35 Burst results for "Walden"

A Look At The Building Blocks Of Stem Cells

Sounds of Science

04:43 min | Last month

A Look At The Building Blocks Of Stem Cells

"From mouse models in one, thousand, nine, hundred, one to cloning Dolly the sheep to a couple of Nobel prizes. Stem cells have had an exciting half-century. But rearranging the building blocks of life is not easy and more importantly for patients not fast. However, newcomers on the market are ready to change the stem cell programming for the quicker. Joining me today are Mariangela, I o Vino Group leader integrated biology at Charles River Saffron Walden site and Mark Qatar. The founder of the cellular reprogramming startup bit bio. The are here to discuss the innovative technology created by mark and his associates and how it can be exploited by end users like Mariangela welcome Mariangela. Thank you welcome to Beautiful Safran. World. Nice, weather? Yeah. Not Bad. So can we start at the beginning? What are stem cells briefly? So stemmed has really the origin of any complex organism. Their form pretty much after an expert. And role is ready to reproduce all the cells. In the body of a human or or an animal. And the cool thing though is that Yamanaka in two thousand seven showed that one doesn't have to fertilized egg to produce stem cells. You can also produce them synthetically using salary programming, and that really has opened up the use of stem cells for drug discovery and can locations. Cool. All right. What practical uses do stem cells have for drug developers? I think that the DAW to using human cells in drug development this is really important because there's a huge translation gap at the moment between. The animal models and cell lines that are traditionally used right and. The high failure rates that you see in clinical trials. Yeah. Totally the boiled on to two things I drugs because they're toxic to human or because they don't work the human setting and so at the center of all this differences between the species used for drug development at us as the end uses. So you're saying is that the stem cells can be made from human cells and that way they're tested on human cells instead of a different species. That's exactly right. Okay. That makes sense. So how were stem cells traditionally used to create sells like brain cells? So the traditional paradigm was to try and repeat what happens during development when embryo grows in Utah and so researchers for the last twenty years or so tried to. Create protocols that expose cells to extra Selah cues, molecules that exist in the growing embryo and instruct them direct them towards particular cell fates. One of the problems that you have if you repeat this paradigm, of course, you're bought into the timelines of of Embryo Genesis, which basically means it often takes sixteen hundred days plus to generate human sale. and. The other problem that you have when you adopt this, this method is that you have to overcome the diversity that nature requires to create cells. So the worst thing that can happen during development is if a lineage, an organ or a cell type isn't produced raced. And Soak Nature seems to. Prevent. This using. CASSIE principles. So these cells make cell fate choices all along the way. If you think about a protocol that takes sixty one, hundred days with multiple steps were cells make these choices than you end up with inconsistencies. So inconsistency and longtime nine's really the biggest bottleneck introduced new Simpson about. So it's basically I, mean if we're trying to imitate nature nature is trying to make all of the organs we may be only want brain. So using nature's methods is a little bit tricky. So I would say if you wanted to produce a particular cell type, it's very tricky. In terms of producing elements of an organ. It's probably slightly less tricky although you still have the inconsistency question right and then this new paradigm called cell reprogramming. Which is essentially. An expansion or reverse engineering of Yamanaka reprogramming. Provides an alternative route so you can now very efficiently in very quickly. Produce. Human cells using. Synthetic biology paradigm

Mark Qatar Charles River Saffron Walden Mariangela Founder Beautiful Safran Yamanaka Vino Group Utah Selah Simpson
Building the Building Blocks of Life

Sounds of Science

04:48 min | Last month

Building the Building Blocks of Life

"I'm Mary Parker and welcome to this episode of Eureka Sounds of science from mouse models in one, thousand, nine, hundred, one to cloning Dolly the sheep to a couple of Nobel prizes. Stem cells have had an exciting half-century. But rearranging the building blocks of life is not easy and more importantly for patients not fast. However, newcomers on the market are ready to change the stem cell programming for the quicker. Joining me today are Mariangela, I o Vino Group leader integrated biology at Charles River Saffron Walden site and Mark Qatar. The founder of the cellular reprogramming startup bit bio. The are here to discuss the innovative technology created by mark and his associates and how it can be exploited by end users like Mariangela welcome Mariangela. Thank you welcome to Beautiful Safran. World. Nice, weather? Yeah. Not Bad. So can we start at the beginning? What are stem cells briefly? So stemmed has really the origin of any complex organism. Their form pretty much after an expert. And role is ready to reproduce all the cells. In the body of a human or or an animal. And the cool thing though is that Yamanaka in two thousand seven showed that one doesn't have to fertilized egg to produce stem cells. You can also produce them synthetically using salary programming, and that really has opened up the use of stem cells for drug discovery and can locations. Cool. All right. What practical uses do stem cells have for drug developers? I think that the DAW to using human cells in drug development this is really important because there's a huge translation gap at the moment between. The animal models and cell lines that are traditionally used right and. The high failure rates that you see in clinical trials. Yeah. Totally the boiled on to two things I drugs because they're toxic to human or because they don't work the human setting and so at the center of all this differences between the species used for drug development at us as the end uses. So you're saying is that the stem cells can be made from human cells and that way they're tested on human cells instead of a different species. That's exactly right. Okay. That makes sense. So how were stem cells traditionally used to create sells like brain cells? So the traditional paradigm was to try and repeat what happens during development when embryo grows in Utah and so researchers for the last twenty years or so tried to. Create protocols that expose cells to extra Selah cues, molecules that exist in the growing embryo and instruct them direct them towards particular cell fates. One of the problems that you have if you repeat this paradigm, of course, you're bought into the timelines of of Embryo Genesis, which basically means it often takes sixteen hundred days plus to generate human sale. and. The other problem that you have when you adopt this, this method is that you have to overcome the diversity that nature requires to create cells. So the worst thing that can happen during development is if a lineage, an organ or a cell type isn't produced raced. And Soak Nature seems to. Prevent. This using. CASSIE principles. So these cells make cell fate choices all along the way. If you think about a protocol that takes sixty one, hundred days with multiple steps were cells make these choices than you end up with inconsistencies. So inconsistency and longtime nine's really the biggest bottleneck introduced new Simpson about. So it's basically I, mean if we're trying to imitate nature nature is trying to make all of the organs we may be only want brain. So using nature's methods is a little bit tricky. So I would say if you wanted to produce a particular cell type, it's very tricky. In terms of producing elements of an organ. It's probably slightly less tricky although you still have the inconsistency question right and then this new paradigm called cell reprogramming. Which is essentially. An expansion or reverse engineering of Yamanaka reprogramming. Provides an alternative route so you can now very efficiently in very quickly. Produce. Human cells using. Synthetic biology paradigm

Mark Qatar Mary Parker Charles River Saffron Walden Founder Mariangela Beautiful Safran Yamanaka Vino Group Utah Selah Simpson
Computer scientist, pixel inventor Russell Kirsch dead at 91

Latest In Tech News

03:18 min | Last month

Computer scientist, pixel inventor Russell Kirsch dead at 91

"On Russell, Kirsch inventor of the Pixel passed away this week. Bit of sad news rest in peace but In case you're wondering who the inventor of the Pixel was. Now you know computer scientists, Russell AAC Kirsch, the inventor of the Pixel and undisputed pioneer of digital imaging passed away on Tuesday in his Portland home from complications arising from a form of Alzheimer's he was ninety one years old Now, Russell might not be name you immediately recognized his contributions to computer science made digital imaging possible born June twentieth nineteen, twenty nine in New York City demographic parents from Russia. and Hungary I attended Bronx High School than nyu Harvard and eventually mit in nineteen fifty one he joined the National Bureau of standards where he worked for fifty years and helped to invent the Pixel and create the first digital photograph It was a one seventy, two by one, seventy, two pixel image of his son Walden created in nineteen, fifty seven and is now iconic and was named. One of life, Magazine's one hundred photographs that changed the world in two thousand three and we have that image appear on the screen One of the first digital images ever created made from two superimposed scans at different thresholds since each pixel could only show one bit of information that being black or white as DP review points out Kirsch never stopped improving and his most famous invention even after retiring in two thousand and one and a twenty, ten interview on wired, he outlined his attempts to create a system that uses. Variable. Shape pixels instead of the squares that have dominated digital imaging since he invented him in that interview, he called square the logical thing to do. But laments that the decision was something rarely foolish that everyone in the world has been suffering from ever since. So at the right bold age of eighty-one, he began working on a masking system that creates six by six pixel areas and an. intelligently. Divides those areas into the two sections that have the most contrast before refusing to pixels on either side of the seem that idea never caught on but he explained the technology and its benefits in detail in a video below it's the thirteen minute long video if you wanted to watch that. But while the incredible accolades described above certainly gives you the sense of Russia Kirsch the. Engineer. The best personal picture of Kirsch probably comes from a two twenty twelve blocked by ant man named Joel Runyon who encountered him in a coffee shop in Portland after revealing net Romanians Computer and images on it probably wouldn't exist or exist as they are without Christmas contributions to engineering and computer science eighty-three-year-old Kirsch shared the following words I. Guess I've always believed that nothing is withheld from us. What we have conceived to do most people think the opposite that all things are withheld from them, which they have conceived to do, and they end up doing nothing Mr, Kirsch may be gone, but his legacy will live on every day in one of the approximately three point eight billion photos that are currently being captured every single day. May He rest in

Kirsch Russia Kirsch Russell Portland Alzheimer National Bureau Of Standards Nyu Harvard Joel Runyon New York City Engineer Bronx High School Walden Hungary Russia.
"walden" Discussed on Spark from CBC Radio

Spark from CBC Radio

01:44 min | Last month

"walden" Discussed on Spark from CBC Radio

"Theatre from the comfort of your own home claiming available wherever you get your podcasts. I'm Nora Young. This is sparked this episode first aired in December Twenty nineteen. At the time we were inspired by Henry David Thoreau who was a twenty eight year old curmudgeon when he wrote his famous book Walden in any weather at any hour of the day or night, I've been anxious to improve the nick of time and watch it on my stick to to stand on the meeting of two attorneys the past and future, which is precisely the present moment to toe that line. If you think about it thorough was something of a nineteenth century American nostradamus giving voice to our twenty-first-century desired unplug get back to nature and to ourselves. Let us spend one day as deliberately as nature and not be thrown off the track by every nutshell mosquitoes wing that falls on the rails. It. Doesn't matter whether it's eighteen forty five in the woods near Walden pond or two thousand nineteen on the busy streets Toronto we humans need to slow down. Or sometimes even stop our minds need a break. Let's rise early and fast or break fast gently and without perturbation. Let Company come and let company go let the bells ring and the Children Cry Determined to make a day of it. But how does saber the space for rest relaxation and restoration in are always on culture maybe we need to reconnect with the rhythms of wakefulness and sleep far.

Walden pond Henry David Thoreau Nora Young Walden Toronto
"walden" Discussed on Spark from CBC Radio

Spark from CBC Radio

01:43 min | Last month

"walden" Discussed on Spark from CBC Radio

"I think. If, we were to go back to the eighteen thirties. We would not be very happy with the results. You know and I don't fancy myself a Luddite I really don't want to undo. Our. Technologies a I wanted to learn how to be healthy living with them because they're not they're not good or evil right. But we do have to remember that they're not neutral either and that they have profound effects on our lives. So. Yeah I. DO I do think Walden is a swansong for a certain kind of disconnected life that most of us can't even imagine anymore. And I think we're living through another swansong now right? We're living through. A massive massive change. And? I don't think it's all bad at all I think they're marvelous things that come along with global connectivity and yet only if we get to design our own lives in the process. Michael thanks so much for your insights on this. Thank you. Michael Harris is the author of solitude and the end of absence. I'm Nulla. I-I'd host of ideas in this age of Click Bait and on much shouting ideas is a meeting ground for people who want to deepen their understanding of the world. Join me as we crack, open a concept to see how it plays out over place and time, and how it matters today from the rise of authoritarianism to the history of cult movies..

Michael Harris Walden
"walden" Discussed on Spark from CBC Radio

Spark from CBC Radio

08:37 min | Last month

"walden" Discussed on Spark from CBC Radio

"This is a CBC podcast. Hi I'm Nora Young. This is spark throughout the summer we'd been replaying episodes aired before March of this year. Certainly, a lot's changed since then and at first today's episode, which aired in December twenty, one, thousand, nine, hundred may seem outdated after all. It's a show that explores the virtues of solitude and slowing down little did we know that only a few months later isolation and lack of physical contact would be our reality. Thanks to the pandemic but I think it's interesting to listen back through the Lens of all. We've experienced this past year put together. It may offer some valuable insight into what we can change for the future. Intense connectivity has really changed. The way we live this is news I know, but think about it in the past decade alone digital tech has crept into every nook and cranny of our lives at work in schools. The way we get around town parent heat our homes find love the list goes on our lives have made more convenient and yet there's a pervasive sense of being over extended overloaded. And for some people being just plain over it, our life is frittered away by detail. Simplicity simplicity simplicity. I say let your affairs be as two or three, and not a hundred or a thousand instead of a million count half a dozen and keep your accounts on your thumb. Go, with me on this now simplified, it's the year eighteen, forty, five, amplifier, and Henry. David Thoreau has had enough of the modern world. The labouring man has not leisure for a true integrity day by day. He. Has No time to be anything but a machine. Even without smartphone streaming and social media at the ripe old age of twenty eight through was ready to unplug. So to speak, he abandoned all his material possessions and his job at the Family Pencil factory in the bustling town of Concord Massachusetts and for two years, two months and two days he lived alone in a tiny cabin, he built on the edge of Walden pond. I went to the woods because I wish to live deliberately to front only the essential facts of life and see if I could not learn what had had to teach and not when I came to die discover that I had not lived. I did not wish to live what was not life living his so dear nor did I wish to practice resignation unless it was quite necessary? I wanted to live deep and suck out all the marrow of life. To live so sturdily and Spartan like as to put to rout all that was not life to cut a broad swath shave close to drive life into a corner and reduce it to its lowest terms, and if it proved to be mean why then to get the whole in genuine meanness of it and publish its meanness to the world Or if it were sublime to know it by experience and be able to give a true account of it in my next excursion. That true account came a few years later when he published Walden or life in the woods, a seminal work and one of the greatest arguments ever made in favor of simple living, we must learn to reawakened and keep ourselves awake not by mechanical AIDS, but by an infinite expectation of the dawn which does not forsake. Even in our soundest sleep. Now, before you say Nora what's going on has sparked become a show about philosophy and simple living listen to that last line again. We must learn to reawakened and keep ourselves awake not mechanical AIDS, but by an infinite expectation of the Dawn. Sure thorough was waxing poetic about nature, but he also managed to nail our present-day conundrum. So let's take a page out of Walden shall we? We. Start with Michael Harris he's the author of the end of absence reclaiming what we've lost in a world of constant connection and also solitude a singular life in a crowded world. Both of those books express a longing for solitude and they're also guidebooks of sorts to help us learn how to be alone, and that feels more important than ever in a world where digital distractions pulling away from our interior life. So you've said that one of the themes of your books was suggested to you by Thoreau and us the idea that loneliness is failed solitude. So how have we failed at solitude? Well I think we fail it solitude every time they don't we we we reach for our phone instead of for the person next to us or We get in the shower and even the five minutes of solitude in the shower feels like maybe too much. I mean, this is the. State of being that that we're in I think every generation has to has to wrestle with designing their own solitude into their lives based on the technologies or or the media environment that they find themselves and is that the primary conundrum for us is balancing solitude with our technologies I? Think you know we're the Internet naive generation, right we're really the people who are having to figure this out for the first time, and as such, we have to learn to curate our media diet in the same way that we've already kind of figured out how to curate a food diet. So it it is a to a certain degree and original question for us just because of the the quantity of interruptions, the quantity of distractions in our lives, and yet at the same time, it really is a question that rolls through the years. Every generation I think has had to make their own decisions about how to balance their lives. I mean that's the funny thing as you go back to thorough in its the nineteenth century and he's talking about the number of things that you have to do and getting away from the complexity of life which seems almost comical to us from our perspective. But absolutely I mean, I think this is the thing is you you only can learn how to live in the future by looking to the past for for examples right and I mean when throw goes to that cabin in the woods in eighteen, forty five and for him, the world really was getting much busier in the same way that our world is getting much busier if you think about. What life was like when he was a child versus twenty eight years old when he when he goes into the woods, you know the railway had just kind of come to town. The telephone was going to be invented ten years after he wrote that book, the Telegraph already existed. So for him, his world was getting so much faster so much busier and the lesson that we get from thorough is that he makes a choice he sees his world changing and for him it's getting too busy too fast and he decides to design his own life So just to return to this idea that loneliness has failed solitude, how consulted actually help US combat loneliness Well I you know with the row again, he said something in a speech once about how the more unhappy are with ourselves the more we will run to the mailbox and I think about that a lot when I dig into my pocket for my phone, it's it says something about what's going on inside of me how content I am with my own life and I think the reverse must be true to that. If we if we design a rich interior life for ourselves if we were if we do that work at building that interior life, it's going to end up giving us. A healthier relationship with our devices. But consolidated be bad for US though. I think that loneliness can be painful. And I do think you know this? This isn't about becoming a hermit at one point when I was writing my last book I went to a cabin in the woods and spent some time completely isolated.

Nora Young David Thoreau Walden US AIDS Walden pond Michael Harris Family Pencil Henry Concord Massachusetts
"walden" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

05:43 min | 4 months ago

"walden" Discussed on Venture Stories

"Now that the coat it's code it's not It's not legal contracts. That said I think a good place to start is probably tested in true decision making processes for example you know delegation like the most successful cooperatives at at scale and there are a number of them that are you a multi-billion-dollar organizations they have a traditional management structure with the CEO in a coo and does not does exact answer to the owners which are are. The community members owned the the product or company or cooperative. So so I think we'll likely land on on something similar to start where you know. Products are owned by their communities. But they still have some hierarchical leadership and you don't really need to decentralize All decision making to every note in the network because people don't have time type for that. I think a good quote here That I picked up from Brad. Usd is an Oscar wilde quote the problem with socialism as it takes up too many evenings and and I think that the same is probably true. large scale collective decision-making CRYPTO network seat. You probably want to delegate that decision making to to some expert and so long as there's a check and balance place if they if they move against her. You're you're you're interesting. You can replace them do you. Take for how crypto will disrupt to be see tables. Yeah so I think in the long run there there will be some disruption. But it's not gonna be as dramatic as as some were predicting twenty seventeen. Were like some are saying. It's going to eliminate it completely. It could change the dynamics of e so for so earlier we touch on the Krypton. are less extractive than corporate networks. Because they're community on and operated in so they don't need you you know return. A profit to shareholders just need to be sustainable and reward their communities commensurate with the value read. So you're less extractive that that could mean that the Roe v C is to to get to be in earlier and to invest it at valued the neighbors slightly lower and that's because the exit for For these types of startups may be to the community rather than to a you know a large group of party shareholders who are sort of indifferent to answer to whether they use the platform. Not so you know a classic. Ipo is to shareholders that are profit maximizing.

Usd CEO coo Brad Krypton.
"walden" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

05:13 min | 4 months ago

"walden" Discussed on Venture Stories

"To another episode adventure stories by village global. I'm here today with the very special guest Jesse. Walden Jesse was formerly on the CRYPTO team of a sixteen Z as now branched out to start his own fund called variant Jesse Welcome to the PODCAST Rodney. So Jesse you. You've been criticized early. I should say that you started a company before media chain. It was about. What was it called me and I was hoping intersection of music. In crypto. And your your partner is a they an artist as well. So you're you're deep with artists when you talk a little bit about your journey within within the space over the last seven years particularly how your views have evolved? I one thing I've known you've for. Is that your the? It'd decentralized governance isn't as important as decentralized ownership what he talk a little bit about how your views evolved out when you serve journey that we get to some of the specifics. Okay cool well. Maybe it'd be helpful to sort of start with got in the first place because because that informs the rest so in order to tell that story I do have to go way back to early two thousands as a teenager in high school and like most teenagers pretty involved with piracy but probably like an order of magnitude more than than than your average. So everyone was downloading threes on napster was part of a scene that congregated around FTP servers where in order to access. Ip Address had to be white listed in order to get that access or get that weightless you needed to play some functional role in community. So it's very incentives driven in that way. Kind of like Crypto is today and so my group was responsible for ripping DVD's and sometimes making them available before they were stores or even if theaters and you know my incentive as as a teenager to participate was if you uploaded a a movie or a You got credit downloaded and there was every Alan video game. Tv shows software on these FTP servers at a time when know netflix mailing DVD's in the snail mail and there was no youtube there was no facebook To having access to all this content was incredible and then and then shortly after that was invented and then suddenly anyone with bittorrent client to get access to those files which was great and democratized access and catalyze streaming as as a concept and then ban within storage got really keeping you file Walker Services like Mega Upload Rapid share and And then suddenly distribution of files moved up to the browser. Fizzy you over. H. E. T. And that was sort of a really amazing time. Because all these music blogs and film boggs things popped up in the reserve this curation renaissance because anyone can distribute files and around the same time because you had the united admitted the cloud you had Serve social networks are building in pushing it infrastructure forward and many of those social networks..

Walden Jesse partner napster netflix boggs H. E. T. youtube facebook Alan
Oregon Republican Cliff Bentz wins House primary to replace Greg Walden

America First

00:20 sec | 4 months ago

Oregon Republican Cliff Bentz wins House primary to replace Greg Walden

"Across public voters in Oregon's second congressional district chose a former state senator to be their candidate to replace representative Greg Walden who did run for twelve term in the conservative region covering the rural eastern and central part of the state cliff Bentz on Tuesday bested former state legislators Jason Atkinson and loot

Oregon Senator Greg Walden Representative Cliff Bentz Jason Atkinson
Joe Biden wins Democratic presidential primary in Oregon

All Of It

00:26 sec | 4 months ago

Joe Biden wins Democratic presidential primary in Oregon

"Joe Biden is one Oregon's democratic presidential primary eleven Republicans and five Democrats are competing for their party's nomination to succeed Oregon's only GOP lawmaker in Congress moderate representative Greg Walden who is retiring meanwhile the Associated Press is projecting Republican Joe ray Perkins says one organs GOP Senate primary Perkins will face incumbent Democrat Jeff Merkley in

Joe Biden Oregon Greg Walden Associated Press Jeff Merkley GOP Congress Representative Joe Ray Perkins Senate
These 5 Tips Will Increase Your CTR

Marketing School

05:11 min | 5 months ago

These 5 Tips Will Increase Your CTR

"To another episode of Marketing School. I'm Eric Su and I'm Neil Patel and today we're GonNa talk about five tips that will increase your C. T. R. That is your click through rate. In this case we are talking about. Click the rate from I think we're talking about overall right organically and paid correct. Yes mainly organic funny enough yet. You have a lot of data on this because Click flow. But yeah we're mainly talking about organic click throughs. I've done a lot of tests on this funding using your software. You have a lot of data because you just have so many users. So why don't you go first Let's crank through five tips. That will help. People get results litter down less than thirty days. I'll make mine stupidly simple. So when you're looking at a Google search result page a lot of people whenever they're writing content. Let's say the New Year hits this year in Twenty Twenty Years Twenty Twenty. One people often forget to change the date. Now when you change a date under title from Two Thousand Nineteen Twenty twenty or just changes to the right year. Your click the rate. Actually chumps fifty to one hundred fifty percent. That's across the board based on data that we've seen with click flow so changed. It's another thing that works. Really well as vocal curiosity or allow matchy backup one more step so one thing. We didn't cover at the beginning of this podcast. Episode is the reason you want higher. Click the races. Let's say you go to Google. Do a search and a thousand other people do the same. Search that you did. If everyone clicks on the secondly instead of the first listing it tells Google the second one's more relevant and it pushes them up in the rankings over time so in theory you want more people to Click on your titan other words. You WANNA appeal them. You know him by appealing to them. And getting more clicks. It will help you rank higher than your competition over time. The air gave the first tip of adding the year at the end of your title tag. The second from me is evoked curiosity. Good example of this is like the seven benefits of green tea. Number six will shock. You put number six shock you in parentheses so doing little things like that. What we found is people like wait. What's number six? The click through Lonzo skimmed the six one and if they like it though backup read the rest of the post and then you know finish it all off but the point. I'm trying to make is voting curiosity. It is a great way to get people to click through. Yeah I think I'll give bonus tip to that one. I think it's really important for people to understand copywriting. I think Neil night we can agree. Some of the smartest people we know. The best entrepreneurs are exceptional copywriters and copywriting a part of it is persuasion and understanding what drives people understanding what people are interested in the more. You can improve at that the better so I recommend reading two books. One is called breakthrough advertising. And you can actually buy a real copy of that now. I think you pay like one hundred twenty five bucks. You combine the letters an look if you're crafty. I'm sure you can find. Pdf's for both of them. It's not that hard to find the. Pdf's leave it at that and then number three for me would be thinking about how you can do on surp- Seo's mean exactly so surp- is search engine result page and what's going on right now is. Google is occupying more and more of the clicks. Meaning that if you live on a search result page over. Fifty percent of people will not click through to your website. So what you can do is whether you're let's say you rank zero so you had the rich snippet with. Let's say you have like how to tie tie. You have like you know. Fourteen tips right there and people can see it right on the search result page. What you should be doing there is you'd be thinking about okay. How can that brand my website in there or in one of those fourteen tips? How can I entice them to click through site? Because if they don't click there. I'm losing that traffic. I can't retarget those people I can't collect the email I do a lot of different things right. So you've got to do everything in your power to not only add value but somehow brand yourself a little bit. So you're doing as much as you can to defend against Google. Taking more. And more of those clicks off number four. One thing that you can end up doing that. We're not seeing a lot of people do is using Faq Schema markup you start using Faq scheme markup on your site right and efficacy Skua Markup funny enough draws more attention to your surp- result if you're number one a lot of times you see less. Click throughs but if you're lower on the page you'll start seeing a boost in placements. You wouldn't get as many from what we've seen if you didn't have it but by having it you draw more attention in a muzy rankings up so if you're number one you do at UC less clicks but if you're lower on the page at it you'll go higher up and you'll start getting mark Lex Yup and then the final thing. I'll say this is a little more related to. Let's say you're doing facebook or Google ads. You WanNa be thinking about okay. How often are you gonna change things up so what I mean by that? So facebook for example. If you keep showing the same ad over and over and over ad fatigue is gonNA kick in very quickly. So you got to think about how you can when you're making new ads. Maybe make a whole batch of like five ten or fifteen of them and just constantly rotate them on. Maybe every two weeks every three weeks or making new batches because that's going to constantly keep your click the rate up if you're not keeping things fresh similar to how you would with. Seo and you're not aligning with the times changing the messaging and understanding what people what then ultimately you click. The rate's GonNa drop and then what's going to happen especially during paid. Your costs are going to increase because click the rate goes hired in Walden. Cpa's also higher as well right

Google Twenty Twenty Years Twenty Twe Nineteen Twenty Facebook Neil Patel Marketing School Eric Su PDF CPA Walden
My favourite tennis match

The Passing Shot Tennis Podcast

08:32 min | 5 months ago

My favourite tennis match

"We'RE GOING TO BE KICKING OFF. A new series and looking at some of a favor owed time tennis. Matches will also be catchy on the tennis news as well a little bit catch on with the virtual Madrid Open. That's just happened Andy. Bari Packard a virtual school as well as the news. The tennis is actually starting up again in some parts of the world in Germany. But before we get into that Kim how you doing. How is how is lockdown? Treating much the same as last week H. O. By fairly fast actually despite the lack of store which is really weird. I think I've kind of just go used to it now but having said that I did cheat in worship Madrid. I didn't won't should awful. I have to say it was. Radi my cup of tea just kind of saying it on a playstation today. What is g thing? Yeah it was a bit of kind of a completely new scenario new situation and I think it's kind of recognizes that living in these times they can open up new opportunities and of course you know this is one of them in the tennis world and I thought it was kind of really interesting to say I think in terms of what I liked. I absolutely loved the place. Be BUYING INTO IT. And procreating like the war codes Up there that the herbs to the controller I really loved that I'd like pretending to warm up thumbs and I really liked the way that kind of the players go invested in it and we're kind of really enthusiastic about getting creative and and kind of showing it off on on social media See I think that was kind of one of the things I I really liked. I saw I think it was Belinda. Bench really went. Allow it like a tennis gear. As I said could walk up the stairs a yeah just thought it was great to see getting really enthusiastic about it. 'cause we've not seen them on a TV. We're not seeing the you know what she pilots. Whatever as fans over the last few months it's just almost kind of great great to see them again really. Yeah I thought that was. That was good like the best saying the players saying the engage with the wall. I thought bench probably owned that one. I just like the little bits in the corner. We can just see their faces as they're playing. You just want to see their homes in the pack right to see what what. They've gone like their bookshelves or like. I just find it really interesting is like through the Keyhole. But he the past and that is really hyping. The stands framed in the background. Well potentially coming up in this focus on his lovely shorts but no yeah I. I didn't really like actually watching this. Nsa Watch just liked having the players kind of interacting having a bit of a laugh so that was nice to see the thing. This format would. I didn't think I'd want to see this every week. I think it would get a bit repetitive. After a while but I think it was a good kind of one off thing and obviously Andy Murray one that we should give him credit for that because he's now won the tournament on three different surfaces. If you can cool the virtual sphere surface adolphus. The Andy has donated his prize. Money half is going to the NHS and half is Gordon to the players Relief Fund. So it's obviously for Good Kohl's and Kiki burdens won the women's event as well and I think she was actually due to defend. Muhtar to say she has succeeded into that are mixed in our love. I love that idea. She's she's the non virtual virtual back to back very innovative. Double D for a champion. But yeah I think yes kind of great to see I guess. Play his Getting involved I think one of the things that I think they could have done. Better way of is the had this common tree over the top of the of the players. Now I I was kind of the point where I think it's more insightful. And more interesting if you just let the play is very commentary because Y- They are tennis players that professionals at the end of the day you'll be ready. I think what bringing up level is kind of almost kind of getting them to kind of talk about the tactics or you know that sort of that sort of level that sort of layer that. Yeah well my sick on a Royal Corps And it's like if I was doing this show in real life. I would choose to go here because of X. Y. And Said Yeah. It could be more of an educational thing as well I think what I did. I cheat and they lost connection because I was watching on light-years addicts correct show. It was just having to could LE- sort of chats while they were waiting for everything to ten on again. Did you see the I think Diego Schwarzer was best. Play at Deborrah. The savvy FIDO's but due to a weak WIFI CONNECTION. Debry a sorry. Schwartzman had to concede walkway. So I mean I love that idea. The like I think that's going to be one of the VAD. The walkover reasons happens to the best of our good today that like even top tennis players have poor Wi fi and all safely on. La has had a bit of a Jake because he said that Rafa could play because he'd like injured his back reaching for his game controller. Which and everyone believes here. I think I mean I think we believed him as well. As we've always believed tweeted about be cowed they gig for Geria- saw and I thought this this off to the best of the fortunately that was not the case. Rafeh was able to play. But we'll just very gullible but yeah if they're going to do this again like I think it could cost you on. But just every now and again maybe they do in other Walden on like Wimbledon. I different surfaces. I assume this playstation game has all the different surfaces they do girl scout one. Couldn't they maybe federal workup? That yeah that I think it could work. I think it could coexist when the tools get back up and running. I wonder if it's a sort of you know in the in the grounds of the events and you have fans can go line up for like an autograph from players and I wonder whether you could be like. There's a stand somewhere grandson for example. Oh face off against some. I player playing tennis against them. Virtually Sake I could see that happening. I know there are a few comments. The game was almost up to like up to scratch And you know whether it's the improvements to be made with with the game and you know I think I think potentially peop- governing bodies like the ATP liked the W. H. E. A. Maybe they should be looking at partnering with Game's about to really kind of Mak- licensed game like fever. Because I think you know I think this is as you said. This is very new is almost kind of this was a test and you know. I think there is appetite for it but I think there's almost kind of a lot can be done on that so a product side of it. Yeah for sure. I'm sure that's an avenue. They could possibly see going for. It's an yeah I like the idea that you could maybe have a bit of a play on it while you are an event. Perhaps if during a rain delay or something and even on Joe we actually have some real tennis. That's happened this weekend in Germany. It's kind of the first actual players of setback on cool so they've done a little exhibition featuring Dustin Brown and seven other players including randomly the British benign. Yon Shouldn't ski. Who I think is based in Germany. Anyway so yeah. That's been happening this weekend. We'll see JEB. So you fall head of other countries. Getting back to normalcy. So they've been out to do this. Little event Neko blends at the Base Tennis Academy. It's GonNa oversee how necessary health and safety measures in place. So they've obviously not touching hands at the net. They're going to touch rockets instead. There's no ballboys fans line judges. They're obviously doing it. Very watered down version is not for any points or or anything. It's not count I guess. Prize money's involved. So it's I guess aimed at lower ranked players to to kind of keep them earning something during this time and I think it's only for players based within about ninety minutes of the event so it's overseas a very limited

Tennis Andy Murray Germany Madrid Open Base Tennis Academy Bari Packard Madrid Players Relief Fund KIM H. O. Good Kohl Belinda Dustin Brown Diego Schwarzer Deborrah Royal Corps Schwartzman NHS
"walden" Discussed on The Takeout

The Takeout

05:30 min | 6 months ago

"walden" Discussed on The Takeout

"Again designed to be safety net and then on top of that. There's six hundred that's six hundred dollars per week. Correct that's correct. Yes Oh Twenty. Four hundred bucks a month And on top of that were sending a twelve hundred dollars every individual making less than seventy five thousand a year and five hundred per kid phase out it at. I think ninety nine per person one ninety eight per couple something like that. So there's a cash infusion here there's a safety net here and then there's a bridge for bigger businesses those with more than five hundred employees. There is a tax credit to help pay for payroll and and basically zero interest loans. Very low interest cost loans. So that's all designed to see if that works to get us through this. We have to watch that carefully. But that's in a different. In addition to the other funds we put forward and then we're sending every state a minimum of one point two five billion for an unanticipated costs. We've got a hundred mill billionaire for hospitals. I mean I it's. We're spending more in that bill. Two point two trillion in that rescue package than it's ever been spent in a single bill in the history of our country. It is bigger than the budget that we fight over every year which we still haven't Produced for this year. We haven't done the appropriations process for the next fiscal year. So there's another billion three for whatever it is that we're going to allocate so there's reason to kind of catch your breath. You're plus oh by the way the Fed- Federal Reserve yes wishing were trillion dollars out there with all these facilities for low interest loan. So it's a it's an unprecedented globally. Unprecedented I would argue rescue package for small medium and large businesses and individuals and a safety net. Along the way anything left out. Well I would have done surprise. Billing and so consumers are going to the emergency room. Don't get gouged With a bill not covered by their insurance. And I would have fully funded our community health centers for four or five years They shouldn't beyond this short term funding which they've been on now for a year it. It's hard for them to hire and maintain personnel. It's it's it it's anyway it's it's not necessary and there's broad bipartisan agreement. To do it all right. I have to ask you the three threshold questions. We ask all of our guests congressman so in no particular order the most influential book in Your Life. time favorite movie or one of your favorite movies. And if you're in if you're if you're indulging in a musical selection which artists or would you find most indulgent? Well let me let me start with block. You know. I remember as a middle schooler at Church camp reading pulling this book down off the library. The that was called the Roosevelt's of Sagnimore Hill and I don't know why pick that one And it was about Theodore Roosevelt and I. I became a big Theodore Roosevelt Fan. As a result of reading that book and just the respect he had for individuals regardless of what they did in life if they did it well The reformer that he was the conservationists that he was I mean he was willing to take on big interests and and for the good of the American people. And so I I would say that book Oh Gosh I don't know on movies There are a lot of my you know I. I'm kind of a soccer. This'll throw you off. My parents grew up in the depression and went through World War. Two and so I grew up watching some of those. I tell you one of the one of the funny ones is South Pacific. I love the music. And just that fear at World War Two and you know crazy. Ri- ball stuff I think that one's Kinda Fun From an old genre. And what was your third one. Music are John Ryan Classic Rock Classic. Rock Bob Seger's silver bullet band. Jimmy Buffett I'm a big Jimmy Buffett van I grew up on. I don't know why they call it. Classic major that's for old people but it's my music classic rock but now Bob Seger definitely falls into the classic rock category. I think Jimmy Buffett falls into the yacht. Rock Category Yeah Jimmy. Nothing in my ear Yeah Jackson Browne. I I like some of the old folk music by wife's getting me to learn how to play the the mountain dulcimer. I play a little piano and You know so we. We have a little fun with that. I think there's a lesson waiting for me when this interviews over. I've I've not done migrelia mountain dulcimer lesson but nothing's well far. Be It from us to interfere any longer with the mountain. Dulcimer lesson of Congressman Gray Walden. It's been a pleasure to talk to you sir. And in honor of Teddy Roosevelt A phrase that he uttered and is one of his many. Many many quotable quotes Might be applicable these times. Do what you can with what you have where you are you. Isn't that true carpenter? Pleasure good to be with you thanks. The takeout is produced by Arden. Jamie Benson Sarah Cook Ellie Watson Zoe poindexter and Jake Rosen. Cbs Production by Eric Soussan Gray seekers and Daniel People's follow us on facebook twitter and Instagram takeout. Podcast that's takeout. Todd cast and for more go to take out PODCAST DOT com the takeout is a of CBS audio..

Theodore Roosevelt Jimmy Buffett Bob Seger Jimmy Buffett van I Jamie Benson Sarah Cook Ellie congressman Fed- Federal Reserve Congressman Gray Walden soccer Jackson Browne John Ryan Church camp Ri CBS South Pacific Todd Cbs
"walden" Discussed on The Takeout

The Takeout

12:01 min | 6 months ago

"walden" Discussed on The Takeout

"Oregon is our special guest congressman. You were talking about the Stay at home in The Commonwealth of Virginia the State of Maryland Washington DC. And how that makes it very difficult to imagine congress reassembling anytime soon if Congress can't reassemble and as you said in the previous segment under parliamentarian rules of the House. You can't vote remotely you can't conduct committee hearings remotely. How does any other future legislation become drafted through the House of Representatives under those circumstances? Well there's there are a lot of discussions going on and frankly There's a lot of work. That's been teed up and ready to go in our committees prior to this are shut down if you will and so our staffs are talking members are talking to each other There are lots of conference calls going on. It's not the sort of open meeting robust public accessible Legislating that I prefer Certainly I believe in the process and earrings and open hearings and markups and all that. But we're in a novel time to use that word more than we should probably but we are and so we're trying to figure out what's the country need and you know so we're we're working on. These issues on supply chain vulnerabilities on. You know what what will need going into the fall wraps infrastructure. There's there's a lot we can be doing. And in some cases we've passed bills in the house. You know we ought to take care. Surprise billings or consumers aren't getting gouged with surprise medical bills. We need to fully fund our community health centers. They're they're actually Republican Democrat leaders by self serve. Lamar Alexander Senator Murray Center KYRSTEN PALLONE ON I. Four of us have agreed to a a bill to stop surprise billing though that's when one out of five going to an emergency room gets bill not covered by their insurance You know there's horror stories about that we've got legislation to fix it and we got legislation of under community health centers by the way run out of funding in November. So there's a lot of effort we can. We can do and come together on. I think you work that out. And then when it when the scientists in the in the doctors tell us it's okay to get back together under whatever the new norm is and it won't be the old door Then we can get back together and we can do our regular order and pass legislation. Let me ask you something very specific since you raise. The issue of insurance health. Insurance President was recently asked and said he is again. This this phrase not mine. His phrase looking into reopening the affordable act exchanges so people who are in a position where they earn more which means they disqualified from Medicaid but they are not old enough to qualify for Medicare can find a means by which to obtain insurance to get them through this particularly scary time. The president said he's looking into that he didn't say yes or no. Do you believe that's something that this administration should do? Reopen the exchanges. So people can get on there and get insurance at whatever cost they can find. It's it's a really good question major and I. I haven't delved into the ramifications of that because often the policies are set on you know sort of a calendar year basis But but it's an issue that's come up along the way that if you miss that window for whatever circumstance and you're basically out of luck for a year and and I think what we want. Here's the focus on. How do we? Keep people insured. How do we get them insured? How do we make insurance affordable? It's all those arguments but I'm open to having that discussion I just would need to know On my own are what does that mean if you do it. 'cause you gotTa make sure the plan works and that it's portable you're experienced in politics. You were the chairman of the Republican Congressional Campaign Committee for two terms. You've been to a political convention or two. I'm willing to bet. Do you imagine that either of the two national party conventions will be able to occur in any recognisable form in this summer while I you know? It's funny that I was having that conversation a day was somebody I. I just. Don't see how that makes sense. It might again science is going to dictate this. But my gosh you when you look at major sporting events and concert events and everything else that are cancelled ray. Starting your Clarendon June now based on what we know and if there's viruses peaking in May in Washington state and some were in Oregon and somewhere around there and that's the peak and then you got the tale of people in the hospital for weeks and then as symptomatic where we have the test. I just I'm looking at that thinking I I don't see how you hold these conventions with tens of thousands of people there Are we going to abandon social distancing for for a convention? I? I don't see how I just. You can delay the Olympics a year. I think that conventions get thrown out the window. Now how you nominate somebody and goes through. That process is GonNa ask somebody better be thinking about that because Junan time line. Of course I'll get to that in a second and it'll be up to the National Committee. Rules committees do that and they can do that They have method methodologies to meet and conduct what their rules are. Whatever they decide is what the conventions will look like but it seems to me to your point having been to many conventions of Republican Democrat. There's one thing that's exactly the same about both. They start at seven. Am and they go to three in the morning. And there's gatherings every hour from seven am to three am sometimes a little bit longer than three M. But the point is there's gatherings relentlessly. It's nothing if not antisocial distancing you know you just can't do it a petri dish awards warm and humid and sweaty and people on top each other. All My Now I WOULD. I would have to confess something. My favorite convention was the one I listened to a my outdoor speakers while barbecuing mistake on my deck in Oregon got all the speeches. I needed a year illegal mutiple summer evening and you know what it was. I went into several of them. Do but I'm with you. It's Oh man the masses of humanity and just people right in your face. They're splitting undocking. And now it's just the word Bread let's let's talk. Let's talk practically about elections You've got a primary in Oregon will be no problem with that. Why because Oregon votes by mail it has and there's some delightful history about that dating back to nineteen eighty one when the first counties in Oregon were allowed to do it by nineteen eighty-seven every county for local elections. Was doing it. The first presidential election by mail two thousand in Oregon Eighty percent participation. You guys have this down the first to pave this way. Do you believe congressman based on that experience. That vote by mail for the November general. Election is something we should think actively about and possibly just assuming plan for I well. Here's here's the deal on that Major. I look at it. Works in Oregon. We had a long ramp up to that and there were some hiccups along the way you have to have a voting system works. I mean I remember. My Wife. Signed the back of her her return envelope and her signature change because we are in the radio business. She signed all these affidavits of advertising hundreds of them every month and are beautiful. Signature became so much different than what had been on file. They made her go into the county courthouse improve that that was her new signature. So we've got good surveillance and now we have a state wide database. And so I think it's pretty clean in terms of that. Not every state's ready to do that and these are always stayed obligations and I just on top everything else. State governments are dealing with. I cannot imagine telling them. Oh guess what in in you know six months or less. You're going to have to do a vote by mail election where you've never contemplated before. I think that could be I mean. Look at the Iowa caucuses where they couldn't even count delegates With a computer program. That in theory was going to work. I that's nothing against vote by mail. It works in my state. I'm I it does but guys thinking I'm going to mandate that on every state who may or may not have the resources a prescription for a worse disaster. That's the voice of Greg Walden and that wraps up our conversation for our radio audience this week's episode of the takeout with those of you listening on our podcast platforms. Please stay tuned for the takeout. Take a special. Which will have a deeper conversation with Congressman Walden about the mechanics of the all important general election in November the next week Roy from CBS News? This is the takeout with Major Garrett I major Garrett welcome to your take out. Take Speciale our special guests this week Greg. Walden Republican Congressman. Second District of Oregon. He was once the chairman of the Energy and Commerce Committee which made him one of the most powerful members in the entire United States. Congress House and Senate is the ranking member of that committee which makes him very very important. A congressman great to have you back. We were having a conversation. I WANNA continue about the mechanics of the November election. It cannot be moved correct. I believe that to be the case. Yes and you would not advocate for it. Being moved no a no I think that I I think that would be bad to the democracy and yeah no bad idea so we have to figure this out. Yeah I think so. And what what? What are your suggestions for that? How to think about that? If not vote by mail nationally well I think states are capable of figuring this out Now you see. In some of the primaries they have delayed them You know I I would hope that. They with of learned lessons from that. What worked in didn't and they will be in a much better say shape Come October into the first in November That's usually not and I'm going to be careful not the traditional flu season right and and not that. This is not saying that but If this behaves like like other corona viruses that still should be a fairly decent window now a lot of states have after devoting And they could open that up. Some are very restrictive part of why we went to vote by mail in Oregon for all elections is our clerks were We had a very open Absentee voting A threshold you just said. I WanNa vote by absentee and they sent you a ballot. We had seventy five percent or so voting absentee and so it was easy to transition to make it one hundred percent vote by mail but we had time to ramp up to that but I think states could do that. A LOT OF HAVE EARLY VOTING. A lot of them have absentee voting. Most do and and so I I would leave it up as the constitution. Generally prescribes of these elections should be run by the states. I don't want the feds run at all understood and if we can vote during the civil war we ought to be able to vote during Kobe. Nineteen there you go there you go. Yeah so let me ask you. Also about the Bill that was passed that you helped. Vote to pass Face three. How optimistic are you that that will be if not enough? The kind of lifeline. I don't want to call it. A stimulus. Stimulus is a misnomer. We don't need to stimulate the economy. We need to save the economy. How successful do you hope it will be in? Is there anything that you think as you were participating in the drafting of it was left out that needs to be thought of in the next iteration? Well those are both really good questions. The first My wife and I were small business owners for twenty one years. We were in small market radio broadcasting. I looked at what now was put together there to help..

Oregon congressman Congressman Walden House of Representatives congress chairman Virginia PALLONE Republican Congressional Campa Walden Maryland Lamar Alexander Senator Murray Washington flu National Committee President
"walden" Discussed on The Takeout

The Takeout

08:17 min | 6 months ago

"walden" Discussed on The Takeout

"Did we have the capability to step up and overnight produce five million five hundred million mass? No but now we have an RFP out to produce five hundred million mass and therefore bidders. They're going about doing that. Did we have a five minute test from Abbott? No we do now so I mean yeah. There was a lag because this was a novel virus. We were told it wouldn't spread human to human then all of a sudden not only does it but it spreads among people who don't even show symptoms. That's that's eight Stealth fighter in biological war. That we've never had to deal with before. Were you comfortable last week? When the president talked about the country reopening ah soon or ASPIRATIONAL as soon as Easter. Because that clearly was not what Dr Fouled she and Dr Bricks work soon thinking and burks rather forgive me doctor burks. We're thinking the expression on their faces showed it and I know the president had to sort of come around and you've dealt with them a lot more than I have but I've dealt with him at a certain level of frequency. He does take time to come around and he always like you said recently is an optimistic. He doesn't WANNA be negative. He wants to be on the sunny side of the hill but what he said. Last week does not comport it all with what has been coming out this week about the death toll the sickness and the malignant nature of what we're coping with and nor does does it comport with what he's saying this week. I mean he he was. It was a very slumber sober discussion at the briefing. A few you know a while ago when he talked about how these death rates could go up and so I looked at guys in optimus. You know he always has been and I think he was trying to be hopeful and I think You know now it's it's more evident than ever gets is worse than even we thought a week ago or two or three or four or five and he's he's pretty locked down in terms of the seriousness of this disease and he's telling people that and And so I. I think what we have to focus on is. What else do we need to do to win? This war and that is investing in the research that is getting the barriers out of the way of. Somebody's come up with an antiviral overseas that works. Then you know Dr Haunted. Fda is doing everything again to make sure it's safe and then getting available you know. They're they're putting in the stockpile. A hydric Clarkson and chloroquine to make sure imparted if that does work as part of a cocktail that they will have it in the national stockpile presence. You know order that the vice president's been doing a great job in this space and so I I think look America. Needs little optimism here and there that was aspirational And we know the reality is it for most of the country's much different. Will you also have this these hot spots? Where you know. They're going to be locked down for a while New York City and in these states. And now we know it can transmit a a symptomatically that Were it's just a different evolving problem. It's it's hard to admit that that's what we're facing. Most of us can't appreciate when our ancestors went through In with some of these diseases and and even millennial ago but We're here we got. We got all GO K. Distancing matter follow the science distancing matters follow the science what about restrictions that are more emphatic than the ones. We are getting adjusted to now. Meaning the president said at a recent briefing. He was looking into. That's his direct quote looking into possible prohibiting. Air and rail travel between hotspots. Do you think we should think differently? And perhaps more aggressively about limiting travel to limit the spread. Well in some states are doing that and again you know you take a district like mine just to put in perspective. My district would stretch from Ohio to To the the Atlantic Ocean. And so you know. I put a whole bunch of eastern states inside mine so state by state. You may need it. I mean you look at Connecticut. What's flaring up there? Because people commute in and out of Manhattan They made a different level of restrictions than parts of my district. Where there's one person for every nine miles of power line? So I mean I think we have to realize our country is huge and vast and once we get this ability to do very rapid and very victis testing. Then then we'll have a lot more ability to to drive that decision making the guy she ridden want people you know that are under quarantine in in New York City flying to Florida back every week. I think I'm in Florida. I'm wondering why that's a good idea. But maybe there are some people that are doing the kind of business where you still need to be able to get back and forth and that could be healthcare providers that could be flying in supplies of me. I don't know there aren't many people are planes. I'll tell you they're not no. They're not a talk to my audience. A little bit about what you imagine. Congress will look like for the next few weeks or a few months I do. We have to accommodate ourselves meeting the Congress not me but the nation because Congress represents the nation to the concept of field hearings done online or through some sort of Internet portal. Do you vote remotely. Do you not gay gathering Washington for meetings as you historically have. What are you imagining? The work of Congress will look like for the next four to six to eight to ten twelve weeks. You know it's it's it's even different than that. Are Rules Gordon. Parliamentarians a don't allow for A remote hearings we we can do field hearings but you can't do them online. There's no provision of vote online there's no provision to vote on Legislation Committee Online That would require us all to go to Washington. Change our rules And as you saw we had a member that required a corum of the house under in. That's legitimate of the constitution. I wouldn't get into that argument but There was a corum there. But I've never seen it major. You've seen the inside of the. Us House Dr Monaghan and his team in forced US sitting at least six feet apart. And if you've got closer than that to a member he came around and said. Could you please More socially distance and I've never seen this members of the house were seated in the galleries. Six feet apart And of course no visitors and so it was pretty easy to count show we add a quorum. That's why that process moved quickly so I don't it with the states of Virginia Maryland locked down I think until June and and the District of Columbia. I don't know why it would make sense for four hundred thirty five of us to fly in from all over the country and whatever we've been around and then I'll get together in close proximity That seemed to be following the science but we can do a lot of work and we are among ourselves on the phone. I do a at least a weekly if not twice weekly conference call with all my Republican members on the Committee and we we got twenty five members and with my leadership team and with the Chairman of the committee chairman alone. And I've been in conversation and our staff sir talking to each other and there's a lot of discussions going on and we'll pick up on the other side of the break. What may be required. If I hear you talk about that the limitations can there be a face for legislation. If you're not there to vote on it or can't be there to vote on it. I Major Garrett Greg Walden is our special guest back segment four of the takeout in just a second from CBS. News this is the takeout with major. Garrett Republican congressman. Greg Walden of.

Congress president New York City Major Garrett Greg Walden Florida Greg Walden Abbott District of Columbia Washington vice president Garrett Republican Dr Fouled hydric Clarkson Atlantic Ocean Manhattan burks chloroquine US
"walden" Discussed on The Takeout

The Takeout

09:01 min | 6 months ago

"walden" Discussed on The Takeout

"Two. But it's the same concept. They tend to die off in the warmer summer months and come back in the colder weather months. And that's kind of the cycle and and so we'll see in the southern hemisphere as we go into summer. What's happened down? There get should give us a little break here To kind of get ourselves regenerated and ready to go. But I I'll tell you some of the American companies that have stepped up and gone for making cars to making ventilators and you know from doing whatever they were doing to making the end ninety five mass or construction companies little ones of donated the mass they had after trump administration. You know waive the rules and said those End Ninety. Five mass using instruction job will work in a in a in a health setting too. You know we've all come together as a country and in pretty good form and so. I don't think you need nine eleven commission. I think you do need a review and in it shouldn't be partisan and ambitious it ought to be factual and and really help understand where we got it right where we got it wrong Pandemics shouldn't be partisan that fixing the problems shouldn't be partisan We just need to get it right for the American people. So burrowing down just a little bit on that of course one of the most memorable possibly the most memorable phrase of the nine eleven commission report was lack of imagination at the level of the federal government. A central problem here. It shouldn't have been. It doesn't seem to me. I don't think so and I I was in. I was literally standing in front of the Capitol when the plane hit the Pentagon we were told to run And I sat through the briefings of the nine eleven commission chairman the Energy and Commerce Committee Put into law the final recommendations for a nationwide Emergency Communication Digital Communications Commission System known as I net Which made Becker available all kinds of things? So I went through that period. I that's not this. This really is is much a tighter look at did the pandemic all hazards preparedness. That we had in place work. Was it adequate in the testing round? What worked what didn't and I think we have a pretty good idea I remember. Cdc went right once. The Chinese put genome up on January tenth Then CDC went right ahead and began developing the diagnostic tests And they got it done in pretty fast order and as a result they shipped it out then they discovered. One of the three reagents did not perform correctly. They didn't end up needing that they brought him back. They fixed it they ship nobody saw remedy during that period. Too is when w a joe is saying there's no human to human transmission according to what were seen in China and it doesn't affect young people and other healthcare leaders. We hear from today. We're saying I think we'll be okay. It turns out. None of that was was what happened so I think we can go back and say okay. Now let's look at the worst case scenario. What should we be doing? But I think we were spending five hundred million a year on the national stock by you. Look at some states. I think it was California when they went and got all their mass out of their state. Stockpiled turned out all expired. So with that why now because maybe the rubber bands that whatever the is they have to hold the mask on. It's not the mass itself. But you can't have that. Give out in the middle of the procedure. No I think we all need to go what worked. What does the distribution system work? We have enough ventilators or not and we get him there and time There's a lot to learn here and to plan for going forward. We just you know it's been two years since the Spanish flu hit right. Let let's talk about two things here. And now that are part of the ongoing drama and the ongoing stressors for those on the front lines one testing. We can't get to surveillance meaning. We can't create bodies of community data about who has or who hasn't or antibody reviews or anything that is central to US understanding what the potential scope is and who can actually possibly go back to work one to it appears to me congressman. I listened to all the White House Task Force. Briefings numbers are constantly placed before the American public about things produced and yet there are appears logistical. Logjams though there produced their ship. They're not where they need to be nearly as fast address. Those two things. If you'd be so kind and I I would take a third step major. I think you've hit on all the right topics and I'll start with the third just because they produced in manship them didn't mean we had the back room technicians equipment to process them. So one of the nation's biggest labs does this for a living ends up being upwards of one hundred and sixty thousand tests behind. 'cause they weren't staffed up. They didn't have the equipment that could produce results for that many tests. So so that's part of it. We don't we're not set up to handle a pandemic of this magnitude and our traditional daily healthcare needs. Don't require anywhere close to this and so we were probably system wide running too tight clearly to handle something like this now. They're catching up. And now we have Abbott labs coming forward with a test. They can get results in five minutes. That gets your issue about surveillance. That's where we have begun if you listen to Dr Got Lieber Dr Fouled. Your doctor Burks They're all saying the same thing before we can really begin to get some level of our freedom back. We have to be able to do almost constant and ubiquitous testing. Because of this novel of people that are a symptomatic but spreading. And so you can't if you open the doors to soon if you say you know were there too soon and you can't measure and you don't have an antiviral you'll just repeat this cycle and none of us wants that to happen. That's why you know the president's team has consistently said the virus and science are going to dictate the timelines and and that's where we're at when the president says as he did very recently. I think we've done a fantastic job. Do you agree. Look it's been a government wide all hands on deck effort and I've talked to the president directly vice-president and I I'm the cause of our committee's jurisdiction in in communications frequently with the head of the FDA. I'll tell you major These the doctor Cadillac. That runs a- asper. I talked to him Monday morning at seven. Am my time. He told me he had not had a day off in sixty nine days. I was talking with Dr on the head of the FDA over the weekend. We were texting and talking. And you know I mean they have really in their teams that are dedicated public servants out there in our health cover. Everybody's throwing everything they have. I've never seen an administration move fast dirty economic relief out to our communities Secretary Mnuchin. I saw him at the White House with the day. The president signed this bill into law. The face rebuilt. He said I may be the craziest treasury secretary. But I'm committing to get that seven a loan relief to small businesses by next Friday. Guess what he didn't do it. He got he got the. It'll be out Friday but the rules were out by by Wednesday night and so I mean they have done things that the government never does in this fast in order and so yeah I think they have. I think they've really leaned forward. They tried to do everything they can. And I'll take like the defense act that president in vote They didn't need to use that. I'm told in large measure because the companies were when they put out an RFP for five hundred million and ninety five mass they suddenly had not one company three m bidding to make they suddenly had three companies so they didn't need to order anybody. is really stepped up. And so I you know. I think they have done a really good job. I remember when he put the travel ban on China on back in in Early J. REMEMBER. He created this task force. I rank on on the thirtieth January an infant. The travel ban on was criticized for doing that. So you know the Sure there are lessons to learn why they've been all wet. What have you ever seen? A president do a daily press briefing. You know I mean it's phenomenal. That's the voice to Greg. Walden Republican Congressman From Oregon. Back for segment three of the takeout with Major Garrett. That's me in just a second.

president China FDA Energy and Commerce Committee Cdc Major Garrett Abbott labs White House Task Force US Emergency Communication Digita Dr Fouled Walden White House California Pentagon Secretary Mnuchin Greg
Walden issues statement of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:49 sec | 6 months ago

Walden issues statement of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act

"Relief for northwest workers and small businesses on its way now that the president is signed Congress's two trillion dollar stimulus package como score when he comports Oregon congressman Greg Walden was at the White House when president trump signed the measure Friday we added a six hundred dollar per week additional federal payment for the next four months if you're unemployed but our goal is to keep you employed that's why he says the package incentivizes small businesses to keep workers on the payroll we have a program for small businesses that employ fewer than five hundred people so they can pay full wages full benefits paid their mortgage pay their lease Hey there overhead costs and at the end get virtually all of that treated as a grant not a loan on top of that Walden says Washington and Oregon both have taken action to stop evictions and foreclosures while the crisis is

President Trump Congress Greg Walden White House Donald Trump Washington Oregon Congressman
Raptors test negative; were last opponents of Jazz

CBS Sports Radio

00:40 sec | 7 months ago

Raptors test negative; were last opponents of Jazz

"The Toronto raptors announced last night corona virus tests but they're traveling party come back negative with one person's results still pending raptors will last in the face the Utah jazz with the top players really go Baron Donovan Mitchell subsequently testing positive Eric Walden who covers the jazz for the Salt Lake Tribune during Vince Quinn here at CBS sports radio during the overnight we discussed Robert marking the corona virus this past Monday we touched all those microphones here over and and cut his arm was kind of like a little bit of an act of defiance I thought you know it it was kind of thing I'm not going to be scared these guys who have been interacting with all

Toronto Raptors Baron Donovan Mitchell Eric Walden Salt Lake Tribune Vince Quinn Robert Utah Cbs Sports
Chicago Police Make Arrest in Blue Line Passenger Shooting

John Williams

00:29 sec | 8 months ago

Chicago Police Make Arrest in Blue Line Passenger Shooting

"Chicago police have arrested a convicted felon suspected of shooting a man during a robbery on the CTA blue line yesterday Patrick Walden faces four charges including three felony counts interim police superintendent Charlie back says they were able to track the suspect thanks to witness descriptions and security camera and I will remind folks at that per capita public transportation in Chicago is very safe but the specific incidents and the people that affect our very troubled the victim is in stable condition

Robbery Patrick Walden Chicago Superintendent Charlie Back
Brexit day: United Kingdom finally leaves the European Union.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

02:20 min | 8 months ago

Brexit day: United Kingdom finally leaves the European Union.

"Kingdom leaves the European Union today for an uncertain brexit future. It's most significant geopolitical. Move since the loss of the empire and a blow to seventy years of efforts to forge European unity from the ruins of two world wars the country will slip away from the club joined in one thousand nine hundred seventy three moving into the no man's land a transition period that preserves membership in all but name until the end of this this year at a stroke the e you will be deprived of fifteen percent of its economy its biggest military spender and the world's international financial capital of London. London the divorce will shape the fate of the United Kingdom and determine its wealth for generations to come the June twenty sixteen brexit referendum. Random showed a nation divided about more than Europe and triggered soul-searching about everything from succession immigration to Capitalism Empire A- and Modern Britishness such was the severity of the meltdown over brexit that allies and investors were left astonished by a country that was for for decades touted as a confident pillar of Western economic and political stability at home. Brexit has tested the bonds that binds together gather the United Kingdom England and. Wales voted to leave the block but Scotland Northern Ireland and London voted to stay so on on Brexit Day. Some we'll celebrate and some will weep but many Britons will do neither the number of British citizens who have applied to acquire acquire the nationality of another e EU member state has surged since the brexit referendum since two thousand sixteen Walden three hundred and fifty thousand UK hey citizens of opposite to apply for the Post Brexit insurance policy with some even forfeiting their British passports to retain the E. U. writes off the Brexit. It the increase was dramatic however among those born in Great Britain who were applying for the first time for an Irish passport. The numbers rose from seven thousand. Three hundred seventy two in twenty fifteen to fifty four thousand eight hundred fifty nine. According to data supplied for Ireland's Foreign Affairs Defense Department

Brexit London United Kingdom European Union Ireland Brexit Day United Kingdom England Foreign Affairs Defense Depart Europe Great Britain Wales Scotland Walden E. U.
Director Destin Daniel Cretton Honors Lawyer Bryan Stevenson’s Work in ‘Just Mercy’

They Call Us Bruce

11:05 min | 10 months ago

Director Destin Daniel Cretton Honors Lawyer Bryan Stevenson’s Work in ‘Just Mercy’

"Hello and welcome to another edition of they call spruce and unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asia America. I feel you Jeff Yang and we're here with a very special guest a filmmaker crater of note storyteller of many things including a certain upcoming superhero movie. But we are not GonNa talk about that Superhero movie. We're GONNA be talking today about a real life superhero movie His film just mercy which is coming out from Warner brothers. In Limited release in December December twenty fifth. I believe and wide in January January tenth. It is the story of Bryan Stevenson. Anson the founder of the Equal Justice Initiative which is a critical nonprofit organizations that advocates for death. Row inmates providing them many cases a gasp of hope before the the actual kind of Mon execution occurs in the context of that Destin tells the story of how Brian Created this organization and some notable first cases that it that led to the organizations becoming a pillar of this particular movement so destin first of all welcome welcome to the show. It's great to be here so we want to start with a little bit with some of your background. I guess you're from Hawaii originally right. Yeah I grew up in Hawaii. And how did you actually embrace still making as a career. It was a it was along the long road to getting to the place where I actually admitted that I was embracing it as a career I I grew up. There is six kids in my fam family. We lived in a small town on Maui called Haiku Right next to a huge pineapple apple field. And we we we. My mom barely let us watch TV. So we're always outside kind of forced us to have to do creative things things and when my my grandma got her first. VHS camera that that she allowed me to borrow That that became kind of the thing that that I would do to pass. The time was make little commercials and short films with my five siblings things as my actors and so from an early age. I knew that I loved it. Loved the process And and so it was a hobby of mine All the way through college. I didn't I didn't go to film school. I got a degree in communications. And it wasn't like 'til my senior year that I did my first short film and then just kept doing short films for fun for about ten years. And eventually it snowballed Walden started to turn into something that I made money out. The short shorts got less short so it was that short film. The one that actually Connected with Brie Larson or was that that I short film without later one short term twelve was was was was a short. It was actually my eighth short film Every other show had been rejected from sundown and short-term twelve is the first time that but I got the call from Sundance saying that we're we got in and then The stars aligned and ended up winning the jury prize at Sundance Site Year And that that was like a big first stepping stone into being able to do this as a job. The film that got the feature that got everyone sort of noticed that. Notice you in a lot of people's minds was was the future for short-term twelve and I look really revisit just looked at the the credits for that film and I was like stunned to see all these young actors. There's who are now like huge stars sort of planning their seeds there. I was wondering like when you look back at that. Like what is your impression of their careers. Your career now like looking looking at all that it seeing like wow. I really had an eye for talent. I don't really see see it that way I I just see as Wow it's so cool to see my friends being doing what they love. And being so successful at it I Yeah I mean I feel really really kind of grateful to that Our our little group has all kind of gone on to do such extraordinary things. It's it's really cool so One of the screwing things. The one we're going to talk about today is is of course this film just mercy and we saw it like I mentioned to you before stories started taping last night at the screening. I was so moved that I actually donated to equal justice initiative before I left the theater I I was struck by how necessary the film was the the story was telling and the work of equal justice initiative in an era where feels increasingly like people of Color immigrants Poor people live under a different system. Like like a different set of laws than people who have more and who have the power to and resources to fight fight back. What what it drew you to the story initially? And how did you actually connect with it. Thank you for donating TJ. Let's a a- and and your reaction is really what we hope. This movie does is introduce people to the amazing work that Brian has has been consistently doing back when you wasn't a hot topic when it was actually it almost looked down upon to to be doing the work that he's doing It's it's the way that the Brian puts it as the our our system. Treats you better if you are rich and guilty than if you are poor innocent And and that is just Incredibly sad but the thing about Brian that that was so so inspiring to be around was that he is not this cynical kind of depressed guy walking around doing this this this works. That is so difficult. He actually has a bounce to his step he has so much energie And and he has so much hope He he actually believes that. You can't do the type of work that he does without hope because hope is the things that allows you to have vision for something that you cannot see and every project that he he embarks on feels impossible at the moment that he's starting But it's the the hope that that allows him to to zinc that. This could change that. There is a way to to change the hearts and minds of the people behind a broken system And and as as much as you know as much as this movie was may taking place in the late eighties early nineties And there there are a lot of things especially recently that that has have even gone backwards And there's a ton of work and and to be done I also Brian Stevenson's work and his life has proven that one person can really make a difference in the difference. That he has made is pretty incredible. I think the hope speak of definitely shines through in the film and it's a light light in serve the most bleakest services you know air hope seems to be short supply in and this really gross systemic abuse injustice and it would make anybody the most cynical I think but the thing about is like you're talking about a real person and so it's not just a fictional movie like superhero or real person right. I wonder what kind of burdens you felt. If at all I mean about representing his story about the writ you know the real life person You know you're dealing with real facts. Real real real personality. I mean what kind of things that you go through in making the film that you kind of pressure to put yourself A lot of threats a a lot. I it's rare as a filmmaker to be able to to tell a story about a person who is Still as active right now in the work that that he does as he was thirty years ago. We're not we're not telling a bio pic of someone who it has passed away or who were not just trying to you know Glamorize somebody's life just to just so you have the information Where where telling a story that you can actually leave the theater and donate to this organization or we're going volunteer somewhere or go and listen to Bryan? Stevenson speak He the day before he came and visited us on say he was. He was arguing in front of the Supreme Court He's he has actively he's actively doing words that he speaks and his words are incredibly powerful because he backs it up with his life and I just just never met a A man or or or woman who has more Dedicated to to to just making the world more fairer place for the most vulnerable people in our society. So I mean I I had a lot of pressure put on myself to not screw it up Because anytime around Bryan Stevenson I just feel so unworthy but he he's very inspiring person to be around.

Bryan Stevenson Brian Equal Justice Initiative Hawaii Jeff Yang Warner Brothers Asia America Bryan Brie Larson Sundance Anson Walden Founder Supreme Court
White House backs emerging deal on consumer health costs

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 10 months ago

White House backs emerging deal on consumer health costs

"The White House has come out in support of an emerging bipartisan bill that aims to curb rising healthcare costs agreement on the pending legislation was announced Sunday by Republican senator Lamar Alexander house Democrat Frank Cologne and Republican representative Greg Walden the legislation would impart target rising prescription drug prices by limiting how long generic drug makers can block competitors from the market in a written statement White House press secretary Stephanie Grisham expressed hope that Congress can pass the measure before the end of the year Mike Crossey up Washington

White House Frank Cologne Greg Walden Stephanie Grisham Congress Mike Crossey Washington Senator Lamar Alexander Representative Press Secretary
"walden" Discussed on Spark from CBC Radio

Spark from CBC Radio

06:38 min | 10 months ago

"walden" Discussed on Spark from CBC Radio

"We can lose sight of what our preferences are. What our desires or but also what our values are and for that we we need a kind of time of subjectivity? which is very different from? This kind of rushed hurried instrumental payments worth completely in quite different from digital time. It is time for music could is a time for dipping into our memories for connecting our memories to our present situation. What can we put in place to in our lives to to try to secure those spaces of of solid well? Some of the really practical things are are ones. I mentioned earlier. The you know not bringing your phone into your bedroom right because what we we know that. If you use your phone alarm you reach over you have to touch your phone to turn the alarm off and the moment that you've touched your phone. It's the easiest thing in the world to check out instagram. Next right. And then you're down the rabbit hole already and and you you've missed out on even just those five minutes of that interstitial period between wake and sleep right I think that such a rich period where people daydream where where they may be have their Eureka moments when you allow that kind of I guess limited space right between consciousness and unconsciousness justice. The brain does such awesome work in that in that in between zone. I also think that the busiest people are often the ones who when they do run into a little bit of empty time. They don't know what to do with it right if they're kind of terrified of that empty space when they do you stumble upon it. So reminding yourself that it's okay to feel awkward or or lonely even and to maybe try and push through that loneliness when you do accidentally run into five minutes so of silence when you spent that Weaken your own cabin in the woods when you're researching your last book. You mentioned that you realize that you had never been alone for longer than twenty four hours and on the first night you said you were beset. The childlike fear. So do you think that we all have that that some level of just fear of being alone totally whether it's like I mean I was literally you know in a cabin cabin in the woods wondering whether an axe murderer trailer accident. Yeah so you know the the would. The of the floorboards starts creaking. And I don't know whether that's some footsteps right but that that was telling on its own that I couldn't even even my unconscious couldn't fathom the idea that there was nobody coming to get me right that I really would be left alone in these woods in a way even more anxiety making was with my first book the One before solitude instead of going to a cabin in the woods spent one full month without going online so no Internet no cell phone either actually for for a month And that was terrifying in a different way because I was around human beings but it was terrifying in that. I didn't even know how addicted I was until I tried to do that. Kind of that digital fast right. It's it's very unsettling when you see how changed you are because it has been so woven into our daily actions. The it's like blinking in King or swallowing. Yeah you don't even notice how many times you you reach for that phone Does all this come more naturally to you now. Like whether it's the soul to your your weather. It's just disconnecting from your phone. Because in in your book it's in your last book. It seems almost like we need to be constantly vigilant in maintaining this protected did space for solitude and for for disconnection yeah. I don't think there are any easy cures here. Unfortunately for the same reason you know back to the food food analogy if I were to have a very healthy fast or or or diet for thirty days. It's it's not as though I would not have to worry about food for the rest of my life right. This is a daily habit. It's about I mean I'm borrowing aristotle phrase here but it's it's a virtuous activity. It's not a goal that you arrive at. It's the habit it's the practice of it and it's and it's something you you I really do have to struggle with every day and I would just add that. I don't write about these things because I have figured them out. You Know I. I don't write right about them because I have achieved some sort of Yoda level of of being. Okay with solitude if anything I write about these things because I find them difficult bolt Because like everybody I am also terrified of of time on my own because like everybody I reach for my my phone whenever I have a moment's emptiness in a checkout line grocery store. It's something I struggle with every day. You wrote that Walden. Alden is a quote swansong for an antique enjoyment of time alone. She's a great way of putting it Do you think it's a swansong. I mean can't can we a rescue time alone in our modern world I think if we were to go back to the eighteen eighteen thirties we would not be very happy with the results. You know and I don't fancy myself a Luddite I really don't want to undo are Technologies I want to learn how to be healthy Living with them because they're not they're not good or evil right but we do have to remember. They're not neutral either and that they have profound effects on our lives. So yeah I do I do think Walden is a swansong for a certain kind of disconnected life. That most of us can't even imagine anymore and I think we're living through another swansong. Now right we're living through Massive massive change and I don't think it's all bad at all. I think there are Komo marvelous. Things that come along with global connectivity and yet only if.

Walden Komo King Alden
"walden" Discussed on Spark from CBC Radio

Spark from CBC Radio

09:12 min | 10 months ago

"walden" Discussed on Spark from CBC Radio

"Must learn to reawakened and keep ourselves awake not by mechanical AIDS but by an infinite expectation of the Dawn. Sure thorough was waxing poetic about nature but he also managed to nail our present-day conundrum. So let's take a page out of Walden. Shall we want we start. Start with Michael Harris. He's the author of the end of absence. Reclaiming what we've lost in a world of constant connection and also solitude a singular life in a crowded world both of those books express a longing for solitude and they're also guidebooks of sorts to help us learn how to be alone and that feels more important than ever in world where digital distractions pulls away from our interior life. So you've said that one of the themes of your books was suggested to you by thorough and that's the idea that loneliness loneliness is failed solitude. So how have we failed at solitude. Well I think we failed solitude everytime wake up. Don't we right we we reach for our phone instead of for the person next to us or we get in the shower and even the five minutes of solitude in the shower fuels like maybe too much I I mean I mean this is. This is the state of being that that we're in. I think every generation has to has to Russell with designing their own solitude into their lives based on the technologies or or the media environment that they find themselves awesome And is that the primary conundrum for us is balancing solitude with our technologies. I think you know we're the first Internet naive generation Sean Right. We're really the people who are having to figure this out for the first time and as such we have to learn to curate our media diet in the same way that we've already he kind of figured out how to curate a food diet so it it is a to a certain degree and original question for us just because of the quantity of interruptions the quantity of distractions in our lives and yet at the same time. It really is a question that rolls through the years years every generation I think as had to make their own decisions about how to balance their lives. I mean that's the funny thing as you go back to. Thoreau thorough in. Its the nineteenth century. And he's talking about the number of things that you have to do and getting away from the complexity of life which seems almost comical to us from our perspective active but absolutely I mean I think this is the thing is you. You only can learn how to live in the future by looking to the past for for examples right and I mean when throw goes to that cabin in the woods In eighteen forty five and for him. The world really was getting much busier in the the same way that our world is getting much busier if you think about what life was like when he was a child verses twenty eight years old when he when he goes into the woods the railway had just kind of come to town. The telephone was going to be invented ten years after he wrote that book the Telegraph already existed so for him. His world was getting so much faster so much busier and the lesson that we get from thorough is that he makes a choice. He sees his world changing and for him. It's getting too busy too fast. And he decides to design his own life So just to return to this idea that loneliness cleaness has failed solitude. How consulted actually help us? Combat Loneliness well. I you know with the row again. He said something in a speech about how the more unhappy are with ourselves. The more we will run to the mailbox and I think about that a lot when I dig dig into my pocket for my phone. It's it says something about what's going on inside of me how content I am with my own life and I think the reverse must be true to that if we if we design a rich interior life for ourselves if we were if we do that work at building that rich interior life. It's going to end up giving us A A healthier relationship with our devices but consulted be bad for us though. I think that loneliness genus can be painful and I do think this isn't about becoming a hermit at one point. When I was writing my last book I went to the cabin in the woods and spent some time completely isolated and when I went into the woods I thought okay? This is great. I'm going to have have have this splendid creative Period and a few days into it it occurred to me that you know like the uni bomber went into the woods to right that there's a healthy and an unhealthy way of doing this. I again Betcha designing your life. I think it comes down to figuring out what you want it out of your life and then what is the amount of social connection or disconnection. That's going to help you get there How is their idea of solitude changed from earlier periods I mean I guess it's a question of scale right. Yeah like if you're thinking of thorough. He has that famous misaligned abode. I had one share for solitude two chairs for conversation and three chairs for company right. That was that was his far. Right Right reap three chairs is a party and you know I think most people listening to this might feel like two hundred or five. Hundred followers was on twitter. Begins to feel like a party. Maybe in your phone right so I think that's not a qualitative change but it is a quantitative change You also point out that some of US move to cities in the first place to become anonymous and and uncounted. So there's a connection between urbanization and an solitude. Oh absolutely right. There's kind of a lovely loneliness to the city. I think a lot of people have found that small town life or our cabin. Life is actually strangely social. Because everybody's in your business all of your neighbors have to be in your business because that's how you survive in an environment environment like that whereas in the city You can you can order every meal and have a task grab it delivered to your apartment door and never know their name and you you can really be quite self sufficient. I WANNA turn a little bit to this idea of contemporary technology in our our lack of solitude. It seems to me that you know we're drawn to social media because we're social creatures but also because connection is literally the entire business model of social media. So why does that kind of social interaction ultimately team so unsatisfying for us I mean I think it's because the point of social media is not actual actually social connection right. The point is always to put eyeballs onto advertising. That's the model for Google It's the model for Facebook Doc. It's the monetization of our attention and it is done under the veil of a social experience but that is not actually the point. It and I think we're all we're all being triggered by these social cues and yet we're all also smart enough to you realize this isn't really what it feels like to to be tied to someone else to feel warm in somebody else's gays right so we always feel Jio little letdown And I think we have become massively. Really Addicted to digital technologies. The most significant effects are psychological. Emotional we begin to experience orients not more but less we to experience less richly we begin to lose our ability to experience experience. I'm Eva Hoffman. And I am primarily a writer but I also teach also the part time academic. I mean there is a whole philosophic tradition starting with classical Greek philosophers Which says that leisure is the foundation Dacian of civilization foundation of culture because it allows us to reflect to think to sort of stoke our imaginative and creative powers? You know occasionally we do need Moments of just unscripted idleness of you know sitting quietly and without any particular purpose without directing.

Sean Right Michael Harris Walden AIDS Dacian of civilization foundat Eva Hoffman US twitter Thoreau writer Russell Jio Google Facebook
Senior House Republican Walden will not seek re-election

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

Senior House Republican Walden will not seek re-election

"Powerful Republican congressman Greg Walden of Oregon has announced he will not seek a twelfth term well that is the top Republican on the house energy and commerce committee he used to be the chairman he was a key player in the effort to replace obamacare he also led house GOP election efforts in twenty fourteen and sixteen well then is the nineteenth house Republican to announce he or she will not seek reelection three other GOP lawmakers have

Greg Walden Oregon Chairman Congressman GOP
"walden" Discussed on The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

10:09 min | 1 year ago

"walden" Discussed on The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

"I'm so that's one way that people can check out kind of what my how I work. if people want to get a free dream interpretation from me and and maybe you have a more specific interaction with me they can call it on my radio show. I have a a show every every Wednesday from nine to ten. Am Pacific Time and it's on unity online radio so people call in all the time and shared with me and then they sometimes will book Lucas session later. I don't do a quote unquote discovery session I used to I don't do that anymore. IF PEOPLE WANNA book with make and go to my website just book session. I have a few slots available every week. Not It's not full-time thing anymore. I'm doing a lot of other things and writing and workshops but I do live events in your. You're obviously you're an author. A Nice Guy Community loves sex and RELATIONSHIP DREAM DICTIONARY. You definitely want to get a hold of that. You've you some of the chicken soup for the soul yeah program also which is all tra- ultra cool to be associated with has done to books with them dreams and premonitions and dreams and the unexplainable and I'm so proud of those and I remember longtime ago somebody said when I was when I was launching first book I pray that one day your book will end up in target or Walmart and I thought that that was an insult but then they said no no that means. It's really successful that means it's gone mainstream and those books are all in Walmart and target yeah. That's that's a good thing that definitely is a good thing so as you as you started this this dream analysis and this hypnotherapy the obvious that you started to really micro niche into into the dream category and he's doing these live events. I understand you have come one coming up. That's in that's in Mexico also also yes. I feel like because I know that the like to learn oftentimes like to learn in in good retreat environments so yes. There's some so teotihuacan Mexico for those who are familiar with Don Miguel Ruiz's he wrote the book the four agreements he kinda put Teotihuacan on the map and and territory con means were men become God and doesn't mean it's not like the blasphemous kind of this means waking up to your divine nature waking up and dropping the shackles of limitation and stepping truly into your power and there's Don Miguel kind of put this on the map and then he trained rain some apprentices and and I'm one of them I'm kind of in that lineage and I have been this'll probably be my tenth journey that I've taken people to and I've been there multiple times before that as a as a student we have a book called Dreaming Heaven that has that really lays out what we do in Teotihuacan but basically I tell people that it's kind of like twenty years of therapy in a week and will in five days you have breakthrough after breakthrough do and it's it's a powerful environment we explore the pyramids and we do have our own modern version of ancient rituals roles that were about coming into your power and saying goodbye to the limitations in an honorable way you give them a proper burial and I mean in burial literally. There's like a burial ground that we do some really we do some awesome shadow work and we end up on the pyramid airman the sun which is symbolic of coming into the year you become this is great for men when you become one with the son like one with does not just the sun you are to your parents but you become one with the sun you literally people shine and we have a lot of men more men that they're coming. We probably have just as many men that are signed up as women this time and it's so powerful deep and there's there's time that you get on on your own but there's a lot of time in spending groups the relationships deepen. Everyone leaves shining like walking like you. You're you're ten feet tall all right so let's talk for just a quick moment about many in our audience that might relate to the entrepreneur. Western world olden non. Wu Thinking there aren't many in our community also that relates for Eastern and more woo sides talk. I heard a lot of Wu and what you said. Take the people that aren't we were there. He'll thank you okay we have there's a there's a group of men the from a pretty prestigious this company that came to the retreat last year that we're not woo at all and they loved it. They got it in there this year profitability ability wise and on every measure of success wise they're coming back. Is they want more of that because their bottom line showed up their results that were in the waking world because really. I mean as a hypnotherapist and this might be this is still probably a bit woo. I feel like my job is a hypnotherapist therapist and even a dream worker is to help people get out of their own way. and I can see it's easier for someone else to see your blind spots than it is for anybody anybody. I mean even myself. It's easier for somebody else to see what's in my blindspot. What's keeping me in my own way so when you when you do something like this. It's an accelerated intensive the shadow the thing that was keeping you limited like I I can only make X. amount of money a year and that's all I'm capable of because as my dad so my dad taught me. I don't WanNa go against him. There's these unconscious beliefs that were carrying that are really shackles and you let them go and it's like the circus elephant that that is chained in at first and then you no longer need. The Cheney's still stays in that that area. You don't even know that you're that you're kind and you have invisible chains so I don't know I. I don't know if it's if I'm if I'm getting anew here but I know that there's bottom line results with just the fact that when you get to know what your tapes are that are going off over and over and over again put yourself in an environment where you're open to interpretation interpretation from a number number of different sources whether it's eastern or Western. You're always going to pull from that a positive experience if you if you open and allow the positivity in the positive is it experienced to come in if you approach this as I'm not going to pardon the expression. I'm not going to any of that that that Wou- crap right now if that's if that's your attitude you will get out of it exactly what you what you think you know you're. You're always going to find what you're looking for right. I would say think in terms of Indiana Jones and being on a quest that is going for your finding this hidden relic. You're finding the the sacred elixir the holy grail and it's not just for you. It's for your family. It's for your community. It's for your business as you become like truly have this. This hero's journey experience it. You become a better provider you you. You do it not just for you. In in a way you get the benefit for sure but it's for the people that you serve and I know the men that are listening to your podcasts are noble men that aren't just in it to win it for themselves but I I know that they really want to be as impactful as possible in their communities and this is one way this is one way to do it. I'm a little more quickly so a couple of things before we wrap on the interview and by the way Nice Guy Community. If you want to get a hold of any of the information that we're talking about on today's interview with Kelly Sullivan Walden make sure you head over to her website will put a link in the show notes. It's simply Kelly Sullivan Walden Dot com but will put a link in the show non-story about the spelling or any of that right now so a couple things one one. Can we change what we dream thereby changing what is our in our future and then I wanna get into a little personal stuff after that but how do Louis Patu we change what is in our dreams. Okay well there is I mean I would say the most. The most apparent answer to that is to learn how to become a lucid dreamer humor and one of the best ways to become a lucid dreamer is to become a lucid liver somebody who lives an awake way but meditation nation is a great way to practice that and I I'm not a lucid dream expert. I have lucid dream that I can help people with that a bit but that's one that's there's a Stephen La- bears and Robert Wagner that are experts and Lucid Jamie. That's one way but here's the thing that I teach to people who are not lucid dreamers and who are frustrated because they can't be. There's a there's a sneaky shortcut and get around to how you can change your dream without having to you become lucid so by sitting on the edge of your seat. Yes okay so like I said before. Your dream isn't over just because you woke up. If if you wake up with a dream that you wish ended differently like let's say it was a nightmare you woke up scared your heart palpitation in your waking state while you're still remembering remembering the dream you can imagine that you're back in the dream but this time your lucid even though you're awake so you're so so it's used sitting on the edge of your bed. You're aware that you're awake but this dream and you can still see the images imagine that you're back in it. You don't have to fall back asleep to get back in you. Just imagine in your waking state that you are back in it and this time you have a superpower or you bring on the people that have the superpowers that that you know have your back and this time you change the dream so that you end up victorious and in some way shape or form or you find the thing or you get the girl or you slay the dragon or you come out of or you whatever it is that you felt unfinished business within the dream. Imagine that you finish it but that you don't just finish the dream the.

Walmart Wu Teotihuacan Lucid Jamie Mexico Lucas Don Miguel Ruiz teotihuacan Mexico Don Miguel Kelly Sullivan Walden Kelly Sullivan Cheney Indiana Jones Louis Patu Stephen La Robert Wagner twenty years five days ten feet
Kennedy Space Center braces for Hurricane Dorian – Spaceflight Now

SPACE NEWS POD

03:52 min | 1 year ago

Kennedy Space Center braces for Hurricane Dorian – Spaceflight Now

"Hello and welcome back to the space news pod. My name is will walden. Today's episode is about kennedy space center in florida oughta. Have you heard about hurricane dorian. Let's say hurricane. It's going to be hitting florida peninsula as a category gory for hurricane sunday night if it hits landfall if it doesn't divert out in the ocean again it's going to hit land sunday sunday night at kennedy space center. They prepare for these kinds of extreme weather conditions. The national hurricane senator said the dorian could be a level for above and in the meantime <hes> kennedy space center supreme to close at six pm on saturday saturday with a team of one hundred to one hundred twenty people staying behind to monitor the storm's effects and conduct a safety inspection once this category for hurricane passes through those that are staying at the kennedy space center will stay at the launch control center which which is certified to handle kid a gory five hurricane in on wednesday k._f._c. head. It's crawler transporter to vehicle <hes> <hes> to launch pad thirty nine b in the event. The mobile launcher must be moved back to the vehicle assembly building. Oh so they're preparing for this. They're taking this seriously. If this hurricane four in category four hurricane passes through it could have winds over one hundred miles an hour those dangerous those are dangerous not only for people but for <hes> equipment that nasa uses and this trailer the crawler transport to it moves it about one mile per hour. You can easily walk faster. This thing takes about eight hours for the crawler to get into the pad from the <hes> vehicle assembly building the crawler project manager. John gyles said this was done for shuttle numerous times so this is nothing new. This is kind of part part of the game plan anyway and if the crawler needs to transport the mobile launcher back to the v. a. b. it would be the first time the crawler transporter vehicle in preparation of a hurricane since the space shuttle and if during does hit the space coast crawler will stall it will stay in the underneath the mobile launcher and as as soon as it's safe though bring it back out to the pad now according to kennedy space center the v._i._p. Is built to withstand winds of around one hundred and twenty five miles per hour and as of now teams are preparing to bring the mobile launcher back early friday morning and it had been at the pad undergoing hardware testing and checks for the nastas artists program in artists if you're not familiar is a plan for for nasa to send astronauts back to the moon and twenty twenty four the first woman in the next man to set foot on the surface of the moon and there's been rumors and murmurs going around that it could possibly be two women to set foot on the moon instead of a woman in the next man so that's pretty interesting as well. Jim breitenstein set as a possibility so the visitor complex dissipates a close on sunday and monday as they continue to monitor the storm and on saturday august thirty first kennedy space center visitor complex will be open during regular hours nine a._m. To six p._m. The m. but no kennedy space center bus tours or special interest

Kennedy Space Center Hurricane Dorian Kennedy Nasa Florida Dorian Jim Breitenstein John Gyles Senator Project Manager Eight Hours
Your Shadows Halo

A Moment of Science

02:00 min | 1 year ago

Your Shadows Halo

"You're sainted shadow on today's moment of science in the record of his life walden pond henry david thoreau reported on an odd phenomenon as i walk on the railroad causeway he wrote. I used to wonder at the halo of light around my shadow. The roy was probably seeing phenomenon called hive again shine which is german for halo. This is going light around the head and shoulders orders of your shadow these days. It's likely to be seen by early morning. Golfers own dewy grass. Where does this halo come from your shadows. Louis made by something called back scattering this happens whenever sunlight enters ado drop the sun beam enters the fun of the drop in a certain amount of light pounces off the back this slide streams back out the front almost exactly in the direction it came from thanks to back scattering every do drop on on the golf course is shining. A narrow beam of light directly back toward the sun highly can shine is the glare from this backward bouncing sunlight. If every ever do drop bounces sunlight. Why does the halo only appear around your shadows head instead of over the whole fairway unlike a light bulb which shines light light in every direction each do drop is reflecting a narrow tightly focused beam directly at the sun. Here is must be in the south of these beams to to see them. If we're looking down at your shadow here is our only in the line of fire for those do drops near your shadows head. The beams from the do drops few feet into the side. Measure is entirely. This is why you're likely to see a halo around your own. Shadows head mutt not around those of others this moment the science comes from indiana university with production support from the office of the provost dong glass.

Henry David Thoreau Provost Indiana University Louis
NASA, Elon Musk And Inland Musk discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

SPACE NEWS POD

03:24 min | 1 year ago

NASA, Elon Musk And Inland Musk discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

"Welcome back to the space based news pod a daily podcast about space science and tech. I'm your host will Walden and on this episode be talking about Inland Musk's latest comments to Time magazine about SPACEX and their ability to land on the moon before Nasa we all know the NASA has plans to land the first woman in the next man on. On the surface of the Moon in twenty twenty four about five years now Elon Musk recently told time dotcom it may literally be easier to just land starship on the moon then I tried to convince NASA that we can what he's talking about here is that Massa has a bunch of red tape. You have to go through a lot of channels in order to make sure that your rocket is the one used by NASA in this article. He says if it were to take longer to convince NASA in the authorities that we do have versus just doing it the we might just do it. It may literally be easier to just land starship on the moon than try to convince NASA that we can obviously this is a decision that's out of my hands but the sheer amount of effort required to convince a large number of skeptical engineers at NASA The we can do it is very high in not unreasonably so 'cause they're like a common. How could this possibly work the skepticism SEPTA system you know they'd have good reasons for it but the for sure way to end the sketch skepticism is to just do it now? Elon Musk and SPACEX are currently working on the starship. Ship starship will be a human capable craft that will be able to send people to the moon and eventually tomorrow's they have star hopper protests going on this week. They had some static fire tests <hes> last night in the night before in within the next five or so days they're going to have a hover test of starship. starship will be able to land dozens of people. Oh on the surface of the

Nasa Elon Musk Inland Musk Spacex Massa Walden Time Hopper Five Years
NASA JPL Hacked

SPACE NEWS POD

03:09 min | 1 year ago

NASA JPL Hacked

"Hello. And welcome back to the space news pod. A daily podcast where we discuss space science and tech. space station. I'm your host And according will to Walden a report in on on Forbes this episode. dot com, Massa the GPO. deep space network The Jet DSM Propulsion array Laboratory of radio has telescopes had its computer and numerous systems hacked. other GPL Hackers systems got into were the system. affected during this hack They and Johnson enter Space the system Center, who's through responsible a raspberry for pi the international computer space station and disconnected, then. completely Hecht further from into the system, the network not just just GPO to make sure at one point, that nothing the were to international happen space to the station ISS was amongst other in programs. jeopardy And they of said being that part of of these these Johnson's attacks. attacks. officials But But were concerned the cyberattacks luckily, luckily, we we could had had move some some engineers engineers laterally from on on the board board gateway into at at their mission Massa Massa systems, that that potentially were were up up gaining access, to to and the the task task initiate to stop initiating the hackers malicious to signals stop basically to human unplug spaceflight the systems that use that were those systems. in contact So basically, what with happened the. is ISS hackers found a before way the hackers not got gonna control go into too much technical of the detail international here. But there's. Security violations. There is no ticket resolutions, and there were delays in patching security vulnerabilities that were known by auditors. So what happened was Hecker is basically targeted a system JPL, and they found backdoors into other parts of NASA systems administrators lax security certificates, no role based security training was in place, GPO, and unlike masses main security operation center, it didn't have a round, the clock incident reporting capability, so things like this are very important to security as far as NASA goes, and our people in space, as well as all the science that could be happening at NASA. And if hackers were to intrude on that and deleted information, well, that would be a sad day for science for Hugh. Humanity in Massa is a big target masses. High-profile target and Mike Thompson. Who's a security analysts said many purely associate them with space related activities, but their depth of research and development includes patents covering, cutting edge science, that nation states would literally kill for the hackers might still be in their network, without them, even knowing it.

Massa Massa Massa Nasa Jet Dsm Propulsion Array Labor Johnson ISS Mike Thompson Walden Hecht JPL Hecker Hugh
"walden" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

SPACE NEWS POD

13:12 min | 1 year ago

"walden" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

"Listening, just tap. The Lincoln my show notes. And I can't wait to hear from you. Hello. And welcome back to the space pod, daily podcast about space science and tech. I'm your host will Walden.

Walden
"walden" Discussed on AppleInsider Podcast

AppleInsider Podcast

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"walden" Discussed on AppleInsider Podcast

"Just like I like to surround myself with the best a consumer electronics. Because I value good experiences. I also liked surround myself with what I find to be the best in other ranges of prototypes, right? No surprise Scifo. And it's it's I I've allowed myself to become a little particular and a little selective. And just, you know, sometimes spoil myself by spending on things that I think are better quality. Are you building to tell me just bolted tesla, I have not. And I am not an telling you is that I apply to as many things I can around me. I will hold off on buying an item in order to buy the better one. And and right now talking about clothing. Book. Mac. Walden is a online retailer that has gone out of their way to try and address clothing and address fabric. And you know, they they started by trying to figure out how to make socks better. Right. And how to make the this all of these things better. So they started by from scratch they engineered their own fabric. And what I like from them is that they sell things that are made from from bamboo cloth, which is a more durable cloth. They sell things that have silver woven into an silver has the property of absorbing both a little bit radiation, which I know inconsequential, scientifically, but whatever and also has the property of absorbing odor. Which is kinda cool. And really what it came down to is that there are some of the most comfortable shirts that I've ever worn. I love the socks I loved the shirts. And so. It's it's. Been my experience that when I put on a MAC Walden shirt. It's better than whatever else. I was wearing before. You know, it's it's not too far out of range to say that they believe in smart design and premium fabrics because that's really what it.

Walden Mac
"walden" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

05:42 min | 2 years ago

"walden" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"Lived. I went to visit Walden with Jeffrey Kramer, Jeff. Nice to meet you. Jeffrey is the curator of the library of the thorough institute at the Walden woods project a nonprofit dedicated to keeping the land around Walden woods state park from being developed nice place, Jeffrey in this light filled wood-paneled library with a bust of thorough on the wall and a big reading table under a giant chandelier. We have about eight thousand volumes here in about sixty thousand documents, making it the most comprehensive collection of thorough related material in the world, Jeffrey and I drove over to the replica throws cabinet Walden state park. But the replica isn't on the site of the original cabin. It's actually right next to the parking lot throws house was about halfway across the pond and when they decided to build a replica, which I think was in the nineteen sixties. Some point, they were afraid of vandalism basically by being taught in the woods, put it here in a more visible area from the outside. The cabin looks like your basic garden, shed two in those a pitched roof and adore we stepped inside. So we're standing in replica of thorough house, ten by fifteen, pretty compact room with a bed and three chairs and desk hit a fireplace and adventure put into stove, pretty cozy for one person. Yeah, it's cozy for one person, but it's not confining. I mean, it's by the standards of the tiny house movement. It's it's fine. Pretty luxurious is bigger. Some dorm rooms I've been in so one could live very comfortably thorough lived there for two years, two months and two days. He did write that book about the trip. He took with his brother, but it didn't sell. He ended up with hundreds of remaindered copies. I have now a library of nearly nine hundred volumes over seven hundred of which I wrote myself. People were just not that interested in what thorough went to Walden pond to, right, but they had a lot of questions for thorough about what he was up to in the woods Henry. What are you doing a house out there by the by the Pont who who does that? It's marginal land. It was a place where middle class son of a businessman who graduated from Harvard college would not normally go. People thought he was a bit odd. Even after he left Walden pond, everybody wanted to hear about why thorough decided to live there and how he scraped by. So we decided to give a series of lectures. He base them on the journals. He kept when he was living in the woods. Those lectures became the first few chapters of the book Walden in the book. He criticizes the way the worker bees in concord, spend all their lives earning money just so they can wear stylish clothes and live in fancy houses. Most men appear never to have considered what a house is and are actually though needlessly poor all their lives because they think that they must have such a one as their neighbors have. And he scathing about the inequality he sees between the haves and the have nots. The luxury of one class is counterbalanced by the indigence of another. On the one side is the palace on the other, are the almshouse and the silent poor, but there's something else going on here. Thorough mother was an anti slavery activist. She. Helped bring some of the country's most radical abolitionists to speak in concord, but it wasn't just talk. The thorough household was a stop on the underground railroad and thorough himself was an agent. The thorough family's abolitionist shows up in Walden. If you read between the lines, Walden takes us on a journey of emancipation of the self with only very glancing references to what's always on his mind, which is the fact of the American economy, the capitalist economy rests on the enslavement of his fellow human beings, and that people like himself, people who are white and privileged, didn't see that was part of our own enslavement to this larger capitalist system. That's the system thorough wanted to opt out of by going to live at Walden pond, but Walden is also full of nature writing, really beautiful nature writing in the morning. I watched the geese. From the door through the mist sailing in the middle of the pond. But when I stood on the shore, they at once rose up with great flapping of wings at the signal of their commander, and when they had got into rank circled about over my head, twenty nine of them and then steered straight to Canada with a regular honk from their leader at intervals. In many ways, we think of thorough as the founder of American environmental thinking because part of his own unique direction was deter outward to the natural world under Emerson's influence thrill had become a transcendental list. The transcendental lists believed that humans had a kind of divine spark. This has some really important consequences, and one of them is that you must respect every human being because all of us have that divine principle within, but thorough went further. He's not the divine in everything. He. Saw that in nature. He could see it and trees. He could see it in a pond. He could see it in the animals around him. I have no doubt that it is part of the destiny of the human race in its gradual improvement to leave off eating animals.

Walden pond Walden Walden woods state park Walden woods Walden state park Jeffrey Kramer concord Harvard college vandalism Jeff commander founder Canada Emerson two months two years two days
"walden" Discussed on Who Charted

Who Charted

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"walden" Discussed on Who Charted

"Bream five bricks and simple shopping. Simple, always better one time in vogue rides to kill a man from post office used a cleaver. I met a Julianne cut in his arse off against, and that is why MAC wild and we'll stay number one because of simplicity. Not only do MAC Waltons under socks and shirts look good. They perform welter. Sara emphysema from smoking dusk. Who is the the garbage chef branch Seger at not healthy. It's also not healthy to not wear MAC Walden. They have a line of silver on though are and shirts that are naturally and mulk grow its mainstay, eliminate odor, and I all you if you don't use and support MAC Walden as a premier sponsor of air wolf, you must abou- if you Don live first pair, you can keep it and they will still refined no questions asked, I use MAC Walden, perhaps somewhere exam right now, would you like to come and find out? Come and test me. I will pull out a grapefruit my and I will rough shop like I did to that fellow down. So she who didn't live to see Olympics. I love the fifth of Mack. Well. Gordon, I can hide easily a boning knife inside their sweat shorts, and they pull it out to slice and dice someone who wrongs me off our puritan when they'll ag- arcs come, they will each assign. We will sign each them different area if you live in that area ball down to that all ag- arc, if you do not bow down, come over and it beautiful, Mike wild and ensemble, and all off Jaap of wealth fake off had Mackel also for twenty percent off your first author visit Mike Walden dot com. And the protocol chart that at checkout..

MAC Walden Mike Walden Mike wild branch Seger Julianne Gordon Mackel Mack Jaap Don twenty percent
"walden" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

04:03 min | 3 years ago

"walden" Discussed on WGTK

"Mm emme no when i was growing up on walden's mountain during the '30s all this season seen filled with a sense of wonder i remember the dog would sprain the watermelon summer the russet and golden leaves a border and most especially by remember christmas sure lorde the sure two the first hand that christmas was on it's way would come with the arrival of the new mailorder catalogue my father called it the wish book uh while the great winter storms raged around the mountain.

walden lorde christmas