35 Burst results for "Walden"

"walden" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

01:44 min | Last month

"walden" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

"I <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <SpeakerChange> guess <Speech_Male> just <Speech_Telephony_Male> take that leap of <Speech_Male> faith. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> I know when I was in <Speech_Telephony_Male> that spot, I know there's <Speech_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> something tugging on your <Speech_Telephony_Male> heartstrings right now. <Speech_Telephony_Male> Maybe <Silence> a not in your throat. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> And probably a <Speech_Male> little bit of <Speech_Telephony_Male> pain and <Speech_Telephony_Male> anxiety, wondering if <Speech_Male> you ever get <Speech_Telephony_Male> through the other <Speech_Male> side of this thing. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> you know, <Speech_Telephony_Male> I know for me, <Speech_Telephony_Male> my mind told me no, <Speech_Male> that it would <Speech_Male> never get any better, <Speech_Telephony_Male> that I would never <Silence> amount to anything. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> That my life <Speech_Male> was going to be <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Male> an existence of <Speech_Telephony_Male> a drug <Speech_Male> induced Groundhog <Speech_Male> Day <Speech_Telephony_Male> that I would forever live <Speech_Male> in <Speech_Male> a prison <Speech_Telephony_Male> that I would never escape. <Speech_Telephony_Male> And I <Silence> just want to reach out to <Speech_Male> average listening <Speech_Telephony_Male> and say that there is <Speech_Male> hope. <Speech_Male> It takes <Speech_Telephony_Male> a big leap of faith <Speech_Telephony_Male> and it takes a <Speech_Telephony_Male> massive amount of vulnerability <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> reach out to that <Speech_Male> to someone <Speech_Telephony_Male> going <Speech_Male> through a similar <Speech_Telephony_Male> has gone through <Silence> a similar same <Speech_Male> situation. <Speech_Telephony_Male> And <Speech_Telephony_Male> truly ask for help. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> It takes a tremendous <Speech_Male> amount of willingness <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> I can speak from <Speech_Telephony_Male> personal experience <Speech_Telephony_Male> that you may not <Speech_Telephony_Male> feel like you have that <Speech_Telephony_Male> much willingness. You may <Speech_Male> not feel like you can <Speech_Telephony_Male> get that vulnerable. You <Speech_Male> may not feel like you take <Speech_Male> that leap of faith, <Speech_Male> but you can. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> You just have <Speech_Telephony_Male> to put that one foot <Speech_Telephony_Male> in front of the other and take <Speech_Telephony_Male> that leap of faith and go <Speech_Male> for it. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> In my experience, <Speech_Telephony_Male> <SpeakerChange> your reward <Speech_Male> at tenfold on the <Speech_Male> other side. Yeah, <Speech_Male> very well said, will <Speech_Male> Walden ladies and gentlemen, <Speech_Male> will congratulations <Speech_Male> on <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> where you are today. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> You're a <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> very strong individual, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> my friend. Keep it rolling <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> we'll look <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> forward to seeing <SpeakerChange> all those big <Speech_Music_Male> horses coming from the barn <Speech_Music_Male> very, very soon. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Appreciate it, Mike. All <Speech_Music_Male> right, congrats on all <Speech_Music_Male> the success.

Mike
"walden" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

06:24 min | Last month

"walden" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

"Could literally I could go for about an hour and probably lift off 20 to 30, 40 grade one winners that have either had the privilege of how walking groomed was a foreman in the barn they were in or had the experience of galloping on myself. How do you think that experience will help you now to be successful as a trainer on your own? Good horses that they're good qualities. Good horses have very specific qualities. They may be different sizes, be different genders. Run different distances or different surfaces. But there's a certain makeup a certain mental makeup that comes with a good horse. And it's really difficult to spot at a sale. At a yearly sale, when you get to look at them for two or three or four minutes at a time. But I really, really got to see what a good horse looks like. And then the other side of that token wouldn't work for a really good trainer named shoe McMahon at Laurel park. Who came up under Scott Lake and was primarily involved in the claiming game. And once I had worked for those trainers, I mentioned already, went to work for Hugh to kind of learn the claiming game because I was sitting there thinking about it one day and was like, there's nobody that starts off training with these kind of horses that I've worked with. So I went ahead and went to Laurel park for about two years and worked for human command and really got to know the claiming game and how to do that and how to be just really got to witness him be super successful at it. He learned from Scott Lake when Scott Lake was at the high day his career. And, you know, just really fortunate to be had the well rounded experience that came with my dad kind of kicked me out of the door to early age saying go figure it out. You'll learn something from these guys. Why should they get to keep it all themselves? Yeah. Did you know at the time that that was something he was doing for your own good to help you? No, absolutely not. Yeah. I thought it was kind of frustrating at the point. You know, I was looking forward to kick it. They had just built it. They just put a pool in at the house. Looking forward to taking by the pool. Chillax and watching watching TV G in the afternoon. And found myself on the end of a shank all the way in Saratoga, you know, trying to make it in, no, to answer your question though. I didn't at the time understand what he was doing. But it didn't take long for that to sink in. You have now adopted a very unique approach in a unique philosophy when it comes to getting your operation off the ground into training the horses that are in your care. You are focusing on young horses who are eligible to run and maiden races which are restricted to horses who were purchased for a certain price level. Tell me more about that philosophy. Yeah, well, you know, we were trying to spit in this around trying to figure out how we were going to jump it, kick the kick start this thing off. And I think the auction race that Kentucky and primarily New York has adopted. I think Louise Louisiana writes a few of them too. It really made a lot of sense. And starting off training with all two year olds in a general sense doesn't make a whole lot of sense. Because you're not, nobody's going to hand over a bunch of half $1 million horses or 6 figure horses to a guy that's just walked off the street. However, if you can, so if you can't have those horses, what better way to win races than to mix them all out. And that's what this auction race does. I don't have to face the 6 figure horses. I can take these 45,000 or less two year olds, hopefully use the knowledge and wisdom gained over years of working with those 6 figure type horses, those really, really talented and very specific and intelligent training regimens. And in applying to these horses and put them in places where they can succeed. This is kind of an adverse to pin hooking. It was kind of the game plan rather than take these horses to a two year old sale, which I don't have anything against two year old sales. A lot of successful horses come from those sales. However, as far as from a horsemanship perspective, when you pick one of those two year old sales two months in advance, the horse has been married to your schedule, which in my experience for the benefit in the productivity of the horse and his career, you're better off being married to his schedule. And with this kind of racing and selling point of view rather than sale to sale point of view, we can kind of cater to that we get three to four months window to kind of cater to the horses schedule and let him tell us where he best fits. And then if you paid 45,000 or less and you happen to win or run second, one of these races that carries in Kentucky, I believe it's a $92,000 purse in New York, I think it's 80 to 85. You pretty much have your purchase price covered in quite a bit of the bills covered up from that point. And just the purse money alone, everything you sell for has been profit. Yeah, yeah. Talking with will Walden here on trainer talk presented by basic tipton, will that's a fantastic approach and we'll wish you all the best with that and all the best with the new training career. We're down to the final minute and a half in the program or so. And I always like to end by asking trainers to tell us something about themselves that maybe we haven't touched on yet, other hobbies, other things they enjoy doing. But in light of everything you've overcome. And where you've been and where you are today, I'm sure there are people listening that are suffering with addictions. No matter what type of addiction, what do you want to say to those people? You've been there. Now you're where you are today. What do you want to say to people who are.

Scott Lake Laurel park Chillax Louise Louisiana McMahon Hugh Saratoga Kentucky New York tipton Walden
"walden" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

06:23 min | Last month

"walden" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

"You know, will you've been around some pretty good trainers, not just your dad. There are others that you've worked with, which I want to get to here in a second. But sticking with your dad for just a minute, what qualities did he possess as a trainer? As you embark now on your own training career, what qualities did he possess that made him so successful? What qualities is every good trainer need to have? Put it that way. It's a tough question because so many have so many different qualities to make them good in their specific areas. I would say my dad he was very he was very decisive when it came to any kind of training or any kind of medical procedure or game plan with a horse. He didn't waffle around and sit around and bat it around for days or weeks. He was very decisive. He thought he was very good at thinking outside the box. I remember he claimed a horse from California. I can't remember his name. But he claimed his horse from California for a modest price, I believe it was 2020 5000. And this was kind of before I really came onto the scene. You would just tell me about it and his claiming horse he ended up winning, I don't know, 5 or 6 stakes races with and in the only thing he would change was the horse was it took a really long time for this horse to kind of get warmed up and loose. Like some athletes are out there. It just takes a minute for I remember he would jog this horse around his barn. He would throw the exercise rider up and put the tack on him in the barn before they went to the receiving block. He jogging for ten, 15 minutes in the shed row. Before they go over to the receiving party done tack and take exercise rider off and take him over there and that kind of delmont kind of pulled the same move in the personal incident Saratoga. I used to one of the first Phillies I ever groomed was a silly named unrivaled bell who won the breeders cup ladies classic and she's also the dam of unique Bella. She had a really bad habit of flipping over in the paddock. And I believe that's actually what ended up ending her career. In her comeback after winning the ladies classic. But for the personal interest, when I was up there with Bill, he, I remember he tacked up the pony and he tacked up the Philly, put the exercise rider on her and he pony her from the receiving from his barn of the receiving bar from receiving barn all the way to the paddock at Saratoga. The untapped in the paddock re tacked the racing tackling through the jockey up and he took her out to the racetrack. Without a problem. Just an amazing amount of horsemanship. And my dad carries a lot of that. I see a lot of similarities between the two. But I'd say, you know, being decisive in really being being in tune in not really training the horses on a. One size fits all kind of basis, but being very specific with each horse. Knowing that each horse is an individual in catering, maybe tweaking your program just a little bit tweaking the program just a little bit if it gives that horse a little bit of an edge. Talking to a trainer will Walden here on trainer talk presented by phasic dipton. If you missed any portion of this show, simply go back to our website after we finish up at 7 o'clock eastern and you'll be able to take a listen to this show and all of our trainer talk programs, but certainly this is one you will not want to miss. You can also do that on every major podcast platform. Bill Mott, a name you just talked about, name you just mentioned. He is on your resume as somebody you've worked with. There are others like Dale Romans and Todd pletcher. You mentioned Wesley ward earlier. Tell me about some of those other people that you've been around and the things that you've been able to learn from them. Oh my gosh. I mean, my dad kicked me out of the house in between my freshman and sophomore year high school. And he kicked me out of the house at the end of school freshman year and he'd say, go, go find a job. Don't come back till school starts sophomore year. And I think I wouldn't work for Taylor made that summer. At the end of sophomore year, it kicked me out of the house. So I don't care where you go. Go get the job, come back before junior year. And I went and worked for walk talks for Todd Fletcher in Saratoga. I believe I was around, you know, I was in the barn with lawyer Ron and scat daddy. Horses like rags to riches. It just won the Belmont that year. A ridiculous amount of horses. And then the next year you kicked me out of the house after junior year and said, get out of here. And I went to Bill Matson. Was that because of the addiction will, and the problems you were going through? Or was that because he wanted you to learn the business from somebody else other than himself? No, no, no, no. It had nothing to do with the ditch and you know, I absolutely, I hated when he quit training. In fact, he'll tell you himself, I called his phone and bugged him for an entire year about going back to training to the point where he had to tell me to shut the hell up for a little. You know, like, I mean, I would drive him nuts about going. But it was one of the best things that ever happened because I had gotten the experience of being around him. And I was always going to have that connection with him to where I could learn from him on a daily basis just by picking up the phone with a relationship as a father in a best friend. But one of the best things he ever did for me was telling me to go learn from other people that you can not be just a one size fits all that you can't just have one experience. And I think a lot of guys out there fall victim to that, just learning one person's way. You know, I work for Jonathan shepherd. If you were to give me a steeplechase horse, if you were to give me a horse today and say, I want you to run in the Jonathan Kaiser state Sarah Tobin two and a half miles over hurdles. I could get the horse ready. I worked for Wesley ward who did two year olds. Todd pletcher who two year olds as.

Saratoga breeders cup California Bill Mott Wesley ward Dale Romans Phillies Todd Fletcher Philly Todd pletcher bell Walden Bill Matson Bill Taylor Ron Jonathan shepherd Jonathan Kaiser Sarah Tobin
"walden" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

09:34 min | Last month

"walden" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

"Mike penna baron in the backstretch with you on this Wednesday afternoon visiting with trainer will Walden the son of now CEO windstar CEO Elliott Walden and of course the trainer of victory gallop that day at Belmont park, if I remember correctly, Elliott was on crutches from an injury he sustained and it was Bill, who actually saddled victory gallop for Elliott Walden in that Belmont stakes. And I know that will Walden knows that better than anybody. Will, as you're listening to that call, what's going through your mind? I must have watched and heard that call 600 times in my life and still the hair stands up on the back of my neck, goosebumps and kind of loss for Brett. That was a massive turning point in my dad. My whole family's career. I try to stump people with that trivia question a lot, like how many Belmont winners has Bill Mott saddled in most of them just answer with the one. Drop them iron. And the answer is actually too. Because yeah, my dad was on crutches, made a basketball move that I don't think his body was necessarily equipped for. And broke his ankle and yeah, I remember him holding up the crutches in the winter circle and the big B yeah, pretty special moment there for you and for the entire family. By the way, if you missed any portion of the first half of the program, will went through his story in his battles with addiction and he talked about some of the people that have helped him along the way. And certainly there is one person in particular, Christian counselor who stands out. He is the person who is working at the drug treatment program in Lexington, shepherd's house where will spent many, many months, and he has continued to have a huge impact on his life and will credit Christian for saving his life. You're listening to the show on Wednesday afternoon, obviously. And earlier on Wednesday, a horse we're recording this on Tuesday. So earlier on Wednesday, there is a horse running at keenland by the name of sergeant counselor, who is yes named for that retired army sergeant Christian counselor and that will be the first starter in the training career of will Walden. Will, I can imagine, and again, we're recording this on Tuesday, so I wish I could do a segment after the race with you, but I can imagine that that is going to be extremely emotional on Wednesday when that horse walks into the paddock. Yeah. Yeah, absolutely. It kind of takes my breath away. Thinking about it, it's just there's a lot of history behind it and luckily we've had a lot of time to prepare for this. I remember, I think I was at the November sale and I ran into Ted champion who bred sergeant counselor. Yes, from the next time we'd see the horse was. And we had had sergeant counselor, I don't know. Under attack for about 15, 15, 20 days at that point. And I told him in April, keenland, the horse has been extremely precocious and very sound minded from day one. He showed us very early on when we strapped the saddle to his back in the round pen. Exactly what kind of quick Twitch he's got. And he's just he's never put a foot wrong we're excited about our chances on Wednesday and we look forward to getting our first runner on the board. By the time folks are listening to this show, the results will be in and let's hope that it's a victory for sergeant counselor. I know there won't be a dry eye in the winter circle if he's standing there having his picture taken and right now. It'll be like Kentucky kingdom. A bit of waterpark. Yeah, well said. Let's go back to the beginning here. I mentioned you were born into this highly influential and successful racing family. The Walden name when you think back on racing and breeding is legendary, really. Tell me about being born into that family, spending the days around the barn with your dad. Tell me more about that. Yeah, I mean, I suffered from a severe ADHD as a kid. So school was pretty traumatic for me all through childhood. And my real getaway, the time I looked forward to most where when I could get out to the bar, whether it be his barn at Churchill downs or in the winters at pace and park. Just getting in there and being around the horses, it was as we kind of spoke earlier, very therapeutic for me as a child. And for those that don't know what it's like to be in a racing stable, it's high octane, it's very energetic and there's never a dull moment. There's all these moving parts that move together in this kind of. Unison that it's pretty cool to see enjoyed going there as a child on my weekends. If I could get out of school, I would always love being. And my dad had some pretty good horse in the barn too. So that was it was pretty cool to be around them. Outside of victory Gallup, because we already touched on him just a few moments ago, who are some of those other horses that your dad had in the barn that you're always going to remember? Well, there's always this sort of humor who at the time was one of my dad's better resources, little did we know what kind of career he would go on to have or we couldn't even really predict it. He was a very solid race horse on the track, but he wasn't he didn't come off the track and stalling farms were tore up to heaven. Little did we know exactly what kind of impact he would have on the bottom side of pedigrees through brood mayors or certainly on the top side he had funny side in his first crop at a Kentucky Derby winner in his first crop and stored humor. I don't believe ran over 6 furlongs. He was not only that, but there was a time period when I was working for Wesley ward here in less than I was getting on horses for Wesley in the morning. And I was riding the stallions for windstar in the afternoons. It's one thing that a lot of styling farms don't do. Wind star does it. They believe that these stains were they were so good on the racetrack, not only for their natural ability, but also their mind and that they loved what they did. So they have a very safe, very specific area on the form where the stallions can go and they kind of jog in like gallop and I was signed on to do that for a little while and was getting on to store to humor at 23, 24 years old. And he acted he was crazy in the rest of them. Just absolutely full of energy and spunk. And it was so cool just to the last time I had been around the horse, I was 8, 9 years old when he was three in my dad's barn. And just to kind of appreciate, I think he's probably my favorite horse of all time. There was another affiliate storm cat Philly, my dad trained named pleasant temper. She won the Jenny Wiley at keenland and was a graded stakes winner on both turf and dirt. And big black Philly owned by Mark Stanley. With a little white stripe down her face and I don't know why she was so special to me and she was she stood about 17 hands tall and she was quite actually pretty nasty in the shadow. You had to really be on the lookout when you're around her because she wasn't afraid to take her shot at you, but I would always bring peppermints and when I would come in the barn, she'd stand in front of her staunch. She put her head down she kind of started Paul on the ground and I don't know. I guess it was the first time I ever felt appreciated by a horse. So she always, she always had a big place in my heart. Let me throw two more names at you. How about men of fee and Acton park? Because those are two horses your dad trained that I will never forget. Exim park had this coat like a copper penny, like a brand new penny that was, it was crazy. I mean, you could almost see your face in it. Absolutely beautiful creature. And I remember, I think one of my dad's biggest days is a trainer aside from winning the Belmont with victory gallop was the day that I think he got too graded stakes victories in a matter of 45 minutes to a half hour when men if he crossed the wire first in the Haskell. And I think 30 minutes prior to that in the slop acting part romped home by ten or 11 in the Jim dandy at Saratoga, we were all up in New Jersey at the time for the Haskell and I mean both beautiful horses, both extremely talented, they were a lot of fun to have in the barn and certainly certainly really, really good for my dad's career at that point..

Walden Mike penna baron CEO windstar CEO Elliott Walde Elliott Walden Bill Mott keenland Belmont park Elliott Brett Lexington Kentucky shepherd Wesley ward basketball Bill Ted ADHD Jenny Wiley Mark Stanley
"walden" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

06:16 min | Last month

"walden" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

"Grateful to have him in my life. Visiting with trainer will Walden here on trainer talk presented by phasic tipped and if you are just joining us, will has overcome his battles with addiction. You just heard him talking about that or maybe you didn't and so I'll recap that for you. He has overcome his battles with addiction. Of course, the son of windstar CEO Elliott Walden a highly successful trainer in his own right will grew up around his father's operation. We're going to get to that part of his story. We'll talk more about the early days of will Walden and being around his father and some of the horses that he had the privilege to be around when his dad was training. But now talking about how he's been able to work through things and overcome things because of one person in particular, Christian counselor who he credits for saving his life. I'm sure you had plenty of people that came to you over the years. And tried to help. Tried to lend a hand in some way. Why was Christians message the one that resonated with you? That's a good question, Mike. There were. And I don't mean to write it off. There wasn't because there were so many people that came along and tried to help. But they got a saying in treatment. You're not ready until you're ready. And I guess Christian just he never beat around the bush, and he never there was never any kind of sense of ulterior motive with him. It was point blank that, you know, you're going to die in this hotel room. You're not going to make it past the next few weeks. And if you're okay with that then go ahead and keep doing what you're doing. But there is a way out, there's a way out because I've taken that way out. There's a way out because I myself after getting discharged out of the army. Spent years homeless on the street to license in. And somebody offered me that way out and I took it. He was able to tell that message to so many people. In the realness, when he would say and it was kind of a, there was a kindness in his eyes, but a seriousness to his voice, and it just, I don't know, it kind of shook me to my core, you know, the realization that death wasn't a fairytale. And it wasn't, you know, a maybe, but it was a virtual certainty if I kept going the way I was going. And he made he made life sound livable. He made life sound appealing. Made it seem he always used to have this one saying, and it was after I'd get the treatment after I got the treatment. For the first 90 days, your brain and all your emotions are pretty much just shot. And your body's trying to recalibrate and get on an even plane. Your emotions are up and down and up and down and it's just one second you're on a pink cloud because you're not where you were, but the next second you're in this bottomless depression because you're back in treatment for the 13th time. And I would go into Christian's office just down, you know, wondering how it had gotten this bad. And he never gave me a direct answer, but one thing he'd say to me often was, you know, It's Okay to Not Be Okay. For a little while. And the way he said it, the way it came off to me was that that was temporary. It didn't sound permanent. And I could get my head around that. I could be okay with not being okay for the moment. And, you know, you put day after day after day soon those days during the week since weeks turned to months as months turned into three, four, 5, 6 month periods. Can you not, you realize what the words ring true that you're not as bad off as you were in that the days are getting better. You just keep plugging forward? Whenever somebody goes through something like you've gone through, it's not just yourself that's affected. It's the people around them, their friends, their family, certainly, and your dad was out there as racing manager, CEO of windstar farm all these years and he's had a smile on his face and smiled in the winter circle and those are joyous moments, but I know that inside these situation had to be tearing him and your family apart too. Talk about the impact and how your dad, in particular, since this is trainer talk, was able to persevere and stick by your side and go through this with you. My dad, it's kind of simple. It's does he put his money where his mouth is. He talks about this faith that he has in that he relies upon daily. And I think that was kind of battle tested when it came to me and what I was going through. Was it something that he was going to try and manipulate and control and try and do all in his own or was he just going to or was he going to take his hands off it and pray to God and give it over to God and trust him with the results, which is a word that he would preach many times to many people. And he did a pretty good job of it. That doesn't I'm not taking away from his pinks. I know it broke him. But he remained strong and he had to, you know, for my mom and my brother and my two sisters. We had to remain strong and he did. It wasn't easy. I remember him going to Dubai about three or four years ago. We might use taking my little sister over there for the first time. I don't remember what horse they were going over there for, but I remember, I remember later on, he told me when I got on that plane to buy, I didn't think I was coming home to you alive. And you know, he'd start to tear up and break down and I know that I know that it hurt and obviously that it tore tore him up, but a guy never lost faith. Never got off his knees..

phasic Walden Elliott Walden windstar windstar farm Mike bush army depression Dubai
"walden" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

03:54 min | Last month

"walden" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

"You just got to give it a chance. You got to give your brain a chance to recalibrate chance for you to get some things back in life. For that spiritual maintenance in that relationship that reliance on God to really grow and kind of show itself in your life, you got to give it time. And we did. I did. And man, I couldn't, I couldn't be more grateful for those guys who came alongside me. Your dad told the story of sitting at a luncheon and hearing pat day speak back in 1994. And he was going through some things and struggling a bit at a time. And pat's words help change your dad's life. Your pet day, the person who really resonated with you was a retired army sergeant who works at the drug treatment program in Lexington that you eventually went to that shepherd's house. His name Christian counselor, tell me a little bit more about Christian and the impact he had on you when you were really down and out. Oh, man. I don't think you had enough time to talk about Chris. We'll try. I was actually with Christian last night. We were, I was helping him pick out some clothes. I was a sports jacket to wear to the races on Wednesday when we have our first starter that's going to run who's named after him. Christian. He came into my life at a real critical point. At this point in my life, I needed to he ran the house that we lived in. Kind of like a military base. And it was very structured. It was very disciplined and you stepped out of line, you either got back in line really quick or you found another place to live. And that in itself was something I really needed at that time in my life. And Christian before I was actually in the house, Christian would come, I was strung out on heroin and crack cocaine. I was in this tiny little motel room on Richmond road. I was, I mean, I was in bad shape, Mike, like bad shape. You know, I was waking up. I'd wake up gasping for air in my hotel bed and there'd be syringes sticking out of my arms and blow it all over the mattress and honestly pissed off that I'd actually woken up just at that point just didn't want to. Just didn't want to partake in life anymore. And Christian would call me and say, what are you doing? And spin off some kind of lie to him. He said, I know exactly what you're doing. He said, do you need something to eat and he'd bring me by McDonald's and it certainly wouldn't you wouldn't tell me what to do. He never told me what to do. He came up with some simple suggestions, but at the end of it, he just say, look, man, trying to stay alive. And when you're ready, give me a call. And that day came. I came about two and a half weeks later. And on November 23rd of 2020, I called him. I reached out and I said, I'm ready. It's time. And he took me to detox, and he walked me through the whole process to get into the house that he was managing at the time. And my life has never been the same since, and it's not just me, you know, I can tell that I can tell that exact same story for about 50 different people. That I've seen Christian work and mentor with. I've seen him come back to the house that we were living at on weekends that he has off. I'd seen him roll up to the house at 9 30 at night with a date in his car sitting in the parking lot. Because he had gotten a text from a house manager saying some kid was going through it, needed his help..

Lexington shepherd pat army Chris Mike McDonald
"walden" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

07:57 min | Last month

"walden" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

"You're sold out at that point. And sure enough, you know, they came to me. I don't know. Mike came to me a few weeks after he's like, man, what you were talking about, man. I went through it. I went through it. It's cool. It really is. And I lived through a vicariously through him. I remember what happened to me, and these horses are as much part of me as anything else. And we're just like I said, man, just extremely grateful to be able to do it. Do it on a daily basis. Yeah, we're going to expand much more on this story of will Walden as we walk through the program here today. The school that he's referring to, the tailor made school of horsemanship, which was started by Frank Taylor out at TaylorMade farm. That is the program that he got his friends, Tyler Maxwell, and Michael Lowry into. They discovered the benefits they are now working with him as he begins his training career and is a wonderful story of perseverance and overcoming incredible adversity. And there are so many people will that are suffering with addictions, whether it's drugs or alcohol or other things. And for you now to be in the position that you're in, you have to feel like in some ways that you are a shining example of what is possible if you commit to yourself to a program and working through things. Yeah. Absolutely. Alcoholics anonymous. It's kind of pretty much a staple in most treatment facilities. It's kind of a way to kind of get you started off in recovery. And one of the founding principles in there is you can only keep what you have by giving it away. And that rings the book is full of a lot of cliches. And a lot of them used to drive me up a wall, but if you really break them down and think about it, it makes a lot of sense. And we can only keep this 24 hour period of sobriety by trying to help the next guy. It's an alcoholism in addition to disease. It's rooted rooted in our minds and it's. Derived from self and the only way to get out of self is one might is to help somebody else. And so it's kind of that's the kind of mantra of the program is helping other people and yeah, it's a torch that me and the guys we've sat down. We've talked about when we were in Ocala for 6 months. No one we were going to come back here and do what we're doing. We had several serious discussions. We all lived together. Had several serious discussions about it. Look, we're not out here for any kind of participation trophies. We're out here to win races. But the main thing here is that we can be a light in a dark world and there are people that are out there and their friends, family might not even know about it. Might not know that there's something going on. And they won't talk about it. Unless somebody jumps out first. Unless somebody takes the first step and kind of opens up about what they're then the doors open. And a lot of people walk through and so that's, like I said, it's a torch that we're willing to carry proud to carry on to carry. And where barn 7 stalls 31 through 40 at keeneland, if anybody's struggling, just pop in, there's three guys who are lives have been transformed in our certainly willing to talk you through whatever you're going through and point you in the right direction if you need to be. You know, as you're talking about that will and I'm listening to you make those comments. I think back to when your father, Elliott Walden, who people know very well, trainer of victory Gallup who won the 1998 Belmont he trained over a thousand winners in his training career. He's now the CEO at windstar farm and he's had a huge impact on the sport, but I think back to when he joined me on this program back in March of 2014. And he told his story about finding religion and embracing Jesus, and that was enormous for him in his life. And he received a note after he came on the show from a listener. Thanking him for telling his story as that listener was going through some very similar things in his life. And I will never forget this. This is one thing in my entire broadcasting career, I will never forget your dad sent a copy of that note to me, saying your show is changing lives. And it just blew me away. And sometimes when things aren't going the way, I want them to go with the show or with whatever it might be. I take a step back and I say, you know, it doesn't matter because if there's one person that benefits from hearing these shows, no matter what it might be, you never know who you're going to have an impact on. And just hearing you tell that story and say, hey, if you're having any troubles, you want to stop by the barn and talk to us. We're here for you. Very similar situation to what your dad went through in the impact he had, at least on that one listener. For sure, for sure. And. I spent the last 31 years around that guy. And people, people know my dad for his expertise in running a business or running a farm or building a farm, training resources, buying resources, but the man has one of the biggest hearts of any human being I've ever met. The amount of times we would drive to Bengals games as kids. Huge Bengals fan, my dad is. And yeah, I try not to hold that against him, by the way. You can after this year. You know, it was a miserable fan base growing up. It was a hard way to grow up. But we had Kentucky basketball to combat it. But the amount of times we would pull off exits, two or three times on the way up to games. And he'd swing around to McDonald's and drop McDonald's off at the homeless guy standing on the corner asking for money. And that's just a drop in the bucket compared to the many examples that he set for me. Growing up, and look, man, we're just grateful to be alive. Let alone give us a platform or let us be a catalyst to help some other people. We're going to take it because that's the only way we keep what we have. And what we have is priceless. We have our families back. We have friends back. We have jobs. We have a purpose in life, which is something we didn't have for a very long time. And it's a tough way to exist. It's a tough way to exist without a purpose. And if we can be a catalyst for change for people for somebody who just it's not even that they're hiding anything. They just don't know who to turn to. If we can be open about society, people reach out to me after the TD and article in like, wow. Will you really put it out there? And. I'd be lying if I said I didn't want more horses in the barn or didn't want to grow the stable, but the article wasn't to bring to attract owners in to give me horses. It was simply to kind of reach out and see if there was anybody we could help in the industry. Let people know that we want to be a Beacon of hope because that's what I needed early on. When I got to the shepherd's house time when I met Mike and Tyler, I needed somebody who's out there doing the thing. I thought, I thought that sobriety was going to be a consolation prize. So the life that I wanted to live and couldn't live successfully. I thought it was going to be measurable. And there were guys that came along came alongside me and said, no, man. This is the best life you'll ever.

TaylorMade farm Tyler Maxwell Michael Lowry Frank Taylor Elliott Walden windstar farm Walden Ocala Mike Bengals Gallup McDonald Kentucky basketball shepherd Tyler
"walden" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

07:14 min | Last month

"walden" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

"Well, my guest on today's show really does embody what this show is all about and is a shining example of why I created this show ten years ago. Each of us has a story, a journey, which has gotten us to where we are today. It's true for all human beings. And if you've been listening to this show for the past decade, you know, it is absolutely true. For those who have chosen to train racehorses for a living. For a few, the journey is relatively smooth. But for most, there are plenty of challenges and hurdles that they need to overcome. And nobody relates to that more than my guest on today's edition of trainer talk. The 31 year old native of Lexington, Kentucky, was born into a highly successful and highly influential racing family. As a child, he spent most of his free time at the barn with his father. The plan was to follow in his father's footsteps and become a trainer, but as he got later into his teenage years, drug addiction stopped that plan in its tracks. And on many occasions, it nearly cost him his life. Today, those troubles are behind him, and he is returned to the racetrack, now training racehorses on his own. It has been a long arduous road, but the sky is now the limit. Please join me in welcoming trainer will Walden to train her talk presented by phasic tipton. Will really appreciate the visit, my friend. Thanks for spending some time. Thanks, Mike. Appreciate glad to be here, man. You know, I can imagine that when you walk into the barn every morning to go to work, the feeling is a little bit different than others who haven't been through what you have been through in your life. So when you stop and you look around at the people and the horses and the environment that you're now in, what things go through your mind. Well, you know, I mean, I agree with that statement wholeheartedly. It's different. A lot of times just kind of caught in all. Not only just for the simple fact that we got horses in training and that a lifelong dreams starting to come to fruition, but more so the guys that are with me, all my Friends, I had two or three friends that worked for work with me and we met in drug and alcohol treatment about a year and a half ago and just to see just to see large changed not only that, but dreams kind of start to take place. And a real passion for this game start to be born. I've stared at many ceilings in jail cells all over the country and in many treatment centers and a lot of dark places and just, I don't know. It's kind of tough to put into words exactly what the feeling is when you walk down the shed around the morning and you get to watch horses train and develop these relationships and kind of try to take these horses along and whatever journey through their racing careers that they have. It's a pleasure and an honor really. And to be doing it with your friends who you just mentioned by your side. That has to be kind of neat too. You're all going down this road of recovery, if you will, together. For sure. Yeah, no. So we met about 1617 months ago and we were on the same place. Just fresh off the street. Some of us were coming from jail and some of us from rehab and life in shambles to put it mildly. And you feel each other out, you kind of, when you meet each other, just like anybody else, you feel now talk to them about what they do, what they pass was outside of addiction and people hear me talk about the horse race and everybody just a lot of people really think it's a cool deal, you know? But it's kind of left at that. And when Frank Taylor started the school horsemanship at the house, I was living at my Tyler joined on. You could really see the lightbulb turn on. And we would talk, we would go. I remember, I think it was their first week there. They're going to work at TaylorMade, and so I took them up to. We had a TV room at the house. And I went out into YouTube and I showed them not this time in his races. Michelle, in his races and in midnight storm and Instagram and just to kind of give him a little background for it. You know, I wanted him to walk in there and knowing a little something to kind of impress their new employer. And you could just see it in their eyes. Like, wow, they had never seen anything like it, you know? Being from less than one was from Bowling Green mics from lacking ten. And they've been here, but never been to keenland. I've never been to the sales. Certainly never been to a horse farm or late hands on a horse before. And I was working at Wendy's at the time. And they were just starting to steal out of TaylorMade and they'd come home and you could you could see the shavings still coming out of their shoes and the horse manure stains on their knees and I mean dog tired. But there was like a brightness in a relief in their eyes just a hard day's work paid off with an animal that definitely has the power to kind of lift your spirits. Yeah, it's incredible. We hear about horses being therapeutic for inmates and for veterans who come back from overseas. And there are several programs there too. And it sounds to me like the horses have served as a therapeutic outlet for you and for your Friends and certainly you had the background, but they did not. And they're discovering the therapeutic value that horses can provide. Yeah, absolutely. I don't know. In addition, from a background of addition, the alcoholism, you know, you feel like such a nuisance in a way on everybody's shoulders. You see the pain and everybody's eyes when they're around you. And therefore, your self worth is pretty low. And you pretty much walk around it with a 24/7. And I told these guys before they went to Taylor, man. I said, I can't put a date on it. I can't put a time on it. But I promise you there'll be a time where you look at you look into your horse's eyes, whichever horse it is. I can't tell you that either. But you're looking to his eyes and he'll look back at you. And you just have a little moment, it's brief, but it feels pretty cool when you know he accepts you for exactly who you are. In that Bond is created. And once that's created, you're pretty you're pretty much stuck at that point. You might as well just cash all your chips in and go ahead and sign up for the horse industry because you're in..

phasic tipton Walden Lexington Kentucky Frank Taylor Mike TaylorMade Tyler Michelle Bowling YouTube Wendy Taylor Bond
Official: Alec Baldwin surrenders phone for shooting probe

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 4 months ago

Official: Alec Baldwin surrenders phone for shooting probe

"Authorities authorities in in New New Mexico Mexico now now have have what what they they feel feel is is a a key key bit bit of of evidence evidence and and the the fatal fatal accidental accidental shooting shooting on on the the set set of of the the movie movie rust rust it's it's been been nearly nearly three three months months and and cinematographer cinematographer Helena Helena Hutchins Hutchins was was shot shot to to death death and and about about a a month month since since authorities authorities in in Santa Santa Fe Fe ask ask for for Alec Alec Baldwin Baldwin cell cell phone phone they they now now finally finally have have it it it it was was turned turned over over this this past past weekend weekend and and investigators investigators hope hope information information on on it it might might yield yield some some clues clues about about the the case case Walden Walden was was an an actor actor and and co co producer producer of of the the movie movie which which is is now now on on hiatus hiatus a a search search warrant warrant for for the the phone phone sought sought text text messages messages photos photos videos videos calls calls and and other other information information related related to to the the movie movie Baldwin's Baldwin's lawyer lawyer says says the the actor actor has has cooperated cooperated with with authorities authorities from from the the get get go go and and the the delay delay in in getting getting the the phone phone to to them them should should not not suggest suggest otherwise otherwise I'm I'm Oscar Oscar wells wells Gabriel Gabriel

New New Mexico Helena Helena Hutchins Hutchin Santa Santa Alec Alec Baldwin Baldwin Walden Walden Mexico FE Baldwin Oscar Oscar Wells Gabriel Gabriel
"walden" Discussed on Counter Apologetics

Counter Apologetics

05:52 min | 6 months ago

"walden" Discussed on Counter Apologetics

"So what is the natural world anyway? My view is open ended, but that's a feature, not a bug. The nature of nature is open ended. I have my own views, but I wouldn't go so far as to say that anyone who doesn't conceive of nature in the exact way that I do isn't a naturalist so if naturalism is the view that there's only the natural world, that leads to the question what is the natural world? Here's how philosopher Galen strawson fleshes out his naturalism. Quote, I'm a naturalist and out and out naturalist, a philosophical or a metaphysical naturalist, a naturalist about concrete reality. I don't think anything Supernatural or otherwise non natural exists. You can't classify anything as Supernatural or non natural until you have a substantive conception of the natural in relation to which something can be classified as non natural. I do have one. I take it the concrete reality, anything that exists in spacetime is entirely physical. End quote he goes on to explain that the physical is experiential in its intrinsic character. Experience in the sense that any conscious creature is familiar with by virtue of being a conscious creature so for strassen, physics is quite abstract. Tells us about the structure and behavior of the physical. But it doesn't tell us anything one way or the other about the concrete stuff that exemplifies the abstract structural behavioral description provided by physical science. Our mathematical physical models could be describing concrete non experiential reality, but they could also be describing concrete experiential reality of the kind with which were directly familiar. So for strassen, naturalism means that there is only the natural world. The natural world is exhausted by the physical and the physical itself is experience. The behavior of the physical is modeled by physical science. But the concrete reality which underlies that abstract description is experience. As your no doubt aware, there are quite different ways of fleshing out naturalism. One could go with strassen and saying that there's only the natural world, the natural world is exhausted by the physical science uncovers the behavior of the physical, but the concrete nature of the physical is wholly non experiential. That would be a more ordinary conception of physicalism. Yet another naturalist might say that there is only the natural world the natural world is exhausted by the physical world and the physical world is entirely characterized by structure and relations. Structure is all there is. The point is not that you have to agree with any of these shorthand accounts of the natural world. The point is to sketch out how naturalism can start with something simple, like there is only the natural world, and work from there to a more elaborated, substantive worldview. And since I'm drawing frequent comparisons with theism, I'll point out that this exact progression is mirrored on the theistic side just as naturalist must give content to the natural world after defining their position as there is only the natural world. Theists must give content to God after defining theism as God exists. There isn't much a theist can say in their attempt to elaborate theism and put some flesh on the bones that won't exclude vast numbers of other theists. God exists. He has attributes a and B but not attributes C and D, his profit was person X, but not person Y and certainly not person Z and so on and so forth. Theism like naturalism is a quite general term that functions more as a starting point. A lot of debates between atheists and theists don't really go into all the details of their worldview. The question is often, is there an omnipotent omniscient maximally good designer of nature? And by the way, that goes beyond the statement that.

Galen strawson strassen
"walden" Discussed on Counter Apologetics

Counter Apologetics

01:58 min | 6 months ago

"walden" Discussed on Counter Apologetics

"Features that.

"walden" Discussed on RiYL

RiYL

05:07 min | 7 months ago

"walden" Discussed on RiYL

"Is the fuchs state. As you described it is it or they call it like flow the flow. Is it about getting out of your own head. I think it's about away from sort of the the perspective in the pressure of others for me it was less about getting out of my own head. It was about getting away from the anxieties of everyone around me. Being zayed's that. I felt like we're sort of bestowed upon me in my childhood as they are. Most kids It flow for me is in a state of sort of going far away. It's just about not worrying. I don't i'd i'm not stressed. I'm not thinking like. Oh what if i draw us wrong. There's no wrong when i'm in when i'm in that state and it's one that i don't get too much anymore bomber. I assume it's also probably pretty difficult to achieve when you're not only doing at first assignment but when jay salutes. Looks you in the eye and tells you that this has to be your best comic back to him. But like i clearly. It's worked for him. But i don't know if that's the best advice that world you know it's it's interesting because now that's my class that i teach and i teach that assignment and i. I don't say that to my students is it is all about using the accumulation of the skills you've gained in this year and putting them to you so you learn how to stop blacks if you learned how to do dialogue better. This is your chance to try and use. It is your sense that he that was his shorthand way of trying to say that absolutely but it's like but it's the student teacher relationship teacher says something student is like why they never. I didn't ask any clarifying questions. I wasn't like jason. What do you mean by best. I just you know got stressed out about it the way he do. I know that you said that you don't go back in real stuff. Which is like totally understandable. I i hate. I hate reading stuff that i wrote like a week ago but But putting together this collection was very much a process of you. Have i assume having to force yourself to back. Not just your old stuff but like your assignments. Yeah and luckily. I didn't have to do most of it. You did write notes though. I did and that was pretty interesting. That was also possible. Because i did it with ricky. So ricky is the editor at avery hill. Who i found me online and i publish my work into. I've known for many years now. I feel very secure with and so when it when it came to talking about these comics. I was like i can do it but we have to do together. And it has to sort of feel like we're just chatting about it. I'm not like sitting here really thinking about comic means like just sort of helped me through it so we helped me through it And it felt like just taking a stroll down memory memory lane not like really looking at it too hard. Because i wasn't happy when i made most of those comics. It's hard for me. It's hard for me to to look in a lot of them. I'm trying to remember another. I've seen another collection. That does that same thing with the with the course assignment attached in. And i think it's probably because i'd only comics had been taught the way that they are taught now through. Cca's or alive the cost of scientists. Va or you know what tom heart's doing down in gainesville but it's a completely different way of looking at you'll read a lot of collections in the bling notes from the artist..

jay salutes avery hill ricky jason tom heart Cca Va gainesville
"walden" Discussed on Japelle Tv Show

Japelle Tv Show

08:13 min | 1 year ago

"walden" Discussed on Japelle Tv Show

"Sued for years. This year relation february two thousand seventeen so In trump and we got the store Twenty three months after we started like a month under a year under two years and You know we just been grinding hard. You know what i'm saying and learning as we go and and Doing pop ups and just trying to the community. Absolutely i can say that. I had to come to you and tell you that i admire your hustle. Your grind all actually alaska. I commend you for all of our work. Like i've seen the growth over this period of time and had become rather kalaiana compensate your brain for yes absolutely so i appreciate that saw. That's what it's all about connecting with people helping people helping each other out you. Have you ran until i personally. Have you ready to nations. Like what like hayden like. Oh why he does. I'm doing a lot of that important Offer like the love. But but i definitely be it but i feel like i don't know what i'm saying and i know you know saying how ridden house lawyer is like always saying like if you're like me you might have like yourself out of just log husband and i'm trying to motivate people You know just. I don't get into bed about nobody i mean be. Time comedian I just you know trying to hustling and just do my thing in really just motivate people to show that you know you can do. Things are some jaws. Whatever you do. So i mean more but it just on that topic bill like i feel like i have received a lot of aid especially since i started my business. This my senior baristas. I told you about my cough. Bikini coffee sandler could facific highway. Come check that out. Since opening night. I received a lot of fucking. Hey i'll be fucking okay. So how got my start on the before. Works for a little over five months. And another case. And i'm not gonna name the name however i got my start there and i've been getting from the owners so crazy this week. She actually sent one of her customers to my coffee. Stand okay. it's a purchase coffee government business card with the steam. Parisa logo drove it. All away to her stan so that she can post a picture and say oh when a customer as you to remain nasty drink and she liked posted the coffee drink with my heart Uh what and you know honestly like me. Unfortunately like i can go there And so you know. I'm not ally. I pulled up on her coffee standing. She wasn't there. Her employer employee was calm down. And you know the around who i am like. You're not there you know. I have a lot to lose at this time. I have a lot going on for my sales up. But i don't understand why there's so much shame i've also had another girl on another coffee. Coffee stains you just pulled up. She didn't think of either. She was trying to shop like high rises. She pulled up right and the car stops. I was actually laying leaving my. She was over and so i was actually still there training the next employee training and so i was carl that they stopped before they got the driver who saw i saw the car. I was like okay so then she probably figure all sheets seem came off. 'cause you pulled all the way up and i'm like oh. Hey what's going awesome. Was the area decided to support can be drinking crazy. The employees that i was i was trading jet literally just mentioned that had referred her to work for the girl and so i was like. Oh that's my point on. This is the order of one. You were just talking about this right so she was like ohio. So nice for you to stop pal support you know. I love to support each other and the girls. It's out there. I was like. What are we drinking. She was like. I'll have one something. That's not coffee. I was like okay. Women a time soda. We got home a coffee. We all got smoothies. See all of that rebel but anyway out his you know some of the the. Hey experience says starting this This new business now. You're doing good. I mean you gotta take the good with the bad right like this any good ambassadors farther back but like you said getting more good than back here. I dont being highly lessened favored. So those people you know. It's like a lotta times. Eight comes from inside. People be liberal in their life over. They might not like you know what's going on in their life where they might be not in the position that you're in or they might. It's all types of different things gonna have an be that A lot of people like you and people don't like them that ends on top of different reasons people that hate but all of it is did security and I mean that's just what it is like slave. There's enough money to go around for everybody. I also designed close to where people like saw that i was involved with fashionably. They will come in asking like oh no. How do i just started do this. I'm giving up all of these sources. I no problem. I wanna see like we're here for. We don't see a lot of people of color like people like you want is in that scenery here so you. That was really like a goal of mine. Get more people of color involved and all that. So i've never on anybody ever. I mean this wasted energy really. When you're hating. That's time that you could be using bettering yourself. Negative energy in you never gonna gonna get positive out of it so you know. But i've never really been here. So i really only congratulated. I figured again if only like you see what you as a man. I respected can't really working hard so another time talking about. Do you miss this pleasure. I would really really. Oh god out there in the past can i definitely had mixed and I mean. I can't say that. I don't really thing that i initiated it. I'm just saying that's awesome before today. But yeah. I definitely try not to not to should just super sour. And then i got check Sydney videos burnham up lows around.

february today trump this week This year Parisa a month under a year under two Eight over five months Sydney Twenty three months two one of her customers one alaska hayden ohio years kalaiana thousand seventeen
"walden" Discussed on Japelle Tv Show

Japelle Tv Show

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"walden" Discussed on Japelle Tv Show

"One thank you so much for tuning. And today i m japan your host for the tv show. This is the show talk about relationships. Love sex entrepreneurship a little bit. Especially and everything..

"walden" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"walden" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

"You know in the middle elevator running it for as long as i can remember and to the laugh. There's a bank of elevators to take you up stairs and see elliot is with us. And he'll echo this too because elliott has been in those elevators. Even more than than i have. And i i asked winifred. Wanda was who was in his always in the next elevator and she passed along the sad news that wanna had died in january. Not cove it But she had worked here for. It's been here twenty plus years wanda. She was over in the jockey. Club suites for years and then moved to the to the when they remodeled the building. She moved to the clubhouse and it's surprising its surprising. How people like wanda become you become friendly and become accustomed to seeing them and happy to see them. So i pass along thoughts to want to son and And the countless countless downs goers that that new like i did and elliott. Walden joins us elliot. Good morning elliot. Case no case that we have now. I can't Not area no. All right i well yeah case. He's got to pick up elliott on the because he some yeah. Sometimes i know that. Sometimes i do that myself. You your ear or your cheek. Hits the mute button on your phone and you're talking away and then you realize they can't area so let's give it a second and we'll get elliott walden and in addition to talking to elliot about About jon ward. There's there's plenty of things happening Windstar to discuss with with elliot as well radio there we go. There's elliott walden. How are we doing guy i. We're good i i. I you know. Obviously saddened elliott the word that john warren I had not heard that That he had been you know. They've been suffering from cancer but I saw your quotes and your association with them and you certainly trade along side him. Yes we did. I mean. I even my first job on the racetrack and worked for him when.

john warren Wanda january elliot elliott winifred elliott walden Walden wanda twenty plus years first job jon ward Windstar
Henry Louis Gates Jr. On the Black Church

Fresh Air

02:09 min | 1 year ago

Henry Louis Gates Jr. On the Black Church

"Guest louis gates has written a new book called the black church. That's a companion to the pbs series. He hosts of the same name. The book explores the history of african american religions from the days of the transatlantic slave trade to the black lives. Matter movement says black churches were the first institutions built by black people and run independent of white society in the us with the earliest black christian congregations. Roughly contemporaneous with the declaration of independence. He describes how churches became the foundation of black religious political economic and social life. He also tells his story about the bargain. He made with jesus that led him to the church at age twelve but life eventually led him to become more of an observer than participants in religion. Henry louis gates has hosted many pbs series and written companion books exploring the history of african americans including the recent book in series on reconstruction. He also hosts the series finding your roots in which through dna tests and in-depth genealogical research reveals the ancestrally. History of his well known. Guess gators a professor at harvard where he directs the hutchins center for african and african american research. Our interview recorded last thursday. Henry louis gates welcome back to fresh air a pleasure to have you back on our show in the acknowledgements in your book. You think a list of people for helping you fully realize the awesome significance of the black church and black religious beliefs in your own life and in the lives of other people. Let's talk a little bit about your own life when you were young. Your mother was methodist your father episcopalian. You attended your mother's church as a child. Would you describe that church yeah. It was a small methodist. Church is called walden methodist church. It's still there and many of my cousins and old friends so worship at church in many of the people most dear to me who passed away or memorialize on the walls of the church but it was a methodist church but it was almost the fundamentalist church. If

Louis Gates White Society Foundation Of Black Religious Henry Louis Gates Black Church PBS Hutchins Center For African An Gators Jesus Harvard United States Walden Methodist Church
Greenwood Genetic Center on Epigenetics

DNA Today

01:53 min | 1 year ago

Greenwood Genetic Center on Epigenetics

"I guess they are front. Greenwood genetic center. Dr louis and kelly walden rate is an assistant director in greenwood's molecular diagnostic laboratory and kelly is greenwood's director of diagnostic development and h net counselor by training. Welcome to the show guys. It's fantastic to have john. Thanks for having us. Thank you so a lot of genetic counselors. If they're listening they know greenwood for their visual aids. I think that's what greenwood is most popular for. But could you give us a little more background and tell us about the other division of green genetic center. That people may be less familiar with kelly. Did you want to start us out of just giving background information. So the green which genetic center is a nonprofit organization We do have four divisions we have our clinical division said they see patients across the state of south carolina. We have our research. Division focused on functional studies setting the causes of autism birth defects intellectual disability. Our education division. They provide programs across the state from middle school. High school all the way up through our medical genetics training programs and then are gonna collapse. I agree with diagnostic labs. We have cited genetics molecular and biochemical testing. And so in this episode we are focusing on epigenetics and really exploring what happy. Genetics is testing four. Bg that conditions for those. That may not understand like they hear this epigenetics term. They're like what is genetics. I have no idea reagan. You fill us in on just giving us that background information so that you know us talking about testing options and conditions all make a little bit more sense. Yup so epigenetics is the process in which expression in jeans are either increase or decrease in a way that's independent makoni sequence

Greenwood Genetic Center Dr Louis Kelly Walden Greenwood Kelly Aids John South Carolina Autism Middle School Reagan
Interview With Gideon Mendels, CEO Of Comet

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

04:26 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Gideon Mendels, CEO Of Comet

"We're so excited to have with us today given mendel. Who's the ceo and co founder of comet so high gideon and thank you so much for joining us today jeff million. Hey you're on. Thank you so much for having me. I'm super excited to today. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners. And tell them a little bit about your background and your current role at comment definitely so as you mentioned. I'm the ceo and co founder of comment For the listeners. Who don't know comet provides a self hosted in college based missionary platform essentially on data science teams to track impair explain and optimize experiments models company support some of the biggest and best enterprise machinery teams in healthcare attack media financial services and other industries Her son who actually started maker of software engineer but she sixteen years ago. And i shifted do working on an applied machine learning about seven years ago. I was a grad student whilst work work on speech processing natural language processing after that i had my own start up again in. Nlp space. And after that. I was google Where i was working on deep learning research specifically we were working on detecting hate speech on youtube comments using the malls. Yeah that's that's really a great application. In general for automated systems is very hard for for humans to just manage the mountains of tasks that are needed for moderation. So great use of of a and a great applied use of ai. It's cool that you bring into that so let's sort of bring us into now. I know what you're doing with commented lot of it's helping people make these better models and and iterative battle and manages models so maybe you could tell us a little bit in our listeners. About what are some of the challenges that organizations face today when they're trying to build machine learning models into production That's a great question. And i liked it. Use the word build rather than deploy because from our view comments in working with these like very business focused engineering teams the biggest challenge in getting them. All production isn't the actual deployment or devops problem behind. It's really a building model. That's good enough to justify deployment right so when we think about machine learning it's actually buried their friends. Offer engineering both from a process perspective. The dodgy the tools everything about different machine learning iterative process tres many pitfalls in the way and now whether it's your optimizing for the wrong metric or you're leaking your target or you're just working on a data set. That doesn't have enough signal so eventually it's really comes down to building a model that meets the business. Kpi in most of the teams out there are really struggling with that point Like i mentioned. There's a lot of things that can contribute to that but a big part of it is the lack of processes and tools of doing these things in a safe and a predictable way. you know. it's it's great that you gave that explanation. I know that a lot of companies are now starting to bring their starting to build models and think about how they can incorporate machine learning into their their company. So why is it. Important to have a tool for data scientists and teams to track explain in optimize experiments in models. That's an excellent question. And i think a lot of companies learned that the hard way but really impossible to run a team successfully without a system of record of your work. I mean that's true for most job functions. Not just machine learning. You know whether it's gets hub for after themes or salesforce for cell students hub spot for marketing and so on you really need a central system of records manage these processes and and again like other system records. Another jobs luncheon. Once you have that like. In our case on experiment and a model management platform it provides value to anyone was in walden engineer. Works so whether it's data scientists that's looking to track their experiments compare and understand. Why one models being better than the other is bias or issues with a model through the software engineer that's needs actual binary defer deployment all the way to the manager that wants to track and have visibility of a team progression and eventually maintaining all that institutional knowledge about research experimentation metrics and models within the organization and non people's personal notes for example.

Jeff Million Mendel Youtube Google Salesforce Walden
Democracy As We Know It

The Experiment

05:14 min | 1 year ago

Democracy As We Know It

"The life of maryland newkirk and on november six twenty twenty after a long battle with cancer. She was fifty six. She survived by her husband three siblings and three kids including her son van. Who's a senior editor at the atlantic. I'm a mom's oldest child. I am required under law to only speak good things when a life comes to an end we the ones who are left behind. We're left with a story a really a bunch of different stories like for van. There were small stories about the way. His mom looked really playing a tie or what she cared about. Walden your church. How she treated people who was an incredibly patient what she struggled with the stress rising off her but he but when van took a minute to pull back to really zoom out on the time line of his mom's life he could see this bigger story about the country. She lived in one of the things. I like to think about is the fact that when she was born it was by no means guaranteed that she would be granted the right to vote and that right to vote would be protected looking back on her life ban sees a story about democracy and it's different than the one he was taught so i was always taught that america was founded explicitly as democracy. You know you go to school. And you're taught that this was the biggest hit in global democracy since the athenians but really to me. I have been more and more convinced that the only true phase of what might even be somewhat called. Democracy in america has been america's voting writer and my mother has seen every single day van says contrary to what you might have been told real. Democracy in america hasn't been here that long. It's only been here for fifty six years this week. Van newkirk tells the short story of democracy by taking us through the life of the woman who saw the whole thing his mom. I'm julie longoria this experiment. A show about our unfinished country as van tells it his mom was born just one year before our democracy started a mother was born in sixty four. I understand that family. Storytelling often embellished. So you have to work a little bit too well. I've not yet gotten the fact checkers on some of this. But as the story goes a mother was born in greenwood mississippi. She went home in a cardboard box. That is the legend. I believe it's probably one of those. Cardboard bassin has which not that uncommon. But yeah you know they were poor and on the way home you know drove pass headquarters of civil rights organizations staging freedom summer but that's also will be known as the summer of civil rights because of the mississippi freedom summer project it was one of the main flashpoints in the civil rights movement and there were staging it out of headquarters in greenwood mississippi where she was born dan. He say what you want. I say i wanna reddish the vote. A lot of what they were trying to do was to register black people to vote to send into mississippi that stomach upwards of one thousand teachers ministers lawyers and students from all around the country and they did that in part by bringing lots and lots of volunteers. Lots and lots of white volunteers around the country to come down to mississippi. I hope we can reach the lives as many people as possible in idealistic the constitution the bill of rights. And i think it's important for everybody to have these every was met with incredible amounts of violence so about two three weeks after that. My house was five close. Been tony one of rise. Black little beaming. They should expect possibly somebody. She was born in the middle of all this. You know a time. When greenwood was a very contentious place to live for

VAN Walden Your Church America Newkirk Van Newkirk Mississippi Julie Longoria Maryland Atlantic Greenwood Cancer DAN
Adii Pienaar on How to Build a Business That Profits Your Life

The $100 MBA Show

08:40 min | 1 year ago

Adii Pienaar on How to Build a Business That Profits Your Life

"Haberman apr. And i've built and sold to sort of businesses and building my next one now and i've also had just published a new book called life ability. The new measure of entrepreneurial success in one hundred dollar. Nba listen today. I'd like to teach you how to build a business that is not only financially profitable but more importantly life profitable as well. I'll be talking about how we should rethink work. Life balance means how. It's risky to take the short term pain long-term gain approach to building a business how to realize your business yourself and the next steps to take to start to create more life prophets today before i get into that. Let me share a bit of my personal journey and how i came to define this idea of life ability. I started my first business with teams and we commerce straight out of university. Even before that i was constantly working on business ideas in favor of just being a student for example and once i exited commerce years later becoming a millionaire in the process. I was supposed to take a break sabbatical sorts. But i got stuck into next. President is pretty much immunity. Because i needed to prove that. I was not a one hit wonder. I winced the building my second business believing that it should be easier. I some capital. I had experience. I had a network. I had new skills. But two years in things started unraveling both in my personal life and in business and pretty soon. I almost lost all of the things that were most dear to me. I realized that. I've been on. This accelerated path my own little rat race that cause so much. Collateral damage along the way regardless of the business financial success that i achieved. It was in that moment that i realized that i need a better way of building. My business and life going forward the philosopher henry david. Thoreau showed a powerful idea and his book walden. That helped me find this new path and ultimately coin the term life of liberty. He says the cost of a thing is the amount of what i will call life which is required to be changed for it immediately or in the long run. I'll just repeat that for a second. The cost of a thing is the amount of what i will call life which required to be exchanged for it immediately or in the long run when we do anything in life. The thing we're paying with is our life. It's our time our attention and all of that is finite and when we as entrepreneurs bowl businesses we pay expenses. Not just with money but with a part of our life and or anything like me you know how demanding a business can be at times. And this whole idea was so counterintuitive to the things that i actually valued at business my family for example represents my highest value. But i was so often just not present with them because my businesses would the monning so much of me and that's what life profitability aims to change. Shift the perspective to growing business that serves you and serves your life every single day as well building a business that generates life. Prophets instead of only accumulating life costs. So let's get into a few ways in which you can start building a business with a you're starting from scratch or you're tweaking existing business to be more profitable. My recommendation is to rethink this whole idea of work life balance. This is a commonly held goal for many people and wall. Street is not a bad goal per se. I do you think it's flawed. The problem with idea that work in life can keep each other imbalance. Is that it proposes. That work in life are two separate independent things. We all know that a bad day at work spills over into our home life easily. Just as an argument with your spouse in the morning influences your mindset throughout the workday to start moving towards greater life ability. We need to acknowledge that work is merely a part of life so a new pursuit of balance should mean that rather hold our work our businesses and balance with all the other things that are important to us whether it's families lovers friends hobbies passions projects. Or maybe just health just like you would balance an investment portfolio. So should you balance your life portfolio that should include all bits of those things that are important to you and your work and business will just be one of the stocks or one of those bits in this personalized life portfolio. The second idea. i'd like to share with. You is a bit of caution. As journey ambitious individuals were conditioned with this notion that short-term compromise and sacrifice if actually leads to long term gain and reward that kind of proverbial pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. We tell ourselves that once. I just make that extra one hundred thousand dollars or i am able to afford. Those two critical hires team. I'll take the time off to go in that family holiday or finally take up those lessons for which i've paid ages ago. The whiskey run in sequencing major life events like that is at the outcome the actual reward but is never that guaranteed and specially don't know how much time we need or have to get to that outcome in his book when breath becomes their acclaimed neurosurgeon. Paul right my life had been building potential potential. That would now go and realized. I plan to do so much and i'd come so close c. Pull it always wanted to write a book and have children but delayed those things as he was ambitiously bullying his professional career. He eventually only started writing his book after he was diagnosed with lung cancer when he was thirty six and his only daughter was only eight months old when he tragedy died the following year his wife ultimately had to write the loss chapter of his book before it was published life. Profitable business means that the business empowers you to integrate the most important things in your life with a regular cadence. It means taking that trip reading that book or spending time on the passion project sooner rather than later the next scenario like to do is to ask you to just take a momentary pause regardless of where you're at in your journey maybe you've been running business for ten years or this your third attempt after two previous failures or maybe he just had the idea to start your business loss week and on l. Planning its launch before you can take the next steps of and pursue greater life liberty. It's important to be aware of universal truth. As you take these next steps you will be the only common denominator on your journey. All other things can change. The business ordered idea with the product and change team members. Come and go. divorce happens right and families can change. You can move to the other side of the world. Make new friends but our goal is of any of those changes. You will still be there. You will be the one on this junior taking so in this momentary pause. I'd ask you to think about who you really are. What are those things that truly really matters and one of the goals hopes and dreams that you have in this moment for your future if you can't reconcile those things in this very moment and at least find partial clarity no amount of next steps can fix that. Discontent or incongruence. Whatever your next look like. They need to be untrue. Alignment of who you really are. Yes you will change and evolve to as you learn and continue on your journey but merely things that make you unique to you in this moment will not change materially life. Prophets will flow from your ability to honor these things as you take your next

Haberman Henry David Thoreau NBA Walden Lung Cancer Paul
How Lawrence Harvey Zeiger Became Larry King

Bernie and Sid in the Morning

02:20 min | 1 year ago

How Lawrence Harvey Zeiger Became Larry King

"Harvey My dad's name. Zeder in Brooklyn, New York, Laurence Harvey is eager to try and he started his radio career at a very small station in Miami Beach. And needless to say, his boss didn't love the name Lawrence Zeder. So if you understand how he became Larry King. Here's how the story went courtesy of Conan O'Brien. Now King is not your real last name. Is that right? What is your real Last name? Gi Girl was born with the name Lawrence Harvey's Iger's e E I g e R And I got the name King. In a funny way. My first day on the radio, all my life I've dreamed of being underrated. This was my I never want to be anything else but a broadcaster finally get hired A small station Miami Beach. Finally, my dreams come true. Get a job. Gonna start Monday morning is a disc jockey and all weekend. I'm nervous on practicing and it's quarter to nine small radio station general manager Close me and he says, Well, you're ready. I said, I'm ready. This is your big day. You're starting radio. I was 22 years old. Yes, This is what name you going to use my says Larry Zeiger, he said you can't use it. That's a wise Well, it's ethnic people won't know how to spell it. They won't remember it. I said, Well, what? Whoa! I'm nervous enough. And he had the Miami Herald Open. I was an ad for Kings wholesale liquors. On. He said. Wait a minute. That's what the air was. Kings Wholesale liquors 1925 Walden Road, Huh? Says, Why don't you take Larry King? So you're named after a sale on booze? I am there grow vast liquors there. Wow. Could have been Larry Wholesale letter. I know that could've been you see, Accepted. What Worse He's right. He could have been a lot of words. Andy, you know I love you. I love you. Do not break and you know, you know why your career hasn't bounced for because you would have named the guy Larry, Larry and I tell you, and that would have been funny for a week. There's about they would never, ever. That would shut ins that would have made me the Here are their hero, but they never would have been a Larry's wholesale liquor live 10th anniversary. Very

Laurence Harvey Zeder Lawrence Zeder Miami Beach Larry King Larry Zeiger Brien Iger Harvey Conan Miami Herald Brooklyn New York Larry Wholesale King Larry Andy
Kevin Feige's 'Star Wars' Movie to Be Written By 'Doctor Strange 2' and 'Loki' Writer Michael Waldron

Lights Camera Barstool

03:19 min | 1 year ago

Kevin Feige's 'Star Wars' Movie to Be Written By 'Doctor Strange 2' and 'Loki' Writer Michael Waldron

"Kevin feige his star wars stuff he was. You know there's always news about him. Doing star. wars movie was as dream. Kevin feige the the leader of marvel. He will be doing a stars movie and it will be along with doctor. Strange to doctor strange in the multi verse of madness Writer michael waldron who. We found out falls upon us on twitter. I don't know if your listener. Mr waldron who also is doing loki. Assure star wars movie with kevin feige listener. Let's let's get him on the pot did bring him. Dougherty to is a producer. Let's don't take my avatar walden joke either. So we we saw today. I don't know if he's barstool fan but yeah. If you're a listener go please come on. Let's talk about this. We'll talk about anything. But he's a star wars movie tapped to right. He's got a big deal now. Overall deal with disney obviously that's three separate entities for disney awesome. Good for him grads to that And then of course kevon foggy called the see him doing a star wars. Always kinda rumors could kevin feige takeover kathleen kennedy ever step down or she just kind of ran out of interest in doing. It seems it's more fabric baloney thing that's going to happen. Seems as though they're the ones who are going to be kind of leading the charge leading the way though catherine kennedy still there obviously as they've Just completely overhauled. How they're going to look at star wars mostly through series now with some movies And the other star wars news. This this is more of a rumor. It's been shot down that route donor. Junior won't play admiral thron however they've said that robert junior has been looked at for a star wars role in the future which makes sense because now stars and sitting that marvel thing with there's so many future properties they're gonna probably have some actors and actors that people are like. Oh that's that's quite the big name That would be a big one forever. Junior joining star wars would be quite the big name and actually. I don't think he would be a great thrown thrown of an intriguing. I still think. Speaking of the mickelson's i still think wars. Nicholson just play the character. He voiced willie because he was just the perfect of i can't think of another thrown voice But to cool pieces of star wars news here both marvel related. I think we should call them I think what a coin now for. This is the f. Cubed baloney favreau and fi. so the f. cubed alliance i think is gonna make a lot of great stores content in the future and i think that the one thing that Foggy is really going to add to this. As far as the stars movie universe cohesion right. The vendors undertaking is an insane thing. Really in retrospect like we look back on him. Like i made a bunch from the cool right but like to kind of loop together. All his moves into cohesive matter and not only that but like kind of build and make the franchise so much better as went along. I think is extremely impressive. And the fact that he's able to make these movies without feeling superhero fatigue is also even more impressive. And that's where. I think marvel in and star wars are kind of in the same lane as far as like you know when it will. When is it too much like when you down content. I think he he knows what he's doing. In that

Kevin Feige Michael Waldron Mr Waldron Kevon Foggy Catherine Kennedy Disney Robert Junior Kathleen Kennedy Dougherty Twitter Cubed Alliance Mickelson Nicholson Favreau Willie
New White House offer adds $600 checks to COVID-19 relief

Dana Loesch

01:39 min | 1 year ago

New White House offer adds $600 checks to COVID-19 relief

"It here New White House covert relief proposal is in the works. This includes $600 stimulus checks, but no more unemployment boosts. That's the latest thing being rolled out by the Treasury secretary, Steven Manoogian. This is something that Mitch McConnell cocaine, Mitch has given his blessings on the Republican leadership. They've given this to house Speaker Pelosi. We are waiting to see how they feel about this. But basically each adults would receive a stimulus. Check a $600 check. And what's it going to do for a business owner? That's been shut down hammer. That's why that man coming with me read Walden. We're not done yet here. Other proposal does include some money for a local businesses. Not a lot, but they're trying to get something passed. Now keep in mind. This is less than what was rolled out to the Democratic leadership in the House multiple times. There was a bill before the election. That was substantially more than this that Pelosi and Schumer and all the high ranking Democrats got together and said, No, this isn't good enough. You want to know the reason why Dick Durbin, the representative from Ohio Democrat senator from Ohio, spilled the beans with Jake Tapper. Yesterday, House Democrats turned down that much larger coronavirus relief bill. Because the election was coming. Senator Bernie Sanders, the

Steven Manoogian Speaker Pelosi Mitch Mcconnell White House Mitch Treasury Walden Schumer Pelosi Dick Durbin House Ohio Democrats Jake Tapper Senator Bernie Sanders
Tangle and Headcorn Go To Battle

Bedtime Stories With Nennis And Douglas

06:11 min | 1 year ago

Tangle and Headcorn Go To Battle

"Hi story eights cold tongo an headcorn go tab bottle. It don't glisten there are two farms coal whores ball lot of poll gentle slope farm boy. The foot of love burst doc. Mountain and pepin farm next to the metals gentle slope farm is run by former on pepin farm farmer corn even though they do similar jobs and have quite similar farms in many ways the to thaw murders have nothing in common fucked. They are quite competitive. All ways arguing about who grows the best vase or who offstage date the best. The who has the most powerful tractor. Who's hayden later tastiest eggs or who has the best rubber boots any. Can you care to mention farmers. Tongo acorn will argue a bow and troy on coke heat with each other of bolton nothing invasive whole world may the more competitive done yearly ploughing contest. Pay was widened. Both farmers would take their tours and plows into the same failed on. Say who could play the earth up in the nativist law and end the quickest towing possible sort of rice way. You have to be very neat and very goad tractor. Driver of the contest would swap around every year while year on gentle slope arm. The next all pippen farm. Wow this year. The ploughing contest walls pippi held on farmer. Had headquarters pippen. Barb on him won't win it aven more than hey usually dade which walls odd about two hundred pay poll from the town had come down to watch and man that were tencent stolz setting cakes and multiples of toy tractors and even roy on some of the far machinery bought the nine attraction. Was the plowing called. Tash te on the rules were as follows. Both farmers must start at opposite ends on opposite soy of the same failed. And i most plowing. Who's bach unforced. And tell one is the first to get all their rows across to the middle of the field in the judges will compare. The rose are the farmer who gets to middle thirst hamas the house then they wayne if they get to the middle i on the author of farmers still has a nate. Ace rose that and they author farmer. When's three o'clock. Thumbers tangle and had corn up enter their two tractors which were parked in the yard. Falmer tarn goals was orange with a white cop and former headquarters was purple with a green cobb age gave each other one last stare before heading note opposite ends of the big failed very long. Gothard a long walden sullied most of them leaning on the stonewall some of them set in on each other's shoulders to watch the main george mayor dobbin storage on the judging platform with his big hooter on hayes. Mega thal on farmers ready. Both tangle on headcorn revved today engines of bear trotters on poulton levers in their that lower plowing blades into the her then So the mayor. The oath bars gently pushed their feet down on. The accelerators of air tractors

Pepin Farm Metals Gentle Slope Farm Tongo Pippen Farm Tencent Stolz Hayden Acorn Bolton Troy Ace Rose Tash Barb Falmer Tarn ROY Bach Gothard Hamas George Mayor Dobbin Walden Hayes
A Look At The Building Blocks Of Stem Cells

Sounds of Science

04:43 min | 1 year ago

A Look At The Building Blocks Of Stem Cells

"From mouse models in one, thousand, nine, hundred, one to cloning Dolly the sheep to a couple of Nobel prizes. Stem cells have had an exciting half-century. But rearranging the building blocks of life is not easy and more importantly for patients not fast. However, newcomers on the market are ready to change the stem cell programming for the quicker. Joining me today are Mariangela, I o Vino Group leader integrated biology at Charles River Saffron Walden site and Mark Qatar. The founder of the cellular reprogramming startup bit bio. The are here to discuss the innovative technology created by mark and his associates and how it can be exploited by end users like Mariangela welcome Mariangela. Thank you welcome to Beautiful Safran. World. Nice, weather? Yeah. Not Bad. So can we start at the beginning? What are stem cells briefly? So stemmed has really the origin of any complex organism. Their form pretty much after an expert. And role is ready to reproduce all the cells. In the body of a human or or an animal. And the cool thing though is that Yamanaka in two thousand seven showed that one doesn't have to fertilized egg to produce stem cells. You can also produce them synthetically using salary programming, and that really has opened up the use of stem cells for drug discovery and can locations. Cool. All right. What practical uses do stem cells have for drug developers? I think that the DAW to using human cells in drug development this is really important because there's a huge translation gap at the moment between. The animal models and cell lines that are traditionally used right and. The high failure rates that you see in clinical trials. Yeah. Totally the boiled on to two things I drugs because they're toxic to human or because they don't work the human setting and so at the center of all this differences between the species used for drug development at us as the end uses. So you're saying is that the stem cells can be made from human cells and that way they're tested on human cells instead of a different species. That's exactly right. Okay. That makes sense. So how were stem cells traditionally used to create sells like brain cells? So the traditional paradigm was to try and repeat what happens during development when embryo grows in Utah and so researchers for the last twenty years or so tried to. Create protocols that expose cells to extra Selah cues, molecules that exist in the growing embryo and instruct them direct them towards particular cell fates. One of the problems that you have if you repeat this paradigm, of course, you're bought into the timelines of of Embryo Genesis, which basically means it often takes sixteen hundred days plus to generate human sale. and. The other problem that you have when you adopt this, this method is that you have to overcome the diversity that nature requires to create cells. So the worst thing that can happen during development is if a lineage, an organ or a cell type isn't produced raced. And Soak Nature seems to. Prevent. This using. CASSIE principles. So these cells make cell fate choices all along the way. If you think about a protocol that takes sixty one, hundred days with multiple steps were cells make these choices than you end up with inconsistencies. So inconsistency and longtime nine's really the biggest bottleneck introduced new Simpson about. So it's basically I, mean if we're trying to imitate nature nature is trying to make all of the organs we may be only want brain. So using nature's methods is a little bit tricky. So I would say if you wanted to produce a particular cell type, it's very tricky. In terms of producing elements of an organ. It's probably slightly less tricky although you still have the inconsistency question right and then this new paradigm called cell reprogramming. Which is essentially. An expansion or reverse engineering of Yamanaka reprogramming. Provides an alternative route so you can now very efficiently in very quickly. Produce. Human cells using. Synthetic biology paradigm

Mark Qatar Charles River Saffron Walden Mariangela Founder Beautiful Safran Yamanaka Vino Group Utah Selah Simpson
Building the Building Blocks of Life

Sounds of Science

04:48 min | 1 year ago

Building the Building Blocks of Life

"I'm Mary Parker and welcome to this episode of Eureka Sounds of science from mouse models in one, thousand, nine, hundred, one to cloning Dolly the sheep to a couple of Nobel prizes. Stem cells have had an exciting half-century. But rearranging the building blocks of life is not easy and more importantly for patients not fast. However, newcomers on the market are ready to change the stem cell programming for the quicker. Joining me today are Mariangela, I o Vino Group leader integrated biology at Charles River Saffron Walden site and Mark Qatar. The founder of the cellular reprogramming startup bit bio. The are here to discuss the innovative technology created by mark and his associates and how it can be exploited by end users like Mariangela welcome Mariangela. Thank you welcome to Beautiful Safran. World. Nice, weather? Yeah. Not Bad. So can we start at the beginning? What are stem cells briefly? So stemmed has really the origin of any complex organism. Their form pretty much after an expert. And role is ready to reproduce all the cells. In the body of a human or or an animal. And the cool thing though is that Yamanaka in two thousand seven showed that one doesn't have to fertilized egg to produce stem cells. You can also produce them synthetically using salary programming, and that really has opened up the use of stem cells for drug discovery and can locations. Cool. All right. What practical uses do stem cells have for drug developers? I think that the DAW to using human cells in drug development this is really important because there's a huge translation gap at the moment between. The animal models and cell lines that are traditionally used right and. The high failure rates that you see in clinical trials. Yeah. Totally the boiled on to two things I drugs because they're toxic to human or because they don't work the human setting and so at the center of all this differences between the species used for drug development at us as the end uses. So you're saying is that the stem cells can be made from human cells and that way they're tested on human cells instead of a different species. That's exactly right. Okay. That makes sense. So how were stem cells traditionally used to create sells like brain cells? So the traditional paradigm was to try and repeat what happens during development when embryo grows in Utah and so researchers for the last twenty years or so tried to. Create protocols that expose cells to extra Selah cues, molecules that exist in the growing embryo and instruct them direct them towards particular cell fates. One of the problems that you have if you repeat this paradigm, of course, you're bought into the timelines of of Embryo Genesis, which basically means it often takes sixteen hundred days plus to generate human sale. and. The other problem that you have when you adopt this, this method is that you have to overcome the diversity that nature requires to create cells. So the worst thing that can happen during development is if a lineage, an organ or a cell type isn't produced raced. And Soak Nature seems to. Prevent. This using. CASSIE principles. So these cells make cell fate choices all along the way. If you think about a protocol that takes sixty one, hundred days with multiple steps were cells make these choices than you end up with inconsistencies. So inconsistency and longtime nine's really the biggest bottleneck introduced new Simpson about. So it's basically I, mean if we're trying to imitate nature nature is trying to make all of the organs we may be only want brain. So using nature's methods is a little bit tricky. So I would say if you wanted to produce a particular cell type, it's very tricky. In terms of producing elements of an organ. It's probably slightly less tricky although you still have the inconsistency question right and then this new paradigm called cell reprogramming. Which is essentially. An expansion or reverse engineering of Yamanaka reprogramming. Provides an alternative route so you can now very efficiently in very quickly. Produce. Human cells using. Synthetic biology paradigm

Mark Qatar Mary Parker Charles River Saffron Walden Founder Mariangela Beautiful Safran Yamanaka Vino Group Utah Selah Simpson
"walden" Discussed on Boring Books for Bedtime

Boring Books for Bedtime

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"walden" Discussed on Boring Books for Bedtime

"Though he hesitated and perhaps failed to express himself distinctly he always had a presentable thought behind. Yet is thinking was so primitive and immersed in his animal life that though more promising than a merely learned demands, it rarely ripened to anything which can be reported. He suggested that there might be minimum genius in the lowest grades of Life However, permanently humble and literate who take their own view always or do not pretend to see at all. Or has bottomless even as Walden pond was thought to be though they may be dark and muddy. Many. A traveler came out of his way to see me and the inside of my house. And as an excuse for calling asked for a glass of water I, told them I drank at the pond and pointed they're offering till and the dipper. Far off as I lived Bama's not exempted from the annual visitation, which occurs mid thinks about the first of. April. When everyone is on the move? And I had my share of good. Luck. Though there were some curious specimens among my visitors. Half witted men from the almshouse and elsewhere came to see me. But I endeavoured to make them exercise all the width they had. And make their confessions to me. In such cases making wit, the theme of our conversation. And so was compensated. Indeed, I found some of them to be wiser than the so called overseers of the poor and selectmen of the town and thought it was time the tables were turned. With. Respect to wed.. I learned that there was not much difference between the half and the home. One. Day In particular an inoffensive simple-minded Pauper. With others, I had often seen used as fencing stuff standing or sitting on a Bushel in the fields to keep cattle and himself from straying visited me and expressed a wish to live as I did. He told me with the utmost simplicity and truth quite superior or rather inferior to anything that has called humility. That he was deficient in intellect. These were his words. The Lord had made him so. Get he supposed the Lord cared as much for him as for another. I have always been. So said he from my childhood. I never had much mind. I was not like other children. I am weak in the head. It was lords well as oppose. And there he was to prove the truth of his words. He was a metaphysical puzzle to me. I have rarely met a fellow man on promising ground. It was so simple and sincere and so true. Oh, that he said. And true enough in proportion as he appeared to humble himself was he exalted..

Walden pond Bama
Computer scientist, pixel inventor Russell Kirsch dead at 91

Latest In Tech News

03:18 min | 1 year ago

Computer scientist, pixel inventor Russell Kirsch dead at 91

"On Russell, Kirsch inventor of the Pixel passed away this week. Bit of sad news rest in peace but In case you're wondering who the inventor of the Pixel was. Now you know computer scientists, Russell AAC Kirsch, the inventor of the Pixel and undisputed pioneer of digital imaging passed away on Tuesday in his Portland home from complications arising from a form of Alzheimer's he was ninety one years old Now, Russell might not be name you immediately recognized his contributions to computer science made digital imaging possible born June twentieth nineteen, twenty nine in New York City demographic parents from Russia. and Hungary I attended Bronx High School than nyu Harvard and eventually mit in nineteen fifty one he joined the National Bureau of standards where he worked for fifty years and helped to invent the Pixel and create the first digital photograph It was a one seventy, two by one, seventy, two pixel image of his son Walden created in nineteen, fifty seven and is now iconic and was named. One of life, Magazine's one hundred photographs that changed the world in two thousand three and we have that image appear on the screen One of the first digital images ever created made from two superimposed scans at different thresholds since each pixel could only show one bit of information that being black or white as DP review points out Kirsch never stopped improving and his most famous invention even after retiring in two thousand and one and a twenty, ten interview on wired, he outlined his attempts to create a system that uses. Variable. Shape pixels instead of the squares that have dominated digital imaging since he invented him in that interview, he called square the logical thing to do. But laments that the decision was something rarely foolish that everyone in the world has been suffering from ever since. So at the right bold age of eighty-one, he began working on a masking system that creates six by six pixel areas and an. intelligently. Divides those areas into the two sections that have the most contrast before refusing to pixels on either side of the seem that idea never caught on but he explained the technology and its benefits in detail in a video below it's the thirteen minute long video if you wanted to watch that. But while the incredible accolades described above certainly gives you the sense of Russia Kirsch the. Engineer. The best personal picture of Kirsch probably comes from a two twenty twelve blocked by ant man named Joel Runyon who encountered him in a coffee shop in Portland after revealing net Romanians Computer and images on it probably wouldn't exist or exist as they are without Christmas contributions to engineering and computer science eighty-three-year-old Kirsch shared the following words I. Guess I've always believed that nothing is withheld from us. What we have conceived to do most people think the opposite that all things are withheld from them, which they have conceived to do, and they end up doing nothing Mr, Kirsch may be gone, but his legacy will live on every day in one of the approximately three point eight billion photos that are currently being captured every single day. May He rest in

Kirsch Russia Kirsch Russell Portland Alzheimer National Bureau Of Standards Nyu Harvard Joel Runyon New York City Engineer Bronx High School Walden Hungary Russia.
Oregon Republican Cliff Bentz wins House primary to replace Greg Walden

America First

00:20 sec | 2 years ago

Oregon Republican Cliff Bentz wins House primary to replace Greg Walden

"Across public voters in Oregon's second congressional district chose a former state senator to be their candidate to replace representative Greg Walden who did run for twelve term in the conservative region covering the rural eastern and central part of the state cliff Bentz on Tuesday bested former state legislators Jason Atkinson and loot

Oregon Senator Greg Walden Representative Cliff Bentz Jason Atkinson
Joe Biden wins Democratic presidential primary in Oregon

All Of It

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

Joe Biden wins Democratic presidential primary in Oregon

"Joe Biden is one Oregon's democratic presidential primary eleven Republicans and five Democrats are competing for their party's nomination to succeed Oregon's only GOP lawmaker in Congress moderate representative Greg Walden who is retiring meanwhile the Associated Press is projecting Republican Joe ray Perkins says one organs GOP Senate primary Perkins will face incumbent Democrat Jeff Merkley in

Joe Biden Oregon Greg Walden Associated Press Jeff Merkley GOP Congress Representative Joe Ray Perkins Senate
These 5 Tips Will Increase Your CTR

Marketing School

05:11 min | 2 years ago

These 5 Tips Will Increase Your CTR

"To another episode of Marketing School. I'm Eric Su and I'm Neil Patel and today we're GonNa talk about five tips that will increase your C. T. R. That is your click through rate. In this case we are talking about. Click the rate from I think we're talking about overall right organically and paid correct. Yes mainly organic funny enough yet. You have a lot of data on this because Click flow. But yeah we're mainly talking about organic click throughs. I've done a lot of tests on this funding using your software. You have a lot of data because you just have so many users. So why don't you go first Let's crank through five tips. That will help. People get results litter down less than thirty days. I'll make mine stupidly simple. So when you're looking at a Google search result page a lot of people whenever they're writing content. Let's say the New Year hits this year in Twenty Twenty Years Twenty Twenty. One people often forget to change the date. Now when you change a date under title from Two Thousand Nineteen Twenty twenty or just changes to the right year. Your click the rate. Actually chumps fifty to one hundred fifty percent. That's across the board based on data that we've seen with click flow so changed. It's another thing that works. Really well as vocal curiosity or allow matchy backup one more step so one thing. We didn't cover at the beginning of this podcast. Episode is the reason you want higher. Click the races. Let's say you go to Google. Do a search and a thousand other people do the same. Search that you did. If everyone clicks on the secondly instead of the first listing it tells Google the second one's more relevant and it pushes them up in the rankings over time so in theory you want more people to Click on your titan other words. You WANNA appeal them. You know him by appealing to them. And getting more clicks. It will help you rank higher than your competition over time. The air gave the first tip of adding the year at the end of your title tag. The second from me is evoked curiosity. Good example of this is like the seven benefits of green tea. Number six will shock. You put number six shock you in parentheses so doing little things like that. What we found is people like wait. What's number six? The click through Lonzo skimmed the six one and if they like it though backup read the rest of the post and then you know finish it all off but the point. I'm trying to make is voting curiosity. It is a great way to get people to click through. Yeah I think I'll give bonus tip to that one. I think it's really important for people to understand copywriting. I think Neil night we can agree. Some of the smartest people we know. The best entrepreneurs are exceptional copywriters and copywriting a part of it is persuasion and understanding what drives people understanding what people are interested in the more. You can improve at that the better so I recommend reading two books. One is called breakthrough advertising. And you can actually buy a real copy of that now. I think you pay like one hundred twenty five bucks. You combine the letters an look if you're crafty. I'm sure you can find. Pdf's for both of them. It's not that hard to find the. Pdf's leave it at that and then number three for me would be thinking about how you can do on surp- Seo's mean exactly so surp- is search engine result page and what's going on right now is. Google is occupying more and more of the clicks. Meaning that if you live on a search result page over. Fifty percent of people will not click through to your website. So what you can do is whether you're let's say you rank zero so you had the rich snippet with. Let's say you have like how to tie tie. You have like you know. Fourteen tips right there and people can see it right on the search result page. What you should be doing there is you'd be thinking about okay. How can that brand my website in there or in one of those fourteen tips? How can I entice them to click through site? Because if they don't click there. I'm losing that traffic. I can't retarget those people I can't collect the email I do a lot of different things right. So you've got to do everything in your power to not only add value but somehow brand yourself a little bit. So you're doing as much as you can to defend against Google. Taking more. And more of those clicks off number four. One thing that you can end up doing that. We're not seeing a lot of people do is using Faq Schema markup you start using Faq scheme markup on your site right and efficacy Skua Markup funny enough draws more attention to your surp- result if you're number one a lot of times you see less. Click throughs but if you're lower on the page you'll start seeing a boost in placements. You wouldn't get as many from what we've seen if you didn't have it but by having it you draw more attention in a muzy rankings up so if you're number one you do at UC less clicks but if you're lower on the page at it you'll go higher up and you'll start getting mark Lex Yup and then the final thing. I'll say this is a little more related to. Let's say you're doing facebook or Google ads. You WanNa be thinking about okay. How often are you gonna change things up so what I mean by that? So facebook for example. If you keep showing the same ad over and over and over ad fatigue is gonNA kick in very quickly. So you got to think about how you can when you're making new ads. Maybe make a whole batch of like five ten or fifteen of them and just constantly rotate them on. Maybe every two weeks every three weeks or making new batches because that's going to constantly keep your click the rate up if you're not keeping things fresh similar to how you would with. Seo and you're not aligning with the times changing the messaging and understanding what people what then ultimately you click. The rate's GonNa drop and then what's going to happen especially during paid. Your costs are going to increase because click the rate goes hired in Walden. Cpa's also higher as well right

Google Twenty Twenty Years Twenty Twe Nineteen Twenty Facebook Neil Patel Marketing School Eric Su PDF CPA Walden
My favourite tennis match

The Passing Shot Tennis Podcast

08:32 min | 2 years ago

My favourite tennis match

"We'RE GOING TO BE KICKING OFF. A new series and looking at some of a favor owed time tennis. Matches will also be catchy on the tennis news as well a little bit catch on with the virtual Madrid Open. That's just happened Andy. Bari Packard a virtual school as well as the news. The tennis is actually starting up again in some parts of the world in Germany. But before we get into that Kim how you doing. How is how is lockdown? Treating much the same as last week H. O. By fairly fast actually despite the lack of store which is really weird. I think I've kind of just go used to it now but having said that I did cheat in worship Madrid. I didn't won't should awful. I have to say it was. Radi my cup of tea just kind of saying it on a playstation today. What is g thing? Yeah it was a bit of kind of a completely new scenario new situation and I think it's kind of recognizes that living in these times they can open up new opportunities and of course you know this is one of them in the tennis world and I thought it was kind of really interesting to say I think in terms of what I liked. I absolutely loved the place. Be BUYING INTO IT. And procreating like the war codes Up there that the herbs to the controller I really loved that I'd like pretending to warm up thumbs and I really liked the way that kind of the players go invested in it and we're kind of really enthusiastic about getting creative and and kind of showing it off on on social media See I think that was kind of one of the things I I really liked. I saw I think it was Belinda. Bench really went. Allow it like a tennis gear. As I said could walk up the stairs a yeah just thought it was great to see getting really enthusiastic about it. 'cause we've not seen them on a TV. We're not seeing the you know what she pilots. Whatever as fans over the last few months it's just almost kind of great great to see them again really. Yeah I thought that was. That was good like the best saying the players saying the engage with the wall. I thought bench probably owned that one. I just like the little bits in the corner. We can just see their faces as they're playing. You just want to see their homes in the pack right to see what what. They've gone like their bookshelves or like. I just find it really interesting is like through the Keyhole. But he the past and that is really hyping. The stands framed in the background. Well potentially coming up in this focus on his lovely shorts but no yeah I. I didn't really like actually watching this. Nsa Watch just liked having the players kind of interacting having a bit of a laugh so that was nice to see the thing. This format would. I didn't think I'd want to see this every week. I think it would get a bit repetitive. After a while but I think it was a good kind of one off thing and obviously Andy Murray one that we should give him credit for that because he's now won the tournament on three different surfaces. If you can cool the virtual sphere surface adolphus. The Andy has donated his prize. Money half is going to the NHS and half is Gordon to the players Relief Fund. So it's obviously for Good Kohl's and Kiki burdens won the women's event as well and I think she was actually due to defend. Muhtar to say she has succeeded into that are mixed in our love. I love that idea. She's she's the non virtual virtual back to back very innovative. Double D for a champion. But yeah I think yes kind of great to see I guess. Play his Getting involved I think one of the things that I think they could have done. Better way of is the had this common tree over the top of the of the players. Now I I was kind of the point where I think it's more insightful. And more interesting if you just let the play is very commentary because Y- They are tennis players that professionals at the end of the day you'll be ready. I think what bringing up level is kind of almost kind of getting them to kind of talk about the tactics or you know that sort of that sort of level that sort of layer that. Yeah well my sick on a Royal Corps And it's like if I was doing this show in real life. I would choose to go here because of X. Y. And Said Yeah. It could be more of an educational thing as well I think what I did. I cheat and they lost connection because I was watching on light-years addicts correct show. It was just having to could LE- sort of chats while they were waiting for everything to ten on again. Did you see the I think Diego Schwarzer was best. Play at Deborrah. The savvy FIDO's but due to a weak WIFI CONNECTION. Debry a sorry. Schwartzman had to concede walkway. So I mean I love that idea. The like I think that's going to be one of the VAD. The walkover reasons happens to the best of our good today that like even top tennis players have poor Wi fi and all safely on. La has had a bit of a Jake because he said that Rafa could play because he'd like injured his back reaching for his game controller. Which and everyone believes here. I think I mean I think we believed him as well. As we've always believed tweeted about be cowed they gig for Geria- saw and I thought this this off to the best of the fortunately that was not the case. Rafeh was able to play. But we'll just very gullible but yeah if they're going to do this again like I think it could cost you on. But just every now and again maybe they do in other Walden on like Wimbledon. I different surfaces. I assume this playstation game has all the different surfaces they do girl scout one. Couldn't they maybe federal workup? That yeah that I think it could work. I think it could coexist when the tools get back up and running. I wonder if it's a sort of you know in the in the grounds of the events and you have fans can go line up for like an autograph from players and I wonder whether you could be like. There's a stand somewhere grandson for example. Oh face off against some. I player playing tennis against them. Virtually Sake I could see that happening. I know there are a few comments. The game was almost up to like up to scratch And you know whether it's the improvements to be made with with the game and you know I think I think potentially peop- governing bodies like the ATP liked the W. H. E. A. Maybe they should be looking at partnering with Game's about to really kind of Mak- licensed game like fever. Because I think you know I think this is as you said. This is very new is almost kind of this was a test and you know. I think there is appetite for it but I think there's almost kind of a lot can be done on that so a product side of it. Yeah for sure. I'm sure that's an avenue. They could possibly see going for. It's an yeah I like the idea that you could maybe have a bit of a play on it while you are an event. Perhaps if during a rain delay or something and even on Joe we actually have some real tennis. That's happened this weekend in Germany. It's kind of the first actual players of setback on cool so they've done a little exhibition featuring Dustin Brown and seven other players including randomly the British benign. Yon Shouldn't ski. Who I think is based in Germany. Anyway so yeah. That's been happening this weekend. We'll see JEB. So you fall head of other countries. Getting back to normalcy. So they've been out to do this. Little event Neko blends at the Base Tennis Academy. It's GonNa oversee how necessary health and safety measures in place. So they've obviously not touching hands at the net. They're going to touch rockets instead. There's no ballboys fans line judges. They're obviously doing it. Very watered down version is not for any points or or anything. It's not count I guess. Prize money's involved. So it's I guess aimed at lower ranked players to to kind of keep them earning something during this time and I think it's only for players based within about ninety minutes of the event so it's overseas a very limited

Tennis Andy Murray Germany Madrid Open Base Tennis Academy Bari Packard Madrid Players Relief Fund KIM H. O. Good Kohl Belinda Dustin Brown Diego Schwarzer Deborrah Royal Corps Schwartzman NHS
Walden issues statement of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:49 sec | 2 years ago

Walden issues statement of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act

"Relief for northwest workers and small businesses on its way now that the president is signed Congress's two trillion dollar stimulus package como score when he comports Oregon congressman Greg Walden was at the White House when president trump signed the measure Friday we added a six hundred dollar per week additional federal payment for the next four months if you're unemployed but our goal is to keep you employed that's why he says the package incentivizes small businesses to keep workers on the payroll we have a program for small businesses that employ fewer than five hundred people so they can pay full wages full benefits paid their mortgage pay their lease Hey there overhead costs and at the end get virtually all of that treated as a grant not a loan on top of that Walden says Washington and Oregon both have taken action to stop evictions and foreclosures while the crisis is

President Trump Congress Greg Walden White House Donald Trump Washington Oregon Congressman
"walden" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"walden" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You'll feel it was so small suddenly she just walked in the room just that from nine then all at once just a few weeks he goes that the game is just and if you come up with a so in that you and your you just can't we don't just take my word no that can you come up with S. one that that's how it goes that Walden.

Walden
"walden" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

SPACE NEWS POD

13:12 min | 3 years ago

"walden" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

"Listening, just tap. The Lincoln my show notes. And I can't wait to hear from you. Hello. And welcome back to the space pod, daily podcast about space science and tech. I'm your host will Walden.

Walden