21 Burst results for "Wagoner"

"wagoner" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:33 min | 2 months ago

"wagoner" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Will be. Oil prices are at the lowest gasoline prices are at the lowest level going back to early this year. Is it time? And I keep asking this because this is what a lot of people are wondering for the U.S. to step in and start buying crude. Is this time to start moving away from some of the policies that led to the outcome that they wanted, which was lower gasoline prices and perhaps trying to reduce the cost of living? Well, we're certainly closer to the U.S. wanting to do that now than we were say a few months ago, but I think there's just still too many unknowns and you still have WTI trading above $70 a barrel. I think when it gets closer to 60, that's when you can see the U.S. have some real impetus to want to go out and fill up the SPR. But the unknowns are huge. We need to find out what's going on number one with demand in China in terms of COVID zero, potentially this week's meeting with Xi Jinping and Mohammed bin Salman could shed some light on that. We also have a huge geopolitical risk that can change prices in a matter of moment. And that's not just Russia's war in Ukraine, but it's also issues going on and potentially an Iranian in Iran, a regime that's digging in its heels as it has protests continuing. There are a number of unknowns and I think for this administration to want to go out and buy oil, it has to be closer to 60 than 70. Greg work has always coverage from D.C. on the crude market as well. Just a note equities rolling over just a little bit with down 7 tenths on the S&P Lisa. Just a bit softer in the last ten minutes or so. After a lot of the pretty dire projections that we heard yesterday from the bank CEO is talking about a downturn. Haven't been the best prognosticators. I have to say, Jamie Dimon was talking about 5% treasure yields. Going back about 5 years. And he was right. I mean, I guess it sort of depends on when. We could still see it. Not to wind up Tom. An economic. Evidently. It's great. Rick wagoner, General Motors, one of the first CEOs I talked to at camp Bloomberg, duke economics. He can talk about economics. He's got Cred to do that. He gave me a blurb for his book, I think. No fantasy. Some of them. I think Brian moynihan Bank of America is very good at just referring back to the research department at the bank. Oh yeah, Brian. They're all different. Bill winters over at standard charters has a great view as well, but just don't get me going. Do we ask you on how to use about headcount out and city? I don't think so. He suggests that we should. It's a little strange. This isn't going to try to be you. I think we want to know how they're preparing their business for the year

U.S. Mohammed bin Salman Xi Jinping SPR Rick wagoner Ukraine Jamie Dimon Russia Iran China D.C. Greg Brian moynihan Lisa Bill winters General Motors Tom Bank of America
"wagoner" Discussed on Poetry Unbound

Poetry Unbound

04:14 min | 4 months ago

"wagoner" Discussed on Poetry Unbound

"wagoner" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

06:30 min | 6 months ago

"wagoner" Discussed on WGN Radio

"I will always love you and it was a farewell to Porter wagoner. Man wasn't that relationship a soap opera. And although that's how she came to prominence singing on the Porter wagoner show and things of that nature. So 888-876-5593 is 88 88 Raleigh. Michelle and Geneva, welcome to WGN radio. Hey Riley, good evening. How are you? All right, how about yourself? I'm okay. I'm okay. Listen, I want to discuss Ricky Nelson for a minute with you if I might. Absolutely. Yeah, I watched this documentary on Amazon Prime yesterday two days ago. It's called heavy petting. And it's a documentary in the late 80s. I had never seen it. It was about the sexual mores of the 50s and 60s and kind of like, you know, when a lot of us grew up, we're growing up. And it was well done. It was very funny, tongue in cheek, and a lot of the interviewed a lot of famous people. And some not famous people. And at the very end of this, they play this video, so to speak, which was cut from one of the Ozzie and Harriet shows. And it was Ricky Nelson seeing I want to be loved. Oh my God. Blew me away, man. I'm telling you, I hadn't heard that song and I totally forgot about that song. He was backed up, of course, by a trio. Fantastic and James Burton was on guitar, of course, a fantastic, it was unbelievable. I was wondering if you could play that. By the way, that video that clip of the video is actually on YouTube. So you can see that I went and did a lot of research last 24 hours. The VH1 behind the music and stuff and a lot of he had a I didn't realize he had such an up and down life. But what if talented guy and boy, what does sexy beast yowza? Yeah. That didn't hurt. I don't know if it came out, but he can think whoever that girl was that he wanted to impress when he went to his father and said, I want to be a singer because the girl liked Elvis. Yeah. And I know that he always failed in comparison to Elvis in a lot of people's minds. But I'm telling you, a lot of his stuff was right up there. Everyone lived in Elvis's shadow, but I mean, Ricky Nelson was really, really talented. And at stone canyon band kicked butt. Where he really benefited in the early days was incredibly good production on those records. Some of those records were just very well produced. You know, you would contend that anyone could have sung them. Now it helped that he was singing them, but if he didn't have his dad didn't have the clout to bring in that type of production strength, I'm not a 100% sure how some of those records would have gone. But he did a lot of things included some of his album cuts were just adorable. In fact, John was listening to a KJ here, the station I put my oldies on. And he said, what the hell is that all she wrote? I said, oh, that's a Ricky Nelson album cut. So I thought it was adorable. But when I talked to John just know, he said it was kind of, he should be in The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. I actually looked that up. He was inducted in 87. Good. Two years after he John fogerty inducted because John fogerty from creedence Clearwater was a huge fan of his. But I was just blown away. He's kind of a forgotten guy and he really shouldn't be. He was fantastic. All right, so you would like to hear I want to be. I would love to hear that. All right, I'm writing it down. That's a bigger night song. Let's see. Okay. All right, you will. Thank you so much. I'll catch you later. Yeah, and well, good. So he's in. Now, of course, nils zedek is still is not. And that's just, that's just abysmal. There's no reason on earth that Neil sedek is not in The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. But yeah, I love that's all she wrote. And so I normally would even it was on Ricky Nelson's Rick Nelson Rick Nelson sings for you, yeah, right. In any event, a cute stuff. So sure, happy to happy to play that. All right, so we got Lisa in Dundee, welcome to WGN radio, Lisa. Hi, Raleigh. While it's in my mind, that last caller, she likes Ricky Nelson so much. He was in a movie with John Wayne called Rio bravo. Yes. And he thinks in that movie and he's really, really good. He's a good actor. And he sings really well too. So if she hasn't seen that, that she may want to look that up. It's a great movie. Yes, 1950. Anyway, I was just calling to get equal time for Dolly Parton. Whitney Houston. Well, a Dolly, of course, wrote the song she made the money. I don't like it, but I like Dolly Parton's version better. I just don't like the song. I don't care who does it. I hate you don't like the song. I hate this song. Let's go that far. I lunge for the radio button. When I played it for Linda right now, I had to leave the room. Well, I was trying to get through quicker to see if you would just follow it up with a little Dolly, but my constitution can't get. You're just getting better. Yeah, I just can't take it, really. And it was a big hit. You can listen to it online anytime you have over. I sleep tonight after listening to Whitney's version. Well, Whitney is that I'm not crazy about that either. But she's a hell of a singer. Like I say, I don't care for the choice of music, but I don't, I certainly know that woman can sing. I just absolutely. But she's not my taste either. But again, she would be, but the material she picks. That's not my taste. And God, the horrible one about the shipwreck. Well, you know, anytime there's a shipwreck, the song is doomed. You know, it doesn't matter whether it's the Poseidon adventure or whatever the Titanic. There's another good movie. Of course, I go by the movie, not by the song. Yeah, well, the song, I think there was Maureen mcgovern, is almost as bad as the Titanic song. And then, of course, the granddaddy of them all the wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald. I'm convinced if there is a word for who I love as well. If there is a boat in the song, it's going to be bad. That's very true. So yeah, sorry about that. Hate to disappoint. Okay, I still love you and no worries on this end. All right, good. Thanks for calling And of course Dolly left all the way to the bank on that. Anybody who didn't like it like me, she made money hand over fist

Ricky Nelson WGN radio Porter wagoner Hey Riley Roll Hall of Fame Elvis John fogerty Raleigh James Burton creedence Clearwater stone canyon Ozzie nils zedek Neil sedek Geneva Harriet Michelle Dolly Parton Amazon
"wagoner" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

03:36 min | 7 months ago

"wagoner" Discussed on Revision Path

"Dot com. And you can go to my design page and there's you won't have access to my portfolio, but you'll see all the other nerdy things that I write about there as well. You can also follow me on Twitter at Trevor Wagner. That's it. Sounds good. Well, Trevor Wagner, I want to thank you so much for coming on the show. I get the sense that you are someone that is at a crossroads right now. Usually when I give these postscripts when I'm like talking to the guest, I'm like, you know, saying that, you know, you're doing great work, which is not to say that you're not doing great work, but I really feel this sense of tension. Within you, like you're at a crossroads right now. I would be interested to see if in the next 5 years you fulfilled that balance that you're seeking. Yeah, I've been seeking for living that persona for years and it's a secret, you eventually find, and so that's probably part of the tension is they realization, I would say, as a seeker, is that you realize what you're looking for you have already had. And so now that I've kind of realized that I've always had it, now I get to actually discover it more, what I already have and enjoy it. That's where I'm at. How profound I am a writer. Trevor Wagner, thank you so much for coming on the show, man. I appreciate.

Trevor Wagner Twitter
"wagoner" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

08:02 min | 7 months ago

"wagoner" Discussed on Revision Path

"It is how I envisioned it. And the quality is great. In terms of design and writing, I was just very proud of it. I think many people should all creative should have something that they're just absolutely proud of that they did. I feel like that's very rare. Even if you do great work that other people admire, this level of self deprecation that designers have. Or they don't fully love the work that they do. Even if it's great. So I think that everybody should have that one project where they're just like, I absolutely love the shit out of this thing. So yeah, the book is about is a book of poetry, a collection of poetry about based on a time in my life where I had experienced relationship trauma. What I aim to do with the book was to really just tell a story of a black queer kid who just wanted to who didn't know how, but just really wanted to be to be loved. And to love. And I think I feel it's intense at times, but I love how it turned out how I came out. And anyone who's read it has told me the same, so. Now, when I asked you earlier about what you wanted to discuss, you had told me a few things that I kind of want to unpack a little bit. You said navigating a box based world as an odd shape. You said, unlearning, harmful habits, and you said self parenting. Talking about it. What's on your heart? It's very whoo whoo. And that's kind of where I'm at in my mid 30s right now. It's like, I feel like if you've grown up in well, this is not the case for everybody, but for a few millennials, we've grown up in some shit. We've grown up in a time where our parents told us one thing and the world is actually another. So there's a great deal of at least when you're identify as black and queer or gay. And so those are two communities that have seen a lot of shit go down. Who have experienced a lot of things, a lot of terrible things we're talking like, if you're black, you know what we've been through, but in terms of like the queer community, aids. I grew up during the 8th epidemic slash pandemic. And the fallout, the religious fallout of that, people who are religious saying, you know, you're going to hell because you got aids or because you're gay or whatever. And just living in fear of identifying as gay. And over time, I've learned to unlearn all of the survival tactics that I've had to that I've had to learn growing up in rural Texas or growing up in Texas in general. Age 35, I'm trying to just radically authentically be myself and love myself and encourage other people to do the same. Not living under any guise is any false pretenses or anything like that. Just be yourself in love in that. I'm finding that it is, it is yielding a lot of great improvement in your health and your physical health and your mental health as well. It's really important to just be yourself. So that's where I'm at. And as far as I think you mentioned self parenting, I think there is talking to a friend of mine who is also a black queer person. And he was like, we need somebody to speak on the unique experience of being a black queer cis male and the relationship with our mothers. My relationship with my mother has been very rocky. But when I came out to her at 19, I wasn't under her roof, she probably maybe would have disowned me completely. So I'm glad that I had the wherewithal and the knowledge to just wait until I was out of her house to tell her who I actually am. After that, I think we were even more distant than we were already, because I think moms know. But once you say the words, then they actually know and there's no denying it. And so I think that created a bigger rift between us too. And so because of that, there were things that as a what we call in the community baby gay or somebody who's fresh to the gay community. There are some things that I experienced that I really could have benefited from having a parent there or some kind of mentor or something. To kind of guide me through all this newness. And I didn't have that necessarily. So I had to learn how to self parent. I had to learn how to look at the 7 year old who was scared to be himself and say, there's nothing wrong with you. Just learn to love myself. And I think that plays out in every aspect of my life, even my professional career, where there are times where I deal with impostor syndrome or just being in spaces where I wasn't previously and now all of a sudden a.m. because of the great shift in thinking in the industry. I'm specifically talking about summer 2020. Where all of a sudden the gates that I wasn't allowed to enter through, all of a sudden I am, but I have no understanding of how this new arena plays out or how to be or anything like that. So I deal with the impostor syndrome and then what I do, the kid who just felt very ostracized very on the outside of everything on the outside of blackness on the outside of queerness. Just because I didn't have access to it, that plays out. And so what ends up happening is when that little kid comes out, the 35 year old comes bubbles up and says, you're okay. I got you. And that is essentially self parenting. Basically being your own advocate and standing up for yourself. Do you think you're still trying to find yourself? I think if you're living, you should be. Because we're always changing. I identify as a seeker. I think it plays out in my travel habits. I'm usually traveling by myself, and I prefer it that way, largely because traveling is not vacation for me, but most of the time, it's me thinking and writing in exotic places in dirty places or whatever, what have you, just being here there and everywhere, just trying to learn about myself and different environments. Also, I feel like growth happens when you're out of your comfort zone. And so that's why I do that. I want to learn as much as possible about myself. And I think that I find it to be a common thing where people don't want to do that. Whether it's from fear or they're afraid of what they might find or lack of self confidence, which I totally understand. But I don't want to live in fear in my life. So I put on a brave face and I go into the unknown, so that's me. Yeah. I feel like there was a lot of subtext in that inhale just then, but black person, the black person, I felt then. I felt that. If you knew that you couldn't fail in your professional life, what would you want to do? What would you want to try to do? Oh my gosh. That's related to the question of if you weren't a designer, what would you be? And I would say if I weren't a designer, I would.

aids Texas
"wagoner" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

08:18 min | 7 months ago

"wagoner" Discussed on Revision Path

"Idea. Was that business braver? It was, yeah, it was a combination of our names, but it was also representative of the kind of place that kind of work that we wanted to do, which was traveling, philanthropic, but also providing web development solutions to small businesses in the Dallas area. So yeah, and we were able to do that. We actually started our company cash positive. So that's always been a great accomplishment of my own. It's not something that people know about, but it's something that I'm really proud of, but I was able to do that. Now you're also the cofounder and the executive director of a group called black UX Austin. Tell me about that and what did you want to sort of get out of that group? Oh my gosh. So going back to talking about leaving a company that I was working for that I faced some racial discrimination. Some a researcher that I was working with at the time, Carmen brooms. She's also black as well. But she saw what I was going through. And she was like, you need a release. You're way too talented to be treated this way. And I want to provide an outlet for you to do what you do best. So she was like, two other researchers had started black UX Austin before I even came along. And they just had never been able to get it off the ground. And so she told me that she wanted to actually take it all the way. She wanted to be nationally recognized and be the one stop shop for people wanting to get into tech. Specifically in the Austin area, largely because they're black people in tech are usually the only in the company that's the typical experience where you're the only black person on your team in your organization, your department. And so you may experience things that if someone like you was around, they would tell you, girl, you're going through some shit right now. Treating you badly. It's gaslighting. So there wasn't that community, or before we came along, I don't think there was that kind of community in Austin specifically. And if you've been to Austin, you know that it's very white. They're not that many black people here. At all. It's funny because one of my best friends asked, I think he was asking someone else and he was like, I think one of his other friends had visited Austin and he was like, did you see any black people there? He was like, no. I was like, yeah, I told him. I was like, yeah, I was just joking, but I was like, yeah, I'm the only one here. I'm right here. You're talking to the white people. I was a black community in Austin, no, just kidding. But there's more than that, of course. But more than me. Yeah, we started black UX Austin as a means for black people in tech to have a community to have a safe space to not feel like you are being tone police to just let your hair down and just be yourself. We started right before the pandemic started and as we were reforming and making it kind of formalized, COVID started. And so we were like, oh, crap. So we had, by that point, we had only had one in person event, and then we had to shift everything to be all virtual. And we got so good at it that other black organizations that were in and out of tech were like, how are you guys doing this? Because we got really good at it that people on LinkedIn on maybe Instagram too or whatever, we're seeing what we were doing and we're wanting to support and these are not just black people, but also white people organizations where they've seen or witnessed by people being oppressed or mistreated in some way. And they just want to support. So they were other black organizations or organizations organizations in general or just asking us how you guys are able to grow and thrive online as you're doing. Part of it was that I know a lot about creating online community having been someone who grew up needing community when I was growing up in rural Texas and being the only a very sensitive black queer person in probably a 20, 30 mile radius. So I sought online community as much in as often as I could. And so I just learned from that. And I think that has warmed its way into or carried its way up to now, which is providing community or safe spaces for other black people. Now, you know, I feel like I'm mentioning all these asides, but you know, as I did my research, I saw that you're a poet, and you're an author. Tell me about that, particularly about the impetus behind your latest book. The drive come home for that. Oh my gosh. So first of all, I don't call myself a poet. I do write poetry about does it really feel that it fits me? Well, I call myself a writer, which is poetry is not the only writing that I will do. I want to do more memoirs and things like that. But actually I didn't get my degree and design or web design or anything like that. I got my degree in creative writing. I had started to pursue creative writing and communication design, which is if you're not familiar, communication design encompasses or at least edit UNT, it encompasses advertising and graphic design. So not web design, but it is designed or the visual aspect of design. And so at the time, it was the closest thing I can get to a design degree. And my minor is in computer education and cognitive systems, which translation that means a couple of courses in installing Linux systems and some Adobe Photoshop courses. So yeah, so that was the closest I could get to having a web design degree at that time, which was like 2000 between 2006 and 2010. So but eventually I ran out of financial aid and I just stuck with the English creative writing aspect of my life. So growing up, I've always had an affinity for writing. I've always wanted to be a songwriter. And so I started writing songs at 12. Just because I had seen one of my favorite songwriters, Mariah Carey. You may laugh, but she's a grandson writer. Obviously, we know a lot of our songs. I've always just written lyrical poems, yeah. There's a floppy disk somewhere in my in my storage somewhere of maybe 500 lyrical forms I had written when I was a kid. Not a floppy disk. You got to get it off the floppy disk man. You know what, I think at some point I did translate them to modern digital at some point. So they're probably somewhere on a hard drive somewhere, maybe. But yeah, I don't know if I want to revisit those to be honest. They're probably terrible, but yeah, well, I was at UNT. I got my English degree, and like I mentioned before, I had started my UX design product design to career. Product design is kind of like a jealous mistress when it comes to my other abilities. So my writing kind of had to be pushed to the side, but eventually I was like, I was approaching 30 and I was like, what can I do very quickly that I can be proud of my 20s for? And that was creating a writing a book. And so I self published my first title, which is called the remaining trouble and other battles. And then during the pandemic, I kind of remixed it and expanded it and republished it as so much trouble. And it's probably in terms of writing, it's probably the project that I'm most proud of because it's the way I was able to produce.

Austin Carmen brooms Dallas LinkedIn Texas Mariah Carey Adobe UNT
"wagoner" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

07:45 min | 7 months ago

"wagoner" Discussed on Revision Path

"I was working from the storage room because we didn't have an office or a desk for me to work in. And so while I was in the storage room, I would just like plaster all the walls with site maps and diagrams and whatever, just to keep myself organized with all these many different properties that I was maintaining. So what was that early post graduation career like? It was because I had already had a lot of experience under my belt already, having been paid to do web design. I was able to get a salary wise, I was able to get a high wage for my first job out of college. It was hard because it was at the time where we were having the recession in 2010. So it was very hard to find a job. But once I got a job, I was able to get a high salary. And high salary at that time for me for, I guess, relatively new designer was 45 K in Dallas. So Dallas area yeah. I felt like I was going from ravioli eating every night to having a luxury apartment overnight. It felt like it was interesting. It was a little bit of adjustment and I don't think I quite found the balance eventually I was let go from that job and I think that was pretty devastating to experience that. But it led me to creating my own business with my former partner, romantic partner, which was a bad idea. Was that business braver? It was, yeah, it was a combination of our names, but it was also representative of the kind of place that kind of work that we wanted to do, which was traveling, philanthropic, but also providing web development solutions to small businesses in the Dallas area. So yeah, and we were able to do that. We actually started our company cash positive. So that's always been a great accomplishment of my own. It's not something that people know about, but it's something that I'm really proud of, but I was able to do that. Now you're also the cofounder and the executive director of a group called black UX Austin. Tell me about that and what did you want to sort of get out of that group? Oh my gosh. So going back to talking about leaving a company that I was working for that I faced some racial discrimination. Some a researcher that I was working with at the time, Carmen brooms. She's also black as well. But she saw what I was going through. And she was like, you need a release. You're way too talented to be treated this way. And I want to provide an outlet for you to do what you do best. So she was like, two other researchers had started black UX Austin before I even came along. And they just had never been able to get it off the ground. And so she told me that she wanted to actually take it all the way. She wanted to be nationally recognized and be the one stop shop for people wanting to get into tech. Specifically in the Austin area, largely because they're black people in tech are usually the only in the company that's the typical experience where you're the only black person on your team in your organization, your department. And so you may experience things that if someone like you was around, they would tell you, girl, you're going through some shit right now. Treating you badly. It's gaslighting. So there wasn't that community, or before we came along, I don't think there was that kind of community in Austin specifically. And if you've been to Austin, you know that it's very white. They're not that many black people here. At all. It's funny because one of my best friends asked, I think he was asking someone else and he was like, I think one of his other friends had visited Austin and he was like, did you see any black people there? He was like, no. I was like, yeah, I told him. I was like, yeah, I was just joking, but I was like, yeah, I'm the only one here. I'm right here. You're talking to the white people. I was a black community in Austin, no, just kidding. But there's more than that, of course. But more than me. Yeah, we started black UX Austin as a means for black people in tech to have a community to have a safe space to not feel like you are being tone police to just let your hair down and just be yourself. We started right before the pandemic started and as we were reforming and making it kind of formalized, COVID started. And so we were like, oh, crap. So we had, by that point, we had only had one in person event, and then we had to shift everything to be all virtual. And we got so good at it that other black organizations that were in and out of tech were like, how are you guys doing this? Because we got really good at it that people on LinkedIn on maybe Instagram too or whatever, we're seeing what we were doing and we're wanting to support and these are not just black people, but also white people organizations where they've seen or witnessed by people being oppressed or mistreated in some way. And they just want to support. So they were other black organizations or organizations organizations in general or just asking us how you guys are able to grow and thrive online as you're doing. Part of it was that I know a lot about creating online community having been someone who grew up needing community when I was growing up in rural Texas and being the only a very sensitive black queer person in probably a 20, 30 mile radius. So I sought online community as much in as often as I could. And so I just learned from that. And I think that has warmed its way into or carried its way up to now, which is providing community or safe spaces for other black people. Now, you know, I feel like I'm mentioning all these asides, but you know, as I did my research, I saw that you're a poet, and you're an author. Tell me about that, particularly about the impetus behind your latest book. The drive come home for that. Oh my gosh. So first of all, I don't call myself a poet. I do write poetry about does it really feel that it fits me? Well, I call myself a writer, which is poetry is not the only writing that I will do. I want to do more memoirs and things like that. But actually I didn't get my degree and design or web design or anything like that. I got my degree in creative writing. I had started to pursue creative writing and communication design, which is if you're not familiar, communication design encompasses or at least edit UNT, it encompasses advertising and graphic design. So not web design, but it is designed or the visual aspect of design. And so at the time, it was the closest thing I can get to a design degree. And my minor is in computer education and cognitive systems, which translation that means a couple of courses in installing Linux systems and some Adobe Photoshop courses..

Austin Dallas Carmen brooms LinkedIn Texas Adobe
"wagoner" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

07:15 min | 7 months ago

"wagoner" Discussed on Revision Path

"Do web design. I was able to get a salary wise, I was able to get a high wage for my first job out of college. It was hard because it was at the time where we were having the recession in 2010. So it was very hard to find a job. But once I got a job, I was able to get a high salary. And high salary at that time for me for, I guess, relatively new designer was 45 K in Dallas. So Dallas area yeah. I felt like I was going from ravioli eating every night to having a luxury apartment overnight. It felt like it was interesting. It was a little bit of adjustment and I don't think I quite found the balance eventually I was let go from that job and I think that was pretty devastating to experience that. But it led me to creating my own business with my former partner, romantic partner, which was a bad idea. Was that business braver? It was, yeah, it was a combination of our names, but it was also representative of the kind of place that kind of work that we wanted to do, which was traveling, philanthropic, but also providing web development solutions to small businesses in the Dallas area. So yeah, and we were able to do that. We actually started our company cash positive. So that's always been a great accomplishment of my own. It's not something that people know about, but it's something that I'm really proud of, but I was able to do that. Now you're also the cofounder and the executive director of a group called black UX Austin. Tell me about that and what did you want to sort of get out of that group? Oh my gosh. So going back to talking about leaving a company that I was working for that I faced some racial discrimination. Some a researcher that I was working with at the time, Carmen brooms. She's also black as well. But she saw what I was going through. And she was like, you need a release. You're way too talented to be treated this way. And I want to provide an outlet for you to do what you do best. So she was like, two other researchers had started black UX Austin before I even came along. And they just had never been able to get it off the ground. And so she told me that she wanted to actually take it all the way. She wanted to be nationally recognized and be the one stop shop for people wanting to get into tech. Specifically in the Austin area, largely because they're black people in tech are usually the only in the company that's the typical experience where you're the only black person on your team in your organization, your department. And so you may experience things that if someone like you was around, they would tell you, girl, you're going through some shit right now. Treating you badly. It's gaslighting. So there wasn't that community, or before we came along, I don't think there was that kind of community in Austin specifically. And if you've been to Austin, you know that it's very white. They're not that many black people here. At all. It's funny because one of my best friends asked, I think he was asking someone else and he was like, I think one of his other friends had visited Austin and he was like, did you see any black people there? He was like, no. I was like, yeah, I told him. I was like, yeah, I was just joking, but I was like, yeah, I'm the only one here. I'm right here. You're talking to the white people. I was a black community in Austin, no, just kidding. But there's more than that, of course. But more than me. Yeah, we started black UX Austin as a means for black people in tech to have a community to have a safe space to not feel like you are being tone police to just let your hair down and just be yourself. We started right before the pandemic started and as we were reforming and making it kind of formalized, COVID started. And so we were like, oh, crap. So we had, by that point, we had only had one in person event, and then we had to shift everything to be all virtual. And we got so good at it that other black organizations that were in and out of tech were like, how are you guys doing this? Because we got really good at it that people on LinkedIn on maybe Instagram too or whatever, we're seeing what we were doing and we're wanting to support and these are not just black people, but also white people organizations where they've seen or witnessed by people being oppressed or mistreated in some way. And they just want to support. So they were other black organizations or organizations organizations in general or just asking us how you guys are able to grow and thrive online as you're doing. Part of it was that I know a lot about creating online community having been someone who grew up needing community when I was growing up in rural Texas and being the only a very sensitive black queer person in probably a 20, 30 mile radius. So I sought online community as much in as often as I could. And so I just learned from that. And I think that has warmed its way into or carried its way up to now, which is providing community or safe spaces for other black people. Now, you know, I feel like I'm mentioning all these asides, but you know, as I did my research, I saw that you're a poet, and you're an author. Tell me about that, particularly about the impetus behind your latest book. The drive come home for that. Oh my gosh. So first of all, I don't call myself a poet. I do write poetry about does it really feel that it fits me? Well, I call myself a writer, which is poetry is not the only writing that I will do. I want to do more memoirs and things like that. But actually I didn't get my degree and design or web design or anything like that. I got my degree in creative writing. I had started to pursue creative writing and communication design, which is if you're not familiar, communication design encompasses or at least edit UNT, it encompasses advertising and graphic design. So not web design, but it is designed or the visual aspect of design. And so at the time, it was the closest thing I can get to a design degree. And my minor is in computer education and cognitive systems, which translation that means a couple of courses in installing Linux systems and some Adobe Photoshop courses..

Austin Dallas Carmen brooms LinkedIn Texas Adobe
"wagoner" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

08:20 min | 7 months ago

"wagoner" Discussed on Revision Path

"Connection until just now. I've always been working on multi brand design systems. But because I understood system thinking, even at that age, which was around, I think it was 2022. He called me guru, so I understood like a process. Was important. It was almost necessary to maintain that many properties all at once. You have to have some symbols of organization. So he just saw my approach and the fact that I plastered this cubby hole wall that I had. I was working from the storage room because we didn't have an office or a desk for me to work in. And so while I was in the storage room, I would just like plaster all the walls with site maps and diagrams and whatever, just to keep myself organized with all these many different properties that I was maintaining. So what was that early post graduation career like? It was because I had already had a lot of experience under my belt already, having been paid to do web design. I was able to get a salary wise, I was able to get a high wage for my first job out of college. It was hard because it was at the time where we were having the recession in 2010. So it was very hard to find a job. But once I got a job, I was able to get a high salary. And high salary at that time for me for, I guess, relatively new designer was 45 K in Dallas. So Dallas area yeah. I felt like I was going from ravioli eating every night to having a luxury apartment overnight. It felt like it was interesting. It was a little bit of adjustment and I don't think I quite found the balance eventually I was let go from that job and I think that was pretty devastating to experience that. But it led me to creating my own business with my former partner, romantic partner, which was a bad idea. Was that business braver? It was, yeah, it was a combination of our names, but it was also representative of the kind of place that kind of work that we wanted to do, which was traveling, philanthropic, but also providing web development solutions to small businesses in the Dallas area. So yeah, and we were able to do that. We actually started our company cash positive. So that's always been a great accomplishment of my own. It's not something that people know about, but it's something that I'm really proud of, but I was able to do that. Now you're also the cofounder and the executive director of a group called black UX Austin. Tell me about that and what did you want to sort of get out of that group? Oh my gosh. So going back to talking about leaving a company that I was working for that I faced some racial discrimination. Some a researcher that I was working with at the time, Carmen brooms. She's also black as well. But she saw what I was going through. And she was like, you need a release. You're way too talented to be treated this way. And I want to provide an outlet for you to do what you do best. So she was like, two other researchers had started black UX Austin before I even came along. And they just had never been able to get it off the ground. And so she told me that she wanted to actually take it all the way. She wanted to be nationally recognized and be the one stop shop for people wanting to get into tech. Specifically in the Austin area, largely because they're black people in tech are usually the only in the company that's the typical experience where you're the only black person on your team in your organization, your department. And so you may experience things that if someone like you was around, they would tell you, girl, you're going through some shit right now. Treating you badly. It's gaslighting. So there wasn't that community, or before we came along, I don't think there was that kind of community in Austin specifically. And if you've been to Austin, you know that it's very white. They're not that many black people here. At all. It's funny because one of my best friends asked, I think he was asking someone else and he was like, I think one of his other friends had visited Austin and he was like, did you see any black people there? He was like, no. I was like, yeah, I told him. I was like, yeah, I was just joking, but I was like, yeah, I'm the only one here. I'm right here. You're talking to the white people. I was a black community in Austin, no, just kidding. But there's more than that, of course. But more than me. Yeah, we started black UX Austin as a means for black people in tech to have a community to have a safe space to not feel like you are being tone police to just let your hair down and just be yourself. We started right before the pandemic started and as we were reforming and making it kind of formalized, COVID started. And so we were like, oh, crap. So we had, by that point, we had only had one in person event, and then we had to shift everything to be all virtual. And we got so good at it that other black organizations that were in and out of tech were like, how are you guys doing this? Because we got really good at it that people on LinkedIn on maybe Instagram too or whatever, we're seeing what we were doing and we're wanting to support and these are not just black people, but also white people organizations where they've seen or witnessed by people being oppressed or mistreated in some way. And they just want to support. So they were other black organizations or organizations organizations in general or just asking us how you guys are able to grow and thrive online as you're doing. Part of it was that I know a lot about creating online community having been someone who grew up needing community when I was growing up in rural Texas and being the only a very sensitive black queer person in probably a 20, 30 mile radius. So I sought online community as much in as often as I could. And so I just learned from that. And I think that has warmed its way into or carried its way up to now, which is providing community or safe spaces for other black people. Now, you know, I feel like I'm mentioning all these asides, but you know, as I did my research, I saw that you're a poet, and you're an author. Tell me about that, particularly about the impetus behind your latest book. The drive come home for that. Oh my gosh. So first of all, I don't call myself a poet. I do write poetry about does it really feel that it fits me? Well, I call myself a writer, which is poetry is not the only writing that I will do. I want to do more memoirs and things like that. But actually I didn't get my degree and design or web design or anything like that. I got my degree in creative writing. I had started to pursue creative writing and communication design, which is if you're not familiar, communication design encompasses or at least edit UNT, it encompasses advertising and graphic design. So not web design, but it is designed or the visual aspect of design. And so at the time, it was the closest thing I can get to a design degree. And my minor is in computer education and cognitive systems, which translation that means a couple of courses in installing Linux systems.

Austin Dallas Carmen brooms LinkedIn Texas
"wagoner" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

07:30 min | 7 months ago

"wagoner" Discussed on Revision Path

"So we had our House in near Waco, but we also lived up in Arlington, Texas, which is in DFW. So we had like a dual residence type situation where we would live in Arlington throughout the week, and then go down to the country on the weekends. So I had like a city life and a country life at the same time, which I think hopping up and down. I 35, sitting in a car for an hour and a half, each way kind of yielded into me being a traveler when I got older and just wanting to explore more of the world more of our country. So yeah, when I was at the age where I needed to start going to school, I started going to private school, Christian private school in Arlington, it was non denominational. So there were all walks of life were there, Catholic, baptist, Christian, Asian, black, white, Latino, et cetera, the neighborhood that we eventually settled in Arlington was predominantly Hispanic, or at least it became predominantly Hispanic and my babysitter who I went to hang out with after school was Hispanic. She was from South Texas and she taught me Spanish. So I was exposed to a lot of culture at a young age, but I was also from a small town. So I faced a lot of small town mindset, which is not being exposed to a lot of different cultures. So I was always met up with encountering people who did not realize that there's a world outside of the small town outside of where Walmart supercenter was the biggest thing. The happy place. So yeah, it was fun. It was interesting, but eventually I had to get out of there because yeah, I'm a queer person and it's a small Texas town. So you can gather what that means. But I had to go find myself. I had to get to see what kind of life I could lead being a black bear person. And that's where I ended up in didn't Texas going to UNT or university of north Texas. So before that, though, you started off at a community college at mclennan, was that in Waco or a nearby Waco? It was in Waco. So I went at the same time, so I've always been kind of an overachiever. I think it's because of the private school education that I had, but while I was a, I think junior and senior at west high, which is in west comma, Texas. We say west common Texas because we say West Texas, people think western Texas. Town called west. You may have heard of it. There was speaking of tragedy. There was a fertilizer explosion that kind of almost demolished the whole town. It was around the time the Boston shooting happened in like 2013, 14. Oh yeah. Yeah. Anyway, so I went to high school there, but at the same time, I did like dual credit, which is when you take government and economics and some other courses, you also get college credit for them. So the local community college that was doing that was mclennan community college. So I didn't actually do full spring semesters. I did summer school, summer classes, and then I eventually went to a transfer those credits to UNT. So I consider university of north Texas my full on college experience in mcclinton or MCC was like my interim exposure to college. Was that a big shift going from like a community college to a four year? Yes. It was more of a big shift because big shift because I had less of a big shift going from community college to a full on university and more of a big shift going from. Going from being very sheltered to just all of a sudden having no rules, no one to watch over me or keep me out of trouble or whatever, no one to keep me from figuring out what queerness is or why identity is. Yeah. It was a unique experience, I would say. It wasn't something that I wasn't used to because I would say going from private school a private education to a public education was far more of a big shift and that happened when I was in like 6th grade where all of a sudden you're enforced to be very prim and proper and no cursing to being in an environment where people are fighting or kids are fighting all over the place cursing, having sex. What did I get myself into? It was a totally different world. It sounds like it was a totally different world. I felt like I was no offense to warm ends, but I felt like I was a Mormon kid coming going to the real world. It was your rum spring yes, but 12, 13. Looking back, it's funny and hilarious, but at the time it was very kind of like scary. So I would say when I transitioned from graduating from high school and attending some community college courses or doing some community college courses to full on living in a dorm, being on a college campus, meeting people from different parts of the world, I would say that was very exciting for me. I just felt very free. I hear that you were dubbed the guru while you were there. Yeah. That was a nickname that my manager at the time gave me. That's funny. I started as a web designer. So I was designing blogs when I was in high school. And online blogs was like my saving grace as a black queer person. I didn't have any friends really in high school. So I would just write online and that was like my ice gate. So in escaping to blog writing blogs, I started designing them and created a service out of that for other blockers. So I would create their templates, their black templates. I learned CSS from doing that. And I think a little bit of HTML at the same time. It also got to flex my creative muscle as well. And creating color schemes and finding this rinky dink image, creation software, editing software. And creating mastheads for blogs and stuff like that. But that led me into wanting to do that as for actually getting paid to do it. And so within a couple of months of being on campus and my freshman year, I found a job flyer for a web designer for the right center on campus and I kind of just begged my way into that job, they gave me the job and after about a year or so doing that the head.

Arlington Waco Texas Christian private school UNT university of north Texas west high west comma mclennan community college DFW South Texas mclennan Walmart West Texas mcclinton MCC Boston
"wagoner" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

08:25 min | 7 months ago

"wagoner" Discussed on Revision Path

"You know, I think we're going to look back in the history books and just see how much repeated trauma and shit black people have to put up with that summer of 2020 because I got laid off right around that time, like in May. Like around Memorial Day. And I remember, I was like, I didn't really feel like going back and trying to jump into finding another job. I had just been at this place for two and a half years. And I sort of wanted to take a break, but I felt extremely guilty about taking a break at a time when people were out protesting in the streets for such a worthy cause and I'm like, I really need this rest though. Like, I don't know what I'm gonna have another time in my professional career to actually be okay with staying still for a few months because we got severance and all that sort of stuff. And what ended up happening and a lot of I think a lot of black folks again during this time I mentioned this is that now you have this influx of companies that are not only pledging to do better in the face of all of this, but now all of a sudden I got work. I'm getting bombarded with offers and things to do and talking to companies internally about ways that they can change their DEI and all this sort of stuff, right? Yeah. But that also being said, you know, this is such a watershed moment and do you think that this will continue and I'm like, no, but also it's not really up to me to do that because you, as the white people in power, it's on y'all to continue this. It's not on us. It's not on the agreed to try to fix this. It's on y'all. And of course, now two years later, pretty much all of those provinces have gone up in smoke, so. Yeah, I think I would say with Redfin, you asked me about Redfin. I would say that I've really seen them try, I'm not trying to be the spokesperson for Redfin because I don't think I could do a good job at it, but I'm really impressed with how they've been kind of like leaders in the real estate real estate industry of trying to do the right thing for not only black people, but marginalized individuals. They've removed crime stats because they found amazing. They removed crime stats from House listings or property listings because they found that the areas that see a lot of quote unquote crime are over policed and are predominantly black or brown. It's kind of skewed data that they're getting. So it's like, why have it on there? It's not clean data is not representative of the actual neighborhood. So let's remove that. And I think they've kind of put the pressure on other real estate companies to do the same. As well. So that really impressed me. Not only have you cleaned up house, clean up your own house, but you're also encouraging other people to clean up their houses too. I thought that was really great. And as you mentioned, this whole conversation is not to bash your employer. I hope I don't want them to think that we're going in on red thinner or anything, but no. No. But I think it's just worth mentioning that during that time in particular, there were so many friends of mine I know that were like finally getting more speaking gig, getting more design gigs, more companies were hitting them up. They were getting more job offers. And it's kind of bittersweet because it's like, well, yeah, it's great that you see what I'm able to offer, but this is what it had to take for that to happen. And for it to not even be a sustained thing, it's just sort of like this one spike. And then that's that. It's crazy. Yeah, it's interesting because it's like, finally, for me, someone who's been in the industry for almost 15 plus years, who has been around a lot of designers who get awards and things like that or whatever, or just get a lot of recognition. It felt good to finally be recognized in some way, but it was also bittersweet because it's like, I've been here. I've been doing the dang thing. I've been doing a great job at it and you're not really in a sense. It's like you're not really recognizing me the work. You're recognizing me the black designer. I'm more than that. I do more than that. Yeah. Or if anything, they're kind of trying to, you know, maybe wallpaper over some corporate guilt. Yeah, exactly. Well, not to dwell too much on work or anything, but I'm curious. What's a typical day like for you at Redfin? What's your day to day look like? So my title is product designer, but we don't our design system team is very small. It's just mainly me and my co lead who is a designer as well. So we don't have a we don't have a direct manager. We don't have a product manager in our quote unquote pod. We work with an engineering team, but they're a separate team. They're not actually a part of our team, but we work very closely together all the time. So my day to today is looking at road maps and kind of filling in for the product manager role. It's also doing some design tasks as well. So designing components, researching systems, checking in with my co lead to make sure that we're on track to meet our goals for our MVP of the design system. And things like that, sometimes we get questions from our design system customers, which are designers and engineers from the company, if I know the answer, which most of the time I don't, well, chime in and help out wherever I can. So doing support, thinking about educating how we're going to educate our customers about the new system that we're working on, checking in with our stakeholders. As we're building the design system to make sure that we're in alignment and we're doing fulfilling business needs as well as our customer needs. And then also making sure our partners, we work with, to build the system, our happy and aligned with us as well. It's a lot of engagement. So a lot of communication, which for me as an introvert, can be a little draining sometimes, but I would say that I have a pretty good self care regimen. I could do better, but I try. I try my best. Yeah. I think you know, especially throughout the pandemic, we're all just we're trying to hold on, especially with all these other things that are happening on the world that are not pandemic related that are still compounding stress. I don't want to specifically give name to any tragedies, but for folks that are listening, they know what's going on right now in this time in the world. So it's heavy. It's heavy. It's like a landmine. You're just walking through this really beautiful field and you come across land mines here and there. Like you mentioned not to name any tragedies that have happened. But there are so many. So take your pick. But each one of those kind of it affects me, yeah, it affects me in some way. I'm an empath. So I see people hurting and I want to do something. I want to take the hurt away, but I can't do anything about it. I feel like the closest I can get is donating money, but I just feel even that feels like it's not enough. So let's switch gears here and learn more about you and your origin story. You mentioned you're in Austin, Texas right now. Is that where you grew up? I did not grow up in Austin. Austin was always this cool city, but I grew up in or near Waco, Texas, which if you're not familiar with wake up for some reason, it is in the center of Texas. Central Texas, I grew up in a very small town, maybe 15, 20 minutes north of Waco, very small town, we're talking less than 900 people. Oh, wow. Yeah. I'm from the country. Right now you're probably not hearing my Texas accent, but it's deep in there somewhere. At a certain point, my mother who, at the time, was a microbiologist, couldn't find a job in the Waco area. She was also involved with the military..

Redfin Texas Austin Waco
"wagoner" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

04:28 min | 7 months ago

"wagoner" Discussed on Revision Path

"Are you looking for a new job? Are you hiring but can't find diverse talented candidates? You're in luck because we just upgraded our job board and we're here to help you out. Head on over to provision path dot com slash jobs where you can browse job listings, post your own jobs, and sign up for email updates when new job listings are posted. This week on the job board, co forma is looking for a senior software engineer. This is a remote position. American Express is looking for a product manager in the United States. And work and co is.

"wagoner" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"wagoner" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"To imply government debt is bad And then went back to say no no it's not bad It's good when government spends well what is it Is that bad when Donald Trump accumulated And Biden do What is it No the economy what I'm saying is all of the things that Donald Trump did Over the last two years are now piling on the fact that he did not want to spend money on he didn't want to take the vaccine seriously the masked seriously Hundreds of thousands of people died because he didn't take it seriously Workforces were not taking huge hundreds of thousands more times But hundreds of thousands of people leave that all out That's amazing She says that's not true at all Oh Moses It's not true at all Folks 350,000 people have died since the inauguration day Since Joe Biden was inaugurated Why come on the air and lie I don't understand Maybe she's not lying I don't want to impugn her character Maybe she just doesn't know Maybe she's just this misinformed like most of the left But you ask a lot why do I do that Why do I put left this on that's why Because it's important that we prove the people who may be down the middle watching that for the first time that we're on the right side of that Someone for the first time I guarantee you went to the Internet after that debate and probably said did more hundreds of thousands of people die since Joe Biden took office from coronavirus Oh my gosh yeah they did Wow I didn't know that I haven't heard that from the media Yeah you haven't have yet What about natural immunity Not here in much about natural immunity from the media Are you Why Because ladies and gentlemen there were only two approved narratives right there Right now both narratives conveniently fit in with the leftist power structure There's nothing the left wants more than to evaporate your civil liberties like an alka seltzer tablet water That's all they want The left socialist empire can't possibly advance forward and they can't move the ball when you have big individuals You get a big individuals you get a big government but you can't have both The left understands that You can't have big bold liberty loving individuals and have big government at the same time Freedom is a zero sum game either you have it or the government hasn't Either you have your money in your free to spend it or the government hasn't Either you pick your doctor or the government does Either you pick where you go to school or your kid goes to school or the government does You can't have it both ways The left knows that Coronavirus is conveniently worked for them to shrink the sphere of big individual liberty and make it smaller and smaller and smaller into small individual liberty and big government and they are moving the ball with every new variant And any narrative that gets in the way of that And mandates and softening body blows and softening you up to mandates and getting used to the government telling you what to do and less of you telling you what to do They love Therefore when the natural immunity topic came up all of a sudden the left doesn't want to talk about it Hundreds of years of immunological research out the window because the left is decided all of a sudden natural immunity doesn't exist Let me read for you a headline John Solomon just a news site COVID survivors with natural immunity at low risk for reinfection or severe symptoms study finds Why are we hearing more about that Why is the only thing we're hearing about is Donald Trump Donald Trump Donald Trump Donald Trump killed hundreds of thousands of people Donald Trump said in Jack bleach vaccines vaccines weird Donald Trump's warp speed was responsible for the fact that the left only loves the vaccine at its convenient which should tell you what these people are full of stuff And I'm not talking about good stuff I'm talking about hit with an acid in front of it That's what they're full of They're full of crap folks I'm really sorry some people on the left side of the political aisle continue to fall for this nonsense These people are full of it 350,000 people have died since Joe Biden raised this right hand If Donald Trump was responsible for hundreds of thousands of dead then Joe Biden is even more responsible But no that doesn't make for a fancy political narrative Joe Biden's a big government acolyte They love that So whatever they have to do to butcher's Joe Biden to make sure your individual liberties decrease They'll do it Even defending this failed senile old man in The White House They will do anything They will sacrifice their credibility They don't care if you fact check them on the air They don't care about anything They never get exposed to the leftist goofball fact checkers out there like bailiff whatever wagoner or whatever the hell just emailed me Never They never touch these people That's why these leftists live in a fantasy land that doesn't exist They're getting people killed They're getting people killed I got more on this natural immunity story and another study about masks and your kids This time from some Brown university researchers Some possible possible correlational data on how mass could be damaging your kids You think they care the left nah They'll double and triple down More on that coming up after the.

Donald Trump Joe Biden Biden John Solomon Donald Trump Donald Trump White House wagoner Brown university
"wagoner" Discussed on Charger Chat

Charger Chat

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"wagoner" Discussed on Charger Chat

"So the clock stars you'll s mind. When i met justin herbert's biggest head of the goal is to just keep it rolling hike. We have a lot of things to be excited about all right guys. We are back with another bolt insight and we have a very familiar face. We the one. And only craig from the craig experience on bull inside. What's going on. Craig hold on. Let me do real quick on papa. Certified re read fresh certified reread fresh. I liked that certified refresh. I'm stealing that Welcome back on man. We haven't actually had you in this capacity since the draft and had you on the show and talk with one of us. Oh wanted to bring you on. This is a big ass week man. We got our first first game against the washington football team. Let's let's let's out a little bit. let's go back because we had you on a longtime ago. We found out how you became a charger fan. But we got a lot of listeners. Let's redo this thing. let's reverse back to. How did you become charger fan. That guy right there to one So november twentieth nineteen ninety nine. Tcu versus texas el paso or hundred six yards sixty days. Now is a kid in high school. I was Think what ninety nine was. Probably my sophomore year high school somewhere around this and i play running back and wide receiver and i love lt in what i realize was in at that point in time i didn't really have a team in a wherever. He is drafted best going so of course. A one draft rolls. Around make trade with the falcons. They get vick. We get lt. And then as a caveat to mid second round so it was actually really really awesome but from that point on it was the boats and nothing else for me and a family full of saints fan so imagine how that went over right. i end. you're in you're in texas so you're talking a little bit beforehand. Is it appears. There's one team that kind of just taking over little areas little band wagoner's tells a little bit about your neighbors so we talked about this briefly new neighbor and i'm trying not to give them too much grief because they literally just had a baby Days ago and i noticed Once we came back from vacation in jamaica like they hit just moved in and do a big chiefs bumper sticker m. i okay. That's not gonna work and so like i haven't really given minimum. I haven't given them any rough about it just yet. I haven't even told him on the chargers fan. I'm just gonna kinda drop it on him but around my neighborhood louis black away. There's a chief flag flying that came out of nowhere here in recent weeks. And then like in the next subdivision somebody else with chiefs bumper sticker and popping up all over. The place is gotta be bandwagon. 'cause i've outlived here for four years. I've not seen anywhere until very recently so not really happy about it but This is my neighborhood. So they'll have to deal with me. I wonder what the punishment is for like. I wouldn't call it. Flags stealing a caught fly. Borrowing of you dislike relocated it. I wonder what the punishment would would be for that. It might be worth it. See the only problem that biz. I haven't seen any of the chargers fans in my neighborhood or around accepting virtuous threat that i mentioned that before so if things come up missing everyone's been another look for me site. Did you got to other fans with ya. Bowman boom.

justin herbert craig texas el paso Tcu Craig vick falcons football wagoner washington chargers jamaica texas Bowman
"wagoner" Discussed on The Rich Eisen Show

The Rich Eisen Show

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"wagoner" Discussed on The Rich Eisen Show

"How many followers. Mike del tufo. Summer because tj hangs out with the stars in context so instagram. If there is context. And i said and we'll re thank mike we're not questioning the contents of not tapestry. Why would you post that for people to answer. Why do i do hold on. I not once a week. I do a psych might thing. This is one of my thing mike thing i in case so mike his. Here's here's now just for the rich eisen show audience and you know they call it broadcasting because you want to actually talk to a broad audience okay so people might not know context. You've got to continuously broadened things out by providing as much context and people who might just surfing or whatever so for anybody who might not understand the context of anything that mike del tufo posts. It's a puzzle. It's a tapestry. You've got to visit his instagram. You've got to put it all together like so. You understand who mike met. I didn't even know the answer to this question. I don't even know. If i care you care you do i do. I do not last week. I said okay so out of justin. Herbert and david kettner. They're thinking that we were a thing and then realising that we were just. We were really an exciting drill squad at best but You know being a clipper fan. Now i i know what to expect. I can get excited. And then i know that when the playoffs come That the exit is is nigh. And i'm okay with it. Are you going to be okay. When you see me in real life wearing a purple and gold carmelo anthony jersey. How's that gonna say with. I'll be fine with it. You know 'cause you're you're you're van wagoner outta here. I just unlike you with a deep allergy to greatness. I have an affinity for it. I seek it out and sorry. I celebrate greatness carmelo winning title in los angeles. Will you be at the parade. We'd be at the laker parade when melons title did uncle drew. We'll be very entertaining. You misfire me so much throughout my career. Sal in our and our friendship and brockman over here is being inspired by you. When you said deep allergy to greatness. He wrote that down. That might be as fantasy team this year. Yes one of one of our bits is whenever just something funny as a phrase get said by either rich or one of us to one of our gas. I just write it down so i like notebooks full of those for potential fantasy names. That that's awesome..

mike Mike del tufo mike del tufo david kettner carmelo anthony jersey van wagoner Herbert justin carmelo brockman los angeles drew allergy
"wagoner" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"wagoner" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"A very high stakes game of chicken. Is the simplest Packers have to come to the realization he's not coming back and then therefore go get their best deal. Um, sort of. I think they already realized that, though, because this is the situation, despite not having been in the media, up until about a few days ago, has been going on for months. I can tell you that the Rams made an offer and try to try to go get him. There's some back channel conversations they had with him prior to trading for Matt Stafford on the Green Bay rebuffed it at that time Niners did to the Niners did the day before the traffic. The Rams did it before the Stafford deal, and so they've been trying to. They've been trying to get him and bring him in. For a while. The Packers have been flying out there trying to talk to him all this kind of stuff. I think as long as Brian good against is there, there's no way or Rogers comes back. This is just good against or is it Mark Murphy as well? I think that he's Personal animus is with Brian Good against. I think that would Mark Murphy could be patched up. And he had Murphy have had conversations between February and now, But I think that there's Animosity with more than one party, but the split or the hard sell is with good goods. What about John James and the Broncos? What do they do there? That's a tough situation, especially after he kind of he was working out at the Broncos facility. And then when the Players association decided to do this arbitrary, ot a boycott thing, Hey, went along with the team, even though he disagreed with it went home and started working out. And when you're working from off site, you're not covered under team insurance. So he wiped out five million and injury protections and 10 million in salary and he ended up really hurting himself on that one. The Broncos. I mean, I talked a couple Bronco sources. They're very, you know, empathetic. But right now that situation is one where he sees he and the players have really kind of set themselves up for failure in the players Union massively overplay their hand. Not all the players were on board with not doing these OTA is I can tell you that right? It was not Wasn't he wanting to do the O T. A S was that he's not the only guys like Alexander Johnson. These guys were showing up there, guys, they're showing up. They just agreed not to talk about it to kind of keep the unified the perception of a unified front. But there I could tell you that locker room was upset about it. And there were guys in that locker room and said We were five win football team, the optics of not showing up for opiates While we're trying to make a power grab on something we didn't collectively bargain. Eyes is bad and JC trader and some of these guys have massively overplay their hand on this, and they're gonna get a lot of pushback this week because of John James was gonna get this could get really sticky with the union. It could get really sticking with you. So if you had to make a prediction will the Broncos Say sorry. You know, we feel bad, but we need this money to get another right tackle. If I'm predicting something, I suggest that they probably what the Eagles did with Jason Peters a few years ago, which has reached a settlement half um yeah, reach reach a settlement. You carry him on the roster and its equitable for everybody. You get cap savings. He gets some of his money. Nobody's the bad guy in it. You know, when you go forward from there, it's not one report that said it's a season indeed. Injurious another report this So what? Maybe there's a chance. He can come back. Is it a Tauron? Achilles? Yes and partially corn's not fully tourney, And there is some optimism that he could be back for the final month of the season. Give or take talked with my Garofalo, who put that out The second report. Talk with him yesterday, and it seems like that's the hope. But that's more of a hope that a medical diagnosis I'll just say based on The fax that we have That would seem highly unlikely to make and it's Z is more hope and wishful thinking that I think it is anything else. So with the Broncos have any interest in a Gallic Mitchell Schwartz or Charles Leno or what do they do it right tackle. Those are two names that are out there. I don't think Leno's gonna be one of them talked to somebody yesterday they hadn't reached out to him yet with Mitchell Schwartz. I talked to his brother Jeff yesterday for quite a bit, and Mitch is still rehabbing. He's not ready to play. So even if they reach out to that, that's kind of a giant question. Mark still has some back issues, some other names that are out there right now that I would suggest Rick Wagoner, Audie Massey. The more Dotson could be brought back, although I think that's kind of an emergency option and then Cam Fleming and Dennis Kelly would be other. They're going to bring some guys in this week and kind of take a look and see where they're at and go from there. So Mitchell Schwartz. He had a back issue that he's still rehabbing. Yeah, he's still rehabbing that back issue last year's Iranian play in the Super Bowl, and he's contemplating retirement. And the rest of these guys. Anybody stand out to you other than him. Cam plaints. Dawson's old. I mean, he did a fairly good job last year. Yeah, but he's old. Yeah, Dotson's a fun guy. He's good in the locker room, but you can't You literally can't run the screen game to his side..

Dennis Kelly Matt Stafford Cam Fleming Mark Murphy Rick Wagoner five million Alexander Johnson Brian Charles Leno Jason Peters Jeff Mark Murphy Audie Massey John James Eagles February Mitch Super Bowl Dawson
"wagoner" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"wagoner" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"But again, they put together the resume. Since that game has been undeniable, mean Aaron has been spectacular. The back the Packers offense unbelievably good. The offensive line even without David Bachtiar e best in league So I think And you know, they didn't make the adjustments that they have with the offensive line back in week six. I believe that kicked Rick Wagoner out the left tackle on that went poorly granted. At that point, they were already down 28 to 10. When? When Bachtiar he got hurt. I think they're equipped to make the adjustments. But that doesn't mean that they're just gonna make the adjustments and then Oh, now they're going to win 38 to 10. This is a talented Buccaneers team that you can't overlook earlier in the segment called Gave Wayne was all part of a stall technique. I was trying to find the answers and updated results of our poll question. Really all it was up on 6 20 wtmj on Twitter. Champions Countdown Pull number one. How do you feel about Sunday's game against the Buccaneers? 70% bags packed for Super Bowl 55 29.7% say can't shake the week six loss. And that is 158 votes that Aaron so maybe maybe just maybe we have chipped away at our listeners a little bit. My bag is packed by the end of the show 20 minutes from now. I hope you will consider packing a bag when you go home, literal figurative. Whatever it may be, all right, coming out, running out running out the segment here. It's time to kick it over to Greg Hill Last week we played a very exciting game. It was called the three word game this week. We're going to play a very exciting game called the Three more word game..

Buccaneers David Bachtiar Aaron Rick Wagoner Packers Greg Hill Twitter Wayne
Embracing the Spirit of Adventure in the Midst of a Financial Depression

Radical Personal Finance

06:59 min | 3 years ago

Embracing the Spirit of Adventure in the Midst of a Financial Depression

"Of us have a list of things we'd like to do. We have a list of adventures. We'd like to participate in and it's always someday. Someday I'll do that but there's generally something in the way usually it's our jobs because after all most adventures take more than two weeks unless you're in Germany and which case most adventures take more than eight weeks released a lot of the fun ones that we want and so what we often lack is time not necessarily money but time. Because it's just not the right time or I'm right now. I'm building my career or I've got to get another job. I don't WanNa have a gap in my resume. And so we're often looking forward to the next thing the next thing but sometimes a break is forced on you. Sometimes you get laid off. Sometimes everything shuts down and the adventures are closer to home. And so I wanNA give you some ideas to help you really focus on recognizing that you can have an adventure right now in the midst of everything if you will embrace the spirit of adventure you can have an adventure and your own house. You can have an adventure in your backyard. I think sometimes we really appreciate this with children because they appreciate the simplest things they love set up in the backyard and sleep in the tent. We adults take what I want to sleep with a ten in the backyard. I don't WanNa go sleep in the tent in the backyard children. They love it and I think that we can embrace and do really well if we would embrace a little bit more of that spirit of adventure to kick off today show read you a short story about a man named Jim and To my knowledge this is a true story but I read this number of years ago in a book called locusts on the horizon which fascinating book really good book but in this book locusts on the horizon. I found this story. It's called three Buderus with the Spanish presentation pronunciation three boroughs. Jim was a traveling man and he was free. Like few are half white and half native Shoshoni. Jim Grew up in rural Idaho and he knew what freedom was he also knew there was more to life than the rat race when he turned eighteen. He was a natural for the US army to recruit so he volunteered and eventually wound up in the Republic of Vietnam with a special forces after a particularly fierce fight with regulars from the North Vietnamese army. Jim Wound up back in the USA with a permanent limp and missing an I twenty five years later in the early nineteen nineties. Jim decided he had enough of the daily grind and he wanted to spend more time seeing America. He had been teaching survival courses and his students volunteered to help him make his traveling rig. Almost everything. In the project was scavenged or bought second-hand. His Gypsy wagon was an old Nissan pickup. That had been rolled and the engine and transmission had already been salvaged from it. They took the crushed body off the frame and kept the hydraulic brake system. And the parking brake intact. They made a wooden wagoner's seat on the front with a wooden pedal for the brakes. They then used scavenged lumber and and corrugated roofing metal to build a covered gypsy wagon on the old pickup frame into the Gypsy wagon. They put an old woodstove built a bed and constructed storage areas including a hidden lockable compartment to store his guns a deep cycle. Rv Battery was put into its own wooden box. Hooked through a small regulator to a small solar panel this powered an automotive cabin light inside the Gypsy Wagon. An old donated forty channel. Cb Radio and a scavenged AM FM car. Stereo mounted on the back of the Gypsy Wagon was a steel whip style. Cbs China and near the front was mounted a scavenged car radio antenna. His Motor was a team of three boroughs. Harnessed side by side. The harnesses were made from old discarded. Firehoses the rig rolled on old castoff car tires wouldn't have lasted twenty minutes at road speeds on an automobile but it borough speeds. They were good pretty much indefinitely. The three boroughs restrung enough together. That if they didn't feel like stopping man sometimes they didn't they could tow the entire rig with the brakes locked and the tires skidding a small trailer using bicycle rims and tires was made and was towed behind the dipsy wagon. The entire small trailer was a chicken coop for small. Bantam chickens on top of the chicken coop. Jim kept a container of chicken. Feed and a couple of bales of hay for the boroughs when grazing was sparse. Such as when they took a break alongside a desert road so at the breathtaking speed of three miles per hour gem saw America lived. The life met people wherever he went and had more than one argument with the highway patrol. Mostly about traveling alongside the shoulder of the road on the interstate. The last we saw Jim was fourth of July nineteen ninety four and he was camped out. Near the base of CA- China peaks just outside of Flagstaff Arizona. His goal was to head back to where he grew up on the Salmon River in Idaho. His guests was it was going to take three months more or less. He wasn't in a hurry because the journey is what mattered and the destination was just part of that now. That's Jim but I think that if you're going to have an adventure one of the things that you can do. You can embrace the spirit of an adventure. You can embrace the spirit that says it's more about the journey and getting out there and getting gone then about the stuff and if he will do that if you will make that embrace what you will find is. You're no longer bound captive to needing more money as go through these adventures. I'm GonNa give you ideas of how you can minimize the cost. And I think you need a little bit of money but not much if you follow in. Jim Spirit recognized that he needed almost no money for his particular adventure. I mean a couple of bales of Hay here and they're nice. That gas is pretty low. Cost Right now but still. Jim didn't need gas at all. They need a little bit of grass from the side of the highway. And some bales of Hay and you can have a similar adventure if you embrace it. The cool thing is though with a little bit of modern technology you can live more comfortably on an adventure cheaply then at any time in human history you can have all the comforts of home with you on an adventure traveling adventure more cheaply than ever before. It's really really incredible. How much is available to

Jim Spirit Gypsy Wagon Idaho America Dipsy Wagon Germany North Vietnamese Army USA Salmon River Shoshoni Nissan Vietnam Wagoner CBS Ca- China China Flagstaff Arizona
Tourism Worries And Few Takers As More Utah Land Offered For Drilling, Mining

Environment: NPR

03:33 min | 3 years ago

Tourism Worries And Few Takers As More Utah Land Offered For Drilling, Mining

"In late two thousand. Seventeen president trump downsized to national monuments in Utah lawsuits from conservation groups and tribes are still working their way through the courts this week. The trump administration finalized plans to expand access for mining and drilling on many of those lands. The area has more an eleven billion tons of coal plus oil gas and other minerals but as nate Heggie of Mountain West News Bureau reports industry is wary of digging being in and locals are divided on whether it should brick crystal is enjoying the desert sun at a gas station just east of the town of Boulder right in the heart of grand staircase your case escalate any national monument. We're in January right now. Crystal is a local rancher and guide. WHO's lived here. Since one thousand nine hundred six and he says he welcomes. Welcome trump downsizing the monument and calling for more resource development on public lands here to open up for logging mining manufacturing. That trump is doing. I think it's a healthy thing for this country. It gets people to work with their hands. It gets people to produce things and this vast expanse of southern. Utah's Red Ed. Rock desert could produce a lot. There's coal coal seams. There's oil and gas there's some uranium there's tar sands John. FREEMUTH is a professor of public lands policy at Boise State University. He says industry has been kicking the tires of Utah's red. Rock desert for decades access to those minerals became available when president isn't it trump drastically reduced the boundaries of both bears ears and grand staircase landing national monuments but in the last two years big oil gas and mining. N- companies haven't come in yet. Freemuth says there are a lot of reasons for that. Industry is not stupid about the cost of producing things. I think they're pretty you know. L. Fairly a stood on the market and some of that stuff is deep and harder to get to are expensive to produce and in some cases there isn't much of a market demand right right now for minerals like coal and uranium so they may just stay underground but above ground. Another industry has been growing tourism. Tourism is a nope. It's a vital part of this community. Nathan Wagoner owns an outdoor gear shop in the town of Escalante tourism pumps more than one hundred and fifty million dollars into the region every year ear and employs almost half the people who live and work there most of them in the service industry and as people come to enjoy this place at different industries are popping up and foreseeing it. Just Main Street has changed in the last fifteen years and it's good to see it's good to see that in a small town in the west and that's why he so baffled that the trump administration would shrink this area's monuments and expand the potential here for mining and drilling. He says could scare away. Tourists and damage the pristine nature of this place. It's home to towering in canyons ancient petroglyphs and the clear shallow Escalante River. It runs eighty seven miles through the heart of its namesake monument. Jonathan Pack Leeann. Who Works for a local environmental nonprofit. Likes to come here some days after work getting out here for. Shell run its rejuvenating. And it's it's kind of like hitting a reset button undermined. He doesn't want to see this. Red Rock desert become a home for drilling and mining and he he may not have to. If the pending lawsuits by conservation groups and indigenous tribes are successful. The monuments will be restored and off limits to development once again for N._p._R.. News I Made Heggie an escalating Utah.

Utah Red Rock Desert Donald Trump Professor President Trump Nathan Wagoner Nate Heggie Mountain West News Bureau Boulder Escalante Escalante River Boise State University Jonathan Pack Leeann N
Saugus school shooter's motive remains unclear

AP 24 Hour News

00:26 sec | 3 years ago

Saugus school shooter's motive remains unclear

"School shooter dies I'm too requires an A. P. newsman investigators want to know why sixteen year old Nathaniel per how open fire yesterday on fellow students at Saugus high school in Santa Clarita California Los Angeles sheriff's captain Kidd Wagoner no motive a rationale has yet been established two students were killed three others wounded bird how who shot himself in the head died this afternoon sure if Alex fill in a way this says he was a cookie cutter kid that you could find

Saugus High School Kidd Wagoner A. P. Nathaniel Santa Clarita California Los A Alex Sixteen Year
Villanova and Michigan head to NCAA national title game

The Dan Patrick Show M

00:56 sec | 5 years ago

Villanova and Michigan head to NCAA national title game

"Their second national title game in three years and in the process of the final four record with eighteen three pointers in the game eric pascoe with twenty four points in jalen brunson added eighteen villanova will face michigan tomorrow for the national championship michigan chicago sixty nine fifty seven head coach john v lines teamwork coverage from a seven point halftime deficit think we created our defense created some turnovers that we had any fastbreak points out of it but we just stop them they're really difficult this time in front of their bench calling their plays they run some great action michigan's one fourteen and a raw morris wagoner with twenty four points national title game tomorrow villanova in michigan nine twenty eastern time tip in san antonio columbus ohio the scene today for the women's national championship notre dame and mississippi state will tip it off tonight at six o'clock eastern time in.

Eric Pascoe Jalen Brunson Michigan Morris Wagoner John San Antonio Ohio Mississippi Three Years