19 Burst results for "Wajahat Ali"

"wajahat ali" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:49 min | Last month

"wajahat ali" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"So I gave this watch a hot actually watch a hot Ali And I want you to listen to wajahat Ali has to say and then ask yourself why does MSNBC its sister NBC in its ownership at Comcast allow this Why do they in my opinion allow blatant racism Day in and day out by their hosts And their guests Cut ten go To quote zora neale hurston not all skin folk are kinfolk Nikki Haley instead is the dinesh d'souza of Candace Owens She's the alpha kern with brown skin and for white supremacists and racists She's the perfect mentor in candidate And instead of applauding her I am just disgusted by people like Nikki Haley who know better whose parents were the beneficiaries as Asha said of the 1965 immigration nationality act which passed thanks to those original BLM protesters and the Civil Rights Act Her father came here because he was a professor He taught at a historically black college in South Carolina That's how she became the proud American that she is and yet what does she do like all these model minorities which by the way is a strategy of white supremacy to use Asians in particular as a cudgel against black folks Instead of pulling us up from the bootstraps and pulling others from the bootstrap we're taught to take your boot and put it on the neck of poor brown's immigrants refugees and black folks And that's what she did in her ad So I see her and I feel sad many because she uses her brown skin as a weapon against poor black folks and poor Brown folks and she uses her brown skin to launder white supremacist talking points And the reason why I feel sad because no matter what she does maybe it'll never be enough They'll never love her

Anthony Weiner Apple
Wajahat Ali: 'Not All Skinfolk Are Kinfolk' Directed to Nikki Haley

Mark Levin

01:49 min | Last month

Wajahat Ali: 'Not All Skinfolk Are Kinfolk' Directed to Nikki Haley

"So I gave this watch a hot actually watch a hot Ali And I want you to listen to wajahat Ali has to say and then ask yourself why does MSNBC its sister NBC in its ownership at Comcast allow this Why do they in my opinion allow blatant racism Day in and day out by their hosts And their guests Cut ten go To quote zora neale hurston not all skin folk are kinfolk Nikki Haley instead is the dinesh d'souza of Candace Owens She's the alpha kern with brown skin and for white supremacists and racists She's the perfect mentor in candidate And instead of applauding her I am just disgusted by people like Nikki Haley who know better whose parents were the beneficiaries as Asha said of the 1965 immigration nationality act which passed thanks to those original BLM protesters and the Civil Rights Act Her father came here because he was a professor He taught at a historically black college in South Carolina That's how she became the proud American that she is and yet what does she do like all these model minorities which by the way is a strategy of white supremacy to use Asians in particular as a cudgel against black folks Instead of pulling us up from the bootstraps and pulling others from the bootstrap we're taught to take your boot and put it on the neck of poor brown's immigrants refugees and black folks And that's what she did in her ad So I see her and I feel sad many because she uses her brown skin as a weapon against poor black folks and poor Brown folks and she uses her brown skin to launder white supremacist talking points And the reason why I feel sad because no matter what she does maybe it'll never be enough They'll never love her

Wajahat Ali Nikki Haley Candace Owens Zora Neale Hurston Msnbc Souza Comcast ALI NBC Asha BLM South Carolina Brown
"wajahat ali" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

02:30 min | 3 months ago

"wajahat ali" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"From the richest man in the world for power. So basically, Matt taibbi was being used by Elon Musk. Now, are we better off having this information? Sure, we are. But not according to Ben Collins, it's very good to suppress information. You are too stupid to understand the information. It would be bad for you to understand the information. Chris Hayes, if MSNBC tweeted watching some of the most famous most powerful and richest men, red pill themselves into disaster. Pretty wild. Most powerful and rich red pill themselves in disaster pretty well. Many Hassan, who used to work for Al Jazeera, so he knows a fair bit about taking money from rich oligarchs. He put out he put out a tweet saying, imagine volunteering, do online PR work for the world's richest man on a Friday night in service of nakedly and cynically right wing narratives, and then pretending you're speaking truth to power. Well, maybe you guys are the power. Maybe when it comes to the media infrastructure you guys out of the power. Maybe the former power or the heads of Twitter and the management level who are shutting down information. And then many has hung can't stop himself. He continues. Oh, and doing it at the end of the same week. The richest man alive on balance, unbanned a bunch of neo Nazis on this website. But sure, the laptop, the laptop, the man, the distraction, tactics from these folks, is astonishing. They have to distract because that's all they have. Because again, they can't acknowledge that this story is a big story. It is in fact a big story when Twitter is working with the Democratic Party in order to shut down major stories damaging their candidate just before an election. At the vague behest of the FBI, like that, that's a pretty massive story. And a pretty serious First Amendment violation, at least in spirit, if not in actual practice. But again, the journalist, these are the journalism experts. They're not, they're not enemies of you, they just, they want you to have the information, but the information that they want you to have is the information that you should get. If Jason schreier from Bloomberg, quote, this thread should be taught in journalism school as evidence of the importance of editors. Because otherwise, you know, editors, they're the ones who make sure you don't get the information. World's worst column, and she says, oh, Jehovah Lee says, Matt taibbi, what sad disgraceful downfall. I swear kids, he did good work back in the day, should be a cautionary tale for everyone, selling your soul for the richest white nationalist on earth. Elon Musk is the richest white nationalist on earth. Did you know these white nationalist Elon Musk? I didn't know that. I had to lean on that 'cause he's a moron. Well, he'll eat well for the rest of his life, I guess, but is it worth it? Says wajahat Ali. I don't know, is it worth it to work for Al Jazeera? I don't know. Wesley Lowry. Who is the wildly partisan reporter, formerly of The Washington Post at an article really would have worked better than a Twitter thread? Well, that's great. Wesley, thank you. And

Elon Musk Matt taibbi Ben Collins Chris Hayes Al Jazeera MSNBC Hassan Twitter Jason schreier Jehovah Lee Democratic Party FBI Bloomberg wajahat Ali Wesley Lowry The Washington Post Wesley
"wajahat ali" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

04:27 min | 7 months ago

"wajahat ali" Discussed on WTOP

"Good morning and Bruce Allen, and I'm John Aaron. Teddy gellman is our producer. The top story we're following this morning police are trying to find out why a Delaware man crashed his car near the capitol and then killed himself early yesterday. Investigators say it's unlikely he was targeting lawmakers since they're in recess until next month. Just after 4 a.m., 29 year old Richard a York the third began walking down east capital street firing a handgun indiscriminately. According to capitol police chief Tom manger, he had just crashed his car into a barricade on the street, the car caught fire. It appears that the individual may have started the fire himself as he was getting out of the car. Capitol police officers then saw him walk onto the capitol grounds at the east front, and that's when York shot himself. No U.S. capitol police officer fired their weapons. According to quarter records, York was previously arrested in Pennsylvania on drug charges and was sentenced for simple assault and terroristic threats. Meantime threats to law enforcement officials are spiking after last week's search or former president Trump's home in Florida. The FBI and the Department of Homeland Security say the threats are occurring primarily online and across multiple platforms, including social media sites, web forums, video sharing platforms, and image boards. Federal authorities say they've spotted personal identifying information of possible targets, including home addresses and identification of family members as additional targets. The intelligence bulletin says the threats include general calls for Civil War and armed rebellion will talk more about this with WTO's national security correspondent JJ green coming up at 7 40. The legal team for Brittany griner has formally filed an appeal after the WNBA star was convicted and sentenced to 9 years in prison for smuggling drugs into Russia. Griner was detained in February for carrying vape cartridges containing cannabis oil in her luggage. The U.S. has offered a prisoner swap with Russia and now Russia's foreign ministry says they're ready for a professional conversation and concrete steps toward arranging a swab involving grinder and U.S. Marine veteran Paul Whelan, who was convicted on espionage charges. The potential swap would be for Victor boot, who was convicted on charges of conspiring to kill U.S. citizens and providing aid to a terrorist organization. It has been a year since the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan following the U.S. troop withdrawal ordered by President Biden, and there is still questions and criticism about how the withdrawal was handled. Republican members of the House foreign affairs committee are expected to release a report today about the drawdown, ranking member Mike McCall told CBS's face the nation, the Biden administration should have been paying attention to the facts on the ground at the time. The intelligence community got it right. So there was no failure on the intelligence side. Nor The Pentagon. They called it right. The problem was The White House and State Department putting their head in the sand, not wanting to believe what they were saying. And therefore, not adequately planning. 13 service members died when a suicide bomber struck the airport while evacuations were underway, the Biden administration plans to issue its own report on the withdrawal. China's military says it's carried out more military exercises near Taiwan, a day after another U.S. congressional delegation arrived at the self governing island which China claims as its own territory. This visit comes less than two weeks after House speaker Nancy Pelosi's visit to Taiwan, which prompted days of threatening military exercises by China. This time Massachusetts senator Ed Markey is leading a 5 member delegation on a two day visit to Taiwan. China regards formal contacts between U.S. politicians and the island's government as support for its independence from China. Iran is responding to the attack on a prominent writer. It has long considered a heretic to Islam. Decades after Iran's then religious leader called for the death of Salman Rushdie because of a book sum Muslims considered blasphemous on Iranian government official now denies Tehran was involved in last Friday's assault on the famed author, rushed these reported recovering from serious stab wounds, suffered in western New York where he was scheduled to speak, fellow author wajahat Ali spoke at the same venue two weeks earlier. As a writer, you say stand in solidarity with your fellow writers because this can very quickly turn on you. Tom CBS News coming up will hear more about the increased threats to law enforcement and more on this weekend's incident on Capitol Hill when we talk to our national security correspondent JJ green at 7 36. Moments like watching my grandsons deal second mean

John Aaron Teddy gellman Tom manger U.S. capitol police Biden administration York JJ green Bruce Allen Brittany griner Russia Griner foreign ministry capitol police U.S. U.S. Marine Capitol police Paul Whelan Victor boot President Biden House foreign affairs committe
"wajahat ali" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:35 min | 7 months ago

"wajahat ali" Discussed on WTOP

"In Washington, though sometimes troubled life of actor Sam hesh ended Sunday Night when she was taken off life support. She suffered unrecoverable injuries in a fiery car crash just about a week and a half ago in Los Angeles and had been considered brain dead. Her family kept her on life support for days while doctors found and matched organ donors over the weekend, the LAPD said it would end its investigation, but a coroner is still expected to perform an autopsy on the actress. Correspondent Monaco ricks and heche was 53. Decades after Iran's then religious leader called for the death of Salman Rushdie because of a book some Muslims considered blasphemous on Iranian government official now denies Tehran was involved in last Friday's assault on the famed author rushdie is now recovering from very serious stab wounds in western New York where he was scheduled to speak. Fellow author wajahat Ali spoke at that same venue two weeks before. As a writer, you say stand in solidarity with your fellow writers because this can very quickly turn on you. And as another U.S. congressional delegation visits Taiwan, China reports new military drills around the island it considers its own an earlier visit by House speaker Nancy Pelosi set off furious Chinese threats and real military exercises all around Taiwan. Now to Egypt's side of a deadly fire at a Coptic Christian church, it has taken at least 41 lives, 15 of them children. Initial reports suggest the fire was caused by an electric fold. People here told us there was a power cut and the church was on a generator. When the electricity was turned on again, there was an overload. Fire was coming out of the air condition, then spread to the rest of the church. It was on the third and fourth floors. Many worshippers fainted and could hardly breathe. A major investigation is now underway. Salina bail of the BBC in Cairo, as Justice Department investigators go over documents taken from ex-president Trump's Florida home and that search warrant for them indicates a criminal investigation. Correspondent Elise Preston tells us a joint FBI Homeland Security memo sent to law enforcement across the country warns of growing threats against them, including a threat to place a so called dirty bomb in front of FBI headquarters and general calls for Civil War and armed rebellion. Pennsylvania state police are holding a suspect in two separate killings, one allegedly of his mother, the other a deadly car crash police spokesman Anthony petrovski. There is one confirmed fatality from the berwick crash, along with 17 people injured. Those people were raising funds for the survivors of ten people killed in a fire the week before. This is CBS News. Liberty mutual customizes your car and home insurance, so you only pay for what you need. Visit liberty mutual dot com to learn more. For O three, Monday, August 15th, 2022, it's 66° in cloudy. Good morning of rich hunter, the top local stories we're following this hour. A fiery crash into a barricade in the early Sunday morning hours near the U.S. capitol was followed by gunfire, capitol police responded, they're now looking for clues as to why. Mitchell Miller is on Capitol Hill. U.S. capitol police chief Tom manger says the man crashed a car into a barricade at second street and east capital, then set the vehicle on fire and got out with a gun. He took out a handgun

Sam hesh Monaco ricks Iranian government wajahat Ali House speaker Nancy Pelosi Coptic Christian church heche Taiwan Salman Rushdie LAPD Elise Preston Tehran Los Angeles Iran Washington FBI Anthony petrovski Salina Egypt U.S.
"wajahat ali" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

04:43 min | 9 months ago

"wajahat ali" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Sound off, call 8 four four four the USA now to let Dan know what you think, 844-484-3872. The Dan bongino show. 844-484-3872 if you want to give us a call 8 four four for the USA, just a programming note we will have some guest hosts in. What are we doing on Monday, Jim, for the fourth, the best of? Okay, so you guys are off, right? For that, you guys need a break too. These guys work hard. No, they do. They work hard, Mike said, thank you, because the mics aren't all. I have to relay the traffic, but it's important. These guys work really hard and want to thank them. For everything they do, you know, I've had a lot of beefs with some folks at the company, which you know about have been well publicized, but it's never, ever, with these two guys, they put in their heart and soul, they're up at the crack of dawn, we do calls at my time Eastern Time at 8 in the morning and I start sending them emails at 6. And then they got post production stuff and a lot of those dark web things we make fun of all the time, you know, Jim, a lot of meatloaf, what's he doing on the dark web? Those are Jim's various voices. If you ever wondering, that's him doing that. I might just got to deal with Anne all the time, calling screaming at him, wishing death on him, the black plague, wishing he's standing by, yeah. So I appreciate that. But Tuesday, Wednesday, we'll have a fun and Lisa booth, right? To moon is that folks, let me tell you something. Is a trip. He is like legal LSD. So you're gonna love that and at least in both is obviously fantastic. We love Lisa. You've heard her as a guest. She's been on my Fox show. So I don't miss that. I will be back on back Thursday. I'm back Thursday, right? So I have to ask Jim. He's like, dude, do you even know you're on schedule? The answer is I don't. I do not. Paula does everything with that. I have no idea when I'm working when I'm up. I will be back. Thursday live radio rock and roll with you. So that'll be great. All right, let me get to this story before I get to the questions for Dan really good. This one you need to understand. So the left is big on talking points, obviously. You get that. But what do I mean by that? Other than talking points, talking points. When you do what I do, you don't want to, you're on TV live, you never want to lose a debate or not know something. It's happened a couple of times. A couple of times I was on TV and someone asked me about a story I hadn't. And I was just honest. Listen, I haven't read this story. It's the best you can do. You're gonna make it up. And once in a while, you'll be in a debate and someone will catch you. You know, Austin Gould be, we got into debate about the economy one time, and I was guest hosting for Hannity. And he caught me on a point. I was trying to say something different, but he was right. I was actually not making that point, but it didn't matter. I made the point poorly and the whole point of the baiting is to make the point. You're trying to make. And I swore to myself, that's not going to happen. So I do a lot of homework on stuff, but I'm also become very receptive. I am antenna for leftist talking points that they've gotten from a focus group somewhere. And the new one I've heard is, well, the overturning of roe is going to be deadly because now ectopic pregnancies, these awful Republican states are going to allow women to die. I heard no miki Khan's saying on Fox the other day. And now I saw it on this Twitter account by wajahat Ali a known promoter misinformation on social media. As a blue check mark, liberal guy said, quote, do I abort this ectopic pregnancy to literally save my life? Or do I go to jail? A question women in America now have to ask, okay, that's nonsense. What is an ectopic pregnancy? An ectopic pregnancy is a pregnancy where the baby is in the fallopian tube. Which can kill the woman and will not under no circumstances be viable. Folks, John McCormick and national review who writes good stuff, he wrote this in national review. In fact, no abortion law in any state in America prevents lifesaving treatment for women with ectopic pregnancies and other life threatening conditions and none. Are we clear on that? None. This is another made up fabricated talking point to make you believe that states that have restrictive abortion laws are going to let women die who have serious life threatening conditions like an ectopic pregnancy. It is not true. It is totally made up. McCormick notes that was true of abortion laws in 1972 and it's true of abortion laws in 2022. It's not true. Really, there's no color commentary to add to this. I'm going to get to the questions here in a second. The only reason I'm bringing it up is it's just I have nothing, it's just not true. You're just making it up. There's not a single law in the country banning the treatment of a woman who tragically has an ectopic pregnancy. There just making that up. To make you believe that Republicans are Neanderthal type savages. Please don't fall for it. All right, let me get some questions for damn. You got some good ones this week. This is from at. I

Jim Dan bongino Lisa booth America Dan Austin Gould Fox miki Khan wajahat Ali Mike Anne Paula Lisa Hannity John McCormick Twitter McCormick
"wajahat ali" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:59 min | 1 year ago

"wajahat ali" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"From tell our listeners briefly what it's about Go back to where you came from and other helpful recommendations and how to become American Is about loving a country that doesn't always love you back And how the rest of us are both citizens and suspects us and them and how this country can turn on us on a dime But at the same time it's about how we can move forward as a multicultural country And I hope it is done with humor and it ends on earned hope not some hallmark a sugary confection but earned hope and the earned hope is by working through the challenges So that's the book Just one perspective my perspective but I tried to use my story as kind of a narrative spine to make a commentary about America and connect the dots for the rest of us The introduction of your book comes in hot You start by sharing some of the most offensive letters you've received from readers and viewers And then you write some snarky responses I'm wondering in real life how often do you respond to often racist hate mail or tweets That's a good question I get those emails every single day When I used to write in the comments section and articles my editors always used to turn off the comments section because they're like you don't want to read this And oftentimes it was benign stuff but it was because of who I am my name my ethnicity and my religion that all of a sudden I became a target I'm sure you get it all so you can sit here and talk about potato chips and somehow someone would make it like a racist That's how it is And you kind of take some dark humor with it and I think it depends on my mood and about once a week I'll respond to a go back to where you come from And if someone really spends a long three page emissive which they have then sometimes I have some fun with it and sometimes I share it with the public Because I feel like oftentimes we're asked to be like daffy duck get angry and upset but sometimes I want to be like Bugs Bunny you know If you really think about it right But as bunny's always chilling they're always after him but he always uses their traps against them and sometimes he dresses up as a girl and kisses them and then sometimes he just mocks them but he always gets the last laugh And I want to make sure I get the last laugh in the last word Yeah Bugs Bunny didn't work hard He worked smart There you go He was a smart bunny You know so much of your life changed on 9 11 And a big turning point in the book is that event and what it meant for you going forward I want to go back to that scene because it was very vivid for me as I read it Where were you when you found out about the attack 20 year old UC Berkeley senior undeclared in my pajamas woken up by my roommate in our apartment a mile away from UC Berkeley He knocks on the door and I'm sleeping He's like you gotta get up I'm like come on man It's freaking exhausted I stayed up all night playing NBA two K then ten minutes later I get another knock You really have to get up and see that something's happening So we're both in our pajamas blurry watching the tower on fire Maybe the pilot had a heart attack That's what happened He was trying to land the plane maybe a Laguardia something happened And then you saw the second plane go Once you saw the second plane that's when we realized something this was deliberate And right there and then you kind of do the minority prayer which all minorities know And the minority player goes something like this Please let it be a white guy And if you're white or self identifies white it's not because we want any harm to come to you going full circle with the beginning of this conversation We realize that when it's a white person all of whiteness is not convicted Well the white guy is like this lone wolf who was misunderstood you know Just a dude You know crazy dude did it You want to have white uncles and white aunties in your community having to like stand up like Uncle Sam with flags like waving in the air and saying I love America and let me prove my moderation and come to my churches and won't be investigation and surveillance and hearings right Like you won't be held you won't be interrogated or indicted and have to prove your loyalty or prove your whiteness But for the rest of us we're effed all of us collectively And then when they saw that on the scroll at the bottom suspected Osama bin Laden and Muslims that's when I remember I closed my eyes and I just realized things were going to get really bad And I was a member of this Muslim student association I was elected to the board And I joke that had Muslims known that 9 11 would happen these horrible conspiracy theories which we did not know because Muslims also died that day I would have joined the Indian student association and I would have learned how to do punga or whatever you do though Do not join the sick student association because that poor group got screwed First hate crime after 9 11 was a sick man in mason This shows you how stupid racism is 19 four and hijackers 15 from Saudi Arabia to from UAE one from Lebanon one from Egypt brought down the two towers killed 3000 people And so the first hate crime after America was in mesa Arizona where a white supremacist blamed a middle aged sick gas station owner balbir Singh for the violent acts of 19 foreign hijackers because he was brownskin had a beard and a turban and he was sick Bigots aren't nuanced This country lost its damn mine after 9 11 And so here I was a Muslim student association board member and I had Muslim women born and raised in America emailing me Should we go to school There are hate crimes We're afraid I had my first hate mail Just think about it I'm in California born and raised in the Bay Area to Pakistani immigrant parents and I am being blamed for the violent actions of 1940 hijackers And that's where it all began And I always tell people that was the baptism by fire That was the turning point the fork in the road That was the danger room simulation for the rest of my life and with the rest of my career For my generation You're listening to it's been a minute from NPR I'm Sam Sanders speaking with wajahat Ali We're talking about his new memoir It's called go back to where you came from You know you wrote about how much work you had to take on at Berkeley in the aftermath of 9 11 You and other students and the Muslim student association just took it upon yourself to do a lot of bridge building You hosted Friday prayers for the entire campus You held forums with all different kinds of speakers and groups And you said something that really stuck out to me about that experience and that year after 9 11 you said it was quote training ground an X-Men danger room simulation that would prepare you for the rest of your life Explain Yeah I mean you become overnight the Muslim firemen You become the Muslim walking Wikipedia You become the person if you're thrust in that spotlight where you have to be an expert on the drop of the dime on all things Muslim and Islam McGraw and Sharia are profit Muhammad Hakeem olajuwon Nan Hakeem not Hakeem three Hakeem everything Bollywood hummus Hamas like everything You know here I have this 20 year old undeclared student playing NBA two K next thing you know I'm giving speeches in front of 200 people And as I have the microphone and giving the speech I'm like why am I sitting here giving a speech What's happening And overnight you get thrust like our parents generation You get you know you get thrust into the moment right You have to meet the moment And you have to then play the stupid condemn Nathan game condemning violent accident by violent people you've never met And you've got to be perfect And if you're not perfect not only are you indicted by this nameless judge you're an executioner that 20 years after 9 11 still holds your loyalty aspect simply due to your ethnicity or religion it condemns this whole thing called Muslims and Islam Because after 9 11 the enemy became this thing called Islam It became a civilizational conflict between us and them I'm using the language of our elected leaders at that time The axis of evil And it wasn't just those who were Muslim and I'm glad you mentioned this earlier It was those who looked Muslim Sick Americans Indian Hindus Arab Christians right And so overnight you become an educator you become.

Muslim student association UC Berkeley America Indian student association brownskin NBA Uncle Sam heart attack Sam Sanders wajahat Ali balbir Singh Osama bin Laden UAE Hakeem Saudi Arabia mason mesa Lebanon Muhammad Hakeem olajuwon
"wajahat ali" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"wajahat ali" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Wajahat Ali His book is called go back to where you came from and other helpful recommendations on becoming American It's out right now You're listening to it's been a minute from NPR Now it's time to end the show as we always do Every week listeners share the best thing that happened to them all week We encourage folks to brag and they do Let's hear a few of those submissions Hey Sam this is Zach from Atlanta Recently I became the artistic director of a theater and I visited my first rehearsal and that role And we're doing a chorus line Youth edition and I got to watch those kids storm the stage in rehearsal and attack the opening number with so much joy and excitement and I feel so grateful that theater is my now full-time job Hi Sam And I ain't ready This is Andrea calling you from otter creek USA and my best thing this week is that I finally got a new job I'm really excited to be reentering the nonprofit world working with some wonderful people on affordable housing All I salmon at buddy this is Alejandra from Whittier California and there were three incredible things that came together this week First it was my one year anniversary of moving into my own home which is a big deal for our first gen American millennial Then I was able to celebrate Allison and Chris marriage after COVID dubreil They're beautiful wedding plans for over a year Congratulations YouTube And lastly my sister is welcoming a new addition to our family and I'm beyond stoked to be at theta Hey Sam this is Nicholas in Mississippi The best thing that happened to me this week was my mom came through breast cancer surgery She's 77 years old with Alzheimer's we're at the hospital right now while she gets started on the road to recovery And we're really hopeful Have a great week Thanks Sam Appreciate you very much Bye Sam Thanks to all those listeners you heard there Zach Andrea Alejandra and Nicholas Listeners don't forget you can share the best part of your week at any point throughout.

Wajahat Ali Hey Sam NPR Zach Alejandra Atlanta Andrea Whittier USA Allison California Nicholas Chris YouTube Mississippi Sam Thanks breast cancer Alzheimer Zach Andrea Alejandra Sam
"wajahat ali" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"wajahat ali" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Tell our listeners briefly what it's about Go back to where you came from and other helpful recommendations and how to become American Is about loving a country that doesn't always love you back And how the rest of us are both citizens and suspects us and them and how this country can turn on us on a dime But at the same time it's about how we can move forward as a multicultural country And I hope it is done with humor and it ends on earned hope not some hallmark a sugary confection but earned hope and the earned hope is by working through the challenges So that's the book And it's just one perspective my perspective but I tried to use my story as kind of a narrative spine to make a commentary about America and connect the dots for the rest of us The introduction of your book comes in hot You start by sharing some of the most offensive letters you've received from readers and viewers and then you write some snarky responses I'm wondering in real life how often do you respond to often racist hate mail or tweets That's a good question I get those emails every single day When I used to write in the comments section and articles my editors always used to turn off the comments section because they're like you don't want to read this And oftentimes it was benign stuff but it was because of who I am my name my ethnicity and my religion that all of a sudden I became a target And I'm sure you get it also We could sit here and talk about potato chips and somehow someone would make it like a racist That's how it is And you kind of take some dark humor with it And I think it depends on my mood and about once a week I'll respond to a go back to where you come from And if someone like really spends a long three page missive which they have then sometimes I have some fun with it And sometimes I share it with the public Because I feel like oftentimes we're asked to be like daffy duck get angry and upset but sometimes I want to be like Bugs Bunny you know If you really think about it right Bugs Bunny's always chilling They're always after him but he always uses their traps against them and sometimes he dresses up as a girl and kisses them and then sometimes he just walks them but he always gets the last laugh And I want to make sure I get the last laugh in the last word Yeah Bugs Bunny didn't work hard He worked smart There you go He was a smart bunny You know so much of your life changed on 9 11 And a big turning point in the book is that event and what it meant for you going forward I want to go back to that scene because it was very vivid for me as I read it Where were you when you found out about the attack 20 year old UC Berkeley senior undeclared in my pajamas woken up by my roommate in our apartment a mile away from UC Berkeley He knocks on the door and I'm sleeping He's like you gotta get up I'm like come on man It's freaking exhausted I stayed up all night playing NBA two K then ten minutes later I get another knock You really have to get up and see that something's happening So we're both in our pajamas blurry watching the tower on fire Maybe the pilot had a heart attack That's what happened He was trying to land a plane maybe a Laguardia something happened and then you saw the second plane go Once you saw the second plane that's when we realized something this was deliberate And right there and then you kind of do the minority prayer which all minorities know And the minority player goes something like this Please let it be a white guy And if you're white or self identifies white it's not because we want any harm to come to you going full circle with the beginning of this conversation We realize that when it's a white person all of whiteness is not convicted Well the white guy is like this lone wolf who was misunderstood you know Just a dude You know crazy dude did it You want to have white uncles and white aunties in your community having to stand up like Uncle Sam with flags like waving in the air and saying I love America and let me prove my moderation and come to my churches and you won't be investigation and surveillance and hearings right Like you won't be held you won't be interrogated or indicted and have to prove your loyalty or prove your whiteness But for the rest of us we're effed all of us collectively And then when they saw that on the scroll at the bottom you know suspected Osama bin Laden in Muslims that's when I remember I closed my eyes and I just realized things were going to get really bad And I was a member of this Muslim student association I was elected to the board and I joke that had Muslims known that 9 11 would happen these horrible conspiracy theories which we did not know because Muslims also died that day I would have joined the Indian student association and I would have learned how to do punga or whatever you do though Do not join the sick student association because that poor group got screwed First hate crime after 9 11 was a sick man and this shows you how stupid racism is 19 foreign hijackers 15 from Saudi Arabia two from UAE one from Lebanon one from Egypt brought down the two towers killed 3000 people And so the first hate crime after America was in mesa Arizona where a white supremacist blamed a middle aged sick gas station owner balbir Singh for the violent acts of 19 foreign hijackers because he was brown skinned had a beard and a turban and he was sick Bigots aren't nuanced This country lost its damn mine after 9 11 And so here I was a Muslim student association board member and I had Muslim women born and raised in America emailing me Should we go to school Their hate crimes were afraid I had my first hate mail Just think about it I'm in California born and raised in the Bay Area to Pakistani immigrant parents and I am being blamed for the violent actions of 1940 hijackers And that's where it all began And I always tell people that was the baptism by fire That was the turning point the fork in the road That was the danger room simulation for the rest of my life and with the rest of my career For my generation Fear listening to it's been a minute from NPR I'm Sam Sanders speaking with wajahat Ali We're talking about his new memoir It's called go back to where you came from.

UC Berkeley America Muslim student association Laguardia Indian student association sick student association heart attack NBA Uncle Sam Osama bin Laden balbir Singh UAE Saudi Arabia Lebanon mesa Egypt Arizona Bay Area California
"wajahat ali" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"wajahat ali" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"It's been a minute from NPR I'm Sam Sanders How are you I'm doing well I was just explaining to your producer at the very interesting situation I'm in where I'm in this slight fetal position in my gym desperately trying to use the Internet because the Internet went down in my home and my basement flooded and I have two homeschooled children running around crazy The guy talking to me from his gym is wajahat Ali He's a columnist for The Daily Beast a public speaker and the author of a new book It's called go back to where you came from and other helpful recommendations on becoming American We made it work How did you make it work Being a child of immigrants and stretching a dollar and making 20 and being creative and hustle because some emergence of the gym decided to look to me and took pity on me You know I'm not a Lin-Manuel Miranda person but I feel like the only quote that works here is from him immigrants that get the job done Now go back to where you came from is a memoir all about the kind of immigrant grit he displayed in trying to find a place to record this chat But his book is also full of quote unquote helpful recommendations for immigrants that he has gotten from white Americans This book points out just how hilarious and untenable and difficult becoming American can be And throughout the book watch tells his own story to offer strategies on how to make America more welcoming and compassionate And yes he still believes that is possible I really enjoy talking with wise about his book especially talking about why he aspires to be just like Bugs Bunny All right enjoy We are here to talk about your book It is called go back to where you came from.

Sam Sanders wajahat Ali Manuel Miranda NPR The Daily Beast America
"wajahat ali" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

07:22 min | 1 year ago

"wajahat ali" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"Do the writing. But you know, having insurance doesn't hurt. This is a thing. Everyone is like, oh, my parents did. My parents said, even if they're a little too enthusiastic about what they want for your life, big picture, they are concerned about the right things. There you go. Your security. They're trying the best they can. They're trying to love you the best way they know how. They just, you know, they're overzealous. You know how it is. And you know, another I'm a parent, I'm an older, you see things from their perspective. Parents instinct is protection. That's all it is. And for my parents generation, especially that immigrant generation, you have to realize they left with they came all by themselves. They were young kids, there was no community. They had the funny accent. They weren't seen as average that you had to put their head down, they could only do a few reliable, safe, secure jobs to send money back. And so once they made the Concorde American Dream, they wanted to hand that checklist down to the kids and said we don't want you to suffer how we suffered we learned the hard way, go get a stable degree in a stable job and keep your head down and be safe and marry someone who's ate on the hotness skill and get a Toyota or Honda that immigrant vehicle of choice. And there's a love there in a concern there. And the reason why so many of my parents generation, the kind of mocked or ridiculed or didn't invest in journalism or podcast host or writers is because we saw no models of success. So they're like, you just can't expect me to have faith. My faith has to be rooted in something tangible. Show me success. And then maybe I'll invest in this. And when I was growing up, we didn't have Hasan minhaj and riz Emma then Mindy Kaling. Flash forward to now, look at you on national public radio, talking about your book. I can't imagine an NPR 15 years ago. Letting the two of us get a whole hour. Seriously. I think 15 years ago, let's take it back, like, 2006. This would be wild. This would be wild. You know what would happen? This is what would happen. Like the whitest white NPR host probably would have been sick. And then they would have gone to the next two hosts who would have been in a car crash God forbid and healing. And then there was another white person who's never done a radio show. And they got like a panic attack. And then like, Sam, you got to do it. And then with me, like, 17 guests would have like bailed the last second. And we've heard about this war a lot. He has a book coming out. And then that's how we get an hour. There you go. There you go. Up next, how 9 11 changed was reality. And prepared him for the rest of his life. Stay with us. Been baller worked at a record label, but he thought his boss was giving young artists a raw deal. I was like, yo man, it's not like you can't still get rich and they can still eat. I'm talking everyone eat Wagyu. Oh, his boss was Dr. Dre. And he fired me. I was like, look, I'm gonna pivot and do something. All he did was change the game of high end, custom jewelry. Here how? On the limits from NPR. You know, so much of your life changed on 9 11. And a big turning point in the book is that event and what it meant for you going forward. I want to go back to that scene because it was very vivid for me as I read it. Where were you when you found out about the attack? 20 year old UC Berkeley senior undeclared in my pajamas woken up by my roommate in our apartment a mile away from UC Berkeley. He knocks on the door and I'm sleeping. He's like, you gotta get up. I'm like, come on, man. It's freaking exhausted, I stayed up all night playing NBA two K then ten minutes later I get another knock. You really have to get up and see that something's happening. So we're both in our pajamas, blurry, watching the tower on fire. Maybe the pilot had heart attack. That's what happened. He was trying to land the plane maybe, a Laguardia, something happened, and then you saw the second plane go. Once you saw the second plane, that's when we realized something this was deliberate. And right there and then you kind of do the minority prayer, which all minorities know. And the minority player goes something like this. Please let it be a white guy. And if you're white or self identifies white, it's not because we want any harm to come to you, going full circle with the beginning of this conversation. We realize that when it's a white person, all of whiteness is not convicted. Well, the white guy is like, this lone wolf, who was misunderstood, you know? Just a dude. You know, crazy dude did it. You want to have white uncles and white aunties in your community having to stand up like Uncle Sam with flags like waving in the air and saying, I love America and let me prove my moderation and come to my churches. And you won't be investigation and surveillance and hearings, right? Like you won't be held, you won't be interrogated or indicted and have to prove your loyalty or prove your whiteness. But for the rest of us, we're effed, all of us collectively. And then when they saw that on the scroll at the bottom, suspected Osama bin Laden in Muslims, that's when I remember I closed my eyes and I just realized things were going to get really bad. And I was a member of this Muslim student association. I was elected to the board. And I joke that had Muslims known that 9 11 would happen, these horrible conspiracy theories, which we did not know, because Muslims also died that day. I would have joined the Indian student association. I would have learned how to do punga, whatever you do, though. Do not join the sick student association because that poor group got screwed. First hate crime after 9 11 was a sick man in this shows you how stupid racism is. 19 foreign hijackers 15 from Saudi Arabia to from UAE one from Lebanon, one from Egypt, brought down the two towers, killed 3000 people. And so the first hate crime after America was in messer Arizona where a white supremacist blamed a middle aged sick gas station owner balbir Singh for the violent acts of 19 foreign hijackers because he was brown skinned had a beard and a turban and he was sick. Bigots aren't nuanced. This country lost its damn mine after 9 11. And so here I was a Muslim student association board member and I had Muslim women born and raised in America emailing me. Should we go to school? There are hate crimes. We're afraid. I had my first hate mail. Just think about it. I'm in California, born and raised in the Bay Area to Pakistani immigrant parents, and I am being blamed for the violent actions of 1940 hijackers. And that's where it all began. And I always tell people, that was the baptism by fire. That was the turning point, the fork in the road. That was the danger room simulation for the rest of my life and with the rest of my career. For my generation. Yeah. You know, you wrote about how much work you had to take on at Berkeley in the aftermath of 9 11. You and other students and the Muslim student association just took it upon yourself to do a lot of bridge building. You hosted Friday prayers for the entire campus. You held forums with all different kinds of speakers and groups. And you said something that really stuck out to me about that experience and that year after 9 11. You said it was quote training ground. An X-Men danger room simulation that would prepare you for the rest of your life. Explain. Yeah, I mean, you become overnight the Muslim firemen. You become the Muslim walking Wikipedia. You become the person if you're thrust in that spotlight, where you have to be an expert on the drop of the dime on all things Muslim and Islam and.

Hasan minhaj riz Emma NPR UC Berkeley Mindy Kaling Muslim student association baller Dr. Dre Honda Toyota Indian student association Laguardia sick student association Sam America heart attack NBA Uncle Sam
"wajahat ali" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

07:17 min | 1 year ago

"wajahat ali" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"Support for NPR in the following message come from Simon and Schuster, publishers of just pursuit, a black prosecutor's fight for fairness by Laura Coates. The CNN senior legal analyst shows how a flawed legal system harms the most vulnerable. Just pursued wherever books are sold. Hello. Hello, hello. How are you? I'm doing well. I was just explaining to your producer at the very interesting situation I'm in where I'm in a slight fetal position in my gym, desperately trying to use the Internet because of the Internet went down in my home and my basement flooded and I have two homeschooled children running around crazy, but we made it work. Oh my God. How did you make it work? Being a child of immigrants and stretching a dollar and making 20 and being creative and hustling. The good samaritans of the gym decided looked at me and took pity on me. You know, I'm not a Lin-Manuel Miranda person, but I feel like the only quote that works here is from him immigrants to get the job done. Hey y'all, you're listening to it's been a minute from NPR. I'm Sam Sanders. And the guy talking to me from his gym is watch a hot Ali. He has many things, a columnist for The Daily Beast, a public speaker, and the author of a new book. It's called go back to where you came from, and other helpful recommendations on becoming American. It's a book all about the kind of immigrant grit he displayed in trying to find a place to record this chat. But it's also full of quote unquote helpful recommendations for immigrants, that he's gotten from white Americans. The whole book points out just how hilarious and untenable and difficult becoming American can be. And throughout the book, waz uses his story to offer strategies on how to make America more welcoming and compassionate. And yes, he still believes that's possible. I really enjoy talking with wage about his book and politics, and why he aspires to be just like Bugs Bunny. Enjoy. I suppose that is the perfect introduction to this conversation all about your book on how to be an immigrant making it in America and perhaps the first lesson is just make it work. Just make it work. If life gives you lemon, you make lemonade and in my case, if you come from a South Asian immigrants originally from Heather bot, you make a char, which I think most NPR listeners now know what a char is. Remind them just in case. A char is this delicious lemon pickle relish that you make, which is totally unhealthy, but can go with naan bread, which is bread bread and rice. And it's a perfect little condiment to add to spice and up your life. Naan bread, red bread. I love that. That was in the book, too. Chai tea, TT. Mahi mahi fish, fish fish fish. I want to talk about the book in detail. But first, I just feel like I have to start with the story in the news right now. As the book lays out, a lot of your career and your life has centered around the way 9 11 changed life from Muslims in America like you. And your book spends a lot of time talking about that shift. But I'm wondering as we begin, what it feels like for you to be in this moment and see in the aftermath of the January 6th insurrection, hundreds of Americans facing federal trial on terrorism charges. Americans who are mostly white would 2001 you ever believe it. I would not even believe it two weeks ago. And what I always said, I still say, can you imagine a bunch of black and brown folks just descending to the capital, angry, hunting down white congressmen? They wouldn't have got in. The snipers would have got them. We'd be chalk lines. We would be chalk lines. So that's what would happen. And people laugh and they go watch, you know, I'm like, are you serious? Look at the black Panthers. They came in armed and right then and there, Ronald Reagan, who was a Republican governor of California. Like gun control, gun control right now. You can have like thousands of mostly white middle class upper middle class maga supporting folks. Literally try to take over the capitol and cancel election, and we kind of just crawl, snail crawl through this investigation, but then you got a bunch of black folks protesting police brutality and Ferguson a couple of years ago, I'm old enough to remember Ferguson and we had tanks. And so that's kind of the double standard. And to get to your point, the fact that we'd have white folks, being charged with terrorism, my God. I don't want to revisit upon white America, the cruelty and viciousness and double standards that have been meted out against Muslims or those who are Muslim in black folks. What we want to do instead is we want to have equal standards. We want to have accountability. And I want to still learn from the disastrous war on terror of what happens when you paint an entire community and part of them and feather them and make them into suspects. Learn from how America treated Muslims. That's what I want to say. What is most surprised you about the way these mostly white people are being treated by our justice system right now, as they face domestic terrorism charges? I'm not surprised, are you surprised? I mean, I've said for the past year, it's good to be a white terrorist. Let's just keep it real. Like, I can't even imagine you and me and all of her family members. Peacefully assembling in front of the U.S. capitol, like bearded brown and black men, like bad things would happen to us, man. And so the fact that these folks felt so emboldened and now cry victimhood, and some of them now are championed by a Republicans who are allegedly Law & Order, and about national security. It just reveals the deep rot of racism, white supremacy, the double standards and law enforcement. You know, is there going to be a reckoning? Because without the reckoning and without accountability and without awareness and without discussions, this country will continue along its path where it's the American Dream for some with the right complexion in the American nightmare for the rest. Yeah. We are here to talk about your book. It is called go back to where you came from. Tell our listeners briefly, what it's about. Go back to where you came from and other helpful recommendations on how to become American. Is about loving a country that doesn't always love you back. And how the rest of us are both citizens and suspects us and them and how this country can turn on us on a dime. But at the same time, it's about how we can move forward as a multicultural country. And I hope it is done with humor and it ends on earned hope, not some hallmark, you know, a sugary confection, but earned hope. And the earned hope is by working through the challenges. So that's the book. But it's just one perspective, my perspective, but I tried to use my story as kind of a narrative spine to make a commentary about America and connect the dots for the rest of us. Coming up. Tips on talking through political difference. Stick around. This message comes from in PR sponsor, future, future is a new fitness experience that provides digital training and custom workouts with your own coach, all through the future app, get started with 50% off your first three months at try.

NPR Laura Coates Manuel Miranda U.S. Sam Sanders Heather bot Schuster The Daily Beast waz CNN Ferguson Simon Ali Ronald Reagan Panthers California
"wajahat ali" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

08:45 min | 1 year ago

"wajahat ali" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I'm chris it and this is on being today. A conversation between journalist and playwright was a hot ali and theologian writer and high caster. Kate bowler they speak to this moment. We're in through the friendship. They found on the edge of life and death. that is cancer or hot through his young daughter. Cate with stage four diagnosis at the age of thirty five that she's chronicle in a beloved book everything happens for a reason and other lies. I've loved i just want to use. You mentioned something about the I regret nothing when people say i regret nothing. I'm like are you a social or are you a an amazing brilliant human being as the cassisi. I'm like how humanly possible that you are seriously saying that you regret nothing. I regret everything all the time. I got on the other extreme. But there's something about the pandemic that i think it. Maybe just my my perverse way of looking at life tracy -cerned positives. I'm like the pandemic forces to stop and for many people especially right now you know. They're they're not really going back in the workforce because they're examining their life force them yet force them to do an audit of their life. Like why am. I working unlike kate at a job that pays me a wage and wasting time that i'll never get back. Maybe i'm making some decisions. That are i regret. And i think it's fast fording and this fast rewinding through life because to me when someone says i regret nothing. It's like you're willfully not confronting your life. You're leaving your life unexamined. And i think there's something in our society that says yeah to join examine it. Be heedless a checklist occupy your time and be productive. I mean what. What does it say about us that we regret nothing. Yeah it might also be another way of saying like a. I picked perfectly like if life was a series of choices. I chose right or it's the version where it's a just a different way of saying everything happens for a reason because they always land with because it made me the person i am today and like causally. No one can disagree. That made you who you are today. Congratulations and the days. But like i think it's just it's fear right. We're so scared of looking back and saying wasted that right. I could've done that better. Like that. Is something i lost him. I can never get back. I feel the pain of that. There's so many things we can't get back but the solution of course is not this delusional forward momentum. I mean future. Ism doesn't also solve the problem of mortality like we don't know walt disney style. Get to promise. Cryogenic freezing meant to be for future. Reanimation we're We get numbered days inside those number days. We can't really often impossible choices this or that. This opportunity those obligations. I have this podcast where we were a lot. A lot of the audience for everything happens which is just what i call it. I just i just crossed off for a reason so it just says everything happens period long just like it just keeps happening friends. But so much of the audience are people who have to forego their own dreams. Because they're they're they're taking care of kids with special needs or or aging parents or or frankly they're in really a service heavy jobs where they have to choose other people every day and in so in most people's lives the version of best life now is that they facilitated the dreams and hopes and dignity of other people and in that version they they are allowed to stop and say like there are things. I can't get back. This good or bad thing was at the expense of these other. Good dreams. But they're god now and and i feel like the pivot then is was whatever days i have left am my willing to take that risk and make those changes or am i able and privilege to make those changes to live out the rest of my life whenever and however death comes to live a life of meaning and purpose because otherwise the other pivot then can you could be anaylyst could lead to such dread and pain and depression and cynicism. I've wasted everything it's gone. Yeah i always. When i in my mind i always think about it. Kind of like a seesaw with a fulcrum right in the center like if you get tilted too much towards the past those questions can be really consuming like most of us will really screw things up at some point even just the thought of it will like will overwhelming. Is it Yeah and the fear of having lost too much and then in the future the fear of then not yet being able to accomplish it and then both can really rob us. I just think that the solution is not then to pivot to this very facile be present in which that's the solution to the past and the future. I think the solution to the past and the future is that there is none. There is like is that we borrow from each of them for really to make really meaningful choices is that we like pull from the past. In order to inform a richer future we pull from the future to be like. Wow i it reminds me that these things are yet undone you know but like if we prevent ourselves from moving between past present and future i think we become really narrow in our cultural language for for how to live and i'm reminded of your situation when you find out that he had a year to live and you're like i might physicists book but you know what dammit i. I'm a nerd. I'm gonna. I'm gonna enjoy this process and i'm going to enjoy this experience. And i'm going to engage in the mundane activities of being a mom and a wife and being a professor and let's see where it goes And and there's a meaning there a purpose there. It seems the way you even describe it. There was a joy there as well. Yeah in pouring yourself into something that is about you and also not about you which is always a relief because you know pain makes us all narcissistic really. Did you know how real this is. Do you know how important my pain is. Today i've actually taken this billboard I think another thing. That kind of i guess noticing too is that there's just so many different kinds of like living in the present like my friend looks at this one time about that. There's like different ways of experiencing time and one is The kind of time. That you and i know really intimately which is tragic term unlike. We know what. It's like to feel that heightened present where everything really matters because you have to make choices because everything you love is so precious and also we know that we can't live there forever because we're just not we're not built to live coverage that close to the edge all the time and then there's Well here miami of lake ordinary time or like pastoral time. Like there's you know anyone who's a farmer knows there's like sowing reaping time and i was always you know the more i was into tragic time either more. I was like a little judge pedal about that. I was like it. Sounds very boring. Found scary coffee place. But that's the You know who's picking up your mom on tuesday. Did you send that email if you made that phone. Call like it's all the wonderful stupid ordinary stuff of day to day life and like that is also necessary and good and then there is something that we've all experienced together very recently. Which is apocalyptic time. It's the feeling that like that. There's a heightened That that we know the future is not guaranteed. And that there's a kind of lightness and darkness and like binary we're kind of wrapped up in binary is about how we're seeing the world and we experience apocalypse to schism with With our environment like wildfires and garage and of and we we see it and we feel it. We experienced the apocalyptic time when we see the scope and magnitude of racial injustice. Is we understand that structures not just broken but that they collapse in on people and that the weak are not sheltered and that the poor not cared for and that.

Kate bowler Cate ali kate chris walt disney cancer depression miami
"wajahat ali" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"wajahat ali" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"The feeling that your world suddenly small like all the advice. You could get in these self help. Books like i'm off you know i. I'm a historian of self helps. I read hundreds of these books about like how to get your best life now. I i think there is a feeling like Like there some solutions that are just no longer available to you and then you realize oh wait. Life is not a series of choices. And i think the pandemic made that clear than ever before to everyone at the same time that like choice was always like an illusion on a luxury. It was just a obsession. We picked up with the invention of modernity that we always like really curate. Our lives if life is not a series of choices Then what is life when a man and a woman love each other very much what happened. I just thought there was a store charts. I'd really like to show you I think so i guess. Is it experiences is it. Fate is ridiculous gorgeous. Terrible binary is right that we have to put up side-by-side the the feeling of seeing a baby being born and then the feeling of holding someone's hand when they pass right. What the what we call like the newness like the drawing up close to the real -ness of life and we don't all get to and we don't want to live in that space of hyper reality but we know when we've been there and we see it when we see a sunset or like i recently got to hold little phosphorescent moon jellies in my hand on a kayaking at night and see nature light up like like underwater glitter. And you think is this really like like god. Thank you for this. Absurd wonder and the privilege of being in this body and loving the people i love and getting shot at doing it again and then also structural inequality and crushing medical debt and in cancer and like having it all up close together. That seems to me to be like the big challenge of all this is is like widening our little aperture so we can see the reality of both with missing one or the other I'm krista tippett and this is on being today for our series. The future of hope feel ogen and cancer survivor cape bowler in conversation with journalist or a league. You know nunu.

krista tippett cancer nunu
"wajahat ali" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"wajahat ali" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"On being is brought to you by the john templeton foundation harnessing the power of the sciences to explore the deepest and most perplexing questions facing humankind. Learn about the latest discoveries in the study of hope and optimism intellectual humility and free will at templeton dot org in this moment. I'm feeling called to walk alongside others to listen. Ask lead in this space so in the year ahead. About once a month we are going to bring a beautiful array of voices former guests on this show engaging in conversations they want to be having. We're calling the series the future of hope today as we get started the esteemed journalist wajahat ali in an irreverent exploration of hope with theologian writer. And podcast cape buller. These are two people. I have long admired. Their friendship began when wash as he likes to be called met kate at an event with the washington post while his three-year-old daughter was enduring stage for cancer. Kate who had her own stage for diagnosis at the age of thirty five. Recognize the hospital bracelet. He'd mistakenly left on and she could tell from his face that he hadn't slept all night. Kate has an amazing ability. Honor heartbreak and evokes smiles at once as the very title of her utterly original book..

"wajahat ali" Discussed on The Daily Beans

The Daily Beans

08:03 min | 1 year ago

"wajahat ali" Discussed on The Daily Beans

"That's a purebred thing that just looks like adobe show. i'm sorry. I just moved so far away for the microphone but i know that probably still hurt you like i. That's a full bred thing but there on the right blue cattle dog which is what we thought was australian shepherd. Okay and you said pity. I thought i thought that was a little bit of rottweiler. But no american staff. My goodness we were really wrong on all night. God we've gotten bad at this game. We're at a practice no lab. No german shepherds. No australian shepherds. Apparently thought was a mixed breed in the middle is a pure bred dog being like instead of the cat. Are they sure that's dog. There's a cow in this picture. Right okay thank you for the lovely submission for honoring the land. You live on writing from. And i'm so glad you're doing with your mental and physical health. It's a beautiful thing. So thank you for sharing that next. We have peter pronouns. He and him beans queens ag. I'm glad to hear weekend in. Washington was a great one. If i can make a suggestion a meet up in toronto. Since vaccinated americans can come into canada but vaccinated. Canadians can't cross the land borders into the states. You should do that way. Pod tax mentioned last week that are cats love to walk on her computer which she's working on it. I solved that problem giving my cat. Juno aka pj the monogrammed cat her own laptop to sleep on so that i can work on mine and peace. Oh my god that's brilliant. Unfortunately i've not solve the problem of for sleeping in my in my only computer chair. Keep up the good work. That is so funny. That cat is so asleep and happy to have its own laptop. It's a decoy laptops caribbean. I have seen also somebody has this Like a clear acrylic sort of shelf that they put over there keyboard for their cats to lay on while they type now. My god. that's fantastic. That's amazing. I do have a spare old laptop junker lying around and i think i'll just i think i'm gonna use that. Thank you for that and toronto toronto. Sorry toronto toronto. Not a bad idea dana. Let me know if you're headed that way. Maybe we could make up a show. I'm sure they could use some trump bashing up north. Okay go ahead no. I'm sure it's super popular in toronto soups popular. Seeps towards pops. All right next to become evan pronouns he and him high ag and digi and all so grateful for your daily synopsis. Thank you for being sane in the insanity and providing a solid base to go forward from once more into the breach of the nonsense. Check out this amazing dog who rescued a friend of mine. This is wilma great name. She is from northern saskatchewan. I'm in canada first. Nations there have matched up with rescue folks to create a new pipeline. They have thousands of dogs up. North and wilma arrived here on vancouver island full of seven puppies anchor dogs. All were placed. All we're pleased wants eight weeks passed and now she's just the most dynamic dog ever super friendly and approachable so thankfully not harder abused and for such a funny shape. She moves like a border collie obviously she is not that. Good luck deciphering this one. Yeah this one looks like a basset hound corgi which is made out. I also for the Funny shape hey easy. She understands you. She's so cute. Yes adorable adorable. I love i love that. She came down to vancouver island and had seven puppies. God i know. I also love that. She they they have a pipeline set up to get foster parents. That's okay jenna pronouns. She and her a gene dana. Captain kirk mom here just wanted to share how i have transformed my dread from the pandemic years into a cozy link it beforehand aiken crochet and straight edge. Had a lot of trapezoid. Practice doesn't make perfect but it does make better edges anyway. I- legit hate when blankets are too short and i've had a lot of awkward fidgeting to do so i am making these for my loved ones as we spend time apart. I hope it makes us all feel less alone keeping open and honest that being not okay. He's okay and talking to your support. System is the most important when you feel the void closing in a man to that and this is absolutely gorgeous blanket. I want one now. Looks warming cousy. I love purples right to color. Good color choices. Excellent thank you. Thank you for sharing that. Yeah and a moment dana. You're here yesterday. But i was not okay and i felt like telling everybody but then i felt bad because i feel like i to be people's rock but it's like okay. It's not sometimes be that and just ask zachary rights and kinda taboos days. Put that out there in the aether. All right next up from jessica pronoun she and her. My daughter has serious mental health issues and is conserved. I am her primary person. Her mama bear. I am the one who makes sure she doesn't fall through the cracks. But i've also been her target sees she has delusions where she believes. I have been replaced. It's called a cab grass delusion as you can imagine. It's a very scary prospect to know that the one person you rely on may be replaced by something that will hurt you. So while she's very symptomatic. It's been very difficult to interact with her because she can be brutal last year for cova they were looking for a placement for her which was very difficult because of her behavior by they found a place in southern california for her in february of twenty twenty to put this in context until a couple of weeks before they found placement for her. I'm not sure why. But she suddenly emerged from her symptoms and finally saw me. Wow it was like. She had been away for a long time and wanted to know what had happened while she was gone. I felt like i had gotten my daughter back. I can't describe the feeling that on february twentieth twenty twenty. She was moved eight and a half hours away. I wanted to be able to go down there to let her know. I was still here and still supporting her cova. Shut everything down then. She stopped responding to me. If i'm not in the room with her it's hard for her to know. I am real refused to sign a release to let her carers. Talk to me for this entire time. I have had to just hope. She's okay not knowing if she really was. I think about her every day. I waited until. I got my vaccinations and travel opened up in california. My first attempt got stalled the day before i was scheduled to leave the facility was closed down because a staff person had a cova test. I was crushed that i had to wait last week. I finally drove down not really knowing if i could see her. I showed up and she was willing to see me. She looked better. She was calm and she knew who i was. We visited over the course of three days. And when i left i gave her a big hug which she hadn't allowed me to do for years for the first time in a year and a half. I know she's okay. Thank you each. Podcast anchors my days and i. I knew that sharing this news with all of you is important to me. We may all find some peace and love in the chaos for my pod pet tax. I i have willow. He's a sweet kitty. But when i got home. This was his priority l. o. l. My oldest kitty is oreo. He's feral took care of him for many years when he was outside about three years ago. I brought him in because he was doing really badly outside. He can't see well he's enjoying life inside where he's always fed and warm. He doesn't let me pet him but he is my bit of wild inside the third one my youngest jackson. He's my monster kitty. he's always getting in trouble. He objects to me being on the computer and not petting him and plops down on my keyboard attract pad. Oh jessica have. I got an idea for you. We've united states law laptop Let me look at these babies here. Oh yeah is the first picture hand on a can of catnip yep that was the first thing when she got home was the catnip. Okay look okay. Oh my goodness he spots on the news markings it looks like he was eating.

toronto queens ag Juno aka pj dana wilma vancouver island aiken crochet canada digi adobe Captain kirk evan saskatchewan caribbean Washington jenna zachary cova jessica southern california
"wajahat ali" Discussed on The Daily Beans

The Daily Beans

05:28 min | 1 year ago

"wajahat ali" Discussed on The Daily Beans

"Everybody welcome back. We're talking to the author of the forthcoming book memoir. Go back to where you came from and other helpful recommendations on how to become an american by wajahat ali and you told me i could call you watch. So i'm that's what i'm gonna do i wanted to ask you. We're talking a little bit before the break about some of the early stuff early. You know you being a student and california and how nine eleven impacted you. I love how this blurb that was sent to me about the book. it's it opens up saying awkward left-handed suffering from ocd and wearing husky pants ali. He grew up on the margins of the american mainstream. And i think that the wonderful thing about that is that you don't have to be muslim. E to relate to that a lot of different people can relate to to the story that you're telling like you said other marginalized communities other other communities in the a and the like talking about your professor at uc berkeley. You know. I'm working on a book and my publishers. Like make it for everybody. How did you make it for everybody. Yeah so this is what's really rich is once you make everything for everybody. It becomes like yogurt. And nobody wants it right now. And and it's not even good yogurt like the crappy yogurt that's left outside for two days. And especially benign exclusively. When you're a person of color or woman. I would say a your told. The following major story relatable wait for it. Here's the buzzword to the mainstream and mainstream has always been codeword in america for white or usually white male gaze and i was told my entire career. Your ethnic story might not relate to the mainstream translation. There's too many darkies and brown people on your Too much earlier in arabic and people won't understand making relatable make it palatable. What i found out this was a quote from i think. Tsa elliot said like you know. Every great american writer is an ethnic writer. If you think about it right universals often founded the specific. I'll give you one example. One of my favorite movies is godfather now. Last time you checked that which is not a sicilian name. I'm not italian. I have not. I do not speak italian. I don't understand italian. I don't think i have any time in my family. That movie came out in one thousand. Nine hundred seventy two to this day. I have absolutely no idea what. Michael says in a restaurant in a sicilian right before he goes to the bathroom stall takes the gun and kills the captain and sollozzo right was the movie still fascinates me. Now how is it possible. Alison that here. I am born and raised in california. The son of ruins a muslim can find that story. Relatable is it because people of color were given like extra genius breast milk from our mothers that allowed us to absorb different cultures in the wolves. That's it that's it that's what it is now or is it that you know you spin a good yarn. The audiences will come. I had no idea what meatloaf was. I was fascinated by meatloaf. I'm like what the f. is meatloaf growing up right. Or baptism eucharist. You always when you're on the margins you always have to work extra hard because nothing is ever defined for you. It's it's always expected that you're supposed to nose mainstream mainstream as white. That's the center and for the rest of us. Were always supposed to do the extra work to bring the rest of you. In the mainstream to our margins and toni morrison i prayer prayer fraser. She says outright. As if i'm in the center and let them come to me and so that's kind of what i chose to do. My whole life and lo and behold i. I'll tell you stories when i did the play. The play came out like two thousand five the stuff that people told me hilarious like the mainstream won't get it agent stormy in your next door. He'd be sure to put a white person. So palatable a hollywood producer said you might you might think about pretty ted danson in the in the plane. I'm like to play six. Americans wh-what role. Would he played the rule of the immigrant. Father i'm it's ted danson. And but you don't which i love. I love i love becker. I love cheers. But you know. It's it's the thing that i have consciously and deliberately tried to fight against and so what i've done is i've seen when you put the match. The masala in the food people like it. There's more taste and specifically you mentioned husky pants and how you find the universal in this specific. So i've given these speeches. I give these talks. And i've talked about in this book about growing up wearing husky pants. Anyone grew up in the eighties. Nineties knows the enduring trauma of husky pants. Were literally in times new roman ninety six on the right side of the on your but it was said husky just to make it like even more painful and everywhere. I've gone this country after giving the talks. There's i don't care what gender someone always comes up to me quietly goes. I also were husky pants. It's at specific these specificity. The husky pats the tumor under the fingernails. Not speaking english. That's the stuff that people latch onto which gives it a richness and which makes them more real and people from different ethnicities say. Oh yeah my parents. My grandparents came from ireland. They had to change their name. Oh yeah they were mocked and ridiculed and so what i found is when you lean in deep your appendix solve in. Give that cultural specificity. Without the shame of trying to newton water it down audiences respond and the kind of reflect back onto what resonates with them..

wajahat ali uc berkeley Tsa elliot sollozzo california ted danson ali Alison toni morrison america Michael fraser becker hollywood ireland newton
"wajahat ali" Discussed on The Daily Beans

The Daily Beans

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"wajahat ali" Discussed on The Daily Beans

"Hey everybody welcome back. I am happy to be joined today by daily beast. Not a daily beans but a daily beast columnist and author of the book out january twenty fifth called. Go back to where you came from. Please welcome wahad ali. Hello hello hello. Thank you so much for having me on mother she wrote. I feel like i finally made it that now. I'm on your podcast. Which got a shout in mary. Trump's new book and so when you get a shoutout in. Mary trump's book. That's when you know you're you reach the upper echelon podcasters. You've made it. We're actually going to play this interview on the daily beans podcast but you know we might as well throw it on muller. She wrote daily beans. Yeah either way. Daily beans muller chiro. Whatever you're you're you're the you're the master of all the domains so doesn't matter. I used to buy domains for weird ideas i would get. I think i've got like twenty five now and twenty. Four sitting dormant. I sit there twiddling your thumbs. Mister burns one day yes one day. I'm gonna activate this very weird website and make some weird thing but never happens. But i can't let him go. I don't know it's weird. But i'm so glad to talk to you today because i'm i'm really really excited about this book. That's coming out and it's coming out in january january twenty fifth five days after my birthday so if anybody needs to get me a birthday present you know what to get me. It's called go back to where you came from. And i wanted to ask you sort of what prompted you. Although i can probably guess to write this book so i will send you a free copy because we're in galleys right now and and won't be my birthday present that just because i'm generous and shameless and narcissistic as well. But you know the book is the full title of the book is go back to where you came from and other helpful recommendations on how to become american and i think that type of juxtaposition is my response to living in a country that you love. That doesn't love you back. And how do you navigate that interesting relationship especially for me personally being a muslim son of box than immigrants but really relates to so many people look at so many asian-americans right now especially since the trump and republicans called the krona virus. Was last time. I checked has no ethnicity or zip code. The kung fu china virus. The huge uptick in anti asian american. Hate right where you have. People who are really born and raised. You're being told go back to where you came from. And so you can respond with pain and sadness and tears and rage as perfectly legitimate or you can laugh. And so i've maybe your listeners. Can tell that i i choose the latter and i think oftentimes we react like daffy duck situation. We get so frustrated so angry with all the chaos and hate in the world but if you look at those cartoons that the annual always falls daffy duck head the shotgun always goes off in his face on like. Maybe i can respond like bugs. Bunny who gets to eat the carrot at the end of the episode and the and the ditch. That elmer fudd. Who is doing his best. Impression is louie gohmert right now and you send mighty sam who. who'd be. Are you seventy. Sam that would be doug collins collins. Yeah yeah it's actually true. Just put a hat on the. They always fall in the ditch that they've created for bugs bunny so the book is kind of like a.

wahad ali Mary trump muller chiro Mister burns muller Trump china louie gohmert elmer fudd Bunny doug collins collins sam Sam
California monitoring 8,400 people for possible coronavirus and actively testing 33 people

Bernie and Sid in the Morning

02:48 min | 3 years ago

California monitoring 8,400 people for possible coronavirus and actively testing 33 people

"United States none of not doing so bad not doing so badly the United States has a we have about fifty cases and the fifteen of them are just an inexplicable but about about thirty five of those cases are people coming back from the Yokohama cruise and one of one in California they don't even know how they got that one person you don't know who I just I just saw on television the one L. thirty three cases in California no one will know thirty three people being quarantined and tested they don't know is that right about thirty three cases okay all right no but the point is this that do you remember of course you remember back when the CNN put out that tweet when the when the president had this a panel of experts doctors medical staff and CNN puts out a tweet a picture of that and says another example of the trump administration's a lack of diversity is what they were concerned with back then and this guy did the other night that his name is what a hot elite from The New York Times the other night when the president had his little event press conference bigger than it was and a great one to authorities very presidential and he was like take it easy everybody take it easy and we we should work together so much over and punk in a pantsuit net Nancy Pelosi stop sniping Abby let's work together anyway yeah this guy Wajahat Ali from New York times he says that the the the presentation was only one woman on stage surrounded by nine white men this is only see that these people are sick and I had a really really a second ed and then you had Jon Meacham but remember I told you I tried to watch Doris Kearns Goodwin's yes Washington you Washington special on the history channel and I saw John Avalon from CNN and then Jon Meacham I I got to meet him and then I turn that thing off I couldn't watch anymore because I know he's a raving that TDS afflicted lunatic John legion and I used to know the guy back in the M. S. N. B. C. day's gonna follow them all the time zone I miss all the time anyway this is not what this idiot said about the coronavirus yesterday on MSNBC migraines anxiety aside from the the impact of the virus itself is we're living in an age of xenophobia and it is not impossible to imagine a scenario where blame is cast in a short article in some country or group of people if this becomes worse you have this what is horribly normal what is this what they're worried about that that Americans might die or whatever they'll blame the pecans in here the woman there and I was making mmhm mmhm it Dave stick absolutely nuts out of their minds they hate this place the blame might be kids we should find out how this virus got started just it's it's it's it's just for knowledge sake it if it the blame falls on the Chinese it falls on the

United States