinformed mythology of voter fraud and whether voting by mail is the answer. That's next stay tuned. Michael Waldman thank you so much for being on the show once again. Thank you for having me so I have to begin as I always do in this age of covent. Nineteen with the question. How are you doing? How's your family? Thanks for asking. We're all doing fine. Not really used to this awful situation. I live in Brooklyn where the sound of sirens continues to be very present And it's never forget the human toll of what's going on but I hope you and your family doing okay. Yeah we're doing all right. I'm very lucky. We have a house outside the city. So we're we're doing as well as can be expected in these circumstances in a lot better than a lot of people still able to do my work. As I'm guessing you are a lot of people. Don't have that ability to keep working. You know the the ability to telework is one more way of revealing sort of the inequality in the class challenges in our in our society. You know the people who who are having the ride the subway and crowded platforms early in the morning or people who are going to work for all of us there people who are working in hospitals there people who are working in retail delivery remember Jesse Jackson used to talk about people who take the early bus rally. And it's it's the same thing and people are.

Michael Waldman Brennan Center Part Jesse Jackson Roberts court America Brooklyn
"waldman" Discussed on Big Blue View

Big Blue View

10:54 min | 1 year ago

"waldman" Discussed on Big Blue View

"All right Matt so the other position I think we need to talk about his tight end now. The giants obviously have Evan Ingram and again as always there are. There are injury concerns with with. Ingram durability concerns the giants have Have spent part of the off. Season collecting tight ends veteran. Guy Like Levine. To eye to eye. Lolo on that brought back Eric Tomlinson. They saw red ellison retire. They have Cayden Smith. They have a couple of other young tight ends on the roster. They have a lot of guys but what I don't see at the tight end position especially with you know with the questions about Ingram's durability what I don't see it the tight end position or a lot of long term answers so again. It's another position. I don't expect the giants to Go and draft a tight end. You know in in the second round even in the third round. I think they just have other priorities other things that they have to do so again. We're talking about data three tight ends. GimMe Gimme a few guys. You think could be could develop into starting caliber. Tight ends day three range. You know guys who who could maybe be part of the long term solution for the giants at that spot. Sure you know and and one guy. We didn't talk about wide receiver. Who could wind up being tight end kind of in that Evan? Ingram mold would be notre. Dame's Chase Klay Pool. So if they decide they want to draft a receiver but they feel like he can provide them. Maybe that Evan Ingram Jared Cook type of play clay pools a guy that we probably should have mentioned earlier but for day. Three guys the one that really sticks out the most is. Ucla'S DEVON OSCEOLA Z. Who is a six three two hundred fifty seven pound Tied in who really came off one strong year because he was toiling behind. Caleb Wilson who was you know statistically very strong college tight end but really more of a move a move tied and kind of more of just a big slow wide receiver. Who's who who's going to have trouble probably making the NFL roster but had a lot of reporter. With the likes of Josh Rosen and there is no and all the way up until last year when he you know. He was kind of their raining guys so they weren't GonNa Bench him for. Maybe a guy like Ozzy Ozzy who's a more promising. Nfl fell prospect but you know was still working his way arrived later at UCLA. So you know. Wilson had seniority in that. Respect but Ozzy Ozzy is you know. Ease a decent blocker. Econo- reminds me of a mix of guys like Randy McMichael who used to play with the dolphins on a Georgia and algae crumpled former Falcons player. Who was a good run? Blocker could really do nice work after the catch in the short and intermediate ranges field and Osceola has that skill. He's a type of guy that has good quickness. Good footwork works. The middle of the field. Wells receiver has the suddenness to be able to make those quick breaks. You need against linebackers. So I'm a big fan of what I think. He could become an probably. He's the best option of those day. Three guys bryson Hopkins is an interesting player. He's six five to forty five. Probably can add a little bit. More Weight is dad. Was Brad Hopkins. The former left tackle for the Tennessee. Titans when they had Steve McNair and that Super Bowl team He's a better block than you would expect he. He has some work to do to bulk up and be able to win the physical matchups but technically yes. I'm pretty Nice. Skills in terms of using the one arm technique being able to slide and and stay square with players but he's best fit as an h back. Who can really lead block in the run game and you can use a little bit more as an h back lead lead blocker also an edge blocker and he has terrific short area acceleration So type of guy that you can kind of leak the ball out too. And he can get yards after the catch You know two other guys that I'll give you a few other guys here. That could be interesting. Thad boss Randy mosses son out of. Lsu He's not a fast guy he's extremely sure handed And he runs good routes. He's the type of guy that you he could win in the short intermediate range when you throw targets up to let him win But he's mostly going to function for you as a blocker and his a short area receiver. They have a lot of those guys already. But he's kind of a Dennis Pitta Heath Miller type of player who can give you some dynamic skill in the red zone But also be a fantastic blocker on. I think he's less likely to be on that radar But guys who might be able to grow into more Jose that Guevara out of Cincinnati Former wide receiver pecan add. Maybe another ten to fifteen pounds. He can work. At the line of scrimmage and not just be an age back but also wind down field. You're Delaney Walker type of player at least aspiring in that area. And then you know jared Pinkney Auto Vanderbilt many concerned him to be atop Titan class but he kinda showed you kind of regressed last year. Production wise so a lot of people are going to be on that but he's also a slower player but he's kind of a you know you think of Zack. Miller as an example of a player that that he that he could be a productive guy in the slower range but still very good blocker enough short area quickness to be able to stretch the seem And then maybe the last guy who might have the most upside and if you're going to take a chance on a guy late in the draft. This might be the guy to do that. And that's Cheyenne O'Grady out of Arkansas. He's he's a hard running. Tied will excellent hands toughness in the face of contact But he's been suspended twice by his team. is former teammate. Forty niners linebacker. Drake Greenlaw actually called him out for. Skipping practices went to high school together and call him out for skipping practice and skipping class And they basically team after suspending him twice essentially quote unquote greed. A mutually to part company at the end of the season So he didn't even really finish at his time at the program but when you watch his game. He has worked at develop as a route runner in blocker. But the physical skills are there and he's type of guy that if he can mature and a lot of guys. You know Nina Little Time. More time to mature at this age If he can be one of those guys to turn the corner and mature and they feel solid about him he could be that guy that that goes from late round pick to emerge into a really productive. Nfl Starter all right Matt. Thank you very very much. For for all of that information lots of players to consider at At all of those positions will be interested to find out what the giants do here in a couple of weeks met before I let you go and before we close up shop wanted to tell folks where they can find you on twitter where they can follow your work. What you got coming up all that good stuff. Sure you know you can follow me at Mount Waldman. Rsvp DOT COM. That's my sight. You also can follow my Youtube Channel Matt Waldman's as P film room for anywhere between you know five minute long videos on player prospects to our long videos Twitter my handle is Matt. Waldman WWL D. A. N. And of course there's the Matt Waldman Czars P cast with you know we share mark. Scofield you know and Mark Mark. Certainly he comes on every other week. I do a scout A scout talk podcast with Russ Landi. Who is a former? Nfl SCOUT WITH A couple of different teams and working with the You know working in Calgary in Calgary with the stampede irs as a scout right now in the CFL and we talk about scouting matters You know go in depth on that and you. Can you know if you're interested in the rookie prospects at the skill positions? You know I offer what is arguably the most in-depth comprehensive guide that came out on April first on the rookie scouting portfolio publication. You can download it You can find the information and I'm videos that give you Tours of rookie scouting portfolio at Mount Waldman ours P dot com and that comes with a pre draft addition post draft edition after the draft. A week after that and then Then I a newsletter from June through December once a month that keeps you updated about those players as well as the past. Three classes of rookies And The upcoming class for twenty twenty one so You know it's well worth it's it's well worth the bang for the buck in terms of people You know the people who've gotten it. That's what their Their thoughts have been for the past fifteen years now. So it's what I do. Full time and You know hopefully give it a look all. It's all definitely great. Information definitely worth the time and the money Matt. Thank you very very much. Maybe After the draft will will get back together. We'll talk about the players that the giants did draft sounds great. Ed All right Matt. Thank you giants fans as always. Thank you for listening. Stay safe out there and we'll talk to you soon. Bye Bye hi. I'm Brian and I'm one of the hosts of the Amazing Avenue Network of podcasts. Each weekday we bring you a different podcast. The covers the New York mets from a different perspective every Monday. You Hear Me Steve. Along with Kenan Lucas on from complex SOCLEAN's will discuss the mets minor league system. Every Tuesday an unforgettable. Join me rebel. They look back on the career of a less. Heralded Mick Hi. I'm Alison and with Maggie and Linda. I host a pot of their own each week. We look at all things. Mets and social justice issues in baseball. I'm Chris and you can catch Brian me chatting about the current state of the mets on Amazing Avenue audio the show every Thursday and then. Friday's we have Amazing Avenue in conversation where I talked with interesting people about the New York mets. So check out the amazing avenue. Family of PODCASTS. You can get us on apple podcasts. Spotify stitcher or your pod catcher of choice and as always. Let's go mets..

giants Matt Waldman Evan Ingram New York mets Nfl Guy Like Levine Mount Waldman Ozzy Ozzy Dennis Pitta Heath Miller Brian Ucla Cayden Smith Caleb Wilson ellison Lolo Brad Hopkins Randy McMichael Eric Tomlinson Waldman WWL D. A. N.
"waldman" Discussed on At Liberty

At Liberty

07:57 min | 1 year ago

"waldman" Discussed on At Liberty

"Ninety five. They're probably not it deport him but I was raised by Trotskyites right so skepticism of the capitalist structure and a capitalist government this is deep and fundamental to my core and incidentally skepticism. About a Stalinist government also because like I said Trotsky on just a plain old communist. Yeah so I got that with my breast milk and one of the things that does appeal to me about the has always appealed to be is the purity already of the commitment to that so the freedom is freedom of expression. It's not freedom of expression for people who for example believe in equality so the skokie cases the cases about White Supremacist and Nazis. I felt like when I learned about those cases as a kid when I read more about a law school that seemed to me to be the finest expression of what the ACLU is doing. And what's interesting to me right now. In terms of the moment that we find ourselves in is that organizations like say you who are devoted to those freedoms could find themselves under attack both the right and the left you know in some ways. I worry that there is less of an understanding of the imports. Are doing that now. We have to understand where that suspicion comes from from right. I mean if your life family security is not their attack by the contemporary white supremacists in the White House at their their various billions of fellow travelers in contemporary American society. It can be agonizing traumatizing to to see an organization that's devoted to your civil rights also speak on behalf of theirs but I think that that commitment is really important to maintain and it's something that I admire most about the sale because it's hard to do man. It's hard to do in a time where you feel like there is a fundamental threat to say. You know it's not just we get to speak it's all of us. It's not just we who are protected from incarceration. It's for you know false and problematic reasons. It's all of us well as an African American rigging on free speech for the ACLU. I can tell you. I hardly understand how how hard these issues can be. And I do want to highlight that. The book is obviously a celebration of the centennial of the ACLU and catalogs are most famous and some lesser lesser-known victories but there are some notes of Critique L.. Absolutely you mentioned the skokie situation in the introduction to the book but then there's also an essay by Scott Turow on Buckley. V Vallejo around campaign. Your finance an issue where large numbers of people who agree with the ACLU on most things internally and externally disagree with us on campaign finance. So I wonder how you handled those critical notes. Personally I was thrilled because I'm I'm in the camp that thinks Buckley versus Vallejo is deeply problematic. And I don't think that corporate speech is human speech and I think campaign finance what's isn't speech and but I disagree with the ACLU on this tour which does not impact my deep commitment to the organization. And I think the same thing is true Scott's wrote so when Scott's I'm going to take that case I was thrilled and from the get-go he said and to be clear I'm critical of it and I was like go for it and then when the s acumen I thought the weight this is an yell. At S- book. This is or Michael's book this we're doing this to celebrate the ACLU. Maybe I should just put this. You know blow this by Anthony David and immediately. They said what you're talking about we're thrilled. This is great in fact. This is our favorite thing of course in a book. Celebrating celebrating the centennial. A city you there should be essays critical of ACLU. I love that I love that. The response was immediate and didn't even warrant consideration consideration. Of course we support this. Of course we want the idea for the book was hatched 2016. We've now just ticked over into twenty twenty. It's still hard for me you to say Happy New Year exactly at the moment. But I'm wondering now that you've completed this project as you mentioned and as I mentioned you've got lots and lots of balls in the air whether they be novels TV any other form I can think of. You're quite busy but I wonder with relations this particular project. What does the before and after look like what have you learned? What if what surprised you about the process well necessarily surprised but it was just so heart warming you know people? Oh like Geraldine Brooks people like Marlin James People like an Patchett. Some George Saunders. Jesmyn Ward they're inundated with requests for their time and when they speak they make tens of thousands of dollars and when they write they make many dollars word and we were saying do something for absolutely nothing and it was so heartwarming. How eager people were? I thought we would write a book with twenty contributors and we have over forty people. Aw involved in this volume so that was something that I found really hurting. And it's particularly report to me personally when I drift through the world and sometimes feel like the entire country has revealed itself to be what my dad always said. It was which is a snake's nest of racist this Toma folks and Anti Immigrants But it reminds me that the truth is that we are in the majority those of us who are committed to civil rights those us who are patriots who believe in the Constitution. Those of us who believe that this is a union that must be constantly in the process of perfecting itself that it it was founded on terribly racist principles in many ways but that there was something pure about the constitution that has allowed room to grow. Oh and change that there was space to create as the phrase is a more perfect union that we are actually in the majority. There are more people in this country like us then art art and because of our deeply problematic electoral system because tiny states rule states. Waiter states have so much more power within larger mortgage verse states because of the way the American political system is structured. We can feel like minority. We can look at a map like the minority already but we are the majority and my husband is an optimist and he believes that the majority will prevail. And sometimes I just allow. Oh myself to believe that too. And the moment we're unpacked the box of books in there were all these great looking books in hardcover and there was all these amazing writers names on on them and I thought okay well. This is a moment that I believe that that potential that we will get through this and the America that is possible will will prevail on the other end and then of course I woke up the next day and you know I was like well. It's all over soon and now let's go build a bunker and it was easy Linda. How much money do you have to have? Can someone else give me a corner of their bunker. Well that may be the closest to ending on a positive note that we're well take this opportunity to thank you very much for your time. Thank you for your years. Literally Years of work on this volume Al-Yaum. It's a beautiful book. It's touching book. It's a powerful book. We really appreciate your time and thank you for all that you've done. Thank you so much. You guys are the greatest. Thanks very much for listening. If you'd like to hear more conversations like this one please be sure to subscribe that Liberty Wherever you get your podcasts and rate and review review the show we really appreciate the feedback till next week piece..

ACLU skokie Scott Turow Trotsky Trotskyites Vallejo White House Anthony David Jesmyn Ward George Saunders Buckley Michael America Geraldine Brooks Linda Marlin James
"waldman" Discussed on At Liberty

At Liberty

04:39 min | 1 year ago

"waldman" Discussed on At Liberty

"From the this is at liberty. I'm Emerson Sykes Staff Attorney here here at the ACLU and your host January nineteenth marks works ACLU's one hundredth birthday to commemorate the centennial. Some of today's most significant writers contributed to a new anthology of essays on landmark. ACLU Jio you cases. The roster of writers includes Jesmyn Ward Salman Rushdie and Dave eggers discussing cases like Brown v Board of Education. Miranda Vieira Zona Zona and Roe v Wade just to name a few. The book is called fight of the century and it was the brainchild of today's guest. Ayelet Waldman an accomplished writer and former public like defender who co edited the book along with her husband and fellow writer. Michael Shaybah. We'll discuss. What inspired this effort and how storytelling in the courtroom in literature can shape our nation and our lives? Islet as I understand it. The idea for this book came about after the last presidential election. Can you take us back to two thousand sixteen. Jean what were you feeling. And what action do I have to go back to. Two Thousand Sixteen. Don't have to revisit the trauma the ongoing or we'll basically I like everyone Nelson Sane. America was horrified and devastated although I was not surprised because I.

ACLU Miranda Vieira Zona Zona Emerson Sykes Staff Attorney Jesmyn Ward Salman Rushdie Ayelet Waldman writer Nelson Sane Dave eggers Michael Shaybah America Jean Board of Education Wade Roe Brown
Kevin Nash Among Those Picked For the WWE Hall Of Fame

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

03:48 min | 1 year ago

Kevin Nash Among Those Picked For the WWE Hall Of Fame

"So we got hall Nash Hogan and Ex Pock going into the hall of fame in Twenty Twenty as the N. W. O.. All are already in Spin Your wacky and Batista is also going in and that leads to this person's question here. I find it weird that out of everyone that was in the N. W. O.. Only Hogan Hall Nash. And Chandra being inducted in the hall of fame might get the first three guys are important because they're the founders but sean being the only other one added his weird especially since guys like Diaz in big show joined before him. Listen really listen my friend. The hall of fame is a Gimmick. The hall of fame is a Gimmick television ratings and to get people to buy tickets. And you do that by presenting big stars and on top of that even if you consider this a real hall of fame which it's not yes. DB OSCE was in before xbox but was a manager who did nothing in one day just disappeared like there was nothing nothing hall of fame worthy about the end of the the big show was in there as in and out in and out in and out he turned fifty five times. Seems like the core of the group Shaan Waldman was a core of the group. He's actually one of the guys you think about when you think of the show as well more so than the big show but at the end of the it doesn't matter Shawn's available and they want the four guys all their. They want to sell tickets based on their names and Batista's name the fact that the announced everyone so far in advance tells me they probably weren't happy with how things went last year. So they're getting all these names out here now to sell a whole bunch of tickets and I'm sure that someday big show is going to go in as has the big show the pregnant. I want to do that when I and then later they can put him in with this faction that faction but I don't think it should over think who's going in they want and stars to be given rings that's it and obviously they got a quota so you can have a woman this year. You can have a legend this year you you can have whatever their pioneer wing is this year. I mean that's just the way things are going to go. It's a payday. It's a rang that later on. You can pawn if you need to you. You know that there's it's hey it's it's a celebration and it is what it is. So is Shawn Watson not in as a member of the X louden they deacs not lou the wwe hall of fame takes win last year. So shall Walkman in with that yes so there's a possibility now that he's in with the end of Yo that we can still. Oh get the one-two-three kid inducted into the hall of fame and Shaul Maltman can get into the hall of fame three times maybe we can give him some lightning kid as well tube. At least the one two three kid has got a chance to make it into the hall of fame. That's what you telling me. Yeah they're multiple people in Multiple Times. I'm sure that's what's the record. I want to see him. Go in. I mean could bury layers twice. He's probably go in three times. You may be in three times by now. I think he's only emphasize though we'll never run out of people people I know you think that we will because they have to bring in so many people. We've already ran out of Michael. No no we're repeating. Listen to me very dr so can make it in the repo man can make it in a demolition smash can make it in Who else was it? The Golfer could make it Mike. You're you're you're missing my point my putting in the a Golfer you've already ran at a people by putting people in twice you've already ran at a people. We ran out of people. The Madison Square Garden Ring. Bell is actually should be in the hall of fame. It's in my own personal hall of fame. That distinct Rengel should be in the hall of fame. That's the direction we're going with this thing actually is we're going to get nanometer objects objects into the hall of fame because we've already got gimmicks going in concepts like the end of your show groups I I guess that's how you're calling this but like why not just have random things things the gobbledygook egg could be in the hall of fame soon.

Hogan Hall Nash Batista Twenty Twenty Shawn Watson Shaan Waldman Shaul Maltman Nash Hogan Michael Diaz Multiple Times Osce Mike Chandra Madison Square Garden Ring Ex Pock Sean Bell LOU X One Day
#PayUpHollywood Attempting To Change Pay And Working Conditions For Entertainment Industry Assistants

The Frame

06:44 min | 1 year ago

#PayUpHollywood Attempting To Change Pay And Working Conditions For Entertainment Industry Assistants

"Assistance in the entertainment industry are overworked underpaid and and often have to run personal errands for their bosses even after they leave for the day. That's according to a new survey of more than fifteen hundred assistance. It was released this this week by the grassroots movement called pay up Hollywood. The campaign started as a twitter Hashtag back in October and has been gaining momentum since then Katie kilkenny is an associate editor at the Hollywood reporter where she covers labor and she explains how the Hashtag grew out of an episode of script notes. A podcast asked about screenwriting. A assistant wrote in saying you know I think one of the big issues. That's going to be coming forward in the next few decades in Hollywood is that we're gonna I have to talk about the low pay. That assistance are facing in how that is related to rising cost of living in Los Angeles and from near the hosts which cacus Craig Mason. Who are both really powerful writers in Hollywood? Read that note and ask for more people to talk about their stories of being an assistant in Los Angeles they just got an overwhelming matic. Email and a writer named Alber who is on the board at the Writers Guild of America started Hashtag called Hashtag Champ. Hollywood so a couple of days before Thanksgiving script notes facilitated a pay up Hollywood town hall where assistance had a chance to talk about some of the issues. And here's what one woman who didn't provide. Her name had to say about burnout. We almost have like three jobs at once. Like not only. Are we working our day. The job for forty to sixty hours a week and not making enough and then therefore doing work on the side like babysitting driving etc but we also have the work of our own careers. I and I think that is what leads that burnout. Because we're not only expected to have this day job that puts all these things in place for us to move forward and then on top of that we're expected to have like an hour to write a day or or to fund their own short films and make them on the weekends like that is just like impossible. I think impossible's inaccurate word word for what she's describing. What some of the other issues that came up around the Hashtag and around the town hall so I think a big one is the question of access? Hollywood has been talking talking a lot about its diversity issues wanting to get more folks into the pipeline of diverse backgrounds. But what we're looking at. Here's the situation where you have to to be able to afford to be an assistant in the first place to get that first leg up in the industry and so Paige Hollywood has just released a survey of one thousand thousand five hundred fifty one assistance and they found that seventy percent of the people who were surveyed were white and that fifty two percent were receiving financial -sential aid from family and friends to make ends meet as they were assistance in Hollywood. So I think we're seeing that this industry in order to diversify does have to become more accessible or economically manically accessible to folks who aren't coming in with with that aid so that to me was notable as well as the fact that a lot of assistance were also talking thing about this sort of demeaning conditions that were expected of them. Hollywood has pay your dues culture and I think a lot of folks remember at its in difficult conditions when they or assistance and so sort of expect. There is a lot to go through that as well. But in the survey it showed that one hundred and four respondents had an object thrown at them in the workplace. So I think that we're looking at conditions assistance or not only being pretty badly paid but also they are facing conditions that are pretty rough. We're talking with Katie kilkenny at the Hollywood reporter about pay up. Hollywood there are other things that really jumped out to me. One is that almost ninety three percent of those. The people surveyed said they work more than forty hours a week and fifteen percent said they were working more than sixty hours a week and hero's something that was really troubling. Almost almost a quarter said that they had reported an increase in substance abuse. So it sounds like the job is really taking a terrible terrible toll on the people who are in this line of work completely. I mean I think these numbers sort of show something that assistance have been talking to each other about for a long time and so I think for a lot of this is not a surprise but this survey really shines a light on some of these issues and the fact that things need to change and it sounds like some show runners are actually saying this is unsustainable and maybe even immoral absolutely so I talked to a few folks. We'd been vocal on twitter with their support and basically found out talking to them that they were advocating for higher wages on projects that they're currently developing and these are Adam conifer who Folks might know true. TV's Adam Ruins everything. David H Steinberg. who was a CO show runner? Netflix is no good nick. And the writer producer producer Creator Ayelet Waldman who was an executive producer on Netflix. Unbelievable Waldman in particular told me that she was trying to get her assistance twenty dollars an hour plus benefits and hover was saying that he was trying to just various aspects of the job to make it more. Tenable you said in your story Lori that you had reached out to the major studios and talent agencies for comment and let's just say they weren't flooding the phone lines calling back. have any of them. Had anything anything to say. One Agency is doing something and they didn't provide comment for the story. But you know I heard via sources that for which is the talent agency that represents spoke John August who helped movement as well as Liz Alpert who coined. The HASHTAG has conducted in anonymous pace survey of their assistance. And and I will also be receiving and looking at the results of the pay up Hollywood survey and I imagine that in weeks to come others will speak up more but for now they our remaining mum and even if the hours are horrible. The working conditions aren't great. A lot of people want these jobs right because it's so hard hard to get into the business and this is one possible path for people who want to become creative people in Hollywood definitely. They're extremely competitive jobs and often a line that is used with assistance to speak up about work. Conditions is that you know there were thousands. That will take place but it's gotten to the point where the wages are the same as they were twenty years ago in some cases That's what we're hearing from. These stories while the cost of living in Los Angeles has skyrocketed. And so these assistance missiles argument is that the situation is untenable at the slain. Katie Kilkenny is an associate editor at the Hollywood reporter. Katie thanks so much for coming on the show as much for having me

Hollywood Katie Kilkenny Paige Hollywood Los Angeles Reporter Writer Twitter Associate Editor Writers Guild Of America Unbelievable Waldman Netflix Craig Mason John August Alber Lori David H Steinberg. Adam Liz Alpert Executive Producer
"waldman" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

12:34 min | 1 year ago

"waldman" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"Mm Studio Feline I'm Sarah Lane and I'm Roger Chan the show's Britta's it very excited to have area Waldman NASA advisor and author of what it's like in space Korea silicon tablet case and a Free Year of free time unlimited both devices are available for preorder today shipping October thirtieth the ten starts at one two hundred forty nine dollars and the H. E. Ten kids edition starts at one hundred ninety nine dollars to your replacement warranty not battery although if your battery rigs you get a replace do years so it works either way and that that's that's really important when selling these kids editions the fire tablet was the first one to kind of pioneer this idea of having a kid friendly version of the device so I'm not surprised to see them kind of updating that along with bringing it out to the kindle the new fire hd ten tablet certainly seems like it's well specked but people seem most excited about the fact that it has a USB port on it like p we've gone from complaining about things with UC ports did like cheering when a USB port say I have so many of them anyway now thank you just get on board California Governor Gavin newsom signed two bills into law last week regulating the distribution of deep fake videos bill AB seven thirty now our law ABC thirty makes it illegal to distribute manipulated videos aimed at deceiving voters or discrediting candidates within sixty days of an election? I guess if it's sixty one days before and election you can distribute all you want ABC six zero two gives people in California the right to do to sue someone for creating pornographic deep fakes using their likeness without consent and a study released Monday from debt security company deep trace found that ninety six percent of the more than fourteen thousand depict videos identified online were pornographic in nature not necessarily revenge porn or something like that but that seems to be what it's used most four so ABC six Oh to making it easier to sue someone for creating deep fakes using their likeness seems like it is called for since that's the majority use of this eighty seven thirty which is the one about not distributing manipulated videos aimed deceiving voters I mean why limit sixty days is my is my question yeah you mentioned if it's sixty one days are we in the clear here yeah it seems like it's a rule that is designed to confuse and you know and perhaps unfairly manipulate something can election it should just be a real hundred percent at the time I suppose I suppose there's reasons to say well we're we're limiting speech too much we do that so just around elections we want to dampen down but if you're limiting speech limiting speech whether it's not area I'm curious if you have a take on on that particular part of this that that idea of of saying you can't distribute something meant to deceive voters and who gets to decide that too yeah well and also how is it enforceable also if something's created at sixty seventy days but then it doesn't really pick up until within the sixty day frame and someone else who disseminates it from someone who's the irs is just it seems very strange I'd I'd be very curious where that came from and a little bit dismayed if it just came from well the sixty days leading up to the election as when you can really distort voters we've found or something I don't know it's I don't know it's almost like they created it to be shot down it seems very ano- strange I wonder somebody's going to challenge that in court especially that what you mentioned does it really interesting scenario of like I have a bunch of things up that are there could be considered deceptive and then it sixty days do I have to take them all down for sixty days until the nations over and then I can put them back up or if somebody re tweets them are or something similar distributors it come back to me distributor there is it you know it's it's interesting we'll see how this ends up being enforced and if it gets taken into court I also wonder if it's really about individuals or about the social networks themselves who are they trying to hold to account is it is it the conspiracy theorists or is it Jack Dorsey oh now well it's the distributor so my guess is it's going to it's targeted at the platforms because they are the distributor of things there also the companies that will pay out more money one suit yes this is perhaps a letter notes sonos launched a test of option service for its hardware called Sonos flex five hundred homes in the Netherlands can now choose from three different plans fifteen euros per month gets you too so I once mark speakers which is equivalent buying after just more than.

ABC California Governor Gavin newsom Waldman NASA H. E. Ten Britta Sarah Lane advisor Korea Roger Chan sixty days sixty one days one two hundred forty nine dol one hundred ninety nine dollar ninety six percent sixty seventy days hundred percent sixty day
"waldman" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

02:48 min | 1 year ago

"waldman" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"Features include reading badges kids earn for how often they read or the types of books they read and more some gamification kind of stuff and a new feature also puts a quick definition of challenging words available between the lines of the book and turn that on or off there's a few other dictionary related features in there for helping kids understand words but first time that Amazon has targeted an e reader particularly at kids I love this idea as a kid I read prolifically I often challenging word where it was like mom what does this word mean she say isn't sentence we'd figure it out amongst nice to have a little bit of like a some sort of a something that echoes my smartwatch where it says like you've read a really good amount keep going you know smarter that kind of thing I I think that that is really motivated and certainly for certain kids and I'd be interested to see if this could be integrated into schools a little bit more so that Teachers could help you know what champion was kids along Yeah Yeah Yeah Roger I'm curious if that free time service you know I don't know that you have a bunch of these Amazon devices so so maybe that's a nonstarter right there but is it attractive to you and your two daughters actually but I don't like you said I don't actually have a lot of amd or amdi Amazon devices I can see it being more useful as my daughter gets older but she's still at the stage where she wants to watch very erratic stuff so it's she doesn't have the attention span guests to sit through anything more educational than five minutes. What about other educational situations I I mean I'm like got some possibilities however I don't know if there's an educational version of free time or if it's really seems to be really targeted a parent's right now in fact I don't think that there is one I think that it would be a great idea for Amazon to figure out how this could be integrated into schools because you know oftentimes the teachers are the ones that are encouraging kids to read and do more educational things on on tablets anyway Amazon also updated the fire Jacobites of internal storage with Microsoft E card expansion any USB port battery life is ready to.

Amazon amd Microsoft five minutes
Hulu finally lets you download shows to watch offline

Daily Tech News Show

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Hulu finally lets you download shows to watch offline

"Launched the ability to download shows for offline viewing users can download up to twenty five titles across five devices keeping their for thirty days although once you start watching a title it expires two days after you start playing it back if you're on the commercial free plan you can download the majority of whose catalog using lose IOS APP who says it will bring that function to android soon but caveat if you have the cheaper plan the one with commercials you don't get the offline viewing plan you got to pay for the top

Thirty Days Two Days
Impeachment probe reaches into White House with new subpoena

Q

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

Impeachment probe reaches into White House with new subpoena

"Beer vice president Mike pence has been subpoenaed by house Democrats over the trump Ukraine scandal goes Franco or don't use reports on the latest in the house impeachment inquiry three of the top democratic house chairman has subpoenaed vice president Mike pence to turn over documents related to the houses impeachment inquiry of president trump's dealing with Ukraine representatives alley angle Adam Schiff and Elijah Cummings a public reports have raised questions about pence's rolling quote conveying a reinforcing the president's message to the Ukrainian president Katy Waldman the vice president's press secretary said it does not appear to be a serious request in characterized it as another attempt by Democrats to obstruct the administration agenda Franco or down yes NPR news

Vice President Mike Pence Franco Chairman Donald Trump Adam Schiff Elijah Cummings President Trump Katy Waldman Press Secretary Ukraine NPR
The new shows to watch and the ones to skip

TV's Top 5

04:25 min | 1 year ago

The new shows to watch and the ones to skip

"As usual we wrap things up with the critics corner this week's new arrivals include undone on Amazon unbelievable on Net flicks and American Horror Story Nineteen eighty-four on FX Dan. What's cooking well? I if I had not seen American Horror Story Nineteen eighty-four as if I have said many times I'm looking forward to watching the first few episodes and quitting as usual but I can't tell you if it's better or worse than usual fortunately though there are actually a lot of things things to watch this week and really the main new releases are all pretty good to very good. Unbelievable is Netflix exes this I would say it is complementary to mind hunter. It is to some degree. It's the story of two detectives played by Merit Weaver in Toni Collette investigating a serial rape case. There's also a story line involving Caitlyn deavere as one of the victims potentially of the same serial rapist. Maybe maybe not it is intense and it sounds like it is unpleasant to watch or could could be unpleasant to watch. It is less wallowing than it could be. I would say that the creators Suzanne grants who wrote Erin Brockovich among other things is the primary creator along with a let Waldman and Michael Chaban and it has a really good grasp of tone. It never goes to dark. It has is very good insight into the criminal investigative process what works what doesn't sometimes it's even funny and that has a lot to do with the fact that Moore Weaver in Tony any clutter just wonderful together. It's based on a Pulitzer Prize winning propublica article and I could honestly watch multiple seasons of this or up Toni Collette Leadin Merit Weaver being awesome Caitlyn deavere also awesome. I thought the eighth episode of the eighth. Maybe is a drop in quality. Maybe a little bit more contrived and conventional conventional than the first seven but it's an impressive piece of economical and powerful storytelling then undone which sounds like it should be right. They're also alphabetically which is very important comes from a Raphael Bob Wax Bergen keep purdy who have worked together on Bo Jack Horseman on Netflix. This one is on an Amazon and it is a twisty turny wrote a scoped story about a young woman who becomes unstuck in time and reality after a car the accident and her father voiced by Bob Odenkirk actually played by Bob Odenkirk because that's how wrote a scope works tells her that she has the power to help. nope basically solve the mystery of his death or murder. Main character is played by Rosa Salazar who people will know maybe from alita battle angel or for man seeking woman. She's she's very good. It is not as funny or Quirky as Beau Jack Horsemen but is is visually magnificent the the the rotor scoping technology and the work done by director his Co.. Housing is is stunning to look at. I didn't care about the murder mystery really at all but I love watching this this is this is such a beautiful show to watch and sometimes it's funny. Sometimes it has some big thoughts in its mind. It's Jerry Interesting Are you gonNa Watch either of those two this weekend direction. I actually just started binging elites. I'm probably going to finish that and then I'm hopefully to watch some baseball this weekend. I'm hopefully going to sit out by the pool. That all sounds good if you need a little bit more TV I can also to some degree. Recommend showtimes murderer on the by you. Showtime is getting into the same true. Crime miniseries extended storytelling market that netflix dominated that obviously Amazon has done some. I'm working. A bunch of folks have done it. It's about the investigation into the deaths of young women in a single Louisiana small town. It is full of rather rather mind boggling details miscarriages of justice. It is absolutely difficult to watch. It's a Lotta graphic. Talk about you know people selling their bodies is selling their souls and smoking crack with their parents but it is you're trying to do right there. It doesn't look like it's that exciting small town so apparently you gotta do what you gotTa do it is harrowing but sometimes gripping and mind boggling to watch a lot of pretty good TV to watch this weekend. I would say so there. You

American Horror Story Nineteen Netflix Amazon Merit Weaver Caitlyn Deavere Toni Collette Leadin Merit Wea Bob Odenkirk Murder Raphael Bob Wax Bergen Toni Collette Pulitzer Prize Rosa Salazar Beau Jack Baseball Erin Brockovich Rape Louisiana Purdy Suzanne Director
"waldman" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"waldman" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Clubhouse. I'm Susan Waldman along with Neil Walker for you this year. How is this year really changed for you? You come in. And now, you kind of a man of all trades. You you go in everywhere. Have you gotten used to that? Really? Are do you ever get used to that? You know, it it certainly was a transition. But I knew that coming in here. I was going to be asked about a little bit defensively. And that was something that was open to didn't think I'd find myself in the outfield I short period of time, but it was open to that too. But more than that. You know, I learned how to. You know, how to kind of grind a little bit more. And it's always been a strong point of mine, but to be asked to be in a different role in early on it took a while to kind of settle in. And I feel like the first month of the season was was obviously a nightmare for for me personally. But more than that is about helping the team win. So whatever I've been asked to do is in my mind is is something that is a benefit for the team. So regardless of playing every day or playing once a week, I've tried to embrace that. What does it mean to you that this came right from the beginning had said he's part of this team. He's going to be here. It's gonna work even when people were screaming, oh, this isn't gonna work. But what does it mean to you that they really thought that? Yeah. You know? That's that's something. I feel very fortunate about something that I know that they, you know, kind did their homework with distrusting my track record and all that kind of comes with that. So I'm very appreciative of that. And you know. At the same time. I had tried to work hard to to help. Like, I said in any way, shape or form. And I think I've done that decently. Well, hey, how much does everybody just want to win this game today? So that you can clinch and get ready for Wednesday at home. Yeah. That's that's something. That's important. You know, we know that we're playing pretty good baseball Renou had an eye series down in Tampa. It'd be nice to close. This thing up today. You know, I I looked in the paper this morning and the Yankees took out a full-page ad congratulating, David Wright and thanking him for everything he did anybody. Who loves baseball knows what this man means is someone that played there and knew him very, well, how hard is this going to be? And what does that mean when you see people get teary eyed and everything about someone like that? How specialists he is very special. I mean, he's he's the heartbeat of that organization for me..

baseball Susan Waldman David Wright Yankees Neil Walker Tampa Renou
Rep. Chris Collins, tagged with insider trading charge, will now suspend reelection campaign

The Brian Lehrer Show

00:36 sec | 2 years ago

Rep. Chris Collins, tagged with insider trading charge, will now suspend reelection campaign

"As you've been hearing. Republican congressman from New York Chris Collins is suspending his reelection campaign that's amid allegations. Of insider trading, Collins may the announcement this morning he. Pleaded not guilty on Wednesday to charges that he used inside information on a biotech company to help his. Friends and family avoid hundreds of thousands of dollars in losses at the. Time he vowed not to end his reelection. Bid Collins. Says he does plan to finish his term and fight what he calls the. Meritless, charges against him the three term congressman represents parts of western New York he was the first sitting congressmen to endorse Donald. Trump for

NPR New York City Chris Collins Blankenship Nick Waldman West Virginia Senate Congressman Charlottesville David Barrera Hughes Spencer Nasa Virginia Kurtis Tommy Shoal Hawes Spencer Massey Energy Barbara Klein Jason Judy
Judge rejects Saudi Arabia's attempt to toss 9/11 lawsuits

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

02:10 min | 3 years ago

Judge rejects Saudi Arabia's attempt to toss 9/11 lawsuits

"A forum to be held this friday also police announcing that they have new crowd control measures in place for tonight's game that's abc's qena woodworth step on clark's funeral set for eleven o'clock this morning a lawyer representing hundreds of survivors of the nine eleven attacks and the families of those killed celebrating a judge's ruling that their lawsuit can go forward against the government of saudi arabia jackie quinn reports the new york federal judge says the allegations that the government of saudi arabia assisted the september eleven hijackers meet the criteria of the justice against sponsors of terrorism act saudi arabia has been trying to get the case dismissed and the same judge previously rejected arguments that the saudi government helped fund al qaeda's rise as a terrorist group plaintiff's attorney shawn carter calls this a historic ruling he says families have been trying for years to get answers from the saudi government fifteen of the nineteen hijackers were saudis the nine eleven commission report though found no evidence of government involvement i'm jacky quin komo news time nine twenty one day your komo propel insurance money update positive day on wall street and get those numbers in just a moment but first china's commerce ministry urging washington to discard a tariff planet warns might set off a chain reaction that could disrupt the global trade ministry spokesman has given no details of how beijing might respond to president trump's tariff hikes what's his china will fight to the end to women say it's time for a reality check for the fashion industry abc's daria all winger explains almost three quarters of american women are a size fourteen or larger and they can't find a thing to wear and that made alexandra waldman angry six woman never had better taste she just had better options so she and her friend pauline eventually started universal standard which they describe as a size inclusive clothing line there was this invisible line being drawn that once you hit a certain size the fabric was worse the fit was worse the design was not mother and a few years later things are so successful universal standard is expanding to larger and smaller sizes daria albinger abc news grain on wall street right now dow jones up two hundred twenty one points the nasdaq ahead seventy three the sp five hundred up twenty six your next money update coming up.

Donald Trump Alexandra Waldman President Trump Beijing Trade Ministry Jacky Quin Attorney New York Pauline ABC Clark Washington China Shawn Carter Saudi Government Saudi Arabia Jackie Quinn Nine Twenty One Day
"waldman" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"waldman" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Was sir the we do now no matter neck them now an waldman says that's right he took them i am a on an donald trump hands.

waldman donald trump