35 Burst results for "Walden"

Henry Louis Gates Jr. On the Black Church

Fresh Air

02:09 min | 3 weeks ago

Henry Louis Gates Jr. On the Black Church

"Guest louis gates has written a new book called the black church. That's a companion to the pbs series. He hosts of the same name. The book explores the history of african american religions from the days of the transatlantic slave trade to the black lives. Matter movement says black churches were the first institutions built by black people and run independent of white society in the us with the earliest black christian congregations. Roughly contemporaneous with the declaration of independence. He describes how churches became the foundation of black religious political economic and social life. He also tells his story about the bargain. He made with jesus that led him to the church at age twelve but life eventually led him to become more of an observer than participants in religion. Henry louis gates has hosted many pbs series and written companion books exploring the history of african americans including the recent book in series on reconstruction. He also hosts the series finding your roots in which through dna tests and in-depth genealogical research reveals the ancestrally. History of his well known. Guess gators a professor at harvard where he directs the hutchins center for african and african american research. Our interview recorded last thursday. Henry louis gates welcome back to fresh air a pleasure to have you back on our show in the acknowledgements in your book. You think a list of people for helping you fully realize the awesome significance of the black church and black religious beliefs in your own life and in the lives of other people. Let's talk a little bit about your own life when you were young. Your mother was methodist your father episcopalian. You attended your mother's church as a child. Would you describe that church yeah. It was a small methodist. Church is called walden methodist church. It's still there and many of my cousins and old friends so worship at church in many of the people most dear to me who passed away or memorialize on the walls of the church but it was a methodist church but it was almost the fundamentalist church. If

Louis Gates White Society Foundation Of Black Religious Henry Louis Gates Black Church PBS Hutchins Center For African An Gators Jesus Harvard United States Walden Methodist Church
Greenwood Genetic Center on Epigenetics

DNA Today

01:53 min | Last month

Greenwood Genetic Center on Epigenetics

"I guess they are front. Greenwood genetic center. Dr louis and kelly walden rate is an assistant director in greenwood's molecular diagnostic laboratory and kelly is greenwood's director of diagnostic development and h net counselor by training. Welcome to the show guys. It's fantastic to have john. Thanks for having us. Thank you so a lot of genetic counselors. If they're listening they know greenwood for their visual aids. I think that's what greenwood is most popular for. But could you give us a little more background and tell us about the other division of green genetic center. That people may be less familiar with kelly. Did you want to start us out of just giving background information. So the green which genetic center is a nonprofit organization We do have four divisions we have our clinical division said they see patients across the state of south carolina. We have our research. Division focused on functional studies setting the causes of autism birth defects intellectual disability. Our education division. They provide programs across the state from middle school. High school all the way up through our medical genetics training programs and then are gonna collapse. I agree with diagnostic labs. We have cited genetics molecular and biochemical testing. And so in this episode we are focusing on epigenetics and really exploring what happy. Genetics is testing four. Bg that conditions for those. That may not understand like they hear this epigenetics term. They're like what is genetics. I have no idea reagan. You fill us in on just giving us that background information so that you know us talking about testing options and conditions all make a little bit more sense. Yup so epigenetics is the process in which expression in jeans are either increase or decrease in a way that's independent makoni sequence

Greenwood Genetic Center Dr Louis Kelly Walden Greenwood Kelly Aids John South Carolina Autism Middle School Reagan
Interview With Gideon Mendels, CEO Of Comet

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

04:26 min | Last month

Interview With Gideon Mendels, CEO Of Comet

"We're so excited to have with us today given mendel. Who's the ceo and co founder of comet so high gideon and thank you so much for joining us today jeff million. Hey you're on. Thank you so much for having me. I'm super excited to today. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners. And tell them a little bit about your background and your current role at comment definitely so as you mentioned. I'm the ceo and co founder of comment For the listeners. Who don't know comet provides a self hosted in college based missionary platform essentially on data science teams to track impair explain and optimize experiments models company support some of the biggest and best enterprise machinery teams in healthcare attack media financial services and other industries Her son who actually started maker of software engineer but she sixteen years ago. And i shifted do working on an applied machine learning about seven years ago. I was a grad student whilst work work on speech processing natural language processing after that i had my own start up again in. Nlp space. And after that. I was google Where i was working on deep learning research specifically we were working on detecting hate speech on youtube comments using the malls. Yeah that's that's really a great application. In general for automated systems is very hard for for humans to just manage the mountains of tasks that are needed for moderation. So great use of of a and a great applied use of ai. It's cool that you bring into that so let's sort of bring us into now. I know what you're doing with commented lot of it's helping people make these better models and and iterative battle and manages models so maybe you could tell us a little bit in our listeners. About what are some of the challenges that organizations face today when they're trying to build machine learning models into production That's a great question. And i liked it. Use the word build rather than deploy because from our view comments in working with these like very business focused engineering teams the biggest challenge in getting them. All production isn't the actual deployment or devops problem behind. It's really a building model. That's good enough to justify deployment right so when we think about machine learning it's actually buried their friends. Offer engineering both from a process perspective. The dodgy the tools everything about different machine learning iterative process tres many pitfalls in the way and now whether it's your optimizing for the wrong metric or you're leaking your target or you're just working on a data set. That doesn't have enough signal so eventually it's really comes down to building a model that meets the business. Kpi in most of the teams out there are really struggling with that point Like i mentioned. There's a lot of things that can contribute to that but a big part of it is the lack of processes and tools of doing these things in a safe and a predictable way. you know. it's it's great that you gave that explanation. I know that a lot of companies are now starting to bring their starting to build models and think about how they can incorporate machine learning into their their company. So why is it. Important to have a tool for data scientists and teams to track explain in optimize experiments in models. That's an excellent question. And i think a lot of companies learned that the hard way but really impossible to run a team successfully without a system of record of your work. I mean that's true for most job functions. Not just machine learning. You know whether it's gets hub for after themes or salesforce for cell students hub spot for marketing and so on you really need a central system of records manage these processes and and again like other system records. Another jobs luncheon. Once you have that like. In our case on experiment and a model management platform it provides value to anyone was in walden engineer. Works so whether it's data scientists that's looking to track their experiments compare and understand. Why one models being better than the other is bias or issues with a model through the software engineer that's needs actual binary defer deployment all the way to the manager that wants to track and have visibility of a team progression and eventually maintaining all that institutional knowledge about research experimentation metrics and models within the organization and non people's personal notes for example.

Jeff Million Mendel Youtube Google Salesforce Walden
"walden" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

The Pomp Podcast

04:16 min | 2 months ago

"walden" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

"There's people i know that. Recently left financing have gone into crypto. And and summer trading zimmer whatever and they're just like you don't realize how nice it is to have our operations as human right the machines. They don't care for humans like when the market closes everyone takes a deep breath. Here yeah and and the space is just moving so fast that you i think. Unfortunately it's only humans that can keep up with all the new ideas to you know to write them. The programs machines run to keep up with the market. Absolutely last question for you is aliens or are you a believer or non-believers. You know i. I'd say i would put myself in the believer candidate just seems it's too big out there for for not to be anything else out there. They're probably out there and they just need some sort of intelligent life form but probably too far away never come in contact. Unfortunately in so you know it's a fun intellectual exercise but the probably worthless one night in terms of preparing for them or anything like that right. What a what a question. Yeah for me to finish up. I guess i'm curious. What what what's your taste in digital art. What do you look for in in assets. Collect so. I read this book. boom Guy sent the and basically goes back and looks at the like Legacy art world in the history of through kind of the twentieth century and our guest twenty century in which you find out is like it's all starts right like what makes a van gogh more expensive or valuable than something else like it is the story in. So you gotta be careful because that's like the fine line between like The charlatans of the world and then actually like the true value in the world. But when you start to understand like the market structure and how important auction houses were. It's actually picking winners in the art world I think we're gonna see a recreation of that. I actually don't think it's going to be auction. Houses like it'll be some other form of that But ultimately when i look at art in the camp of like i couldn't tell you what's good or bad art if you should be five pieces in legacy world. Which was the most expensive at. I don't have that. I don't i don't have that That artistic inclination. Into instead. What i think of it as is much more like a star right is if you look at it and you say hey. What is the story behind this. What is kind of at a directional arrow of progress like the equivalent of that for the art world. That's basically the decisions that i make and then the other piece of it too. I think is that there's this idea. Startups things in motion stay in motion and so when you see kind of momentum like you should pay attention I think the same thing happens with artists rice when you see artists are to sell a couple of pieces and it's very obvious like hey. This artists gaining more more traction. Traction is really assigned for the community. It's really for audience right. Might like you're basically increasing the demand side of the equation. So if you have you know relatively fixed supply from an artist and you've got an increasing demand for that artists like obviously if you're just looking at it as a pure financial investment the price of those assets are gonna go up over time inside just kind of chocolate up figuring out once that everybody else. But that's a couple of frameworks have been used. Yeah that makes sense. I think i think it's species on important about crypto markets aren't market traditional art markets end markets. They're all reflexive markets. Read so you better than anyone. But the more that sort of insiders talk about the value of the thing and the more value day trade in internal to one another the more. Outsiders look at that and say look at all that value. Those guys are crazy. What what's going on in the more they pay attention and that's what causes the outsiders annan's these reflects markets compound in dry activity in the space. I i couldn't agree more. Where can we send people to find you on the internet or find out more about the work you're doing it variant just variant dot fund. Simple you would. You are a man of very little little words on that one. So variant dot fund. Jessica said thank you so much for doing this. People really really gonna learn a lot from this and you guys on the cutting edge a lot. That's going on in this industry. So congrats on all the success. Not just keep going through skin future cool. Thanks so much for having me. It was fun..

Jessica twentieth century five pieces one night twenty century pieces Guy
"walden" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

The Pomp Podcast

07:24 min | 2 months ago

"walden" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

"Of some of these products services while i think the most foremost one is It's really hot hard to you. Know to design a product that people want by committee right. The best startups have strong leadership. Strong product vision and the interim quickly. They moved quickly You know once once in the public markets as a traditional company you know you're beholden to shareholders in what they want. And you know that that can pull you in a number of directions can slow you down. It can force to optimize for short-term profits over long-term growth and and so i think that's. that's one of the potential downsides that founders. Think about when they're going through this process of progressive decentralisation turning over ownership to users. You don't wanna do it too soon. That's what happened in two thousand seventeen when they're all these is ios. They kind of had the right idea where they're like. You know we should give our users ownership and then they'll be incentivized to try our thing. The problem was they had built the thing and so they got hamstrung by having to build a product by community consensus as opposed to having a founders of drive the initial product vision. Build the thing and then actuate distribution chewed actual users once they already are using product. So i think that's that's one downside. I think Another is that You know products that do need to continue to evolve this just an extension of of the prior point wants your community on your decision. Making process is beholden to governance right. And so how do you remain competitive. I think a good sort of lessen the founders can look to is you know visa actually started as a cooperative and a bunch of banks came together. Pooled money go this network and grew the network effects of of the payment system. Really quickly because they all had skin games do so But as as grew and competition got more fierce mastercard came an american express. These converted from a cooperative to profit entity because they could raise more capital through that structure ultimately. That's what they felt. They needed to do in order to remain competitive versus others who had raised considerable amount. Said we're moving quickly. So i think that's something that just keep in mind that You need to remain nimble even once in the public markets even with these are ownership in order to remain competitive. I'm optimistic that. Because crypto tokens allow you to distribute value very gradually in programming programmable so like an automated fashion will be able to you know to make cooperatives a lot more efficient. You know like a lot more automated than they've been in the past and thus a lot more competitive so i think this market can this market structure can scale thinking about the difference between equity in tokens as you deploy capital right. See you mentioned that your venture capital fund. That air quotes. Because i think people think generally you go by equity uche. Brian tokens one. Are you buying equity as well. And then too. How do you think about if faced with heck by equity or token is a framework for like a pros and cons. You think through which you would rather own yet So i think there. There is a best practice funding structure in the space. I think this is something that the folks extensive Worked on a lot. And a lot of the deals i work on their started this way. Similarly at variant most the deals we do are structured as equity with a warrant for tokens. And so there's really two separate components here the reason you know. I'll start by saying a lot of the companies that we invest in. They do have a very specific goal. Which is to become a decentralized network coordinated by a token just like bitcoin and so on so the expectation is that a lot of value of what's being built will ultimately accrue to the token But in the short term the reason we're buying equity is that equity allows for. It's the most flexible instrument for lining incentives between investors and entrepreneurs and at the earliest stages of company flexibility is is paramount because things change counters need to have had the able to pivot if the if the idea or the market moves in the direction. They weren't anticipating in so equity. Aligns investors with the founders. Should they decide. Hey you know that network we said we were gonna build. It doesn't make sense in the market today. We're doing something. Different equity preserved the alignment the In two thousand seventeen a lot of investors were buying Saft's which were promise for tokens in the future. The problem or that can occur with that structure is a team is sort of committing in advance. We're building a network with this specific token and maybe that doesn't make sense as the market evolves right. It doesn't allow for the flexibility that that's important too early stage startups. So so that's why we do equity. And then the worked for tokens essentially. What it says is if you do end up building a network that is coordinated by token at the time you launched network. Hopefully that never is sufficiently decentralized so that the the token is no longer a security at that point this warrant gets used and the investors. Get their sort of you know pro. Rata share of the tokens in alignment with with The founders and critical thing. There is that the network does need to be sufficiently decentralized at that point which typically means that a lot of the tokens aren't just going to founders investors but are also going to the actual users who are operating the network on a go forward basis makes sense or switch gears and talk about what seems to be like the topic Which has nf. T's not fungible tokens last year. I think it was september. I wrote this publicly just saying hey look i think digital art is going to be bigger than traditional art. It's very similar to kind of bitcoin. Verse gold The digital versions could be bigger than the analogue version. That may seem crazy today. But like you see in twenty years and we'll see what happens type situation as you can imagine literally got laughed out of the room fast forward to today in. I'm actually even thinking to myself. Well wait a second like maybe. I was archaic. Am i thinking of just comparing digital art to traditional Because it seems like an taking on a life of its own. There's all these different implementations like it's much much bigger than just digital art so what is your kind of Thought process and maybe at a high level when you think of nfc today. Why do you think that is interesting or valuable. Yeah so i think i think of key is sort of Through the lens of the ownership economy thesis right so again the idea that You know in the future. The next big products on the internet are going to be built operated and owned by users. And you know when you think about media on internet today know everyday billions of images video songs are shared on social media platforms. What what's interesting about. What's actually happening there. As creators of those media files. There's up owning the files to facebook twitter to to instagram. And what's happening is copying pasting. The file from their computer to the servers of those companies and along with the file they also copy and paste ownership of the file itself in that. That's because somewhere along the way in the service you agreed..

twenty years last year Brian facebook september twitter Saft today instagram two thousand seventeen billions of images two separate components once two thousand one tokens american express ios seventeen
"walden" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

The Pomp Podcast

08:31 min | 2 months ago

"walden" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

"Solely their opinions and do not reflect the opinions of more creek digital or morgan creek capital management. You should not tree. Any opinions expressed by pomp as civic inducement to make a particular investment or follow a particular strategy but only as an expression of his opinion. This podcast is for informational purposes. Only all right guys bang bang. Got a special treat for you today. I've got jesse here from variant that source for doing this. Thanks for having me. I feel like you have taken the world by storm but before we get into what you're doing now. Let's just go back in time. it gets to your background. Where'd you grow up in. How did you get into a invest. Yes i i grew up in new york. Went went to high school in long island. Went to college in in canada I think relevant detail of my early years was in high school. I got pretty involved with piracy much more than you know your average teenager in two thousand and thanks friend of mine as sort of found my way into this community of people who are uploading the files that everyone else was downloading and for me. That was exciting. Because i got access to the jay z. Album before everyone else was burning copies of it and and selling them to my friends. The paper mind dsl modem and like it was just amazing to have access to all this content at a time when like youtube didn't exist. Facebook didn't exist. There is no sound thought spotify cetera. Meanwhile here was literally every piece of audio video software video games etcetera on these exclusive. Ftp servers that were highly organized and incentivized communities not that dissimilar from from the way crypto communities function today and that was a formative experience for me. Because it's sort of highlighted. How media was going to propagate on the internet in the future in the very near future so like four years later. I'm in college Wasn't the best of students was too busy throwing parties an concerts and then using these new technology platforms that that we're sort of coming up at that time To distribute media fires music that of the artists that were performing at these shows. And so i i the straight line through my career is always been fascinated with how media propagates online value of that means captured which the piracy era was was not happening at all And then in this platform era started to get captured more and more by platforms. And what i set out to do sort of. After the myers montreal was set up an artist management company to help artists leverage these new tech platforms at reach their fans directly and capture more value for their business independent of the major label system. In so i work with with a number of big independent artists salons noah's blood orange magical clouds To help them do this much as possible and through that came really Sort of aware of the degree to which these platforms were coming to dominate the relationship between creators and their audience And also some some more. You know less. Glamorous problems with the way royalties were administered in the traditional music business and then i learned about bitcoin in twenty thirteen or so and that was the turning point for me where you know i read the white paper and to me. The most interesting thing was was not the financial side of it though. I thought that was cool. And still think it's really cool But the fact that bitcoin was this peer to peer network. That was very similar in a lot of ways to the pure pure higher. See protocols I was engaging with as a teenager. And i was like this is kind of you. Know kind of like bit torn in ottawa's as but it has something that bittorrent lacked another's It has this identity system built into the protocol and now know public. Private key cryptography. Which is what allows you to own your bitcoin and have it be yours. Independent of any third party and i thought that's really interesting. What if you could do the same for different. Kind of digital assets that have a financial asset what about digital media asset like an image of video or song if you could let the creator of that asset be discovered through the acid itself. They could capture much more value without having to depend on the platforms who intermediate that relationship today. And so that idea was the spark for a startup co founded in twenty. fourteen called media chain. Labs where we set out to do that. And i'll say you know. In hindsight we were. We were way too early. I think today a lot of those ideas are being realized through. Nfc's which will get into but so that's exciting but back then you know. Bitcoin was just coming into mainstream consciousness. It it was. It was too early to be exploring nonfinancial use cases We had a good outcome in that. We we were acquired by spotify ended up leading blockchain. Are indeed there to help them so to think about and solve some of the royalty administration problems that were adjacent to what we were exploring. And then after spotify joined entries. In horowitz And then the better part of three years on their crypto investment team before spinning out variant last year. So i'll pause there. That was that was a lot you get major props from coming on here and talking about jay z right at jump so that the other thing is probably similar. Age or least ballpark wise. And i remember being in middle school or maybe even into high school and Lime wire was like really popular put. It was always like russian roulette. You didn't of you're downloading the song or a virus and sometimes you got both of them said always felt like your computer drastically slowed down and i think there's a whole generation of kids who Who kind grew up on a lot of those platforms and got a crash. Course in what What's going on today in the world. Talk a little bit about variant of what your goal is under that you guys have this idea of of being a community oriented fund. That really wants to invest these community owned a networks but like what exactly does that neat. Yeah so it's it's it's related to our thesis Which which. I call the ownership economy thesis and so one lens to view. What's happening in crypto. Is that for the very first time we have networks that are worth billions and billions of dollars that are completely built operated and owned by their users right so with bitcoin. Of course the first example There is no bitcoin company. It's just a permission list network Air your listeners. Know this really well And i think that model that is at the core of success. The success of bitcoin is being adapted to other networks in completely different verticals. And this is playing out You know from an audience of users. That's been fairly technical. Developers were the first to realize. Hey if i mind. Bitcoin you know i can earn bitcoin and earn an ownership stake in the network. And so naturally developers and technologists. I understand that but increasingly more and more mainstream audiences are realizing hey i can actually earn some of the value. I contribute to the products and services. I use every day so now there is bitcoin. there's theorem in defy. there's lots of networks today that that are owned by their users. Couple of good examples are unique swap and compound which are both financial marketplaces unique Pickiness opposite example. It's it's an exchange not unlike calling based but where the users of the exchange of the ones earning the transaction fees in the marketplace in exchange for putting quantity into the marketplace so this ownership model is in my view the most market-driven way to build network effects for you know for next generation platforms in what's driven the really rapid growth in bitcoin. In theory i'm in the leg so what we're investing in at variant is Founders were building networks that have the objective of becoming community owned because we feel. It's these types of networks will grow much faster and much larger than their web two counterparts which are largely owned by e. c's and and that may sound counterintuitive because we are a venture capital firm right. So how how do we do.

new york youtube Facebook canada jay z two thousand last year spotify long island two counterparts today three years both four years later twenty thirteen billions of dollars first time first first example Couple of good examples
"walden" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

The Pomp Podcast

08:33 min | 2 months ago

"walden" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

"Many people who are new to the asset class. On okay ex you can easily use your credit card or debit card to buy top crypto currencies with almost forty different fiat currencies. Shout out to all the international listeners. So head on. Over an open an account at ok x dot com slash pump. It's about okay e. x. dot com slash pomp again. Okay dot com slash pop lastly l. max digital bang bang. Listen up l. max. Digital is the leading institutional crypto currency exchange which offers clients regulated transparent insecure trading environment. That's for the retail traders l. max digital all institutions baby with an average of two billion dollars traded per day max digital counts all of the largest global crypto trading institutions as its clients l. Max digital is the go-to institutional exchange leveraging the l. max groups proven low latency technology and liquidity relationships l. amax digital offers the market leading solution for crypto trading and custodial services as a primary price discovery venue olmecs digital provides streaming real time market. Data to the industry's leading indices in analytics platforms enhancing the quality of market information available to investors trade like an institution with digital learn more at l. max digital dot com slash pomp l. Max digital the number one player when it comes to the institutional world if you're trading for an institution you better using l. max digital go to l. max digital dot com slash pomp telhami century. And you might get a little discount. A little bit of a treat. L. max digital dot com slash pomp. All right getting so with jesse. I hope you guys enjoy this anthony. Pomigliano is a partner morgan creek digital all expressed by palm or his guests on this podcast per solely their opinions and do not reflect the opinions of more creek digital or morgan creek capital management. You should not tree. Any opinions expressed by pomp as civic inducement to make a particular investment or follow a particular strategy but only as an expression of his opinion. This podcast is for informational purposes. Only all right guys bang bang. Got a special treat for you today. I've got jesse here from variant that source for doing this. Thanks for having me. I feel like you have taken the world by storm but before we get into what you're doing now. Let's just go back in time. it gets to your background. Where'd you grow up in. How did you get into a invest. Yes i i grew up in new york. Went went to high school in long island. Went to college in in canada I think relevant detail of my early years was in high school. I got pretty involved with piracy much more than you know your average teenager in two thousand and thanks friend of mine as sort of found my way into this community of people who are uploading the files that everyone else was downloading and for me. That was exciting. Because i got access to the jay z. Album before everyone else was burning copies of it and and selling them to my friends. The paper mind dsl modem and like it was just amazing to have access to all this content at a time when like youtube didn't exist. Facebook didn't exist. There is no sound thought spotify cetera. Meanwhile here was literally every piece of audio video software video games etcetera on these exclusive. Ftp servers that were highly organized and incentivized communities not that dissimilar from from the way crypto communities function today and that was a formative experience for me. Because it's sort of highlighted. How media was going to propagate on the internet in the future in the very near future so like four years later. I'm in college Wasn't the best of students was too busy throwing parties an concerts and then using these new technology platforms that that we're sort of coming up at that time To distribute media fires music that of the artists that were performing at these shows. And so i i the straight line through my career is always been fascinated with how media propagates online value of that means captured which the piracy era was was not happening at all And then in this platform era started to get captured more and more by platforms. And what i set out to do sort of. After the myers montreal was set up an artist management company to help artists leverage these new tech platforms at reach their fans directly and capture more value for their business independent of the major label system. In so i work with with a number of big independent artists salons noah's blood orange magical clouds To help them do this much as possible and through that came really Sort of aware of the degree to which these platforms were coming to dominate the relationship between creators and their audience And also some some more. You know less. Glamorous problems with the way royalties were administered in the traditional music business and then i learned about bitcoin in twenty thirteen or so and that was the turning point for me where you know i read the white paper and to me. The most interesting thing was was not the financial side of it though. I thought that was cool. And still think it's really cool But the fact that bitcoin was this peer to peer network. That was very similar in a lot of ways to the pure pure higher. See protocols I was engaging with as a teenager. And i was like this is kind of you. Know kind of like bit torn in ottawa's as but it has something that bittorrent lacked another's It has this identity system built into the protocol and now know public. Private key cryptography. Which is what allows you to own your bitcoin and have it be yours. Independent of any third party and i thought that's really interesting. What if you could do the same for different. Kind of digital assets that have a financial asset what about digital media asset like an image of video or song if you could let the creator of that asset be discovered through the acid itself. They could capture much more value without having to depend on the platforms who intermediate that relationship today. And so that idea was the spark for a startup co founded in twenty. fourteen called media chain. Labs where we set out to do that. And i'll say you know. In hindsight we were. We were way too early. I think today a lot of those ideas are being realized through. Nfc's which will get into but so that's exciting but back then you know. Bitcoin was just coming into mainstream consciousness. It it was. It was too early to be exploring nonfinancial use cases We had a good outcome in that. We we were acquired by spotify ended up leading blockchain. Are indeed there to help them so to think about and solve some of the royalty administration problems that were adjacent to what we were exploring. And then after spotify joined entries. In horowitz And then the better part of three years on their crypto investment team before spinning out variant last year. So i'll pause there. That was that was a lot you get major props from coming on here and talking about jay z right at jump so that the other thing is probably similar. Age or least ballpark wise. And i remember being in middle school or maybe even into high school and Lime wire was like really popular put. It was always like russian roulette. You didn't of you're downloading the song or a virus and sometimes you got both of them said always felt like your computer drastically slowed down and i think there's a whole generation of kids who Who kind grew up on a lot of those platforms and got a crash. Course in what What's going on today in the world. Talk a little bit about variant of what your goal is under that you guys have this idea of of being a community oriented fund. That really wants to invest these community owned a networks but like what exactly does that neat. Yeah so it's it's it's related to our thesis Which which. I call the ownership economy thesis and so one lens to view. What's happening in crypto. Is that for the very first time we have networks that are worth billions and billions of dollars that are completely built operated and owned by their users right so with bitcoin. Of course the first example There is no bitcoin company. It's just a permission list network.

new york youtube billions Facebook canada two billion dollars last year spotify today two thousand three years four years later both max digital l. max. Digital jay z first time olmecs digital billions of dollars dot com
"walden" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

03:08 min | 2 months ago

"walden" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"Chasing your dreams and and not fearing failure and Our kids are not going to be program in that way. And so what are we. Walk into all this and We get the win or a we feed. we're going into that game fully. Prepare preparing So to win and and to go go institute and that's that's gotta be the mindset. I think every game then you gotta treat every game You know you know the same in terms of that preparation whether we're playing tennessee. Tech like like this sunday or playing a great team. Like ole miss or a great team like alabama You know the the focus remains the same and the goal remains the same. And i think anything less than that is Cheating your kid and cheating you're facil- we plan on doing everything we can prepare this and go mix it up with the best and have fun with it and our kids have all of it and A lot of those guys take pride in like. Hey battle mr recruiter demand. That was recruited me. I want to get all the tuna. Show them why they should have. And that's the fun time for our guy so but our mindset is go play with a chip on your shoulder and play with the edge and You know a couple years ago. Several years ago. I know but as they did at the michigan. And you know there's been a couple of other examples of that you know why not awesome p. Why not somebody else. Why not coach. Love the enthusiasm kirk. Walden from austin. Be good luck this weekend and we hope you'll come back. Thank you for the time. Always appreciate you avenue song. Let's go creek. You got it coach scotty. Wall and the great great model of a austin peay especially when they had a basketball player named fly williams. Figure that one out for yourself. We'll be right back. You're listening to the paul finebaum. Show podcast with me back to have all of you here on a friday afternoon in single grab one call here before we run out of time. Peyton go right ahead. You're on the air was just wanting know what south carolina and same being read to do this year to become a better football team. Well paid. And i think i think the biggest issue there has already been solved. And that's getting a change. For whatever reason i don't know why she didn't work. Players apparently weren't listening to him Mistakes were made in recruiting and you know. His staff at times was in consistent especially on the defensive side of the ball Offense wasn't all that great either anyway. I appreciate your call very much. We we have had a pretty breakneck first hour and appreciate kosheh joining us. Editor 's head is a really amazing attitude. They're thinking hey we can beat anyone. What else are you supposed to think. If your head football coach we have a lot to do. We will get some basketball conversation in here in a few minutes also talked to field. Yates he will join us in the next hour talking about the nfl draft in the final hour today patch smith who really created the idea for this show. Many many years ago in birmingham will join us. We'll do some reminiscent interacting and we will be back with three more hours. We hope you'll stick around. Thank you for listening to the paul finebaum. Show podcast the paul finebaum. Show airs weekdays on the sec network beginning at three eastern..

paul finebaum Yates fly williams Peyton friday afternoon Walden birmingham today scotty patch smith first hour austin Several years ago couple years ago alabama three more hours kirk one call single many years ago
Democracy As We Know It

The Experiment

05:14 min | 3 months ago

Democracy As We Know It

"The life of maryland newkirk and on november six twenty twenty after a long battle with cancer. She was fifty six. She survived by her husband three siblings and three kids including her son van. Who's a senior editor at the atlantic. I'm a mom's oldest child. I am required under law to only speak good things when a life comes to an end we the ones who are left behind. We're left with a story a really a bunch of different stories like for van. There were small stories about the way. His mom looked really playing a tie or what she cared about. Walden your church. How she treated people who was an incredibly patient what she struggled with the stress rising off her but he but when van took a minute to pull back to really zoom out on the time line of his mom's life he could see this bigger story about the country. She lived in one of the things. I like to think about is the fact that when she was born it was by no means guaranteed that she would be granted the right to vote and that right to vote would be protected looking back on her life ban sees a story about democracy and it's different than the one he was taught so i was always taught that america was founded explicitly as democracy. You know you go to school. And you're taught that this was the biggest hit in global democracy since the athenians but really to me. I have been more and more convinced that the only true phase of what might even be somewhat called. Democracy in america has been america's voting writer and my mother has seen every single day van says contrary to what you might have been told real. Democracy in america hasn't been here that long. It's only been here for fifty six years this week. Van newkirk tells the short story of democracy by taking us through the life of the woman who saw the whole thing his mom. I'm julie longoria this experiment. A show about our unfinished country as van tells it his mom was born just one year before our democracy started a mother was born in sixty four. I understand that family. Storytelling often embellished. So you have to work a little bit too well. I've not yet gotten the fact checkers on some of this. But as the story goes a mother was born in greenwood mississippi. She went home in a cardboard box. That is the legend. I believe it's probably one of those. Cardboard bassin has which not that uncommon. But yeah you know they were poor and on the way home you know drove pass headquarters of civil rights organizations staging freedom summer but that's also will be known as the summer of civil rights because of the mississippi freedom summer project it was one of the main flashpoints in the civil rights movement and there were staging it out of headquarters in greenwood mississippi where she was born dan. He say what you want. I say i wanna reddish the vote. A lot of what they were trying to do was to register black people to vote to send into mississippi that stomach upwards of one thousand teachers ministers lawyers and students from all around the country and they did that in part by bringing lots and lots of volunteers. Lots and lots of white volunteers around the country to come down to mississippi. I hope we can reach the lives as many people as possible in idealistic the constitution the bill of rights. And i think it's important for everybody to have these every was met with incredible amounts of violence so about two three weeks after that. My house was five close. Been tony one of rise. Black little beaming. They should expect possibly somebody. She was born in the middle of all this. You know a time. When greenwood was a very contentious place to live for

VAN Walden Your Church America Newkirk Van Newkirk Mississippi Julie Longoria Maryland Atlantic Greenwood Cancer DAN
Adii Pienaar on How to Build a Business That Profits Your Life

The $100 MBA Show

08:40 min | 3 months ago

Adii Pienaar on How to Build a Business That Profits Your Life

"Haberman apr. And i've built and sold to sort of businesses and building my next one now and i've also had just published a new book called life ability. The new measure of entrepreneurial success in one hundred dollar. Nba listen today. I'd like to teach you how to build a business that is not only financially profitable but more importantly life profitable as well. I'll be talking about how we should rethink work. Life balance means how. It's risky to take the short term pain long-term gain approach to building a business how to realize your business yourself and the next steps to take to start to create more life prophets today before i get into that. Let me share a bit of my personal journey and how i came to define this idea of life ability. I started my first business with teams and we commerce straight out of university. Even before that i was constantly working on business ideas in favor of just being a student for example and once i exited commerce years later becoming a millionaire in the process. I was supposed to take a break sabbatical sorts. But i got stuck into next. President is pretty much immunity. Because i needed to prove that. I was not a one hit wonder. I winced the building my second business believing that it should be easier. I some capital. I had experience. I had a network. I had new skills. But two years in things started unraveling both in my personal life and in business and pretty soon. I almost lost all of the things that were most dear to me. I realized that. I've been on. This accelerated path my own little rat race that cause so much. Collateral damage along the way regardless of the business financial success that i achieved. It was in that moment that i realized that i need a better way of building. My business and life going forward the philosopher henry david. Thoreau showed a powerful idea and his book walden. That helped me find this new path and ultimately coin the term life of liberty. He says the cost of a thing is the amount of what i will call life which is required to be changed for it immediately or in the long run. I'll just repeat that for a second. The cost of a thing is the amount of what i will call life which required to be exchanged for it immediately or in the long run when we do anything in life. The thing we're paying with is our life. It's our time our attention and all of that is finite and when we as entrepreneurs bowl businesses we pay expenses. Not just with money but with a part of our life and or anything like me you know how demanding a business can be at times. And this whole idea was so counterintuitive to the things that i actually valued at business my family for example represents my highest value. But i was so often just not present with them because my businesses would the monning so much of me and that's what life profitability aims to change. Shift the perspective to growing business that serves you and serves your life every single day as well building a business that generates life. Prophets instead of only accumulating life costs. So let's get into a few ways in which you can start building a business with a you're starting from scratch or you're tweaking existing business to be more profitable. My recommendation is to rethink this whole idea of work life balance. This is a commonly held goal for many people and wall. Street is not a bad goal per se. I do you think it's flawed. The problem with idea that work in life can keep each other imbalance. Is that it proposes. That work in life are two separate independent things. We all know that a bad day at work spills over into our home life easily. Just as an argument with your spouse in the morning influences your mindset throughout the workday to start moving towards greater life ability. We need to acknowledge that work is merely a part of life so a new pursuit of balance should mean that rather hold our work our businesses and balance with all the other things that are important to us whether it's families lovers friends hobbies passions projects. Or maybe just health just like you would balance an investment portfolio. So should you balance your life portfolio that should include all bits of those things that are important to you and your work and business will just be one of the stocks or one of those bits in this personalized life portfolio. The second idea. i'd like to share with. You is a bit of caution. As journey ambitious individuals were conditioned with this notion that short-term compromise and sacrifice if actually leads to long term gain and reward that kind of proverbial pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. We tell ourselves that once. I just make that extra one hundred thousand dollars or i am able to afford. Those two critical hires team. I'll take the time off to go in that family holiday or finally take up those lessons for which i've paid ages ago. The whiskey run in sequencing major life events like that is at the outcome the actual reward but is never that guaranteed and specially don't know how much time we need or have to get to that outcome in his book when breath becomes their acclaimed neurosurgeon. Paul right my life had been building potential potential. That would now go and realized. I plan to do so much and i'd come so close c. Pull it always wanted to write a book and have children but delayed those things as he was ambitiously bullying his professional career. He eventually only started writing his book after he was diagnosed with lung cancer when he was thirty six and his only daughter was only eight months old when he tragedy died the following year his wife ultimately had to write the loss chapter of his book before it was published life. Profitable business means that the business empowers you to integrate the most important things in your life with a regular cadence. It means taking that trip reading that book or spending time on the passion project sooner rather than later the next scenario like to do is to ask you to just take a momentary pause regardless of where you're at in your journey maybe you've been running business for ten years or this your third attempt after two previous failures or maybe he just had the idea to start your business loss week and on l. Planning its launch before you can take the next steps of and pursue greater life liberty. It's important to be aware of universal truth. As you take these next steps you will be the only common denominator on your journey. All other things can change. The business ordered idea with the product and change team members. Come and go. divorce happens right and families can change. You can move to the other side of the world. Make new friends but our goal is of any of those changes. You will still be there. You will be the one on this junior taking so in this momentary pause. I'd ask you to think about who you really are. What are those things that truly really matters and one of the goals hopes and dreams that you have in this moment for your future if you can't reconcile those things in this very moment and at least find partial clarity no amount of next steps can fix that. Discontent or incongruence. Whatever your next look like. They need to be untrue. Alignment of who you really are. Yes you will change and evolve to as you learn and continue on your journey but merely things that make you unique to you in this moment will not change materially life. Prophets will flow from your ability to honor these things as you take your next

Haberman Henry David Thoreau NBA Walden Lung Cancer Paul
How Lawrence Harvey Zeiger Became Larry King

Bernie and Sid in the Morning

02:20 min | 3 months ago

How Lawrence Harvey Zeiger Became Larry King

"Harvey My dad's name. Zeder in Brooklyn, New York, Laurence Harvey is eager to try and he started his radio career at a very small station in Miami Beach. And needless to say, his boss didn't love the name Lawrence Zeder. So if you understand how he became Larry King. Here's how the story went courtesy of Conan O'Brien. Now King is not your real last name. Is that right? What is your real Last name? Gi Girl was born with the name Lawrence Harvey's Iger's e E I g e R And I got the name King. In a funny way. My first day on the radio, all my life I've dreamed of being underrated. This was my I never want to be anything else but a broadcaster finally get hired A small station Miami Beach. Finally, my dreams come true. Get a job. Gonna start Monday morning is a disc jockey and all weekend. I'm nervous on practicing and it's quarter to nine small radio station general manager Close me and he says, Well, you're ready. I said, I'm ready. This is your big day. You're starting radio. I was 22 years old. Yes, This is what name you going to use my says Larry Zeiger, he said you can't use it. That's a wise Well, it's ethnic people won't know how to spell it. They won't remember it. I said, Well, what? Whoa! I'm nervous enough. And he had the Miami Herald Open. I was an ad for Kings wholesale liquors. On. He said. Wait a minute. That's what the air was. Kings Wholesale liquors 1925 Walden Road, Huh? Says, Why don't you take Larry King? So you're named after a sale on booze? I am there grow vast liquors there. Wow. Could have been Larry Wholesale letter. I know that could've been you see, Accepted. What Worse He's right. He could have been a lot of words. Andy, you know I love you. I love you. Do not break and you know, you know why your career hasn't bounced for because you would have named the guy Larry, Larry and I tell you, and that would have been funny for a week. There's about they would never, ever. That would shut ins that would have made me the Here are their hero, but they never would have been a Larry's wholesale liquor live 10th anniversary. Very

Laurence Harvey Zeder Lawrence Zeder Miami Beach Larry King Larry Zeiger Brien Iger Harvey Conan Miami Herald Brooklyn New York Larry Wholesale King Larry Andy
Kevin Feige's 'Star Wars' Movie to Be Written By 'Doctor Strange 2' and 'Loki' Writer Michael Waldron

Lights Camera Barstool

03:19 min | 4 months ago

Kevin Feige's 'Star Wars' Movie to Be Written By 'Doctor Strange 2' and 'Loki' Writer Michael Waldron

"Kevin feige his star wars stuff he was. You know there's always news about him. Doing star. wars movie was as dream. Kevin feige the the leader of marvel. He will be doing a stars movie and it will be along with doctor. Strange to doctor strange in the multi verse of madness Writer michael waldron who. We found out falls upon us on twitter. I don't know if your listener. Mr waldron who also is doing loki. Assure star wars movie with kevin feige listener. Let's let's get him on the pot did bring him. Dougherty to is a producer. Let's don't take my avatar walden joke either. So we we saw today. I don't know if he's barstool fan but yeah. If you're a listener go please come on. Let's talk about this. We'll talk about anything. But he's a star wars movie tapped to right. He's got a big deal now. Overall deal with disney obviously that's three separate entities for disney awesome. Good for him grads to that And then of course kevon foggy called the see him doing a star wars. Always kinda rumors could kevin feige takeover kathleen kennedy ever step down or she just kind of ran out of interest in doing. It seems it's more fabric baloney thing that's going to happen. Seems as though they're the ones who are going to be kind of leading the charge leading the way though catherine kennedy still there obviously as they've Just completely overhauled. How they're going to look at star wars mostly through series now with some movies And the other star wars news. This this is more of a rumor. It's been shot down that route donor. Junior won't play admiral thron however they've said that robert junior has been looked at for a star wars role in the future which makes sense because now stars and sitting that marvel thing with there's so many future properties they're gonna probably have some actors and actors that people are like. Oh that's that's quite the big name That would be a big one forever. Junior joining star wars would be quite the big name and actually. I don't think he would be a great thrown thrown of an intriguing. I still think. Speaking of the mickelson's i still think wars. Nicholson just play the character. He voiced willie because he was just the perfect of i can't think of another thrown voice But to cool pieces of star wars news here both marvel related. I think we should call them I think what a coin now for. This is the f. Cubed baloney favreau and fi. so the f. cubed alliance i think is gonna make a lot of great stores content in the future and i think that the one thing that Foggy is really going to add to this. As far as the stars movie universe cohesion right. The vendors undertaking is an insane thing. Really in retrospect like we look back on him. Like i made a bunch from the cool right but like to kind of loop together. All his moves into cohesive matter and not only that but like kind of build and make the franchise so much better as went along. I think is extremely impressive. And the fact that he's able to make these movies without feeling superhero fatigue is also even more impressive. And that's where. I think marvel in and star wars are kind of in the same lane as far as like you know when it will. When is it too much like when you down content. I think he he knows what he's doing. In that

Kevin Feige Michael Waldron Mr Waldron Kevon Foggy Catherine Kennedy Disney Robert Junior Kathleen Kennedy Dougherty Twitter Cubed Alliance Mickelson Nicholson Favreau Willie
New White House offer adds $600 checks to COVID-19 relief

Dana Loesch

01:39 min | 5 months ago

New White House offer adds $600 checks to COVID-19 relief

"It here New White House covert relief proposal is in the works. This includes $600 stimulus checks, but no more unemployment boosts. That's the latest thing being rolled out by the Treasury secretary, Steven Manoogian. This is something that Mitch McConnell cocaine, Mitch has given his blessings on the Republican leadership. They've given this to house Speaker Pelosi. We are waiting to see how they feel about this. But basically each adults would receive a stimulus. Check a $600 check. And what's it going to do for a business owner? That's been shut down hammer. That's why that man coming with me read Walden. We're not done yet here. Other proposal does include some money for a local businesses. Not a lot, but they're trying to get something passed. Now keep in mind. This is less than what was rolled out to the Democratic leadership in the House multiple times. There was a bill before the election. That was substantially more than this that Pelosi and Schumer and all the high ranking Democrats got together and said, No, this isn't good enough. You want to know the reason why Dick Durbin, the representative from Ohio Democrat senator from Ohio, spilled the beans with Jake Tapper. Yesterday, House Democrats turned down that much larger coronavirus relief bill. Because the election was coming. Senator Bernie Sanders, the

Steven Manoogian Speaker Pelosi Mitch Mcconnell White House Mitch Treasury Walden Schumer Pelosi Dick Durbin House Ohio Democrats Jake Tapper Senator Bernie Sanders
Tangle and Headcorn Go To Battle

Bedtime Stories With Nennis And Douglas

06:11 min | 5 months ago

Tangle and Headcorn Go To Battle

"Hi story eights cold tongo an headcorn go tab bottle. It don't glisten there are two farms coal whores ball lot of poll gentle slope farm boy. The foot of love burst doc. Mountain and pepin farm next to the metals gentle slope farm is run by former on pepin farm farmer corn even though they do similar jobs and have quite similar farms in many ways the to thaw murders have nothing in common fucked. They are quite competitive. All ways arguing about who grows the best vase or who offstage date the best. The who has the most powerful tractor. Who's hayden later tastiest eggs or who has the best rubber boots any. Can you care to mention farmers. Tongo acorn will argue a bow and troy on coke heat with each other of bolton nothing invasive whole world may the more competitive done yearly ploughing contest. Pay was widened. Both farmers would take their tours and plows into the same failed on. Say who could play the earth up in the nativist law and end the quickest towing possible sort of rice way. You have to be very neat and very goad tractor. Driver of the contest would swap around every year while year on gentle slope arm. The next all pippen farm. Wow this year. The ploughing contest walls pippi held on farmer. Had headquarters pippen. Barb on him won't win it aven more than hey usually dade which walls odd about two hundred pay poll from the town had come down to watch and man that were tencent stolz setting cakes and multiples of toy tractors and even roy on some of the far machinery bought the nine attraction. Was the plowing called. Tash te on the rules were as follows. Both farmers must start at opposite ends on opposite soy of the same failed. And i most plowing. Who's bach unforced. And tell one is the first to get all their rows across to the middle of the field in the judges will compare. The rose are the farmer who gets to middle thirst hamas the house then they wayne if they get to the middle i on the author of farmers still has a nate. Ace rose that and they author farmer. When's three o'clock. Thumbers tangle and had corn up enter their two tractors which were parked in the yard. Falmer tarn goals was orange with a white cop and former headquarters was purple with a green cobb age gave each other one last stare before heading note opposite ends of the big failed very long. Gothard a long walden sullied most of them leaning on the stonewall some of them set in on each other's shoulders to watch the main george mayor dobbin storage on the judging platform with his big hooter on hayes. Mega thal on farmers ready. Both tangle on headcorn revved today engines of bear trotters on poulton levers in their that lower plowing blades into the her then So the mayor. The oath bars gently pushed their feet down on. The accelerators of air tractors

Pepin Farm Metals Gentle Slope Farm Tongo Pippen Farm Tencent Stolz Hayden Acorn Bolton Troy Ace Rose Tash Barb Falmer Tarn ROY Bach Gothard Hamas George Mayor Dobbin Walden Hayes
A Look At The Building Blocks Of Stem Cells

Sounds of Science

04:43 min | 8 months ago

A Look At The Building Blocks Of Stem Cells

"From mouse models in one, thousand, nine, hundred, one to cloning Dolly the sheep to a couple of Nobel prizes. Stem cells have had an exciting half-century. But rearranging the building blocks of life is not easy and more importantly for patients not fast. However, newcomers on the market are ready to change the stem cell programming for the quicker. Joining me today are Mariangela, I o Vino Group leader integrated biology at Charles River Saffron Walden site and Mark Qatar. The founder of the cellular reprogramming startup bit bio. The are here to discuss the innovative technology created by mark and his associates and how it can be exploited by end users like Mariangela welcome Mariangela. Thank you welcome to Beautiful Safran. World. Nice, weather? Yeah. Not Bad. So can we start at the beginning? What are stem cells briefly? So stemmed has really the origin of any complex organism. Their form pretty much after an expert. And role is ready to reproduce all the cells. In the body of a human or or an animal. And the cool thing though is that Yamanaka in two thousand seven showed that one doesn't have to fertilized egg to produce stem cells. You can also produce them synthetically using salary programming, and that really has opened up the use of stem cells for drug discovery and can locations. Cool. All right. What practical uses do stem cells have for drug developers? I think that the DAW to using human cells in drug development this is really important because there's a huge translation gap at the moment between. The animal models and cell lines that are traditionally used right and. The high failure rates that you see in clinical trials. Yeah. Totally the boiled on to two things I drugs because they're toxic to human or because they don't work the human setting and so at the center of all this differences between the species used for drug development at us as the end uses. So you're saying is that the stem cells can be made from human cells and that way they're tested on human cells instead of a different species. That's exactly right. Okay. That makes sense. So how were stem cells traditionally used to create sells like brain cells? So the traditional paradigm was to try and repeat what happens during development when embryo grows in Utah and so researchers for the last twenty years or so tried to. Create protocols that expose cells to extra Selah cues, molecules that exist in the growing embryo and instruct them direct them towards particular cell fates. One of the problems that you have if you repeat this paradigm, of course, you're bought into the timelines of of Embryo Genesis, which basically means it often takes sixteen hundred days plus to generate human sale. and. The other problem that you have when you adopt this, this method is that you have to overcome the diversity that nature requires to create cells. So the worst thing that can happen during development is if a lineage, an organ or a cell type isn't produced raced. And Soak Nature seems to. Prevent. This using. CASSIE principles. So these cells make cell fate choices all along the way. If you think about a protocol that takes sixty one, hundred days with multiple steps were cells make these choices than you end up with inconsistencies. So inconsistency and longtime nine's really the biggest bottleneck introduced new Simpson about. So it's basically I, mean if we're trying to imitate nature nature is trying to make all of the organs we may be only want brain. So using nature's methods is a little bit tricky. So I would say if you wanted to produce a particular cell type, it's very tricky. In terms of producing elements of an organ. It's probably slightly less tricky although you still have the inconsistency question right and then this new paradigm called cell reprogramming. Which is essentially. An expansion or reverse engineering of Yamanaka reprogramming. Provides an alternative route so you can now very efficiently in very quickly. Produce. Human cells using. Synthetic biology paradigm

Mark Qatar Charles River Saffron Walden Mariangela Founder Beautiful Safran Yamanaka Vino Group Utah Selah Simpson
Building the Building Blocks of Life

Sounds of Science

04:48 min | 8 months ago

Building the Building Blocks of Life

"I'm Mary Parker and welcome to this episode of Eureka Sounds of science from mouse models in one, thousand, nine, hundred, one to cloning Dolly the sheep to a couple of Nobel prizes. Stem cells have had an exciting half-century. But rearranging the building blocks of life is not easy and more importantly for patients not fast. However, newcomers on the market are ready to change the stem cell programming for the quicker. Joining me today are Mariangela, I o Vino Group leader integrated biology at Charles River Saffron Walden site and Mark Qatar. The founder of the cellular reprogramming startup bit bio. The are here to discuss the innovative technology created by mark and his associates and how it can be exploited by end users like Mariangela welcome Mariangela. Thank you welcome to Beautiful Safran. World. Nice, weather? Yeah. Not Bad. So can we start at the beginning? What are stem cells briefly? So stemmed has really the origin of any complex organism. Their form pretty much after an expert. And role is ready to reproduce all the cells. In the body of a human or or an animal. And the cool thing though is that Yamanaka in two thousand seven showed that one doesn't have to fertilized egg to produce stem cells. You can also produce them synthetically using salary programming, and that really has opened up the use of stem cells for drug discovery and can locations. Cool. All right. What practical uses do stem cells have for drug developers? I think that the DAW to using human cells in drug development this is really important because there's a huge translation gap at the moment between. The animal models and cell lines that are traditionally used right and. The high failure rates that you see in clinical trials. Yeah. Totally the boiled on to two things I drugs because they're toxic to human or because they don't work the human setting and so at the center of all this differences between the species used for drug development at us as the end uses. So you're saying is that the stem cells can be made from human cells and that way they're tested on human cells instead of a different species. That's exactly right. Okay. That makes sense. So how were stem cells traditionally used to create sells like brain cells? So the traditional paradigm was to try and repeat what happens during development when embryo grows in Utah and so researchers for the last twenty years or so tried to. Create protocols that expose cells to extra Selah cues, molecules that exist in the growing embryo and instruct them direct them towards particular cell fates. One of the problems that you have if you repeat this paradigm, of course, you're bought into the timelines of of Embryo Genesis, which basically means it often takes sixteen hundred days plus to generate human sale. and. The other problem that you have when you adopt this, this method is that you have to overcome the diversity that nature requires to create cells. So the worst thing that can happen during development is if a lineage, an organ or a cell type isn't produced raced. And Soak Nature seems to. Prevent. This using. CASSIE principles. So these cells make cell fate choices all along the way. If you think about a protocol that takes sixty one, hundred days with multiple steps were cells make these choices than you end up with inconsistencies. So inconsistency and longtime nine's really the biggest bottleneck introduced new Simpson about. So it's basically I, mean if we're trying to imitate nature nature is trying to make all of the organs we may be only want brain. So using nature's methods is a little bit tricky. So I would say if you wanted to produce a particular cell type, it's very tricky. In terms of producing elements of an organ. It's probably slightly less tricky although you still have the inconsistency question right and then this new paradigm called cell reprogramming. Which is essentially. An expansion or reverse engineering of Yamanaka reprogramming. Provides an alternative route so you can now very efficiently in very quickly. Produce. Human cells using. Synthetic biology paradigm

Mark Qatar Mary Parker Charles River Saffron Walden Founder Mariangela Beautiful Safran Yamanaka Vino Group Utah Selah Simpson
Computer scientist, pixel inventor Russell Kirsch dead at 91

Latest In Tech News

03:18 min | 9 months ago

Computer scientist, pixel inventor Russell Kirsch dead at 91

"On Russell, Kirsch inventor of the Pixel passed away this week. Bit of sad news rest in peace but In case you're wondering who the inventor of the Pixel was. Now you know computer scientists, Russell AAC Kirsch, the inventor of the Pixel and undisputed pioneer of digital imaging passed away on Tuesday in his Portland home from complications arising from a form of Alzheimer's he was ninety one years old Now, Russell might not be name you immediately recognized his contributions to computer science made digital imaging possible born June twentieth nineteen, twenty nine in New York City demographic parents from Russia. and Hungary I attended Bronx High School than nyu Harvard and eventually mit in nineteen fifty one he joined the National Bureau of standards where he worked for fifty years and helped to invent the Pixel and create the first digital photograph It was a one seventy, two by one, seventy, two pixel image of his son Walden created in nineteen, fifty seven and is now iconic and was named. One of life, Magazine's one hundred photographs that changed the world in two thousand three and we have that image appear on the screen One of the first digital images ever created made from two superimposed scans at different thresholds since each pixel could only show one bit of information that being black or white as DP review points out Kirsch never stopped improving and his most famous invention even after retiring in two thousand and one and a twenty, ten interview on wired, he outlined his attempts to create a system that uses. Variable. Shape pixels instead of the squares that have dominated digital imaging since he invented him in that interview, he called square the logical thing to do. But laments that the decision was something rarely foolish that everyone in the world has been suffering from ever since. So at the right bold age of eighty-one, he began working on a masking system that creates six by six pixel areas and an. intelligently. Divides those areas into the two sections that have the most contrast before refusing to pixels on either side of the seem that idea never caught on but he explained the technology and its benefits in detail in a video below it's the thirteen minute long video if you wanted to watch that. But while the incredible accolades described above certainly gives you the sense of Russia Kirsch the. Engineer. The best personal picture of Kirsch probably comes from a two twenty twelve blocked by ant man named Joel Runyon who encountered him in a coffee shop in Portland after revealing net Romanians Computer and images on it probably wouldn't exist or exist as they are without Christmas contributions to engineering and computer science eighty-three-year-old Kirsch shared the following words I. Guess I've always believed that nothing is withheld from us. What we have conceived to do most people think the opposite that all things are withheld from them, which they have conceived to do, and they end up doing nothing Mr, Kirsch may be gone, but his legacy will live on every day in one of the approximately three point eight billion photos that are currently being captured every single day. May He rest in

Kirsch Russia Kirsch Russell Portland Alzheimer National Bureau Of Standards Nyu Harvard Joel Runyon New York City Engineer Bronx High School Walden Hungary Russia.
"walden" Discussed on Spark from CBC Radio

Spark from CBC Radio

01:44 min | 9 months ago

"walden" Discussed on Spark from CBC Radio

"Theatre from the comfort of your own home claiming available wherever you get your podcasts. I'm Nora Young. This is sparked this episode first aired in December Twenty nineteen. At the time we were inspired by Henry David Thoreau who was a twenty eight year old curmudgeon when he wrote his famous book Walden in any weather at any hour of the day or night, I've been anxious to improve the nick of time and watch it on my stick to to stand on the meeting of two attorneys the past and future, which is precisely the present moment to toe that line. If you think about it thorough was something of a nineteenth century American nostradamus giving voice to our twenty-first-century desired unplug get back to nature and to ourselves. Let us spend one day as deliberately as nature and not be thrown off the track by every nutshell mosquitoes wing that falls on the rails. It. Doesn't matter whether it's eighteen forty five in the woods near Walden pond or two thousand nineteen on the busy streets Toronto we humans need to slow down. Or sometimes even stop our minds need a break. Let's rise early and fast or break fast gently and without perturbation. Let Company come and let company go let the bells ring and the Children Cry Determined to make a day of it. But how does saber the space for rest relaxation and restoration in are always on culture maybe we need to reconnect with the rhythms of wakefulness and sleep far.

Walden pond Henry David Thoreau Nora Young Walden Toronto
"walden" Discussed on Spark from CBC Radio

Spark from CBC Radio

01:43 min | 9 months ago

"walden" Discussed on Spark from CBC Radio

"I think. If, we were to go back to the eighteen thirties. We would not be very happy with the results. You know and I don't fancy myself a Luddite I really don't want to undo. Our. Technologies a I wanted to learn how to be healthy living with them because they're not they're not good or evil right. But we do have to remember that they're not neutral either and that they have profound effects on our lives. So. Yeah I. DO I do think Walden is a swansong for a certain kind of disconnected life that most of us can't even imagine anymore. And I think we're living through another swansong now right? We're living through. A massive massive change. And? I don't think it's all bad at all I think they're marvelous things that come along with global connectivity and yet only if we get to design our own lives in the process. Michael thanks so much for your insights on this. Thank you. Michael Harris is the author of solitude and the end of absence. I'm Nulla. I-I'd host of ideas in this age of Click Bait and on much shouting ideas is a meeting ground for people who want to deepen their understanding of the world. Join me as we crack, open a concept to see how it plays out over place and time, and how it matters today from the rise of authoritarianism to the history of cult movies..

Michael Harris Walden
"walden" Discussed on Spark from CBC Radio

Spark from CBC Radio

08:37 min | 9 months ago

"walden" Discussed on Spark from CBC Radio

"This is a CBC podcast. Hi I'm Nora Young. This is spark throughout the summer we'd been replaying episodes aired before March of this year. Certainly, a lot's changed since then and at first today's episode, which aired in December twenty, one, thousand, nine, hundred may seem outdated after all. It's a show that explores the virtues of solitude and slowing down little did we know that only a few months later isolation and lack of physical contact would be our reality. Thanks to the pandemic but I think it's interesting to listen back through the Lens of all. We've experienced this past year put together. It may offer some valuable insight into what we can change for the future. Intense connectivity has really changed. The way we live this is news I know, but think about it in the past decade alone digital tech has crept into every nook and cranny of our lives at work in schools. The way we get around town parent heat our homes find love the list goes on our lives have made more convenient and yet there's a pervasive sense of being over extended overloaded. And for some people being just plain over it, our life is frittered away by detail. Simplicity simplicity simplicity. I say let your affairs be as two or three, and not a hundred or a thousand instead of a million count half a dozen and keep your accounts on your thumb. Go, with me on this now simplified, it's the year eighteen, forty, five, amplifier, and Henry. David Thoreau has had enough of the modern world. The labouring man has not leisure for a true integrity day by day. He. Has No time to be anything but a machine. Even without smartphone streaming and social media at the ripe old age of twenty eight through was ready to unplug. So to speak, he abandoned all his material possessions and his job at the Family Pencil factory in the bustling town of Concord Massachusetts and for two years, two months and two days he lived alone in a tiny cabin, he built on the edge of Walden pond. I went to the woods because I wish to live deliberately to front only the essential facts of life and see if I could not learn what had had to teach and not when I came to die discover that I had not lived. I did not wish to live what was not life living his so dear nor did I wish to practice resignation unless it was quite necessary? I wanted to live deep and suck out all the marrow of life. To live so sturdily and Spartan like as to put to rout all that was not life to cut a broad swath shave close to drive life into a corner and reduce it to its lowest terms, and if it proved to be mean why then to get the whole in genuine meanness of it and publish its meanness to the world Or if it were sublime to know it by experience and be able to give a true account of it in my next excursion. That true account came a few years later when he published Walden or life in the woods, a seminal work and one of the greatest arguments ever made in favor of simple living, we must learn to reawakened and keep ourselves awake not by mechanical AIDS, but by an infinite expectation of the dawn which does not forsake. Even in our soundest sleep. Now, before you say Nora what's going on has sparked become a show about philosophy and simple living listen to that last line again. We must learn to reawakened and keep ourselves awake not mechanical AIDS, but by an infinite expectation of the Dawn. Sure thorough was waxing poetic about nature, but he also managed to nail our present-day conundrum. So let's take a page out of Walden shall we? We. Start with Michael Harris he's the author of the end of absence reclaiming what we've lost in a world of constant connection and also solitude a singular life in a crowded world. Both of those books express a longing for solitude and they're also guidebooks of sorts to help us learn how to be alone, and that feels more important than ever in a world where digital distractions pulling away from our interior life. So you've said that one of the themes of your books was suggested to you by Thoreau and us the idea that loneliness is failed solitude. So how have we failed at solitude? Well I think we fail it solitude every time they don't we we we reach for our phone instead of for the person next to us or We get in the shower and even the five minutes of solitude in the shower feels like maybe too much. I mean, this is the. State of being that that we're in I think every generation has to has to wrestle with designing their own solitude into their lives based on the technologies or or the media environment that they find themselves and is that the primary conundrum for us is balancing solitude with our technologies I? Think you know we're the Internet naive generation, right we're really the people who are having to figure this out for the first time, and as such, we have to learn to curate our media diet in the same way that we've already kind of figured out how to curate a food diet. So it it is a to a certain degree and original question for us just because of the the quantity of interruptions, the quantity of distractions in our lives, and yet at the same time, it really is a question that rolls through the years. Every generation I think has had to make their own decisions about how to balance their lives. I mean that's the funny thing as you go back to thorough in its the nineteenth century and he's talking about the number of things that you have to do and getting away from the complexity of life which seems almost comical to us from our perspective. But absolutely I mean, I think this is the thing is you you only can learn how to live in the future by looking to the past for for examples right and I mean when throw goes to that cabin in the woods in eighteen, forty five and for him, the world really was getting much busier in the same way that our world is getting much busier if you think about. What life was like when he was a child versus twenty eight years old when he when he goes into the woods, you know the railway had just kind of come to town. The telephone was going to be invented ten years after he wrote that book, the Telegraph already existed. So for him, his world was getting so much faster so much busier and the lesson that we get from thorough is that he makes a choice he sees his world changing and for him it's getting too busy too fast and he decides to design his own life So just to return to this idea that loneliness has failed solitude, how consulted actually help US combat loneliness Well I you know with the row again, he said something in a speech once about how the more unhappy are with ourselves the more we will run to the mailbox and I think about that a lot when I dig into my pocket for my phone, it's it says something about what's going on inside of me how content I am with my own life and I think the reverse must be true to that. If we if we design a rich interior life for ourselves if we were if we do that work at building that interior life, it's going to end up giving us. A healthier relationship with our devices. But consolidated be bad for US though. I think that loneliness can be painful. And I do think you know this? This isn't about becoming a hermit at one point when I was writing my last book I went to a cabin in the woods and spent some time completely isolated.

Nora Young David Thoreau Walden US AIDS Walden pond Michael Harris Family Pencil Henry Concord Massachusetts
"walden" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

05:43 min | 1 year ago

"walden" Discussed on Venture Stories

"Now that the coat it's code it's not It's not legal contracts. That said I think a good place to start is probably tested in true decision making processes for example you know delegation like the most successful cooperatives at at scale and there are a number of them that are you a multi-billion-dollar organizations they have a traditional management structure with the CEO in a coo and does not does exact answer to the owners which are are. The community members owned the the product or company or cooperative. So so I think we'll likely land on on something similar to start where you know. Products are owned by their communities. But they still have some hierarchical leadership and you don't really need to decentralize All decision making to every note in the network because people don't have time type for that. I think a good quote here That I picked up from Brad. Usd is an Oscar wilde quote the problem with socialism as it takes up too many evenings and and I think that the same is probably true. large scale collective decision-making CRYPTO network seat. You probably want to delegate that decision making to to some expert and so long as there's a check and balance place if they if they move against her. You're you're you're interesting. You can replace them do you. Take for how crypto will disrupt to be see tables. Yeah so I think in the long run there there will be some disruption. But it's not gonna be as dramatic as as some were predicting twenty seventeen. Were like some are saying. It's going to eliminate it completely. It could change the dynamics of e so for so earlier we touch on the Krypton. are less extractive than corporate networks. Because they're community on and operated in so they don't need you you know return. A profit to shareholders just need to be sustainable and reward their communities commensurate with the value read. So you're less extractive that that could mean that the Roe v C is to to get to be in earlier and to invest it at valued the neighbors slightly lower and that's because the exit for For these types of startups may be to the community rather than to a you know a large group of party shareholders who are sort of indifferent to answer to whether they use the platform. Not so you know a classic. Ipo is to shareholders that are profit maximizing.

Usd CEO coo Brad Krypton.
"walden" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

05:13 min | 1 year ago

"walden" Discussed on Venture Stories

"To another episode adventure stories by village global. I'm here today with the very special guest Jesse. Walden Jesse was formerly on the CRYPTO team of a sixteen Z as now branched out to start his own fund called variant Jesse Welcome to the PODCAST Rodney. So Jesse you. You've been criticized early. I should say that you started a company before media chain. It was about. What was it called me and I was hoping intersection of music. In crypto. And your your partner is a they an artist as well. So you're you're deep with artists when you talk a little bit about your journey within within the space over the last seven years particularly how your views have evolved? I one thing I've known you've for. Is that your the? It'd decentralized governance isn't as important as decentralized ownership what he talk a little bit about how your views evolved out when you serve journey that we get to some of the specifics. Okay cool well. Maybe it'd be helpful to sort of start with got in the first place because because that informs the rest so in order to tell that story I do have to go way back to early two thousands as a teenager in high school and like most teenagers pretty involved with piracy but probably like an order of magnitude more than than than your average. So everyone was downloading threes on napster was part of a scene that congregated around FTP servers where in order to access. Ip Address had to be white listed in order to get that access or get that weightless you needed to play some functional role in community. So it's very incentives driven in that way. Kind of like Crypto is today and so my group was responsible for ripping DVD's and sometimes making them available before they were stores or even if theaters and you know my incentive as as a teenager to participate was if you uploaded a a movie or a You got credit downloaded and there was every Alan video game. Tv shows software on these FTP servers at a time when know netflix mailing DVD's in the snail mail and there was no youtube there was no facebook To having access to all this content was incredible and then and then shortly after that was invented and then suddenly anyone with bittorrent client to get access to those files which was great and democratized access and catalyze streaming as as a concept and then ban within storage got really keeping you file Walker Services like Mega Upload Rapid share and And then suddenly distribution of files moved up to the browser. Fizzy you over. H. E. T. And that was sort of a really amazing time. Because all these music blogs and film boggs things popped up in the reserve this curation renaissance because anyone can distribute files and around the same time because you had the united admitted the cloud you had Serve social networks are building in pushing it infrastructure forward and many of those social networks..

Walden Jesse partner napster netflix boggs H. E. T. youtube facebook Alan
Oregon Republican Cliff Bentz wins House primary to replace Greg Walden

America First

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

Oregon Republican Cliff Bentz wins House primary to replace Greg Walden

"Across public voters in Oregon's second congressional district chose a former state senator to be their candidate to replace representative Greg Walden who did run for twelve term in the conservative region covering the rural eastern and central part of the state cliff Bentz on Tuesday bested former state legislators Jason Atkinson and loot

Oregon Senator Greg Walden Representative Cliff Bentz Jason Atkinson
Joe Biden wins Democratic presidential primary in Oregon

All Of It

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

Joe Biden wins Democratic presidential primary in Oregon

"Joe Biden is one Oregon's democratic presidential primary eleven Republicans and five Democrats are competing for their party's nomination to succeed Oregon's only GOP lawmaker in Congress moderate representative Greg Walden who is retiring meanwhile the Associated Press is projecting Republican Joe ray Perkins says one organs GOP Senate primary Perkins will face incumbent Democrat Jeff Merkley in

Joe Biden Oregon Greg Walden Associated Press Jeff Merkley GOP Congress Representative Joe Ray Perkins Senate
These 5 Tips Will Increase Your CTR

Marketing School

05:11 min | 1 year ago

These 5 Tips Will Increase Your CTR

"To another episode of Marketing School. I'm Eric Su and I'm Neil Patel and today we're GonNa talk about five tips that will increase your C. T. R. That is your click through rate. In this case we are talking about. Click the rate from I think we're talking about overall right organically and paid correct. Yes mainly organic funny enough yet. You have a lot of data on this because Click flow. But yeah we're mainly talking about organic click throughs. I've done a lot of tests on this funding using your software. You have a lot of data because you just have so many users. So why don't you go first Let's crank through five tips. That will help. People get results litter down less than thirty days. I'll make mine stupidly simple. So when you're looking at a Google search result page a lot of people whenever they're writing content. Let's say the New Year hits this year in Twenty Twenty Years Twenty Twenty. One people often forget to change the date. Now when you change a date under title from Two Thousand Nineteen Twenty twenty or just changes to the right year. Your click the rate. Actually chumps fifty to one hundred fifty percent. That's across the board based on data that we've seen with click flow so changed. It's another thing that works. Really well as vocal curiosity or allow matchy backup one more step so one thing. We didn't cover at the beginning of this podcast. Episode is the reason you want higher. Click the races. Let's say you go to Google. Do a search and a thousand other people do the same. Search that you did. If everyone clicks on the secondly instead of the first listing it tells Google the second one's more relevant and it pushes them up in the rankings over time so in theory you want more people to Click on your titan other words. You WANNA appeal them. You know him by appealing to them. And getting more clicks. It will help you rank higher than your competition over time. The air gave the first tip of adding the year at the end of your title tag. The second from me is evoked curiosity. Good example of this is like the seven benefits of green tea. Number six will shock. You put number six shock you in parentheses so doing little things like that. What we found is people like wait. What's number six? The click through Lonzo skimmed the six one and if they like it though backup read the rest of the post and then you know finish it all off but the point. I'm trying to make is voting curiosity. It is a great way to get people to click through. Yeah I think I'll give bonus tip to that one. I think it's really important for people to understand copywriting. I think Neil night we can agree. Some of the smartest people we know. The best entrepreneurs are exceptional copywriters and copywriting a part of it is persuasion and understanding what drives people understanding what people are interested in the more. You can improve at that the better so I recommend reading two books. One is called breakthrough advertising. And you can actually buy a real copy of that now. I think you pay like one hundred twenty five bucks. You combine the letters an look if you're crafty. I'm sure you can find. Pdf's for both of them. It's not that hard to find the. Pdf's leave it at that and then number three for me would be thinking about how you can do on surp- Seo's mean exactly so surp- is search engine result page and what's going on right now is. Google is occupying more and more of the clicks. Meaning that if you live on a search result page over. Fifty percent of people will not click through to your website. So what you can do is whether you're let's say you rank zero so you had the rich snippet with. Let's say you have like how to tie tie. You have like you know. Fourteen tips right there and people can see it right on the search result page. What you should be doing there is you'd be thinking about okay. How can that brand my website in there or in one of those fourteen tips? How can I entice them to click through site? Because if they don't click there. I'm losing that traffic. I can't retarget those people I can't collect the email I do a lot of different things right. So you've got to do everything in your power to not only add value but somehow brand yourself a little bit. So you're doing as much as you can to defend against Google. Taking more. And more of those clicks off number four. One thing that you can end up doing that. We're not seeing a lot of people do is using Faq Schema markup you start using Faq scheme markup on your site right and efficacy Skua Markup funny enough draws more attention to your surp- result if you're number one a lot of times you see less. Click throughs but if you're lower on the page you'll start seeing a boost in placements. You wouldn't get as many from what we've seen if you didn't have it but by having it you draw more attention in a muzy rankings up so if you're number one you do at UC less clicks but if you're lower on the page at it you'll go higher up and you'll start getting mark Lex Yup and then the final thing. I'll say this is a little more related to. Let's say you're doing facebook or Google ads. You WanNa be thinking about okay. How often are you gonna change things up so what I mean by that? So facebook for example. If you keep showing the same ad over and over and over ad fatigue is gonNA kick in very quickly. So you got to think about how you can when you're making new ads. Maybe make a whole batch of like five ten or fifteen of them and just constantly rotate them on. Maybe every two weeks every three weeks or making new batches because that's going to constantly keep your click the rate up if you're not keeping things fresh similar to how you would with. Seo and you're not aligning with the times changing the messaging and understanding what people what then ultimately you click. The rate's GonNa drop and then what's going to happen especially during paid. Your costs are going to increase because click the rate goes hired in Walden. Cpa's also higher as well right

Google Twenty Twenty Years Twenty Twe Nineteen Twenty Facebook Neil Patel Marketing School Eric Su PDF CPA Walden
My favourite tennis match

The Passing Shot Tennis Podcast

08:32 min | 1 year ago

My favourite tennis match

"We'RE GOING TO BE KICKING OFF. A new series and looking at some of a favor owed time tennis. Matches will also be catchy on the tennis news as well a little bit catch on with the virtual Madrid Open. That's just happened Andy. Bari Packard a virtual school as well as the news. The tennis is actually starting up again in some parts of the world in Germany. But before we get into that Kim how you doing. How is how is lockdown? Treating much the same as last week H. O. By fairly fast actually despite the lack of store which is really weird. I think I've kind of just go used to it now but having said that I did cheat in worship Madrid. I didn't won't should awful. I have to say it was. Radi my cup of tea just kind of saying it on a playstation today. What is g thing? Yeah it was a bit of kind of a completely new scenario new situation and I think it's kind of recognizes that living in these times they can open up new opportunities and of course you know this is one of them in the tennis world and I thought it was kind of really interesting to say I think in terms of what I liked. I absolutely loved the place. Be BUYING INTO IT. And procreating like the war codes Up there that the herbs to the controller I really loved that I'd like pretending to warm up thumbs and I really liked the way that kind of the players go invested in it and we're kind of really enthusiastic about getting creative and and kind of showing it off on on social media See I think that was kind of one of the things I I really liked. I saw I think it was Belinda. Bench really went. Allow it like a tennis gear. As I said could walk up the stairs a yeah just thought it was great to see getting really enthusiastic about it. 'cause we've not seen them on a TV. We're not seeing the you know what she pilots. Whatever as fans over the last few months it's just almost kind of great great to see them again really. Yeah I thought that was. That was good like the best saying the players saying the engage with the wall. I thought bench probably owned that one. I just like the little bits in the corner. We can just see their faces as they're playing. You just want to see their homes in the pack right to see what what. They've gone like their bookshelves or like. I just find it really interesting is like through the Keyhole. But he the past and that is really hyping. The stands framed in the background. Well potentially coming up in this focus on his lovely shorts but no yeah I. I didn't really like actually watching this. Nsa Watch just liked having the players kind of interacting having a bit of a laugh so that was nice to see the thing. This format would. I didn't think I'd want to see this every week. I think it would get a bit repetitive. After a while but I think it was a good kind of one off thing and obviously Andy Murray one that we should give him credit for that because he's now won the tournament on three different surfaces. If you can cool the virtual sphere surface adolphus. The Andy has donated his prize. Money half is going to the NHS and half is Gordon to the players Relief Fund. So it's obviously for Good Kohl's and Kiki burdens won the women's event as well and I think she was actually due to defend. Muhtar to say she has succeeded into that are mixed in our love. I love that idea. She's she's the non virtual virtual back to back very innovative. Double D for a champion. But yeah I think yes kind of great to see I guess. Play his Getting involved I think one of the things that I think they could have done. Better way of is the had this common tree over the top of the of the players. Now I I was kind of the point where I think it's more insightful. And more interesting if you just let the play is very commentary because Y- They are tennis players that professionals at the end of the day you'll be ready. I think what bringing up level is kind of almost kind of getting them to kind of talk about the tactics or you know that sort of that sort of level that sort of layer that. Yeah well my sick on a Royal Corps And it's like if I was doing this show in real life. I would choose to go here because of X. Y. And Said Yeah. It could be more of an educational thing as well I think what I did. I cheat and they lost connection because I was watching on light-years addicts correct show. It was just having to could LE- sort of chats while they were waiting for everything to ten on again. Did you see the I think Diego Schwarzer was best. Play at Deborrah. The savvy FIDO's but due to a weak WIFI CONNECTION. Debry a sorry. Schwartzman had to concede walkway. So I mean I love that idea. The like I think that's going to be one of the VAD. The walkover reasons happens to the best of our good today that like even top tennis players have poor Wi fi and all safely on. La has had a bit of a Jake because he said that Rafa could play because he'd like injured his back reaching for his game controller. Which and everyone believes here. I think I mean I think we believed him as well. As we've always believed tweeted about be cowed they gig for Geria- saw and I thought this this off to the best of the fortunately that was not the case. Rafeh was able to play. But we'll just very gullible but yeah if they're going to do this again like I think it could cost you on. But just every now and again maybe they do in other Walden on like Wimbledon. I different surfaces. I assume this playstation game has all the different surfaces they do girl scout one. Couldn't they maybe federal workup? That yeah that I think it could work. I think it could coexist when the tools get back up and running. I wonder if it's a sort of you know in the in the grounds of the events and you have fans can go line up for like an autograph from players and I wonder whether you could be like. There's a stand somewhere grandson for example. Oh face off against some. I player playing tennis against them. Virtually Sake I could see that happening. I know there are a few comments. The game was almost up to like up to scratch And you know whether it's the improvements to be made with with the game and you know I think I think potentially peop- governing bodies like the ATP liked the W. H. E. A. Maybe they should be looking at partnering with Game's about to really kind of Mak- licensed game like fever. Because I think you know I think this is as you said. This is very new is almost kind of this was a test and you know. I think there is appetite for it but I think there's almost kind of a lot can be done on that so a product side of it. Yeah for sure. I'm sure that's an avenue. They could possibly see going for. It's an yeah I like the idea that you could maybe have a bit of a play on it while you are an event. Perhaps if during a rain delay or something and even on Joe we actually have some real tennis. That's happened this weekend in Germany. It's kind of the first actual players of setback on cool so they've done a little exhibition featuring Dustin Brown and seven other players including randomly the British benign. Yon Shouldn't ski. Who I think is based in Germany. Anyway so yeah. That's been happening this weekend. We'll see JEB. So you fall head of other countries. Getting back to normalcy. So they've been out to do this. Little event Neko blends at the Base Tennis Academy. It's GonNa oversee how necessary health and safety measures in place. So they've obviously not touching hands at the net. They're going to touch rockets instead. There's no ballboys fans line judges. They're obviously doing it. Very watered down version is not for any points or or anything. It's not count I guess. Prize money's involved. So it's I guess aimed at lower ranked players to to kind of keep them earning something during this time and I think it's only for players based within about ninety minutes of the event so it's overseas a very limited

Tennis Andy Murray Germany Madrid Open Base Tennis Academy Bari Packard Madrid Players Relief Fund KIM H. O. Good Kohl Belinda Dustin Brown Diego Schwarzer Deborrah Royal Corps Schwartzman NHS
Walden issues statement of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

Walden issues statement of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act

"Relief for northwest workers and small businesses on its way now that the president is signed Congress's two trillion dollar stimulus package como score when he comports Oregon congressman Greg Walden was at the White House when president trump signed the measure Friday we added a six hundred dollar per week additional federal payment for the next four months if you're unemployed but our goal is to keep you employed that's why he says the package incentivizes small businesses to keep workers on the payroll we have a program for small businesses that employ fewer than five hundred people so they can pay full wages full benefits paid their mortgage pay their lease Hey there overhead costs and at the end get virtually all of that treated as a grant not a loan on top of that Walden says Washington and Oregon both have taken action to stop evictions and foreclosures while the crisis is

President Trump Congress Greg Walden White House Donald Trump Washington Oregon Congressman
Raptors test negative; were last opponents of Jazz

CBS Sports Radio

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Raptors test negative; were last opponents of Jazz

"The Toronto raptors announced last night corona virus tests but they're traveling party come back negative with one person's results still pending raptors will last in the face the Utah jazz with the top players really go Baron Donovan Mitchell subsequently testing positive Eric Walden who covers the jazz for the Salt Lake Tribune during Vince Quinn here at CBS sports radio during the overnight we discussed Robert marking the corona virus this past Monday we touched all those microphones here over and and cut his arm was kind of like a little bit of an act of defiance I thought you know it it was kind of thing I'm not going to be scared these guys who have been interacting with all

Toronto Raptors Baron Donovan Mitchell Eric Walden Salt Lake Tribune Vince Quinn Robert Utah Cbs Sports
"walden" Discussed on Spark from CBC Radio

Spark from CBC Radio

06:38 min | 1 year ago

"walden" Discussed on Spark from CBC Radio

"We can lose sight of what our preferences are. What our desires or but also what our values are and for that we we need a kind of time of subjectivity? which is very different from? This kind of rushed hurried instrumental payments worth completely in quite different from digital time. It is time for music could is a time for dipping into our memories for connecting our memories to our present situation. What can we put in place to in our lives to to try to secure those spaces of of solid well? Some of the really practical things are are ones. I mentioned earlier. The you know not bringing your phone into your bedroom right because what we we know that. If you use your phone alarm you reach over you have to touch your phone to turn the alarm off and the moment that you've touched your phone. It's the easiest thing in the world to check out instagram. Next right. And then you're down the rabbit hole already and and you you've missed out on even just those five minutes of that interstitial period between wake and sleep right I think that such a rich period where people daydream where where they may be have their Eureka moments when you allow that kind of I guess limited space right between consciousness and unconsciousness justice. The brain does such awesome work in that in that in between zone. I also think that the busiest people are often the ones who when they do run into a little bit of empty time. They don't know what to do with it right if they're kind of terrified of that empty space when they do you stumble upon it. So reminding yourself that it's okay to feel awkward or or lonely even and to maybe try and push through that loneliness when you do accidentally run into five minutes so of silence when you spent that Weaken your own cabin in the woods when you're researching your last book. You mentioned that you realize that you had never been alone for longer than twenty four hours and on the first night you said you were beset. The childlike fear. So do you think that we all have that that some level of just fear of being alone totally whether it's like I mean I was literally you know in a cabin cabin in the woods wondering whether an axe murderer trailer accident. Yeah so you know the the would. The of the floorboards starts creaking. And I don't know whether that's some footsteps right but that that was telling on its own that I couldn't even even my unconscious couldn't fathom the idea that there was nobody coming to get me right that I really would be left alone in these woods in a way even more anxiety making was with my first book the One before solitude instead of going to a cabin in the woods spent one full month without going online so no Internet no cell phone either actually for for a month And that was terrifying in a different way because I was around human beings but it was terrifying in that. I didn't even know how addicted I was until I tried to do that. Kind of that digital fast right. It's it's very unsettling when you see how changed you are because it has been so woven into our daily actions. The it's like blinking in King or swallowing. Yeah you don't even notice how many times you you reach for that phone Does all this come more naturally to you now. Like whether it's the soul to your your weather. It's just disconnecting from your phone. Because in in your book it's in your last book. It seems almost like we need to be constantly vigilant in maintaining this protected did space for solitude and for for disconnection yeah. I don't think there are any easy cures here. Unfortunately for the same reason you know back to the food food analogy if I were to have a very healthy fast or or or diet for thirty days. It's it's not as though I would not have to worry about food for the rest of my life right. This is a daily habit. It's about I mean I'm borrowing aristotle phrase here but it's it's a virtuous activity. It's not a goal that you arrive at. It's the habit it's the practice of it and it's and it's something you you I really do have to struggle with every day and I would just add that. I don't write about these things because I have figured them out. You Know I. I don't write right about them because I have achieved some sort of Yoda level of of being. Okay with solitude if anything I write about these things because I find them difficult bolt Because like everybody I am also terrified of of time on my own because like everybody I reach for my my phone whenever I have a moment's emptiness in a checkout line grocery store. It's something I struggle with every day. You wrote that Walden. Alden is a quote swansong for an antique enjoyment of time alone. She's a great way of putting it Do you think it's a swansong. I mean can't can we a rescue time alone in our modern world I think if we were to go back to the eighteen eighteen thirties we would not be very happy with the results. You know and I don't fancy myself a Luddite I really don't want to undo are Technologies I want to learn how to be healthy Living with them because they're not they're not good or evil right but we do have to remember. They're not neutral either and that they have profound effects on our lives. So yeah I do I do think Walden is a swansong for a certain kind of disconnected life. That most of us can't even imagine anymore and I think we're living through another swansong. Now right we're living through Massive massive change and I don't think it's all bad at all. I think there are Komo marvelous. Things that come along with global connectivity and yet only if.

Walden Komo King Alden
"walden" Discussed on Spark from CBC Radio

Spark from CBC Radio

09:12 min | 1 year ago

"walden" Discussed on Spark from CBC Radio

"Must learn to reawakened and keep ourselves awake not by mechanical AIDS but by an infinite expectation of the Dawn. Sure thorough was waxing poetic about nature but he also managed to nail our present-day conundrum. So let's take a page out of Walden. Shall we want we start. Start with Michael Harris. He's the author of the end of absence. Reclaiming what we've lost in a world of constant connection and also solitude a singular life in a crowded world both of those books express a longing for solitude and they're also guidebooks of sorts to help us learn how to be alone and that feels more important than ever in world where digital distractions pulls away from our interior life. So you've said that one of the themes of your books was suggested to you by thorough and that's the idea that loneliness loneliness is failed solitude. So how have we failed at solitude. Well I think we failed solitude everytime wake up. Don't we right we we reach for our phone instead of for the person next to us or we get in the shower and even the five minutes of solitude in the shower fuels like maybe too much I I mean I mean this is. This is the state of being that that we're in. I think every generation has to has to Russell with designing their own solitude into their lives based on the technologies or or the media environment that they find themselves awesome And is that the primary conundrum for us is balancing solitude with our technologies. I think you know we're the first Internet naive generation Sean Right. We're really the people who are having to figure this out for the first time and as such we have to learn to curate our media diet in the same way that we've already he kind of figured out how to curate a food diet so it it is a to a certain degree and original question for us just because of the quantity of interruptions the quantity of distractions in our lives and yet at the same time. It really is a question that rolls through the years years every generation I think as had to make their own decisions about how to balance their lives. I mean that's the funny thing as you go back to. Thoreau thorough in. Its the nineteenth century. And he's talking about the number of things that you have to do and getting away from the complexity of life which seems almost comical to us from our perspective active but absolutely I mean I think this is the thing is you. You only can learn how to live in the future by looking to the past for for examples right and I mean when throw goes to that cabin in the woods In eighteen forty five and for him. The world really was getting much busier in the the same way that our world is getting much busier if you think about what life was like when he was a child verses twenty eight years old when he when he goes into the woods the railway had just kind of come to town. The telephone was going to be invented ten years after he wrote that book the Telegraph already existed so for him. His world was getting so much faster so much busier and the lesson that we get from thorough is that he makes a choice. He sees his world changing and for him. It's getting too busy too fast. And he decides to design his own life So just to return to this idea that loneliness cleaness has failed solitude. How consulted actually help us? Combat Loneliness well. I you know with the row again. He said something in a speech about how the more unhappy are with ourselves. The more we will run to the mailbox and I think about that a lot when I dig dig into my pocket for my phone. It's it says something about what's going on inside of me how content I am with my own life and I think the reverse must be true to that if we if we design a rich interior life for ourselves if we were if we do that work at building that rich interior life. It's going to end up giving us A A healthier relationship with our devices but consulted be bad for us though. I think that loneliness genus can be painful and I do think this isn't about becoming a hermit at one point. When I was writing my last book I went to the cabin in the woods and spent some time completely isolated and when I went into the woods I thought okay? This is great. I'm going to have have have this splendid creative Period and a few days into it it occurred to me that you know like the uni bomber went into the woods to right that there's a healthy and an unhealthy way of doing this. I again Betcha designing your life. I think it comes down to figuring out what you want it out of your life and then what is the amount of social connection or disconnection. That's going to help you get there How is their idea of solitude changed from earlier periods I mean I guess it's a question of scale right. Yeah like if you're thinking of thorough. He has that famous misaligned abode. I had one share for solitude two chairs for conversation and three chairs for company right. That was that was his far. Right Right reap three chairs is a party and you know I think most people listening to this might feel like two hundred or five. Hundred followers was on twitter. Begins to feel like a party. Maybe in your phone right so I think that's not a qualitative change but it is a quantitative change You also point out that some of US move to cities in the first place to become anonymous and and uncounted. So there's a connection between urbanization and an solitude. Oh absolutely right. There's kind of a lovely loneliness to the city. I think a lot of people have found that small town life or our cabin. Life is actually strangely social. Because everybody's in your business all of your neighbors have to be in your business because that's how you survive in an environment environment like that whereas in the city You can you can order every meal and have a task grab it delivered to your apartment door and never know their name and you you can really be quite self sufficient. I WANNA turn a little bit to this idea of contemporary technology in our our lack of solitude. It seems to me that you know we're drawn to social media because we're social creatures but also because connection is literally the entire business model of social media. So why does that kind of social interaction ultimately team so unsatisfying for us I mean I think it's because the point of social media is not actual actually social connection right. The point is always to put eyeballs onto advertising. That's the model for Google It's the model for Facebook Doc. It's the monetization of our attention and it is done under the veil of a social experience but that is not actually the point. It and I think we're all we're all being triggered by these social cues and yet we're all also smart enough to you realize this isn't really what it feels like to to be tied to someone else to feel warm in somebody else's gays right so we always feel Jio little letdown And I think we have become massively. Really Addicted to digital technologies. The most significant effects are psychological. Emotional we begin to experience orients not more but less we to experience less richly we begin to lose our ability to experience experience. I'm Eva Hoffman. And I am primarily a writer but I also teach also the part time academic. I mean there is a whole philosophic tradition starting with classical Greek philosophers Which says that leisure is the foundation Dacian of civilization foundation of culture because it allows us to reflect to think to sort of stoke our imaginative and creative powers? You know occasionally we do need Moments of just unscripted idleness of you know sitting quietly and without any particular purpose without directing.

Sean Right Michael Harris Walden AIDS Dacian of civilization foundat Eva Hoffman US twitter Thoreau writer Russell Jio Google Facebook
"walden" Discussed on The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

10:09 min | 1 year ago

"walden" Discussed on The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

"I'm so that's one way that people can check out kind of what my how I work. if people want to get a free dream interpretation from me and and maybe you have a more specific interaction with me they can call it on my radio show. I have a a show every every Wednesday from nine to ten. Am Pacific Time and it's on unity online radio so people call in all the time and shared with me and then they sometimes will book Lucas session later. I don't do a quote unquote discovery session I used to I don't do that anymore. IF PEOPLE WANNA book with make and go to my website just book session. I have a few slots available every week. Not It's not full-time thing anymore. I'm doing a lot of other things and writing and workshops but I do live events in your. You're obviously you're an author. A Nice Guy Community loves sex and RELATIONSHIP DREAM DICTIONARY. You definitely want to get a hold of that. You've you some of the chicken soup for the soul yeah program also which is all tra- ultra cool to be associated with has done to books with them dreams and premonitions and dreams and the unexplainable and I'm so proud of those and I remember longtime ago somebody said when I was when I was launching first book I pray that one day your book will end up in target or Walmart and I thought that that was an insult but then they said no no that means. It's really successful that means it's gone mainstream and those books are all in Walmart and target yeah. That's that's a good thing that definitely is a good thing so as you as you started this this dream analysis and this hypnotherapy the obvious that you started to really micro niche into into the dream category and he's doing these live events. I understand you have come one coming up. That's in that's in Mexico also also yes. I feel like because I know that the like to learn oftentimes like to learn in in good retreat environments so yes. There's some so teotihuacan Mexico for those who are familiar with Don Miguel Ruiz's he wrote the book the four agreements he kinda put Teotihuacan on the map and and territory con means were men become God and doesn't mean it's not like the blasphemous kind of this means waking up to your divine nature waking up and dropping the shackles of limitation and stepping truly into your power and there's Don Miguel kind of put this on the map and then he trained rain some apprentices and and I'm one of them I'm kind of in that lineage and I have been this'll probably be my tenth journey that I've taken people to and I've been there multiple times before that as a as a student we have a book called Dreaming Heaven that has that really lays out what we do in Teotihuacan but basically I tell people that it's kind of like twenty years of therapy in a week and will in five days you have breakthrough after breakthrough do and it's it's a powerful environment we explore the pyramids and we do have our own modern version of ancient rituals roles that were about coming into your power and saying goodbye to the limitations in an honorable way you give them a proper burial and I mean in burial literally. There's like a burial ground that we do some really we do some awesome shadow work and we end up on the pyramid airman the sun which is symbolic of coming into the year you become this is great for men when you become one with the son like one with does not just the sun you are to your parents but you become one with the sun you literally people shine and we have a lot of men more men that they're coming. We probably have just as many men that are signed up as women this time and it's so powerful deep and there's there's time that you get on on your own but there's a lot of time in spending groups the relationships deepen. Everyone leaves shining like walking like you. You're you're ten feet tall all right so let's talk for just a quick moment about many in our audience that might relate to the entrepreneur. Western world olden non. Wu Thinking there aren't many in our community also that relates for Eastern and more woo sides talk. I heard a lot of Wu and what you said. Take the people that aren't we were there. He'll thank you okay we have there's a there's a group of men the from a pretty prestigious this company that came to the retreat last year that we're not woo at all and they loved it. They got it in there this year profitability ability wise and on every measure of success wise they're coming back. Is they want more of that because their bottom line showed up their results that were in the waking world because really. I mean as a hypnotherapist and this might be this is still probably a bit woo. I feel like my job is a hypnotherapist therapist and even a dream worker is to help people get out of their own way. and I can see it's easier for someone else to see your blind spots than it is for anybody anybody. I mean even myself. It's easier for somebody else to see what's in my blindspot. What's keeping me in my own way so when you when you do something like this. It's an accelerated intensive the shadow the thing that was keeping you limited like I I can only make X. amount of money a year and that's all I'm capable of because as my dad so my dad taught me. I don't WanNa go against him. There's these unconscious beliefs that were carrying that are really shackles and you let them go and it's like the circus elephant that that is chained in at first and then you no longer need. The Cheney's still stays in that that area. You don't even know that you're that you're kind and you have invisible chains so I don't know I. I don't know if it's if I'm if I'm getting anew here but I know that there's bottom line results with just the fact that when you get to know what your tapes are that are going off over and over and over again put yourself in an environment where you're open to interpretation interpretation from a number number of different sources whether it's eastern or Western. You're always going to pull from that a positive experience if you if you open and allow the positivity in the positive is it experienced to come in if you approach this as I'm not going to pardon the expression. I'm not going to any of that that that Wou- crap right now if that's if that's your attitude you will get out of it exactly what you what you think you know you're. You're always going to find what you're looking for right. I would say think in terms of Indiana Jones and being on a quest that is going for your finding this hidden relic. You're finding the the sacred elixir the holy grail and it's not just for you. It's for your family. It's for your community. It's for your business as you become like truly have this. This hero's journey experience it. You become a better provider you you. You do it not just for you. In in a way you get the benefit for sure but it's for the people that you serve and I know the men that are listening to your podcasts are noble men that aren't just in it to win it for themselves but I I know that they really want to be as impactful as possible in their communities and this is one way this is one way to do it. I'm a little more quickly so a couple of things before we wrap on the interview and by the way Nice Guy Community. If you want to get a hold of any of the information that we're talking about on today's interview with Kelly Sullivan Walden make sure you head over to her website will put a link in the show notes. It's simply Kelly Sullivan Walden Dot com but will put a link in the show non-story about the spelling or any of that right now so a couple things one one. Can we change what we dream thereby changing what is our in our future and then I wanna get into a little personal stuff after that but how do Louis Patu we change what is in our dreams. Okay well there is I mean I would say the most. The most apparent answer to that is to learn how to become a lucid dreamer humor and one of the best ways to become a lucid dreamer is to become a lucid liver somebody who lives an awake way but meditation nation is a great way to practice that and I I'm not a lucid dream expert. I have lucid dream that I can help people with that a bit but that's one that's there's a Stephen La- bears and Robert Wagner that are experts and Lucid Jamie. That's one way but here's the thing that I teach to people who are not lucid dreamers and who are frustrated because they can't be. There's a there's a sneaky shortcut and get around to how you can change your dream without having to you become lucid so by sitting on the edge of your seat. Yes okay so like I said before. Your dream isn't over just because you woke up. If if you wake up with a dream that you wish ended differently like let's say it was a nightmare you woke up scared your heart palpitation in your waking state while you're still remembering remembering the dream you can imagine that you're back in the dream but this time your lucid even though you're awake so you're so so it's used sitting on the edge of your bed. You're aware that you're awake but this dream and you can still see the images imagine that you're back in it. You don't have to fall back asleep to get back in you. Just imagine in your waking state that you are back in it and this time you have a superpower or you bring on the people that have the superpowers that that you know have your back and this time you change the dream so that you end up victorious and in some way shape or form or you find the thing or you get the girl or you slay the dragon or you come out of or you whatever it is that you felt unfinished business within the dream. Imagine that you finish it but that you don't just finish the dream the.

Walmart Wu Teotihuacan Lucid Jamie Mexico Lucas Don Miguel Ruiz teotihuacan Mexico Don Miguel Kelly Sullivan Walden Kelly Sullivan Cheney Indiana Jones Louis Patu Stephen La Robert Wagner twenty years five days ten feet
"walden" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

SPACE NEWS POD

13:12 min | 2 years ago

"walden" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

"Listening, just tap. The Lincoln my show notes. And I can't wait to hear from you. Hello. And welcome back to the space pod, daily podcast about space science and tech. I'm your host will Walden.

Walden
"walden" Discussed on AppleInsider Podcast

AppleInsider Podcast

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"walden" Discussed on AppleInsider Podcast

"Just like I like to surround myself with the best a consumer electronics. Because I value good experiences. I also liked surround myself with what I find to be the best in other ranges of prototypes, right? No surprise Scifo. And it's it's I I've allowed myself to become a little particular and a little selective. And just, you know, sometimes spoil myself by spending on things that I think are better quality. Are you building to tell me just bolted tesla, I have not. And I am not an telling you is that I apply to as many things I can around me. I will hold off on buying an item in order to buy the better one. And and right now talking about clothing. Book. Mac. Walden is a online retailer that has gone out of their way to try and address clothing and address fabric. And you know, they they started by trying to figure out how to make socks better. Right. And how to make the this all of these things better. So they started by from scratch they engineered their own fabric. And what I like from them is that they sell things that are made from from bamboo cloth, which is a more durable cloth. They sell things that have silver woven into an silver has the property of absorbing both a little bit radiation, which I know inconsequential, scientifically, but whatever and also has the property of absorbing odor. Which is kinda cool. And really what it came down to is that there are some of the most comfortable shirts that I've ever worn. I love the socks I loved the shirts. And so. It's it's. Been my experience that when I put on a MAC Walden shirt. It's better than whatever else. I was wearing before. You know, it's it's not too far out of range to say that they believe in smart design and premium fabrics because that's really what it.

Walden Mac
"walden" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

05:42 min | 2 years ago

"walden" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"Lived. I went to visit Walden with Jeffrey Kramer, Jeff. Nice to meet you. Jeffrey is the curator of the library of the thorough institute at the Walden woods project a nonprofit dedicated to keeping the land around Walden woods state park from being developed nice place, Jeffrey in this light filled wood-paneled library with a bust of thorough on the wall and a big reading table under a giant chandelier. We have about eight thousand volumes here in about sixty thousand documents, making it the most comprehensive collection of thorough related material in the world, Jeffrey and I drove over to the replica throws cabinet Walden state park. But the replica isn't on the site of the original cabin. It's actually right next to the parking lot throws house was about halfway across the pond and when they decided to build a replica, which I think was in the nineteen sixties. Some point, they were afraid of vandalism basically by being taught in the woods, put it here in a more visible area from the outside. The cabin looks like your basic garden, shed two in those a pitched roof and adore we stepped inside. So we're standing in replica of thorough house, ten by fifteen, pretty compact room with a bed and three chairs and desk hit a fireplace and adventure put into stove, pretty cozy for one person. Yeah, it's cozy for one person, but it's not confining. I mean, it's by the standards of the tiny house movement. It's it's fine. Pretty luxurious is bigger. Some dorm rooms I've been in so one could live very comfortably thorough lived there for two years, two months and two days. He did write that book about the trip. He took with his brother, but it didn't sell. He ended up with hundreds of remaindered copies. I have now a library of nearly nine hundred volumes over seven hundred of which I wrote myself. People were just not that interested in what thorough went to Walden pond to, right, but they had a lot of questions for thorough about what he was up to in the woods Henry. What are you doing a house out there by the by the Pont who who does that? It's marginal land. It was a place where middle class son of a businessman who graduated from Harvard college would not normally go. People thought he was a bit odd. Even after he left Walden pond, everybody wanted to hear about why thorough decided to live there and how he scraped by. So we decided to give a series of lectures. He base them on the journals. He kept when he was living in the woods. Those lectures became the first few chapters of the book Walden in the book. He criticizes the way the worker bees in concord, spend all their lives earning money just so they can wear stylish clothes and live in fancy houses. Most men appear never to have considered what a house is and are actually though needlessly poor all their lives because they think that they must have such a one as their neighbors have. And he scathing about the inequality he sees between the haves and the have nots. The luxury of one class is counterbalanced by the indigence of another. On the one side is the palace on the other, are the almshouse and the silent poor, but there's something else going on here. Thorough mother was an anti slavery activist. She. Helped bring some of the country's most radical abolitionists to speak in concord, but it wasn't just talk. The thorough household was a stop on the underground railroad and thorough himself was an agent. The thorough family's abolitionist shows up in Walden. If you read between the lines, Walden takes us on a journey of emancipation of the self with only very glancing references to what's always on his mind, which is the fact of the American economy, the capitalist economy rests on the enslavement of his fellow human beings, and that people like himself, people who are white and privileged, didn't see that was part of our own enslavement to this larger capitalist system. That's the system thorough wanted to opt out of by going to live at Walden pond, but Walden is also full of nature writing, really beautiful nature writing in the morning. I watched the geese. From the door through the mist sailing in the middle of the pond. But when I stood on the shore, they at once rose up with great flapping of wings at the signal of their commander, and when they had got into rank circled about over my head, twenty nine of them and then steered straight to Canada with a regular honk from their leader at intervals. In many ways, we think of thorough as the founder of American environmental thinking because part of his own unique direction was deter outward to the natural world under Emerson's influence thrill had become a transcendental list. The transcendental lists believed that humans had a kind of divine spark. This has some really important consequences, and one of them is that you must respect every human being because all of us have that divine principle within, but thorough went further. He's not the divine in everything. He. Saw that in nature. He could see it and trees. He could see it in a pond. He could see it in the animals around him. I have no doubt that it is part of the destiny of the human race in its gradual improvement to leave off eating animals.

Walden pond Walden Walden woods state park Walden woods Walden state park Jeffrey Kramer concord Harvard college vandalism Jeff commander founder Canada Emerson two months two years two days
"walden" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

03:40 min | 3 years ago

"walden" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"Be this guy that would right walden and write these poems about nature or was this something that developed you know as he entered young manhood oh great question brett i mean this is the this is the interesting thing about about becoming a biographer is do the do these signatures to these hallmarks of these gestures do they leap out immediately with the row you have a of an incredibly generous subject in that he wrote two million words into a journal in the starting when he was just a teenager so i would say you know the gesture that i that i felt from the very beginning that his life showed is he had a gift for expansiveness for ecstasy he had a gift for relationship and it was there you know my own daughter the miniature could walk she was dancing and singing in and boom you know she's not forty one and she's dancing and singing and i think that each of us especially if we're expressive the gestures the main gestures we carry out of the cosmos into where human being they show up really early and in one of the cool things was that when he was just in his early twenties he sat his mother down the interviewed his mother it was he had a very intense and wonderful relationship with his mother closer than than to his father and he would catch these catch these little things in his journal over a about a month period of time where he's he's getting the stories of his own childhood from from her something that is so telling for young adult when both what does their mother say about them and then what did they what today then hold close and i think that there was a real consonants between what his mother remembered was his essence and what he took in as being his his his own life journeys own life's imprint i think one of the stories i remember reading was as a boy and his mother said that he went off and you just go look at the stars for hours on end well even that the the thing that he records in his journal is that they had a trundle bed and this'll this'll help take us back you know out of the twenty first century in the eighteen twenties you know wasn't uncommon for people to share beds back in the day you know the a lot of people in smaller spaces than bigger families and even though they were just three children in the in the throw family he and his brother john slept in what was called the trundle bed it pulled out from underneath the parents bed like a murphy bed kind of thing out of the wall and that you know she would she would catch him at the window at night you know having left the bed and looking out at the star so yeah he was a deep yearning in him from infancy practically i mean did his family were they were they romantic poetic religious that kind of help flush that stuff out in throws life well the the picture i i very much got his of you know father who had mouths to feed he had had a family he was a man on the make at a time when you know in new england win the economy was shifting and he had to be he had to be light on his feet to figure out how to how to prosper and he he.

walden