20 Episode results for "Wadley"

Bitcoins Chance To Lead

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

09:58 min | 5 months ago

Bitcoins Chance To Lead

"This episode is proudly brought to you by next. The only provider offering instant crypto. Credit Lines was let you use digital assets as collateral to get cash in forty five plus fit currencies and stable going next so also offers the ability to up to eight percent daily compounding interest on your digital assets in Euro USD and pay. The company has one hundred million dollar insurance. On all custodial assets provided by the leading custodian begun so that worry your assets a safe when using next get started now a Nikko Dot Gentlemen Welcome. Welcome to the Crypto podcast hope. You're well Roddy. What's happened not well? As same market tumble action not so much encrypted but certainly certainly in the Nankai markets and. Here's something that I've got to say. Here is a theory a foot view from me. Bitcoin was set up for the back of the JC kind. That's really what kicked this puppy off to give papal another option. Something to hedge themselves to have. That's outside of the traditional a financial sector. The Central Bank will that we currently live in now. Hazmat concern if we say bitcoin coupling and correlating with that of traditional markets It's really hurt bitcoin. Here's the reason why it was set up to be separate to that mockup now if it becomes one and the same with that market useful is it for spending not so much That might change. That can change. But let's be fair. It's mostly speculation. All right mostly people to hold a huddle as the huddle is coal up. So if in the markets ton of nayed individuals of the world's ton of Nayed there was to be a safe haven. Full the money to go to if of course we say this corona virus continue to kicking and cause an another massive sell off if they quit doesn't step up to the plight then it's caught a foul. Its first test unless things can file forever but it will filed its first test and I say that is a very good thing because of course we haven't had bitcoin during a global financial cross this top event we haven't had in a major downturn simply because we haven't had imagined downturn since the AFC. Okay which is quite astronomical when you consider that. Spain twelve years or so. I think that that's being well over Joan. This could be as I've said a couple of times. The brakes the Bulls back We could actually say the markets come up quite heavily and steadily for quite some more time yet but with that being said we never really doing. We never really not my concern. Is that if we don't say bitcoin become somewhat of a haven of all risk palatable opportunity for those out Saudi crypto to manage portfolios. Then it's going to really really affect the you know how how quickly the future of Bitcoin will take hall now. That's not to say that it would kill it notable. Not suggesting that foot. For one minute blockchain's an extraordinary technology. Bitcoin is still available. Is still valuable of course for the rest of the markets than and especially if all goes on gold is up today. Three percent silt was up three percent. If we goldenseal these more traditional assets thought to play their pot like bonding plying bonds of being the tenure notes like one less than one percent yield. I believe for the first time ever. If we would say would say this. Play out the way that traditional markets play and allow which is yield's decreasing bonds increasing in value as a safe haven for money and gold increasing. That it really does Nagai any need for Bitcoin Apart from speculation. And that's not what I want to say. I want to see a lot more money coming into the market and has got to give people an opportunity to do so. I think that right. Now we have a wonderful wonderful time We've got the period of time rot now with. Bitcoin can really stand up and be counted. He can you imagine bitcoin. Moving higher as the global financial markets. Continue to full low. That would be two fingers in the air that would be bitcoin scientology cy. That would be massive absolutely massive full bitcoin itself and for anyone who's insulted crypto rotten and of course for me. I am a try to first and foremost fourteen years. I've been trying to digital markets as well as less two and a half years has been exclusively in crypto assets. That's what takes people how to do this now. Starting to say the volatility the is the reason why focus on Crypto at the moment with saying that volatility in traditional markets traditional markets of course have absolutely fine getting a pounding Mikhail sane once again of the Fed come out with emergency stimulus options with with the decreasing of the interest. Right there have not unexpected announcement that they brought out on. Strike the same thing yesterday. minimizing the interest rate on the landing right rotten To its lowest levels of up. We awesome stimulus starting to come back into play here. And the strategy of central banks and and different countries is to try and show the strength but in actual fact it's had the opposite effect. I was around when they cut the libel ride. The discount window full length banks lending to each other back in two thousand two dozen. I will join up pretty sure it was two thousand and night Longtemps Guy. Now and the market soared. Think a think we did we sort of volatility Foley AP appreciate did find During that period that was around the bottom we steadily came back with not steadily. Wadley started to swing around but we did end up coming back from there. So where are we now? What we've been we've Sane. The stimulus attempt will the attended stimulus. Actually having a negative effect on the market by the Mafia guy will hang on a second. It's really that bad then. Maybe we should be exiting the market. If the Fed is willing to cut the right then Jeez you know maybe it is something that we should be very concerned about. Not a higgledy-piggledy virus It's actually the unraveling all the financial markets as we know them right now. That sounds very very brewed. I not But you know the short term might see some very very severe pullbacks and it wouldn't be uncommon to see a forty percent pullback. That's sort of thing we saw that loss. Jeff say so it's had a a negative effect on the markets coup bounce back tomorrow. This is the reason that I focus on. Crypto guys because that's sort of volatility for try to like may is Tom's when you make your money to two thousand seventy eight. Gmc Definitely made me as I try to I went through all that and I'll be waiting for the same. Swell found crypto and that volatility is. They're very very frequently for example today. Bitcoin is sitting down one point. Five percent which is half of that of what the Dow was down now right now as it stands where eight thousand seven hundred eighty two dollars per bitcoin. The market is holding a Ryan Already rang sorry. It's holding in an area that I call the Kreider our and this area right now. Well we're GONNA dial you down trim to wake up to. What are we going to say? Well I don't know something very very very cautious Onto a theory of now to two hundred and twenty four dollars and sixty four cents down three point. Three percent as it stands. The thing is holding its ground in that. Criollos are waiting to see what goes on. Of course try to. We don't always try when it'd be focusing on what is and where we can when we can use the strategies that we employ now employ three trading strategies they'll teach try to call dot com. Check it out. There's a free stuff there if you wish except plays at twenty three cents down to thirty five percent right now sitting in that deadly down a guy sitting in limbo for the time being no real confirmation of trend for me at this stage to familiar willingly but yet the long going short for that matter patients is my program three Cy three hundred and thirty dollars and ninety cents which is down two point five nine percent on Bitcoin cash pretty ugly looking out there as well. Best is pushed down through that two hundred and fifty three dollars. Seventy mach which is a level of support currently two hundred and forty eight thousand ninety six sense that has us down two to three percent lot. Twenty two and a half percent rotten out sixty one dollars and sixteen cents full eos three dollars and sixty four cents down two percent as it stands bonds down one point six five percent nineteen dollars and fifty four cents holding in that range in that cried. We'll have to wait and see what goes on lighter in the trading die for that. Katana is coming up with support. A four point five cents just about four point six to be fair. It's a four-point it. Its down point of a theory of Classic Beautiful Little Cradle in the candle cradles on the daily problem as it's not looking very bearish right now. Which is one of the rules of a half within that trading strategy big year for Theorem classic but it has come off quite a bit with sitting idle. Forty two cents down half percent. Tron is at one point seven cents down one point eight three percent as to round out the top ten in the cryptocurrency mockup. Sagoes keep your eyes peeled. Keep your head down manage that risk accordingly and if you want more information go to try to call dot com. Have a great day. Let's see what goes on. It's definitely exciting. Thomas you WANNA learn how to trade making money with the mind goes up or down you know what to do. Try TO COPE DOT COM as you come off now views and Held in the advert at the beginning of this. Podcast are not endorsed by try to call. This is an advert to sponsor the podcast. Mike you're in decisions and always speak to financial advisor for doing anything.

Fed Nikko Dot Nankai Roddy Spain Bitcoin Longtemps Guy Bulls Joan Nagai Wadley Thomas Mikhail AFC Mafia
James Wadley on Black Culture and Sex & Sexuality

PodcastDetroit.com

27:36 min | 11 months ago

James Wadley on Black Culture and Sex & Sexuality

"You're listening to the PODCAST DETROIT visit. WWW DOT PODCAST DETROIT DOT com before information welcome to smart sex smart love. We're talking about sex goes beyond the taboos and talking about love goes beyond the honeymoon. I'm Dr Joe Court. Thanks for tuning tuning in all right and today's show I'll be discussing black culture and sex and sexuality the Social Justice Movement over the past few years has enabled a new dialogue about privilege power entitlements and access us and this moment in our culture seems like the right time to try to create opportunities for a group of folks who've been traditionally invisible in the research and clinical literature literature as well as national sexology organizations. My guest today is Dr James Wildly and associate professor and chair of the counseling and Human Services Program. I'm at Lincoln University. He's a licensed professional counselor and marriage family and Sexuality Therapist in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. He's also the founder and editor in Chief of the Journal of Black Sexuality and relationships and has a book coming out on Black Sexuality and sexual health. He's an expert on sexual diversity the in race and is on a mission to bring openness and community to those from all walks of life that may otherwise have shied away from getting help for themselves or their families. He's he's one of the nation's best marriage family and sexuality clinicians. Welcome James Wildly. Thanks Fatemi Joe really appreciate reaching out to me and I'm honored to be on your podcast thank you. I feel exactly the same way. I'm really happy I wanted to also make sure we add in here that you edited a book supervision for therapists around sexology isn't that true too. Yes a couple years ago. I actually co edited go with Seagull and the title of the Book is Art of Sex Therapy Supervision and so we had a number of prominent folks near here in far to contribute to our book and and I'm using Argo because it it's always felt like the book belongs to The sexology community and contributors were able to offer their professionalism expertise and their wisdom and just knowhow on how to conduct supervision when trying to help supervise these address sensitive issues yes. It was such a needed book. It's a really good book too. I highly recommend it. so could you tell us that we could just start with the basic here of why focus on black sexologist and clinicians editions what what makes that important for people to understand it. It's wipe for me why not so aw in my training when I was I did my doctoral work at the University of Pennsylvania and of course as I took and you know the the trainings that I went to very little of it at anything to do with persons of African descent African Americans or black folks whichever turn turn like us and so going through that process it felt like something was missing right and as you a- As I went through my textbooks one would be left to believe that you know a person of African descent African Americans had nothing to do with the history of sexology so fast forward no I came back took some time away from the field and came back and when I would go to conferences or being professional space these there were very few people of color there including African American so I already started doing work with the American Association of Blacks in Higher Ed in the work that I was doing was helping them do the conference planning and somewhere in there it dawned on me that there needed to be a space where I could walk walk in and not just be the only black guy walking around for not just be the only black person walking around and I will say that you know in going to different in conferences and even in my program graduate program and beyond wasn't that anyone mistreated me or anything crazier rude or anything to me but but I just wanted to see more people who look like me in the field so at that time maybe about five years ago I started to work on a book devoted to black sexuality and relationships and I don't know something just hit me on a flight between between Philadelphia in Dallas that I wanted to do something that was on going right so I decided that I was going to in try to do a journal and so sometimes I kinda shoot from the hip and I have these grandiose ideas so I put together proposal. Oh and I sent it out to Maybe about a couple of dozen publishers. University brass compress came back to me and a few other publishers came back to me and said come on. Let's try to do this journal devoted towards black six rowdy relationships and essentially the black sexualities. He's just compliments of Greece in sex out and possibly gender so they asked me. They said well James All right. This is a great idea. Who's on your editorial board and I freaked out because I didn't have an editorial board. Wow okay so I reached out to Cali again near and far and and the original board was probably thirteen fourteen people. I went back to brass depressed. I said all right these are the folks who are GonNa read and and read and edit the journal offer appear review experience so away we went so so one of my colleagues who sits on my board or name Sheila Baldwin and she's out of Columbia College Gago she says all right James and we had served on Abad blacks and higher it. She said all right James. You know we have these professionals together for this journal. You know we're ready to go. Have you ever thought about doing you. WanNa Conference and I said Yeah you know I thought about it but you know. Let's go ahead and try it. So the story is is that I hire. I didn't event planner in Philadelphia who went out and found me this beautiful space in downtown. Philly and so the folks folks at sears brandy wine. They came back and said okay. You want to have a conference. what's the name of your organization and so that was like Oh. I don't use profanity on your pocket you can right. This is regularly uh-huh. FCC like Oh shit. I don't have a name and we were not even an entity so I had to go back to my board and I said all right folks. We got got three days to figure out what's going to be the name of this entity that wants to host this conference and so folks voted and we came up with the Association of Black Colleges Benicia arrived in LLC rounded and then signed the contract and away. We went so the contract was signed. maybe about about thirteen months before we hosted our first event and for me based on my experience of doing conference planning the American. Association blacks in high red and then based on my experience. I don't know if I think I told you this job. I used to host parties in Philadelphia Emmy for me. I was like can and I throw an event a nerd event for black professionals a year in advance and do the planning over the year and so I was like yes so well I spent the entire year obviously promoting and you know trying to put it together and we ended up having a hundred and forty nine teeth and show up to Philadelphia via from as far west as the University of Alaska Anchorage to as Far East as why university in Kenya and it was awesome wow it was absolutely awesome and for the first time not only was I involved in you know a circumstance where you have black professionals coming together but all of them were devoted towards sexology sexuality studies and it was great so we've evolved over the years and I've been involved in a number of organizations that are less flexible old and what we are in that I've always wanted to be a part of an organization that had conferences or events on the other side of the globe writing show because of the success of the of our first constant Philadelphia we end up hosting our first Spring Roundtable series in the US Virgin Islands of Saint Thomas well that next spring and because that was that was a success we the ended up hosting our second conference which was in court Lauderdale and then I all again I always wanted to do something on the other side of the planet so I had done some work in Cape Town South Africa and then we did our first international lecture series in Capetown South Africa a few years back so to say all that that we've been to Philadelphia for Lauderdale and Chicago here in the US as well as you know Saint Thomas we've been in Saint Thomas each cheer during the last week in April and what's Nice about that event is that you know people come and share their clinical research best practice pedagogy. We do it on the on the last asked Monday and Tuesday of April and that week is also carnival week so not only can you come and be a nerd you know talk about the work that you do but then you can and also come and let your hair down and sit out on the beach with us in enjoy all the festival spoon culture of Carnival. Well let me tell you what you've done for me and I think a lot of people I can't speak for others but for me just doing all this is like I met you for the first time I think that out of Control Sexual Behavior Summer Conference where we're all talking talking about it from different perspectives I think that's where I met Iraq right right and I sat through your powerpoint and it was the first time that I ever felt like this but all of your slides AIDS featured people of Color if they were images of people and I was sitting there going this must be what it feels like to to be in my audience and all of my Kazakh images are why honestly I had never the only time I've ever thought about it before. It is a couple of years before your thing there was I I talked about in my lgbt presentations. I talked about tw- inks and a twinkies an eighteen year old plus mail who's young and lean and thin and boyish and in a lot of gay men are attracted to him. He's eighteen years old and older and I always have this picture of this white tw- INC and this black woman on my audience said I just want you to know with all due respect black eighteen year old plus can between two and I was like Oh you know like I didn't think about that and I'm just being honest and after lunch he came back and I said look I added added an I did and so I just WanNa appreciate that because I feel like some people went on. I I'll be you know I'm white male. I'm gender but I'm still a minority right. I'm gay and I've always felt my as a minority but but I do have privilege and when someone comes to me and is angrily saying something to me about my privilege I I can't hear them but when it when it sent me as educational or intentional but not adversarial I totally get it and I feel like you do do that and your presentation well. Thank you thank you. I I. I think that was in Saint Louis so I think I was. I don't it was in Saint Louis but anyway in Saint Louis you know I talked about the talk before we talk about race and sexuality and I know that a lot of people's color maybe some people excuse me struggle with their own trauma around discussing race and sexuality and and then there's the generational effect of trauma as it relates to sexuality so then the goal was to have the conversation before the conversation about trump about race and sexuality and so for some white folks they experienced trauma win trying to talk about these sensitive issues because either one they experienced privileged and they've never had a conversation about it and then two they may no some some folks may not know how to empathize with some people of Color who have this challenging history MHM and so be you know I want to be a medium work onto it or try to facilitate a conversation because ultimately that's that's what it is but I think that as professionals we have to be mindful of people's own position or space that the occupy occupy and you know try to honor that and that you know when people come together they they're trying and for me. I just want folks to try to have the conversation serve me too. I've always felt that way as a gay guy you know I I may be their batons. I've been angry and somebody not being ignorant only because of the way they approached me but in general this is an opportunity for us to just talk about this and learn from each other and I just think it's so can you say I often feel that for black and African the American they're underserved when it comes to mental health and addiction programs and sexuality programs and out of control behaviors. I've even had therapy in my audiences. We'll black people don't come to therapy and I thought you could speak to that and I can and I'll say some black people don't go to therapy in the same way that some white people don't go to their exactly or seek medical attention so it's not necessarily stereotype black people no longer the pair that I think that's a people issue and what makes it a people that therapy as you know there's a heightened level of vulnerability owner ability and some people aren't ready to have that kind of vulnerability in their lives experience that kind of vulnerability but then if if we tossed in the racial component in a little bit of history you know the for some black folks who identify with that would some portion of black history where you've had were there is a history of mistrust of medical professionals as well as mental health professionals and I'm thinking about you know some of the challenges that existed with people who were part of the to ski study so here it is you have these black men were injected with syphilis and then you know it comes out that that wasn't supposed goes to happen and that shouldn't happen to anyone and I would say even recently more recently you have of encounters of how some professionals abused their proved in their power to make suggestions for people of color and their communities or their families to make some sort of change no and what that might look like is let's say you are. Let's say I have black family family and the black family has kittens in school. We know that like boys are more likely to be diagnosed with. ADHD or oppositional defiant disorder or kind of disordered compared to white kids so then how how does that diagnosis impact their constructions around masculinity and how they are expected to govern themselves in school. we know that some that black boys and girls who identify as gay lesbian has being are by they are more likely to experience suicide were actually commit suicide compared to white so it's not so much that it's not so much that black folks struggle with vulnerability but then that's a people issue and not necessarily the racial issue but if you you want to use the racial component with it yes there is a history of some black people not all the history of mistrust around you know medical the medical community as well as mental health profession uh-huh and would you say this is something that I know I need to learn more about. I don't Nola UH so there's an African American woman in my practice I I run a center here and her name is Rita Clark and she actually what happens is a lot of people seek her out of color because because she's of color and a lot of people like me out as a gay guy because they're gay man you know or we've an Orthodox Jewish therapist. She gets a lot of so. I understand that people want to come to sameness. S. and I feel like if I come to you'll understand what I'm saying. Now I lost my point of what I wanted to ask you. oh that people typically to go seek seek out therapist who look like them or are innocent web a similar background and the assumption is that if somebody has a similar background that they'll be able to identify with whatever it is. The client is going through yeah. What do you think about that thing's pretty cool and you know it goes into my experience of if you know being in a field like out in about and I'm looking for people who look like me and it was based on the assumption that if I find other black back folks in the field that they can identify with I don't know what my feelings of loneliness and and how they make an assumption that they've been able to manage it up to a point where they could have a conversation with me and you know that that's true for many groups of people where you walk into a room and you may seek out other men or you may seek out other women or you know people who look like you or people who have different backgrounds yeah. I have a similar background. You know I had a client wants a very dark skinned black man who said to me one day he was he had an active prejudice happened to him and he said started started crying. He said you don't know what it's like to walk into an elevator and have pete women clutched their purses and men check their wallets. I see that or walk across the street and a red light and people locking their doors. I hear that and that that affects me and he was right I had no. I have to be honest. I know I've done that over my lifetime and and it never occurred to me how the person would experience it. I'm only thinking about myself and not having any empathy for what that must be like yeah here with my students last last night that you know my office and anything. New Jersey there are very few black folks walking around walking through downtown Pennington New Jersey so I'm I'm very mindful of when I walk outside if I walk outside right now at eleven fifty two. I'm very mindful of my pace. I'm very mindful pull of where I'm going and when we say we stay woke looking around because if you know I got not even pulled over because I'm on I got if I got pulled over by a cop you know my assumption is that anything is possible and hopefully nothing bad happened right but because of you know the trauma that communal trauma that you know some people of color black folk seven or over the past ASC x number of years you know I know that some some engagements but law enforcement don't always turn out favorite right. We see that all the time in the news all all the time. What would you say this is an old. We don't have a lot of time but just specific issues. That may be a little different in the black culture around sex and sexuality. Do you think there is a lot of differences. Yeah I would say a Lotta differences but I I would say that. There's some okay so if you can. I think that I can think of reflect on my training and maybe reflect upon yours. Where did you ever have a conversation of ground. Color is a now eight so color. ISM is discrimination that happens with some the people of color towards another person of color where people of lighter hues are typically judged to be more favorable than people of darker darker right so then if I'm in if I'm in a circumstance where I have if with my partner and my partner is lighter or Darker Debbie how does that affect my response towards him her or them and then how did that impact by one vulnerability but then to sexual response because I may have internalized eight about myself in how light or dark or possibly light or dark my partners never had a conversation like that in India my tricks. I get it now because I know enough folks in the community who can have that conversation distinction. What am I supervise. Z's specialized then texture ISM and what texture ISM is is that there are different textures to people's hair in that some people are more is more or less kinky her than others or straight and others names Donna Orioles so i WanNa make sure that I that acknowledge good so I've never had that conversation at any of the trainings that I that I that I've been to me either in what's and what's fascinating fascinating is that on some list serves the sex allergy community is really struggling with evolving into becoming something else in that if you go to a SAR more often than not you're going to see images of young white folks able body engaging in whatever yes let me just say what people people don't WanNa SARS sexual attitude reassessment. Yes that's the attitude reassessment and just helps people get desensitized to different sexual acts. I just wanted to say that. Keep going. Thank you so then professionals in the field of sexology. They're struggling to think about how they would. Incorporate separate issues that people of Color Fe people of color face then their intimate relationships and there's been a lot of pushback around around. This is what a star is. This is what it should be. This is what you need to credential but as the field continues to evolve into embracing and the experiences of people of Color people who probably GONNA call it out people who are white. They may do themselves a greater service into learning about some of the nuances of what sex therapy can be. I totally agree and it's been really more verbal and vocal on the LISTSERV. Recently I forget the woman's name but I'm going to go to her. Sourby and I have to be honest that my initial response is I feel shame like I don't know this stuff. Why don't I know all this stuff. Why didn't I think of it as important to know but I have to deal with that on my own and just go and like when you show those slides honestly I was like if I felt ashamed like it's such a no brainer to have more than just white people in my stock images but it wasn't now my brain. It was a privileged rain. I guess right yeah and AH. That doesn't mean that you know you or anyone else. WHO's not a person of color your bad or wrong. It just means that all of us have worked totally so let me ask you before we come to close or anything. We didn't address that you felt is really important. In this podcast you want to just add. I wanted to add that. My next book is coming coming out or next for our book is coming out and that book is devoted towards the intersection of Sexuality Studies in in Leadership Studies in so for many of us who have grown in the field. There's never been a blueprint from. How do you get from A to b. So how do you become a sex therapist in Michigan. Where your or how do you become a faculty member and you identify as Lesbian Bisexual transgender or how do you start start a podcast so the book is devoted towards leadership in our field in the title is the handbook of Sexuality Leadership Inspiring Community Engagement Social Empowerment and transformational influence and so the book was titled That Way Because is as we move kind of evolve out of this social justice era right we're in the Social Justice Air People Wanted the field is supposed to be more inclusive more diverse and accepting a different. Peo accepting people of different backgrounds as we move out of that the the next era is how do we lead the communities that we represent and how do we impact and engage communities that we don't rip so I got twenty some folks to contribute articles. Susani contribute manuscripts that are particular to their own background and how they have led or had or how they have lead in the field of six allergy excited about. That's what I tell you. I'm excited about. I I'm jumping out of my the. We'll tell us what they can find you and find that information when it comes out where where can people go they can go to. WWW Dr James lobby dot com the book is being published through Rutledge. I just chose the book cover what yesterday and so the book this is what August twenty nineteen and so the book will probably be out in the early part of twenty twenty. I love how excited you are about your work and excites me to get excited about your work and I really really appreciate that. You came on my show and that you were willing to do this because I think it's important work. You're doing thank you James. Thanks and thanks for listening to this episode of Smart Sex Smart Love. I'm Dr Joe Court and you can find me on JOE COURT DOT com. That's J. O. E. K. O. R. T. DOT COM and see you next time.

Philadelphia Dr James James All Dr Joe Court Journal of Black Sexuality New Jersey Association of Black Colleges Social Justice Movement Saint Louis Art of Sex Therapy Supervision Lincoln University Cali editorial board US Emmy Pennsylvania Sexuality Studies associate professor University of Pennsylvania
"Delta Diamond Fish" (w/ Shangela)

Las Culturistas

1:01:11 hr | 1 year ago

"Delta Diamond Fish" (w/ Shangela)

"Forever. Oh, I see why bullet look over there. Yes. Less culture. Hello, everyone. This is Matt and we have a very special episode today with literally Shangila. I just recorded the episode with her. I am fully gagged. I saw stars born last night. I am also going tonight. I am also going tomorrow night. I am also going Sunday. There is story behind why I'm seeing it four times. Do I have a sick disease? Yes. But I'm very excited. The movie is absolutely fantastic. The conversation was Shangila. I cannot wait for you to hear. However, I did just want to get on here really quick and say it is just gonna be me with Shangila on this episode because Bowen is what working this week. Now I know some people have been reaching out and asking some questions about, you know, bone with his new job, which if you know what it is, you can look it up bitch, but I know there's been some questions about what's going on with Lasco. Theresa's last cultures stays exactly the same. When is still the Las culture staff that he has always been or lock culturally star. If you're going to hound me for my for my grammar Yuval cher's. But you know, we just really wanted to get shandra, I'll be could. And the nature of his schedule now is we're gonna be recording on his off weeks. So of course, there were some stuff throughout the rest of the year that I'm going to have some sisters co host with me, did some really, really fun episodes up in Toronto with Dave Mazzoni and I'm super excited that Jill can booster is going to be hosting my next show in LA. I don't think so, Honey live at the region on December fifth, so, but that should really be it. Otherwise Bowen is still around. I know all my diehard bow and fans are like clambering for their Bo. I am also clamoring for your bo-. He's also my abo-, but I had to get Shangila while she was available. The woman is on one hundred eighty one city toward doing literal press all over the world. I ours born so I was so gagged, I'm sitting here with HP. He is shaking his head because he can't believe that we got her. We had to get our. This is such a fun, fun, fun episode. I guess to hear it. So here we go. Here's me with Sean literally. Shangila Quevedo wildly. Okay. Ding, Dong Las Culturas those calling and hope. Boy kind of tell you. We rented a breather for this moment. We are in union square. I traveled to the talent today because this is I actually actually pretty that we even have you because this person is in the middle of one hundred eighty one city tore now I don't think you guys my remember how many days are in the year a roughly three sixty five potentially three sixty six if you form the leap, but that's a love. This is the busy human being also doing international press for I think the film of the year and I have to tell you listeners. I did go last night and it is as good as you've heard it is stunning. It is unbelievable stars born. You also know my guest clearly from repulsed drag race us to season three all stars. Three. We know we've been around the repulsed, drag risk LA. But this is truly an honor to welcome Shangila to last countries. This hollow here. Yes, I there's never a time that you say, how do that? I'm not cracking up laughing. I think it's the funniest thing I've ever heard. Oh, well, good because I had a lot but all day, then I love that didn't say, didn't sneak into stars born. It did it because I was trying to be professionals character on like this is a care to, however you will find the word professional. You might wanna listen. She didn't want to lose her liquor license. I saw your action. Thank you. Let's stay in business. This is this. This woman is feeling. I also I have to tell you like, couldn't have anticipated this movie more. It is beyond. I think what I could have expected not only in how great it is, but how much you guys are in it like you and Willem are have big parts in this movie, like what was when you got the script or even was a script. 'cause I'm hearing now. A lot of it was improvised, did you think, wow, we're in this thing? No, they're one hundred percent was script, and you know the great thing about it is you never know what's going to end up in the final cut, of course. And so I really didn't tell a lot of people about it. I was thrilled. I was thrilled when we shot it, but I've been in situations before I shot a role in a film call our PD right, and I was like, mom, I'm in this movie and she called me baby in that movie. I said, no, mom, I'm dragged. You've probably and she's like. Baby. I know you you and I in that movie. I'm familiar with. So I didn't tell a lot of people about it because you never know what's going to make site in the end. I saw it last week in London. I was like a, we up in this. Yes, and I was thrilled because you know the script was really, really well written. Yeah. But also when we got to set Bradley was like miss Bradley Cooper, Mr. Brent crude to'real debut, he gets you. He was. He was super knowledgeable about what he wanted and it created this great scene. But he also said to me, you know, shaimaa I know you know this world fill free to go there and if I feel the need to pull you back, I will and baby. I went there because the drag Marsin one hundred eighty one nights a year. Okay. Okay, so it was so much fun. That was your turf girl. Let's do this. Whose idea was it for you to serve full executive real nece while you're doing the numbers because that was harkening back to your relationship with cheetah vein on all sorts three in. Glasses and your whole get up? Yeah. Well, we been that well also three but addictive. I will say in the care too, when you're working with here makeup and they had a great wardrobe and hair makeup team. I actually did my own makeup for the film, but the hair team came with a couple of options. And when they show me the little short rare, brianna cranberry peas on in the film. Yes. Well, and I say, this is the drag on this is not Shangila. She's working, say gonna be on the qual- beyond the cough. The working woman and this gave a berry. The look was very cabaret. When the had in the Leotard and the jacket Britney circus kind of feel. Yes. So I was okay. I'm going with this look when you got a mug like this moment you can pull off a little pad Kabylie off the face shine. I was giving you Monet exchange realness. The pussycat wing call that a pussycat way that was more of like sort of Mary j. Blige. Willem calls it a bus driver. So I don't know. I wrote a lot of buses. The bus still running is what I wanna do. Is it okay? So listen. So you're onset and this is the scene this when you're doing the numbers and William has Titi signed to spoiler alert if this'll week or so. So they'll all have seen them. I know my listeners and they're out seeing stars more in fabulously, but this scene where he starts singing and you guys are sitting there and you're listening to him saying that had to be the guy because he's truly doing it. Well, yeah, and there was so much live performance in this film and even on the days that we were shooting there. It was amazing. It was like being front row for free Bradley, Cooper lady Gaga concert like she when she was doing lovey on rose. She would sing it. Of course. She sing it live and they're doing the playback, but she sing it live and they would say, okay, we're gonna go again. And I was, yes, go ahead. Go again and they did it was it was great front row tickets and then went Bradley's doing his part. He has such a great presence. So like he's just like Bradley Cooper and he's gorgeous, but he's also sweet. And then he's in this characters, Jackson, Maine, and he's there with the guitar. And you're just like, yeah. Yeah. Yes, yes, you can see it on. You're gonna spacious. I mean, well ends like mouth is dropped. Slager I had to tell if I was thinking this woman throws pennies at the stage. I'm gonna leave. I'm just get up. Believe I'm gonna have we believe that it would happen. We had him in the studio couple of weeks ago now I know with anything is possible. True, true. I don't even wanna go there with what happened, but I could just say true. So were you a fan of Bradley Cooper's before this? Because I'm like, I do know that he's this talented is one thing, but I always also just like he was in my top five as we say crushes. Well, you're talking about one of the sexiest man alive. It's been named. It's been said also his ability as an actress. Fantastic. Yeah, silver linings playbook, even him as a comedy actor in the hangover and those films I've always been a huge fan of his as well. And then to be a part of his direct to'real debut. Truly, he was just so professional, but also vary like warm. He wanted. He created environment where he wanted you to be able to do your best work. Yes. And that was real as an actor that was like. Thank you. Thank you. Something I really liked about the whole drag bar scene was this is this guy who's a country legend, and he stumbles into this drag bar, but there's really no comment from him from anyone of like, oh, it's drag bar. You know what I mean? He's just there and he's getting to know everybody. Sure. He's like drunk or whatever, but it did feel like something we haven't seen before where there was no comment on the fact that this is a drag bar this. These are gay people is just like he was there and joying everything. Can you speak a little too that like like what that was like and really watching? It really just feels very celebratory in very loving towards the community, which I'm sure was important to Gaga must be important to you. It was very that and it's, it's funny you say that because you're right. We don't see that a lot on screen in films and in television. But my experiences impersonal with people, especially even straight men that come to our shows and because of repulsed drag race, we have families that watch the shows and women come with their husbands who they're like me and him. Watching. We were so mad, you didn't, you know, that is a part of my life. So to see that it gave this real authentic feel as well to the film. And I love the way that it's written in there that he drag a lot of tons of punchline in movies pass. I think it's very refreshing to see where we're going, where writers are being more aware that this is sometimes just the experience. This is a slice of life, and I think that's what he was having a slice of life experience. And I hope it inspires people on how to treat people that you may not be necessarily from Melia with that particular community. It's not always joke. It's just what it is. Yeah, you just go in there. You experience it. You accept people for exactly who they are. We keep it moving, and I think that's what I mean by like what I was. So you guys have such a big partners movie because you go to movies like this, like and as a gay person. And as someone who's like, loves drag, but you go and you hear shandra Wilmer in the movie, and then you watch and you guys are real. In the movie you appear later on in the movie comeback. Four scene out of this, but it's just so it was so great to see. And obviously that's a throwback or a callback to Gaza's own life, which her drag friends and community that she came up through is so important to her. So I guess my question is like, did she also sort of like, what was she liked to work with in that back room? Was she very down to earth or was it would? There was no heirs about her. She was just back in that old zone. Let me lay down for you. I love lady Gaga fan. I before even being a star in the film with her co star in the film with her. So I was thrilled to be able to work on set with her. And then when I found out that she had kind of hand picked me for this role, I was like, okay, I don't want wanna up. So working with her in the back room, you talked to Gaga for like thirty seconds, and you automatically feel like, oh, this is my homegirl. We're best friends then. Realize, okay, I don't have numbers so, but not best friends, Stephanie level all no, no, no, no, we can't. Love the Gaga level. I love. Pay homage and worship to the Gaga, but working with her, it was such a pleasant, fun experience. You know, when they would call cut between scenes, I would think she's going to go with hurt on charges to the trailer and wait. No kicked it in the dressing room with us. She was like, socially. And how are you really Shannon? I was like, all I'm good l. g. math Gaga. And in that moment, I was like, well, Honey, entertain the Queen felt like just court. So I was like girl on fist started telling story, lift and Bri and just asking questions. I felt like the Oprah. I know she's like, Lord, she's going to keep this Queen shut up, but I was just so excited to be there with, but also as an actress, she's so she's very focused and dedicated to the role and into herself in doing it. You could see when they're called action. She's prepared. She's ready. It makes you want to pull up via better actor as well. Anyone like. I think there was like when I was announced there were some doubts Oli guy was going to do a move. And it's going to be this big deal. We've seen stars weren't so many times Bradley Cooper's I directing. There were so many question marks, but I said to myself, I was like anyone who doubts lady Gaga at all is not a fam- because you've seen her over the years, like reinvent herself. So many times like comeback against everything. I mean you the documentary of the struggles that she deals with. It's like this woman is unbeatable. Well, I think that I attached to her even personally also has a fan in that way because a large part of my experiences, especially with repulsed drag, race has been go get told no come back, get better. Go get told. No, that's all right. Come back and get better. And I think she continues to exceed people's expectations as well with big things like Coachella in the Super Bowl and just so many amazing things that she's done. It really makes you be like, you know what? I can do that too. Very inspirational. I think that the way you say that about her, I do. That people feel that way about you. And that's one of the reasons why I'm so excited to have you here because I do think that you are such like an example of excellence. Thank you really think that just excellence in general, you. I mean like that people like, for example, in the finale of all stars three, when you did your verse mean all my friends are Washington the bar we got emotional. We really did because it's like when you got the whole world screama Holly. She does one hundred eighty one series bitch. I mean, that's that's nothing to scoff at and to think about where you started where you come in and you're the first one knocked out of recalls limits season two came in the door, the dream and no make on your speech. No, yes. Just a baseline here. No, it was. I thought I was daytime, fears you. I'll give a loved light, dusty beats honestly. But then so you come back the next season and I thought you were great on that season. What? Thank you. Even at that point only been doing Dr joining year. I was super brand new, but I felt like Ripon hip brought me back. I was the first person brought back from another season to compete again. So I was like, okay, he's invested in me. I've really got a pull up on this and do a good job. And so I was stressed, but I wanna do well. I wanna have fun. Yeah, but yeah, you're right. I kept pushing girl. I got another. No, but I got. So was the boxer idea, the original box come in the Christmas box, the production teams. I wonder. Like it's a Christmas episode and we want you to jump out and I was like ready, but they didn't put any breathing holes in that thing. Oh, I was just in their sweaty and hot. I was like, come on ru, but it was fun though. Energy was Shangila energy and also extremely hot energy. Thank you since then. No boxes been safe holiday box mailbox. I think children afraid to eat out serial body. You never know. That could be honestly cereal branding idea over at the team, their their phones typing down, yes, cereal brand. You go on this on this perfect instead of Wheaties Wiggins. Yes, Hala Lula hoops. This machine. So then you go back years pass and you cultivate Chandola and you become like this, like sort of this is I feel good saying, sort of like a modern drag legend in a way that you are out there all the time, all sorts through you come in and you are slaying. It doesn't end up going your way for reasons that you could attribute to just them wanting to put on a fun show, like having it be devoting whatever from the other contestants. But you know, you slay. So when you think about it now, do you look back on it kind of just like that was just disappointed that you didn't win. Are you looking at it like that's a reality show and they're going to pull the stunts they're going to pull they're going to do what they want to do. How are you looking back on all stars? Three. Well, in the moment when we filmed it last year right after that final episode when I didn't get voted by the other girls to go from the four to the top two to lip sync, I was like super disappointed. Because I just put so much into coming back and I felt like this will be like the icing on the cake. If I can win this by get to thinking, you know, I had a wrecking balls number one hundred zero wreck, doll, Freddie, curious to know what you would have done was Lord you. The lip syncs were so ready for stunts strict shows in extra. I was going to give it so when I didn't get to dig it the chance that's all I wanted was the chance to show like I totally could do this. It was it hurt, but what I learned in looking back at the season and even processed all that after we filmed it and then kept working. That's all. 'cause I'm accustomed to not getting the crown. So I've been working since he's into three. You just keep going out there. You keep pushing. You keep letting people know you can be a Queen without having a crown. Okay. You don't have to have that crown to be the Queen. So that's what I wanted to do. I went right back to work, and then when I saw it and so had all played out on all stars, I'm so thankful. I was like, so. Oh, gracious. And I am so just sometimes in about how many fans really attached to my story. I thought all because I didn't win. They're going to not feel as inspired as I wanted them to be, but that I hear from people that has still inspire them. You know, you told me taught me how to not give up to keep coming back and even though you didn't win, you didn't like fall apart. Now you're on a one hundred eighty one city tour, which is the largest single tour of any drag race contestant in history for one year, and I'm continuing to get out there and now here to star is born, which is also amazingly awesome. So you know, looking back at I wouldn't change anything. Maybe the very ending. Stars. It before I came back to have bond came back and I gave made some memorable moments and I got to finally be the drag Queen that I always envisioned myself able to be. And that audience, especially the new VH one audience now gets to see that. Yes, that was you at Chandel level hot, let illu indeed. And it also is kind of like an a macro sense. It's kind of a thing of all life isn't fair. Sometimes you deserve it and it doesn't always go your way baby. That's the story of my tire life. You gotta think as many highs as I've had in my life. I've also had a lot of low points. You know, working Hollywood, you get told no million times. I can only tell you how many things that I've been like, okay, this is it. This is my moment. Finally, it's gonna break through and then all of a sudden it just disappears. You like, okay, but you gotta keep going. I broke a leg on stage in New York in two thousand twelve. I remember the Hani I went up for a leap and helicopter debts rock, and you know, I know the d'etre taught it to the kids on. Dance moms. Okay. How to execute the death trap unit done? Exactly. And I came down and release the leg early for some reason and land on it broke the tibia and fibula in my right leg all the. Relining that could be twins, actually. If you. Today tibula fibula we have names for you. And I'd have titanium rod put in the leg with two screws the knee in to the ankle that I still have to the day. Yes, but I and I remember being in the hospital here in New York, I was at lenox hill beyond that gave birth to baby blue. So the good hospital. Thank you. Blue Cross Blue shield. Same mommy essential plan, Sanjay money. That's that PPO. I just qualified actually in the Screen Actors Guild for insurance, October. I, I never broken anything before and then Tober thirty. I broke the legs very thankful for that. But I came back and I had to go to physical therapy. I was on a Walker. I was on crutches. I was on a boot, but I didn't give up. And now this year I'm still able to drop, say, flee and turn the party in cities on pretty much almost every continent except and Artika. Okay. So literally an article has to be a destination now at this point? Yes, performance art, Honey. I've already looked it up the National Geographic crews that goes from the tip of Argentina down to NRT, but you can only go during the months where it's never warm but know right seasonal travel to, and they'll let twelve people off the boat at a time, and I'm gonna do my little happy feet. Number one day, not this year. To be like the season is like between late November through like wearing nice. Yes, dropping well, yes, Honey, yes. Okay. Well, after I guess I have to go ticket. Joe. Go before me though, because I listen, I'm trying to get in the goodness book of world records for the first dragon -tainer to ever perform on all seven continents. And I just got one more to go nothing. I mean, here we go. Do you have a favorite city that you perform? That's gonna be like, yeah, they're different around the world. We were talking earlier. I love Toronto. I love Brazil everywhere in Brazil on love. I'm going to some places for the first time, Australia and London. They're always great, but I'm going to be in New Zealand for the first time in December on Kong, Bangkok, Singapore, someplace in Australia. Camber never been so have new one hour stand up. Comedy show called Shangila is shook. So yeah, tiny, I'm shook this year, so he's taking it. They're really excited. So what are we talking about on the show? Is it a all-stars? Three related. This show is kind of a roadmap recap of all stars three, but it also talks about some other hilarious funds stories, and it goes. So we get in there too. That's amazing. So just like, because I think it's good for people to hear your someone who when there's something in your way, or there's something going down like that's maybe negative or like there's something you are a worker you work through it? Yeah, you have to push what I learned early in my life is that if you don't do it is not going to get done, so you gotta get out there and go to work. Mom was a worker. She's a military veteran when she came back, she was a single mom, and I watched her have two sometimes three jobs at a time even to the point where one time like she had taken a night shift to make extra money for us, and she was like filling vending machines. And she would like load up that low dollywood like cases cokes and I would go with her sometimes and she'd be like, no, go home. You have school in the morning. I'm like, no, I want to help you. So I've always seen that in my life. I was the first in my family to go to college in Dallas. And then I moved out to LA to be an actor and when I quit working in corporate world to be a drag Queen, you worked in corporate, we're all Honey, our PR fish Petit product. You've got it. Got it, became sesame Jack chicken strips. You about that spreading the good word about this, Jack, thank you very much. What I was. Yes, I was. But you know, even at that time knew that I wanted to be an entertainer. We would have an annual Halloween party and they put me in charge or they used to have a costume contest. But I turned it into a pageant of course, gay, you know, the game job and you have those intrinsic gate interests and instincts. They win all people from finance and accounting to be on my in my squad for my talent number. I did bring infected back as Michael Jackson. Oh, okay. Yeah, I one and I remember the at the time, the c, o of TGI Fridays, Richard Snead. He wanted to an Elvis number. Well, he found the gate. I helped him get his Elvis drank together, but then he told me after seeing the show, he goes, look, you're great here, love you here. But if you ever have the passion use should really consider pursuing a career entertainment. You'd be really good and now is probably the time you should do it. So I'm not. I'm not telling you leave us, but he was just saying, if that's in your mind, ever something you wanted to pursue, you should do it. And I listened him and I started saving money at that time. And I remember at one point I said, okay, that's it here. I love it, but I know that people love their jobs there, but that life for me wasn't. I didn't feel fulfilled to take the leap of faith. Hani packed up my car Ella. She was an explorer, elevates flora packed up and moved out west and then literally within a year. So I was going to addition for drag race. Yeah. So listen, I feel like, why don't we talk about quip? And we should be talking about it because it's just the way you need to be brushing your teeth. And it's actually kind of changed my life and I know it's changed Bowen's life. We often talk about how great it is. It's so easy. It's just like it's the revolutionary method of teeth cleanin it's actually real of culture number three hundred forty six quip is the revolutionary method of teeth cleaned him, and here's why you guys the sensitive sonic vibrations are gentle enough on your sensitive gums that you're not like damaging them. I know Henry my ex-boyfriend look at my toothbrushes and he would be like, it looks like a dog use this. I don't know. I'm a hard brusher. I don't know if that shocks you. The fans out there that I'm someone who, like I dunno brushes the shit out of my teeth, but I do want them to be white. And sometimes that can be counterintuitive when you're abused. Your gums with brushes with quip. It's like, you know what? Just put it on your teeth, babe, and let quip handle the rest a built in two minute timer pulses every thirty seconds to remind you went to switch sides, helping to full and even clean. You know, up to ninety percent of us don't brush for a full two minutes and we don't even clean evenly. And here's the thing like that. It was ninety seconds. No, Hon. You need to be doing a full two minutes of claiming. Okay, and that's why you need quip. It was designed to make brushing your teeth, more simple, affordable and even enjoyable. I love a little tickled to my tooth. It's an electric, toothbrush created by dentists and designers. So here's the thing you're not just getting the dentist recommended, toothbrush that you need. It's also designed to feel inclined. I don't know. I feel like that sort of worked. What am I just get to this call action? Because you want to just figure out how to order this and you want to stop. Hearing me talk. I love quip. You need quip and they're backed by over twenty thousand dental profession. Annals. Quip starts at just twenty five dollars and if you go to get quip dot com forward slash ding-dong right now you get your first refill pack for free with a quip, electric toothbrush. That's your first refill pack free at GATT q. u. IP dot com. Forward slash ding-dong get quip dot com. Thord slash ding-dong get quick dot com. Slash ding Dong. Ooh, the clubs are ringing deck the halls. Imagine if it was a Christmas, toothbrush, painted, red and green. You can do whatever you want. Just make sure you order it by get quip. Okay. So this now we talked a little bit about your background by the way your explorer ele. I had a Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo named Jeff? Yes. Upbringings, their evidence, Jeff, the Jeep, but I wanted to ask you, we asked all of our guests this question. So we talked a little bit about you as a youngster. This is a question. What was the pop culture or the culture in your life that influenced you that made you say culture is for me and what I say that what I mean is like what was whether it was like a movie or a particular musical artists or something that's like your thing that you were like? I feel this way that's like defining for me. You have something in your life like that. There were film one. I always loved movies, like sister act? Yes, Mrs. Doubtfire. I just I love seeing artists on TV that were able to like go into different character. Like what the undercover of whatever it will be again, hilariously funny. And that was a part of my scape grew up in Paris, Texas. There wasn't a lot of gay culture or any of that, but I also there wasn't any particular one particular music artists. I love Tina Turner. I love beyond say, figured you love. Oh, t- non snatch kit. Oh yeah, you rate it's natch game performance. Say that even with the Holly lose even with the okay, don't let team. But honestly, it was less artists and more music, high energy dance music just gave me this spring feeling if I could turn on some that had a good beat. I just wanted to move. I wanted to dance, and I think that is part of the energy of me like I just love a good time. I love when you're just having fun, and that's why I love being on stage. People go. Are you exhausted? One hundred eighty one cities. I'm like, no, I'll get my life and I really do. And then to be a part of this, you know now to be working in Hollywood as an actress, still entertaining. It's the same energy and the music in this film to like all of that is just motivating. It's part of my thread. So yeah, that's it. Just it's so crazy for your journey to end up at this particular not end up, obviously. No. I'm just saying like at this moment for it to be literally, a star is born, which is a musical, which is, you know, lady Gaga it turn. It's going to be hurt breakthrough. The next level and I, I hear you. When you say you're not, you're not tired or not. Well, you must be tired, but you're not like beat down by your excited about the one hundred eighty one cities. How often do you ever get to like? Just sit back and be like, oh my God, like I get to actually do this each and every day in my life and not only that, but it is at the highest level. This movie is going to win several Oscars. It might be nominated for like eleven or twelve. I think these amounts is driving and I'll tell you. Because I'm on the go so much the London premiere happened. It was stunning. Thank you. Oh, my. Gigamon toil. You again. Ooh, but I will, you know, that was on Thursday. And then we had quickly popped into the after party. And then I had a show at j why heaven at one AM I was on stage and then at a meeting right after that and then a showered quickly to get on my six forty AM flight because I had a show in Atlanta when I landed the next day. And then I had Latrice is wedding the next day. And then we flew to New York. So I really had a tree on, no right drop them in negative. But that being said, I didn't really have a big moment to sit and be like, wow, this morning. Well, I was going through Twitter and now more people are seeing the film and I usually I can check like, I try to check all my Twitter messages and DM's like I'm on that. I'm attached to my phone, but I had so many. And people were saying such nice things about the film. I almost cry. I was sitting there in a hotel and I'm like, okay, go pull together. But I was like, this is wow, this is amazing and not just for me, but just to be a part of this film and to know a hard work, but not just that. But like to be with lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper and just amazing cast in a mate and to see the film. Again, last night, I saw it last night and take it all in like fish. It's me up. And in addition to that, like this is an amazing. It's a great movies, flat out SOGA, I'm thrown. So the fans, it really is like even meet and greet and stuff around the world. I'll get messages and notes from kids or from anyone read them in the dressing room or later on that night. And I'm like, I'm really, this is cool to be a part of something that is means something to. I mean, well, you might not. You've seen it. You saw it last night. Second time you've seen second time? Well, in my experiencing it last night and I saw it at a press screening. There was applause when you came out. And I know I told you tonight, I'm seeing it with. I swear to God. Me back there. Clapping. I thought I felt like it rhythmic clap to working girl, but. I'm going tonight with thirty gays. Like I even posted on my story like the ticket stub. I said, this is when we're going, come buy a ticket. Let's sell out this theater. So I know everyone's gonna go wild tonight when they see you. But even in the screening like and I heard this woman next to me, that's. Colleague or whatever that is chancellor. Oh, she was in the know she was in the. No, she has. She had it all. She knew the cast, but it's just crazy. And so I really, I hope that you do give yourself those moments because it's just insane to me that you had to show when after the London after those huge London, premiere of star is born. You're in a photo with lady Gaga Bradley Cooper, let's get out the dress and do a gig, Todd, I'm a working girl, Honey and checks. Okay. But in addition, there are so many great fans in London, and I wanted to celebrate with likes, let's party and we had a great time, but I'm learning how to take it in have a second I journal allot. Yeah. So maybe the memoir one day. Of course. Jennifer Lewis says, Honey, write it down. Yes, sure. It's dictated annot tainted. I did journal a lot about it and sometimes I go back read it because it's like, wow, this is a cool moment, but I hope to have many more, you know, hopefully this is just a great start. I'm hoping to get more visibility and just, you know, people to understand that not only are dragging our -tainer but also interested in working as an actor. Do we have more products lined up on the pipeline? All this always got a job on a. Yes. I'm actually filming an episode for a Netflix series. This weekend. I'm featured in a couple of episodes of Elissa Edwards, new docu series wanted to the house of our. It's our things there. Things are good. I listen. I have been friends for God before even there was a Shangila. I used to back backup dance for her in Dallas in the pageants. So it's really cool like to drag race. And then she was on drag race and we toward together. We've been great friends for a very long time, so it's really cool to be able to celebrate each other. Accomplishments right now as well. And I wish Luganda as well. She's all over the place. I think she just landed in Beirue today to do his show tonight. So everyone's on their tracks doing their thing. And we always like when we circle back hot five girl keeping, we want to see her on all stars. I think Gandara I'm surprised she hasn't been on, you know, I do too, but you know, she's always said that she wants to focus on her dance as well. She started that Lagaan just dance school thing. She did. I know that she was teaching at young arts a program in Florida. So she's she's on her, and then she was on dancing with the stars. Do you think? Yeah. Yeah. And that was that was wild and it's crazy like Eliza and Lagaan fills like dance education is really like in their blood. They truly love that. Well, Luganda was the student Alissa school also taught at list school in Dallas. I used to back up dance and do our rehearsals at Liszt's dance studio in Dallas. So she's creating a really great home for a lot of people, and that's why we're so happy. I love her as my friend and so excited for her. Have you always been a dancer ever since a young age? Because it seems that been, I've always been excited to Dan. I have never been trained, but I did meet Judith Jameson once as which is graduated in Dallas and all my friends, all the gays were. Okay. All the gays when a dance department. So I used to, of course not all of them, but a lot of the dance to gays. So I would when I first came out when I went to college as eighteen. So it was a whole new world for me in a lot of them have been out since. Forever from New York, and I was from Paris, Texas. So so people all over this country came to this college just by being in Texas, the meadows school of dance is one of the most respected, Dan schools in the US as well for arts. So yeah, I just remember I took one class over there and I thought, oh, Honey, I'm dancing now. Yeah, yeah. Love to dance. Yeah, think it's a great way to have a great time and communicate with people. Plus I not talk a lot, but Latrice is wedding me and Bianca cut the rug Honey, all the girls at the wedding. Well, it was me the ones that were there because it was also during New York drag Conwy. Right, right, right. But and it was in Atlanta. It was me Bianca, Willem, Manila. I'm forgetting Kennedy. Jasmine masters, so fun. Yeah. So we all had a great time that had to be dance for, oh, Honey, you know, move over. She didn't even book, but we did a booking. We all drag, no, no one was in draft. Okay. But a lot. People at Latrice as wedding did come in drag, and it was such a nice thing. We get to see each other in the clubs a lot or working. But to be there like in our little suits and ties and like celebrating our friend, their love for each other Latrice and Chris, it was really special. How long have you been together? Many years. They've been together for a while because I remember on Latrice Susan, she had this moment where she said she did annot of she believed in herself. Getting married. Yeah. So now we have obviously the turnaround. Well, she said that to during her speech in between the tiers, it was if it were crying. Lord, I'm crying over him room, good light based powder. But yeah, she said that I never thought this would happen for me. I really didn't believe in it. And this person, Chris is changed my life and changed online, and that's really cool to see that. You know, it's been an emotional week Sunday. I mean, Saturday, that wedding. And then when I saw star is born last night bawling again, you know, we can't help it. You can't. You really can't. There's so many scenes in that movie where it's just like you feel the tears coming down your face and you didn't even expect. Well, you know, I was trying to be all professionals. Quick white. You know what you swipe it like real fast here comes into this gone, but there were so many because the movie is so powerfully, emotional, and I love that we get to bring some light and fun to it as well, but it's a great. That's the thing to expect it to be as funny as it is. The horse. You're even like even Gaga. There's a scene where she over pours a shot and just the way she reacts. Little things that you don't see from her because you never see her out there being the grounded lady Gaga, you know, you see an for so many years. I thought when people were like, maybe she'll act one day I was like, but who is she? There needs to be like, we need to see who that is. And now you truly see who that is and just unsold excited to see more and seeing the film. You saw two people at the top of their game, really going in with these characters. I swear it was like a masterclass performance alone deserve the accolades, whatever they may be to come because you could take. They were amazing together, true, amazing chemistry. But you could take those performances and sit them by themselves and look at them and be like, oh, she was doing that even especially other people, Sam Elliot Ramos, the great great performances, so good. And you guys clay sickening truly great and like such a believable father, yes, character and you could tell. I think I read an interview with Brad. That was saying that they had seen major names. I heard the word Niro Fulda through the air. Yeah, I could see, yeah, but then you meet someone like Andrew dice clay and it just feels so right, and I love the kind of atypical casting this movie that you would never think Andrew dice clay. Dave Chapelle on. I mean, Angela, but the thing is, I think that is the coolest thing, and I think that's like part of another credit to his directing and his is just like he knew exactly what he wanted. He also knew went to listen to her and her instincts, and she obviously said, we must get Shange that Willem for this movie lamb thankful. I told her when we were together at the so house in London. Didn't that sound. We were the so heavy from Paris, Texas. When I was sitting with lady Gaga London shares in my darling with my mom there by the way. Tag? I, she said to me Shangila. When I saw you on the carpet tonight is the true story. Wow. I can say this is private. She said, when I saw you on the carpet tonight I looked over and I said, that's a star. Wow. And I was that's not even more. My head was thing. I was happy. I was standing the course it was so tied at least kind of bring. Let's it. But she and I said, thank you so much, but you have no idea. I, I'm in like I'm battling in Amish in worship to you gave me such a great opportunity. She goes, all right. Keep going. Yes, she said, keep it going, and I will forever be grateful to her and to Bradley for what they've given me with. Allow me to be involved with this fills just so much beauty emanating from her is just so much obvious love for our community so much obvious love and passion for what she does. And I do feel that from him as well. And it's so interesting you, you mentioned the chemistry between them, you fully believe that they. They fall in love in this movie. Yeah, in seconds. Yes. I mean, there's like that the sequence of them spending a night together and they don't sleep together at first. It's just very kind of very meet cute. They have this wild night where these things happen in a bar at cetera, et cetera. And it's just like, this is such. And we've seen this stores more. How'd you seen the other stars Bornes? Yes, yeah. So we've not all of them, but I've seen so Barbara familiar. We're familiar with the Barbara version, but the thing is like it's just feel so new and so off entity. And what I feel about the movie is it feels like a big Hollywood movie, but it also feels very small like that. Same with the cake on her face, yes, or the scene in the parking lot. The way it was shot was really cool. And it almost felt like like, when you see a really indie movie, you know. Yeah, that was a true testament to the directing and everyone who worked on this film is fantastic and the chemistry. You're exactly right because, you know, this is Bradley. I think modernization of the story. He kind of like revision realized it, and you could see there from the previous versions. This one is like a retake on and it's amazing. Yeah, and sex. I mean, just the chemistry between the two. His height was we were standing there. I was like, well, wishes character hint fall in love with mine, but. Okay. Even his like alcohol to Spero like you can't deny. This is still Bradley Cooper hollow Holly all honestly. And the thing too is like why? So I didn't like it was a theater that I saw it and it had the Dobie digital. Oh yes, we heal it in your seat. Okay. For real because you really think you're at a real rock concert like this. Just like I recommend a straight up trolley is nodding. Publicist Charlie, who we love. Yeah. Well, why do you wince you don't want the spotlight. Oh, no. But you the sound mixing the sound editing. Listen to me sound like a fucking films. I love. I love. These are the awards that are given out at six o'clock. He's like Moore's that were cut from this year's broadcast area. Important though. They are important. I was saying, like I hold my friend, Don. I tried to run. I'm like, are we at this concert? Almost smell it. No, it was because the music is such an integral part of this film because it also tells the story. Yes. Yes, it made me feel like I've been every Gaga tour. I've been all of them. Okay. Fan, I the okay. So when you sing her and she's playing at that in the cameras right there in that face, but you feel it, you feel the music and it's part of the emotion, and that's why this film does have so much heart. That's why people cry because you are in it, you're in it. And I hope that if anyone watches it, get to feel it the way that we've seen in felt it. Yeah. I mean, truly, there's a couple of scenes like not to give anything away, but there's just a couple of scenes with like between the brothers that will get you and obviously seem between them the final song. There's a certain cut end of the song that will destroy destroy any with a heart. Yup. It's just crazy, and I'm thinking, I also can't wait for the soundtrack. Come out. I got it off your order, you got it? Yes. Well, I don't have the right, right, right. But I haven't preordered but you know. Got shallow. That's really all anisia is doing. I didn't know if you get like special preorder, Shangila copy that MS l. g.. L. g. l. to meal Jeep lead. We're about to get it. And that's thing. Do you watch the movie? You hear little snippets of songs and you're like, what's that for the soundtrack? Because of course you're not gonna hear every hole out. I'm about to break into the SNL well to performance song right now, there's so many good ones like I'm just and when you see the preorder there's a lot of tracks on there so you wanna just like click through and get your life. It's like one of those walking through New York kind of albums. You had the headsets and you're like, I gotta go from thirtieth street all the way up to the sixties. Watch me, walked puppet album. One hundred percent. I have a question for you who is inspiring you right now, whether it's another Queen or like a certain like artists besides lady Gaga who we've discussed in for, is there someone that you're watching right now out there that you're like, okay, I think they are. I'm going to ramble a couple of names to you because I really, I really inspired by these people. First foremost Jenifer Lewis. I mean, the legend, the legend, and. I'm so grateful, and I've been blessed that I get to. I moved into her basement seven years ago, and I've never left because I get a masterclass in Jenifer Lewis on is still to this day, how in control you always tells ab- ever. Don't worry when you come home, your things are going to be at the streak too big of a stone. But she's such. She's like my LA mom and she's taught me so much. She's been the business thirty years. Yeah, and she's whether the ups and the downs of the world of entertainment and still manage to hold onto herself, be successful and be a good person. And like that inspires me at all times in addition to her beyond say, I saw on the run tour just recently in Dallas and seeing knowing where she is in her world and at her level, but the fact that she still gets out there and gives you one hundred and ten every no Dollond Ainhoa phone in. She goes for it away. Makes me like Shange. Okay. I gotta get to the house like any new costumes. I need to give the new mix gotta do better. It's inspiring. No matter what you do. Yeah. Even I do comedy and like stuff like that, but I saw her show, you know, I saw I've seen her three times, but the most inspiring time I saw her was the four album. She did four shows at roseland ballroom. Yes, small. So I was like one hundred feet away from our cause. I got there early, but this was the four album which to me is genius album. And Jay z is sitting up there like in the balcony watching her, and she is on top of the piano singing. One plus one giving the fantasy and you're like, wow, this feels like a moment. There's the sound is all around you giving her everything during end of time. Corio didn't miss a step showing up every dancer being VO one. The up two months later. She does the mic drop on the VM as and she shows that she's pregnant. I was like, are you telling me that this woman was three or four months pregnant when that happened on believe beyond, say beyond say, and that's all there is. So there's Jenna Lewis beyond say, and then my good friend, Lena waif who? Yeah, yeah. Now, Lena and I, this is the fun story. Not a lot of people know this Lena and I started around the same time as a systens in LA. She was Mark Brown's assistant for a while, working on the show girlfriends for BT and I was Jennifer Lewis assistant in Mark. And Jennifer have been best friends for like twenty thirty years. So they're like, well, since we're best you guys should know each other. So lean and I would like go out to lunch or whatever hang out, and then we became really close for. And she wrote the first short film that I ever did about the time. My car was stolen call body of a Barbie. Yeah, Lena told the store and she was like, oh, baby. I'm writing this into a script and she didn't and produced it and it got on BT like in a short special thing. This was a bad makeup Shanji way back in the day ID my own look and and then like my car ran out of gas like twice. She's the friend. I call it a pick me up and she would come out over the gas came. We're on the side of the one on one in LA, like pouring gas to my car. So this is I've known her for a while and I know hard. She's worked and now to see her getting her shine and she's such a smart person, but also a person who gets the job done. And she encourages me like, I'll be like, Lena. She's like, you know, Yoko Lena. She's like, y'all, look, you need to get. You need to get your team. Together, yo cause this time? Yeah. She's like, sometimes she'll gem I got a role for you, but you ain't never hear you on a tour. So when you come home so you can do your job and I'm like, I'm coming out promise. So I love her so much and she inspires me trees. History-making. Okay. Yes, Hala Lou. And that is such a cool thing too. When you when you think when you have a sense that the community that you're part of his special, and then as you start working and working and working and things happen, you're like, wow, I was right. Yeah, know what I mean. That's super special. It is and it's amazing to I love being gay who love being gay and it's a, it took me a while because you know, I grew up in a very southern Baptist household as internal my grandparents every Sunday, and you hear messages like gays, wrong, and homosexuality and San, you're going to hell. So I didn't embrace being gay. I'm like, I'm gay darn wish I wasn't gang kind of thing. And then when I got out there on my own and started like learning about who more of. I was and coming into my own learning that everything that I do. I should love if I'm doing if I'm a good person, I'm out there just being myself. There's nothing wrong with being gay. Then I was on this journey and even being a drag Queen, you've just build up even more confidence in yourself. So people who love themselves also inspire me to continue my stuff. I'm so inspired by like kids to come to our shows and they're like figuring themselves out, you know, trans kids are gender non conforming, whatever because or even like strike is just that's my gay friend. I love her because I didn't get that until later in my life. So to see it happen for people who are younger on like good for you. Good for you, and it also takes their. I've spoken with many people on this podcast that that you know sometimes looking at that generation there is that little part of you. That's like. Wow. Yeah, only I had been born fifteen twenty years later. Five years. Yeah, it's like I could have had that, but you have to be grateful for the adversity. You do how maybe you wouldn't be the workers that you are true. I tell people that all the time they're like, don't you wish you at one drug race threats at? No, I wasn't. Apparently. I wasn't ready for it at that point. And even to this point where I didn't win all-stars three, that wasn't in the cards three, but I've never given up and that means something to me. And hopefully it means something to someone else as well. And I think it's really cool. Hell like, that's why I love being part of this movie because somebody some little gay kid is going to be able to go down to the Paris, Texas cinema, movies, eight. Yes. And one of those screens there Shangila who grew up right down the street. You know, in this community went to Saint John Baptist church and there she is a drag Queen and her best life. Yeah, in this film. So not only does it mean something to me to be able to work as an actor, but it's a message as well. Well, that there is acceptance out there for you absolately it's actually, you know what it is. It's literally a very Jennifer Hudson narrative. Oh, we did not win the gig, but that stole the the whole applauded for her when she sang song dream goes up law from me when I come on. Oh my God. That's what we need. Is you guys host the Oscars? You will. I'm how about that? Oh, I love that. Host the Oscars host, Miss Universe, Miss America, host it all. Again, we're saying yes to gigs we are. We're available the nineteen. Nineteen twenty nineteen. Here we come. When does the tour wrap up December thirty? First, my low is New Year's Eve in Columbus, Ohio at access nightclub, come MBA so high Shangila for new years. They actually have Shangila analysts Edwards together. All that place is going to light on fire. It is now with me. Okay. So we're going to do a segment that we do the wrap up the show it's called, I don't think so, Honey. You already know what this is listeners. So we take one minute to rant against something in culture, hop culture, whatever that we think needs addressing down. It can be anything big or small. I'm going to go. First HP is going to timer. Theory is one minute. I'm gonna go first and I'll thirty second myself. How about that? Go on. Here we go. This is Matt Rogers. That's me my, I don't think so. Honey time starts now. Okay. Bitch, I don't think so Honey. When something is overbooked. If there is a number of seats book that many people and I- specially me in this for planes because if I paid for a seat and then I'm going to have to tell my mother, hey girl pick me up at three pm at the airport Islip you know, the one and she shows up and I'm not there because you overbooked. I don't think so, Honey. You also potentially maybe. Was that. Like a couple screenings and they didn't have enough seats. Okay. This is this is. I'm teasing. Not that one another one, but I'm not going to be sitting on the ground, but luckily we did end up with a great seed because some people didn't show up, but I don't think so Honey, the fact that I might have to sit on the floor. I need a thing for my for my juice. I need. It wasn't a, it was a slushy, but I need a little Cup holder for it and something popcorn down. Don't overbook only under book. Second, my legs on the seat in front of me until then I don't think so Honey, boom. And that's one minute you did that. Okay. I got a loss along the way. No, you have your chest tiny. Tell you. Whenever I hear story about someone buying a ticket, twin airplane on an airplane, and then they have to get moved when they paid the same money as everyone else doing overbook Southwest Airlines, I'm looking at you, don't worry. I said, not you as I love me some delta hunting home, or are you a delta Queen delta diamond fish. Delta diamond fish might be the title of. What it is. Okay. So I'm thrilled because Shangila are you ready to do? And I don't think so, Honey. Oh, let me see what I'm going off about them going off. I go off. Okay. So this is Shange says, I don't think the Honey and her time starts now. Okay. I don't think so. Honey, miss Uber eats when I order something in the bag, and I tell ya order French fries and my burger and my soda when I'd get my bag, you have disappeared. And I don't have all the things that I needed in my bag. You know, I was hungry for my meal. Now, meal should show up warm already. Okay. 'cause I've been tracking your process and when I'm looking at six minutes and then it's just four minutes and then it's back up to six minutes, Jamaica pissed off gas. Well, all my things. And when I order French fries, I'm gonna need to have some catch up that should have been known to right catch up on the order. You should know if off sprints prod, you bring some ketchup and might as well. One of those men as in the back to because I like mayonnaise. In my heart, earn money over here. Okay. Foot to put my process my mind. I didn't wanna leave the house wanted you to bring my nice things and I pay my things because you want to know why. 'cause I don't have a sugar daddy. I never had a sugar daddy. I can go out and get one. What exiting and with Athos still might be hungry all. One minute, wow, I con EQ and it's actually rule of culture number. I'm going to say fifty two. If a lady orders French fries, there should be catch up. Okay, thank you. I also love personifying as MS Uber, see a woman like her glasses on, kind of like softly doing her job like Mizzou. Burris you gotta shape just picked up and then dropped it in my hand and hit because she knew I was gonna hit no tips. So she was like our got my deliver fee. I'm good, whatever. I'm doing the bare minimum Mizzou ver- it's okay. So this is what I have to say. Obviously, you know where I stand on the movie stars, born booklet there and see for yourself. I'm actually going to go see again tonight as I was telling Shangila before my mom also texted me and said, I got tickets for us Friday night. So that'll be the third time. And I did also promised my friends Sudi. I'd go with her on Sunday. So are we going to what fourth time? That's why you can't stand up suiting. No, we can't be standing up suit. This was such a pleasure and honor to have you on. Thank you really. You really are just like, I mean, I don't have to tell you you were my favorite on all stars. Three. You're also my favorite on season three. Oh. Leleu my boat. That's the one I actually I was watching with Henry my boyfriend at the time, and I was like, I think Shange alert should win. And he was like, I like Manila, and I was like, this is over. We have divided a manifesto family, but you gotta know being Manila reconnected. The wedding have too many times we connect the love her so much much, but she's married. Now injury come. I know he's with someone. She's with Mike. Hers name is Mike. Her name is Mike. All right. Well, everyone, this is Shantha. This is Roger. Signing off. Thank you. Everyone. Listening to Las Culturas us. Go see stars barn or else your father Michelle. Oh. Cooper. Alone. I love the little. They put me on the album girl. We need to work on the album. This has been forever. Dog production executive produced by Brett Bom, Joe Silio and Alex Ramsey for move ritual podcasts, please visit forever. Dog podcasts dot com. It's a scribe toward shows on apple podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts keep up with the latest forever. Dog news by following on Twitter and Instagram at forever. Dog team and liking on Facebook.

lady Gaga New York Shangila Bradley Cooper London Dallas LA Shangila Willem Texas Jennifer Lewis Gaga Bradley Cooper Hollywood Paris Bowen Toronto Yoko Lena
Domino Annual #1 & Spider-Man vs Deadpool #39: Wade's World--The Deadpool Podcast Episode #67

Channel 52: The DC Podcast

19:36 min | 2 years ago

Domino Annual #1 & Spider-Man vs Deadpool #39: Wade's World--The Deadpool Podcast Episode #67

"This episode of keep some lunatic. Sidekicks is brought to you by tweaked audio to get awesome. Headphones, could a tweaked audio dot com and use the coupon code Southgate to get thirty percent off your shipping and a lifetime warranty, or you can get there through the link on our website. Southgate media group dot com. Hello, and welcome to Wade's world that whole podcast. I am. I am. Always this technology herself. Hayao will have. Yes, I have issues. Such fellow. More. That he is the only issue I don't. Well, so what are we talking about tonight? We're talking about a new brand new release that just released today as of this recording domino number one as mentioned by Fabian Lisa, what like to episodes back. For me, the daffodil. Routes for the show. Kelly knows that better than you shame. Will fix it fixes. Anyway. Yeah, I was really excited about this for like a month and a half now. 'cause a, it's got cable in at night crawler. Yes. Diamond. Well. Got enough of them. Tell the author would like, let me towards you. Yes, we have five storms just seems like they've been like they announced a while ago could see seems like bringing it up like all of the dominant angels coming. It's coming from inside. Stories. All. Fun. Baria apple lake on the decisions were meaningful impactful in thing. My favorite story has to be the night crawlers joy, a thought was gonna cable, but in. Story. Well, I was gonna say it wasn't the first one that drunken dry Gulch or remand. They took the name for your autobiography. No. The officers are good, but I like night crawler in this. That was a fun interaction for me. Were they basically current him in communists Thurday a support group for meetings who can't pass as humid. Yeah. I mean, they, I mean they dug for some Stacey. Acts. I was like. I really like in domino deadpool university do did in find Costa. He's really poor connections. I mean, I mean, who's mentioned who's even mentioned, Stacey accents what? Two thousand four. Getting a miniseries. Drudge, stuff like that. Either a because the writers binders personal little thing or being added, you're maybe it's like always one of those. That or give me the dominant book may. The rent's head group of people yet. Ark against while I was gonna say, is support group in show up again, but the it's not Gail rids Gilman rate that one. So I don't know how that works in animals when they do like all the backup stories. Saturdays off for the body count was the French storms pretty good, too. I know you said, you know you're here for cable. What did you think of that cable story? The good fight. We kinda got it ruined for us, but it was still pretty good. Aw, cable, you. Story wasn't that bad either for five pages, like punch to five pages early cribs. Cribs punching crimson dynamo in the face. Heard a couple of Russians, Duke it out. Project, what could be more fun? You know. So you want. Here the place in continuity to as you know, it's like him all the press out for not getting married. Yeah, that we don't need to rub that in need. We did them really cool out of ads, but again, it's like batmans didn't marry thing. Let's just move on from an opportunity. Didn't happen pissed off a lot of things. Yeah. Wake loss has got something in the end done. Coby wives down. Oh, but see. Kitty. In hand has ruined to pry of who experts what's my goal is had this last issue last week. So. Yeah, extermination than what on Kanye accident about. Yeah, that one. I just wonder who's inex- have all these covers with basically everyone. Seventeen, Hon worked there Olek real mall. We've got four hologram. We got stickers. That models. On that front gonna say one one for wounds who've been in x. men x. may it, you're Stacey xperience. Collectibles through batmans. Oh, that you're off. Oh boy. One job for the rest of my life. It would be. God people on the fake scandals. I cannot take the internet anymore. Like I'm just so over. What did you why was I was a Texas with Tyler, like a little bit ago went up because he said he got doomsday clock seven that came out today too, and I was like, oh, yeah, Dr. Manhattan avenue store. Sounds like I was like, we'll talk your hat. Manhattan finally shows up. So what is these? Are they doing like a penis a week or something valid. The new event. The caulking off you. Ha ha. I wish anyway. Russians in her life right now. I was really. Oh time. Just those on one don's, said wide was impactful better, Pat numidian stuff. For some of these stories, there's wadley gum. Look, the first four was how her in time in that met out loss. I mean that has to deal with the series. Yeah, the whole cable stuffs the past out and accords the clauses stuff deals with exit. Yeah. So like every story here, like, you know, they weren't like throwaways early. I appreciate that annual. 'cause sometimes you'll be in the middle of Arkansas, the angle heads you dislike? That was okay. But what about that name story though? Oh, yeah. All the great at that off stores voted well in someone. Another two. So, yeah, was gonna be a from the minute that this cable was coming home. On a little bit more. Not even that to this time. Course found Nadi now that I'm saying it. Ripcord. Anyway. The x. universes such as but I love it. Yeah, yeah. I mean, every couple of years they do like a, you know, it would down the two hundred. Then it's like, oh, no, Maui of millions. Makes sense in population of billions. Yeah. I mean, if you have a millions of meetings, that's fine, but not all the x.. Men. Yeah. That's enough to be should be the elite like twenty. Not really. They never have. You'd be fearing. They should be the best of the best mutants. I see you in this issue marrow. I see. No, everybody picked us look up. I thought it was like one of the best marble books in the bunch this for sure. Watson, pick from from our own. This was a big week. Yeah. Back all this move on out for me. Discuss that more Friday night. Yes. Keeps lunatics seventy two. Oh, the big bang theory since that seldom statement number Oba's. Inga. Yeah. I know that it's my friends that I'm talking to is obsessed with big bang theory. So your friend likes big bang theory. I will. He's a boy. Anyway. So, yeah, I think we should discuss that with Chatterly. Oh, yeah. So anyway. Yeah, the book it was good. Yeah, especially if you like the Gilson Mon series. And, but yeah, I mean, if you were. The first issue you didn't pick up anything at this is the perfect place jump right in and he voted. Yes, that was a good bit of marketing on their parts frozen between issues, six and seven. You know the end of the first arc in the beginning of the second one. So mice jumping on point. An Simpson's deadpool podcast. Did you read Spiderman? Verse deadpool thirty nine. Grew to cash grab, but I just I don't know how long gonna stay on this bandwagon. Story lines been really weird because like when they do the dead pool, he was like, kind of like more sinister than that. Now they doubt if back since. Make your mouth because deadpool can't be a selfish ball were fine. Well, in the main book, he did kind of like wind, his memories back, you know, like you mind, wife last couple months or years. So. Such cheap. Bio. Do with that pool if they try. Try, but Atlit funny ages. Place and some of the issues. Like previously? I like I wasn't thrilled with the art for the art was good in this one. That it really pocket was Chris. They were com- slop in the last couple that have picked up not back on job in early do like deadpool to joke, like regrows legs. McConnell was before too. Laughing fresh off. He does deadpool twos, DVD release. Why not? But if you like Spiderman deadly teaming up every month, you like dinosaurs. I don't know that I've not phone that debt pools by that amick way of my favorites vitamin that will is in the cartoons animated versions. And they've brought that into this book. If Bulow while it's a move, it's like different writers, but it just seems like they want them to be closed buddies and then like the mini thing to close, they kind of doubt back in there. Like, you know, all of a sudden spider-man's ready to be his best friend than all of a sudden. It's not your killer. Kill people to buddy. Intentionally. So mean let's be callin birth inside mass says. Guns. Will you should own. That woman kidnapped. Traumatize anyway, random von sense. Speaking him, Spiderman. I think I got a rare variant of amazing spider, man number six. That really? Yeah. Like like hat, like a bunch of papers in the middle were missing. Instead, I got pages from think venom, firs of issue of venom. I has. 'cause I like I put in the digital code red, the digital and it, it's it's a complete Spiderman story. There's no air. They'll be worth money, your Batman Pena's problem. We do those cash. Retire. I wish all man, if I could retirement many podcasts be. I retired for now. I don't wanna know what you're doing for money right now. Living off savings with everybody should have. Triggered DJ or anything. ACA that will last time that living light musicals vague at still have migrated from it to three years. Oh. No. Way. All good. That I give that like a straight of c. minors add not here for this book or vitamins. Worse thing. Alerts thing. It's not. Like you like it's b minus something news. All right. Like I said, the art, the art was good. The story. I mean. The story again, I mean, for some someone some here for other months. I'm like, okay, just get through this. But I mean, I could tell is they could try, hey, we have thought his wars. We got the wrecking crew be minus. Okay. Yeah, Reichen Christie, plus. You're right. So hitting newsworthy tune in Friday for four. You the comic books on case lunatics here the hear those drunkards Lil Charlie. Vala patrol Yalon here. Those drunkards review iron hammer the call. They they. Did you read that yet? The combination of foreign ironman could here liver shriveling up. Just thinking about that. Captain bag decisions Kat the decisions. All right here. But we got it that far social media's that's right. Answer centers, your thoughts, what the you know, what did you think of domino annual? What did you think of Spiderman than forty main that poll book and next episode? We're going to continue our age Nexans soldier. Ex journey are long. That's what she said. Anyway. Email us. We'd world pod at g. mail dot com. Find us on Facebook, Facebook dot com. Slash Wade's world podcasts at we'd world pod and at seal side kicks on Twitter, fineness on Instagram, Wade's world. That will podcast NC l. side kicks in the voicemail six one four three eight two two, seven, three seven. That's six one four thirty capes and I'm gonna give little plug to a young man. We all know appears Mr. truly is now on Instagram as super connectivity. What in quite initiative cry? No, not. I can pack him in those posts. Of them, the Trey. Got it, right. It's all one word that's what is Instagram. All one word superconductivity should've been to ease. Quality. Megan's BMI offend anyone. It. Thank you. They make make fake probably couch l. my God bless this stuff. Now, dare you make fake account for trial ES or make it sound like in the Rooney. Wonder what's inside the inside of internet router. Actually, yes part. It's actually not much. The old school beepers Young's what's up with this Rick and Morty. Consolatory traumatize. Art. So where can people find you. Fight me at willpower fire just no, we are weeks away from these e CW vers launching from fall. So I'm gonna happen. You decide? So definitely following, I will follow you that we can have. In if you wanna put her for more mitzvahs. People find you and that's everything else. If you want to do an interview with superior a famous person common creator, seventy, six story, Email me night wing PDP at g. dot com. On Twitter. I am at night wing PDP. All right. Thank you once again for joining us on ways world. Charlie. TIMMY gonna do. So the groom. Pictures of him boring Brock. Also somebody. Win coffin. Yes. That's what I wanted picture probably trick or treating on Halloween. I will give rise. Send. Internet use it for good in able.

Stacey xperience Slash Wade Instagram Twitter Southgate media Hayao Fabian Lisa Facebook Kelly Costa Southgate Baria apple lake Texas dry Gulch Drudge Pat numidian Kanye
Tory conference feels like a sideshow to Brexit - but ignore it at your peril

The Leader

13:06 min | 10 months ago

Tory conference feels like a sideshow to Brexit - but ignore it at your peril

"From the Evening Standard in London this is the leader Hi. I'm David Moslem. It's been a big day for Boris. Johnson and normally political parties get annoyed. Loyd when events distract from their party conference especially the leader's speech the Tories this year though the conference has been a distraction from events it has the potential still to be what they liked to call a one nation party but really a Morton party part of representing Britain as it is not as it used to be trouble chapel is drowned out by the brexit message and he's also drowned up that sense spending money. They don't have our associate editor. Julian gloves sifts through the noise to listen to what's actually been happening happening in Manchester and also assess the chances of whether any of the ideas. We've heard can actually be candidate. Also extinction rebellion brought London to a standstill before now. Police want to stop them doing it again. Why this newspaper has backing the mate thanking you insight and analysis from the Evening Standard's editorial call them this is the leader grab a paper to read it all it's on page fourteen fourteen today or you can head over to standard DOCO UK and find it under comment in a Moment Julian Glover on the troubles facing the Tories. Thank you very much. Thank you very much worry laptop. Then the screen would be sharing the frayed read the pizza. We'll do coming out of October. Thirty first on more folks had started the week we spoke on this podcast about the cults of Boris Johnson how its members have dominated the conference and there was Nettie moderate to be seen the overwhelming chanting to greet. PM Speech was so obviously coming. I actually wrote the intro when I got into the the office at half past seven this morning but if you manage to listen through the ball rhys baugh shouts through the week there have been some interesting ideas coming from that stage from today's editorial. Call him his what the standard things. It's telling his first speech to the assembled. Toori tribe as their leader is only the second most important thing Boris Johnson and is doing today immediately after his address in Manchester the Prime Minister published details of the Brexit deal he is offering the EU the Tory conference has felt like a side show but it would be a mistake to ignore it completely pay attention as there have been clues to the future health of one of the leading political parties whether any of the conservative. Tis politicians have a chance to implement their ideas is another matter as the Tories return from their week in the northern powerhouse. They will quickly be reminded of their own lack of power. Allah Control Events Are Associated Julian Garcia now it was Boris's big movement today Julian. We know that he's wanted this all of his life and yet it's not even the biggest thing in his diary today and he spoke like it as well. It was a very peculiar conference speech. It sounded like a few remarks before dinner or a quick chat to the rotary tree club before everybody slipped for Gin and tonic. It wasn't the great passion piece of Art Tree that that we pretend that conference beaches ought to be but of course Burston never does that. He's he's no good at making speeches. It's one of the strange things about him. He's got a powerful personality a great turn of phrase. He's a good writer. He's not oreital so he rambled away forbidden and he finished and everybody wanted off and yet we talk about him as being this great asset to the Conservative Party because of how he appears on screen. I'm not sure who the we is there but yes he would like to present himself as the great winner the great asset. He has this extraordinary personality. There's a power to him the way he looks the way he speaks the way he sounds the casualness that turns of phrase the jokes the glibness is probably a reality. TV show then the whole lot of us. I'm afraid would have been voted out out of the jungle by now but at least we had the cultivation of watching the speaker being forced to eat a kangaroo testicle very different traditional political leader. Everybody will say because it's the kind of thing you do say that in the whole it went down terribly well while I wasn't in the hall so I can't really tell Lola we could see was clips of cabinet ministers grinning Inane Lee and wondering what an earth they've unleashed on the nation but with the whole the people I'm not sure some of awesome like too few of his jokes was moderately good jokes in it but when he said we all Europeans that was pretty much silence he had to kind of G. them up a bit but this is he's not anti European party. This is not the nineteen European country. We all European. We love your. I love aww anyway. They didn't quite get where he was going. With this speech I think and yet throughout the week has been this. Theme of Boras can do no wrong long really hasn't there among the people who were there in the conference. It could be argued. That's because the only people who were there were Boris's supporters after all but there's been a lot of noise has go. Oh yes I mean he was off see popular. He's doing what the party wants now which is to stand up on on Europe and we say an leader that this was a successful accessible conference because it it really it really has been there was some clarity to the message they tried to focus on things that went just brexit but the get brexit done and then look after to the future. There was some interesting speakers. The the sense party has in its potential in some of the people in the cabinet and in some of the stories. It's trying to tell the country it has the potential still to be what they liked to call a one nation party but really a modern party potter representing Britain as it is not as it it used to be thinking ahead investment in things this call that could make a difference triple is drowned out by the brexit message and also drowned up since they just spending money they don't have the was really interesting was one of the ones brought out in leader was Javid addressing his mother. Yes we had both the prime minister and such Javale talk about their mothers in their speeches. Such Jesse was more effective speaking Punjabi. The sense of he's come on a journey. It's really home. It was the significant movement the conference I think can I welcome my mum twenty years ago. Mom thought it was a big deal when she watched the first Asians move into coronation street in here in Manchester well now. She's watched the first agents moving to Downing Street once again. We're living above the shop but I'm so happy happy to make her proud mommy to Jesse up at the home game. Daddy shop anytime these days. That's between us. I forgot party was suddenly needed to look for a different leader. I think he might now b b the person they think of turning to the prime minister told us his mother voted for Brexit and his father didn't know well. It's a different thing thing but we've had lots of interesting ideas coming through from lots of different speakers not just the Javard but my hancock expressing his vision for the NHS as well will any of this be done though there are so many storms wiling around Boris Johnson's government. Does any of this happened after socialist well as we say in the day it is worth looking at the conservative conference and thinking. What are they trying to talk about. And who are the people shouldn't just ignore it but it's been too long doing that. The leader also says the big thing is brexit. The big thing is the plan he's meant to be delivering to Europe as as he spoke I think the plan was being handed over. Is it supplant tool or is it aimed at just creating a row in order to say we can't do a deal. We'll find out in the next forty eight hours and probably quicker how it's going down doesn't. Look Too Good Good Sofa. That's the big thing for his future and if he can get some version of a deal completed and put some version of deal to parliament and there's a huge fs then he might be able to turn to some of the other things they tried to talk about at the conference until then it won't work next the the met is asking the Home Office if it can amend legislation in various ways to try to make it easier for them to do with major protests extinction rebellion and anything any protests it tries to adopt a similar tactic extinction rebellion plan to be back on the streets of London next week. Police now won't palace to stop them causing causing havoc. We're taking a short break. Why not give us a quick rating and subscribe to make sure you get the leader early. Scotland Yard wants new legal pilots to stop extinction rebellion and other protesters bringing parts of the capital title to a standstill from the Standards Odio News Team Hits Lisa Monitoring Andy Movement as emerged on the streets of London and around the world to fight climate change thousands of people protested for the first time in the capital in April earlier this year bringing the city to a standstill and more of this has been planned by the extinction belly and again next week eleven sites around Westminster being targeted as part of protests in sixty countries trees. Now police want more powers to stop the disruption as Home Affairs editor. Martin Bentham explains who's outside Scotland Yard having just had a briefing about the new powers what we learned today is the met is asking the Home Office if it can amend legislation in various ways to try to make accusees easy for them to do with major protests like the extinction rebellion and anything any list protests it tries to adopt a similar tactic of mass disruption AH inconvenience to the public similar things they're proposing which are early stage over simple apparently being received favorably by the Home Office include the idea of some sort of restriction banning orders to stop people going back to the scene never protest repeatedly and just committing the same offenses over and over again the unlike the spokesperson spokesperson from the extinction rebellion movement and says trying to save the world. What we hope to achieve is festival for the government to hear us for the British government to listen to our demands owns the group papers a wakeup calls that people act change their own lifestyles to help the planet and put pressure on their politicians to lobby for change corporately extinct show rebellions three demands on number one for the government to tell the truth about the climate emergency number two to bring emissions down to net zero by two hundred twenty five and number three for the government it to be to create and be led by citizen's assemblies in April. The police made more than a thousand arrests which saw activists shut down Oxford Street with a pink boat and Clays Wadley early bridge by camping out on the structure. If enough slave the protesters hope they're changing hearts and minds on the issue of climate change. What are your thoughts on their methods. Climate protests are here to stay and he has the Standards Take Scotland. We ought wants new powers to stop protesters blocking London streets. We agree it needs them. Why because today's power has turned out to be useless this this spring when extinction rebellion protesters for a lot of central London to a standstill next week extinction rebellion promises to return they will make a powerful case and Winston public support. That's the point of a protest. We don't want that to stop but a city made up of millions of people can't be paralyzed by just one group. If they pushed the rules to the limit then the rules need to change you could hear news updates on regular analysis from audio news team through your small speaker just ask for the news from the evening standard that new Billiton at seven am every weekday the leaders here from four and in between you can get in touch through social media with the HASHTAG leader podcast. We're back tomorrow uh-huh.

Boris Johnson Evening Standard Manchester Prime Minister London Brexit London Julian Europe Britain Home Office Conservative Party David Moslem associate editor Julian Glover Loyd Scotland Yard Jesse rhys baugh
A Story About A Restaurant, A Song and An Exploding Comfort Bubble

Surrounded by Idiots Radio Podcast

19:18 min | 1 year ago

A Story About A Restaurant, A Song and An Exploding Comfort Bubble

"Then there was this instantaneous in complete silence. That's when that is the moment where everybody realized that this that there was some idiot singing in the middle of the restaurant. The millennial generation is as follows well come by podcast overlooking the picturesque Continental Municipal Municipal Golf Course in the beautiful town section Scottsdale Arizona. This is the Ron Abidi Radio podcast. This is Tony back with you again. How how are things hope things are well? It's been on the natural time line. It's been a couple of weeks and the reason why Y and I'm sorry that it's been I've been pretty consistent over the last couple of years to three years almost now <hes> up to this point but I've gone through. I'm going through this marketing thing. It's one of those things where it's A. It's a new experience. It's new beginnings. It's the beginner's mind thing and online marketing to me is witchcraft in. I'm trying to figure it out. I've got a good friend of mine is going to help me out later on down the road because I'm putting together in the end you'll see and I'll let you know ahead of time. You guys have been with me in your listen to all the stuff for however however many times you've been listening but putting the book a putting offer together for the book and a bunch of little stuff and it is just all consuming in terms of how to write copy and how to set the pages up and whatnot not so anyway I apologize because that is completely bogarted my time over the last month and it's been very difficult to get anything out in regards to the podcast so I'm going to come back with a vengeance and this this week I'm actually going to tell you. A story in this story is noted in my book and it was my I call it my epiphany story. It's the one point in my life that changed my direction the most and if you've read the book it's called a restaurant serenade in the reason. I'd like to share this with you. This week is because I think we all have those moments where something happens and it may not even be this huge thing. It may be just a very very subtle thing but for some reason it has massively huge impact a big ripple effect through the rest of your life and it happened a while ago this was actually December fourteenth nineteen eighty nine and I was sitting with a group of about thirty and and we're all participating this personal development workshop and it was day two it was about an hour before we were going to go to lunch and I was there just quietly observing the group when genie the facilitator came over to me and says Hey Tony I notice you have shared much group so far so when we all go to lunch today you are going to stand up in the middle of the restaurant and sing a song well immediately. Immediately I felt every ounce of blood rush to my feet and there was this loud pulsating ringing in my ear and I just I remember I just had this frozen. Look a fear on my face and I just stared no blinking just stared right through Jeanie and is she walked away. I realized our lunch break was like in an hour and I was thinking that's three thousand six hundred seconds I would have to agonize over all the things that could possibly go wrong with with me standing up in the middle of a restaurant and singing and I thought Oh crap you know if I do this. What was I going to sing? So then I thought for a second and I thought well what about Christmas Song I mean it is a couple of weeks before Christmas and someone singing Christmas Carol out of the blue might be a lot less shocking to people okay so forward the three thousand six hundred seconds they sped right by and now I find myself at the hostess station at the restaurant and she is gathering our group group together and was starting to lead us through the restaurant to our table but since our group was so large the hostess was seating us in the separate banquet room not the main dining room where I was to do my little number in this means that I won't even have anybody in the room. That knows what I'm doing. They're all going to be the back banquet room. I won't have anyone to focus my attention on. While I'm seeing the song basically I'm going to do this all alone out in the middle of this restaurant and as we made our we into the back room and I was heading towards my seat I felt this subtle tap on my shoulder and it was Jeanie and of course she didn't say a word. Just give me that look and I knew it was go time. Well the next thing I remember I was standing in the middle of this huge huge dining room studying my wadley legs against the salad bar with his cold stainless steel counter that was littered with these little drips of ranch dressing and Croutons bits so- I steadied myself with my sweaty right hand on that a cold salad bar counter and stared straight ahead 'cause I was way too scared. Make eye contact with everybody and I took a deep breath and I began to sing so you're probably wondering how I got into this situation. In the first place well years ago. I had an opportunity to start a really promising new job and one of the requirements of employment was that I tend to afford a business business seminar. I was told it was to help me focus in get better at time management negotiation creation skills and leadership and all that business stuff and I wasn't too thrilled to go but I thought well okay. I mean I I maybe I should be more open need to see things a little bit differently kind of go with the flow and just you get this seminar thing over with turned out that that four day seminar was an absolute blast. I mean picture one hundred thirty people in this big bright room. It's loud it's fun. There's music playing high fives thrown all over the place hugs and we all went through a number of small personal breakthroughs breakthroughs because a seminar was really a personal growth and development workshop. There wasn't a business thing he'd my friend just told me that because he knew how we guy wouldn't go if it was a personal development thing but I actually did and I actually had a really great. Great Time so as that seminar came to a close as four day seminar as a came to a close immediately signed up for the next level course because they they try to get you to sign up right at that last day they'll get you all fired up and they try to get everybody to go again and I did. I was fired up. I decided to go so the next one was a five day workshop. That was going to start two weeks after that one ended because I'd gotten so much out of that one I wanted to just to keep the party going. Cut The two weeks later and I'm still riding the high of this first seminar Dr and that morning I got up jump in the car and I excitedly drove my way back to the same location expecting loud fun music and a bunch of high fives from the friends I made during the previous workshop but when I arrived through the doors open to lobby I immediately really got a sense that something was a little different first of all there's no music and it was only the single employees sitting at the small folding table just outside the large seminar room where we had our big meeting the last time so that I thought well this is kind of weird. I I mean am I in the right. Guy Is adhere by the right place. I mean I don't hear music. There's obviously no hugs. I mean for the first time in my life. I think I missed the touchy touchy feely the workshop was today right. I'm thinking I I thought I had by counter was right so I'm completely confused as I made my way over to the lady at the table and I asked her if I'm in the right place and it was some sort of forced smile she said yes and then Hammy a packet of papers the present name tag and then sort of pointed to me to go into the room. Well okay so maybe maybe she's just having a bad day. All the fun people have already gone into the room so I grab the packet and put the name tag on and and I went over to the door through the door and there's no party there's just a large dimly lit meeting room with about thirty chairs in the middle of the room and they're all set up in a circle facing facing each other I mean I thought I was going to a party and now I'm seriously getting the sense that I'm at a funeral so I found a seat in quietly sat there as each of the other attendees he's one by one quietly did the same thing as I did kind of entered the room slowly and found a seat in the big circle of chairs and when all the tears were filled the doors closed in genie the facilitator walked into the middle of the circle and just it just stood there will naturally. I'm thinking well. What the hell is this in just then it this? This is the one of the worst things that ever happened to me in my life just then a woman on the other side of the circle circle stood up and just started crying and began to share a tragic abuse experienced that she has a child now mind you nothing has been set up to this point no introductions no oh directions nothing. Nobody's talking to each other. The lady out in the front lobby didn't tell me that to do anything to prep any finger to tell store. I mean nothing I mean I wanted to just bail at that point but it was weird I almost couldn't because. It was like watching it was like watching a car crash. I couldn't turn away from this so then the woman finished her story her tragic story and she sat down and I thought okay now we're GonNa get started introductions directions and whatever but no the lady next to her stands up and starts talking and balling about a tragedy that she went through right then and there I knew I it was not here for this and as that very somber day one of the seminar continued and then came to an end this happened like through the whole day and I was the only one out of the group of thirty of us that didn't share some deeply personal story and to be honest with you. I didn't feel like I could compete. I I really had kind of a milquetoasty typical. I kind of a non tragic childhood and after after all that I questioned why should even stay because I think I didn't have anything in common with these people but the one thing I did learn from that first seminar that was such a blast was I did need to accept that there was a reason I was there and I should just go go it so right then and there I decided I was going to surrender to the process and I was GonNa see this through although I had I still had no idea what the hell is going on so I figured you know what my role my best role in this situation will be as a super supporter order to all these poor people so I make my way back for day to end at actually I was feeling a little better because I now figured out my role and I was gonNA play the super supporter and as a morning played out I continue Mike Quite supported these poor people in this room and things were continuing on as they were in day one until about an hour before lunch when genie the facilitator came over to me tap me on the shoulder and she apparently rejecting my supporter plan an and my punishment for not sharing anything was too yep sing in the middle of the restaurant at lunch so let's flash back again to that salad bar so there I was is up against that damn thing <hes> okay deep breath mouth open and I began to sing. I'm singing chestnuts roasting on an open fire. Jack Frost nipping at your nose. It is so I'm singing. The Christmas song figured again. Remember the Christmas Song because it's Christmas and I figured it would be less shocking to these people that have no idea that this guy is going to be singing at the salad bar in the middle of launch rush at a Marie callender's. I'm rolling through the song again. I'm not looking at anybody. I'm staring at the back wall. Get to the chorus to let everybody know that Santa's on his way and he's bringing lots of toys and presence on his leg part then there was this instantaneous incomplete silence. That's when that is the moment where everybody. Nobody realized that this that there was some idiot singing in the middle of the restaurant every single person swear to God customer server bus or cooks bottle washers whoever stopped whatever they were doing and the room was just pin drop silence. It was like my own the room didn't want to for the record but I was in the room at that point and I thought Oh God here comes. I'M NOT BR. I'm seriously now bracing myself probably grabbing onto the salad bar thinking okay flying food is going to be coming my way maybe large kitchen staff rushing to pull me off the stage but as I as I continued on the verse none of that happened actually for the first time in this entire crazy situation situation. I thought I actually just might be able to survive this ordeal now. I'm just after I realized that I just want this thing to be over. So I am booking through the last parts of this Song Merry Christmas to you to write and I and I bow I give a little bit of a bow just out of the fact that I was deeply mortified that I was up there in front of everybody which was nothing compared to the next. I don't know probably ten seconds. It felt like an hour pin drop silence as I stood there and then out of the banquet room you know the banquet room in the back where all my other my peeps were back there and explosion of cheers and clapping in eventually because all that was happening back there and they were getting all fired up the diners in the dining room kind of started this slope clap you know the the Eighties Ron Davies John Hughes movies slow clap of course at a more reserve level because they are still in shock. They had no idea what the hell is going on and at that point I quickly acknowledged the diner crowd with a little shortwave and practically ran back into the banquet room and into the arms of my nurturing supportive group and as I got into the room I practically floated over to my seat and I picked up my menu completely relieved that all this was behind me and just then our server enters the room without saying anything to the group she stares right at me from across the table and she says hi we have a problem and now my mind immediately went to well of course you do because you know why should this on a good note so she says the Bar area at the back of the restaurant couldn't hear you very well and they want you to come in and senior song again. Of course I didn't have time to personally accept that invitation because again that was like a double shock to me I thought I was done so my group at that moment had already yanked me out of my seat and was pushing me towards the door towards the main towards the main dining room and all and and to be honest with you I remembering back what I can because it was such a blur. Although I did have a chance to dig my heels in could've said nope absolutely not I'm done finished. I thought well the first time it didn't kill me me. I mean I actually managed to survive and got a little reward for taking the risk and completely surrendering to the process so you know what but the hell. Let's do this again so I did make my. Our way back to the bar and I sang the song again and I got another rousing round of applause and as I made my way back to my group through the dining room and into the back banquet room I was reflecting on how I was able to actually enjoy singing that time because the second time I had fun what made the whole experience bearable is because I finally surrendered I mean I I chose to see things differently. I went with the flow and I just got it over with and looking back. There were so many things I really got out of that restaurant experiences. Well you know the bottom line is is that it taught me how to really loosen up in that resulted in me building more confidence and accepting myself and that allowed me to be fully present for the rest of the seminar in addition that one experience continues continues to shave my life every single day I mean it started being on the path to helping others through my practice and I've discovered how to open up and to be a better coach and a mentor by understanding the process of taking action through fear because that was like the biggest action through fear the thing I've ever experienced up to that point so when a client comes in and is stuck or frozen with indecision I can not only completely understand because I totally can but I can also provide them support and guidance as they jump off that cliff and into the unknown into that restaurant and the lesson I learned about accepting what is and just going with it has made me a lot less stressed about the small stuff in life which is maybe a lot more fun hanging around in a lot better friend to those who struggle with getting caught up in Manusha getting caught up in every little thing I call the ninety eight percent role and seriously live by this every single day that two percent of stuff is important and I'll care about it and I'll be concerned about it in a worry about it the other ninety eight percent. I don't give a shit about it. I just I let Roloff and I don't worry about it so as I wrap this up. I'd like to leave you with this because it's the most important thing for me out of all those it's the most important impact on my life that this one experience has had as a single dad raising a let's say headstrong headstrong daughter I was able to much more effectively teach and model self confidence and trust to a child that was dealing with a lot of self doubt about her strained relationship with her. Mom and I knew I could never be both mom and dad because that's straight out you just can't but I think I was much better at being there for her emotionally as much as I could because I was able to lift through that moment of ultimate vulnerability in that restaurant so I highly encourage you whatever is going on in your life. Try to look at things differently. Let go of the Rock. Just go with the flow and stop wasting any more time. Do something just get it done. That is my story for you this week. I hope you enjoyed it. If you want to learn more about all of this stuff than you can certainly pick up the books around by idiots because I start with the story and then I move into all the fun stuff and the most important part taking action. If you have any questions comments or concerns you could always get hold of me if Tony at Java dot com how things are well out there touching next week.

Tony Continental Municipal Municipa Arizona Ron Abidi Jeanie Croutons Roloff Jack Frost Manusha Mike Santa Marie callender Ron Davies John Hughes three thousand six hundred sec ninety eight percent two weeks four day
S4 01 | There's a body, what next?

The Pineapple Project

21:49 min | 6 months ago

S4 01 | There's a body, what next?

"This is an ABC podcast. He died at home which meant that. I found him and immediately find triple zero and proceeded to do what they said which was to provide CPR until they arrived but He was gone by that stage and there was nothing I could do. It's just an awful shock when you I mean I don't know how else to explain it. It's just the last thing you expect to find. Sorry I'm Jan Fran and this is the pineapple project and that's what you just heard from. That's exactly what this season is about death. But and why Dave I hear you ask because that is what we do on this. Show my friend we talk about the big stuff the hard stuff the stuff that makes you uncomfortable and we bloody make it sweeter and easier to deal now. I know what you're thinking it's too hot. Jenn it's ages away jen shortly. The global financial system would collapse in the world would send it to climate Kale before I have to do with the Chad and look this is probably true. But in the event it doesn't you. Kinda need to be prepared. Otherwise you're can leave one mother of an admin headache behind and it's not just your death that you need to be ready for. Have you ever played that one game with your parents or your partner or your best night's cold? What happens in these into your debt? Would you like to be buried? Remained or turned into a diamond. Have you done a proper will too? I can't find a special bonus round. Will you look after my kids if my partner and I both what down in a freak gardening accident prizes include peace of mind and a reduction in the logistical chaos and family resentment that can link fees and also these twenty four. Karat Gold Pin. She Sh- now wonder. We've been putting these off so you know what you and I are going to learn about wills and funerals and last wishes. And how do you cancel? Someone's credit cards and then netflix subscription after they die and I want to say straight off. This is not about great. If you need help you can always speak to your doctor about finding the right service abused but what you will learn in this series is how to sit down and actually have a conversation about the awkward logistics with the people who matter most in goal line you'll hear from experts and regular people who've been through it so let's start from the stock. What happens if somebody dies suddenly and you're not prepared. Well exactly what happened to Emma who you just heard. Before she was in her early forty s she was married to jeff who was kind and solid. You know dependable then one night emerson. Jeff went to sleep. She woke up and he didn't look back on it now. Actually and and it really was a very ordinary night but it was also following awakened that had been particularly relaxed and happy for family. I don't know it. Almost in retrospect looks like we kind of knew something was going to happen but we couldn't of course a predicted this but it was just one of those really lovely relaxed kipnes where we had a beautiful time together just doing. We went to toys shopping. Got Some Jigsaw Puzzles. And then we went to a cafe and had hot chocolates and it was just a normal everyday Weekend and then back to work the next day and we had actually all being seek with the flu around the same time and I believe that people with heart disease Can Struggle with the flu. But Jeff had no notion that he had heart disease hadn't had his heart checked we. We'd actually gone to sleep in different bedrooms that not. Because we're all seeking so I had a little boy in with me as you do when kids on well so jeff was actually in his room which of course then. I couldn't use after that off since moved half sexually Because it was just too many memories in in the House but Are being in the room a couple of times in the afternoon to check how he was because he was off work. I found him and immediately find Triple zero and proceeded to Do what they said which was to provide Cpr until they arrived but he was well gone by that stage and there was nothing they could do. And because These happened at home. They then had to call the police who came straight to our house and were there for several hours including extra team of investigators who came and I had to have quite a thorough police interview. Of course you're incomplete shock at the time and and you know nothing about the process of what happens when someone dies let alone when they die at home and it's a little bit different the has to be a the coroner has to become involved. You know it looked like natural causes so they have to determine the cause of death and it's all kind of a blur now in my in my memory all I mainly remember is Just that one minute. Everything was a normal family life and the next minute. The houses full of police officers the name violence officers investigators and funeral directors and You know a huge crowd felt a huge crowd of people. Yeah But but there were questions about what was their last meal. You know they would checking the air conditioning. Vents and all sorts of of different Quite confronting things at the time Checking the the venue you say yes investigators who come I think they just. It's just standard procedure to rule out foul play. I guess Right so in the moments after your husband You'll light husband had died suddenly. You're dealing with the police. Did you think that was something that would happen no? I didn't really know what happened when this occurred. Because I don't think we talk about and talk much about this sort of thing I think culture is really quite Wary and and scared of death and dying and Greif and it's and it's an area that we don't talk about Wadley So I didn't know what the process was but they young police officer young woman who handles This for us. That not was absolutely brilliant at her job. She had clearly done this before unfortunately and she just paste her interview questions in very calm way that you know I would sort of just drifted away from that conversation and start talking about ringing people and all of that sort of stuff that dawns on you when when you first discover something like this. What sort of questions asking you or it was just about Well all the standard questions about All their contact details. I urge you. Helen would leave their what had happened. What medication he was on my had to go through the events of the night in detail and timings that kind of thing but Got How are you able to recall donates details in that? Well I don't know how recall them at the Tom? Another and a hammer calling them now. Uh that because it it. Yeah it was just extremely traumatic. I think that's the thing when something like this happens unexpectedly. There's no preparation at all. So you just launch straight into a situation. Unlock anything you've ever encountered before more emotional than anything you've ever encountered and you sort of just get carried along by the professionals around you. I K so you might be thinking that's never going to happen to me but somebody dies every three minutes in Australia. Look it up the APS sensor and each person's death sits in motion a particular series of events. If it's unexpected like it was with Emma's husband that's when the Carnegie involved people don't realize that disconnect happen at any point in time it's doesn't happen between Nantou. Five noted happens twenty four seven and we are twenty four seven. That's Jodi Lewinsky. She runs the mortuary inside the Victorian. Coroner's office exactly where I sit now is in the kernel which this inquiries office and sometimes I hate to say it but it's a little bit a core centre so there's nurses the his administrative assistance or sitting with headphones on and talking on the phone we get about three hundred. Almost four hundred sometimes phone calls going in and out of Day. So you'll have someone talking to someone on the phone. That may be really really really grieving. Or you might have a place of serene and you'll have different stories going on all around you in the same instance of got occurrence sitting in a office. Rodney me as well as a forensic pathologists not far away. I've got the mortuary said that. Area is staff by technical officers and scientists and they were meeting face persons and undertaking the prices that need to happen in the moisture very spy. I've also got what we call viewing rooms where we might have family members arriving to view a deceased. That's recently person with recently died so wins a case going to the current event so most people a lot of people because they look at the media. Think that the only one reported to us other suspicious deaths are homicides and all the or those cases if based on probability if a doctor can't generally say why someone's died. They must be reported to the corner of. I need to be reported to the CAR. So many of our days are deaths of an early person. There has died am a doctor may not be able to say why that person's died they may not have seen a doctor so a lot of those sort of cases are reported to us we also unfortunately in the study for Tori to have a high rate of suicide so those are also reported to US suspected suicides unfortunately are drug overdoses again very high rates there also reported to us car accidents any person die suddenly a person is found in the community and has collapsed aw at home and has no reason also reported to us so what would your advice spaeth and to a family who has just had a loved one pass away very unexpectedly what would you want them to know in the first instance out want tonight that where the salesperson is going to be transferred to apply that people are very respectful and very professional people have very different views about mortuaries and I work with the huge number of very professional scientists technicians and carrying people so that surfacing tonight that the person that they loved one is being transferred into a very respectful professional place. The second thing I'd like them to know is that they can have access to information. We will provide them with as much information as we are able to also inform them that we don't do autopsies in all circumstances but if we do an autopsy is because we really really need to do on. It's not a decision. We take lightly and that an autopsy or any medical investigation can provide answers to families can help them. Many families actually a really wondering why someone's died suddenly unexpectedly. The cause of death may be a simple as that. There has been a rupture of the heart muscle. In course bleed around the heart and the heart has stopped pumping school cardiac Tampa and we can ring the family and at least give him that a little answer and maybe hopefully that I just put them onto recipes natural event and this has happened now. You guys keeping track here. So what Jodi saying is that a death doesn't have to be suspicious to wind up with the car. Now it's more about determining cause of death realistically not all debts require the emergency services or a car. Now most people will go straight to a funeral home but no matter how someone dies if your the next of kin the one document that you are definitely going to need is a death certificate and in the early place that can give you a death. Certificate is very creatively named department of births deaths and marriages. I like it because they don't exactly what it says on the ball. We've got to have a twenty five million records and they have to be kept in Pachulia. That means forever. That's Amanda Yana. She's the registry of births deaths and marriages in new south. Lyle now Amanda. How does want actually get it so? We're the only best marriages of only entity that can issue a death certificate. So what happens when someone dies? A doctor has to verify that someone has passed away so they do what's called a medical certificate causative or a perinatal causative so that someone that's under twenty eight days or the current issues a medical death certificate so all that does is say the person what they died at birth was way they died and what they said that fades into the death registration. Which is what we tape along with. The information that comes from the funeral director we print the death certificate from that so the funeral director will usually look after everything for years. I when it comes to registering the disc so interacting with ESA marriages. It's all done by the funeral director. And they wonderful at it and say they actually tight they look after the body they look after the family as well and I take all the information and they send the medical certificate cause of death which has signed off by the doctor or the coroners orders. If it happens to be coroners case Sometimes that happens someone suddenly and they send all of that into US via electronic methods and it all matches and we print the death certificate out and send it back out to the family okay. Does everyone have to have a depth ticket? They don't actually have to order a death certificate but it would be very rare that you didn't need one when someone passed away because you'd need it for the estate short like you can't really proceed logistically without a debts. Kenya no you. Can't you need to have one slide spanner in the works? What if you're not the next of kin and you need to prove that someone has died just so you should helps with someone and you had a joint lace and you needed to prove that that person was deceased? We wouldn't issue for one because it has too much information on it and you not actually entitled to it so that comes back to US protecting people's privacy and protecting the information on the register and what we would do is just issue a what's called an extract and it's got the person's name and date and place of death and you could use that then to use for instance so there's different documents depending on what you wanted. So that's what you guys are doing in those government buildings I have wondered thanks. Amanda Jay's one day you're living your life and the next burp yet did it really makes you think doesn't it sure does. Oh my God what is it old main. What's mileage is he gonNA be? I'm sorry who you and what are you doing at my house. I'm here every time someone dies may with my rub and my size when a hold it now. You got well creamy fish yet to make you no. I don't want to meet you. Oh I hit a lot but everybody does now an thinks. It's going to be them next minute. They've cashed in their chips and it's up to the defacto or whoever they've left behind to organize everything like whether to cater lasagna. And we suck at wake. Oh honey you've got. No IDEA. Defended happening all around us all the time and I'm constantly amazed at how shit you humans are dealing with it like. Let's not talk about it. I'm in the room people. Let's talk about. He's very unpleasant but yeah he's right. We're talking about your legacy Babes so when it comes to planning death. Let's start with these three things. I won every situation is different. And the logistics of death can be complex fought to the death certificate. Is your key to unlocking that bureaucracy. So if you get one the love of God remember where you file it and three. There are a lot of places that you can go to for help. These trillion government's human services DOT GOV DOT. A U website is actually really good place to start. They literally have a section called what to do following a dead now. You get net. Oh Hi the grim rape grammy. You're still here. Sorry I had to pop out. I teach a casual infusion tap class. Oh Okay Sorry. What is it that you do exactly look? It's a mystery of the universe but I am terrible escaping Sankara's so I'm going to be here with you holding your hand not literally touch me back off to help guide you through dying business to help. Prepare and plan things in advance so you can get on with living. He's a question to what you whistle Have you thought about your funeral is not really what about a will who gets the cats? I'm sure you've got a bunch you don't want you realize fighting of Yusup Aji well of course not. Are you paying the bills? Who's GonNa keep doing that if you nearest and dearest don't have all your passwords well? I just assumed that my husband would base upset that he wouldn't need electricity anymore. Oh and the most important your social media do you want people getting birthday notifications from beyond the grew. And what if you're unconscious in hospital and you can't speak for yourself who's GonNa make decisions about what to do next. Jeez grimmie that's full on but look. I think it's okay. I think we've got this. We're going to end so all these questions about dying good. I mean people think my job is so easy because I do it with such grace but there's a lot to think about hold on. Has it been three minutes already? GonNa Fly. Finding the game rape A-. Wow Nice did. I'm JEN fron. This is the pineapple project and we undoing death. Better because it's coming to you like it or not Bama next on the pine. How much have you put? Into your final Hurrah from cremation cardboard coffins intimate sky burial. There are a lot of choices to be night how to plan your own funeral and how to take care of business when you get the job of organizing someone else's this is all the insider info dodgy funeral directors. Don't want you get your Mitts on. That is next on the pineapple project. The project is mixed by sound engineers and she grant and Chrissy Miltiades. It's produced by collar onnell and clay of Halloween. The role of the camera is played by race. Nicholson the horse. Is Chad Fred? The PODCASTS Executive Producer. Rachel Fountain Kelly read is the manager of ABC Audio Studios. How are you yes you if you like the pineapple project you should check out another ABC? And let's go ladies. We need to talk talking lady. That's exactly what I was. GonNa say ladies? We need to talk hosted by my friend Yumi. Stein's what are you talking about? Everything we women. Avoid talking about like discharge cheating fat shaming and the mental load. We even did a whole episode on. I just did you hear it on the ABC. Listen only get your podcast.

Jeff ABC partner Chad Fred US Jodi Lewinsky Emma heart disease rape director Jan Fran Dave netflix Jenn jen Australia Kale Sh
Season 4 - Episode 12

They Walk Among Us

1:13:10 hr | 1 year ago

Season 4 - Episode 12

"<music> welcome to season for episode twelve the first time round kamara was now introduced which would have profoundly influenced the witnesses decision alone with his height and distinctive. We've clothing of a prison issue. Blue stripe shut andbranch rouses. The identification paraded not followed proper procedure june part of the difficulty difficulty in assembling a procession consisting of men who had the same skin color and it breached identification rules should have been set parades made made up of different people appoint tonight again is that raymond gilbert was not picked out boy any witnesses and also had no forensic links to the crime crime other than his own admission of guilt. The appeal also acknowledge solicitor rex makin who represented both guild baton kamara was relatively the inexperienced in criminal work at the time the crown had not informed the defense that mrs edmonds who identify john kamara had given evidence in another case ice in which her brother was ultimately convicted we that information the defense could have used that to question her honesty while the appeal judges did not agree that they suggested the witness was lying and should not affect the safety of cameras conviction. They understood that mrs edmunds had visited you too brother in prison. After his conviction with him wearing prison issue cliven the same style of shirt and trousers kamara was wearing you know the statements not provided to the defense these included a number of details which vastly contradicted the crown series of events one witness stated they saw van approaching the betting shop and four men jumped out bus they weigh in along with a witness confirming the john suffield had had been threatened the day before his murder but this was not adequately explored by police the further testimony provided by fellow prisoners who said to hurt kamara admit to the crime were later withdrawn counsel for the appellant michael bom bom described the case as is disturbing and said this is a case of a kind which in one respect at least one would hope is a thing of the past this is to say case case in which the turns out to have been a massive nondisclosure at the trial the defense presented its case silence install over the court and when the three judges began to discuss a matter in whispered times neither counsel for the crown defense could hear what they were saying. The judges then retired unsure of what would come next. Everyone in the court had to wait five minutes before they returned the public galleries full to the brim supporters on look as journalists waiting for an answer and thursday march thirtieth two thousand thousand john peter camara received the news he had been waiting nearly two decades to hear this conviction was deemed unsafe and he was to be released laced with immediate effect. The case was labeled as difficult worrying and complex by lord justice sautin on the reason for the judge's decision would would be made available in the fullness of time journalists. Were quick tonight. They seem to be very little in the way of an apology to john kamar with any legal counsel sel being thanked for their time a few hours later kamara walked after the door free man the following his release. Kamara provided a statement into reporters undelighted. This dreadful miscarriage of justice has been righted after such a long time. It is not quite sunk in yet now wants to go way somewhere quietly to start rebuilding my life regarding the revelation that someone else had confessed to the murder phillip lipped jones brother said the momento. I'm full of joy in thinking it's johnny's day the angle will hit me. Lighter justice has to come right it but why did it take twenty years when he could have been out twelve years ago. The police investigated the case never found anything. A total of two hundred hundred one statements were hidden by police assistant chief constable of merseyside police. At the time michael baxter told the press we will study the reasons behind this judgment very closely as he left in a taxi. Kamara was being filmed for documentary. You would like to recall the remembered. The short journey to his lodgings felt like the con was traveling too fast. Everything seemed to be playing double a spate. They found it hard to take in the colors of the outside world having spent the majority of his time in a jail cell staring only at four walls <music> unbeknownst nice to john kamara john suffield father contacted the probation service on the home office seeking to understand how kamara would be treated if his conviction was zyppah turned. You would soon find out a month and a half after john. Kamara was released the three appeal judges who granted him his freedom provided their reasons for the conviction being overturned in a bruising rebuttal the judges harshly criticized the direct the republic prosecutions on the file disclosure of over two hundred witness statements to the defense and how the admission from gilbert was handled at the trial part of the appeal judges summary read the defensive kamara was disadvantage by an accumulation of factors the change of plea the retention of the statement by the jury leading counsels reference to earn reliance upon part of it the denial of the opportunity to cross examine gilbert and on the absence of the benefits of appropriate directions accordingly we take the view that there is a real risk that the jury might have given undue credence to the statement payment this might have contributed significantly to the verdict while the remarks by the judge's work considerable. Joan kamara founded found. They did not go far enough. He was confident that it was a cover up is the director of public prosecutions were blamed in the appeal but kamara sure it was due to failures by the merseyside police and how they dealt with the investigation <music> after john. Kamara was released from prison. He was provided with half a dozen classics to carry his belongings. You stunned to fifty pounds and travel called which expired later that evening there was no support system in place and he was not offered any further financial aid is the probation service deal with individuals who have been found guilty and finish their sentence. Kamara took a taxi to the home of patty hill in north london. He was one of the birmingham six convicted in nineteen seventy five of planting explosives into birmingham pubs in which the twenty people were killed. The convictions was subsequently overturned turned sixteen years later since realizing the lack of support system for those wrongfully convicted in often opened his doors to those facing facing life on the outside he would say most individuals who are victims of a miscarriage of justice turn to drink or drugs and not fully equipped to deal with the changing changing their circumstances. The lack of pipe work available makes it hard to obtain interim lines while they look for work along with the challenges of seeing a health care yeah professional assam suffer with severe psychological problems in an interview with the guardian newspaper during march two thousand and one he'll all said one day you're all sitting in a prison cell and the next day you are in the court of appeal. You're thrown out like a sack of garbage and forgotten about is mind mind boggling coming out on the subject of his release. Camara set one minute. I was sitting with a life sentence and the next minnesota any so free to go go where i was given a trouble. Warranty liverpool expired at eight p._m. I had no money for six to seven weeks. I had no legal documentation. No identity you already known person. The dss granted me an emergency line of five pounds which i had to pay back within twenty days told them to keep it housing manager said because it was a miscarriage of justice. Why didn't i get a loan. Oh boy myself a property because he said you're going to get a massive compensation us how bad it is. Sometimes i thought fucking hell. It looks like you've gotta get arrested arrested to get probation. They seem to push. They want you to commit a crime. After jones release ac- seve reporters descended on the property where he was staying wanting to hear how it felt to be a free man jones spoke of the feeling that someone was going to pull the rug out from under him and throw him back in his cell shortly after cameras release john suffield swath to meet with him to spokane john senior was entirely of the belief that kamara was not involved in his son's murder stressing that he he had nothing to fear they discuss what arrangements the probation service made and john suffield would later describe the assistance offered to kamara laura the man he had once thought it killed his son as totally inadequate while john kamara had found exoneration in the always the law is status with the state was somewhat more complicated given counseling was given no accommodation he could obtain no benefit benefit and being out of work for nearly twenty years might finding a job incredibly difficult couldn't sleep spending evenings at alexandra endre palace unsure of where he belonged almost wishing he was back in prison unless there he had a bed unbelievably believably if he had committed the crime admitted to attend was being released following his sentence they would be services to help him re acclimatize but as he's conviction had been overturned in the states is at least he didn't exist campaigner the time that worked for moshe miscarriages of justice organisation said. How can you compensate someone when you take their lives away. Eventually kamara did receive compensation for the time he had been in prison nine hundred thousand pounds in old will though he took five years john kamara would turn his life around rant. You met his partner bettina found a new home in london done to drive and fathered two children. You give give me the life sentence. I knew from day. I would after fight marquess. When i went in prison time. Stop you know i can send time stopped outside can't get it out my mind account like i'll put a you know a calm then. I didn't like when i bic at my final compensation. They took seventy five thousand pounds football lodging <music> <music> john suffield senior and his family were interviewed in april two thousand and one by the bbc jones said in many ways we are as much victims of a miscarriage of justice is john camera after speaking with the merseyside the police about the investigation where things are headed. He was told that the force was not looking at any other individuals in connection with the crime mazi side police is chose not to reopen the file voicing his frustrations jones senior would go on to say a third man it was named on the trial the narrow program told the police he actually carried out the mud and not kamara he was offered limited immunity by the police if he would go on record but he refused <music> <music> one prison a number one zero one one one admitted on multiple occasions not murder john suffield raymond gilbert claimed he was coerced and threatened after review the criminal cases review commission refused. I used to refer his case to the court of appeal. Jones suffield seen europe. I believed in spite of gilbert's claims he was involved in the mud. The in the years that followed suffield slowly changed his mind as he learned a number of psychiatrist doubted the validity of the confession suffield field was interviewed again in february two thousand and seven and said over the last few years evidence has been revealed to me from a number of sources. The change is that initial certainty but he did it into some doubt now as to whether he did it. I want this evidence to be looked at by someone who is qualified to look at it even saw so ray gilbert has been in prison now for twenty six years is tariff was fifteen years. So what is he been doing in prison for those extra eleven years. He's the prison service. Tell me he is not a model prisoner and therefore his risk assessment for a lease on licenses unacceptable on call all would be a model prisoner if always put in prison for life for a crime. I didn't commit john. Suffield senior was now so convinced gilbert citizens that he even offered him a bed. If he were released from prison it was reported that due to gilbert psychological problems may committed to something that he did not do because gilbert was under the belief that he would never be given a prison sentence. You'd been interviewed over appeared of at least twenty twenty nine hours without a lawyer present between the sixteenth and seventeenth of march nineteen hundred eighty one the first confession came after seven hours with father inconsistent confessions coming thick and fast the majority of the interview transcripts will hung written prior to the police and criminal mental evidence act of nineteen ninety four or pice as it is otherwise known which now require electronic recordings of interviews to be made uber confession either match some elements of the crime ovid wadley from what police discovered at the scene the timelines simply did not match at first gilbert said he income are committed. The murder at ten past ten more than ten minutes off to suffield was found. It was not until his fourth interview. The gilbert either admitted the truth or guess the right time is his supporters would insist gilbert told police overly the murder weapon and north could be found around down the drain near the scene but then in his written confession. He said it was taken to a friend. He'll say said that he and camara walked straight into the a betting shop but he's written confession describes threatening suffield with a knife making him open the door before entering detective superintendant tulsa leading leading the inquiry stated that the door was forced open which begged the question which was it though knife was shown to the jury at the trial there was no forensic evidence linked the weapon to the crime not to mention the lack of forensic evidence linking both men to the mud assi no coins were found and in that possession additionally gilbert at first said he stole eighty pounds then one hundred then five hundred a considerable white if it were to be taken in ten pence coins they gilbert made no mention of the money he had taken being in notes or coins he statement also said that the the plan was to i rub the bingo hall next door taking a knife on cooled with them but the robbery of the betting shop was only formed quickly when they spotted john suffield southfield opening the shop. Why gilbert implicated john kamara is not fully understood. Maybe he was coerced or may have been down to the the argument he had with his girlfriend over her allegedly sleeping with kamara as the interviews would not typed it was impossible to verify what was said highlighting the importance of having strict interview standard it is almost certain that geeta gilbert's admission with you deem it folks or not that that played a considerable part in john come ours unjust incarceration. It wasn't until his fifth and final interview that the pieces began gan to fall into place for detectives. They're repeated by gilbert. It would admit to an element of the crime before retracting his statement insisting he he was lying. You would eventually see a lawyer will die by then he had signed a confession during his time in prison gilbert would write to i'm neil a generalist who covered a series of miscarriages of justice. He writes about his interrogation explaining quote. They grabbed me around the throat in struggle and we began to wrestle with each other during the show is asking them to get off me and i bought one of them from this action. They decided i was the culprit. I never raised the abuse with the police doctor. No way woody avast because of the culture at the time join it was now also believed that gilbert changed his plea mid trial as he thought associates of kamara gun to come off to him in prison so he pleaded guilty hoping the camara would be released raymond gilbert had continued to deny his involvement and oboe sentenced to fifteen years he remained behind bars for not admitting that he was involved in the crime so another strange observations was is that bisazza newspapers around a bottle of milk which would have typically been left on the steps of the betting shop had been placed on a table inside neatly detective superintendent ulsan would describe this was pitched in the police photographs of the scene and even the jury raised this as a question into the judge puzzled how joan suffield could have been forced into the property at knife point but had the sense to pick up the bottle of milk and morning's paper on the way ryan was it more likely that will waiting inside in response to the jury's question about the milk in piper's. The judge queered wearied white masset us what he did with the money he stole from the betting shop. Gilbert said he bought furniture that when unquestioned his girlfriend june bannon verified that this wasn't true the furniture was legitimately purchased for the queries were raised just about the possibility that john suffield was handing over the keys to the betting shock to his manager following an unverified resignation along with the speed at which the police dismiss the individual who was said to threaten john a day before he was killed as a possible suspect. Joan suffield family recall him coming home from work worried on thursday night the evening before the murder. John said that he no longer wished to work at the betting shop and would be meeting his manage to return the a keys the next morning at nine thirty a. m. threats he had received the betting short were too much puzzlingly the betting shop coral as what is now known or joe curls as it was then but not received any communication to suggest that john safi wished to hand in his resignation and the manager could did not recall arranging to meet with john to collect the keys jones family also wondered how the police could have so quickly dismissed the man who had threatened on the day before he was murdered as they claimed to have interviewed everyone at the betting shot by the saturday evening. Jones family also questioned the reason for why he was murdered while they agreed that john had a stammer they described it as mild so he would have been able to communicate the safe combination. It is another piece of the puzzle which did not seem to fit was that john suffield family were familiar with the betting industry and the wayne which money stored in the saif they believed if are more likely but the killers became frustrated. Juice looking mechanism in the safe won't staff could open the outer to do a with a key or combination that was another compartment which only opened at specific times in this instance at eleven a._m. Jones family believed if he's killers were frustrated. It was likely due to their unwillingness to accept john could not access the safe as a timer was placed on the second lock doc or incest safe as it is also referred to while say the design this way to hinder any potential robberies is possible. There were no post as in the brought to explain the time lock was in operation. The robot didn't ni- they would not be able to access the money this pointed to raymond gilbert. It's innocence at least in the eyes of the suffield family is at the time they were unaware that she had made any mention of the problem with the second cy flock during any leave the statements they had seen in spite of multiple applications to the criminal cases review commission raymond gilbert's case was not referred to the court of appeal in two thousand nine before he's fourth submission to the c._r._c. which would ultimately file a campaign of a guild but bruce kent a former roman catholic priest on political activists said he never mentioned a time siphon his confession. If he had been there he would surely seen the scf. We also know the victim took a bottle of milk into the bookmakers but according to gilbert's confession it was being manhandled at the time. It's gilbert's confession have been true. The milk could have been dropped rather than place neatly down today today. There is no way that confession would lead to a prosecution in a further interview. Bruce kent said why would a man given a fifteen year tariff. You could have been released from prison years ago. Had he been model prisoner taken the necessary anger management courses and admitted his guilt nevertheless gone claiming he did not commit the crime while gilbert was not the best behaved prisoner he had undertaken several sponsored runs in the prison yard raising over one thousand housing four hundred pounds to provide medical care for young people is advocate sang these proves he was making progress and he was not the disruptive and undisciplined support man the prison authorities claimed him to be the university of bristol innocence project began working with raymond gilbert's defense thing and requested the merseyside police analyzed the exhibits from the crime scene for diana however they informed that the exhibits were lost the following john cameras release the press began to focus on a number of high profile miscarriages of justice and how the individuals involved were treated these included the birmingham six the bridge will to four an twenty five three kamara was often quoted as an example of how the state treats exonerates pulley after his release he was refused both housing and financial assistance being informed the tussey had not made the necessary national insurance contributions. He was ineligible. Kamara had to frequently points out that is he was in prison for a crime he did not commit he'd been unable to contribute anything. The weasel men an m._p. For liverpool riverside had been contacted by kamara while he was in prison and she started to look into his case she was interviewed and said quote initially thought john slip through the system but then i realized there was nice system she began working with the home office raising objectives to ensure that these individuals would be given urgent financial compensation housing council lake immediate access to financial benefits and assistance to help them find work. Elm was told by the home office they were setting up a working party to offer recommendations about compensation during may two thousand and one the is that followed new legislation was drafted in two thousand fourteen to define what constitutes a miscarriage of justice however these changes had severe ramifications in what was seen as a test case the supreme court ruled that not every miscarriage of justice would be entitled to compensation after after serving seventeen years in prison victim neilan had his conviction of rape attend in december two thousand thirteen following fresh dna evidence and sam hallam seven years for murder before having his conviction quashed after a single witness who placed him at the scene recanted her testimony joining hallam was imprison. His father took his life. Both men were at. I told they would receive no compensation for their unjust adjusting conservation and that claims eventually made their way to the u._k. Supreme court in a majority decision made at the start of two thousand nineteen lord man said quote the criminal standard of proof beyond reasonable doubt may on occasions lead to acquit a little discontinuance in civil case in circumstances where the commission off the offense could be established on the balance of probabilities in essence this means that an individual what i need receive compensation when it is proven beyond a reasonable doubt they did not commit the crime <music> in two thousand and seven john suffield senior made the most poignant comment of all nobody least of all. My family wants an innocent man in prison. Uh but three years later towards the end of two thousand and ten one of raymond gilbert's most prominent supporters seventy-five-year-old jones suffield what senior out a change of heart and was now says in his son was mud at raymond gilbert he had for the first time obtained and read further the confession made by gilbert and indeed mention a combination safe. Just as jones suffield senior thought it would he was part the statement in which gilbert refers to his accomplices. Roy coat kept asking suffield. If there was another safe he had his mouth open and wasn't and speaking a punched him twice in the face of them produced a knife and said if after resort to use this to get the answer about where the bright is our will but i won't say we took him into the back room and pushed him onto. Its share a tied. His hands behind his back and roy was looking at the safe. We found it in the back room returned to me and said it was a combo safe. I all suffield what the numbers were to open. The safe off to suffield had been cut twice. I told our roy to ask him for the numbers to open the scf. Roy put his head near to suffield mouth to hear what he was saying. Southfield mumbled something to roy news able to open the first part of the safe. I asked if there was anything else in the safe and roy said that there were only pipes yes but there was another part of the safe you will say said he couldn't open the other part suffield how to get open the other part of the safe. He was trying to mumble but i couldn't hear what he was saying was angry. Lost my temper in an interview with the liverpool echo john suffield senior said the only conclusion one comes too often reading that narrative is that gilbert was the killa ella. There's no remorse ni- massey the person who made that statement had to be there it appeared as though raman in gilbert had mentioned a combination safe after all while it would seem that that was the ended the matter things were getting even more complicated as it was revealed the statement provided by raymond gilbert detailing a combination safe. This was in fact written after he admitted to the crime in court and john kamara was then on trial. It was being alleged by raymond gilbert supporters supporters the gilbert's only wrote this confession to help kamara a campaign of a guild but would save gilbert's initial confession that quite white this was signed off the two days and nights of frequent interrogation by police officers with no one else present permissible in nineteen ninety-one but not today the confession made with police made no reference to the inner site which is crucial but i think raymond gilbert is a saint ain't but he's not matter so where are we now. During february two thousand thirteen raymond gilbert source first real taste of freedom was allowed to visit the town of shaft spring two miles north of guys marsh the category c prison in dorset where he was being held fifty four of the time. It's so far been imprisoned for thirty. One years he had been given a minimum term of fifteen years for the murder of john suffield and a further five attacking another inmate with a knife gilbert would have been released seena at he admitted to the murder however he still continue to deny he was involved a year later in a written submission he might further attempts to be moved to a category d prison and the open conditions of high champion kirk. I mean lancashire following his visits outside the prison wools the submission was rejected and he was informed that he was not suitable to be moved at this stage. It'd been violent silence and disruptive reportedly salting a female prison officer at the start of october two thousand and sixteen it was reported that raymond gilbert had been relased thirty five years after being sentenced for the murder of john suffield while gilbert was free questions still remain bruce ken to man who had campaigned continually forgive but to release said the raymond two survived all these years without losing his sanity is a miracle money side now at last he's out <music> <music>. Thank you for listening and special thanks to this week's patriot producers rebecca ratty tweets rebecca st sour khloe khloe cater and everyone who supports us on patriot for more information. Please lee seok show nights or visit. They walk among us podcast dot com <music> <music> <music> <music> yeah.

john kamara raymond gilbert john suffield murder Suffield jones John suffield raymond gilbert source john suffield family merseyside police peter camara john suffield southfield gilbert joan suffield john kamar suffield family Roy coat liverpool gilbert
The 2011 Tornado Super Outbreak Pt. 2

Natural Disasters

43:27 min | 10 months ago

The 2011 Tornado Super Outbreak Pt. 2

"Thank you so much for listening to natural disasters. We want to take this time to tell you that will be away. Okay over the Thanksgiving holiday and won't be releasing an episode on November twenty eighth but we'll be back with a brand new episode on December fifth. Have a happy and and safe Thanksgiving right now looking at the radar there's at least Fifteen in different storms in Alabama Mississippi. Tennessee that have tornado warnings and write our show the possibility of strong tornadoes with all of these storms. It was five eighteen. AM on April twenty-seventh. Two thousand eleven four tornadoes had already touched down that morning. In in Alabama the fifth tore up the main street of Cordova a rural town about fifty miles north of Tuscaloosa. The local fire station collapsed trapping fire and rescue trucks inside the garage. The only medical clinic in town was demolished. As people across the the rest of the state still slept soundly. Downtown Cordova disappeared into the dark funnel of an e F three Tornado. It was all over by seven. AM The Sun. Rose over a blue sky. People in Tuscaloosa and Birmingham turned on the news and heard that thirty you. One tornadoes had touchdown overnight across the southern state back in Cordova people emerged from the remains of their homes. Electricity city was out. They tried to call for help. But these surrounding towns were dealing with their own damage. The town was cut off isolated and it's emergency warnings. Services were down. There would be no warning when the next tornado arrived. Welcome to natural disasters a podcast original. I'm your host. Kate and I'm bill bill every Monday. We'll explore the moments in history. When the natural world turned deadly you can find all episodes of natural disasters and all other podcast asked originals for free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts to stream natural disasters for free on spotify just opened the APP tap browse rows and type natural disasters in the search bar at par cast? We are grateful for you our listeners. You allow us to do what we love. Let let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and Instagram at podcast and twitter at podcast network and if you enjoyed today's episode the best way to help Buses to leave a five star review. Wherever you're listening it really does help? This is the second part of our story on the wave of storms that devastated the southern United States in two thousand eleven known as the super outbreak. It became the costliest tornado outbreak ever recorded. So this week we'll trace the Tornado's path through Alabama and Mississippi as they careen through these states will show how the inhabitants tried to endure or the inconceivable power of Tornado superstorm and how after the storms passed the states. Were never quite the same by mid afternoon. On April twenty seventh. Two Thousand Eleven James Span was exhausted. Did he was the chief meteorologist at ABC Thirty Three Forty in Birmingham Alabama and he had been broadcasting live for nearly forty eight hours straight. There was no time for a break. The superstorm had already produced over a hundred twisters as span review the Doppler radar projected onto the enormous green screen behind him. He couldn't believe what he was saying. There were so many hook echoes the radar fingerprint Tornado. That he couldn't keep them all on screen up. North to e f five twisters born in Mississippi had crossed the State Line into rural Alabama another e f four Tornado was about to wreak havoc in Georgia but those were out of his jurisdiction the Huntsville affiliate would issue warnings span. had to focus on what was coming towards Tuscaloosa and Birmingham. His voice caught has. Has He zoomed in. On one of the massive swirls of bright red on the radar hovering over a small dot labeled Coleman the small town was being obliterated traded in real time. No you fill over girls from going over there and we'll be all right. Wow just hit something over there. Turn real black span. Turned back to the camera and thought of his terrified audience watching the newscast while they hunkered down in their homes and businesses. His voice might be the last thing some of them would ever hear over the deafening wind pointing to the Swirl on the green screen radar span said. That's a debris ball. That's the radar beam bouncing off of the stuff in the tornado. Cars could be in their boards. Bricks glass glass nails shrapnel span. Didn't want to imagine what all of that debris hurling through the air at a hundred and ninety miles an hour might due to an unprotected human body. He again reminded everyone watching to get to a safe. The place he watched as two of the biggest swirls lurched northeast. One was about fifty miles to the north. The other was heading toward Tuscaloosa USA right for the newsroom. The sprawling university campus and the only Trauma Center for a hundred miles ninety thousand people were in its path. Half as span was out in front of the cameras. Jason Simpson worked behind a bank of computers in the newsroom. He was monitoring Deterring radar social media reports and several storm chaser teams that contributed to the ABC weather. UPDATES suddenly a message popped popped up on his screen. It was from John Old shoe a former. ABC weatherman and colleague who now chased storms volunteer. The message said Yo Joe. We're going to the county line. Jason hammered out a quick reply with a grim smile. Old Shoe was gunning for the southern supercell. The one that was threatening Tuscaloosa a supercell or a rotating thunderstorm is a massive kind of storm that features. There's a rotating updraft of wind which can commonly result in tornadoes. The former weekend weatherman still had good instincts. Old Shoe who had been the first intern James Span ever had mostly because span had never thought to have one until old shoe left him a phone message explaining that he. I needed an internship for college and didn't WanNa work for anyone else eventually. Old Shoe became. ABC Thirty Three Forties Resident Storm Chaser. Dr Driving Their purpose built van into the heart of storms to capture footage of tornadoes. One of them nearly killed him when it turned turned suddenly and destroyed his van. Old Shoe had survived by taking cover in a motel. He retired from broadcasting after that but his coverage won an emmy for him and span. Old Shoe knew how to hunt down. Twisters back out on the interstate. Old Shoe pressed pressed the accelerator to the floor guiding his deep blue Toyota highlander through the sheets of rain as the windshield wipers tried to keep up in the passenger passenger seat old shoes partner. Ben Greer read Jason's reply Jason Needed. I witnessed confirmation that the storms had produced a tornado. This was called ground truth. It was an integral part of storm warnings if they had a direct line to ground truth span and and his team could instantly warn people in the path of that tornado and save lives. Old Shoe looked for an exit. That would give them a clear. View as Greer prepped cameras and quickly down a snickers bar. They needed energy and focus for what came next. They were going to live stream a tornado. Tornado meanwhile seventy miles to the north lieutenant. Brett Dawkins stepped out of the travel camper. The Cordova fire department had been MM using as a command post. He had his team salvages many rescue tools and medical supplies as they could from the wreck fire station. They stashed everything in the camper for fast retrieval as they picked through the rubble of downtown the loan. Emergency dispatcher in town had salvage this church surviving phone and radio and set up shop in an ancient train depot. Not far from the trailer. She was taking calls and furiously writing writing notes on injury and damage reports building a list for Dawkins and his team to tackle one by one. Dock INS was only twenty one years old old but he was already well liked in the ranks of Cordova Fire and rescue. He was a local and much of his family lived in the surrounding area. His aunt and uncle owned the only restaurant in town. After the tornado that morning he had been all over the area helping clean up. But right now Dawkins kept an eye glued on the ominous clouds above him. Something didn't feel right. The wind and rain were picking up and the sky. Had An unpleasant greenish yellow color. He shook off the uneasy feeling and got back to work clearing rubble. A few miles outside Cordova storm chasers. Brian Peters and Tim Coleman were right on the tail of the northern. supercell Coleman kept an eye on the radar as Peter's blasted their Chevy Avalanche through the downpour at ninety five miles per hour kicking up huge sheets of water. Coleman was frantic. They couldn't see the tornado yet but he knew it was there. The radar signal was obvious. Obvious and peters was still driving towards it Coleman turned to his partner and said you haven't turned southeast yet it's coming Addis Addis Peter slowed down. There was a Twang of fear in his voice. Says he said we're going to have a view right up here. Let's let's just see what we can see Coleman nodded. He responded okay. But keep your engine running. Then in the interstate crested a hill and Coleman saw something terrifying. It wasn't just one tornado. There were three of them then two then three again. Smaller tendrils spun around the core. It was a multiple vortex. Tornado Coleman started filming while Peters called Jason in the newsroom. Jason told span they had confirmed touchdown and live audio span span. Put them over. The studio system and suddenly Peter's voice was being broadcast statewide. He said we're looking at what appears ears to be two tornadoes. One has lifted and the second one is definitely on the ground. We're not going to be able to stay here very long this. This thing is coming at us. Spans deep baritone voice calmly replied Brian. You get out of there. If you've got to hang up you go in the background of the phone. Call a woman who had also pulled off. The highway was screaming. It's right there to the south. John Old Shoe Yanked his camera off. Its cradle on the dashboard. The giant funnel cloud was crossing in front of them approaching Tuscaloosa greer slid a laptop onto the hood of the Toyota and ran a thin cable to the camera. In old shoes hand. They were ready old shoe. Send Send Jason a message in the newsroom. He asked if the livestream was working. Jason said Yes old shoe replied that they were looking right at the tornado tornado. They needed to get on the air. Jason checked the feed a huge black wedge filled the screen. The Sky around it was soft soft and white. There was no mistaking the enormous tornado. barreling towards Tuscaloosa Jason Patched through to span and told him what they were seeing to e f four tornadoes in two different cities at the same time span. Put them both live live on the air. Peter's voice overlapped with old shoes footage span turned back to the camera and issued two simultaneous warnings. He he said we've got a large tornado crossing into Cordova. And I've got video of a separate tornado. We are calling a tornado. Emergency for Tuscaloosa Qaluza be in a safe place. The town of Cordova was eerily quiet and the sun. Sun was shining through a smattering of dark clouds. A woman directing traffic through the rubble of downtown took a drag of her cigarette and looked up at the sky. There were some wispy pink clouds floating Earth a few raindrops quickly followed then. She looked closer. They weren't pink clouds. It was insulation from the walls of a destroyed home. The rain suddenly got worse and then became came. Hail up the street. A young boy was shouting and pointing. She looked up again and saw a tree branch spinning high high in the air above her. Then it started to fall getting bigger and bigger until she saw that it was an entire tree. The boy ran towards the highest point in town aiming his camera. Phone he screamed. Look right there. Lieutenant Dawkins DOC in in his team sprinted out of their makeshift command post in the camper and ran toward city hall hollering anyone and everyone that could hear them. Doc Can stood in the doorway leading to the damp basement of the municipal building waving his arms and yelling. Get in here now. Run the F four Tornado. Four NATO tore into the town like a freight train with a jet engine. The people huddled in the basement listened as several of the buildings that had survived survived the F. Three that morning crumbled like toys. The bank disappeared into the funnel along with the piggly-wiggly market and most of the Church and enormous home on a hill looking over the town was spun around and separated from its foundation. The family hiding inside it was hurled out as their house disintegrated around them as Dawkins watched through a crack in the door. The camper lifted off the ground owned and plunged into the depot building a few hundred feet away. Then the winds quieted. Everything was calm. One of the other young firefighters jumped to his feet. Saying it's gone that's it it's over. He tried to run outside but someone else held albin back. The firefighter shrugged them off and kept pushing towards the door. He was worried about the police dispatcher. who had holed up alone in the train depot? She had refused to abandon her post. And the camper had just crashed into the exact spot where she'd taken cover they. They had to find out if she was alive. Someone in the basement yelled no get in here. It's just the calm. The wind suddenly reverse reverse direction blowing just as strong as before. It was the other side of the tornadoes core but it was too late. The firefighter had already shoved his way outside. We'll discuss these survivors of the Cordova. E F four right after this their four-legged full of love and oftentimes more like family than their nickname suggests adjusts the podcast original dog. Tales tells the true stories of heroic canines who have gone above and beyond their best friend duties every Monday dog tales embarks on a new journey of courage service and unwavering sacrifice by our most loyal companions. You'll hear tales of inspiration nation from all breeds of life like buddy. The German shepherd the world's first seeing I guide dog or Huskies Balto and Togo the sled dogs who made a lifesaving medical delivery from anchorage to known each episode of Dog Tales is as unique as the pops themselves and sure to bring you closer oeser to the furry friend in your life so get ready to sit. Stay and roll over with excitement for podcast endearing series dog tales. Listen to dog tales free on spotify. Or wherever you get your podcasts. Now back back to the story. It was five twenty seven. PM On April twenty-seventh two thousand eleven and the small town of Cordova had had just been struck by a tornado for the second time that day at the exact same moment. An enormous E F four Tornado was tearing into the city of Tuscaloosa Oskaloosa at Druid City hospital in Tuscaloosa. The nursing staff prepared for a massive intake of victims. The we are was quiet as though everyone was holding their breath waiting for the tornado. The warnings from span and the storm chasers had done their job Bob The D. C. H.. Medical Center had almost an hour to get ready. Suddenly a big plastic garbage been dropped out of the sky and slammed slammed into the hospital. Parking lot the ER staff looked out the front windows. The Black Wedge of the Tornado was coming up the streets. The nurses says a dived over gurneys protecting their patients bodies with their own as it entered the city. The tornado crossed interstate. Three fifty nine hurling Hurling cars and tipping over semi trucks. An elderly woman named mini Acklin was thrown from her car and became the tornadoes NATO's first fatality. The tornado slammed into the TUSCALOOSA Emergency Management Agency building which had been built in the seventies to survive a nuclear blast. The steel and concrete building shook and the tornado passed over. The students at the University of Alabama had been preparing for final exams that week. Danielle downs was at home with her roommate. Lauren Brown and their friend will Stevens. They were holed up in a small hallway under the stairs. They had been trying to study but were too terrified to focus. They had the television set up in the hallway. Alway with them watching James Span and the video of the incoming Tornado Danielle frantically text. Her sister the windows were rattling and the wind wind howled around the house. Suddenly the power went out. The Tornado had ripped apart the local electrical substation. The steel beams of a nearby warehouse were bent double as the roof was torn off. The neighborhood. Church collapsed. The tornado. 8-o was upon them. Lauren was on her cell phone with her mother crying in fear as she clutched will's hand her mother heard him telling Lauren. Lauren everything is going to be okay. It's okay just is the phone call. Went dead an enormous oak tree that had grown in the front the yard for decades crush the House Danielle Lauren and will were killed instantly. The Tornado eight oh blasted through the neighborhood of Alberta leveling the elementary school and shopping center. They're leaving nothing but a few piles of debris on the concrete foundations. The local fire station was destroyed stopping the station clock at five Oh eight. PM Exactly Chelsea Thrash was at her boyfriend's ends apartment not far from Lauren Danielle and had taken cover in the bathroom. She huddled against the heavy porcelain bathtub with her class notes And a few snacks the wind was picking up and it had become a roar Chelsea peaked out the door as the house began to vibrate. She I saw the front door of the apartment disappear into the vortex the walls of the bathroom shook violently and then everything went black as she lost. Consciousness business the Tuscaloosa e f four left the city limits. At Five thirty seven PM. It had left a six mile oil path of destruction through Tuscaloosa. Now it was heading for the city of Birmingham meteorologist. Jim Stefka Vich and his team team at the national weather. Service station in Birmingham had direct lines of communication to span and other broadcasters to provide up to the minute weather data the NWS team had been covering these super outbreak since the first winds picked up over Oklahoma several days before now the storm was literally literally pounding on their front door as the sirens wind outside. The weather. Service building was buffeted by straight line winds in the center. The building was a concrete storm. Proof bunker built specifically for days like this as the F. Four Tornado drew closer to Birmingham. Stefka Vich gave the order for everyone to take shelter in the bunker. The beeping radar screens and crackling radios echoed in an empty room has has the weather service. Personnel gathered behind two feet of masonry. They were safe. They were also lucky along with everyone else in Birmingham. The tornado veered north and miss the city. By less than four miles the twister had been a mile and a half wide. It was a narrow miss by the time. The tornado dissipated north of the city at approximately six fourteen PM. It had chewed up over eighty miles of Alabama. In the course of ninety ninety minutes up north. The Cordova Tornado had been on the ground for over two hours scouring a path of over one hundred. It's sixteen miles. It had lifted back into the storm cell a few minutes before six. PM The fire and Rescue Squad was overwhelmed trying to address the fresh damage. Bread Dawkins emerged from the basement of Cordova City Hall into a wasteland of debris and carnage. There was a strong smell of pine and natural gas was thick in the air. People were bloodied and dazed stumbling or sitting on the wreckage. Their homes and businesses dawkins recognized one of the men running towards him. It was his uncle Mike. He was pointing up the street. He he said Jackson and Bev are trapped. The whole damn houses on them nearby. Don's found a tractor that had survived the twister. He fired it up and cleared a path through the rubble to the remains of the fire station. He loaded up. What remained of the gear from the wrecked trucks including airbags? Thanks medical and digging equipment. He brought it all downtown and set up a triage facility for the squad then he headed towards where his family was trapped. Scrapped the rest of the fire and rescue squad made their way through the rubble of downtown and the surrounding blocks. Amanda Haj one of the firefighters fighters was heading for the remains of the destroyed piggly-wiggly market when she noticed a small figure curled up in the middle of the road. It was a young. Oh boy about eight years old. She hollered for chief Harbison. The head of the Cordova Fire Department who was driving the only operational rescue truck. Amanda dropped to her knees next to the boy he was covered in mudan blended in with the dirt and debris all around him. She tried to feel his pulse. The chief sped over setting up an ekg as Amanda did CPR. She noticed a huge open hole in the boy's shoulder leading to a black mark all the way down his body. She knew immediately he'd been struck by lightning. She kept up with the compressions and watch the heart monitor. There was no sign of life. The chief quietly told her to stop. The boy was gone on but Amanda was a mother and she couldn't just give up. They had cleaned the mud off the boy's face and Amanda Recognize Him. He was one of her son's classmates. Chief Harbison understood. He was a father to but they had a job to do. Chief chief harbison gently pulled her away. They found the boys brother in the parking lot of the market. His body was terribly twisted and many any of his bones were broken. Their friend had just been pulled out of the debris unconscious and bleeding profusely. His mother was found found dead along the road nearby. Meanwhile Brett Dawkins finally made it to his uncle's house. The structure was off its foundation leaning hard. Our to one side like a collapsed line of dominoes. Bread could hear his aunt. Bev's voice calling for help from somewhere. Underneath the floor Dawkins located where Bev's voice was coming from and fired up his chainsaw. He cut a hole in the floor just wide enough for him to fit. He pulled back the flooring and grab a flashlight crouching to squeeze under the House. He shined the light in the dark crawlspace. He found his is an BEV. I her right arm trapped under a wall and her neck bent severely. She could hardly breathe. Then doc it's pivoted did and the light illuminated his cousin Jackson. Bev said he's gone. She couldn't see her son on the other side of the wall that had trapped her arm but she could feel him. He had grown cold as they were trapped under the house. The fallen house had come to rest on Jackson's shoulders now. His body was supporting the entire structure. The only thing keeping it from crushing his mother's neck in death he she had saved her life. Dockings had to move fast. He jumped back out of the hole and returned with several items. That seemed silly to breath. They looked like pizza boxes but they weren't pizza boxes they were airbags and Brett quickly placed them under the support. Beams the house. He was going to get her out. He connected the bags to an air compressor and with a powerful his severe. The House began the lift. Bev was free and most importantly she was alive. Back in Tuscaloosa a giant Dan red and white fire truck with a number seven painted on the side was crawling. Its way through the rubble-strewn streets riding in the back was twenty-seven-year-old. Your old paramedic. Adam Motley. The truck and the firefighters were heading towards the remains of the Rosedale neighbourhood. But when they arrived there were yeah no buildings left. There was only a flat field of asphalt and piles of debris even the trees and traffic signs. Were gone then widely noticed the refrigerators. They poked out of the wreckage as small morbid landmarks of where homes used to be. He knew you. Some of them showed where the firefighters would likely find bodies as Wadley and the rest of the firefighters jumped out of the truck they were quickly approached approached by surviving residents wildly took a look at a man's gashed Armagh one of the other firemen and ex-marine nodded towards wildly and I'd ride the more severely injured people gathering around them. They only had a few men and supplies. They were going to have to triage in the street deciding deciding which people needed immediate help which ones could wait and who was beyond saving these. Were terrible decisions to make. They were necessary if they were going to save lives. The squad was quickly outnumbered by the injured residence. The expiration pointed a woman towards Schwartz wildly. She was carrying something small clutched against her chest. It was a baby girl wildly examined her and realized realized there was no hope he tried to find the words but was interrupted by a man carrying another injured baby. The man said this came through my window. What we took the two children towards the big rescue truck that had just arrived? They were taking the babies to the hospital whether they had had a chance or not. They couldn't simply leave them in the street what they put the two infants on a Gurney and told the driver to roll out suddenly the ambulance lurch to a halt as a man pounded on the back door wildly opened it. The man was bleeding badly widely at least started to tell him he couldn't take him when he noticed what was in the man's bloody hands. It was another baby. Widely quickly took the third child into the truck he started. CPR on the babies as they made their way towards D. C. H. Medical Center. The Tornado had narrowly missed the hospital. Title passing the building by only a few blocks normally. It would have been seven minutes to the hospital. But on April twenty-seventh two thousand eleven. It would take forty five. We'll return to the harrowing rescue right after this now back to the story. A major search and rescue is occurring. Think perhaps you can hear in the background. Rubble being moved by by my count about thirty men and women looking for family and relatives. I'm told that there is a one year old and a five year old little girl stuck under this rubble and there are many people missing where it was six. PM on April twenty-seventh less than an hour had passed since the e F. Four Tornado left Tuscaloosa. The fire department had to set up a makeshift morgue in a parking lot because there were so many bodies. Adam Watt was in rescue twenty-seven even making round trips from the parking lot to the hospital. The truck had run out of medical supplies almost immediately and now it was shuttling survivors by the dozen dozen packing as many people into the back as possible. Wildly new the scenes of death and destruction would haunt him for the rest of his career. The three three babies he was transporting hadn't survived the trip to the hospital now. More bodies were piling up then as the rescue truck returned into the parking lot Group had arrived with a college student on a makeshift stretcher. She couldn't feel or move her legs but she was conscious and alert. It was Chelsea thrash. The girl who had been sucked out of the second story apartment bathroom she had landed on a rock in the courtyard of the destroyed building thing. Her spine was broken but she was lucid as wildly. Look down at her on the stretcher. He suddenly found hope widely loaded her into the back of rescue twenty seven and yelled at the driver. Let's run this hot. He was going to make sure this girl made it and she did. Chelsea went into surgery but she had a long road ahead. A piece of her rib was taken out to repair her vertebra. Uh She went into intensive physical therapy and four months later she walked into her first day of class. The final tornado go to Strike Alabama on the twenty seventh touchdown at eight twelve PM. It was rated an es four and was the sixty second tornado in the state that day the twister chewed through forty four miles of the countryside and took seven lives before it slowly retracted back into the dark clouds at at nine hundred nine. PM The outbreak was over. It affected some people for the second time as well as a lot more new people so I think people are beginning to realize that. It's such an overwhelming disaster That is going to be awhile before things can get back to normal. Cordova was the only town in Alabama to suffer two direct hits in one day Brett Dawkins and the rescue squad worked for three days straight. When Brett finally returned home he found his house had vanished into the belly of the tornado? But he would rebuild build. Along with the rest of Cordova. The final victim Tuscaloosa was found in the rubble of an apartment building five days after the tornado. The final death toll from that day was two hundred fifty. Three President Obama declared a federal state of emergency for the region and visited Tuscaloosa Qaluza. A few days after the outbreak the loss of life has been heartbreaking especially in Alabama in the ABC News Newsroom. James Span was hearing good news. Out of Coleman the town hit by the tornado that he had used as an example of a debris ball that tornado had been an e f four an incredibly powerful twister. The town had suffered a direct hit but the residents had sixteen minutes warning warning spans and Jason Simpson to Coleman with a camera crew where he reported that the hospital there had survived and there were no fatalities in the town own. Ah We heard when I play hundred mile an hour winds and the power and the table went out and it is spin himself. Went Visit Cordova leading a caravan volunteer families to help with the cleanup spans family bonded with a family and Cordova the Adamses as an over the next six months the spans helped build them a new home. Their story was repeated in many towns in the weeks following the tornado. Although all over the area communities were coming together to support each other I wanted my children to see how they are to steal have a house in place place asleep at night and to have food so we just bought up some water and food and just walk in and finding people to kneel. It's just material it can all be replaced Getting trying to go through that and see if I can say anything. Pop drinks food there a bunch of people and I want thank all of them for come through here and greatly appreciated. Made gotTa have faith and Mike Borough. Volunteers showed up from all across. America bringing supplies food and water and construction materials. Oh Jackson Professional Football Ball in baseball player and a native Alabama began a charity bike ride across the state joined by a series of other athletes. Jackson visited small towns hounds all across the state including Cordova. He ended the ride in Tuscaloosa with an enormous gathering of survivors and first responders. He raised six hundred thousand dollars towards the relief effort in the year after the super outbreak. He said I was so amazed. Did how resilient people can be after tragedy to be six or seven years old and have it all taken away. That's enough to sink. Antibody the cleanup would take nearly four years and cost eleven billion dollars. The super outbreak set records for the most tornadoes in a single day and a single month and very nearly broke the records for most violent and deadly single tornadoes. To this day. Meteorologist's point to the two thousand eleven super outbreak as an incredible outlier in their studies of Tornado. Damage the national weather. Service service ran a comprehensive analysis of the super outbreak including their forecasts successful warning rates and indexes of damage and wind produced by the tornadoes. NATO's as a result. The false warning rate dropped by nearly forty percent in Birmingham and the surrounding areas Steph Kovic and his team I'm at the. NWS office also took on a new mission of public education using social media to communicate. Storm warnings and information in May two thousand eleven the month after the super outbreak and e f five tornado destroyed the town of Joplin Missouri. This tornado was more powerful than any of the super outbreak. The images of the aftermath dominated the news two years later Tim Samaras a veteran storm Chaser and leader in the storm Chaser community was killed by a tornado in El Reno Oklahoma. His tragic and surprising death brought a new wave of public attention to storm chasing and tornado outbreaks. Brian Peters the chaser that it had covered the second. Cordova Tornado was distraught. When he heard that four people had been killed he turned his grief into inspiration and devoted himself off to teaching storm spotting classes and training a new generation of informed spotters and chasers at one weather conference where Peters was speaking he he was approached by a teenage girl? Her family stood a few feet away watching. She asked him if she could give him a hug. Brian was confused infused but he agreed and asked her why she said you saved my life. You saved my family's life. Brian choked poked up as the girl explained that she and her family lived in a mobile home not far from Cordova when his phone call was broadcast over the radio by span span they heard him and took shelter. The tornado turned their home into a twisted hunk of metal and glass. The girl showed Brian Picture. Sure of the aftermath. It was an image. He would never forget so. Thanks for listening to natural disasters for more information information on the two thousand eleven super outbreak amongst the many sources we used. We found what stands in a storm by Kim Cross to be extremely helpful helpful to our research next week. We'll dive into another of nature's terrible catastrophes. You can find all episodes of natural disasters and all other podcast arc cast originals for free on spotify. Not only does spotify already. Have all of your favorite music but now spotify is making it easy for you to enjoy all live your favorite podcast originals like natural disasters for free from your phone desktop or smart speaker to stream natural disasters on spotify. Just just open the APP tap browse and type natural disasters in the search bar. And don't forget to follow us on facebook and Instagram at podcast and twitter at podcast. Our cast network. We'll see you next time. Natural disasters was created by Max. Cutler is a production of color media. And as part of the podcast network it's produced by Maxon Ron Cutler sound designed by Michael Lang's Ner with Production Assistance Byron Shapiro. Paul Libeskind Maggie Admire and Carly Madden. This episode. Would of natural disasters was written by Andrew Messer and stars Kate Leonard and Bill Thomas from all of us at natural disasters. We'd like to wish you a happy Thanksgiving just a reminder that we won't be releasing an episode on on November twenty eighth but we will be back with a brand new episode on December fifth. Thanks again for listening for the animal lovers in history fans out there. Don't forget to check out the podcast original series dog tales. Every Monday dog dog tales shares the inspirational true stories behind some of the most heroic canine history. They're uplifting exciting and full of heart search search for dog tales in the spotify APP. And listen free today.

Tuscaloosa Cordova Tornado Coleman Brett Dawkins Jason Simpson Cordova Tornado Alabama Mississippi spotify Birmingham James Span Old Shoe Ben Greer NATO Jackson United States Cordova fire department ABC ABC
S3: Best of 2019: The 2011 Tornado Super Outbreak Pt. 2

Parcast Presents: Summer of '69

41:06 min | 8 months ago

S3: Best of 2019: The 2011 Tornado Super Outbreak Pt. 2

"Right now looking at the radar there's at least Fifteen different storms in Alabama Mississippi and Tennessee that have tornado the warnings and radar. Show the possibility of strong tornadoes with all of these storms five eighteen. AM on April. Twenty seventh seventh. Two thousand eleven four tornadoes had already touched down that morning. In Alabama the fifth tore up the main street of Cordova Elva a rural town about fifty miles north of Tuscaloosa. The local fire station collapsed trapping fire and rescue trucks inside the garage Asia. The only medical clinic in town was demolished. As people across the rest of the state still slept soundly. Downtown Cordova disappeared into the dark funnel of an e F three tornado it was all over by seven. AM The Sun rose over a blue sky. Why people in Tuscaloosa and Birmingham turned on the news and heard that thirty? One tornadoes had touchdown overnight across the southern state date back in Cordova people emerged from the remains of their homes. Electricity was out. They tried to call for help. But these surrounding ending towns were dealing with their own damage. The town was cut off isolated. And it's emergency warning services were down. There would be no no warning when the next tornado arrived. Welcome welcome to natural disasters. Apar- cast original. I'm your host and I'm bill every Monday. We'll explore the moments in history. When the natural world turned deadly you can find all episodes of natural disasters and all other podcast originals for free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts to stream natural disasters for free on spotify? Just open the APP tap browse and type natural disasters in the search bar at podcast. Our cast we are grateful for you our listeners. You allow us to do what we love. Let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and Instagram at par cast I and twitter at podcast network. And if you enjoy today's episode the best way to help us is to leave a five star review. Wherever you're listening? It really does help. This is the second part of our story on the wave of storms that devastated the southern United States in two thousand eleven known as the super outbreak. It became the costliest tornado outbreak. Ever recorded this week. We'll trace the Tornado's path through Alabama and and Mississippi as they careen through these states will show how the inhabitants tried to endure the inconceivable power of a tornado superstorm and and how after the storms passed the states. Were never quite the same by mid afternoon afternoon. On April Twenty seventh two thousand eleven James Span was exhausted. He was the chief meteorologist at ABC. Thirty the three forty in Birmingham Alabama and he had been broadcasting live for nearly forty eight hours straight. There was no time for a break. The superstorm had already produced over a hundred twisters has span review the Doppler radar projected onto the enormous green screen behind him. He he couldn't believe what he was saying. There were so many hook. Echoes the radar fingerprint of a tornado. That he couldn't keep them all on screen up. North to E-e-eh five twisters born in Mississippi had crossed the State Line into rural Alabama another e f four Tornado Tornado was about to wreak havoc in Georgia. But those were out of his jurisdiction the Huntsville affiliate would issue warnings span. had to focus focus on what was coming towards Tuscaloosa and Birmingham his voice caught. Has He zoomed in. On one of the massive swirls of bright red on the radar hovering over a small dot labeled Coleman the small town was being obliterated in real time thriller over girls from Stove going over there. We'll be right. Wow it just hit something over there. Turn real black span turned back to the camera. And thought of his terrified audience audience watching the newscast while they hunkered down in their homes and businesses. His voice might be the last thing some of them would ever hear over the deafening wind pointing to the Swirl on the green screen radar span said. That's a debris ball. That's the radar beam bouncing housing office of the stuff. In the Tornado. Cars could be in their boards. Bricks glass nails shrapnel span. Didn't want to imagine what all of that debris hurling through the air at one hundred and ninety miles an hour might due to an unprotected had human body. He again reminded everyone watching to get to a safe place he watched. As two of the biggest swirls lurched. The northeast was about fifty miles to the north. The other was heading toward Tuscaloosa right for the newsroom. The sprawling university campus and the only Trauma Center for one hundred miles ninety thousand people were in its path as span was out in front of the cameras. Jason Simpson worked behind a bank of computers in the newsroom. He was monitoring radar social media reports and several storm. I'm chasing teams that contributed to the ABC weather updates. Suddenly a message popped up on his screen. It was from John Old shoe a former. ABC weatherman and colleague who now chased storms as a volunteer. The message said Yo. We're going to the county line Jason. Jason hammered out a quick reply with a grim smile. Old Shoe was gunning for the southern supercell. The one that was threatening Tuscaloosa a super cell or a rotating thunderstorm is a massive kind of storm that features a rotating updraft of wind which can commonly result in tornadoes. The former weekend weatherman still had good instincts. Old Shoe had been the first intern. James Span ever had mostly because a span had never thought to have one until old shoe left him a phone message explaining that he needed an internship for college and didn't WanNa work for anyone else else eventually. Old Shoe became. ABC Thirty Three Forties Resident Storm Chaser driving their purpose built van into the heart of storms arms to capture footage of tornadoes. One of them nearly killed him when it turned suddenly and destroyed his van. Old Shoe had had survived by taking cover in a motel. He retired from broadcasting after that but his coverage won an emmy for him and span. Old Shoe soon knew how to hunt down twisters back out on the interstate. Old Shoe press the accelerator to the floor guiding his deep blue Toyota. highlander it went through the sheets of rain as the windshield wipers. Tried to keep up in the passenger seat hold shoes partner Ben Greer read Jason's reply. Jason needed eyewitness confirmation that the storms had produced a tornado. This was called ground truth. It was an integral girl. Part of storm warnings if they had a direct line to ground truth span and his team could instantly warn people in the path of that tornado and save lives. Old Shoe looked for an exit. That would give them a clear. View as Greer prepped cameras and quickly down a snickers bar they needed needed energy and focus for what came next. They were going to live stream. A Tornado meanwhile seventy miles to the north lieutenant. Brett doc in stepped out of the travel camper the Cordova Fire Department had been using as a command post. He had his team salvages many many rescue tools and medical supplies as they could from the wreck. Fire station they stashed everything in the camper for fast retrieval as they. They picked through the rubble of downtown. The loan emergency dispatcher in town had salvaged her surviving phone and radio equipment and set up shop in an ancient ancient train depot. Not far from the trailer. She was taking calls furiously writing notes on injury and damage reports building a list for docking and his team to tackle one by one. Duggan's was only twenty one years old but he was already well liked in the ranks of Cordova Fire and rescue. He was a local and much of his family lived in the surrounding area. His aunt and uncle owned the only restaurant in town. After the tornado that morning he had been all over the area helping clean up. But right now doc is kept an eye glued on the ominous clouds clouds above him. Something didn't feel right. The wind and rain were picking up and the sky. Had An unpleasant greenish yellow color. He shook off the uneasy feeling and got back to work clearing rubble. A few miles outside Cordova Storm Storm. Chasers Brian Peters and Tim. Coleman were right on the tail of the northern supercell Coleman kept an eye on the radar as Peter's eaters blasted their Chevy Avalanche through the downpour at ninety five miles per hour kicking up huge sheets of water. Coleman was frantic. They couldn't see the tornado yet but he knew it was there. The radar signal was obvious and peters was still driving towards it. Coleman Ullman turned to his partner and said you haven't turned southeast yet. It's coming at us. Peter's slow down there was a Twang of fear in his voice as he said. We're going to have a view right up here. Let's just see what we can see. Coleman nodded he responded. Okay but keep your engine running. Then the interstate crested a hill and Coleman saw something. I'm Tara finding it wasn't just one tornado. There were three of them then two then three again smaller tendrils federal's spun around the core. It was a multiple vortex. Tornado Coleman started filming while Peters called Jason in the newsroom. Jason told span they had confirmed touchdown and live audio span. Put them over the studio system and suddenly Peter's voice voice was being broadcast statewide. He said we're looking at what appears to be to tornadoes. One has lifted and the second can one is definitely on the ground. We're not going to be able to stay here very long. This thing is coming at US stands deep baritone tone voice calmly replied Brian. You get out of there. If you've got to hang up you go in the background of the phone. Call a woman who had also pulled off the highway with screaming. It's right there to the south. John Old Shoe Yanked his camera off. Its cradle on the dashboard. The giant funnel cloud was crossing in front of them approaching Tuscaloosa greer slid a laptop onto the hood of the Toyota and ran the thin cable to the camera and old shoes hand. They were ready. Old Shoe sent Jason a message in the newsroom. He asked if the livestream was working. Jason said Yes old shoe replied that they were looking right at the tornado. They needed to get on the air. Jason checked the the feed a huge black wedge filled the screen. The Sky around it was soft and white. There was no mistaking the enormous tornado. barreling towards Tuscaloosa Jason Patched through span and told him what they were seeing to e f four tornadoes NATO's in two different cities at the same time span. Put them both live on the air. Peter's voice overlapped with old shoes footage at age span turned back to the camera and issued two simultaneous warnings. He said we've got a large tornado crossing into Cordova. And I've got video of a separate tornado. We are calling a tornado. Emergency for Tuscaloosa. Be a safe place. The town of Cordova was eerily quiet and the sun was shining through a smattering of dark clouds. A A woman directing traffic through the rubble of downtown took a drag of her cigarette and looked up at the sky. There were some wispy pink clouds. Let's floating to Earth a few raindrops quickly followed. Then she looked closer. They weren't pink clouds. It was insulation relation from the walls of a destroyed home. The rain suddenly got worse and then became hail up the street. A young boy was shouting and pointing. She looked up again and saw a tree branch spinning high in the air above her. Then it started to fall getting bigger and bigger until she saw that it was an entire tree. The boy ran towards the highest point in town aiming his camera. Phone he screamed look right there. Lieutenant Dawkins and his team sprinted out of their makeshift command post in the camper and ran toward city hall hollering at anyone and everyone that could hear them. Dawkins stood in the doorway leading to the damp basement of the municipal building waving his arms in yelling. Get in here now. Run the F. Four Tornado tore into the town. Like A freight train with a jet engine engine. The people huddled in the basement listened as several of the buildings that had survived the three that morning crumbled like toys. The bank disappeared into the funnel along with the piggly-wiggly market and most of the church. An enormous home on a hill looking over the town was spun around and separated from its foundation. The family hiding inside was hurled out as their house. Disintegrated around them as Dawkins watched through a crack in the door the camper lifted off the ground and plunged into the depot building a few hundred feet away. Then the winds quieted. Everything was calm. One of the other young firefighters jumped to his feet. Saying it's it's gone that's it. It's over. He tried to run outside but someone else held him back. The firefighters shrugged them off and kept pushing towards towards the door. He was worried about the police dispatcher. who had holed up alone in the train depot? She had refused to abandon her post and the camper had just crashed into the exact spot where she'd taken cover. They had to find out if she was alive. Someone in the basement yelled no get in here. It's just the calm. The wind suddenly reverse direction blowing just as strong as before it was was the other side of the tornadoes core but it was too late. The firefighter had already shoved his way outside. We'll discuss these survivors of the Cordova e F. Before right after this now back to the story it was five twenty seven. PM On April twenty. Seven two thousand eleven and the small town of Cordova had just been struck by a tornado so for the second time that day at the exact same moment an enormous e f four Tornado was tearing into the city of Tuscaloosa at the Druid City hospital in Tuscaloosa. The nursing staff prepared for a massive intake of victims the ER was quiet as as though everyone was holding their breath waiting for the tornado. The warnings from span and the storm chasers had done their job the D. C. H.. Medical ICAL center had almost an hour to get ready. Suddenly a big plastic garbage been dropped out of the sky and slammed into the hospital parking lot. What the ER staff looked out the front windows? The Black Wedge of the Tornado was coming up the streets. The nurses dived over gurneys protecting their patients bodies with their own as it entered the city. The tornado crossed interstate three fifty nine hurling cars and tipping over semi trucks. An elderly woman named mini Acklin was thrown from her car and became the tornadoes first fatality mighty. The tornado slammed into the TUSCALOOSA Emergency Management Agency building which had been built in the seventies to survive a nuclear blast. The steel and concrete building shook and the tornado passed over. The students at the University of Alabama had been preparing for final exams exams. That Week Danielle downs was at home with her roommate. Lauren Brown and their friend will Stevens. They were holed up in a small hallway away under the stairs. They had been trying to study but were too terrified to focus. They have the television set up in the hallway with them watching James Span and the video of the incoming Tornado. Danielle frantically texted her sister. The windows were rattling and the wind howled around the house. Suddenly the power went out. The Tornado had ripped apart the local electrical substation. The steel beams of of a nearby warehouse were bent double as the roof was torn off. The neighborhood church collapsed. The tornado was upon and Lauren was on her cell phone with her mother crying in fear as she clutched will's hand her mother heard him telling. Lauren everything is going to be okay. It's okay just as the phone call went dead an enormous oak tree that had grown in the front yard for decades crushed. Rush the House Danielle Lauren and will were killed instantly. The tornado blasted through the neighborhood of Alberta Alberta leveling the elementary school and shopping center. They're leaving nothing. But a few piles of debris on the concrete foundations. The local fire station nation was destroyed stopping the station clock at five Oh eight. PM Exactly Chelsea Thrash was at her boyfriend's apartment. Not Far are from Lauren and Danielle and had taken cover in the bathroom. She huddled against the heavy porcelain bathtub with her class notes. And a few snacks. The wind was picking up and it had become a roar Chelsea peaked out the door as the house began to vibrate. She saw the front door of the apartment and disappear into the vortex the walls of the bathroom shook violently and then everything went black as she lost consciousness. The TUSCALOOSA four left the city limits. At Five thirty seven pm it had left a six mile path of destruction through Tuscaloosa. Now it was heading for the city of Birmingham meteorologist. Jim Steph rich and his team at the national weather. Service station in Birmingham had direct lines of communication to span and other broadcasters to provide up to the minute weather data the NWS team. I'm had been covering the super outbreak since the first winds picked up over Oklahoma several days before now the storm was literally pounding on their front door as the sirens wind outside. The weather. Service building was buffeted by straight line. Winds in the center of the building was a concrete create storm proof bunker built specifically for days like this as the F. Four Tornado drew closer to Birmingham Stefka. Vich gave the order for everyone to take shelter in the bunker. The beeping radar screen. Crackling radios echoed an empty room. Has the weather service personnel. Gather other behind two feet of masonry. They were safe. They were also lucky along with everyone else in Birmingham. The tornado veered North North and missed the city. By less than four miles the twister had been a mile a half wide. It was a narrow miss by the time. The tornado dissipated -tated north of the city at approximately six fourteen pm. It had chewed up over eighty miles of Alabama. In the course of ninety minutes up north. The Cordova Tornado had been on the ground for over two hours scouring a path of over one hundred sixteen miles. It had lifted back into the storm cell a few minutes before six. PM The fire and Rescue Squad was overwhelmed trying to address the fresh damage. Bread talking emerged from the basement of Cordova City Hall into a wasteland of debris and carnage. There was a strong smell of pine and natural gas was thick in the air. People were bloodied and dazed stumbling or sitting on the wreckage of their homes and businesses Dawkins recognized one of the men running towards him. It was his uncle Mike. He was pointing up the street. He said Jackson and Bev are trapped. The whole damn houses on them nearby dockings found a tractor that had survived the twister. He fired it up and cleared cleared a path through the rubble to the remains of the fire station. He loaded up. What remained of the gear from the wrecked trucks including airbags medical and digging equipment equipment? He brought it all downtown and set up a triage facility for the squad then he headed towards where his family was trapped. The rest of the fire and rescue squad made their way through the rubble of downtown and the surrounding blocks. Amanda Haj one of the firefighters was heading for the remains of the destroyed piggly-wiggly market when she noticed a small figure curled up in the middle of the road. It was a young boy about eight years old. God She hollered for Chief Harbison. The head of the Cordova Fire Department who was driving the only operational rescue truck. Amanda dropped to her knees these next to the boy he was covered in mud and blended in with the dirt debris all around him. She tried to feel his pulse. The chiefs sped over setting up an ekg as Amanda did CPR. She noticed a huge open hole in the boy's shoulder leading leading to a black mark all the way down his body. She knew immediately he'd been struck by lightning. She kept up with the compressions and watch the heart monitor. There was no sign of life. The chief quietly told her to stop. The boy was gone but Amanda Handle was a mother and she couldn't just give up. They had cleaned the mud off of the boy's face and Amanda recognized him. He was one of her son's classmates classmates. Chief Harbison understood. He was a father to but they had a job to do. Chief Harbison gently pulled her away. They found the boys brother in the parking lot of the market. His body was terribly twisted and many of his bones were broken. Their friend had just been pulled out of the debris unconscious and bleeding profusely. His mother was found dead along the road nearby. Meanwhile Brett Dawkins finally made it to his uncle's house. The structure was off. Its Foundation leaning hard to one side like collapsed. Line of dominoes. Bread could hear his aunt. Bev's voice calling for help from somewhere underneath the floor. Duck INS located aware BEV's voice was coming from and fired up his chainsaw. He cut a hole in the floor just wide enough for him to fit. He pulled back the flooring in and grabbed a flashlight crouching to squeeze under the House. He shined the light in the dark crawlspace. He found his aunt Bev. I her her right arm trapped under a wall and her neck bent severely. She could hardly breathe then. Dockings pivoted and the light illuminated his cousin Jackson. Bev said he's gone. She couldn't see her son on the other side of the wall that had trapped her arm but she could would feel him. He had grown cold as they were trapped under the house. The fallen house had come to rest on Jackson's shoulders now. His body body was supporting the entire structure. The only thing keeping it from crushing his mother's neck in death he had saved her life. Dawkins had to move fast. He jumped back out of the hole and returned with several items. That seemed silly to Bev. They looked like pizza. It's a boxes but they weren't pizza boxes they were airbags and Brett quickly. Place them under the support. Beams of the House he was I was going to get her out. He connected the bags to an air compressor and with a powerful hiss of air. The House began to lift Bev of was free and most importantly she was alive. Back in Tuscaloosa. A giant red and white fire truck with the number seven painted on the side was crawling. Its way through the rubble-strewn streets riding in the back was twenty-seven-year-old paramedic. Adam wildly the truck and the firefighters were heading towards the remains of the Rosedale neighbourhood. But when they arrived there were no buildings left. There was only a flat field of asphalt in piles of debris even the trees and traffic signs were gone then widely noticed the refrigerators. They poked out of the wreckage as small morbid landmarks of where homes used to be. He knew some of them showed where the firefighters firefighters would likely find bodies as widely and the rest of the firefighters jumped out of the truck they were quickly approached by surviving residents. It's widely took a look at a man's gashed arm. One of the other fireman and ex-marine nodded towards widely and I the more severely injured people gathering around them. They only had a few men and supplies. They were going to have to triage in the street deciding which people needed immediate immediate help which ones could wait and who was beyond saving. These were terrible decisions to make but they were necessary if if they were going to save lives the squad was quickly outnumbered by the injured residents. The expiration pointed a woman towards Wadley she. He was carrying something small clutched against her chest. It was a baby girl wildly examined her and realized there was no hope nope he tried to find the words but was interrupted by a man carrying another injured baby. The man said this came through my window so what we took the two children towards the big rescue truck that had just arrived. They were taking the babies to the hospital whether they had a chance or not. They couldn't simply leave them in the street what they put the two infants on a Gurney and told the driver to roll out. Suddenly the ambulance Lynne's lurched to a halt as a man pounded on the back door wildly opened it. The man was bleeding badly wildly started to tell him he couldn't couldn't take him when he noticed what was in the man's bloody hands. It was another baby. Widely quickly took the third child into the truck he started. CPR on the babies as they made their way towards D. C. H. Medical Center. The Tornado had narrowly missed the hospital passing the building by only a few blocks. Normally it would have been seven minutes to the hospital. But on April twenty seventh two thousand eleven it would take forty forty five. We'll return to the harrowing rescue right after this now back to the story A major search and rescue is occurring. Perhaps you can hear in the background. Rubble being moved by by my count about thirty men and women and looking for family and relatives. I'm told that there is a one year old and a five year old little girl stuck under this rubble. There are many people missing hair. It was six. PM on April twenty-seventh less than an hour had passed since the F four Tornado left. Tuscaloosa the fire department and had to set up a makeshift morgue in a parking lot because there were so many bodies. Adam Watt Lee was in rescue twenty-seven making round trips from the parking parking lot to the hospital. The truck had run out of medical supplies almost immediately and now it was shuttling survivors by the dozen packing as many the people into the back as possible. Wildly new the scenes of death and destruction would haunt him for the rest of his career. The three babies he was transporting shooting hadn't survived the trip to the hospital now. More bodies were piling up then as the rescue truck return to the parking lot group group had arrived with a college student on a makeshift stretcher. She couldn't feel or move her legs but she was conscious and alert. It was Chelsea thrash. Thrash the girl who had been sucked out of the second story up harpen bathroom. She had landed on a rock in the courtyard of the destroyed building. Her spine was broken broken but she was lucid. As widely looked down at her on the stretcher he suddenly found hope widely loaded her into the back of rescue twenty eighty seven and yelled at the driver. Let's run this hot. He was going to make sure this girl made it and she did. Chelsea went into surgery but she had a long road ahead. A piece of her rib was taken out to repair her vertebra. She went into intensive intensive physical therapy and four months later she walked into her first day of class the final tornado to strike Alabama. On on the twenty seven th touchdown at eight twelve pm it was rated an e four and was the sixty second tornado in the state that day the twister twister chewed through forty four miles of the countryside and took seven lives before it slowly retracted back into the dark clouds at nine. Oh Nine PM. The outbreak was over. It affected some people for the second time as well as a lot more new people so I think people are beginning to you realize that it's such an overwhelming disaster That it's going to be a while before things can get back to normal. Kurkova was the only only tone in Alabama to suffer two direct hits in one day Brett Dawkins and the rescue squad worked for three days straight. When Bret finally returned home he found his house had vanished into the belly of the tornado? But he would rebuild along with the rest rest of Cordova. The final victim Tuscaloosa was found in the rubble of an apartment building five days after the tornado. The final death toll from that Dave was two hundred fifty. Three president. Obama declared a federal state of emergency for the region and visited Tuscaloosa a few days after the outbreak. The loss of life has been heartbreaking especially in Alabama in the ABC News. Room James Span. John was hearing good news. Out of Coleman the town hit by the tornado that he had used as an example of a debris ball that tornado had been the F. for an incredibly powerful twister. The town had suffered a direct hit but the residents had sixteen minutes warning spans. Jason Simpson to Coleman with a camera crew where he reported that the hospital had survived and there were no fatalities in the town. We heard the weather guy. Five hundred mile an hour winds and the power and the cable went out and did a span himself went to visit Cordova leading being a caravan of volunteer families to help with the cleanup spans family bonded with a family and Cordova the Adamses and over the next six six months the spans helped build them a new home. Their story was repeated in many towns in the weeks following the tornado. All over the area area communities were coming together to support each other. I wanted my children to see how blessed to still have a house in places sleep at night in the half food so we just bought up some water food and just walk in and find people to help is just material it can all be replaced. Try to sort there and see if I can say anything you know drinks food there a bunch of great people now. I want to thank all of them for come through here and and greatly appreciated maple have got to have and to make America Great. Volunteers showed up from all across. America bringing supplies food and water and Construction Materials Jackson Professional football and baseball player and a native native of Alabama began a charity bike ride across the state joined by a series of other athletes. Jackson visited small towns all across the state including Cordova. He ended the ride in Tuscaloosa with an enormous gathering of survivors and first responders. He raised six six hundred thousand dollars towards the relief effort in the year after the super outbreak. He said I was so amazed at how resilient people can be after a tragedy to be six or seven years old and have it all taken away. That's enough to sink anybody. The cleanup would take aac nearly four years and cost eleven billion dollars. The super outbreak set records for the most tornadoes in a single day and a single single month and very nearly broke the records for most violent and deadly single tornadoes to this day. Meteorologist's point to the two thousand eleven super outbreak as an incredible outlier in their studies of Tornado. Damage the National Weather Service ran a comprehensive analysis also of the super outbreak including their forecasts successful warning rates and indexes of damage and wind produced by the tornadoes as a result called the false warning rate dropped by nearly forty percent in Birmingham and the surrounding areas Steph rich and his team at the NWS office also took on a new mission of public education using social media to communicate. Storm warnings and information in May two thousand eleven the month after the super outbreak and e f five tornado destroyed the town of Joplin Missouri. This tornado was more more powerful than any of the super outbreak. The images of the aftermath dominated the news two years later Tim Samaras a veteran storm Chaser and leader in the storm Chaser community was killed by a tornado in El Reno Oklahoma. His tragic and surprising prizing death brought a new wave of public attention to storm chasing and tornado outbreaks. Brian Peters the chaser that had covered the second Cordova Tornado or NATO was distraught. When he heard that four people had been killed he turned his grief into inspiration and devoted himself to teaching storm spotting classes classes and training a new generation of informed spotters and chasers at one weather conference where Peters was speaking he was approached by a teenage teenage girl? Her family stood a few feet away watching. She asked him if she could give him a hug. Brian was confused but he agreed. Read and asked her why she said you saved my life. You saved my family's life. Brian choked up as the girl explained lane that she and her family lived in a mobile home not far from Cordova when his phone call was broadcast over the radio by span they heard him an and took shelter. The tornado turned their home into a twisted hunk of metal and glass. The girl showed Brian a picture of the aftermath. It was an image he would never forget. Thanks for listening to natural disasters for more information on the two thousand eleven eleven super outbreak amongst the many sources we used. We found what stands in a storm by Kim Cross to be extremely helpful to our research next next week. We'll dive into another of nature's terrible catastrophes. You can find all episodes of natural disasters and all other podcasts originals. For Free on spotify not only to spotify already. Have all of your favorite music but now spotify is making it easy for you to enjoy all of your favorite podcast. Originals malls like natural disasters for free from your phone desktop or smart speaker to stream natural disasters on spotify. Just open the APP tap browse rows and type natural disasters in the search bar and don't forget to follow us on facebook and Instagram at podcast and twitter at podcast network. We'll see the next time. Natural disasters was created by Max Cutler is a production of cutler media. And as part of the par cast network it's produced by Maxon Ron Cutler Cutler sound designed by Michael Lands Ner with production assistance by Ron Shapiro. Paul Liebskind Maggie Admire and Carly Madden. This episode of Natural Disasters was written and by Andrew Mr and stars Kate. Leonard and Bill Thomas.

Tuscaloosa Cordova Tornado Coleman Alabama Jason Simpson Old Shoe Birmingham Lieutenant Dawkins Natural Disasters James Span Brian Peters spotify United States Bev Jackson ABC Cordova Fire Department ABC News
Best of 2019: The 2011 Tornado Super Outbreak Pt. 2

Natural Disasters

41:56 min | 7 months ago

Best of 2019: The 2011 Tornado Super Outbreak Pt. 2

"Right now looking at the radar there's at least Fifteen different storms in Alabama Mississippi and Tennessee that have tornado the warnings and radar. Show the possibility of strong tornadoes with all of these storms five eighteen. AM on April. Twenty seventh seventh. Two thousand eleven four tornadoes had already touched down that morning. In Alabama the fifth tore up the main street of Cordova Elva a rural town about fifty miles north of Tuscaloosa. The local fire station collapsed trapping fire and rescue trucks inside the garage Asia. The only medical clinic in town was demolished. As people across the rest of the state still slept soundly. Downtown Cordova disappeared into the dark funnel of an e F three tornado it was all over by seven. AM The Sun rose over a blue sky. Why people in Tuscaloosa and Birmingham turned on the news and heard that thirty? One tornadoes had touchdown overnight across the southern state date back in Cordova people emerged from the remains of their homes. Electricity was out. They tried to call for help. But these surrounding ending towns were dealing with their own damage. The town was cut off isolated. And it's emergency warning services were down. There would be no no warning when the next tornado arrived. Welcome welcome to natural disasters. Apar- cast original. I'm your host and I'm bill every Monday. We'll explore the moments in history. When the natural world turned deadly you can find all episodes of natural disasters and all other podcast originals for free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts to stream natural disasters for free on spotify? Just open the APP tap browse and type natural disasters in the search bar at podcast. Our cast we are grateful for you our listeners. You allow us to do what we love. Let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and Instagram at par cast I and twitter at podcast network. And if you enjoy today's episode the best way to help us is to leave a five star review. Wherever you're listening? It really does help. This is the second part of our story on the wave of storms that devastated the southern United States in two thousand eleven known as the super outbreak. It became the costliest tornado outbreak. Ever recorded this week. We'll trace the Tornado's path through Alabama and and Mississippi as they careen through these states will show how the inhabitants tried to endure the inconceivable power of a tornado superstorm and and how after the storms passed the states. Were never quite the same by mid afternoon afternoon. On April Twenty seventh two thousand eleven James Span was exhausted. He was the chief meteorologist at ABC. Thirty the three forty in Birmingham Alabama and he had been broadcasting live for nearly forty eight hours straight. There was no time for a break. The superstorm had already produced over a hundred twisters has span review the Doppler radar projected onto the enormous green screen behind him. He he couldn't believe what he was saying. There were so many hook. Echoes the radar fingerprint of a tornado. That he couldn't keep them all on screen up. North to E-e-eh five twisters born in Mississippi had crossed the State Line into rural Alabama another e f four Tornado Tornado was about to wreak havoc in Georgia. But those were out of his jurisdiction the Huntsville affiliate would issue warnings span. had to focus focus on what was coming towards Tuscaloosa and Birmingham his voice caught. Has He zoomed in. On one of the massive swirls of bright red on the radar hovering over a small dot labeled Coleman the small town was being obliterated in real time thriller over curls from Stove going over there. We'll be right. Wow it just hit something over there. Turn real black span turned back to the camera. And thought of his terrified audience audience watching the newscast while they hunkered down in their homes and businesses. His voice might be the last thing some of them would ever hear over the deafening wind pointing to the Swirl on the green screen radar span said. That's a debris ball. That's the radar beam bouncing housing off of the stuff in the tornado. Cars could be in their boards. Bricks glass nails shrapnel span. Didn't want to imagine what all of that debris hurling through the air at one hundred and ninety miles an hour might due to an unprotected had human body. He again reminded everyone watching to get to a safe place he watched. As two of the biggest swirls lurched. The northeast was about fifty miles to the north. The other was heading toward Tuscaloosa right for the newsroom. The sprawling university campus and the only Trauma Center for one hundred miles ninety thousand people were in its path as span was out in front of the cameras. Jason Simpson worked behind a bank of computers in the newsroom. He was monitoring radar social media reports and several storm. I'm chasing teams that contributed to the ABC weather updates. Suddenly a message popped up on his screen. It was from John Old shoe a former. ABC weatherman and colleague who now chased storms as a volunteer. The message said Yo. We're going to the county line Jason. Jason hammered out a quick reply with a grim smile. Old Shoe was gunning for the southern supercell. The one that was threatening Tuscaloosa a super cell or a rotating thunderstorm is a massive kind of storm that features a rotating updraft of wind which can commonly result in tornadoes. The former weekend weatherman still had good instincts. Old Shoe had been the first intern. James Span ever had mostly because a span had never thought to have one until old shoe left him a phone message explaining that he needed an internship for college and didn't WanNa work for anyone else else eventually. Old Shoe became. ABC Thirty Three Forties Resident Storm Chaser driving their purpose built van into the heart of storms arms to capture footage of tornadoes. One of them nearly killed him when it turned suddenly and destroyed his van. Old Shoe had had survived by taking cover in a motel. He retired from broadcasting after that but his coverage won an emmy for him and span. Old Shoe soon knew how to hunt down twisters back out on the interstate. Old Shoe press the accelerator to the floor guiding his deep blue Toyota. highlander it went through the sheets of rain as the windshield wipers. Tried to keep up in the passenger seat hold shoes partner Ben Greer read Jason's reply. Jason needed eyewitness confirmation that the storms had produced a tornado. This was called ground truth. It was an integral girl. Part of storm warnings if they had a direct line to ground truth span and his team could instantly warn people in the path of that tornado and save lives. Old Shoe looked for an exit. That would give them a clear. View as Greer prepped cameras and quickly down a snickers bar they needed needed energy and focus for what came next. They were going to live stream. A Tornado meanwhile seventy miles to the north lieutenant. Brett doc in stepped out of the travel camper the Cordova Fire Department had been using as a command post. He had his team salvages many many rescue tools and medical supplies as they could from the wreck. Fire station they stashed everything in the camper for fast retrieval as they. They picked through the rubble of downtown. The loan emergency dispatcher in town had salvaged her surviving phone and radio equipment and set up shop in an ancient ancient train depot. Not far from the trailer. She was taking calls furiously writing notes on injury and damage reports building a list for docking and his team to tackle one by one. Duggan's was only twenty one years old but he was already well liked in the ranks of Cordova Fire and rescue. He was a local and much of his family lived in the surrounding area. His aunt and uncle owned the only restaurant in town. After the tornado that morning he had been all over the area helping clean up. But right now doc is kept an eye glued on the ominous clouds clouds above him. Something didn't feel right. The wind and rain were picking up and the sky. Had An unpleasant greenish yellow color. He shook off the uneasy feeling and got back to work clearing rubble. A few miles outside Cordova Storm Storm. Chasers Brian Peters and Tim. Coleman were right on the tail of the northern supercell Coleman kept an eye on the radar as Peter's eaters blasted their Chevy Avalanche through the downpour at ninety five miles per hour kicking up huge sheets of water. Coleman was frantic. They couldn't see the tornado yet but he knew it was there. The radar signal was obvious and peters was still driving towards it. Coleman Ullman turned to his partner and said you haven't turned southeast yet. It's coming at us. Peter's slow down there was a Twang of fear in his voice as he said. We're going to have a view right up here. Let's just see what we can see. Coleman nodded he responded. Okay but keep your engine running. Then the interstate crested a hill and Coleman saw something tariff eyeing. It wasn't just one tornado. There were three of them then two then three again smaller tendrils. Israel's spun around the core it was a multiple vortex. Tornado Coleman started filming while Peters called Jason in the newsroom. Jason told span they had confirmed touchdown and live audio span. Put them over the studio system and suddenly Peter's voice voice was being broadcast statewide. He said we're looking at what appears to be to tornadoes. One has lifted and the second can one is definitely on the ground. We're not going to be able to stay here very long. This thing is coming at US stands deep baritone tone voice calmly replied Brian. You get out of there. If you've got to hang up you go in the background of the phone. Call a woman who had also pulled off the highway with screaming. It's right there to the south. John Old Shoe Yanked his camera off. Its cradle on the dashboard. The giant funnel cloud was crossing in front of them approaching Tuscaloosa greer slid a laptop onto the hood of the Toyota and ran the thin cable to the camera and old shoes hand. They were ready. Old Shoe sent Jason a message in the newsroom. He asked if the livestream was working. Jason said Yes old shoe replied that they were looking right at the tornado. They needed to get on the air. Jason checked the the feed a huge black wedge filled the screen. The Sky around it was soft and white. There was no mistaking the enormous tornado. barreling towards Tuscaloosa Jason Patched through span and told him what they were seeing to e f four tornadoes NATO's in two different cities at the same time span. Put them both live on the air. Peter's voice overlapped with old shoes footage at age span turned back to the camera and issued two simultaneous warnings. He said we've got a large tornado crossing into Cordova. And I've got video of a separate tornado. We are calling a tornado. Emergency for Tuscaloosa. Be Safe Place. The town of Cordova was eerily quiet and the sun was shining through a smattering of dark clouds. A A woman directing traffic through the rubble of downtown took a drag of her cigarette and looked up at the sky. There were some wispy pink clouds. Let's floating to Earth a few raindrops quickly followed. Then she looked closer. They weren't pink clouds. It was insulation relation from the walls of a destroyed home. The rain suddenly got worse and then became hail up the street. A young boy was shouting and pointing. She looked up again and saw a tree branch spinning high in the air above her. Then it started to fall getting bigger and bigger until she saw that it was an entire tree. The boy ran towards the highest point in town aiming his camera. Phone he screamed look right there. Lieutenant Dawkins and his team sprinted out of their makeshift command post in the camper and ran toward city hall hollering at anyone and everyone that could hear them. Dawkins stood in the doorway leading to the damp basement of the municipal building waving his arms in yelling. Get in here now. Run the F. Four Tornado tore into the town. Like A freight train with a jet engine engine. The people huddled in the basement listened as several of the buildings that had survived the three that morning crumbled like toys. The bank disappeared into the funnel along with the piggly-wiggly market and most of the church. An enormous home on a hill looking over the town was spun around and separated from its foundation. The family hiding inside was her ruled out as their house. Disintegrated around them as Dawkins watched through a crack in the door the camper lifted off the ground and plunged into the depot building a few hundred feet away. Then the winds quieted. Everything was calm. One of the other young firefighters jumped to his feet. Saying it's it's gone that's it. It's over. He tried to run outside but someone else held him back. The firefighters shrugged them off and kept pushing towards towards the door. He was worried about the police dispatcher. who had holed up alone in the train depot? She had refused to abandon her post and the camper had just crashed into the exact spot where she'd taken cover. They had to find out if she was alive. Someone in the basement yelled no get in here. It's just the calm. The wind suddenly reverse direction blowing just as strong as before it was was the other side of the tornadoes core but it was too late. The firefighter had already shoved his way outside. We'll discuss these survivors of the Cordova. Es Four right after this Need more binge over the holidays. We've got you covered. PODCAST has released an abundance of episodes from your favorite shows all available to listen into right now. If you enjoy natural disasters you'll absolutely love these classic stories from some of our incredible shows such as mythology serial killers haunted ended places and many more. So whether you're reliving some of your favorite episodes or hearing them for the first time you can access entire back catalogues of episodes. Whenever you want all you have to do is subscribe and enjoy and don't forget you can still hear new episodes of natural disasters? Thursday check out more podcast shows on spotify by searching searching for podcast in the spotify search bar or go to spotify dot com slash podcast. Now back to the story it was five twenty seven. PM On April Twenty seven th two thousand eleven and these small town of Cordova had just been struck by a tornado for NATO for the second time that day at the exact same moment an enormous e f four Tornado was tearing into the city of Tuscaloosa at the Druid City Hospital in Tuscaloosa the nursing staff prepared for a massive intake victims the Er was quiet as though everyone was holding their breath waiting for the tornado. The warnings from span and the storm chasers had done their job the D. C. H.. To Medical Center had almost an hour to get ready suddenly a big plastic garbage been dropped out of the sky and slammed into the hospital parking making lot the ER staff looked out the front windows. The Black Wedge of the Tornado was coming up the streets. The nurses dived over gurneys. He's protecting their patients bodies with their own as it entered the city. The tornado crossed interstate. Three fifty nine hurling cars an tipping over semi trucks. An elderly woman named mini Acklin was thrown from her car and became the tornadoes. First Fatality Talapity but tornado slammed into the TUSCALOOSA Emergency Management Agency building which had been built in the seventies to survive a nuclear blast. The steel and concrete building shook and the tornado passed over. The students at the University of Alabama had been preparing for final final exams. That Week Danielle downs was at home with her roommate. Lauren Brown and their friend will Stevens. They were holed up in a small hallway under the stairs. They had been trying to study but were too terrified to focus. They had the television set up in the hallway with them watching James Span and the video of the incoming Tornado. Danielle frantically texted her sister. The windows were rattling and the wind howled around the House House. Suddenly the power went out. The Tornado had ripped apart the local electrical substation. The steel beams James. A nearby warehouse were bent. Double as the roof was torn off the neighborhood church collapsed. The Tornado was upon Pondimin. Lauren was on her cell phone with her mother crying in fear as she clutched will's hand her mother heard him telling Lauren. Everything thing is going to be okay. It's okay just as the phone call went dead an enormous oak tree that had grown in the front yard for decades Crushed the House Danielle Lauren and will were killed instantly. The tornado blasted through the neighborhood hood of Alberta Leveling the Elementary School and shopping center. They're leaving nothing but a few piles of debris on the concrete foundations but local fire fire station was destroyed stopping the station clock at five. Oh Eight. PM Exactly. Chelsea thrash was at her boyfriend's apartment not far from Lauren and Danielle and had taken cover in the bathroom. She huddled against the heavy porcelain bathtub with her class notes. And a few snacks. The wind was picking up and it had become a roar Chelsea peaked out the door as the house began to vibrate. She saw the front door of the apartment apartment disappear into the vortex the walls of the bathroom shook violently and then everything went black as she lost. Consciousness the Tuscaloosa e f four left the city limits. At Five thirty seven PM. It had left a six mile path of destruction shen through Tuscaloosa. Now it was heading for the city of Birmingham meteorologist. Jim Stefka Vich and his team at the national weather. Service station in Birmingham had direct lines of communication to span and other broadcasters to provide up to the minute weather data the NWF team had been covering the super outbreak since the first winds picked up over Oklahoma several days before now the storm was literally pounding on on their front door as the sirens wind outside. The weather. Service building was buffeted by straight line. Winds in the center of the building was a concrete storm. Proof bunker built specifically for days like this as the F. Four Tornado drew closer to Birmingham Stefka. Vich keep gave the order for everyone to take shelter in the bunker. The beeping radar screens and crackling radios echoed in an empty room. Has the weather service personnel l.. Gathered behind two feet of masonry. They were safe. They were also lucky along with everyone else in Birmingham. The tornado veered north and miss the city. By less than four miles the twister had been a mile and a half wide. It was a narrow miss by the time. The tornado dissipated north of the city at approximately six fourteen PM. It had shoot up over eighty miles of Alabama in the course of ninety minutes up north. The Cordova Tornado had been on the ground for over two hours. Scouring path of over one hundred sixteen miles tells it had lifted back into the storm cell a few minutes before six. PM The fire and Rescue Squad was overwhelmed trying to address rest. The fresh damage bread Dawkins emerged from the basement of Cordova City Hall into a wasteland of debris and carnage there was a strong smell. Smell of pine and natural gas was thick in the air. People were bloodied and dazed stumbling or sitting on the wreckage of their homes and businesses. Businesses Dawkins recognized one of the men running towards him. It was his uncle Mike he was pointing up the street. He said Jackson Sin and Bev are trapped. The whole Damn House is on them. Nearby Dawkins found a tractor that had survived the twister. He fired it up and and cleared a path through the rubble to the remains of the fire station. He loaded up. What remained of the gear from the wrecked trucks including airbags medical and digging thinking equipment? He brought it all downtown and set up a triage facility for the squad then he headed towards where his family was trapped. The rest rest of the fire and rescue squad made their way through the rubble of downtown and the surrounding blocks. Amanda Haj one of the firefighters was heading for the remains of the destroyed piggly-wiggly market when she noticed a small figure curled up in the middle of the road. It was a young boy about eight years. told she hollered for chief Harbison the head of the Cordova Fire Department who was driving the only operational rescue truck. Amanda dropped to her knees next to the boy he was covered in mud and blended in with dirt and debris all around him. She tried to feel his pulse. The chiefs sped over setting up an ekg as Amanda did CPR. She noticed a huge open hole in the boy's shoulder leading to a black mark all the way down his body. She knew immediately he'd been struck by lightning. She kept up with the compressions and watch the heart monitor. There was no sign of life. The chief quietly told her to stop. The boy was gone but Amanda was a mother and she couldn't just give up. They had cleaned the mud off of the boy's face and Amanda Recognize Him. He was one of her son's John's classmates. Chief Harbison understood. He was a father to but they had a job to do. Chief Harbison gently Lee pulled her away. They found the boys brother in the parking lot of the market. His body was terribly twisted and many of his bones were broken given their friend had just been pulled out of the debris unconscious and bleeding profusely. His mother was found dead along the road nearby. Meanwhile Brett Dawkins finally made it to his uncle's house. The structure was off. Its Foundation leaning hard to one side. LEICA collapsed line of dominoes. Bread could hear his aunt. Bev's voice calling for help from somewhere underneath the floor. Duck ins located hated where Bev's voice was coming from and fired up his chainsaw. He cut a hole in the floor just wide enough for him to fit. He pulled back the flooring boring and grabbed a flashlight crouching to squeeze under the House he shined the light in the dark crawlspace. He found his aunt Bev. I Sir right arm trapped under a wall and her neck bent severely. She could hardly breathe then. darkens pivoted and the light illuminated. Take his cousin Jackson. Bev said he's gone. She couldn't see her son on the other side of the wall that had trapped her arm but she she could feel him. He had grown cold as they were trapped under the house. The fallen house had come to rest on Jackson's shoulders now. His his body was supporting the entire structure. The only thing keeping it from crushing his mother's neck in death he had saved her life. Dawkins had to move fast. He jumped back out of the hole and returned with several items. That seemed silly to Bev. They looked like the pizza boxes but they weren't pizza boxes they were airbags and Brett quickly. Place them under the support beams of the house. He he was going to get her out. He connected the bags to an air compressor and with a powerful hit severe. The House began to lift. Bev was free and most importantly she was alive. Back in Tuscaloosa a giant red and white fire truck truck with a number seven painted on the side was crawling. Its way through the rubble-strewn streets riding in the back was twenty-seven-year-old paramedic. Adam Adam wildly the truck and the firefighters were heading towards the remains of the Rosedale neighbourhood but when they arrived there were no buildings left there was only a flat field of asphalt in piles of debris even the trees and traffic signs were gone then widely. He noticed the refrigerators. They poked out of the wreckage as small morbid landmarks of where homes used to be. He knew some of them showed. Where we're the firefighters would likely find bodies as widely and the rest of the firefighters jumped out of the truck they were quickly approached by surviving residents residents wildly took a look at a man's gashed arm? One of the other firemen and ex-marine nodded towards wildly and I the more severely entered people gathering around them. They only had a few men and supplies. They were going to have to triage in the street deciding which people needed needed. Immediate help which ones could wait and who was beyond saving. These were terrible decisions to make but they were necessary. Hey if they were going to save lives the squad was quickly. Outnumbered by the injured residents. The expiration pointed a woman towards Wadley. She was carrying something. Small clutched against her chest. It was a baby girl widely examined her and realized there was no L.. Hope he tried to find the words but was interrupted by a man carrying another injured. Baby the man said this came through my window Ndau what we took the two children towards the big rescue truck that had just arrived. They were taking the babies to the hospital whether they had a chance or not which they couldn't simply leave them in the street what they put the two infants on a Gurney and told the driver to roll out. Suddenly the Ambulance Ambulance Lurch to a halt as a man pounded on the back door wildly opened it. The man was bleeding badly wildly started to tell him he couldn't take him when he noticed what was in the man's bloody hands. It was another baby. Widely quickly took the third child into the truck Iraq he started. CPR on the babies as they made their way towards D. C. H. Medical Center. The Tornado had narrowly missed the hospital passing the building by only a few blocks. Normally it would have been seven minutes to the hospital but on April twenty seventh two thousand eleven it would take forty five. We'll return to the heroin rescue right after this now back to the story. A major search and rescue is occurring. Perhaps you can hear the background. Rubble being moved by by my count about thirty men and women looking for family and relatives. I'm told that there is a one year old and a five year old girl stuck under this rubble. There are many people missing hair. It was six. PM on April twenty-seventh less than an hour had passed. Since the F four Tornado left Tuscaloosa the fire department -partment had to set up a makeshift morgue in a parking lot because there were so many bodies Adam. What Lee was in rescue twenty-seven making round trips from from the parking lot to the hospital? The truck had run out of medical supplies almost immediately and now it was shuttling survivors by the dozen packing as committee people into the back as possible. Wildly new the scenes of death and destruction would haunt him for the rest of his career. The three babies he was transporting unsporting hadn't survived the trip to the hospital now. More bodies were piling up then as the rescue truck return to the parking lot Group had arrived with a college student on a makeshift stretcher. She couldn't feel alert. move her legs but she was conscious and alert. It was Chelsea. We'll see thrash. The girl who had been sucked out of the second story of harpen bathroom she had landed on a rock in the courtyard of the destroyed building. Her spine was broken but she was lucid. As widely looked down at her on the stretcher he suddenly found hope widely loaded her into the back of rescue you twenty-seven and yelled at the driver. Let's run this hot. He was going to make sure this girl made it and she did. Did Chelsea went into surgery but she had a long road ahead. A piece of her rib was taken out to repair her vertebra. She went into intensive physical therapy and four months later she walked into her first day of class. The final tornado to Strike Alabama among the twenty seven th touchdown at eight twelve PM. It was rated an E. Four and was the sixty second tornado in the state that day the twister chewed through forty four miles of the countryside and took seven lives before. It's slowly retracted. Back into the dark clouds at nine nine pm Alma. The outbreak was over. It affected some people for the second time as well as a lot more new people so I think people are beginning getting to realize that. It's such an overwhelming disaster That is going to be awhile before things can get back to normal. Kurkova was the only town in Alabama to suffer two direct hits in one day Brett Dawkins and the rescue squad worked for three days straight. When Bret finally returned home he found his house had vanished into the belly of the tornado but he would rebuild? Along with the rest of Cordova the final victim and Tuscaloosa was found in the rubble of an apartment building. Five days after the tornado the final death toll from Matt Day was two hundred fifty. Three President Obama declared a federal state of emergency for the region and visited Tuscaloosa a few days after after the outbreak. The loss of life has been heartbreaking especially in Alabama in the ABC News Room. James Span Span was hearing good news. Out of Coleman the town hit by the tornado that he had used as an example of a debris ball that tornado had had been an ETF for an incredibly powerful twister the town had suffered direct hits but the residents had sixteen minutes warning span. Ansah Jason Simpson to Coleman with a camera crew where he reported that the hospital there had survived and there were no fatalities in the town. We heard heard the weather guy. Five hundred mile an hour winds and then the power and the cable went out and hit a span himself went to visit Cordova leading a caravan of volunteer families to help with the cleanup spans family bonded with a family and Cordova the ADAMSES and over the next x six months the spans helped build them a new home. Their story was repeated in many towns in the weeks following the tornado. All over the area communities were coming together to support each other. I Want my children to see how blessed to still have a house in place asleep at night and and to have food so we just bought up some water and food and just walk in and find people need help. It's just material it can all be replaced GONNA try to goes sort through that and see if I can say anything you know drinks food there are a bunch of people and I want to thank all of them for come through here and greatly appreciated maple have got to have and to make America great volunteers. Tears showed up from all across America bringing supplies food and water and Construction Materials Jackson Professional football and baseball player and added a native of Alabama began charity. Bike ride across the state joined by a series of other athletes. Jackson visited small towns all across the state including Cordova. He ended the ride in Tuscaloosa with an enormous gathering of survivors and first responders. He raised six hundred thousand dollars towards the relief effort in the year after the super outbreak. He said I was so amazed at how resilient people can be after a tragedy to be six or seven years old and have it all taken away. That's enough to sink antibody. The cleanup would would take nearly four years and cost eleven billion dollars. The super outbreak set records for the most tornadoes in a single day and and a single month and very nearly broke the records for most violent and deadly single tornadoes to this day. Meteorologist's point point to the two thousand eleven super outbreak as an incredible outlier in their studies of Tornado damage. The National Weather Service ran a comprehensive analysis analysis of the super outbreak including their forecasts successful warning rate and indexes of damage and wind produced by the tornadoes. As a result result. The false warning rate dropped by nearly forty percent in Birmingham and the surrounding areas steph Kovic and his team at the NWS office office also took on a new mission of public education using social media to communicate storm warnings and information in May two thousand eleven the month after the super outbreak and e f five tornado destroyed the town of Joplin Missouri. This tornado was more powerful than any of the super outbreak. The images of the aftermath dominated the news. Two years later Tim Samaras Of Veteran Storm Chaser and leader in the storm Chaser community was killed by a tornado in El Reno Oklahoma. His tragic and and surprising death brought a new wave of public attention to storm chasing and tornado outbreaks. Brian Peters the chaser that had covered the second Cordova. Over Tornado was distraught. When he heard that four people had been killed he turned his grief into inspiration and devoted himself to teaching storm spotting morning classes and training a new generation of informed spotters and chasers at one weather conference where peters was speaking he was approached by Teenage girl her family stood a few feet away watching. She asked him if she could give him a hug. Brian was confused but he he agreed and asked her why she said you saved my life. You saved my family's life. Brian choked up as the girl explained that she and her family lived in a mobile home. Not far from Cordova. When his phone call was broadcast over the radio by span they heard heard him and took shelter? The tornado turned their home into a twisted hunk of metal and glass. The girl showed Brian a picture of the aftermath. If it was an image he would never forget. Thanks for listening to natural disasters for more information on the two thousand as an eleven super outbreak amongst many sources we used. We found what stands in a storm by Kim Cross to be extremely helpful to our research. Next week we'll dive into another of nature's terrible catastrophes. You can find all episodes of natural disasters and all other podcast originals for free three on spotify. Not only spotify already. Have all of your favorite music but now spotify is making it easy for you to enjoy all of your favorite podcast originals originals like natural disasters for free from your phone desktop or smart speaker to stream natural disasters on spotify. Just open the APP tap browse and type natural disasters in the search bar. And don't forget to follow us on facebook and Instagram at par cast and twitter at podcast network. We'll see next time. Natural disasters was created by Max. Cutler is a production of cutler media and as part of the par cast network. It's produced by Maxon Ron Cutler sound designed by Michael Eisner with production assistance by Ron Shapiro. Paul Lieber skinned Maggie Admire and Carly Madden. This episode of Natural Disasters was was written by Andrew. Mr And stars Kate. Leonard and Bill Thomas.

Tuscaloosa Cordova Tornado Coleman Alabama Natural Disasters Jason Simpson James Span Lieutenant Dawkins Birmingham Old Shoe spotify Brian Peters Jackson Sin Bev Ben Greer ABC United States Cordova Fire Department
A Solo Hiking Adventure

ActionPacked

34:29 min | 2 weeks ago

A Solo Hiking Adventure

"Craze, Still Plan Peter and I'm police work into action packed. When are we travel across interview? Some amazing people who ventured to the corners of the world. We hope you'll feel as in as we do. By the extraordinary journeys, so let's go straight to the action. This week. We're talking to in Australia with incurable travel. Stephanie hot spend three decays traveling around the world, keying sailing and her latest exploit hiking. The two thousand, six, hundred and fifty mile linked the west coast of the US. Stephanie Welcome Troppo 'cause Hud. This will come about. Seventeen when you've got hooked on going places. Yes, I, when I was seventeen I, was studying at university and I'm working full price waterhouse and took a two weeks gain holiday to New Zealand was my fists. Holiday is an independent adult and I joined a group. They are on a tour of New Zealand skills and had such a wonderful time that I arrived back in Australia gave three weeks. Notice to mind ploy, university and what to second job to save. A few hundred dollars. Send with backpack is sleeping bag four hundred dollars a one way ticket. I lift to on my eighteenth. Birthday on. You went to New Zealand. I went back to New Zealand initially working escape fields there at at mount hot, and then went up to Oakland after the season was over, and did some white waitressing name before going to Europe. Where did he go in Europe I initially went to Switzerland spend a week in Zurich and then I went to France Some of this is that I met in New Zealand where working in France I went to Morzine Avoriaz in an income harm to Australia for a brief holiday, and on my way back to France a check that I had met working in the school in new. Zealand's invited me to. Stop Irene in Japan to visit some other girls that Mitt. In one of the chaps from the school, said, coming, visiting there and I, said on a really forty said, that's okay I'll get you a job so I started off to the an area in nugget, Kin Huckabee to see him, and then I said. What's this job? You've got me I got a job as a skein struck during the school and I said that's great except that. I worked in the cafeteria. So the couple who idle the guy who ended escape school are he ran a scaled with these so I, cooked cleaned for them for the rest of the winter season, and for the spring and summer is will. What's influence? You do this traveling. Did you? When you were growing up? Did you travel a lot with your family? Yeah, we travel a lot. We had never really done much skiing escape twice before going. Skiing Zealand. My grandparents had a farm, so we were always hitting off to the farm. My Dad become a glider instructor when I was about seven and inboard powered plane, and so we started. Started, doing a lot of plane travel, and then he had a small China companies, so that I've been up. Some other opportunities long distance traveled Australia who were always hitting off somewhere to go water, skiing or motorbike riding in every year for three weeks, we went to foster just a little stay. Saad Tan a few hours north of Sydney. We went there every Christmas and captive. Three weeks ATF. From when I was ten until malate teams until after Japan, while I was in Japan, I went to Hong Kong. My Mom flew over to Hong Kong and while we were there, we spent a few days in China and I was supposed to go to Indonesia after Hong Kong but China so much. That I cancelled my flight to Indonesia and win. Mom left Hong Kong I went back to China and spent three months travelling in China and then another month travelling in South Korea. This was in nineteen, eighty, seven. I think just before the Tiananmen Square massacre. Recall you know a number of friends who are concerned about my whereabouts when that happened. So travel inside in those days was really quite difficult and you bought a bike as Iran. Yeah it was really challenging. Because I ne- one hundred and fifty, five, seizing the hall of China were open to tourism at the time, and when I was on the boats going over to Gornj, I met a chap, and we spent the first week to traveling together, and he was there on his boss today, some long distance touring, and that was a little bit out. Out of my experience, but I did say the advantages of having bar equality in China, and but the area between the towns and CDs wouldn't actually I've been to tourism and being in is areas was an imprisonable offence so I, it was a little risky to Rod, but also fun city ride rampaging I once read rampaging on a bike. There's so many bites incredibly. Yes there. Certainly they now people didn't have 'cause I. Only any government employees had caused in fact caused with Syria that the tarmac was there was when the Chinese government was trying to stimulate the economy, and so they told farmers could cape a certain percentage of the yield from their annual production. Your annual harvest and I also provided them with harvesters so that they would transition from using water buffalo in the field, because these people didn't have cars, I can't. They would about flooring the. The field, and they drive their family around from place to place in the Harvester on the ride, and as you say the city, they'd be a few at a traffic lot. At five hundred baht, I never made it as far as Beijing now I spent two months traveling in China, and never made it further north in Shanghai, and then later on went back to Australia I are so spent time in China. They went to South Korea and went back to Japan and Tony. Tony English there for a while, and then went back to Australia, and then you had a family I did had a son, which was an exciting period in my life, I just enrolled in university, and he had the good graces to be born between my first and second semester university that was a challenging period, rising child, working and studying at the same time, and then you set off again when he was to, you went traveling with him. Is that right? Yeah, so? So I had an opportunity I was doing my degree to do a semester of study in the UK at the University of Homicide, so I saw that as a great opportunity to go and spend some more time in Europe for a couple of months before I went to haul, had friends in whom in Germany and I helped me by a little Carl on seventy, seven Volkswagon Paula, and we put the car seat in the front that looked like a rocket ship. and I started on my son set up the at the front with me as to when we drive twenty thousand kilometers around Europe in an easterner. Before I went to England to study whereabouts together, we started in Germany and went to Australia Italy Greece Bulgaria Romania Hungary Slovakia Slovenia Beck across through Austria back into Switzerland than us through different countries up to build him to take the ferry across to the guy, and then had a at a great opportunity to Osa guy to Scotland and Wales while I was studying in Spain to are waking all and. So all of that with a two year old in your car, that must have been tricky. Sometimes, it was was tricky sometimes when it got tricky, was at the end of a really long days driving. We will usually some really busy. We didn't have a GPS then or all of the tools `electronic tools that we have now driving around trying to raise a mapping the dock and. And from where on earth will spice this diet? That's when my son would really lose the plot and say he's screaming. I'm trying to deal with the traffic. Driving on the other side of the ride is evenings were very challenging, and there were there was more than one occasion where it just got so hard that we ended up dropping out of the city, and not just we. Just found a spot peach the tin. We just slate there deal with it in the morning, but usually did you book somewhere to stay or just ton? Yes, yeah, but sometimes just couldn't. Some homes just couldn't find day. Can All through on the side? You left England again? Yes, came back to Australia, so my son was two and a half then and spent the next few years buckling down and getting some work done. I finished my degree when I got home and worked for the university for a while, and then moved into Beck into into business, and had a very stressful job that became very stressful there for a while and I was at the gym one morning when. A guy that is to say every morning at the gym fit and healthy was always the he died at G.. Fell off the back of the Bach and couldn't be resuscitated a Messina, not a lady guiding CPR and couldn't revive him. And I spent the rest of the day. Just really wondering what was I doing with my loss. Why was I staying in this job that had become really stressful. It was really toxic environment to me and so six weeks later. I'd quit my job board a yacht saw. Saw My house and was living on the yacht, initially in the marine just physics wakes for for another six weeks while my father helped me transition it full onboard leaving, and then we sit sail spent two and a half years selling up and down the Queensland Coast, which thousands of almonds in the Mary did you know about setting and you to show their child? Now? I'd never felt so. I was at the time that this happened and I had been dating a fellow with your and hate introduced me to some other people who also leaving onboard they are, and also went to a barbecue, and there was a family on a couple who had two children on board, so it became clear that having a child was an obstacle to styling behind schooling decades in I, looked around and thought. These people out rocket scientists. If they can do it, I can do it and said I seeks wait did is in the marina feeding out my by island to sell it, and sometimes it was just a case of asking someone else from the Marina who had a spare afternoon. If that could come and spend a couple of hours me on my show me had to do. Do something that I didn't know how to do it. And the first three days when we left for good I did our someone to style with me. He was caught experienced. We had to go over a bar that headquarter reputation, and so I asked if he would help missile across the bar, and then he left after three days and we. We're on our after that scary. It was scary and it was exciting. We left it meet not because we wanted to get the todd out of the Riva the pool from the rear The Todd was running. The other way was caught significant end at seven o'clock in the morning, just after it had become lot, and it was the fifth time by myself, and my son had been saying. There wasn't particularly Raff. There was just a funny role at upset stomachs and I'd gone down relied to. A course which I did every hour, and there was these Almighty crash on the Dick and I went running up and on. Just didn't couldn't comprehend what I was saying. The style was in the water. There was a big beaming in the water and I I i. thought it was the master turned out. It was just the boom and I'm just going. Look what's gone wrong, and so my son helped me winch. This style is really heavy full of water than I am I got on the house point of my by and called my friend who had sowed with me at abundant big, and said the booms down, and the sales the water what just happened and he said I think you bright, you talking and I said well. What is that and is it important? So, we ended up monitoring to scribe all, and and while we were this and people on another yacht helped winch me up the top of the mast, and I am just. A temporary measure to fix the Sil- backup from I couldn't couldn't style with the full extension. It was had to be reefed down in order I to style back this way, but then we're able to spend a few days there and style at leisure to we got to McCarthy, and had a Yuba putting back on the top of the mast topic repaired, and we were fine, after that wasn't allied scary moment, but it was the first one where I'm just gonNA. What am I doing? And how was your son? At the time he was known. It was just the two of us on board, so he was my. He was my first night. They call styling socialized singlehanded sailing and I felt like styling with the child. Some home was like sign with both hands tied behind your back that he was actually he was very good. Pick things up very quickly with very sensible and very innovative onboard. Sometimes, there were situations that I was stumped Niessen Mama I. Think you should try this in often. A, when did you go on the on your yard? As the first year, we just styled from Brisbane up to the Wheat Sundays and back to Brisbane. We saw through in court. A lot of islands and bays and things like that that aren't really accessible by car. The all on inhabited and then the second G, we sailed all the way up to lease it all, which is north of cooktown towards the Torres Strait not not in the Torres Strait, and then we saw back from it the Wheat Sundays we'll actually back from the Dunk Carlin and I spent a summer, anketing Dunkel island in doing some dogging instruction, and then the next year we just went back and sailed around the with Sunday's. Sounds amazing your next adventure after thought was hiking. As my my mice, recent adventure was hawking in two thousand eighteen IHEART. The Pacific Chris Trial in the United States. It runs the entire distance from the Mexican border to Canada. It's not a coastal trial, although it does parallel the coast around one, hundred, one hundred and fifty miles inland from the coast, it runs up through the high desert in through the Sierra Mountains and in through a another mountain range cold, the cast guide so it goes through California. California Oregon and Washington. The entire trial is two, thousand, six, hundred and fifty miles, or four, thousand, two, hundred, fifty or Columbus and on every tixx about one hundred and forty, nine or one hundred fifty is to complete took me one hundred and fifty five I was doing some work in Perth in two thousand fifteen and the same year the movie walled Reese Witherspoon came out and when I was watching that movie I realized that a woman in. In a hawking group that I was a member of hockey net trial at the time, and when she came back, she did a walk and I went along with a friend, and was really inspired and thought. You know I really love to do that. And it was just an incredible experience I was so inspired by my friends, Tolkien, and soon as I got the opportunity to go I took it off I went, and what was the terrain like? Like, so the I seven hundred miles and I have to apologize. I can't tell you these distances in in metric, because as soon as I got there. I realized that. If I didn't start thinking Abou- everything into in the way that the like people thought abandoned in the whitest on each was and things like that I'd be forever. Converting are would make mistakes and things like that, so the desert section I goes to seven hundred miles and it's. Relatively flat them in there s still mountain ranges. They and you still harking up into areas of snow. In fact down onto ballet's, it's called the Pacific Chris Trial, because it follows mountain ranges, so it's certainly not flat by Australian definition of a flat, but were comparatively flat to you. Get into the Sierra, and then you are just climbing up six thousand feet a die down six thousand feet diet. The entire distance is locked climbing from hockey from the say to the top of Everest back to the say, Seventeen Times the distance end the elevation gain in losses similar. Mason I'm what about the weather was that? Okay or did it? Was it sometimes too difficult to hike? Because of the weather, I had more rain than most people usually experience, which wasn't a bad thing at my the desserts cooler I started early by traditional Stott Deitz for the Pacific crest trial, and that meant that I arrived at the Sierra early even by the conditions were. Were possible for people to go in there because I'm from Australia I. Don't have a lot of have never really spent a lot of time. In the snowfields, a dynamic, a lot of experience with snow, and I made a decision that it wasn't right for me to go in at that time, so initially I took two weeks off the trial and went to see the grand. Grand Canyon a number of other places in the US that I was really excited to to visit luck on Ross National Pa. And then I was watching the accounts of other people who were in the Sierra Hawking into this year the time and they just sounded pretty. Israel tomato I post hauling from non o'clock in the morning. Usually you have fairly solid snow until me die. Die You can start at four o'clock in the morning. Heart dies down while I was starting at two, hawking to non and then sometimes post hauling up to their waists, and it doesn't sound like very much fun, so I went north to skip the Sierra to get a and went back and did it lighter, but I skipped north to to an area felling called Sierra. And started hockey north from now I still encountered snow and I definitely felt out of my depth on with now hawking line as a solid Hawk that you may other people, and there are always other people travelling in the same direction as you harking it fairly similar prices you and so you run into the Mola. Tom throughout the course of the day you might be in the same camp sought. You might have chosen the cat sign pies to camp at not will. There was no one I didn't see anyone. Seeks Dies five and A. A half dies. I was worried that it was taking too slow, so I didn't say anyone. I needed to distort in sort of tight measure, because it was taking me a lot longer to the section than I thought because of the snow, and I was worried that I might run out of food and and then I realized when I did a bit of an assessment of where I was at wasn't food. It was the problem because I couldn't say the trial. Because couldn't say many footprint. I was using my foreign as by GPS. GPS Law to to find the trial, so they're not was consented I didn't have enough power in my battery pack to Kate Might Find Charge. Linked to Thomas going to need to get to the town, and I decided that I could afford to continue for half a day longer until the ended that day, and if the conditions didn't improve than unaided to go back and had met previously people who had come back out because they were finding the conditions to tough anyway I got to the end of that. Diane things were much better there. There was a lot less nine so I. I continued. That was probably it wasn't bad. Weather just conditions that were other were Adam. I was out of debt. I had a couple of slips in the Austin one of them honestly thought landing like that amount of had trouble getting out of and so I had to you know, take these things into consideration, but other than that I think I was pretty fortunate with rhythm through a few thunderstorms and Hawking Iris, it seeks thousand fate. Thousand fate threw a lightning. Storm is really scary. Santa Yeah did while you sleep? You always had a ten. Yes, so you carry a tent with you and you just find a Bay Patrick. On the side of the. there there's an APP for a couple of EPS it. You can follow that. Tell you where they might be places. Lock that coming up, so you can sort of at the start of the day or the night before you might look at what you want to accomplish for the next day and choose something that you think a suitable distance. Occasionally you pass something else as you getting close to the time of day. Day that you'd like to finish anything. This looks so or you might push on a little further I. didn't use my Tanto Lot. Though I went. Joe Often slit without my tent, just on the ground with my sleeping bag and let's go cowboy camping and I went through one Renault into whole month. Without sleeping in my taint cabot camping was my preferred way to sleep. If the wasn't GonNa rain during the not. What about wildlife was there anything like Basil anything? That could it be dangerous snake? Yes, so these three states have rattlesnakes and other snakes, but most of the other snakes aren't venomous rattlesnakes, Biz and mountain lions, so I like wildlife. I was excited to have wildlife laughing. Canada's locked is. Quite accustomed to talking with air snakes, Australia so even though I saw some rattlesn- night, they were experiences that exotic man. Oh my God. I was so excited. The Face Thomas Obey I was absolutely thrilled. I'd had my eyes appeal. Had passed on the otherwise denied saying bays, and it was just such a hollered hours. Absolutely true and I had run into someone was talking with someone at that stage and I said. Oh you hockey much faster now. Is it because of the and it's not because I'm scared of the bad. Just that I was so excited I was on cloud nine. Stephen based on the trial and I was delighted with every bear experience I never saw a mountain lion. I I would have loved to have seen a man, LUND says. was there any danger from the bears, or did you know what to do to avoid well? These are black bears, which are not the same as Grizzly Byzantine have the same reputation is grizzly bears. You do have to be sensible. It's important that you don't get between a mother. Bear and hiccups, and it's also important that you take adequate care of your food, and particularly how you story of food at not so through Sierra, you must. must use a beer can and you should leave. It should put bear can away from where you can't at not, and they were others with that was sensible. As I often slit, tweet my food with the Bacon or what is back on exactly it's a canister that fits all of your food and all of your toiletries, and all of your rubbish, and they're all the scented things that obey decided that it likes the smell off and. It's got special antilock pages. If you think about childproof locks on same medicine bottles, it's block that I ni fifty times. And the Locke's Matarrese, usually tool to help you open the lock. Because the bay is a very clever and learn how to open these devices. You make sure you stare stored away from you ten, but you don't store near a cliff because they will drop them over the cliff to smash the up in that way I didn't have any trouble, but I didn't Kansas amount of people who had all their food in by a big. Wow, what do you do about water so fortunately? There's a water report that tells you in the areas where water is scarce, which is the is it one or two other sections? It tells you where you can expect. Expect. Water and people updated as they travel along I also mentioned that there was an APP that you could use his JP end. You could also look at the reports for water there, so when I found water in sections where people winch, or if there was water, there was an area where I was talking through, and so I was always update this I wear I fan war-era. They're the two considerations HD days. Where is the water to make sure that you carry enough and way will? You can't tell us about the people you met along the way the people I met were amazing. You Atoll before you guy by people who've done it before that. That you make the most incredible friendships, and you're expecting it, but there's just something about I. Don't know if it's just these trial, or if it embarking on a long distance trial, but there's something that just cracks your heart wide open, and you approach these French. In just a really genuine way, you make friends with people that you probably wouldn't kanner in your daily loss that you know the a very different yield. Very different laws are range of ages and loss styles, and countries, and I just fell in love with everyone. It was an incredible experience. I was very lucky early on to develop a trial family, which is called a tramway and you were. Were given a trial name. usually on a long distance trial, mice, people given child I'm and these young guys. You are failing hawking with on fifteen hours forty, eight, forty, forty, nine in film, these also saw travelers. A group regards mostly in the mid twenties range from twenty to eighty and couple Alda and I gave me the trial and I'm Wendy of the lost boys. I thought they were lost boys from Japan and and say my child nine became Wendy of the lost boys, and from then on our was not nine as Stephanie Anymore. It is windy the people you made. It really is amazing if you're you do foam very very strong. When you run into the sign, people in different places and you get really excited that you've met them before. Well match more intent than that to try and give you an example of what it feels like. You mentioned trail angels. What are they say? Trial Angels that the trial just wouldn't be the same without the mirror. Really special people who usually aren't hawking, but they provide services to hawk, so I was part of the facebook group and a woman who is a trial. Angel offered when I arrived in America for me to stay at her house. Then she would take me to the trial, so she picked me up from San Diego and drive me to her house. I stayed for Cutler. Cutler dies while I got my jetlag. Did my grocery race apply? It's quite difficult for international travelers, because you can't bring you food or any food really with you saying innate to do fish shot usually Australians want to get some gear there as well because it's less expensive than in Australia, and so I stayed with her for a couple of days. And then she drove me to the start of the trial, and then trial angels from the on people who awfully somewhere to stay while you're in town, might offer to help drive you somewhere if you need something special during race supply die also just do random pop-ups on the trial where someone will pack somewhere in open the beauty the. Full of food and called drinks trial coming all different foams provide an amazing service usually at Nikon. To Haughey's I've never experienced such incredible generosity is what did you take with you on the trail? Pat Nicely on a on a long distance. Hockey's iming to have you pack as lot as possible, so you don't take anything that you not going to use nearly everything needs to have a multi. Use PIPPA so my big four my pack. Pack my tent, my sleeping bag and my met Dan I had hawked without a stove, so I called food the hallway so anything I really had in my food was a spoon, and a little off, then I had bear claws, so has don't carry a lot of clothing within. You've got the clothes you wearing that you hearken then you've got one clothes. You put on if you need to so our heart in shorts and fishing. Fishing shirt which are found was really vented, and had quite good airflow, and then I had a puffy to put on if I got called. Ryan Jacket and Ryan, Pant didn't. I ended up dropping rain pants from my kid. And then you have the quasi sleeping, which really is just a pair of them will taught an Thamel Tall, and you can live in with your hockey clause if conditions get really called, so you sleep in? In your Thamel gear with puffy and I had a cool, not a sleeping bag, and that just it's a little bit locher, and it works on the basis that when you align on Dan you compressing it, and it's not insulating you anyway other than that. I had a very small I kit a couple of toiletries, but really just toothbrush toothpaste and China Clippers, and then I, had a little of is my sort of electronics and. And Navigation in spares and repair, so a compass, a battery pack my fine mind Ta Pack White Without Food and water was around seven kilos. Food generally was user to follow six hundred grams a day of food, and I really had to carry more than three liters of water on the trial. Whether anytime when you thought you might not make it that you might have to give up. Yes, so I had really bad plan officie. Officie oddest when I started before I started hockey in the trial in fact when I was flying ivor, and even in the car on the way to the trial I was thinking I'm not even last away. It's the connective tissue between the ball of your foot NGO. He'll, and it affects different people different ways, most people who have it that it's a little bit painful for them to walk I in the morning and then it. It goes away. It was like every step was like someone was driving off up through my heel I. Really wasn't sure if I was going to be able to complete the hawk, I'd done much preparation including new moving out of the house where leaving and temporarily rehoming my dogs and taking six months off work that I thought I was going to go anyway. I made it through with arbitrary from, but there were times where. where the pine was caught that other than that that section of the trial where our alliance physiques dies I really questioning what I was doing. I felt like I'd already had an amazing experience. I was said that my family when I longer on trial that lift the trial for different reasons I thought you know. I've got three and a half more months of work. Maybe I should spend some of that on a beach in Thailand. Drinking my art is in Thailand and so I went through a period like that where it was high, and they were one or two other times where I felt like quitting one of the things that kept me going because I had initially skip this year, because of the snow, a harsher northern California and a hawk through all of Oregon and the thing that kept me going was you haven't seen this area and you haven't seen Washington yet, which the? The two, my spectacularly scenic parts of the trial, and then I got into the Sierra, and dusted, and have the connection to it as a was hawking thought you know I, think I'm done I think of saying everything I wanted to say they say. Don't quit on a bad day. That's the advice from other has never quit on a bad die. Because usually there's better times ahead and wasn't a bad day the day that are made the decision. Decision to quit to trial was really spectacular die I stopped and had an came in really called divisive waterfall, and then I went and had a nap on this, and tracing the sun, and thought yeah I'm done, and then I looked at the map about where I needed to leave the trial to in my heart, and there was a junction where I could leave the trial. Just three miles away and I thought that to be close maybe. Maybe I'll take the knicks one and I thought you know I'm almost at Yosemite I'm not as we'll just talk to Yosemite. I really really wanted to go there. And that was only a few days away. I thought well. That'd be a nice way to finish the hawk. Full more dis Oh cutty, and and then I'll be done, and as I was leaving there. I applied a podcast joyride podcast with a freak of night. Toco David Goggin and And he just talked about doing the hot things and sucking it up, and not quitting. I got to the end of the podcast and and I was done with wanting to quit, and I continued and completed the rest of the trial. Tell us about your journalism misery specific point where you run onto trial. Yes, there is a monument on the Canadian border and you've got two options. When you reach it, you can then hike thirty five miles back into. into the US, I and try and get to Seattle from the oil. You can hide Moma's forward into Canada and unfinished. The Not before admit a woman to size last couple of is, and we were sort of when I say hawking get, we'd see each other during the die and we'd end up in the same camp saw at night. I had a chat to her. The Not before and we agreed that we wanted to Hawk separately in the. The morning, so that we experienced the finish on just to really get the maximum benefit from an always expecting it to be really emotional, and now is really surprised when it wasn't i. just sorta got there and went. Yeah, there's the monument was my birthday I. So the monument is a quite an interesting shite. Beds is these wooden pillars of different hots, and I had knowing that I was gonNA finish on my birthday I bought all these sneakers. Sneakers Baas debt in the heff different, so I have twin packs in two packs and single ones, and they're all different sizes. M I myself as NECAS, Bob Stike from all these different, hot, sneaky Bassett. Look just like the just like the monument. So I got that atten, there were a few other people who arrived just before, and just after me, and we all celebrated together, and it was exciting, but it wasn't caught didn't have quite the climactic. I duNno I duNno, the expecting trumpets and. And things Thought I'd cry and I didn't but It's still incredible then. Design Malls into Canada are the longest miles of the whole trial. Daiva and you want it to be over, but you don't want it to be because really you want to keep doing it forever. And often it's how you get back to normal life. Was that easy? It was easy and difficult. If that makes sense, I was back at work awake after finishing the trial, and that was a cult to shop in its time. Wise in that respect. It was like I'd never gone on the other hand. You fundamentally changed in. It's really hard to work out how you can be that new person. Becky Newell outlaws and I think for people who go on to create I a different law for themselves. When I return I know, everyone struggles with it in their iron way, but I feel like in some ways at market. Give you an opportunity to be. Be More of the new person that you've become one of the things that you really struggle with his, you have just a change dismissed incredible epic thing for me. It was was incredible in an epic in the greatest achievement of my life, other than rising much hog, and so it's weed that people don't know this about you, and it's not. You want to brag about it, but you feel like it so significant. Everyone should just know. That sounds really guy centric I know. It's hard to explain what I mean by that, but it's it's just just weird. LAFI, sign almo and your. Fundamentally different. Now I know that you're butts. Torturer input cost. But how else can people follow your exploits? well I have a facebook community called wildly in sparring community, which anyone who's interested in night to based adventure is welcome to join. They can find that by searching for Wadley inspiring community on facebook Stephanie. Thank you very much preparing travel poor cost him. We wish you the very best of luck in the future with your traveled around the world. Thank you say it's Beta privileged, thank you. That SOFA now. If you've enjoyed the show, do please visit our website. Action packed travel, DOT, com, or subscribe on spotify. Google podcasts, I tunes or another the many platforms that were on. Financial Twitter facebook and instagram. If you enjoyed this episode, please share it with at least one other person. Craze is still.

Australia hockey hawking United States Canada Japan Sierra Stephanie Welcome Troppo China Europe New Zealand facebook Hong Kong California England Switzerland New Zealand France
Argument from Antiquity - FT#30

Fallacious Trump

1:08:40 hr | 1 year ago

Argument from Antiquity - FT#30

"Nobody has respect women than i do nobody hillary clinton wants to abolish it for labor she wants to abolish our second amendment like they didn't deny it i don't think anybody tonight it other presidents did not call pitt write letters at some presidents do anything many people have come out and said i'm right we do have to ask yourself where does it stop hello and welcome to fallacious trump the podcast where we use the insane ramblings of dorito cellini to explain logical fallacies i'm your host jim jim i'm your host mark a logical fallacy is an error in reasoning results in bad or probably don't agreements and the logical fallacy looking at this week is the argument from antiquity we also known as argument had antiquitatum and appeal to tradition yes so as the alternative name suggests filter tradition this this is where someone basically says that because something has been going for a long time because it's the way it's always been done that means it's the right way to do it with the best way to the right to borrow from a tim mention some white wine and some just because an idea is today shis it means it is worthy that's royno to good way of reasoning because there's lots of reasons why something could have been done a long time ago we'll have been done for a long time but there are better ways to do or their alternatives yeah just as good so for our first example from trump we have one of his examples for y walls assay good and a he faces of why he decides it's a good idea to the wall and this was during a period where he thought that it was a good idea to connect the idea of tools to the idea of wheels they say a wall is medieval well so as a wheel a wheel is older they're a wall and i looked at every single ca-car out there even the really expensive ones that the secret service users and believe me they are expensive i said do they all have wheels yes oh i thought thought it was medieval the wheel is older than the wall you know that and there are some things that work you know what a wheel works at a wall works we wheels sales are older than wall well says no then no yeah exactly and the thing that makes makes the secret services cards expensive expensive is that they've got walls built into the doors surely yeah yeah first of all the first walls that we found archaeologically geologically a probably around nine thousand years BC the first wheels that there's evidence or about three to five thousand years basie so wolf macho wills and and yes wolves do work for particular purposes they work for separating out areas this so you know which part of the land is your land which part is your neighbor's land they still work just as well as they always did for that kind of thing that doesn't doesn't necessarily mean it's the best thing for stopping illegal immigration or drugs getting into the country especially when you use actually not making you won't be making a steel fence with slats with holes in slabs that you can just push drugs through if you wanted to when parts of the entire point was to stop the drug drug trade so walls were for specific purposes doesn't mean it's just because they're all just because they've been used for time that the right answer to a particular kid appropriate that people are having at the all the people solve all the the thing you'd go to as the best solution there's a scar discard remember the song says if you build a wall will build a ladder it's a song by grace petri who's a british this kind of angry folksinger which is the best way obviously of folk singing and choruses you you billable we'll build oh you build a bridge so actually absolutely that is one of the drawbacks of walls is in part because they've been around so long people have had quite a long time to figure out how to get over them come up tribus kinds of its it's most of which 'cause it's a simplistic problem is the also quite simplistic to defeat there you don't need yeah expensive technology difficult oh plans to get over all you do just need a ladder another example from trump as he and had a bit of a problem with the modern aircraft carriers that they've been building for particular reasons for building carriers we're building one they using being an electric catapault and an electric elevator number one i can't imagine in the case of battle it must be very delicate delicate okay and steams only worked for about sixty five years perfectly and i won't tell you this because it's before my time i'm by a little bit but they have nine hundred million dollar cost overrun on this crazy electric catapult i said what was wrong with steam you know they're always come up with new ideas they're making plane so complex you can't fly him you know that they i want to show next next next and we all want innovation but it's still much bloody innovation new ideas coming up with new solutions to all problems wrong with the old delusions so they have been using steam for a long time one aircraft carriers to launch the planes and the reason for this is because planes need a certain distance to get up the speed required to take on an aircraft carriers a short so they use lose steam powered carriage that they attached to the front of the plane to put it really fast along so that it can help speed to take off like flicking in flicking a toy plane often elastic band exactly and so that's what they've used for quite long time but they came up with a better way of doing it and for the most modern kinds of aircraft carriers the newest clawback of cameras that they building they came up with an electromagnetic version whereas in the old carriers first of all they were the they generated a lot of steam anyway for the engines and they had a section where they would take some of that steve often a story in another tankan and put it in a place where they where they could use use it to launch the planes so it needed quite a lot of infrastructure built into the ship to be able to do that it's going to be quite thick over thought because if uh holding the steam under pressure is a weighty tang there's a considerable amount of engineering that goes into it is heavy and it's it's complicated complicated and he said we've used it for sixty five years without any problems that they're all problems it's it's fixable you only people who work on the ship because it's designed to be effects on people work on the ship carrying something goes wrong you need to be able to fix it in situ freaks the thing the thing with the new electromagnetic ones and is that it needs a lot less ship space to be able to do to have a section underneath the deck where essentially what you've got is a series of of magnus it's electromagnet which you which turn on and off in sequence to pull a an electromagnetic carriage alone to launch the plans that takes less space underneath the ship it doesn't require separating out steam from the power of the ship basically as well so we'll infrastructure is gonna slot nighter also it's a lot more just with steam basically they push the button and and this team goes and that's it once you've pushed it your your plane is going that fast with with the electromagnet ambi- adjusted all the way along the deck so if if my seventy five percent of the wheel on the deck he hasn't gone off speed dramatically it will increase the speed to make sure that that's happening it can launch heavier planes than there aren't really able is an aunt with the steam system and it can also don't lie to once they're able to currently launch with the same system that jenner art by this team sister rasha russia the dealer one uses can be adjusted so much yes when you're developing something like this there is a huge cost to doing that to developing and getting it right and and have been problems in the testing of doing it and it did run intensive budget but it will end up being a lot cheaper and it also usa yeah and a and a lot more flexible and a better solution to the puts a lot less strain on the frame of the plane as well because it isn't a sudden sudden acceleration from zero to two fast as it can it can be worked so that it starts slower and then accelerates to the speed at needs to get okay so by doing that she mean the planes all last longer as well so you save an enormous near stretching the place yeah the trouble is that trump doesn't take any of this stuff into account he has seen this thing oh they're having problems with this electric thing let's just use steam it was fine yeah yeah well there were lots of things wrong with it and to dismiss it on the basis that in the heat of battle electric is quite as well because he's saying i can only on be safe in battle because it'd be delicate but that's just because he hasn't thought about the fact that maybe the people who designed aircraft carriers might think of that is is is the rest of it not running on the electric city like the the radar and the sewn on the communications through the IRS those things world about on the top of the thing just just theme so just because something has been used for longtime doesn't mean the new thing isn't isn't worth during our final trump example is actually from kellyanne conway it's came out with the over the adding the citizenship question to the census she went on and said this why can't we just ask the question the way it was asked for fifty years before the obama administration yanked it out of their we've we've been asking questions like this the american community survey every fifth year asked a similar question even if all of what she said was true just because it's being you know for a long time doesn't mean it's right to be asked doesn't mean that the reasons they want to ask it all legitimate valid reasons and it doesn't make a good thing to necessarily do now you still have to evaluate whether it's the right thing to do now actually as usual it's quite amazing how many bits of the show sentence wrong because she said she said they've been asking for fifty years until obama uh-huh yanked out the survey so first of all it was asked from nineteen seventy two two thousand which is thirty years or fifty years it was taken shaken out before obama go into office in two thousand and five and it wasn't even asked on the full survey the full felt full census goes to allow sold also in the US and the citizenship question was based on the longer form survey the goes out with the census assist to about seventeen eighteen percent of households and asks more details the the main sense has not that many questions the last one had about ten questions on it and it's just basic information about who lifts the who's their only specific day when you do the census basically is a count an enumeration of people in the country so the the more information that they asked that goes on a longer form questionnaire which you also have to fill in and it does give them information but it absolutely doesn't cover the entire population wouldn't give them anywhere near the kind of information they want in order to justify reducing the funding funding they give to areas where they're less naturalized citizens so she also says that they've been asking every five years on the american community survey first of all they've been asking every year on the american community survey because that goes out every every five years and also that only goes out to about about one point eight percent of the US population so that is nowhere near the kind of information that they get from the senses it tells them stuff about the general makeup various various but it's no anywhere near the kind of information they want it to get by being able to put a question to ask are you a citizen is amazing in twenty three seconds twelve second there's imagine it's quite impressive and and she manages to to concoct a the obama because it's saying the implication of things being done a long period of time traditionally we always doses until someone yang jiao on the implication is taking our is a bad thing because purely on the basis that has been done for fifty or thirty not your one hundred and twenty four straight times on the long form section of the census was two thousand i was asked on the ACS was two thousand five which was before obama was she like and she says it's so cheerfully she's the cheese the archetypal chilies evil twin cheerleader and now is the time i think marks british politics order well had to happen boris is the new communist moorland he's and so this is on the steps of number ten a major speech saying i've been saved queen as is tradition and angie ngos asked me to form a new government and i accepted and all that stuff so i would listen to this thing which is just an amazing on slow law of rhetorical trickery really and i was listening throughout new there would be an appeal to tradition and he says this after three years of unfounded self doubt it is time to change the record to recover our natural and historic rick role as an enterprising outward-looking and truly global written generous in temper and engaged with the world no one in the last few centuries has exceeded in betting against the pluck nov and ambition of this country entry wow so it's quite a generous way to describe the natural and historic role of britain particularly the engaged with the world engaged setback for anyone that y'all flags to places and god yes this is now recovering so he's appealing healing so he's the most of the rest of the speech has been about finally now that theresa may has gone and we haven't got the ball with that pesky deep withdrawal agreement we can just leave with no deal which is why i think he's what's going to happen and the other day he kind of does his backhanded argument from antiquity when he says no one in the last few centuries has succeeded in betting against the puck of of out of little britain so it's basically saying for centuries we have been plucky and we've had the nerve to go ahead as a small mole nation and you know i wave punch above our weight so this is this notion the whole of the brexit thing i would argue you as an appeal to tradition it's the white cliffs of dover it's being singing there'll be bluebirds over the spitfires throwing across these henry the fifth fighting once more unto the breach it's all that follow tradition staff off the is fueling how we don't need to be a vassal state we're not a slave rule britannia where you know britain never never never shall be slaves it's that notion that we are in charge and he's so bought into that because because he thinks he's winston churchill who used the same rhetorical devices to keep people going during the war he's so boarded into that the he can't help believe it he believes the hype and he thinks that no more required of them thanked to just reminded going to some of these things and everyone will fall into place the whole of europe will just go yeah geno what you riot the not going to they just going to see it as is bluffing bluster and sound and fury signifying nothing so my second example so it's the occurred to me that of whoa need to be balanced as a as a right-thinking bbc journalists needed you balanced in all things so walls boris's been becoming when the new promised everyone jeremy corbyn isn't and the whole of the right wing media seems to be out to get him one way or another and this me me must popped up a lot of seen on youtube of senior facebook senior twitter it's the five times jeremy corbyn has been on the right side of history story and what it does i think the implication is the here he is he's been doing this stuff which has turned out to be the roy thing and the basically the same past performance is a guarantee of future performance the very everything that investment companies always tell you to look out for when they go well yeah you know we have a history of the three percent return on your savings and then look at the end and the bottom it says past performance is no indicator of future performance particularly with the no deal breaks so what this meam listen sir all the fact that corbin campaigned against apartheid right he's soared through the dodgy dossier for the women's of mass destruction in the iraq war aw organiz biggest demonstration against it he was noted in pink news that he was in italy champion of LGBT rights he opposed the the introduction of university tuition fees which subsequently have gone up three times twice and he campaigned against austerity and the meme says at the bottom even his critics can't deny that coburn is a principled man on the right side of history and he yeah yeah yeah he conned the do they kinda you kinda go okay i can see that he is a principal people man and he has been on the right so history i suspect that just as with boris is thing there's a bit of cherrypicking going going on in there and you kinda go yeah they turn out to be the roy soit of history but they could just have easily not been you know the big because just because he did that and because i guess the the appeal to tradition is that coal been traditionally votes on the right right side of history so therefore we should continue to vote for him or continue to have faith and believe in him and he promised ultimately i don't think for arguing in opposition to political views go get a defendant side loyd wow see that's why i did it wrong lull yes i'm sure there is some cherry-picking going on here f this the list was produced in an intellectually honest way when it doesn't ignore times when he he was on the wrong side of history arguably or did things which could be seen as negative a fantasy it is an honest list which says look at all the times that the the made the right decisions and everyone actually these days now agrees with the things he did then and at the time they didn't i think is reasonable to say let this person has a record of making good decisions and and being a progressive and tolerant and good did unprincipled we can issue that's the kind of person he is and therefore will make similar decisions in the future the trouble is that these kinds serb lists are very rarely created in an intellectually honest way because the reason that created is to make a particular political point so it would always be one side saying all the negative things about a person and the and the other side saying well the positive things about them and they are kind of appealing to the weight of history sorry the weight of the individual's personal history within the realms of politics for these particular examples so that's that's the tradition that it's being appealed to your expected in a way to not question the validity of the list you just they just add one on top of the other and go did this if he voted the right way for that and he demonstrated against this and that shouldn't be done and you you're with each one it's another it's another brick in the wall it's another stone don't on the pile of antiquity we're going right well when we go and look at that particular pile of snuff the you know the man who made those decisions as a fine upstanding figure of our society and ought to be whatever leader or or he's this this pile of detritus detritus means he's a fine upstanding figure remanding you ought to be the leader and of course you can read them in either depending sitting on what your political persuasion is you can read either list to suit your own particular viewpoint so that you know the the the the tradition itself isn't a fixed thing you read it as tradition of will that just betrays his socialist extremism mizzima verging communism or that just betrays his adherence to one nation conservatism so it depends who's writing the history isn't it yeah yes exactly yes said about why blue i l we all the doors there with this is the end barbas inspired that because we are living in the end of days and and and then i thought well even though the doors were seeing that this is the end and francis ford coppola use it for clips now now it wasn't the end was still here i sit says fifty is on yeah it's still yeah and there's going to be another release of booklets now this summer in the cinemas really really re oregon us again and again so in the fallacy in the wild we talk about the fancy i see the week from a political perspective and well we're getting kind of slightly focal at school this week because is from parks and recreation and and in the pony indiana constitution they have a section talking about a tradition as has become or an event where they put tea into a body of water they wrote it in an ambiguous way and so it has become tradition to instead through a person called ted into a body of water and in this particular episode called article to ted objects to this uh-huh don't the ted right he says that's the that's the way it's always been done is not a good reason to keep things on yeah there's there's the counter right there there's no seriously that's what you've just say in this episode of recreation there is a bit of pushback from the community because they like to they like the tradition of it and actually they have a hearing about it and decide whether they're going to do about it and and they they come to an agreement that they will continue to do but it will be a voluntary thing that people can can represent ted and be thrown into the lake instead of ah just wrapping someone in the like so everyone is happy because traditionally is held the it's not infringing on some people's rights they say the says i've had a chat with all the other heads under given this tradition you would think that people would stop naming theodore we'll he says i don't even go by ted yeah yeah the second example in the world is from dr ause because this kind of alternative therapies tencent medicine uses the appeal to antiquity they should tradition lot lower on taking you to some of the world's oldest cures for modern day problems remedies that i i believe will change how you think about getting healthy from acupuncture for pain for chinese herbal medicine we are covering it all and we're starting off with secrets from an ancient unhealing practice from india it's called ir vetik medicine and it's all based on your body type so medicine has improved moved over time yet so the idea that medicine that was used thousands of years ago is somehow better the modern western medicine is insane you're purely because he'd been practiced for thousands of years prior prior to because it comes uh-huh basically from this idea that either it's been used so long it's been stick around set on because it worked which isn't how things work like that because of x. coatings of biases and stuff like that that mean people think this thing works until it's actually tested and then people go oh actually it didn't do anything but we have things now that do stuff and we can test them that they will but also there's this sense that we've kind of somehow lost this wisdom the old ancient cultures had that they knew they were imbalance with nature and they had they knew you new body needed and stuff and these days where somehow corrupted and we don't know stuff it's obviously it's it's complete nonsense we are able now to look how will something works and we have through that process dramatically increased life expectancies through through both nutrition and increase in ah efficiency of medicine and i still i can't understand why people still adhere to this idea that these these old answer take medicines work better in zenon the could much cyclamate since rob persic and if you haven't really read it he he kind of makes this distinction between classic and romantic and the classic view is of nuts and bolts basically he's the you know in the motorcycle moussaka maintaining he kind of quality doing that and the romantic view is are just want the thrill of the open road and all that kind of stuff so there's this this idea that modern things to carry says in the main characters friends john silvia and they have a dripping faucet forcet in their apartment and it's been dripping for all the years he's known them and they haven't fixed it because they say they can't be dealing with all that basically the AP's and they think that the dripping tap is a technology impinging upon the natural state state of humans the real way of us being in tune with nature and all that kind of stuff and yet what persic says is that it actually the buddha the god head is your exists just as much an internal combustion engine and a motorcycle gearbox as it does the mountain and a flower and why wouldn't it for me when i read the sunday when i get the day is this idea here that the people that hold that okay you have this modern medicine it may well cure everything it may will stop people dying of the simplest things but it means we're out of touch with the natural state of things that we've had for thousands of years and the only verification in all of why this is the natural state of things is because it happened for a thousand years so the natural state is to die of smallpox and all that kind of stuff so interfering with that is interfering with nature and that's wrong not is understanding what's going on affixing it yeah it's it's a bizarre belief that has well has been around for a long time and sustains unfortunately so i have an example which is an either too far away from politics so this is the british comedian stewart lee who we'd love you've talked about the UK policy there was a particular member of you keep cool pull nuttal and he was talking about immigration and and the influx of bulgarian workers into the UK and his statement was they should go back to where they came from which is you know don't like trump hayes was they should stay in bulgaria and see to the upkeep of the bulgarian economy they should do what they can to make sure that the bulgarian economy thrives before they leave bulgaria so stupidly julie does is we're here to listen to the before them four hundred million years ago when i fish trolled up onto onto the land land back in the c. you can't win you'll pay eh develop lungs and your hopes and dreams of tomorrow i can't my name's paul none of you and i say we nature insure the brightest and best fish staying assay concentra- on making a prosperous instead of coming up here on today land ah beginning the process of evolution that will eventually lead all so in a way he's kind of a tradition stay where you are because you've been there for hundreds of thousands of years millions is stay there that's where that's the good thing is coming out there with your fiend ways so we're gonna we're gonna play fake news folks i love the game it's a great game i understand the game as well as anybody as well as anybody fake news the game where i read out three he trump quit to which really what i made up and mark has to figure out which one is fake news and i'm currently i think you'll find if we look back at the past of this competition and you realize that i'm been winning combination of you losing wins on talk to me i was working perfectly perfectly this new changing a asean it must be very delicate in fact i'm practically halfway twelve twenty twenty i yeah sure these forty the moment opportunity to go up to two forty five percent i think with this one again this is even a row which would definitely be a record all my word that's you see i have a tradition in doing yeah four or more row so in we haven't really there's no theme this week as such but the last time we did this was from a speech that trump trump gave to the national republican convention committee and this is from the same speech because it was so crazy there was options for me the tradition of craziness speech so yeah why go anywhere else all their monks a statement number one i was in china and china's not doing well we're doing well we have all the records twenty two records i think we have and i said to president she i call him the king of china because he's the president for life so that means he's the king it's a great thing i wouldn't say that i'm thinking about that because that would be the big story tomorrow president trump says is he'll be president for life so i won't say that but we've sold millions and millions of hats state two wins not so good and you know you have no idea how expensive it is to make those things they're all made in china and germany by the way just in case you we don't make them here ever since the weekend made them here and by the way the carbon and all of the things flying up in the air you know the carbon footprint president obama used to talk about the carbon footprint and he'd khawpoon johnathan seven four seven with very old engines and heat flights hawaii to play a round of golf okay rather than going in a massive heavy car off or log statement number three cured sean now he's working on the reciprocal trade act if they charge us we charge them very very simple they charge us we charge them i think you're doing great on that show on i appreciate it man great job but he's the tree climbing you know these characters that go up the trees then they come down dan he said no going artists coming down because if you miss your dead he said he's missed about four times i couldn't get through that through that with that oh this right that's not sean spicer hi suzanne i'm just i'm just picturing sean spicer patry o. k. a all those things up in the air the carbon footprint why footprints in the air but the k. right but it is also crazy how can they be possibly not made up i k- winston good spent some real that well i think the president gee prison crystallized thing sounds convincingly familia sean patry one is just so crazy is going to be true on that basis i'm going to prompt the traditional saying the number two is the one you made up okay so of the of the a to which confidence number one okay so number one biz fake news oh wow were very good indeed wow nice that is perfectly thought appeared in the speech we've sold millions and millions of hats i thought that secretary was was for me as well oh yeah that's the thing we tony's hats president trump says he'll be present live is that i think i think he was talking about mega hats you know the kind info great yeah again king of the king of kings the america when they say to rickles noticed is is who who wins not so good and you know you have no idea how expensive it is to make those things they're all made in china and germany by the way just occasion we don't make them here essentially we don't make them i'm here and by the way the carbon and all of the things flying up in the air you know the carbon footprint president obama used to talk about aw the carbon footprint and then it hop on air force one a big seven forty seven with very old engines and he fly to hawaii to play around ago so only needed to say but obama did not fly to way to play around with gold cards enough ask new yeah yeah yeah whereas trump yeah they yeah but the carbon an owner the things flying up in the air say yes and also statement the number three that means that is true as well and sean now is working on the reciprocal trade back if they charge us we charge them i simple they charge us we charge them and i think you're doing great on john and i appreciate it man great job but he's the tree climbing coming you know these characters go up the trees and they come down he said no going up is the hard part is coming down because if you miss your dead and he said he's missed about four times he's presumably dead date we're off to the first one and then the other three the hell is asala power this is the sean who is a wisconsin congressman and and he is indeed a five time tree claiming champion no he he has been a competitor on the ESPN's great outdoor games the strongest man world's strongest man competition that we get here christmas probably concerned with those kind of weird things nobody except really built people with enormous do so showing al-zaanun he was originally he was on the real world the american emmett mtv reality tv show before when royalties but yes he hears a five-time tree climbing champion and former reality TV studies missed about four times yeah yeah the five yeah sound that's brilliant isn't it now he's where is now wisconsin congressmens now fantastic other lotteries in wisconsin leadership to climb bribes lumber county yeah wow how you so don't mind losing so that means yeah i find out the other two were really really appealing to traditional back and now i think only forty one percent which is still very good syllabus john's you're doing well it's time for the part that showed that this week at least is called melas testimony is not logical fallacy now let's see because this week great rover miller s muller third testified in front of congress in seven hours of testimony testimony new orleans to congressional committees and largely state within the bounds of his report which she's war he said he was gonna do and his testimony has had a lot of people saying that oh it was very total letdown it wasn't an it wasn't important that it didn't say anything wasn't what the democrats were hoping for and i think the the response is a bit like the midterms because it really depends whoa you're expecting from it if you went in in king model was going to say trump is a criminal if he if he wasn't president we would have indicted tim you should impeach him now then yes it was very very disappointing because he didn't say any of that stuff yeah but before he started he said and when he gave his original public statement in may he said i will not be saying anymore stuff about this is my statement i have have nothing more to say i will not be be drawn on it basically and and the justice department issued a kind of a letter saying that he was not allowed to they were basically putting executive privilege over everything other than what was in the room so he wasn't allowed to talk about anything else in his opening statement he said i won't be talking about anything that wasn't in my report i won't be talking about the origins of the report or fusion GPS or any of that stuff it didn't stop some republicans asking him questions about it largely the democrats asked him stuff about his report because he he you released also to read sound visible he wasn't going to say things and essentially i think he was just trying to avoid a soundbite he was trying to avoid section way you get melissa saying we need to get rid of trump and also each very and he's very mindful of being correct and not being able to be pulled up because if if he did do that even on one occasion then you can be sure that everyone within just rip apart the the integrity entire report on one occasion where he did actually say a little more than he meant is to say when ted lieu asked him if the only reason he didn't indict trump was because of the decision that you content i sitting president initially he said that that was the reason and then when he came back for another session he he actually made a statement saying although it's true that they will cede memo stopped us from indicting stops us from making a decision that i wasn't trying to imply that if there wasn't an LLC member we would've indicted i was just saying we didn't come to a conclusion based on that he was being very careful not to give any kind of sound by would make him the story the only on either side that would let him would democrats say look mother saying we should impeach all that the republicans say the monarch said he was totally exonerated very unlikely to happen and so he did stay well within scope of the report and he and he kind of slight destroyed around the corners of a couple of times but it did come across into some people and certainly this was the push from the republicans after that he was kind of hesitant halting and several several republicans including kellyanne conway and some of this claimed it was like he clearly has alzheimer's or something didn't they what was going on he didn't know the report he was he's obviously mentally deficient which i think is where they kind of they will they look at the top of the page oh no trump yeah so i'm gonna play a clip of jerry nadler's questions full miller and his response is and you can hear in this how difficult is for him together exactly the right whereas in fact you were actually unable to include the president did not commit obstruction of justice is that correct well we at the outset determined that we came to the the the president's culpability we need the two we we needed to go forward only after taking into account the LLC opinion that indicated that a president sitting president hasn't cannot be indicted so the report did not conclude that he did not commit obstruction of justice is that correct that is correct correct and what about total exoneration did you actually totally exonerate the president so i mean he's very in the uh-huh is a weird double negative isn't it that kind of did no sir that you could not so well that's why audio miller is actually kind of he's trying to pass sentence he's trying to figure out exactly where the w how doesn't say the wrong and i'm sure you know this is definitely could be argued as my cognitive bias is my special pleading and i can see why the people on the other side look at that and look at him searching for the right word and think you know he's he doesn't they way saying he doesn't always talk him out but it comes across to me as he is being very careful about choosing his words and saying the right thing and he does not want to any point given give the wrong implication wants to make absolutely sure that the words he's choosing all the correct yeah against say the right thing so when he gets to the follow up questions are okay so does that mean that you couldn't find obstruction and you know and and does that mean you exonerated no so he kind of knows exactly what you mean yeah you can see they're going to pounce on and in fact trump did pounce johnson the and trump junior's poundstone the fact that when malakhov overstretched something came back and said i didn't wish to employ on trump tom said he changes his story he changed the story and you guess his story yeah bye bye clarify yeah one thing that he'd said the went a little bit they intended yeah oh he didn't wish he didn't accident it sounds like other people would imply he meant something else here which seems to me like the you know as its sign of a very good legal minds you know he's he's the adult in the room my sword cartoon in the new yorker maybe add on on a cartoon of moolah with these kind of genetic deadpan face as finks we thought whether it's quite good because there's finks is timeless intractable enigmatic and a damn good lawyer now this isn't a damn good lawyer that those all kind of traits of a very good lawyer these just he's rock solid in the face of all the what was tantamount to goading from the republican side with a desperately trying ah to the load of the republicans we using it as an opportunity to yell at him or push conspiracy theories about hillary clinton can conspiring barring with the russians somehow to make her lose the election whereas the democrats tend to use it as a way to get things onto the record to get things set in public they were reading out sections of reward saying is accurate he was saying yes for the most part or sometimes they were kind of trying to buy things the i oh i think the most interesting sound by ashi came from possibly accidental thing that came from republican ken buck who's i think colorado congressman was sufficient evidence to convict president trump or anyone else with obstruction of justice we could not make that calculation how could you not meet the calculation was we'll see opinion the oil c- opinion office lulu council indicates that we cannot indict a sitting president so one of the tools that are prosecutor would use is not there okay but let me just stop you made the decision on the russian interference you you couldn't have died the president on that and you made the decision on that but when it came to obstruction you through a bunch of stuff up against the wall to see what would stick i would not i would not agree to that characterization a- at all what we did is provide the attorney general in the form of a confidential memorandum our understanding of the case those cases that were brought those cases or decline and and that one case where the president cannot be charged with a crime okay but the could you charge the president with a after he left office yes you believe that he committed you could charge the president nine states with obstruction of justice after he left office yes really sad that ken buck stopped himself from saying you believe he committed thank you the replied to the movie set up the first question and then you say well how could you not oh no he's not getting that the the answer was you know fruit we're on obstruction we couldn't make a decision because we we weren't allowed to indict him and and kentucky saying but you made a decision not to indict on the collusion and what you could could kind of feel everyone was thinking here can they made a decision because there wasn't enough evidence et on collusion whereas on the strong they had to allowed to go check we've found so much stuff you know sufficient that way when he leaves off his that's when we'll get him are you still get the president once you've left but you've asked trump if he was concerned because i had said that he could be indicted after after he left office and trump just completely denied that had been said google the reporter fake news so we didn't say i'm going to be president for life so they didn't ever gonna the leave office and they should have done that so a lot of republicans they really did not argue about any of the facts and they did not try and push back and claim that the stuff that the obstruction of justice things that trump was being accused of were unfair or didn't happen or any of that kind of stuff they did dog you device tool they tried to argue melas kind of conflicts of interest and the the the team of angry democrats kelley armstrong argued the all the team were in favor of and against trump and marashi pushback on this you must be aware by now that's six of your lawyers donated twelve thousand dollars directly directly to hillary clinton i'm not even talking about the forty nine thousand they donated other democrats just the donations to the opponent who was the target of your investigation speak for the second to the hiring practices we strove to hire those individuals that could do the job okay i've been in this business for almost twenty five years and knows twenty-five years i have not had occasion wants to ask somebody about their political affiliation it is not done what i care about is the capability shape ability of the individual to do the job and do the job quickly and seriously and with integrity integrity he's yeah because it doesn't matter views such trump airing this isn't a we go yeah you because of your because your your of mexican origin than your your decision because you aura hanging minute trump used to be a democrat the trouble is this you can find someone who has never expressed a political opinion or donate it to any kind of political cause is only oh you saying in in cham strong trump or any of the second fans trump all they saying that the only people who should be allowed to investigate them all people who support oh exactly yeah registered republicans it's republicans because that's just as well that's trump's methods jesmyn winches choose people with integrity and then it doesn't matter whether ed for the set up in business for twenty five years which is probably longer because then you could be like awaits back kelly at that point going yeah when he was ten short pants and he it was in a boxcar yeah just getting his knees wells moldova's so yeah i want to finish with a couple of clips of adam schiff jeff because he opened by laying out some facts of the case and just getting to just accept that they were things that he had written back in the report and i think this is a pretty powerful action when you're investigation looked into these matters numerous trump associates lied to your team the grand injury and to congress number of persons that we interviewed in our investigation it turns out did lie mike flynn lied he was he's convicted of lying yes george papadopoulos was convicted of lying crew paul manafort was convicted of lying through manafort was in fact when so i encourage the other people to lie is accurate manafort's deputy rick gates lied accurate michael cohen the president's lawyer was indicted for lying drew you lied to stay on message with the president allegedly by him and donald trump called your investigation a witch hunt that was also so false was it not like to think so yes will your investigation is not a witch hunt does it is not a witch hunt that's pretty thank all of these people lied for don't lie to cover up things that they done along the way that's a message he responds to it he even detaches hatches himself from the response in a way it detaches himself from the truth of the matter because he says yes he was was convicted of having lied and then then shift says and he's a true yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah he's you're saying this is a fact this is something we are not yes i believe it's yes he was convicted of lying and then shifted ended with this conversely committed federal crimes or to help donald trump when you're talking about that a computer crimes in charge in our case absolutely the trump campaign officials built their strategy their messaging strategy around those stolen documents i generally true again he's making the case the even though there wasn't sufficient evidence to establish conspiracy no even collision yes as snobbish i'm just that wasn't that isn't legal term there wasn't enough evidence to establish conspiracy between trump and the russians they definitely established that the russians did into the elections the trump campaign welcomed it and built their strategy around the help that they were expecting to get from the russians yard complex clearer really that's a good message for two i mean it's a bad message really bad good message to get out to americans who who in some cases will not have heard that because he washed folks knees and finally some things we really don't have time to talk about in more could be seen as an attempt to distract the media from stories of former trump pal and noted peter falk jeffrey epstein trump appears to have picked over racism as theme of his twenty twenty when he campaign after telling four US congresswoman three of whom were born in the USA to go back where they came from trump and his sycophants of lamented that you can't disagree with minorities anymore more without getting accused of racism by the hyper sensitive leftists only thought this was america look if you tend to women to get back in the kitchen and make you a sandwich you're you're sexist and if you tell the person of color about where they came from your racist and if your best defense is to send creepy skinheads stephen miller on the sunday shows to tell everyone you'll have not racist you are you've already lost the occupant exactly the tradition right there and this week's what's trump i'm done the san mateo delusional embarrassing goes to solving india-pakistan kashmir problem rather making the problem worse india india and now at pains to deny that prime minister modi ever said anything to the white house is owned walter mitzi valley intervening on india's behalf in a conflict the disputed territory of kashmir which is run probably since politician in nineteen forty seven thanks to his unique combination of ineptitude and overconfidence trump may well have setback is a peaceful negotiations continuing by the siam seventy odd years look donald justice pakistan's prime minister imran imran khan gave up cricket to become a politician perhaps you should give it all up and become a golfer or no wait a minute following the testament the house judiciary committee has filed an application to have the grand jury material minutes report unsealed committee chairman jerry nadler said on friday the committee is considering whether to exercise its full article one powers including constitutional GT power of the utmost gravity recommendation of articles of impeachment when asked if this is essentially the same as an impeachment inquiry napa said that in effect it is seems like someone got tired of waiting for nancy pelosi yeah because there was a whole bunch of stuff that melissa dot com talk about that because he's currently under investigation elsewhere on with the grandchildren in a brilliant switcheroo not seen since the latest ramones t shirt gag trump stood in front of adopted presidential seal at the turning point USA student teen action summit in washington DC the graphic quite blatantly though sadly featured the russian double headed eagle oh trusting award of cash in one claw and a fistful of golf clubs in the other a reference to the one hundred ten trips gopher news since taking office out about a million lean dollars a pop extra and increase security and travel and april brazil unum was replaced with the spanish for forty five is a puppet in truell turned turned in fact style of representative turning point you as i told the washington post that the fake seal was a mistake result of rushed online search but whilst the a group called the slip up unacceptable they maintained there was no malicious intent just when you thought the US don't do irony it was a brilliantly seized opportunity to show the seal that was created as a private joke but charles lazard who i did that the person who put up with either wadley incompetent or the best troll ever the way he said i love him always DD joe in johnny would have saved approval a whole gar trump has named richard spencer us s. his third acting defense secretary since january to be clear that's richard v spencer former secretary of the navy but given trump's newfound pride in white pride pride i must admit there was a moment where i thought maybe punishable white supremacist an old right for your head richard b spencer had been made defense secretary to be honest i did have to google it before i was absolutely sure and how fucking scary is that up to check and in a way oy kind of wouldn't have been surprising nothing last week nobel peace prize winner nadia mourad told old trump to his face in an impassioned explanation of the horrors she her family and many women and girls suffer drivers how terrorists kidnapped her and kills her mother and brothers he replied where are they now while the rest of the free world were hanging on to who are every word trump simply missed the importance of what she was saying i e that is is wasn't the be all end all merely the latest in a series years of similarly power-hungry spots still exacting similarly harsh inequalities in the region and rather than see the need for long term commitment to a global intervention chian on such things he was more interested in wash she got the surprise with the subject being move and i go to he penalizing leo adage i did like your grandpas no idea what you're talking about oh you were the first to escape maybe he's thinking oh i could escape arco in the prior to the peace bright by scaping escaping please all happily jump over the vaulting horse for hours on end whilst you donnie presidential bete noire elon oma we'll have some competition she's up for reelection next year and the republicans are fielding a candidate in the form of danielle stella here stellar at the recent event this is ben it could be eh it's gonna make he doesn't appear to be in any way particularly mentally challenged or anything like that so we're not making fun of someone who can't speak that's just just how she speaks wow i second amendment in america and stuff is mostly just man but stellar has all the attributes of a perfect trump acolyte aside from being every bit as erudite and coherent as trump himself she's also accused on conspiracy theorist and accused felon having been arrested twice this this year for shoplifting over two thousand dollars worth of merchandise if convicted she might have to drop out of the race due to a potential five year prison term unless of course trump changes the rules to let people governed from behind bars actually i'm a little surprised he hasn't done that already in preparation for his family heading in that direction ninety two thousand odd people people have spoken and they are point one three percent of the electro populace bringing back democratic control to the UK by voting boris johnson's to be the latest prime minister britain or is it a bank tweeted the united kingston which i guess is the joint commonwealth of a suburb of london and the capital city of jamaica jamaica with such a large mandate from the masses forest is not making the mistake to resume dealing calling general election our some higher less self-serving sense of integrity a need to gain a national mandate for her actions own our because as john chris in the guardian newspaper pointed out if if a developing country had just changed his entire government without an election we'd be calling it a coup and if that coup had been led by a man clearly unfit unfit for office who even his own family can't trust to tell the truth we'd be cooling that country a failed state but as this but as this this is the UK and the leader in question is boris johnson we plead the exceptionalism of first world democracy well it's good to know that boris is happy to continue to commit fallacies we've already covered in the podcast otherwise only cry so that's the full reasoning we have time for this episode you can and find shannon's at trump dot com and if you hear trump say something stupid in one to ask if it's a fallacy contacting towns on the content page if you think we've used the fellas AL cells let the snow and if you've had a good time please give review on apple podcasts stitcher or wherever you get your podcast and you can support the show on patron page at patient dot com slash f trump and can connect us another listeners in the facebook group facebook dot com slash groups slash finishes trump music is by the outposts and was used with permission mission so until next time fallacious trump will leave the last word to donald mommy

hillary clinton pitt jim jim fifty years twenty five years sixty five years five years nine hundred million dollar four hundred million years seventeen eighteen percent twelve thousand dollars two forty five percent seventy five percent twenty three seconds five thousand years nine thousand years forty one percent twenty-five years thousand years
15 - Olympic Dreams

Hollywood Unscripted

34:11 min | 6 months ago

15 - Olympic Dreams

"From Kurt Co Media Hollywood end scripted. I'm your host Scott's along with Malibu Film Society joining us today. Jeremy tonsure a filmmaker who has gone where no other filmmaker has ever gone before you actually got to shoot a feature film inside Olympic Village during the Olympics. Yes thank you for having me Thank you for joining us. You made this film with your wife. Alexi it's such an interesting genesis because I understand. Alexi is a dual citizenship. Greek American and she ran in the 2016 Rio Games. Yes or what happened from there Alexi. My wife competed in Rio and addition to be an athlete. She's a writer and filmmaker. I am not an Olympic athlete but just a writer and filmmaker and where creative duo so when she went to run real we adjust premiered an indie film that we made called track town which was a blend of fiction. Reality kind of exploring the emotional journey of trying to make it to the Olympics trying to achieve a goal. And you don't know if you're going to get it or not. So when she had this experience of competing Rio and feeling like you achieve a goal that you've worked for for so long now what that feeling combined with the insanity of being inside Olympic Village and what that looks like at that time when she was competing and just had finished we were like it would be insane to be able to bring a camera in here and making indie film in the Olympic Village. But obviously that would be impossible but then two years later. That's what we did and I understand that the head of the IOC was on an airplane young movies to watch on a long flight and one of the movies. He watched track town. That is right so as with many indie films. Every film has its own. Genesis story hours for Olympic dreams was that the president of the Olympics was on a flight distributors. Track town had done an airline deal which sidebar airline flights founder where a lot of people sit and watch indie films. I don't know why that is but whoever is in that ecosystem. I just WANNA give a shout out to because there's always really great indie films on long-haul flights and not only did the president of the Olympics. Track town on an airplane which led to this invitation to go do a project in the village which unfold for you in a second. It's also aware Paul Thomas Anderson saw track town and mentioned it in an interview and we later connected with him and he became a mentor to on Olympic Dreams and I actually got to show him a rough cut in workshops some scenes with him which was an incredible experience. I'll bet yeah so. Shout out to airline film programmers. You're doing a great job now. Originally this was going to be artist in residence. Kinda grant just a series of shorts but then the head of the Olympic channel stepped in. Yes so after seeing track town and realizing that Alexi was actually an Olympic athlete. The president of the Olympics reached out to us because were starting artist in residency program effort to combine the arts with the Games more and opened opportunities for athletes to do projects at the Olympics. You know coming from the Mumbai Record Indie film. I feel like we came of age looking up to the Joe Swartberg and do foster brothers like we knew that. Give us a camera. We can make a feature film in the Olympic Village. Like no put us in coach. Let us do this. But of course to people not familiar with microfilm making that seems like an impossible thing so what we landed on. What are we going to make a short film in the Olympic Village? And if there's enough footage will turn it into a feature. That's where it started and from that point we developed. The idea would be so we knew that it would be. Alexi and me and we'd be able to bring one other person that's all the security clearance that we could get. We knew that we would pull in athletes and real people to clave fictional roles but the two main actors. What's the film you can make so lost in translation became our biggest inspiration and we unashamedly adapted slash stall that conceit of two people? Lost Souls at a transitional time in their life coming together for this transformative period of time are backdrop was the Olympics. I knew that we would be able to capture enough footage for feature so I kinda planned it all out with the hope that we'll be able to pull this off and Nick. Kroll came on board to be the third leg of our three person team. Doctor E yes Dr. Ezra volunteer dentist because in Rio and Alexi competed. She met a volunteer doctor. Who asked her out. Of course we were engaged at that time and she politely turned down his offer but that was the spark for this idea. We had a whirlwind three and a half weeks shooting. I was a one man band so I shot did sync sound directed at the same time. Alexia nick did each other's makeup and Mike themselves up and I had a feature films worth of raw footage and I cut the short films like retroactively from that. So many five shorts that are more avant-garde like visual and once those were received. Well we got the go-ahead to cut together. The feature which is now being distributed by IFC films and Olympic Channel. Yes it premiered at South by southwest and IFC came in to do our distribution and the Olympic channel is a new entity within the IOC the International Olympic Committee. It's actually an exciting group. They're like a group of folks from the entertainment world who now work for the Olympics to try and do cool collaborations like this and this is their first narrative project there's microfilm making and then there is being a one man band because you were director cinematographer and did one hundred percent of the sound. Yes which is unfathomable for a lot of narrative filmmakers. A lot of doc filmmakers like of course what other ways to do it but yes first of all we wanted to keep a really small profile second of all we could not bring more people out with us so what I did was put together at the time the most advanced one man band rig that we could get we wanted to have a cinema quality is fair to say I was shooting like a verite documentary style but it needed to be sound quality and picture quality that would let you suspend your disbelief for a narrative film so I worked with my sound designer Nathan rule and some texts from Panasonic to design this rig. That would enable me to well okay. There's no way to like not be ultra gear nerdy about this. So let's just do it. So what we did was actually knew. We needed to have a Panasonic camera body because they have deal with the Olympics so I had to but it was also cool because I knew if something were to go wrong there be tex around I use the evil one which is like their Pro Sumer Camera. It has e F mount so you could use. Dsl are lenses which brings the cost down the weight down like honestly cost is not a factor with the quick weight so I tried the camera. That's one step up from the evil one. The very cabinet was simply too heavy for me to deal with on my own. I knew like I'm GonNa have three weeks of picking this thing up one hundred times a day so starting with that e f Mount Lenses and then we had a sound devices sync sound rig that I had to sling over my other shoulder which was then jam sync hardwired to the cameras so that there was no need to slate. If I just hit record it started recording the lobster fed in and then there was like a boom attached to the camera and I use the. Mono pod and we made friends with the team. Usa bobsled chiropractor. Who would adjust my back every day after you were done shooting. Yeah so that's how we hold it off. Pretty wild now. You talked about lost in translation but I know that you have some other. Inspirations on this film before sunrise of course. That's funny that I feel like Richard Linklater's influences so baked in for me that I don't even think to say it but yes I mean. I don't think he was the first person ever make a movie about two people meeting random place and following them for an extended period of time. But certainly that's what people associate that setup with is Rick linklaters movies a cool moment was I had a chance to meet him and then he came to watch the film at South by and has since become a mentor and friend at we got to do a Q. And A. Together after one of the screenings and most filmmakers are super impressed with this one man band thing that we had to do but he i. That's how I made slacker. I don't see what's such a big deal out doing that now. Speaking of two people who met totally at random you and Alexi were at Dartmouth. Yes but there's a difference of opinion. I understand because you claimed that you met when you were filming concert on campus. And she came up to dance onstage. Yes that she says that you met at a party a semester prior. Here's what I'll say about that. Alexis and Olympic athlete but there was a period of time when he wasn't running when our lifestyles could intersect. Like the first time I ever went to a track meet in my life was after we had been dating for a year and I was probably twenty one twenty so I'm not surprised that the memory of maybe our first meeting is a little bit hazy. I think she and I both became much more like serious people about pursuing our goals like after we met each other. I think she helped me kind of commit to becoming a filmmaker even very concrete. When I was trying to figure out how to put together my first movie she helped me write. Grant applications forged. This is something you could really do. And I think I did the same really believing in her path as again an athlete and a writer and for that very first film you ended up winning an Oscar nomination for best student film a Student Oscar. Yeah the Student Academy Awards for documentary. So I've made a short doc when I was in college and I went back to that area village in Senegal. I'd known this group of students since I was a student myself and they acted as fictional versions of themselves and that was tells the Baobab Tree. I fill watching the film one of the that becomes apparent very early. On is you had a script. You had a story ARC. But no scripted dialogue. It was all Improv. Yes so we knew that we would need to use improvisation as techniques. How could you? I mean you're walking into a completely uncontrolled environment and that can either be something you fight against or something that you embrace and if you're prepared then you can embrace it and I think the way to embrace chaos like that is to be rock solid on certain key plot points tent poles or footholds. Whatever you WANNA call them and have those in your mind as the director so that you can be completely nimble to embrace chaos around you. What we did was made a an outline like the three acts of the film which I would do for any scripts fully written out or not so we start with that. I am a fan of save the cat. The Blake Snyder beat sheet. I find it to be such a helpful way to think of the key. Beats of the script. So you're not just with a total blank page and then things grow from there but starting with that making an outline and then as you flesh out your outline you start to plan the specific seen so you're not just doing the big beats but the scenes between the beats and then sometimes you maybe have a little line of dialogue. That comes to you that you really like. And at certain point you're kind of left with the script meant and if it was a traditional film that script is what I would then use to create my first draft and final draft all the dialogue and everything. But if it's improvised that's where stop in an uncontrolled environment. They're going to be things that happen or opportunities present themselves talk to us about some of those occurrences in the course of making this film. I was just kind of meditating on this today thinking about that process. It's so similar to you. Know when you have your outline no matter how much you've tried to nail every single scene down when you start writing dialogue things change the characters. Come to life they take you in a new direction and the same thing happens when you are shooting an improvised film and again. It's improvised based on that outline. It's almost the same process. So you start to shoot the actors. Become more confident with WHO? They are and to really embody the character. There's actually a great example of this so there is a kiss that occurs movie. I can't give away where it happens. But we thought that it was gonNA happen in one particular scene and by the end of the scene. They just didn't kiss. It didn't feel right so part of me was. Oh my God. I couldn't force it. It didn't feel right. It didn't feel like that's what they would do at that point. So we'd like all right. We'll probably have the kiss in the next scene and then we performed that scene. The Kiss didn't happen again and it was starting to become this tension which builds in the movie definitely but also it was like building with me behind the scenes. Maybe they're not gonNA kiss in the film and when it did happen it was so perfect but I couldn't have written it like that and I think that's something that we experience when you're writing dialogue where things change. And so I found it to be so similar with improvising in real life. You just need to have a nimble schedule and a good memory wasn't just nick and Lexi 'cause you would run into other Olympic athletes and say hey WANNA play it. Yes we would. And what was the reaction? Well this is where it was really helpful to have. Alexi an athlete herself. You know we would go to the dining hall or to the Game Room and look around at different people and Alexi Catanha tell like who would welcome a distraction and who was just in the zone needed to be left alone. What we've found is most athletes were super game. You don't really get an opportunity to do something like this especially not when you're in the middle of competition time. It was actually great because what I found with non actors which I know a lot of people don't even like that term but non trained actors who you then pull into your film. I mean this is what the softest didn't uncut gems you have. People playing characters that are close to themselves in real life and so you're not pushing them out of their comfort zone in that way and then as long as people who are able to forget that the cameras there you can get amazing performances in real interaction. So that's what we did with athletes. So much of this story seems to have been lifted from Alexis own personal experience in Rio. I would say that a Lexi's real life experience as an athlete competing in Rio was the seed. But you know she's a different person than the character. Someone like penelope the character in the film when she's done with her competition. It's a cliff for her. She does not know what's coming next in her life and in in some ways an Olympic athlete has to be like that. That's been my experience with all the athletes that I've gone to interact with and I know Alexi Kentucky this more personally but if you focus on what happens after you won't get to the goal itself. It's the same with making an indie film to some extent. You just need to be razor focused on accomplishing this. Basically impossible thing so in Alexis case she could really empathize with what our character is going through in real life. We're engaged. We add another film like I think. She's a bit more of a person who has her life together then her character in the movie but I was picking up on the fact that intellectuals case in real life. Here's someone who was not a particularly great runner by her own admission but she worked her ass off yes and she became a great runner and she not only achieved personal bests. She set national records in Greece and yet her competition in Rio was over like that. You know it's one thing to look at Olympia and say you are the best of the best in you have made it to the competition that a lot of people don't think about what happens to everybody else. Who didn't meddle yes. Post-olympic depression is a real thing. And that's something that the film explores which I think is relatable to anyone who reaches a big milestone in your life while you're not exactly sure what happens next and something interesting that we found is we have athletes who have cameos in the film play roles in the film. Knicks dental patient certain people hanging out in the game room who are gold medalists and we chat with them. That phenomenon of hitting that cliff feels the same weather your gold medallist or whether you finish seventeen which is still amazing seventeenth in the world right. It's a feeling that I think. A lot of these athletes can relate to. I also sense that after the medal ceremony. It's like the cool kids in high school and everybody else well. It's easy to feel like the cool kid. Crowd off feels totally good about themselves when the truth is that a lot of them don't but yes. Our movie is definitely from the perspective of someone who does feel left on the outside of that. One of my favorite shots in the movie is after. This isn't giving anything away because the athletic competition happens in the very beginning. It's almost like the inciting incident which I think is kind of interesting sports related movie to be like that but we went to a real medal. Ceremony was like set up in this stage dancers and crowds and the athletes were. They're getting their medals for some event. I forgot exactly what we planted. Alexi in the crowd and along lands on the camera. It's alright start crying and watch this phony because you're sad you didn't get the metal and then there's this moment like after. The athletes got their medals and left harsh stage. Lights were turned off the TV cameras had already packed up. But you could see the technical crew come up onto the stage and lift the podium and carry it into a truck that's shot in the film. That's just such a great moment because we wanted to show a different side of this event that so many people know about but so if you get to see in this particular way and so I think that was such a great example of visually what it's like and then also emotionally of the full journey for that person who finishes seventeenth and that's still the end of a huge time in their life in some respects. There obviously have been movies like this and other respects. There's never been a movie like this. It's not the first story about people who are lost trying to figure out what happens next. I feel like that's just such a great topic for movies especially indie films. But it's certainly the first one to play on the stage. As of you're you're getting a look of what it's like to be an athlete in the Olympic Village during the Olympics. Yes we were able to bring a camera into areas that have not been allowed to be really filmed before like the dining hall is the coolest thing I've ever seen now. This is like a sidebar. But it's just every athletes in their national uniform to it. Looks kind of like a Wes Anderson movie because everyone's all dressed up in these different matching things all sitting together. People are in different moods. It's like this that are away from the public eye or only able to be filmed like Super Control. The news segments. We had the freedom to do anything. Their dorm rooms bedrooms the laundry room. There's a laundry room in the athletes village. We only had that sort of access because Alexi was an athlete. Herself and the president of the Olympics happened to see our movies so it definitely feels like this once in a lifetime opportunity that we had to capture this. Were there any restrictions on you things that you just weren't allowed to get that you wanted to from a story standpoint? Actually no we told them ahead of time. What the plot was anything? Everyone was cool with that. You know we couldn't film athletes getting like medical attention who didn't want to be just common sense and things that we wouldn't WanNa do anyway. I think something that's really important to us is when we're portraying real life community. In this case the Olympic Community. We just wanted them to watch the film and feel like their experience was captured accurately and respectfully and they're proud of what we did in their space. Hi This is Jean Curtis producer of Hollywood unscripted. We hope this show is ignited your passion as much as it is hours. Please SUBSCRIBE RATE. Us and leave a review. It really does matter as we bring you more inspiring conversations with the filmmakers. You admire now back to the show. I would imagine that during the shoot one you're responsible for directing and sound and cinematography everything. You're too busy to realize what's happening in the moment so funny. Because I had the opposite experience there was a learning curve to be sure with that level of equipment that I was carrying around. Luckily though I gave myself a few days like in the rental house ahead of time to familiarize myself like physically. Put the camera on walk around. Take it apart all that stuff. Once I got in the flow there I actually felt more free as a filmmaker than I ever have. Since the high school days with yourself in a camera I felt like when I had bigger cruise in the past my attention was pulled in more ways than being there with the Lexi and nick. I felt really lucky to have that opportunity to go back to the one man band days that most of us had in childhood but on a big playing field it felt like a reconnection to the pure essence of film making in that. There's no bullshit if that makes sense. Yeah my hands are freezing cold. And sometimes the equipment would freeze. It was so cold. Even the athletes were commenting. How particularly called it was. But I digress. The point is that it just felt once I got used to the equipment it just felt like I had this direct creative line with the actors. There was nothing between them and me and that just the way that that felt was so productive and own. Good no matter how big the crew is. You need that feeling to really be cooking as you're walking around though is your mind being blown. It's like Oh my God. I'm an Olympic Village and I'm shooting a feature. That comes the reflection. I think at the same thing when you start working with more famous people for the first time like the first time I met Nick or when we had Rachel draft or Andy Buckley and track down our previous films. I think this is something. Maybe other filmmakers can relate to you have these starstruck moments. But then you're you're just working. We always keeping our. I open though to not take anything that we were seeing around us for granted because it is very special so just things like. Oh look at this digital map thing that they're everywhere but I'm GonNa miss this when we're gone and it's not normal that this exists so let's make sure we capture it somehow. Talk to us about. How did you settle on me? And then bringing him on board. Is it like. Hey Nick WanNa go to the Olympics on somebody else's dime it's definitely made for a unique offer letter for sure you know. We had generally like an age range for the Ezra character. We knew kind of a rough vibe of what we wanted but I think the main priority for us was just making sure that whoever we picked was going to be cool with being one part of a three person team and that would mean being in the trenches to unheard of an unusual degree in terms of helping. Carry stuff being cooled. Doing your own makeup. Making yourself and comfortable improvising and bringing out the best of nontrained actors so we had casting directors help us with this search and from there it was kind of like once we are somewhat unusual criteria set out. It was just the process of connecting with agents who are passionate about the project and we wanted to aim high. I know we're pretty small. Indie filmmakers who had a successful but small indie film behind US already. But we're going to go to the Olympics and this is pretty crazy. So can we somehow get this letter into people's hands who might not normally look at projects that are like three people big? You Know Knicks agent really believed in it and then when we met nick it was clear right away that coming from the stand up world. He's produced his own shows. Just he had like that energy the instinct even the way he was talking about how we go about certain things we felt good and relieved and excited so you have a stand up comedian in a dramatic role. Yeah talk to us about the VIBE. Between takes I hesitate. I suppose it is a dramatic role. I would just say it's a true role. This guy goes through a lot but I'm never asking someone to cam anything up. He's just being in the moment and reacting to certain things as he slashed. His character would and that results in some dramatic moments for sure between takes. And there's not a lot of time between takes especially when you're crew is one person you can just go and be shooting pretty much all the time. Nick became just familiar with the story. Line as I was and this is why he was so great that his eyes were always open to. There was one time we were stuck on a bus and the bus wasn't moving and we learned we'd be stuck there for at least an hour and it was the knicks idea. Let's shoot something. What can shoot here Jeremy. Let's use this time. And I referenced. My Internal Excel spreadsheet public. What we needed to shoot and we try an incredible scene. It's one of my favorite scenes in the movie so that is what Nick was like. So when you're doing this. How many times are you shooting the same scene? How many takes when you're one camera doing like verite thing you're doing multiple takes for coverage and performance. I would like to do long. Take so we pretty much do the whole scene and I would move around. Maybe two to four takes at most for any for any one moment sometimes. When we would do that long initial performance I would be able to mentally at it and say okay. I know I'm gonNA need this line. This is probably an important line in the edit. I'm always really involved in the edit. So that's helpful for me to be able to go back and we'll sometimes hit certain lines again and again and that's something that I can do with Nick Alexi because they are more trained when it's with a non trained actor. That's just more on me to be really editing as I'm shooting. I almost don't know another way I could have done. It could've used a sound guy but me holding. The camera was really helpful because I could tell like sometimes if it was a section of a take that they were saying something. That was kind of filler. I would just go down and grab insert shots of like their hands making a gesture or something like that just knowing that like. That's what it's GonNa take to edit these scenes together when you're improvising. You need to maintain the freshness so that does limit the number of takes. What helps is with your mind and giving yourself enough coverage when you're working on a film like this new are limited to the fact that you have to start and finish during the Olympics. Yes about how you fit your scheduled into that. So we received a map of the Olympic venues ahead of time and there were some photos of what these places would look lake so what I did was first of all break down. The script went into Sean's and do my best guess for how long each scene might take which is just total guesswork at first based on my knowledge of just how. I liked to work and then we had this list of locations and we tried to mix and match things so we knew a number of seems to be taking place in the main characters dorm room. We knew some scenes. We're going to be in the dining hall and we had a list like K. Arguments in maybe. That could be cool to take place in either the empty stadium or the bobsled rink. And let's look into those places so I just did my best to group everything by location. We just shot out locations. That was the easiest way to go about it and then when we got to the Olympic area we were there a few days early so at that point I connected with a venue manager and we learned then what was going to be available when and so then. You're just kind of playing tetris at that point so we would shoot out a day and then every night. There's like pictures on Instagram of me looking super haggard backing up all the footage looking at what we were able to shoot updating my schedule ingesting information from the various venue people who I was with and like making the next day scheduled the night before. So it's just something that you update nightly and the things that influence that or what you were able to film the location availability and also then like what happened in the Improv. That day there were certain key ten polls that we're never going to change but sometimes based on the kiss example would impact then how important certain later scenes worse that might impact how I timed out a day so it was just a a nightly update. We talked earlier about the fact that you were able to bring in some real Olympians to play scenes with you but in general. How are people reacting when you're just walking into the dining room and you've got a camera? What was cool is that we were not only crew with the camera. Walk you out. You have news stations or television entities from dozens of countries who are zipping around at any given moment so it wasn't had turning to be walking around with a camera like it might be some other more guerrilla filmmaking settings so in that way we were able to totally blend in. We were definitely the only people making like a narrative project but luckily it wasn't the type of thing where just heads would turn simply because of us being there. If people recognize nick then we might have to interrupt a taker too. But luckily we're able to blend in another nice thing. Is that certain? Public areas like the common spaces of the Olympic Village including the dining hall and the athletic venues is like. I don't know the technical term but anyone. There was fair game to be captured in the background. So you don't have to necessarily get clearances for them. That's right the only people we got clearances for him. We're the ones who spoke and took part in the film and then there would always be a conversation ahead of time. The only place that we were really careful not to get anyone who didn't absolutely no they were being filmed in the medical clinic area for the dental scenes. And we just. We wanted to respect. Everyone's privacy which for the most part was fine because we were in the dentist's office and Luckily for us. The dental staff was not very busy during the Winter Olympics which was funny because during the Summer Games. There's a whole medical suite. The polyclinic is called. And there's you have volunteer doctors mostly from the host country but also from all over the world who come in to be on call in case anything were to happen in the Winter Games. Once people realize there was a dentist. Us had athletes coming in to get free teeth. Cleanings but in the Summer Games where you have athletes I mean frankly from more diverse cross section of the world because winter sports just do have a high like financial barrier to entry by and large so you tended to have athletes for more affluent countries or affluent situations there in the Summer Games. We checked out the polyclinic. Because we're starting to brew this idea together. And it was just constantly packed because there were coaches and athletes who this was their first dental cleaning. There's an optometrist. So you had athletes getting glasses for the first time. That was so interesting and moving an interesting difference that we noticed between the summer and Winter Games which in this case worked out in our favor because the polyclinic was pretty calm so the Summer Games are coming up. Alexia training yes. She is currently training for the marathon. A lot of athletes at least in the sport of track and field or marathon. You don't know if you're going to be competing until pretty close to the time because the way qualifications were and. What are your plans for the Olympics? We actually have another creative project brewing. We're going to do another film thing. I cannot speak too soon on this because it is very much still in the works but what I can say is that we have ambitions to do another film project. That has not been done before so it won't be a narrative feature will be something else. I will tell you that my wife and I have been working together for thirty years and we have found a secret is just. Don't kill each other. I mean like see and I met in college. We I guess we empowered each other to take our dreams a little more seriously. And I think it's going to be a continual balance to figure out when you're in work mode and when you're not I am genuinely off what she's able to do and I think we complement each other very very well in terms of our interests and also our skill set so it's fun to go on this adventure with someone like this but don't you find it when you were living and working together. It's a journey to find how you divide the roles. I mean what is nice about having your business and creative partner be in your family which I think is. Maybe why we see so. Many great sibling pairs is that it becomes easier to totally take away your ego because you truly want the best for the other person you truly feel that a rising tide lifts all ships and so I think that's what the best partnerships really are as if it's something that just has my name on it you can still rest assured that like Alexi and I have worked on that behind the scenes and vice versa. It's great when you're in a creative partnership where you can take ego out of the equation but what about the creative differences that are gonNA inevitably occur. I think as long as you have the shared goal of creating something that is the best thing and you have no ego than creative differences are ultimately resolved and this is where ego comes in because it takes a lack of ego to recognize ideas objectively. Better like. Don't get me wrong there. Were moments like full-blown creative arguments that if we weren't married might have been more serious disagreements but ultimately it's cool to have a partner who feels comfortable standing their ground and also we do both have the same ultimate vision for things so when we do have creative differences no matter how heated debate gets we will ultimately decide the same objective like aesthetic decision. Well best of luck the release of Olympic Dreams joining us today. The director cinematographer sound Guy Producer. Yes editor everything. Jeremy T-shirt best of luck to you. Best of luck to thank you so much. Hollywood unscripted has created by Kurt Co media and presented in cooperation with the Malibu Film Society. This episode was hosted by Scott to lull with guest. Jeremy Tiger produced and edited by Jenny. Curtis sound engineering by Michael Kennedy. The score from Olympic dreams featured as the music in this episode was composed by Anti Heart and J Wadley and provided courtesy of IFC films the executive producer of Hollywood scripted is Stuart Helper in the Hollywood unscripted theme. Song by Celeste. And Eric Dick Please. Rate Review and subscribe to this podcast for more conversations with top industry professionals discussing the entertainment. You Love Kirk Co media media for your mind.

Nick Alexi Olympics Olympic Village Alexia nick director Rio International Olympic Committe Olympic Channel Lexi Malibu Film Society president writer Knicks IFC films Scott Paul Thomas Anderson Rio Games Hollywood Jeremy Alexi Catanha
European Parliament Elections

World News Analysis

54:55 min | 1 year ago

European Parliament Elections

"Today provide you with in-depth news and expert analysis ten the who story bigger picture for you. The news you want to know only on today. Welcome to world. Today news programme with a different perspective. I'm joing voters in twenty eight EU countries are heading to the pools for the European parliament, elections with Brexit looming nationalist, populism on the rise, this year's election, a political event held every five years, it seem by many as decisive for ease future. So how will the votes change the makeup of the European parliament? Are we going to see an explosion of populism in these elections? How good a predictor will be to the national politics in each Member State, and where is a you heading in terms of his role on the world stage for these questions? And more. We are joined by doctors who Jen, head of European studies department was China Institute of international studies, and her ought boop man, from Switzerland. He's an expert on Chinese and international studies and Phil Perry editor of the eye and investigative news, Beppe side in wells UK, welcome to work today. Day. Well, I think before we move on to our discussion on the European elections. There's breaking news this afternoon. Theresa May is stepping done as British Prime minister she anals to quit as conservative leader of on the seventh of June. So Mr. Paracha, study was the could you bring us more on the latest of this? Yeah. Basically, Theresa May lost control of the cabinet. In fact, there was a very major resignation leader. The palm tree party in the Commons, unrelenting them few days ago, and she's out, she had no where to go. She has tried and failed on several occasions to get he withdrawal, they'll through pollen. And now she's been told he has to go and she has plying resigned after one of the shelties ten years post second World War as prime minister in Britain, so Mr. power, we know UK was supposed to have deft the by now because the government has failed to reach the old that satisfies either the British parliament or the EU. They're now holding the elections as usual will cost more than one hundred million pounds. To choose the MVP is to take up seizing apartment that you're not into part of. So how many Brits are actually going to vote this time? That's very good question. I mean. Theresa May really didn't want these elections. They are distinctly old in Britain because, frankly, any Ps will be lactate, possibly Rhodia few weeks to take this before Britain comes out of the EU, and he didn't quite conceivable and the poll suggests that the tower is could come behind, for example, the glean, and that election result, which will compete. They election wall yesterday Britain, but the results coming on some day would be absolute anathema for the Tories and one of the reasons why she I think why he decided she had to go. And I think she decided she wanted to go now before the results come in on Sunday, which would be bad for labor after the polling poll, the toys. Yes. And if we believe in the pools, Mr. bug. C'mon. The pools actually suggest the candidates in the UK, that's most likely to be seated in a European parliament are actually those school are most determined. That Britain was leave the issue with the Brexit party that by Nigel Farraj expanded to come up on tops. Are you surprised by that? Well nine away. Yes. Great good come pain. I think. Yes. Mr. Volkmann was her take. From looking maybe from a bit more a far away from the UK. It's I wouldn't say surprising, in that many European elections have always shown that parties on the fringes get elected, much easier much more because voters may not fear so much that they're more extreme election. Choices have any tangible consequences. The parliament is very far away. It's actual powers limited, and national government have remained very strong autonomy above the European Union parliamentary decisions. So people may feel free to vent anger at their own, national government by voting some extreme parties into the European parliament. And I think that's something that's also happening in the UK with the special case, of course. That this Brexit has been going on for so long, and from all I hear is people are really fed up. I mean half, maybe half the Brits would like to have a revote and not leave at all the other half is saying, we should have left two years ago, and people are really fed up and they want to really show their government that they're really not happy. Doctors say, how do you look at those think the Brexit party has been doing so well in the European elections? Saw ROY Sophie Mr. Rogers party indeed. We can find out. He not only some very specific background in bracket, because so far, they the lot of disappointments from Aggie people in your K, about the conservative party and a neighbor party and the in Tallahassee of push for wadley some practice process. But of course, I think, generally, we can find out the environment recently special written years as we know that the pope Latam as the voice for Mr. Faraj and his party. And there was a very big showcase forty some general Trent. But now of course, I agree with optimism point is to a large degree the European parliament election has to be regarded by most of our European people us. Us as a secondary vote, which means it could not be decisive by resort daily life, by the daily life. But of course, it will become very, very cute opportunity to express the disappointment, and they are companies about of the politics about the European Union. Well, Mr McMahon, could you explain to us more how the European parliament elections actually work because that really looks of it complex or confusing for outsiders? Yes. And you asked me, I mean, I mostly focused on international politics, and, of course, preparing for tonight, I have looked at the elections also and the institutions of the and I totally agree with what you just said, it is extremely complicated. Simply put the elections are national elections all across Europe, and in each country, people vote for the parties that are available in their countries and these parties, try to kind of form you repeating parties. They are aligned across countries. But in some places they have different names than in others. They tried to have this one bitten candidat, which is like this one head figureheads to drama voters, but it's, it's not really unified parties with an authority across Europe. So each national party can do whatever they like Indian. So, for example, Merkel's German. Cd party is the same European party as Hungary's rather. Centerfold, anti-foreigner anti immigrants party there in the same European populist party. So it's, it's very confusing set of many local elections, put together Nash, a European parliament, which, of course, is not the official explanation of the process, but this is looking from a distance at how it actually happens. Well, Mr Perry, actually, the voter turnout has gone down in every single European parliament elections since they began in nineteen seventy nine on, do you think the low turnout main stat EU has actually failed time, and again to unite Europe, Ian people with Brexit, perhaps being approve of that. Yes. The Turner has been very low as you said, for well election to the EU, Paul, but, but it conceivable we done the exact truth, yet possible that the turn out will actually be now, we'll be higher this time because being the news people want to bend their anger. Again, the slowness of breath as you airing because galvanized people to have a not, oh, breakfast or to come. I need all those remain to day in though, it's possible the turn will actually go up, I but you're absolutely correct, the Turner, happy, very low therapy, and that tied into this whole drama, the undergoing now because it the EU is in. By many as a remote organization institution that is full of bureaucracy. They don't want, they don't want to be positive, and they won't hire the voted to leave those who remain one day head. They don't bureaucrats over that number across and that had been hearing, split Britain, and is having a huge effect on Europe as well. Well, we serves how do you look at the low turnout and do you think it will go up this year? Indeed. The now turn out fully saw European parliament, you'd action. I said in a past. Many because of the, I think real. No. I mean competence via European parliament in the decision making process in the European Union institution. But since Lisbon Treaty, I mean, especially refitted fake in a year for two hundred ten at night. It looks like a European parliament, got some more competence, only decision making process in European Union. But I think who lots also first time we witness to voice of populace party in European parliament. So this year, I think, maybe there will be some different because absolutely no firstly establishment parties. Try to defeat the populist party in his election. Perhaps, they will have some more mobile. Relation in various states and other I think the reason is because of the now the European parliament get a Parisian also house. The co on policymakers along these European Union commission and no-show European Council. So I think maybe some more confidence to voters to. To active more actively. Yeah. Well, Mr. man, how does the general public think about e you these days, especially the young people in Europe? I can't speak for five hundred billion people. Of course, what I feel as myself below forty in Europe. Is that? There has been a massive rise in European identity, especially among the higher educated Europeans, it's, it's very natural to travel between European states and no people across borders. And so there is something coming up that people start feeling of themselves as Europeans, even though it may not be a patriotic feeling. But it somehow irrational feeling of we are all somehow connected through one European Union, and at the same time, I would like to talk about this concept of procedural, legitimacy versus material, legitimacy, and in my view, the west has much too much focused on this procedural legimacy of government. What I mean is, we only talk about how does the government get elected, and as long as there's a free and fair election? Nobody questions whatever happens afterwards and the Apas. It would be to say, well, a government is only legitimized, if it does something good for the people, which, for example, be a socialist. Take not only, but also socialists, and that second question is, I think where people are very unhappy with Europe? And with a lot of national governments within Europe, because time and again, people vote for higher wages for normal workers for less power to large corporations for not giving billions of euro two big banks to save them. But then when common people get in trouble, you know, they don't get money. They don't get retirement money. They get cuts. They get all these kinds of challenges of common people, and so from this material perspective, what the governments do is not satisfying. A lot of people. There's not been enough positive economic development or social development in. General in Europe. And I think this is what gets people more and more dissatisfied makes them feel, powerless helpless. And that's when people start vote voting for extreme parties just to show. Look, if it doesn't matter anyway, what I say, then I just say something because I know it makes you angry you being the current politicians in charge. While Mr. Barry, just now Mr. Buch mentioned about all those problems facing the continent right now. And with own noticed the rise of nationalism and populism, what is think are the key issues that are likely to sway the vote in the elections. Well, the terms of Britain, they are wrongly nasty. Issues. So people vote, according to how they warm, the policy in Britain be pursued generally, there are also issues in relation to climate change, and all is a cross-border issue. But the main thing is, as much as I don't want it to be the main thing is that the voting coats to national politics. So in bitten anyway, particularly it's, you know, whether or not threes may won't get Britain hours or whether other people do better, all whether other parties think they want Britain should I should be another referendum should stay in. Now, there are other issues in relation to the Konomi and you know, how climate change should be tackled in other countries, but I certainly issue here. That the they are issues and relations to how it affects Britain, and that is not what the with mentally about. Is that to be about a supernatural thing, and it tells you about how precede within Britain, the people vote because national issues? Well, what about in other countries? Dr J we've seen also seen a rise of populism nationalism in other countries like France, like Germany, etc. Yes. If we take some major Member States, especially I think this year. So European parliament election will be very rare decision for its domestic politics for them, perhaps, the frost as we know, mR Macron, party so far. Not yet has a single cent seat in parliament. So this election will be a very big showcase for how cute president Macron got the support. I mean substantially from French people, especially the very, very big gaming between Mr. Macron's party, and Mario Lopez party. Also in Italy's, actually, they would be a, you know. You know decisive. I mean. Resort for this new party by Mitch Macron, and also existed populist party by the LaPointe, another, I think very big issue is how Italy assume now Mr. Salvini, try to play a Zoll to be a leader of the summer publisher party, not only in Italy, and also across the border all the other European countries. So I think the resort of the election for this European parliament will give a very, very pick. I mean impact on French politics in future, and also toured the Italian politics on this yearbook. No, we know that for quite a long time. The European politics had a fairly stable, alignment, is two or three major parties holding sway, but how much? They rake configuration of party, alignments and party system. Are we going to get coming out of this election? I don't want to speculate what's going to happen. But indeed, the rise of these so-called, far-right populace has been a theme over the last few years in all national elections across a number of countries. And it's worth to talk about that, and why I want to stay clearly did I don't endorse some of their especially anti-foreign rhetorics and the way they talk politics. I think I'm not as worried as some commenters in Europe are, and the reason for that. I recall a few years back, there was is congress between people like the builders marine lapenne foul Kapit of German, French Dutch, and other far-right populist leaders and I found that a huge change for the better because if we think just one hundred years ago, these. Right wing parties from France, Germany. They would call for war against each other to defend their culture against the other culture. Now, these countries sent their right-wing people to a congress together in order to debate how they can protect their common culture. Of course, again it's against foreign influences against Islam against the Africans against Middle Eastern immigrants cetera. But still it just gives me the sense that even the right wing parties to the vast majority. They're not trying to dissolve the European Union, and then end up in a state of pre e-. You -times of independent countries or even longer before Europe has been at war for centuries. Most of history of Europe is small countries fighting against each other. And I don't see any of these new populist parties one. Wanting to go back to that. And the second statement, I want to make is about this term populism, which I'm very unhappy with because. Populism comes from the word populace, which is people, right? And the biggest part is the European People's Party, which is ironic because it refers to the same route of people and the Greek term for people then is demos, and from that re is, is the word democracies. So it's about the rule of the people, and populism takes this majority rule, and turns it negative, which I find risky, because it just gives a very, very strong opening for these parties to say, yes, we are populous. That's a good thing because we stand for the majority of the people, which don't but that's what they're claiming. So I'm very careful with this term populist. Well, Mr Perry, how'd you look at this, this issue this rise of populism or nationalism on a continent? Do think they have perhaps become softer compared with one hundred years ago. Well, it's very very definite the'd as you be airing. And. Is absolutely corrected far better to how have the past all far better? But it is a great concern for those who are in power that we are seeing an issue, where in Hungary, for example goal band, and, you know, Farrar Britain, the Brexit party. We're going to staying a issue, where policies driven by parties of extremes. And they want to be the EU influences anyway, they won't tend to laugh intend to write, but they want far-right fall, and they say she populism, which appears to be and. There are different variations across Europe, but it appears to be sweeping across the year. We have kids builders in Holland. We have all we have Faraj. So it is to conceal low, historically, much better than it has in the past in relation to what is happen. But it is also concern for those people in power, the these parties such as for our break the party, we should likely to hold sway, and we'll top the poll in Britain holding sway. Have a love influence in the European parliament. And so that is a great source concern. Well, Dr Trifon. When did we start to see this latest fragmentation of European politics and the rise of nationalism and euroscepticism? If we look back to the past year. Shogo special euro-zone, that's crisis would be a very big stimulation to listeners ROY so for populism in Europe because we know this that crisis explored a lot of. Contradiction. So a lot of the problems or challenges will in European Union, especially so far, as we, if we can find out the situation in European Union, especially the very peak divergencies between the so-called lost part of Europe and south part of Europe, and especially eastern part and the western part. So I think it gives a I mean, the earth or soil for ROY so populist because it take a chance. Thea. To find some more, how to say extreme policy on annoys extreme principles in the name of people. I think Jessica Oakham hokum mentioned populace to parties Misir, too. Very big disappointment with his establishment parties, and those comments because they are not, they could not they are not successful to deal with the issue of the development and also that crisis. So he gives a space for populist party, another issue, I think to the change of the political situation in Europe with the feature of the voice of populist me center, it's also a part of the huge change in western countries. Indeed. It's kind of result of these. We have a very short break here coming back. We'll continue our discussion. You're listening to world today. I'm joing stay with us. I am on car sharia. I teach at the university in today has organized its programs, and it says, on bringing in a lot of views from all over, it is an extremely good platform for information and analysis than I should all success in the future. China plus dot cri. Dot sin is your home for everything you want to know about China. The latest news in China and everything China related from around the world, everything can focus only one place, bringing you vital information, feel business and travel, Chinese culture, language, lining, and mall. Shine A-plus dot CO, arrived dot C, N China, plots dot cri dot C N, your portal entities, middle kingdom. Online on air and on your flown. Take today wherever you go and stay ahead of what's changing our world from politics and the economy to business and technology today, covers regional and international issues that affect China and the world Jeep up-to-date with today. Welcome back. You're listening to world today. I'm joanne. Jordan, by doctors honed. In had of European studies department was China Institute. Jiffy international studies, Mr. Harare, book man from Switzerland. He's an expert on Chinese and international politics, and feel Perry editor of the I an investigative news site in wells UK. So just now we with mentioned about the rise of populist parties on, on the European continent. So Mr. Buch men, if we do not look, as far back as maybe a hundred years ago of juicing the populace in Europe has softened their agenda in regards the, you just compared with navy seven six months ago, because they once vouch shutter, the European Union banal leaders like Salvini or lapenne. They are talking about altering the European Union from within. So do you think they have maybe learned lessons from food or other issues? That makes them softer on their agenda. Yes. Very much. I think indeed, it's one reason for that has been the Brexit experience. And as a result, also of this very unsuccessful road towards Brexit. Also in many countries poll shows that people are less eager to leave the EU, and I think that's also reason why these far-right forces are toning down on, on destroying or wanting to destroy the U N rather one to reform it. I think there's other reasons too. I mean Europeans are very much aware that the tone from the US has changed. So instead of having a big ally, a big brother who protects you against evil now, the US more more seem like a threat to many Europeans. At the same time China has been on the rise. And whether you agree or not. China could be a threat or is just another powerful country for sure. It shows the Europeans that details of individual nation states in Europe is just coming to an end because a middle-sized European country is just too small to be of any importance on a global stage anymore. And I think that's another reason why more and more people realize, if Europe wants to have any say in the world than it needs to be a United powerful European Union. One thing that I'm very worried about the right wing, though, is foreign interference and I'm also surprised because while a lot of people talk about Russian interference potential Russian interference. I hear very publicly that an American like Steve Bannon is touring Europe, and, and trying to drum up far-right nationalist, and he's, he's an outspoken, nationalist slash Leninist in his own definition, which I find very weird. I mean that's. Dangerous personality, who's openly interfering in European politics? And I wonder why there's not much of an outcry that somebody so openly interferes into inner-european discussion yet. Dr ties defense was in Paris those week. And as Mr. boatman said he's been accused by many of interfering in European parliament parliamentary elections. How'd you look at these accusations? Indeed. I think that to why this some Jessica, we talked about earlier to how about this some. I mean, the some public party, it's why to a change the Tong and maybe change the scales to his issue. And how is the intervention of so-called, outsiders on these Thomas politics, everything? Now it's just a pot of Lia. We call the political evolution in Europe, because also once the LUSA populist party, they are ready to be part of a mainstream politics in Europe. They had they had to adopt to the. Principal, some policies, for example, to from so-called ING dividing European Union, and to kind of reform reforming European exact. But now I think it's also a situation to now more on the more public party. The find out more and more hopes. And in the pasta several years to say that they could be in the center of domestic politics in some counties, so they try to enlarge the basis of the supporters. So I think it's also requirement of four scales to attract more average people to support their policies not issue, I think these into wishing or some other now I think it's was so part of a skillful instrument party to fight against the populist party because everytime, she are some elections. In Member States of European Union. Always the fake news issue was some intervention issue from outside become very, very hot issue. But finally is difficult to find the ending. I mean substantive substantial evidence to prove that is a very, very strong linkage between the Popular Party, and Osama, you know, a political forces from outside has now, also become a part of the. Dilemma or the Mace of the European parties, or eating low, Mr Perry from your perspective, is Donald form exacerbating populism of Europe. That is one of the fears that he's wrapped up in the rise of popular them. We are seeing the rising populism in the US and in America. Don't Trump is a fair. Among remains and three. The maze thing supposedly until after he's close state visit to Britain. Now he is a divisive figure, and he's quite possible. He's pass on this rise in this bit. Certainly feel that way. Those voted poll remain, that you have Trump in America, the right engaging, the tariff war with China, and he's positives. Farraj Wilders Berina pan in Hungary old. I'm this brise in the populace the extreme. In politics. So Trump is positive that it's quite conceivable on the great Alrighty with from his, he has this faith the polls, and yet it appears the terrorists are off hitting the consumers tickly produces. Some of them sixteen in the following areas of, of the midwest, and yet, they are still supporting them also supporting Trump. They're saying, yes, it's bad for us, but he didn't write thing. So it is teen as him being positive whole rise about the rights in the world on the Europe in election thing, well, Mr. both men besides the American elements. How'd you look at the video scandal off the Austria's far-right Freedom Party? I mean, that comes at really out of a very awkward time, just a few days before the European election. Well, I mean first of all, it is a big scandal to have somebody in power being so openly talking about corruption and selling a state power for money. Basically, I mean, that is shocking even for the standards that we've seen recently in, in some far-right populist parties. On the other hand, as we've discussed today, mister Perry said it and. The European elections still very much is a national elections across different countries. So I strongly doubt that it will have much of an impact on other far-right parties. I believe it will be an Austrian thing, and even in Australia. We'll have to see if the supporters of these of the F, the far-right party, if they will take it as a scandal from that party or rather blame it on to people and say, yet they did that they were drunk, they're bad people. Now they lost all their power. But the ideas for which there party stood and still stands is what we want. And so we still vote for this party. I think that's actually very well possible. So I, I doubt that it will have a short term massive impact on the election results, whether it will have a long term impact on. Credibility of some of those populists who came with the promise of being totally different from from all other politicians that is still possible. And I think that's also what's happening with Trump, who started as I'm the outside of politics guy. I'm different from them all. And now factually, what's happening in the US is not much different from what's happened before. I mean it sounds different. It looks different. But there's not this positive change that voters who voted for him were hoping for. And so, so this it's kind of they lose their, their image of being totally different from other politicians and for that. I think this video will also play a big role. I do think this is going to affect the elections, and maybe even the forest movement Europe, because, you know, the far-right Freedom Party has actually been playing well before the dental. We it'd depend on how could is different parties, especially fully mission party in populist party, how to describe it and how to interpret so far. Yes. For most of the establishment parties toy to interpreted it as a very, very strong proof to, was, you are probably the party certainly, you will be very, very easy to be influence by outsiders like that. And of course, now I think, because Australia special far far-right. The party's Austria now before the scandal, they were in a comment. So certain now they have to, you know, retraite from garment, and it looks like a big loose for his party in Austria. But indeed, I should now for all our Member States for other parties in other Member States because they have their own. I mean, some are in strong support and to have their own. I mean very specific. I mean manifestos so I don't think that will give a lot of influence on this election being a ho Europe a lot, while the Mr Barrot. You think this my serve as another avance of the close ties between Russia and the populist parties in gear up and does have a maybe long term impact on the far right movement? That is certainly a worry. The there are there is evidence that, for example, trim. We talking about the Austrian issue that under star. Right. That one of the issues, dad will rush tension vote, the sting was supposedly Russian home tractor wanted policies. So it's quite possible that this will feed into this whole issue and Russia's sees this as a way all the, the thing into control in Europe becoming quite close to Saudi, and other in the right wing, and in the past. And, and, you know, we have an issue where for example, Russian television is beamed into homes within Europe. And some of them. Lease how programs on there and, and I should like that. So there is a concern about the Russian influence within year in America winning Europe as well. And that won't be exacerbated by the rise of right wing parties in Europe, in these election. Well, Mr. Buch, then there are people, people also say that these populist parties. They also have significant divisions among themselves on his shoes, like on migration and on his shoes like relations with Russia. So do you think they are going to find unity even after the elections? Certainly they have big divisions and other one that I would like to mention also environmentalism from from being totally anti climate to being actually quite green at there. There are big divisions and the only uniting factor is, is this anti immigration theme. And to some extent, the anti-establishment theme that they have. But in Europe in the European parliament on that level, that is actually quite common for all the parties. I mean, take the social Democrats six socialist parties. They are vastly different from, from Portugal, Spain to Germany to, to Greece to have very different stances. I mentioned at the beginning European populist party going from Oregon to, to miracle. I mean okay. Organised div ING our expect to leave the populist party now but. That is a common thing in Europe that these pan-european parties to not have an aligned mission or aligned goal, even though they are by name in one aligned faction, and that's the same for the right wing. And as long as they find topics on, which they can cooperate. And as long as they can push those agendas. I don't think their differences, will be that important. It's even conceivable that on certain topics they will vote divided and on other topics they vote United behind their stance. I think that's not a big issue. Yes. While doctors say, I'll German Chancellor Angela Merkel has recently said, in an interview, the vise of right wing populism has fundamentally shifted the global order alliances and leaves Europe and its political and economic union owned the defense. So which way do you think? EU with heading in terms of role on the world stage. I think to charter Mercker issue crackly, because the logic behind the Publix party is to take a, I mean, another Papa reort already also so called a national interests. Does Mr. Trump mation American, I and also mississau- Walney also co a kind of a tiny Italy. I so which will give I mean, very big impact on this so called the European degration firstly, because we know the traditional logic for European degration is to, you know, to give some more, I mean, popica- or collective Apollo's to institution in process, and then also returned to have a lesson less sermon. I, I mean, powerful national state, national state and the full Member States. So I think it now why some more national interest also requirement it will change this logic. I mean politics oil, Europe, integration, and his interview, some more perhaps are conservative influence on the policy. So I think. I can't take the understand the deep concern from for marker and some other politicians MIM parties in Europe. Some Mr. man, actually Merckel also said, she thinks the post war global autre built over seven decades is over. And she ripped the United States with China and Russia as rivals of Europe. So is she talking about a resurgence of great power politics in today's world that Europe should engage us as one of the great powers? I think to some extent she, she is definitely saying that. And I also think she is probably the most threatened one by this rise of the right wing populace because she's the target of many of those right wing populace. Because while in theory, the European Union is in charge factually, Germany, has wielded an enormous amount of power within the European Union. And as head of Germany head of state in Germany. She she was the one who's wielding that power. And she's been in office for a very, very long time. Now soon people with start voting who have never seen anyone else leading terminate in her. And I think she's also somehow feeling that an air is going to end where she is saying, which way you are up is. Going. And I think she's also bit afraid of that because I don't think this rise of populace is really going to change the European outlook on the world that much. Because honestly, I haven't seen that much of a European outlook on the world because most of what foreign policy has done was done by national governments to French have their foreign policy, the British determines and there's two sixteen plus one, for example, where China with central and eastern European countries has a corporation on Belton road. Italy has chosen to join in while Germany has a very negative stance towards it. So it seems to me, she is realizing that her power is waning, but she's not realizing that, that's a natural thing that has was found to happen, because it was too much power focused on her. Mr perry. Do you can't miracles view that she's, she said Europe? Should put he was together with China and Russia as the rivals hero g thing that transatlantic alliance is, is dead as she's been suggesting. Well, the transatlantic lines is definitely one but the levers want to pursue. And they stressed that all the time for them like America, all the people of the EU until it feeds into domestic politics in Britain issues like that. And they want to strike deals with pays like America and China, and India, I thought the EU and at the moment, they count from say, and they come was in, because the us to deal so they want to stress that trans Atlantic aligned with America of the, the Brexit happened. And that is something spread into this debate. And we shouldn't overlook the pie. But a lot of the heartbreaker tears won't come out. Like Michael goes, and always Johnson have endorsed Trump don't Trump and Michael go go with being over to Stephen fact. So they all think in that way and thirteen the minds, though remained. And they all linked in relation to this transatlantic lines and they are par deep as link past of this populist, search within the European Union. And I'll try. Dr today. Think what we've been talking just now is it a temporary thing only because of Trump's America first policy or shall we see it as part of a lasting change which started before, don't Trump? And we'll also continue after him so too. I really depends on the judgment. Firmer European perspective? Harbor natural year church and undeclared relations, because I know a lot of steel hesitant from European scientists say to once chomp jumped down in the general election in United States, perhaps they would be renewal of the traditional transatlantic relations if. A mole. European politicians, keep these some judgment, I think, to date, the things that it just a very temporary. I mean situation for these relations. But at the same time I sink to maybe two. I mean. Mean situation for Trenton rations is. Trump is not a single voice. Go single figure in United States to have race. We got on transatlantic relations because once to keep American I become a successful I mean policy, especially in is of Mr. Trump and also in some. People average people even in the United States, I think this situation will keep going on you. Mr. Trump will drop down in next election. Another issue I could now Foley's, issue between e- European countries and United States. I sent it at the same time, it's a major member sleighs for European Union, including Germany, and France, tried to take the issue, the so-called a strategic autonomy and against the United States to play Zo. I mean to push forward European decoration, because we know because of a lot of divergent has now within European Union. It looks like it's more difficult to get some dynamics from internal I mean, from European Union herself, so too. Shape. China's law show United States as a kind of a compensator or kind of arrivals from outside. We'll be perhaps goot for his own Newton amick for your integration all miss your book nine talking about the strategic atonomy, how realistic is that given that Europe still relies on Washington for security? It's a very good question. And actually, I think it's more realistic than many people think if we just look at the security aspect, because yes indeed Europe relies on a lot, but it wouldn't really have to because the military threat towards Europe, even without NATO is not that big. I mean who would militarily try seriously to attack? You're up the Russians surely not. I mean, the French have nuclear weapons as well. I don't see anyone in tradition. War, who would try to engage a major power, like the European Union. So the question or the reason why I don't believe Europe is ready to Thomas is because it's not able to act as a political body. It's so divided. Also, institutionally between national states between a lot of institutions within the European Union, that there is no one who has a vision. What should Europe be where is it going? What does it want in the world, and it's very easy for other powers like the US like China like Russia to divide Europe time? And again, and that's why Europe is not an autonomous body in the international politics. Well mister Perry on what is the kind of European future that you'd like to see. Well, I would like to see an issue that we touched on. In fact, that small and medium sized countries and businesses for country is pass of bigger block, and we are going to see they shoe where in the future years to come. The will will be made up bigger blocks like the EU. And so on the world thing, each a person of sixty million people, whatever it is cannot be a major player, I don't think in future, but within the EU it could exist, great influence. I mean, the EU has p- hundred million people unless much bigger than Britain will ever be on the world faith e you can't quite possible Britain will not count in years to come, and that is something that our main within Britain up pushing big. Time you know that we all should be part of bigger block like this like that. You you have him so the reformed and basically, but have the influence which Britain as a small country would never have in pitcher. Let me serve Okinawa. What about you once? I would hope for more United Europe, that has a really strong leadership, and most of all has vision for its people. Thank you, Mr. Buch, man expert on Chinese and international politics. Feel Perry editor the I an investigative investigative of news about side in wells UK, and Dr Houghton had of the European studies, -partment, China Institute of international studies. Thank you.

European Union Europe European parliament Britain China mister Perry United States Brexit party European People's Party Germany UK Mr. Buch Mr. Trump Hungary Member States Brexit editor Russia European Union institution America
SYMHC Classics: Phillis Wheatley

Stuff You Missed in History Class

38:16 min | 3 weeks ago

SYMHC Classics: Phillis Wheatley

"Give yourself a little moment of happy with the day brightening thirst, quenching, mango, dragon, fruits, starbucks for freshers, beverage with tropical vibes served over ice. It's like a sip of sunshine. Download the starbucks APP to order ahead. Guys. It's bobby bones. I host. The bobby bones show, and a pretty much always sleepy, because I wake up at three o'clock in the morning a couple hours later. I get all my friends together. We get into a room and we radio show share our allies. We tell our stories. We try to find as much good in the world if he possibly can, and we look through the news of the day that you'll care about also your favorite country artists are always stopping by to hang out and share their lives and music, too, so wake up with a bunch of my friends. On Ninety eight point seven W Z Q in Washington DC, or wherever rotates you on the iheartradio APP? Happy Saturday everybody coming up this week on the show we have podcast. Subject has some parallels with Phillis Wheatley, since we have a previous episode on Wheatley thought it would be a good time to share this win out of Archive. This episode originally came out on March. Fifth, two, thousand, eighteen, so enjoy. Welcome to stuff you missed in history class, a production of iheartradio. Hello, and welcome to the PODCAST, I'm Tracy be. Wilson and I'm holly, FRY, so I've had the same experience multiple times last year, or so, which is that I've been walking through museum or a library and I've seen an exhibit on Phillis Wheatley and thought we really should do a podcast episode on her. That in that keeps happening for at least a year. While for various reasons, other topics wind up up at the top of the list so sweetly. Somebody who's basic biography I learned about and whose work I read in school, but it was only when I got into the research for today's show that I realized how various very incomplete a lot of that was, and how dramatically people's perceptions, and their interpretations of her life and work have shifted since the eighteenth century I mean. Mean people have thought wildly different things about Phillis. Wheatley over the years so today we are going to talk about not only Phillis Wheatley, who was one of only three people in North America to publish their work while enslaved, but also how her place in the world of literature, especially black literature rose, and then fell, and then rose again during her life, and after her death Phillis Wheatley was likely born in what's now Senegal or the Gambia in about seventeen fifty three. We don't have details about exactly where she was from or which African nation or people she belonged to. Even the connection to the Senegambia region is a little tenuous. The slave ship that took her to Boston. Massachusetts did stop there, but it also made several other stops in western Africa so it's really tricky to pin down. The crew moved south along the African coast as they tried to carry out the orders of the ship's owner Timothy Fitch which were to quote purchase, one, hundred or one hundred ten prime slaves phyllis herself. Herself did not really fit that description of quote prime slaves. She was about seven judging by the fact that she'd lost her front baby teeth. By the time she arrived in Boston. She was also small and she was in poor health. She probably would not have been purchased during the ship's. I stops in Africa only later on in a final attempt for the crew to fill that quota. They'd been given the ship. Ninety, five enslaved Africans aboard so phyllis may have been from farther south along the African coast possibly as far South as Sierra Leone. We also don't know what Phyllis wheat lease name was before she was taken from Africa or even what language it was in. The ship she was aboard arrived in Boston as we mentioned, and that happened on July eleventh seventeen, sixty, one with seventy-five enslaved. Africans still living after the eight week transatlantic journey. In August, John, and Susanna Wheatley purchased her, and they named her after the ship they bought her from which was called the charming phyllis also known simply as Phyllis. By the time the ship arrived in Boston Phyllis. Herself was in poor health that she was considered to be refuse, which was the term that was used for enslaved people who were too old, sick or injured to be saleable. Charles J Stratford, who was descended from one of Susanna Wheatley. Relatives described it this way quote in or about the year seventeen sixty one, a slave ship arrived in Boston harbor with a cargo of slaves, and Wheatley was in want of a domestic. She went on board to purchase and looking through the ship's company of living freight. Her attention was drawn to that of a slender frail female child, which wants enlisted her sympathies, owing to the frailty of the child, she procured her for a trifle as the captain had fears of her, dropping off his hands without emolument by death. John Wheatley was a prosperous tailor and merchant, and he and his wife Susanna had twin children. Mary in the FANEUIL, who were about eighteen at the time, and the family quickly realized that Phyllis was really bright John and Susanna gave their children especially Mary permission to tutor her. By the age of about nine just two years after she arrived in Boston Phyllis learned how to speak read and write in English in addition to doing extensive Bible study. She also started learning Latin and Greek including translating part of its metamorphosis, expanding it into the poem. For her children's slain by Apollo later on. She also studied literature, history, geography and astronomy, and she also read lots and lots of poetry. Her work is most often compared to English neoclassical poet Alexander Pope, but she read the work of other poets including some from the colonies one these was mather byles, who seventeen forty four poems on various occasions may have inspired the structure and arrangement of Phyllis his own book chew so veracious in her education that she was allowed to spend more time in study than in domestic labor at the Wheatley home. This was well before the rise of anti literacy slave codes, which were passed most of the south in the early nineteenth century, and made it illegal to teach enslaved people to read and write, but even so in the eighteenth century it was not typical at all to educate enslaved people, even though she had no formal education Phillis Wheatley tutoring and herself study also went well beyond what would have been expected for? Eighteenth Century White Women. In seventeen sixty seven two men from NAM Tuck it visited the Wheatley home, and they told a story about how they'd been sailing there from Boston when a storm struck their ship, they had narrowly escaped disaster. Phyllis overheard their conversation, and she wrote a poem about it, which became her first published work on Misters, Hussy and coffin, and that was printed in the December twenty first seventeen, sixty seven edition of the Newport Rhode Island Mercury. She was fourteen at the time. By seventeen seventy so just a few years later, tensions were rising between Britain and its colonies, although the Wheatley family were by all accounts, loyalists meaning that they were loyal to Britain. Phyllis sympathies were with the Patriots cars. She attended church, the Old South Meeting House which is a place that comes up over and over again in stories about the revolutionary war, and in seventeen seventy, she wrote two poems about relevant events of the day that made it really clear which side she was on the first on the death of Mr, Snider. Murdered by Richardson, she describes the murder of a boy named Christopher Snyder or CIDER at the hands of Customs, officer, Evans or Richardson. In, this poem, she describes Christopher as a martyr. The second is on the affray in King, street on the evening of the fifth of March seventeen seventy. It's not completely clear whether the second one, which is obviously about the Boston. Massacre has survived There is a poem with that name that was published in the Boston Evening Post on March twelfth seventeen seventy, but it was not signed while some critics say it's the same poem. Others are not so sure. As a pretty common way of describing the Boston massacre, which is why it's believable that two different poets could have written a poem about with roughly the same title. was also in seventeen seventy that Phillis Wheatley wrote the poem that would make her famous. This was called an elegiac poem on the death of that celebrated. Divine Imminent Servant of Jesus, Christ, the Reverend and learning George Whitefield Whitefield was an Anglican Deacon who toured the colonies that employed a style of preaching. That was incredibly dynamic and charismatic. He was really instrumental in the religious revival that was known as the great awakening. Happiest Poem titles. They all tend to run a little long. Phyllis wrote the elegy shortly after Whitefield died on September thirtieth seventeen seventy. It was first circulated as a pamphlet in cities like Boston and Philadelphia. In seventeen seventy one. It was reprinted along with the funeral sermon. That Ebenezer Pemberton had delivered on October eleventh seventeen seventy. This reprinting gave Wheatley an audience on both sides of the Atlantic especially after she sent a copy to Selina Hastings Countess of Huntingdon, in addition to his preaching tours in the colonies Whitefield had been the countesses personal chaplain. Almost instantly Phillis Wheatley became the most famous African in Britain, and its colonies very well known as a poet, and we'll talk about what followed and the now famous Phillis Wheatley writing career after a quick. Break! This episode is brought to you by the Mazda C. X thirty. I don't know that I've ever talked to read this on the show before, but I absolutely love to drive. It's something I've really been missing to be honest. And one of the activities that Tracy and I have been lucky enough to get to do. As part of this show was go out to California and test drive a Mazda C X thirty from Palm Springs to San, Diego and we talked with the designers and the engineers that worked on this car and And we realized that every single thing about it was planned thoughtfully from the tiniest increment of time you could possibly have to look away from the road to get all the information. You might need to the way that your leg muscles work when you break and making that the best possible drive for more information on Mazda and the first ever see thirty go to Mazda USA dot com slash iheart or better yet when it is safe to do so see the entire Mazda vehicle lineup by visiting your local area. Mazda dealer. Guys, it's bobby bones host the bobby bones show and pretty much, obviously, because I wake up at three o'clock in the morning a couple of hours later I, get all my friends together, and we get into a room and we do a radio show. Wish your alive. We tell our stories. We try to find as much good in the world. Possibly can, and we look through the news of the day that you'll care about also your favorite country artists are always stopping by to hang out and share their lives and music, too. So wake up with a bunch of my friends on ninety eight point seven, w. m Z Q in Washington DC or wherever the rotates you on the iheartradio APP. Phillips, we kept writing poems in the early seventeen seventies, although some of them were published in pamphlets and newspapers, she didn't really want to just scatter them all around publishing them and lots of different places, she wanted to publish them together in a book, and by Seventeen Seventy two. She had ridden enough to do it, but to fund this books. Publications needed to find subscribers to commit to buying the work in advance. I imagine this as sort of a colonial version of kickstarter. Either she or Susanna Wheatley you're possibly both of them. Working together started placing advertisements for this forthcoming book with Ezekiel Russell as its printer. But sometime that summer, Phyllis turned her attention to publishing in England. Instead, the reasons for this are not entirely clear. There are a number of accounts that claim that she wasn't able to find enough subscribers in the colonies, but they don't really site primary sources for that, but there is a seventeen seventy three letter from one of her subscribers. John Andrews of Boston. who suggested that it was really for financial reasons? Basically, she was getting better terms from a London press. The Not enough subscribers argument usually comes along with the explanation that racism was the root cause of her, not finding an audience in the colonies, and this was not racism as in white readers maliciously, not wanting to read the work of a black person. It was really racism as in white readers, disbelieving that a black person could have even written it. for the institution of slavery to. The way that it did in the American colonies had to rest on the idea that Africans were less than human, and were inherently less intelligent than Europeans, so there were definitely people on both sides of the Atlantic. Who thought that we poems must be some kind of fraud? Wheatley dealt with this by getting some of Boston's most prominent men to sign an attestation that she really was the author of her own poems. This included Massachusetts Governor Thomas Hutchinson Lieutenant Governor Andrew Oliver the Reverend Mather byles and the Reverend Samuel, mather nephew and son of cotton, mather, the Reverend Charles Chauncey and John Hancock. A copy of this attestation dated October twenty, eight, th seventeen, seventy, two appeared in Lloyd's Evening Post, and British chronicle in September of the following year, and a slightly reworded version of it was part of wheat Lee's first book as well and here's with the book version, said quote, we whose names are underwritten, do assure the world that the poems specified and the. The following page were as we barely believe written by Phyllis a young Negro girl, who, but a few years sense brought, an uncultivated barbarian from Africa has ever since been, and now is under the disadvantage of serving as a slave in a family in this town. She has been examined by some of the best judges and is thought qualified to write them. Although it's become part of the popular lore about Phillis Wheatley that this took place. There's no actual evidence that the undersigned men actually met in a group in interrogated her about her work. There's even a children's book. That hinges on the supposed meeting. It's actually much more likely scenario that there was a big meeting that was documented to have happened on October twenty eighth. And that she took advantage of this gathering of prominent men to stop by and say hey, would you please sign this attestation that I actually wrote my own work. This attestation was not the only step that she took and getting her book published in England and in getting people to believe that she had really written what was in the book? See also wrote to William leg, the Earl of dartmouth in October of Seventeen, seventy, two, sending him a copy of a poem she had written about him. The Earl had just been named secretary of state for the colonies, and she both celebrated his appointment in the poem, and included another attestation of her authenticity. This one signed by Nathaniel Wheatley. Phyllis also made a third connection to Selina Hastings, the Countess of Huntingdon the one who's personal chaplain had been the Reverend George Whitefield, the Countess Dartmouth and Susanna. We were all connected through the Countess of Huntingdon's connection, which was a network of evangelical churches and chapels. Phyllis dedicated her manuscript to the Countess who advocated for its publication in England through publisher Archibald Bill. Accompanied by Nathaniel Wheatley Phyllis went to London in Seventeen, seventy, three to oversee the publication of her book. Sometimes, this is also described as being for the sake of her health. She was definitely there to work on the book by this point, she'd established such a name for herself that she had a huge list of notable people to visit. Probably the name that people would be most likely to recognize. The day is Benjamin Franklin. He was at the time in London. If you've listened to the Daito Elizabeth Bell segment of our episode three astonishing bells. You'll recall that we talked about the Somerset case. And this was a court case decided in seventeen, seventy, two, in which Lord Mansfield rule that an enslaved person brought to England could not be sold back into slavery. In some places, this was interpreted as freeing all slaves in England which it didn't really do, but it did mean that. When Phillis Wheatley arrived in London the following year under English law, she could not be forced back into slavery. It's possible that this is one of the reasons that she decided to Publish her book. In England, rather than in the colonies, the people in Boston definitely knew about the Somerset case by the time she made that decision. Phyllis Wheatley first and only published book, which was poems on various subjects, religious and moral was published on September first, seventeen, seventy three. This is the first published volume of poetry by an African woman in the English speaking world. It included that attestation of her authenticity that we read earlier along with a letter from John Wheatley briefly detailing where she came from and how she had been educated and concluding quote relation is given by her master who bought her, and with whom she now lives. The book's frontispiece featured a portrait of her remained in the words Phillis Wheatley Negro Servants Mr John Wheatley Boston. That portrait is likely the work of enslaved African painter Scipio Moorhead, who was also the subject of at least poem to s m a young African painter on seeing his works. If you're wondering about that, wording of Negro Servant, a lot of people who were enslaved, were referred to as servants, especially in England and New England. A few weeks after Phyllis arrived in England Susanna Wheatley became seriously ill and phyllis returned to Massachusetts to her. Her ship arrived on September sixteenth seventeen, seventy three. Four days later, the Boston Gazette noted her arrival among notable passengers aboard her ship, calling her an extraordinary poetical genius. At some point not long after that Phyllis was manufactured by the wheat leaves in a letter to David Wooster dated October, eighteenth, seventeen, seventy three. She wrote quote since my return to America by master has at the desire. My friends in England given me my freedom. Her book had received at least nine reviews in British papers and many of those reviews had really condemned. The wheat leaves continued enslavement of her, so even though she could really have been forced to return to slavery. Somerset ruling after having been in England the wheat lease made that official Phyllis also took the precautionary step of sending a copy of her. Papers to contact. She had in London for safekeeping. We're going to talk about what we know Phyllis. Lease life is a free woman including famous exchange with George Washington, but we're GONNA I take a little sponsor break. Feels like so many books. These days are getting the Hollywood treatment and I am one of those people that has to read the book before I watched the movie. This is Dana, Schwartz host of the brand new podcast popcorn book club by talked for of my smartest and funniest friends, and to starting a book club with me where we read super buzzy books and talk about them every week. He was GonNa get an MFA and writing, and then write the book them, and then she reads there. Before, we go into the rest of the, but can we just all say our favorite Ruffalo, my Ruffalo of preference is from eternal sunshine at the SPA. Gladys good yeah, read the book along with us or don't know pressure this English class. We won't tell we're talking normal people by Sally Rooney I. Know This much is true by wally lamb the hate you give by Angie? Thomas so many more awesome books, all of them becoming movies and TV series. Then we watch, and also judge and talk about so join the club. Listen to popcorn book club on the iheartradio. APP ON APPLE PODCASTS or wherever you get your podcasts. By the time Phillis Wheatley Return from England colonies were definitely headed toward war with Britain. That was of course the revolutionary war. George Washington was named commander in Chief of the continental army on June. Nineteenth, seventeen, seventy, five and on October twenty sixth of that year Phillis Wheatley sent him a poem. She had written in his honor along with the letter. The letter read quote I have taken the freedom to address Your Excellency in the enclosed poem and Intrigue Your Acceptance Though. I am not insensible of its inaccuracies. You're being appointed by the Grand Continental Congress to be Generalissimo of the armies of North America together with the fame of your virtues excite sensations, not easy to suppress. Your generosity therefore I. Presume we'll pardon the attempt wishing your Excellency all possible success in the great 'cause. You're so generously engaged in. This poem ends with the widely quoted lines proceed grief with virtue on die side by every action, let the goddess guide a crown, a mansion in a throne that shine with gold, unfair trading, Washington be thine that Washington is in all caps. Washington's reply dated February tenth of the following year began with an apology for taking so long to answer it then went on to say quote. The Style and manner exhibit a striking proof of your great poetical talents in honor of which, and as a tribute justly due to you I would have published poem had I not been apprehensive that while I only meant to give the world this. This new instance of your genius I might have incurred the imputation of vanity. This nothing else determined me not to give it place in the public prints. If you should ever come to Cambridge or near headquarters, I shall be happy to see a person so favored by the muses, and to whom nature has been so liberal beneficent in her dispensations Im am with great respect, etc, etc.. Historians are divided about whether she actually met. George Washington in Cambridge. But it cracks me up that this letter is basically like I would have published this incredibly flattering poem. You wrote about me, but then people might think I'm vain. Perhaps to get around that accusation vanity. George Washington also sent the poem to Lieutenant. Colonel Joseph read enclosing it in a letter that talked about all kinds of other various unrelated matters before concluding quote. I recollect nothing else worth giving you the trouble of unless you can be amused by reading a letter and poem addressed to me by Mrs, or Miss Phillis Wheatley, and searching over a parcel of papers the other day in order to destroy such as we're useless. I brought it to light again at first with a view of doing justice to her great poetical genius I had a great mind to publish the poem, but not knowing whether it might be considered rather as a mark of my own vanity than as a complement to her. I laid it aside till I came across it again, and the manner just mentioned. Lieutenant Colonel. Read apparently took the hint. The poem was published in Pennsylvania. Magazine in April of Seventeen, seventy, six and other publications picked it up from there. With the onset of the revolutionary war, things got a lot more difficult for Phillis Wheatley. Susanna Wheatley had died on march, third, seventeen, seventy four, then the FANEUIL Wheatley had actually died a year before his mother Mary and John Wheatley both died in seventeen, seventy eight, so the wheat lease had kept Phyllis in bondage, but they'd also essentially been filling the role of her patrons without their support, she had trouble selling poems, and making ends meet especially, since the war meant that reader's attention was really focused on other matters. On April first seventeen seventy eight phillis wheatley in a free black man named John Peters announced their engagement. They married on Thanksgiving Day of that year, which was November twenty sixth. Most biographers have not been very kind to John Peters kind of paint him as a shiftless man who could not get his act together. But in reality, things were extremely difficult for free black people in New England during the revolutionary war, jobs were hard to find. The pay was often so low that it wasn't enough to live on so Jon. Peters tried his hand at running a grocery and bakery and a saloon, but he just was not able to get a stable financial footing under him. He also referred to himself as a doctor, and at one point practice law, and some biographers have made a great big deal of the fact that he didn't have a license to do either of those, even though there was not a licensing body that he could have applied. See you at the time. That was pretty common practice, if in this for people to hang out their shingle and say they were. Professional in a field where today we would have a lot more Paperwork and applications and approval before you could use those words for sure that is not exclusive John Peters at all. we really don't know much at all. About the last few years of Phillis Wheatley his life except that they seem to have been lived in poverty. John Peters wound up in and out of jail for debt, and Phyllis may have had as many as three children, although Renault records kept of their births or deaths, she died most likely due to complications from childbirth on December, fifth, seventeen, eighty, four at the age of thirty, one with most sources, agreeing that her newborn died on that same day. Before? She died Phillis Wheatley had ridden A. Book which she had tried to publish in seventeen seventy nine, but she couldn't find sufficient subscribers to do it again. This was during the revolutionary. War was difficult that manuscript. Has Been Lost John. Peters does seem to have gotten. His financial worries straightened out after the war was over and led an upstanding life from that point he is the last person known to have had access to that manuscript. He may have taken it with him when he eventually left Boston, but exactly where he went, or what happened to the manuscript is just not clear. Fifty seven of Phyllis Poem Survive Today Forty six of them were published during her lifetime. In Nineteen eighty-six, what was believed to be her last poem was unearthed, that was titled an Elegy on leaving, and it was published in Armenian magazine, which would later become methodist magazine in July seventeen, eighty four. This magazine was edited by John. Wesley the founder of Methodism, and it seems as though whoever sent the poem to him, incorrectly attributed it. According to research by Caroline. Wigan, it was really the work of Mary Wadley first published in her collection original poems on several occasions twenty years earlier. Probably an honest mistake somebody made as we've talked about before. Spellings were not very standardized at this period, so it would, it would have been easy for weekly and widely or wildly. To, have been spelled in nearly the same are exactly the same way. During, and after philosphy lifetime, her work was used by abolitionists as evidence that Africans were humans with souls and intelligence equal to that of Europeans, but not everyone had seen her work as evidence of the Intrinsic Humanity and equality of Africans Thomas Jefferson criticized. Her work has in notes on the state of Virginia in seventeen, eighty seven. He wrote quote. Misery is often the parent of the most affecting touches and poetry among the blacks as misery enough. God knows but no poetry. Love is the particular eastern of the poet. Their love is ardent, but it kindles is. Not The imagination religion indeed has pursued has produced a Phillis Wheatley, but it could not produce the poet. The compositions composed under her name r below the dignity of criticism. I want to time travel and maybe yeah I WANNA. Say Bad things. Thomas Jefferson and that's what's up. aside from Jefferson's disparagement, we lease work started to fall out of favor in the nineteenth century, as it was overshadowed by slave narratives and the work of People Lake Frederick Douglass this was especially true since Whitley's enslavement had taken place in such relative comfort. We don't want to downplay the fact that she was still an enslaved person, but it it. There were certainly stories that were a lot darker out there circulating so good in sharp contrast to the writing. That was tied at the time to the antebellum south. By the turn of the twentieth century, writers and critics were pointing out a range of perceived shortcomings and Phila- sweet lease work including that she wasn't personal enough. Genuine enough and she cared too little for other enslaved Africans in the words of James Weldon Johnson he was riding in the nineteen twenty two preface to the book of American Negro Poetry, quote one looks in vain for some outbursts or even complaint against the bondage of her people for some agonizing cry about her native land in two poems, she refers definitely to Africa as her home, but in each instance there seems to be under the sentiment, the lines a feeling of almost smug contentment at her own escape therefrom. In the early to mid twentieth century, people started to write Phillis Wheatley off as a second rate imitator of Alexander Pope. This sort of criticism really escalated in the nineteen sixties, especially within the Black Arts Movement, which saw wheat lease work as not nearly political or radical enough writing in the New Yorker in two thousand three Doctor Henry Louis Gates Junior described this way quote to black to be taken seriously by white critics in the eighteenth century. Wheatley was now considered to white to interest black credits critics in the twentieth. A lot of this criticism site sweetly poem on being brought from Africa to America and the first stanza of this poem reads Twas. Mercy brought me from my pagan land taught my benighted soul to understand that there's a god, and there's a savior to once I- redemption, neither sought nor new so in other words she's describing being brought from Africa to America as a slave as something merciful, because otherwise she wouldn't have learned about the existence of God and sought redemption. But, the poems second stanza goes on to condemn racism and hypocrisy among Christians leave owners, admonishing them to remember that to use her word. Negroes are also human souls who are able to enter the Kingdom of Heaven. Here is the second half of that poem. Some view are sable race was scornful I. Their color is a diabolic die. Remember Christians Negros Black, as Kane may be refined and joined than Djelic train. He also worth noting that this poem which has been used to just write villa sweetly off, completely was written when she was about fourteen years old, and if she had lived longer, it would have been thought of part of her. Juvenilia and not as part of her mature body of work. In criticisms that she never condemned slavery or simply not accurate. Here's a stanza from to the right honorable. William Earl of Dartmouth with reference earlier quote, should you my Lord while you peruse my song wonder from whence, my love of freedom sprung whence flow these wishes for the common good by feeling hearts alone best understood. I life by seeming cruel fate was snatched from Africa's fancy happy seats. What pangs excruciating must molest what sorrows, Labor in my parents, breast steeled, was that soul, and by no misery moved that from a father seized his Babe Beloved, such such my case, and can I then, but pray others may never feel terrific. Sway in that same book, Interdiction James Weldon. Johnson dismissed that poem as unimagined. In the last few decades, critics and scholars have started to take a closer look at we lease actual writing, which had previously been overshadowed by her biography and her general note worthiness as an enslaved black poet during the colonial era. Some of this traces possible African influences in her work, several literary critics including John C Shields and Mary Catherine Loving also interpreted her work as a lot more subversive than previous criticism had given credit for. So, it's hard to draw comparisons to specific African cultures, because Africa is not a monolith, and we don't know exactly where Phillis, Wheatley was from or what who were people in Africa would have been. But several historians have noted that multiple West African peoples us. As a central element of community life with these songs, most often being performed by young women, nearly a third of we leave surviving poems are eligible, and structurally they have more in common with African, allergies than with elevate poems from when she was living written in Europe. Another potential African influence on wheat lease work is in its imagery. Margarita Mathilde Odell wrote the first biography, which was published with an addition of her poems in eighteen, thirty, four in in the introduction to that biography Odell claimed quote. She does not seem to have preserved any remembrance of the place of Harney tippety or of her parents, accepting the simple circumstance that her mother poured out water before the sun is rising in reference, no doubt to an ancient African custom. The rising sun is frequently a repeated theme in wheat, least poetry, as well as plays on the words, involving son as in the male child and son, as in the bright blazing object in the sky. And then there's the fact that Wheatley was based on everything. We know of her obviously very smart. Her making connections in London and traveling there after the Somerset case was decided suggests that she was also politically very savvy. She also removed a lot of explicitly pro Patriot poems from that collection of poetry before having it printed in London and she replaced them with ones that would be more acceptable to a more loyalist audience, so it's really reasonable to conclude that she understood how she was being constrained by the world that she was living in, and she was crafting poems to be well received within that world, so instead of writing poems explicitly about the evils of slavery. She wrote poems about loving. And Freedom which, within her overwhelmingly white audience, and the colonies would be read as patriotism instead of as criticism. Thank you so much for joining us today for this Saturday classic. If you have heard any kind of email, address may facebook url during the course of the episode. That might be obsolete. It might be doubly obsolete because we have changed our email address again. You can now reach us at history podcasts Iheartradio, dot com, and we're all over social media at missed in history, and you can subscribe to our show on apple podcast Google podcasts the iheartradio APP, and wherever else you listen to podcasts. Stuff you missed in history classes. The production of heart radio for more podcasts iheartradio visit the iheartradio, APP, apple, podcasts, or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Hey guys. It's bobby bones i. host the Bobby Bones Show, and pretty much always sleepy because I. Wake up at three o'clock in the morning a couple of hours later I get all my friends together. We get into a room and we do a radio show. We share our allies. We tell our stories. We try to find as much good in the world that. That they possibly can, and we look through the news of the day that you'll care about also your favorite country artists are always stop them by the hang out and share their lives and music, too. So wake up with a bunch of my friends on ninety eight point seven W. Z Q in Washington DC, or wherever the rotates you on the iheartradio APP.

Phillis Wheatley Nathaniel Wheatley Phyllis Boston John Wheatley Africa Washington London bobby bones Phillis Wheatley Negro Nathaniel Wheatley Phillis Massachusetts Wheatley home England This magazine Somerset Wheatley George Whitefield Whitefield George Washington Tracy
S5:E10 Being An Overachiever

NWAP

51:52 min | 1 year ago

S5:E10 Being An Overachiever

"Hey, what's going on listeners is your boy, smooth order first of all just want to? Thank you for listening to the podcast and let you know that we got a couple of things going on. You got the five or five you can give us five bucks or five stars on itunes, the five bus go to the ended rape e test at cash up you could find the podcast on Facebook. I tunes Google play and YouTube at end in way, he cast which the website and debris p tasks dot com. Forget were also on Spotify. Ed and rupee test this season five enjoy the show. What what was going on everybody? Boy, smooth order. Welcome to negroes with the pie. I'll know by saying negroes would have breakfast, you never get the name of your own podcast. Right. Every you know, what it is is because I say it's so much like I feel like a MO Senator wrong. Like, I always say anyway, p negroes would a podcast, and then like when you like my brain goes on auto select start thinking of other things while I'm doing this generic comfortable, you remember the name of the podcast. Who's a nigga with the podcast? And I was like no we cannot. And I was the only person who was like, no we can't name it to everybody else is like it was like. It was like you never went live with that. Right. No. Fuck now. Doing the this is like in the planning stages. Trying to cast four fucking four and a half years ago. And we were like, yeah. We what are we going to name it? And then it became like a bunch of ridiculous names. And then some Atlantic writer who will not be named. Dez is like, yeah. I'm like guys guys. What are you doing? Why do you ever want? Anybody to hear anything that? We're doing right now. Right. Like, no. Oh, anyway. So I was thinking of the I always do the same intro whenever I do because that's how I do it. But I was thinking about breakfast at the time. Because that is to forty five and having eaten. Yes, Jose food. I came up with negroes or the breakfast anyway is smooth order that sounds like one of those empowerment things where we could sell tickets for eighty nine dollars breakfast. And income, right. Right. Right. I'm. Next up here and. Yeah, we're gonna we're gonna jump right into it today because you know, nigga got stuff to do which is actually how we ended up on this topic in the first place. So for those of you who don't know. I am currently in grad school. If you've been listening to this podcast for a while, you will know that I have also gone to law school prior to going to grad school, and therefore going to grad school may not make a whole lot of sense to you. If you didn't know that you're probably wondering why I'm going to grad school right now, which will get into in a second. Lex is a business owner slash director of vibes slash you. Good night. Good night. And I'm so mad. I'm so tickled about that. Because I did not expect you to disrespect me like that. Yeah. And today's is Nigerian. So like. Migas is we all have our own little backgrounds of like over achievement miss, which is what we're going to be talking about today's distress of being an overachiever. So since I'm talking I will go first. So I went to law school, and I graduated I did not pass the bar Allen took the bar once she know anything about the bar. Most people take the barks wise, and I want to pay for on and take it. And then I decided that I was going to do a career switch a mid career switch which I hadn't even started to career, but doesn't do a career switch to journalism, and I was a freelance writer for a while. I was doing all this writing stuff or whatever. And I was like what they're going to be like an actual journalists. Like, I wanna work in the field of journalism, which is how I ended up going back to grad school in January of last year, which would be two thousand seventeen I'm in the final semester of grad school, and I will graduate in six weeks. And when I tell you like I am neck deep in a sign. That's right now that I can't even like this podcast is getting in the way of my homework. Nagin burke. Thank you know. So that's kind of how I came into. That's that's where I'm at today before we even get inside arrested. This lex tell people you always talk about you being tired and shit. Like, what is it that? You'd be doing in often you'll be doing it because he used to have we used to do the podcast back. They used to have like an entire wall full of shit at you riding on. It on route. 'cause yeah, 'cause I'm just a weirdo used to have the whiteboard paint. And I did it on the whole wall. But since I moved now, Mike stressed out. Because I'm like, I don't think I wanna do that again. But I need derisive down. So there was a minute like a month ago. I just had like random as piece of paper stuck on my wall. And I was like, Nah, I just look like even more of a serial killer. So finally like for people watching the video like I finally got this little white or and put like a lot of stuff on it. And I just put like I have posted all over my room that I don't know. I'm a widow because instead of actually putting pictures up I put posing as a family photo put a plant here put a shelf here like I just overly analyze things. But a life has been crazy actually, not a bad idea. Well, I moved. I was like, oh, well ahead of idea of things I want to get at his don't have the money or having gotten stuff yet. So this is floor plant family photo. And I need to actually get some. So. This summer has been fucking crazy for me. I'm like extremely exhausted in overwhelmed, and I took on way too much. Couple of my clients were like extremely extremely needy not necessarily in a bad way. But like they just had a lot going on which has been cooler to work with them. But I I have my company I have to startups now at the one started balls working with a now branched into another startup trying to get this on my mastermind group off the ground that I started. It started doing another podcast when this podcast. Was trying to do some research. Depp. I could guess funding around. But because I started trying to do too much things started to slip. So for example from having like go auburn's wear. Okay. I have on my wall. One two three four five six people who want me to send him like a sales proposal about doing work in social media strategy consulting. I literally one of them is like weeks old announced getting awkward to where I'm like shit. You know, how can I how can actually do my work or take on these people? If I can't even get to standing them some shit like even get started. So it kind of makes me reevaluate like how I operating what am I systems? I'm doing too much of light bartering my time for money, and like how can I do things a little smarter? But I'm enjoying the things that I'm doing. I'm just like extremely tired. And I just try to do too much. All right. Don't they? By now, let's see. I work fulltime. I'm a I currently switched professions. Also. I think I talked about before I was doing research. Bob medical research announ swertz four time out of the lab into full time. Teaching and I'm currently a professor, I've poor course this on quarter. Teaching. Intro to body survey RG survey of anatomy, physiology on top of that I'm framing for America. Which is why every week I'm always late to the podcast 'cause I'm gonna. I'm gonna obscene amounts of miles. I just finished writing seventeen. Yeah. So this on on. I think. As far as professionally. I think teaching is. I've had a grading it is, you know, a bit of a step back when the math on. There's not stressful. So. Today for the doctor now. I thought it was kind of my first name don't even like being on it. Yeah. Are you name? Dr princeton. Ally. Yeah. So I noticed that. And I know that you said you took a step back from the lab before. But I felt like you were doing like a lot of you're juggling like a lot of different before. Like, I think you were doing the lab stuff. Now you like teaching like an online course. Yeah. So like, I'll go to grad school, and I work fulltime than our freelance right outside of that that I do this podcast in lex does like everything as she just said, and we were all in our early to mid thirties and into news case mid fifties. Because I feel like I have to do this and not that I I was actually gonna I was gonna get like why do we do this to ourselves or why have we done this to ourselves in the pension since you were already starting last August, go with you. Felt like a done this to myself because what I guess there's two Parsa. There's the psychological what's going on in my mind. And then there's the technical light because of the way life is these days where we don't necessarily have regular jobs. Are you know, there's more ability for you to create some shit like to do your aunt shitting actually, get paid. AM had bills to pay. So, you know, whether it's figuring out where money gonna come from from this from this from this from this like it feels like you have to kind of play the game across the board to discount wiscon- pops in times like it. Can you never know like, but you need to do things you actually care about. And then it makes it a little easier. Let's like a logically too. I feel like I'm making up for some kind of mistime personally, I feel like and I try not to think too much time in age and all that. But I'm like, I'm thirty three in. I know what I care about. Now a lot more like in the last year or so than before. And so it's almost like, hey, like, I know what I can do. And I just really want to get to a point of like being further up within like certain Fiona within this certain thing that I'm working towards and so it's just like super hustling to get there. I mean when you're in racing light you see the finish line. It's almost more frustrating at that point. Whereas see the in rest have to keep running versus, you know, before like I can't stop round, but it's just exhausting. Keep born. You know, what's interesting about that? You're talking about like you wanna get to a point where like everything sort of runs more efficiently or like that. You're you're not you don't have to juggle as many things because he already had the system Sam place at the. I think about this all the time. But I think about this all the time in in terms of like in terms of video games. Right. And what I mean by that is like all video games kinda have like the same sort of rhythm in a beginning middle and end in the beginning when you're start playing video game like whatever game you're playing like, you don't know how anything works like your learn the systems. You know, if you times you have to misuse resourcefulness. Right. You're you're basically trying to fill your way out. And maybe let in the the more you're able to fill your way out and stop in stop thinking so much about what you're doing automatically like processing. All right. This is having this has having disadvantage to do this. And if this do this in order for this to happen, right? You don't get that way to halfway in the game. Right. And usually at the end of the game, you're like, you know, so much about everything like you basically running autopilot. But like that middle part where like, I learned everything. And now, I'm in the groove of doing the thing. I always look at life like that. Like, I hate being in this is actually against mutant trouble. I hate being in the beginning. I hate basically like feeling around in the dark, right? Like, I hate that feeling of like, I don't know where the light switches to turn the light off. Right. But when I get to the part where I control the light switch. I all I love being in that moment. But it's like everything in my life is all it always. Feels like me searching around in the dark like I went to law school, and I graduated and I was like, yeah. About to be a lawyer that Dan pass the bar, and I was like, I don't really wanna pay twelve fifteen seventeen eighteen whatever whatever thousands of dollars. It was to retake the bar, but I really do enjoy writing. So I'm gonna do that. So then I did. And then I was like, yeah. Well, freelance writing and getting freelance checks is like wadley is like wildly volatile is is sustainable way to live like. Nick. And I work in an industry nigga still believe in paper checks, and they don't cut them still like thirty days after all, you know. You know, like I did an article for vibe, I wrote the article in August in like July, never like gear you're not gonna get the chance in September. And it's like. The negative torn a half months from now our be working because you never even know like when you're gonna have Jared getting Jenner when the checks come in. Right. And then like now like I go to school fulltime in our work fulltime. And like, I do the podcast and our freelance writing this like I joined doing the podcast. I enjoyed freelance writing actually like my job, and you know, schools are not that bad. But it's like you get into these moments. It's like, I hate everything doglike dot when it comes to the pike has because I'm supposed to be doing homework, and I can't do my homework. If I'm doing a podcast, I wonder freelance right because I enjoy freelance writing and those checks come pretty decently. But I don't have the time a freelance because if a freelance writing, and I'm not doing the homework that I should have been doing then I'm basically like doing something. Could've been doing something else. Like, the freelance should go. No is beater this homework. Not always going to be there. Trying to get this agree. Right. Like, I go to work. And I'm like, I can't always focus all works. I'm like nigga got like seventy five things to do as soon as I leave this. You know, what I'm saying the mornings I wanna give I asked in the movie. Nothing. I literally don't think electronic and think about it like as soon as I wake up in the morning. The only thing I'm the only decision on making the morning is am I going to the gym? And we're not going to the jet car. That's good. That's the only thing wrong. Because that's the only thing. That's all. I mean, I go to work at noon. So like we have about so many hours to like trying to finesse like alright jam we to some homework like, Jim I'm not going to the gym. And if I'm not going to the gym, am, I gonna do homework? If answers note of both questions, I'm not gonna do anything or one of the little charts where it's like, yes. One of those flow charts. Like, yes. Because my issue is like because it has so many things I'm thinking about it all at once all the time. So it's very hard to prioritize day hard to like him plant. Okay. Like shut up everything else. And let me just think about one thing. Right. But I didn't get to the I didn't get to the negative of that. I don't go to the gym in the morning. I'm gonna feel guilty. If I don't do any homework, I'm gonna feel guilty. So now, I'm going to work with. The guilt when I get home. Now, I have to turn around trying to make up for the fact that I do shit this morning, though, it works in dozen tuned jumping on here. So that that that guilt? You you act like, you know, where where I come from that I have to achieve. I think they growing up that how my parents always taught me like the devil on an idle mind outta my playground like ours can be doing something like a high school. I was like I play sports. Pay basketball, Iran. I was on on society. Pammy Nader's top of that had you know jobs on our still working in high school is oh. On that traffic into college into grad schools. I'm always doing something. So even now. I don't work on. I don't have class on Tuesday and Thursday. So you think that those days out just sit back relax note, our time, I sound doing something the holiday in a moment. I'm even more tired on days dumb. Rick than the days that I do work. I think that guilt that you know, if you're just doing nothing, then you feel like like a bum. Does that mean we've tied our identity into the wrong things if you feel like in can't just relaxed sometimes or is it just the state of life where it can't afford to just relax. I think it's like a coalition of both really like I think that like when I was going when I wasn't working when I was like unemployed unemployed. Like, I wasn't freelance writing. I wasn't doing nothing what I was unemployed unemployed. I felt like I spent a lot of time. And I was like depressed, I spent a lot of time trying to divorce this idea of who I am and the work that I do right by f-. Oh, like where we're imperil right were inundated with all this information. Like, you know, who you know, what you do who you are. You know, like the work that you do know speaks to you know, whatever. And I realized like at one point like my nigga job is just a job, right? Like the job has a purpose. The jobs purpose is to pay you. So that you can afford to live, basically. Right. So like before I used to buy all I want to be a writer have to be a writer at the rat the rat half the right half the right for a living. And it's like actually I don't like I have a skill set. That is employable that somebody will pay me for and as long as I don't hate going to work every day. If I guess I like I like my job. It's it's it has writing elements to it. But it's more like on the producing. So it's like I like my job, and I like going to my job. But my job doesn't define me. Right. Like, my job is what I do when I'm right or am as kind of like a passion of yours. That can make sense live more actual iron identity. Right. Maybe not excellent. Mrs -sarily. I we we I'll call it. What my my what am I friends is called caller dream adjacent? Right. It's not what is not. What your dream is. It's next to what you're like. My job has ready elements intimate. I do spend a lot of time writing this sort of writing that I'm doing is not my job. I mean, I was not my dream, right? It's it has an element of what I like to do. But it ain't it ain't my drain. You know, it wasn't my dream to be a news producer like that wasn't the case or whatever. Like I wanted to write essays in paragraphs in books and all that kind of shit. But my job allows me to do that on my own time. Like, I can still freelance right next. If I wanted to write books and essays and all that shit on my on my free time, I can do that. So I spent a lot of time just kind of divorce in this idea of like my job defining me. Because if my job defines me than what happened. How am I defined if I have no job, right? Like my job like how I do. Find myself can't be based on some shit that I don't have any control over his basically where I was going with that. But maybe it's also more than saying Jap injured anticipating a your defined by whatever principles. You see yourself as like maybe for me. I'm more defined by this feeling of like, I need to be successful. I need to be something in particular. However, I try to do that by like doing the most the I'm not it's weird. 'cause you talk people on their tail like, oh, let's take a break. Or don't you? Relax. I run you time yourself in is I got bills to pay. It's really hard for me to separate our to to understand what their lines are between. I do need to be doing things versus like, okay. It's still shitting be detrimental to yourself to be doing them. Natuna? When you mentioned the time like when you're unemployed, right? I've also been unemployed. So I as actually how I got back into running. So this is twenty thirteen and I was at my first fellowship NYU, and because of like the landscape of have funding for research in this country. It's like a very competitive field the lab hours working with in Hanlon funding. So my PI or principal investigator who was to the lab can can afford it to pick up or pay everyone salary. So. Since I I was taking pay the most obviously, I have to go. So I was unemployed for like from like, April until November. So. At that point time image. You realized you know. I think especially as as a man like not saying women can't hear this to the affect the man like, oh, okay. A lot of who. I am is tied up into what I do for eleven. And you know. I don't take. I don't take for granted. I do a lot of pains to keep myself busy because then at time I got back into running after taking a year off. I got every morning six o'clock in the morning. And ran I got my bartending license on. Bar. I never even bartended. I just got it. Because it's something I always wanted to do. And it's and it's things like that. They help you. Maintain a sense of having something to do. I guess. The. People say the ever take a break now, it's just real. But I don't think I have any other way. But I think. People say when people say like do you ever take a break? It's stressful hours things to myself like, and this is how I I do a lot of things in my life is a pro and Connie like among my my question is always what's the alternative? So working my ass off. I'm working I'm working two job going to grad school. I'm doing this relaxed doing this podcast, which is trying to, you know, trying to get us some money, whatever. Like don't to stop right. Do. I want to take a break. Okay. We'll look at the pros. I will probably be a little bit less stressed. Probably have a little bit more time to sleep probably have extra time. We just some work done. What are the cons nigga, yo bro as well? And it's like, you know. Not we're not there yet. I have MS the fucking don't. I want to give me a million dollars say we can't be France. Somebody gave me five hundred thousand dollars right now. It will make all my problems go away. Or budgeted seventy five thousand dollars right now on our problems would go away. Hundred racks are now tax rate. Maguy that take that take your eighty five percent of my problems. I was just trying to fit my student loans in about. About two hundred thousand we good evening to seventy five. We good to you. Take care take care of this the car payment credit cards, the student loan. I'm able to start from zero. And I think about that a lot like or that's not even any extra. I'll be right. That light. That's just enough to start you euro, they have a network of actually dollar, right? I think about that a lot. I think about that. I think about is like super negative dishes while to me, I really not worth anything. I'm a piece of it out here. A million on the president. So how about this man because tune day you brought up a while you're unemployed. I do not. Inc. Being an overachiever coverage with this feeling a need to be busy busy as in productive. But you just have to be doing something like even right now. I can't just do this podcast like picking for light. Nick at just do one thing at I think. It goes hand hand because I can be busy like you just need to feel lazy feel like you're doing some say even a productive to. I'm sorry. I could be essay I went and got a job at target, and I work fucking fifteen hour days. I'm busy. But then I was still feel like let's say they didn't want to work on target. But. Just needs to be something you like or want to do after I had to kind of progress. Yeah. And I wanna make a difference. Like when I'm when I'm teaching I'm making a difference. When I was a lab, I made a devil. Unlike because I think that makes it harder to personally for me where people are sending messages in like, man. I really felt when you said this when you talked about this or when this met people to see what they but Tanisha makes me feel bad. Like, Nah, I can't chill out about to watch Netflix show. Let me get back on my back on my shit, which I guess is is there a lot of times people will inspire slash motivate me by them failing inspire. But I just sometimes we wanted people to know lay dot added Navin feeling like a lot of times. So. I'll be dead S. That's probably why I have a quick the podcast yet is only because I know that this podcast was resolved in people be reaching out to us and stuff like that NS not to say that the only reason why I'm doing this podcast is because other people like departures face, right? Like I liked I liked I enjoyed. I mean, there's really only time I get to talk during the week for row for also. You know what I'm saying? So I definitely enjoy doing the podcast like that. But there's been times when we were doing the podcast houses. Like, you're like, I ain't got it in be today. Like, I need. Has hiatus. I was just telling lex before we started the puck has I'm not gonna take the rest of the month off his Bishop. 'cause like I really got like I'm have fallen behind my projects. Like, I'm basically juggling all three right now in a pretty even fuck in. You know, what I'm saying in a pretty even keel, but like mega? It's is rough. You know what I'm saying on rough? I've been behind for like a month. Folks. Thanks. And then a sex because you can get things done, but you can have four productive day and still like you're not really quite cut up. And so like Hannah has some I alluded earlier to it's a big thing about if you're gonna be an overachiever really really have to have a perspective of like forgiveness of yourself in like ink done. You know, what I mean like I can go all day working damn? I got to do things left to do. But I got things done in like really have in that perspective. Because otherwise like, you'll never be happy. There's always more. Let's talk about that. Let's talk about that. Let's talk about. Alah? Let's talk about that. Let's talk about doing. Forget for the forgiveness aspect of. Because when you're an overachiever, you're really hair on yourself. You're the hardest. Hardest person all yourself you carry all these different burdens like you got all different shit going on. Let's talk about that. For a second Sunday talk talk talk talk type about there for a little bit. So I have a raft better teaching this quarter. Is there as the day the post notes each day? I would have like my planner on my phone, but I hate digits of sun. I always like writing shit out and taken off the ice to have the posted notes. And to me, they got like, I would leave a post note here. Then forget whatever I need to do about alpha planner. So each day. I ran out to do my list. Like today. My listens like has ten on it. So if I get to like, if I don't do any eight out of ten I might mail FARC. Man thinking about it. I I'll I'll dream about the days. Like, I got a. Shit real. But it takes it takes so much like break the habit. Let s that's not it's not healthy. It's better ways to make listen to do is to. But we'll get to that later. If if not happy at all like, I I don't know like if you're dream, I figure not you're not getting ready to go sleeping and you get up next morning. You're tired. Wait wanting to know why I would like to podcast run late. I wanted to run a seven to eight because also tired this morning 'cause last night. I make an exam and finished the exam. Like, I said, I did it today. Like, I feel like we have to like put ourselves in the habit of not not being ourselves up. When we don't get like everything that we need to do because it's a downward spiral. It's on man. I ain't get everything done fucking chill or it's well, you're down on yourself. So it makes it even harder than next day. Like he started out in kind of a negative move it focused more on action because action breeds action. Like, why get done more? You feel good about yourself. You. It's like you build confidence in yourself, the more you get done too. But it can focus on that part of it makes a lot of difference. It's just taking a step back. Sometimes like breathe think about it. I am. I'm good. Yeah. I try to make like, and I'm and I'm sure this isn't like uncommon like try to bargain with myself like love model, we're not gonna get everything done the day. So how much is it that we can get done? I wanted to play video games today. Right. Red dead redemption to came out haven't played the shit since the first three hours. It came up. You know, I haven't played it should basically since it came out. Like, I play the intro. I haven't played it since then or whatever. And I started to I went and went to the barber. Shop got my got my lineup or whatever like this. When they get the car lost with the car wash. They wasn't outside. And I was for to come home for the play some video games. Do the pike as do my homework after that and up shit you up? I got an a car to drive home. And I was like if you start playing video games, and you do that podcast. Not gonna do your homework in don't do it. If you don't do something if you don't do a portion of their homework today that you have to do all that should tomorrow. And you know, you gotta go to therapy tomorrow. And if you go to therapy tomorrow therapies at two o'clock, you try to go to Jim in the morning, you're going to fuck in the whole week off. Because you didn't start the day. You start the week might all be ever. Appier lion. Damasio? Oh, yeah. I mean, my I'm off on Thursday and Friday. So I start my I start my like that's how I start my week. I start my week on Thursday, basically. So I go from Thursday Friday, I'm off in without the Wednesday or whatever like that. But it's really because I worked to thirty to eleven thirty on Saturday and Sunday at ten o'clock ten thirty meetings on Saturday and Sunday, I try to fit like the gym in between. They're like, I know they like Saturday and Sunday is kind of a fucking wash. I try to do like work at work. Sometimes when I can you know when I can get it over like that. But we're next to unpredictable. You know, so I don't depend on that to be look at that. As a bonus like old like do work all have to do homework while I'm at work, then that's good. But I don't go into work thinking, I'm going to do homework at work. You know, saying so Thursday like Thursday and fighters are really really big days for me in terms of set in the week off in the right direction, and I came in. And I was like all right. So how about this? If you finish to assignments. And then you do the podcast you play video game. Oh games. After that. You know what I'm saying? And then that way 'cause like will will really happen is I'll start playing if out if I was like fuck it. I'm not doing work today. I'm for the play video games. I'll start playing video games. Now won't be able to enjoy playing video games because I'll be thinking the whole time. I should have been doing fucking Homer. You're earning. You know what I'm saying? If I do this effectively gonna do this and do that. I. Like, I trying to go she ate too much. And then I'm just stuck in my head. Yeah. I can't I can't like either gotta do the thing or I'm not doing thing. Like, I'm either going to do the work or I'm not going to do the work. But I can't do like a piece of the work. Like, I finish I Iran like today, I read my chat to finish my quiz. But it's like. Finished my quiz. But like I can't like halfway read and do something. And then try to do something else. Like, either gotta finish the reading finish the quiz. Do one exercise that I'm good like, I can I can I can breathe better after that. But if I don't do that shit like I'm playing video games with the guilt. Face the whole fucking top. Why it's fucking insane. Like the way my brain. Like makes me do these things. I don't know. We've got off lucky triggered. 'cause like too. That's an effort way will probably I'm like, all right? I'm I'm about to get on pudgy. It's not the night playing pudgy now. Right. It's a rapid night. What is that? If a game players are known better. So I if I if I stop playing now. I'm not going anywhere done. I'm tired of shit the morning. I'm not getting I'm not getting the molecules. I forget, so whatever. Right. Like, you can't even you can't even like for real focus on the shit like 'cause you just like you'll brain. You're not locked in all this other shit going on at this is and it's like if feel different than when I finished everything. Now, let me sit down in waste the next seven hours killing people online. It's not like, I don't have time for fun stuff. Or why can't we basic ill? Like fuck it. What does that mean? Now like, we don't wanna over team like to be. We don't want better for ourselves. It's. At the end of the day. Honestly to me that you know, what I'm never. I'm always wanted to be better. So that means it's just like, I'm always telling myself, I'm not good enough. So you have to be real careful about that. Right. Because you know, what I always obviously be like man like when I told me a long time to realize what ignorance is bliss means like what it really really means. In like, the in the in the context of life is like if you don't know something that could possibly hurt you like you have a greater chance of being ignorant of something that can possibly hurt you. Then you do of thing that can actually help you. Right. So that's why I said it's blitz because your ignorance all the things that could possibly hurt you and you'll be fine. Like if I didn't feel like I was talented enough to pull all the things off and on pull enough. I didn't Fleck I could do these things I wouldn't have to do these days. I'd be a lot happier because I just wanted to work or play video games all day, right? That that all rely. Don't you work in field? Yeah. I don't want to you know. It's funny about that too. I actually saw that somebody's enemy worth somebody said, you should be passionate about the work. You do but you should not work in your passion. And I was like mega finger snaps, bro. Bigger silent. You should be like, I'm a news producer right news producing is not my passion. But I am passionate about doing a good job with newspapers. Right. My passion in. I'm just talking about something. I was straight passionate. It didn't bring me when I say like passionate. I mean, something that doesn't bring me like any type of money any type of fame is something I do purely because it makes me happy is video games. Like video games is the thing that I do like that. She don't have nothing to do with. No about somebody's had never knew nobody else tomatoes. Streams video game so much or get out of your fucking about. None of that big of the controller. I the PlayStation Biden, and whatever it is that I'm playing it just blocks me out from whatever. The fuck else is going on in my life, unless I actually have some fucking work you do right? Video games are my passion. But I should not play video games for a living. I am not the kind of I should play video games for a living. Right. So be passionate about what you're doing. But don't. Don't work in your passion. I can be passionate about my the fact that I produce the news, but my passionate video games not something that I should actually pursue as like a way to make a living. No. I I I like to quote because I feel like when when I anx in. Yeah. I'll say for me, I can't speak for anybody else. But for me once a thing that I liked to do has a monetary value attached to it. It takes the fun out of it. Okay. I can see that. You know what I'm saying? Like, I enjoy playing video games like a motherfucker. Right. But if you told me that I had to get up every single day at eight o'clock in the morning, I play video games from eight o'clock in the morning to eight o'clock at night in the entertain people and added keep content going do you to I don't wanna do that shit anymore? Because now, it's work. Okay. I can see my I I might like it. But now like I can't play video games outside of that. Because this is my job. You know what I'm saying? So I I really that was a quote that really really hit me made me feel like it just kinda like reaffirmed some things for me and my head like, I know you love running right soon day. Yeah. But I mean, you run at your. I mean, you you might be like a special case because you really do like running. But like if somebody was like, you gotta run three hundred sixty five days every single day at not right at this time that we tell you at this place that we tell you you have to do this after you ride like every single day where structuring your day based on this downing Arizona pay me enough. But I wouldn't love it running. But you right. But it wouldn't be a thing that you're like I'm just gonna go running after work because I spend all day doing having to feel like you have to do anything. Right. And that's where your, you know, the thing that you feel passionate. I mean that they nights you're passionate about or whatever. But yeah. Let you said something about being overachiever Neo. It would I cannot get enough. That fuck yourself. Stay like, yes killer. Do you wanna Atlantic? Remove when people are telling you how awesome you are any like trying to not will meet I guess, I always for me like China, not d- dean value their statements in except whatever they're saying. But it's hard because you know, what you could personally doing so much more or different or better or whatever. Yeah. Same here like. But you gotta stop me. Like, you're right. Like, I am doing this. I am doing that. Cool. Thank you. Remember just earlier in this conversation. You ask me like your standard like Dr to your name? I think a lot especially my parents, they they tend to like overplay that shit like the same time like their friends. Oh, he's a doctor whatever. And I am always always downplay it, and I hate when people army that it has always feel like I can do better. And I know people who are doing better. So I'm not gonna you know appearing race, my achievements. Man, I'm trying to find this. The sable quote because under listening to the album care for me, which is fucking fire, by the way. And he says something about like, this is like the more people more people give me prompts like the the less. He essentially said the more people give me pops like the less. I feel like I deserve what I'm doing? You know what I'm saying? And I think that speaks to what you were saying earlier, it's like you're where you work so hard, it's like people compliments you or they give you processes like for some very strange reason, it doesn't make you feel better. If somehow magically makes you feel worse and site is is this this weird car went through you said what that's not really right though. No. I'm not saying what you mean. I mean, they shouldn't be that way. Right. He it shouldn't be that way. Like, yeah. Definitely definitely understand that you know, what I'm saying. But it's like, it's it's like why like why why why do these things you know, what I'm saying? Like, why do these things happen? And I think too rapid. I mean, you know, it's a wrap it all up or whatever slide into like the ending of it. I think it goes back to and I think he might have actually kinda discussed this the beginning is like who are we doing these things for lamp? What am I doing them for me doing them for you? And my doing them for fighters. I don't worry about the haters, but am I doing it for like my little brothers and sisters at watching me am I trying to prove something might try to affirm? Something about myself is there some negative thing that I'm holding onto that I'm constantly trying to fight against there's some is this trial that dealing with. You know, says this trauma that I'm not dealing with that I feel like I need to keep doing this thing in order to get away from that trauma. But I'm not it's not dealing with the problem because I'm still, you know, faced with these problems. Like, what do you guys think as far as your own personal concern? Keep your opinions about me to yourself. Who are we doing for? Like, you said at the very beginning the podcast on Nigerian. So most Nigeria turns. When they have children read only three acceptable professions must add out as a doctor lawyer or intimate. And my mom told me from you know, timeouts animated school. I guess you saw most promising me because my brother. Very I'm saying they want very gifted academically. So she put it at Nigeria in my head early on that you're going to be a doctor. So that's the career path that I chose even though my favorite subjects in high school were math and history as they will chose science has a major in my life science. But. I think originally that's where like my like I said early. Also, I never wanted to be not busy. 'cause my parents always put that here that you have to be doing something. And you can't just sit around the house, even though in even though, you know, all your choice, you guide me doing something. So I think it came from my parents, and it just it just you know, multiplied or or just progress after that. So I'm gonna bring them. When in doubt, blame your parents. Lex. Probably came from my parents them. Yeah. Ideas are like I need to be perfect or I don't wanna let them down or like everything comes as sounds airgun. Everything comes pretty easily to me. So always try to do everything. And I don't have many failures over all. And yet I still feel like I'm where I should be. And so I do this because I'm trying to assess myself as I thought I I do this. To valid day. What I think everybody else thinks about me, which I don't feel is true haters now not for haters. Nobody people don't have tell me like that. And are they don't do it loudly. I don't I don't care about anybody who doesn't care about me period. But there's a lot of people who do look to me. I have people hit me up like last week. I had like three people hate me about cannot be their mentor. Unlike I got like three dollars. But okay. I mean, I just I just feel like there's a lot to prove to myself. But I feel like that's a cliche answer. And I don't think that's quite deep enough. I don't I don't know who I'm doing it for necessarily. As when I get this money. Cargo. I mean, I feel like I've gone through different stages of who I'm doing this thing for I think I've found until point where it's like I am actually doing this for myself. Now, like, I think when I first started I was doing it to Jamaican. So I'm a Jamaican were immigrants. So we, you know, you're indoctrinated. I mean, like tuna Santa by Nigerians like nobody friendly was really trying to hear. No, she does the lawyer lawyer nets. We didn't we didn't even have a discussion about no other shit. You know what I'm saying? So that was kind of what I did, you know, then like when I was when I didn't pass the bar, and I was unemployed. I was really confused about like what it was that. I wanted to do I wanted to right. That's what I wanted to do. But that shit wasn't paying no bills. You know, like I was in a relationship, and I was trying to figure out like how I'm gonna like maintain sustain will be going on as I try to get some fucking work or whatever like that. And then now, you know, like I have like five brothers and sisters like, you know, your mother always, you know, you know, your role. Model and you know, that kind of stuff or whatever. So like, nothing is the surly donor for them. But I was aware that they were watching me. You know, what I'm saying that my mom was my mom would be relying the stories that were happening with me to them in hopes of inspiring them to do better, you know. But like, I think now like, I think grad school poly, just makes everything a lot more pressurized or whatever. Because if without grad squad politics, we live in a regular asked life from now, I mostly I ninety seven percent of the time on just doing the Schiffer me like I work at the job that I work at because I like working there also because I like getting my bills paid money March. Oh, but you know, go to work to you know, what I'm saying. Like, I I write articles. I don't the end because my job pays me. Well enough. I I don't have to like pitch articles that I don't care about righty. Because before it was kind of like, just write whatever it is. It's going to get paid. As I'm the boss right now. I right. You know, if I have a good idea for an article, I'll pay somebody now black. I'm right this article because this is what I want to see like, I don't even think I don't think about what other people want me to write about. I think about what what kind of article that. I would want to read. And then I write that article. We do podcast when we talk about stuff. Like, I talk about stuff that I think that you know, I would want to hear somebody talk about to for whatever reason today ended up being about being a fucking overachiever because I'm in-between this island's right now. But you know, that's kind of what came up. So I think I'm getting better about I think I've gotten better about getting into more things sort of serve me in the way that I need them serve me as opposed to like, I only keep his lights on because when you gotta worry about how you gonna keep the lights on a lot of shit that you don't want to do because. I feel like I enjoy everything that I do and everything that's on my plate and yet it's still too much. So so what's the problem? I mean, it's like ice cream nigga you love you like ice cream, right? All right. What do you? What are you something that you really liked the? Attackers. Okay. Does last night. Right. So Zuniga hand you hundred affiliate talk contests right now. Like, it's like diminishing returns as the first tacos going to be like the most luscious taco that you ever had a second SoKo was going to be equally. As firm that out earlier is still needs to be on your terms. Like just because you write it. You have to do shit. Is. It makes everything you eat that fourth taco, you won't be lie. All right. One hundred taco by fun taco yet. You'll be live. Eydelie letters. Like many ship. No more. You don't say about one hundred fiftieth taco, you probably won't be in the ER. So I mean is basically I think every I mean as everything has to be done in moderation. Right. Like, you can take on pro. You can take on five projects that you love to do because you have these individual passers at U you love to do these things. But if all five of them negative got five deadlines that are like all five deadlines are due at these disparate points in the calendar where you have other shit going on like then it becomes a burden. So it's not necessarily. It's not always the work. That's the burden. It's the life portion that comes tash with the work as the bone. Again. I see I see you processing like I see I see going on in there. I wanna be content with being a bomb. Yeah. Sometimes that's real. That's real. That is absolutely the fuck real. But I mean, you know. Album Necas, tell me go. No, I don't I just want that like why did the talented tenth? I don't understand. I never understood that term at a scene reference to like kids in school or something like that. Now, it's like a. WBZ bois. He like came a concept that like a camp percent of black population is gonna garage to the top and do things and then come back and pull up the other nine hundred percent. Okay. Yes. We all energy in the top ten percent. Basically yet. I do not believe in the talented tenth. I really was is offering that idea. All right. I know lex gotta go, and I got homework. So got any final comments, then I can. I leading to tune day came right off his seventeen miles, stinky as run them. So hopefully, we see y'all next week. But I'm at a lot of assignments came. Our per screen shot this episode and tell us like how you deal with overachiever and stress because I'm interested in like we didn't talk too much about things that we do to try to like stay sane. We did a little bit. But I'm always down for some tips. All right same here. Well. Alan, oh, if you're gonna be back next week. Hopefully, we will not opulent here solo told to do. Maybe that will give some slight everybody solo up. So it is talking about what you wanna talk about Chit. I'm running name 's organic down for that. Let me know that way we need to have next episode. Give gulford a break. But I think in the season five episode chain holiday child sometime in the near future.

Lex writer Nick Jim I producer Iran Spotify Facebook rape Google Nigeria Senator Dez Ed Migas Nagin burke Mike basketball YouTube
Zero Ego | Ajahn Brahmavamso | 6 March 2020

Buddhist Society of Western Australia

1:02:17 hr | 5 months ago

Zero Ego | Ajahn Brahmavamso | 6 March 2020

"So for today's talk is made a tightening before I go eat a peaceful I remembered. I just come back from Indonesia on Tuesday. Giving some talks teaching meditation over. There had a wonderful time really working hot because the POKES which I've eaten over there really really really popular so popular TV in the main Bookshop chain it's called Gramedia told the my book see the opening. The door of your heart which was translated into Indonesia is the all time number three bestseller in that bookshop chain routed easier and the manager of the book shop said Please please please. Please try to improve to get to number talk number. One number two is the Bible the number. What is Karan? Okay big trouble if I tried to do any further but anyway it made this of all these people come to my talks. She's a couple of thousand on average and lots of people are learning meditation but thinking what can I put my talk about today? The title of the whole tour. It is amazing. It was cold zero eager. No self no eager. The wow what a wonderful title for. This evening's talk because sometimes you say how come when you sort of get so well known. Can you let how to disappear as well IGA? This is important to be able to do this so I have great fun being a monk. Learning how to sometimes disappear. Third me just in meditation as I see. That's quite an easy thing to do. But sometimes when I travel around the world or anybody Ghanem Honesty. Sometimes you can sort of vanish. People don't know who you are at that time some years ago when I was building. He's C- Produ now in the monastery. You see the DON's monastery Jonah Gov. You'll often see many of the monks out the with a Shovel Smith chainsaws with the wheelbarrows IDA 'cause with me with the trowel lane bricks building stuff and one of my favorite occupations. Which people don't let me do might. Perhaps I should volve it. Where people aren't watching is mixing concrete. I don't know why but what I see a concrete track. Say Wow what a wonderful machine that is because I've missed so much concrete in my life building body down on a stay and there. Was this what occasion? I was there with the other box shoveling in the sad shoveling in the sermon shoveling in the Blue Mental. And People say oh. Don't do that involving get a truck for you and get. Some work has no. I love this stuff. It's almost like a hobby. Enjoy it afterwards. You can actually say what you've what you've done they get some so much fulfillment they have a house or a Kuti. A place where you know you can come and stay. Like the the patio over in body non-monetary which is ago so you can actually have your lunches so all. This is my giving my love that sort of stuff but the problem is when people see me they keep saying jump out too old to mix concrete he then all the last time. I really did any serious. What was weighing in the John Glenn? Meditation Retreat Center. I was on top of the roof fixing some plumbing hours. Quite okay until somebody. Somebody took a photograph of me and they put it on the Internet. They shouldn't have done that. I go all of these these comments from people at the Prom. You're too valuable to on top of a I won't fall off not taking affording off which is wondering if the rafters can withstand your weight. But anyway when I was pleased exclusive story but but icon is busy mixing concrete one day and of course you get very dirty. I just get cement all over you got your work clothes on and sometimes you see some of our mocks diner body modesty paying Tony here on there because we work as A. I was coming back from the work site and this every refined straight line can put his came to see me. She was actually. She's coming possible path and so she took one look at me and he said Oh. Do you know where I can find at Jan Brahm. I never let on John Brahm because I didn't look like at Brown thirty Ruffo monk so the gate quickly. I still gotta good Brian. I said if you go down to the whole over there he probably be fifteen minutes and it worked perfectly. Fifteen minutes was enough for me to take a shower put on clean role and Godspeed to this lady and she was asking questions about Buddhism and meditation the Monastery. She was really impressed and afterwards afterwards. She said that's wonderful. You know I'm really glad to meet you. Watch I'M BOB. You've got a beautiful monastry except for one thing I said. Well what is she said? On my way here I met one of your monks and he was very dirty and badly dressed. That should not happen in your monastry and I said Oh oh I'm terribly sorry Ma'am I'll talk to that monk later. She never realized it was me. So that's wonderful wife. I want to go incognito disappear and vanish and how it's not recognizable ego. It's great to walk because when you work. Sometimes people don't think that's what a senior mark is supposed to do other stuff other stuff. I'd love to go public transport. No just going in a car from place to place when I go public transport wherever I can next trip is over to Sydney a Monday and I made sure at least. I'm trying to mess up. My plans. Made sure to Oba Kat. Von Opel Kadett is. Is this little? Cardi go travel on the buses and trains in Sydney. Great Fun and safe. Anyone recognizes me. Sometimes they do sometimes. They don't do this great when they don't like. When I was on the underground trains in London on the underground trains I was sitting calmly mighty my own business and a woman came sat right next to me and she said to me said are you. Put this monk. Yes is it a real one which you said I thought a fight? What is real smile? Oh great wonderful. Just can I ask some questions about Buddhism and she was really interested now because you are a monk in the public space and people come and actually us you questions even here. I'll try to be as open as valuable as possible but how many of you are. How many of them have made it impossible to give you all that time but on a trade are going through the tunnels of London. But it's easy like it's been quite a Twenty twenty twenty five minutes talking and it's not just me talking all 'cause I know this. I used to live in London all the other passengers on the train. Also listen without a bitting or the heads down here but there is open if there were Kangaroos 'cause kangaroos. You can know who they're listening to because there is actually move and you can actually see the issue because there is a living this way that way can give us a really good but anyway. I was giving of some offices to our questions. And of course then. We came up to the question about reincarnation. That's part of Buddhism repairs. So what about that and I said Oh. Yeah that's interesting. You tell me asked me that question because about a month early two months earlier. I was teaching the retreat here in us on this. It's highly Tighter he came and told me this really weird experiences he had in meditation Italian. Okay so it is meditation. He had this feeling almost like we did experience that he was a piece of Spaghetti. Now we do have some very strange experiences in meditation. That's way out there. In this is the most experienced police also said this is not the first time he said another day. Amaya treat my retreat that he felt that he was a piece of Ravioli and I had to sort of open my mind than think. Make peace get some insight. What's going on thinking you're a piece of Ravioli and then you're a piece of of Spaghetti and of course when you have enough experience of meditation the Institute comes up and it was office. I should've caught straight away and I said Sir you're recollecting. Your pastor lives got a good response there but that was actually true. I tell that story on the the crowd in London. I deal with a Magic Marvin. I wish somebody had a video. It hit because I'll maybe about forty or fifty people in the character and the time and they all start reading. A newspaper actually texted. They all looked up at me. Half of them laugh the other half growed brought mind at least I will listing all the time but this this is what can happen when you just see. An easy tend to be a big Monaco as small small. Might you can have a wonderful time with people because sometimes if you to become a celebrity. Oh this is such a such a pain in the baton you outside and you think is people always listen to expensive subject wise subbed. I say something stupid and they said Oh. I don't understand that but it must be profound going on thinking Osceola. Sometimes I like it when I can disappear. What was that other Taiba discipline. Because I love also love grades conferences because at conferences you can actually sit in the back and vanish all. You can get past present and all sorts of different things in conferences. Because you you practice zero ego. You can just give a talk about here. Over in six. Last idea was radio. I wish one of Fred's DOT com. These are public but anyway he invited me to his six. Pr Said you've got all these people call back radio too busy. Not just. I've got so many other things to kind of just Watson said okay. I'll come after the Friday night. Talk because that's the time I'm in town and other times Centaur overseas or somewhere. So he said Yeah. Okay after the Friday night come to the studio put you inside the the thing where they give the ads talks the talk back which is get you on the show so you know what it's like here for me after the talk. I ask any questions and everyone is quiet so we finish off then. There's all these questions so hard to get outlets eventually managed to rush out and get into a car and go into the East Perth. Get get into this huge as I was I already made. It had to rush through again. The student as soon as I sat out in the studio red lights came on and the microphone was right in front of me headphones on ready to actually performs ten o'clock ten o'clock to midnight show. I don't listen to the radio so I don't know what type of show those on between ten PM and nine and midnight. Pavley was one of those shows on. Addow themes okay. I should have done some research or you guys should have helped me out. Wadley out of time so there. I was two hours taking calls from the general public. All the most intimate matters of their life as a Buddhist monk. Well first of all I still remember this interview. It was too hard to pronounce my name. Jon Rahm so we just had to agree really quickly called me. Mr. I don't mind AK- call me Mr Murray. He wasn't doing that out of this. Respective it's not just to the interview Mr Mark and he said not to introduce Mr Martin put his senior big following. Most books written your questions this evening and also regardless. I think I remember her night. Mrs Dr Morrissey who is the author of many well known books in Australia on sexual things? And that's when I saw what got myself into doubt there's one thing about which I've already noticed in my celtics this into the questions and the answers now as it comes out from you on the usually pretty good onces and they were the point. And that's the whole two hours about ninety percent of questions honestly. We're covering this question Mr especially all the time. There's something about that which was sort of Just wanting me interested in getting some information from the general public and giving onces mostly just being kind too hot and then being so superior. Because I'm amount that's just see what ego it's hold. Geico listening and respecting you can do. When you do have to respect other people could. That was something which again I missed. I learned that especially going to prisons to answer your question because I didn't know what to do and I. I went into prison to teach meditation just to talk to prisoners. Who is it was something with? Very few people wanted to dangerous places in those days sexually. So yeah you went in there and that's one of the things which I always remember to the people. I met inside a child's as Western Australia or some to other channels as well in our world that the people I the human beings does some very bad things but there's more to them than the bad things one thing I was amendment spectrum covered. This is part of my training part of loving kindness. You always say my all beings be happy and well maybe free from pain and suffering. All beings receive forgiveness mentioned saving. Today's to somebody. They said it was a strange statement. We cannot understand it. Say what. I'm angry and cool. I feel like powerful imperial because understand that she's doing something you know your your your matter listening and we said yes and it'll be more powerful enough to give food especially if it gives something which is people find so difficult to forgive is incredible power. They're being cruel is easy. Forgiving is really difficult and if you can actually get their energy up and that a lot of time it's courage not so much energy that sense of why not then actually you become incredibly powerful person and is a powerful event to see that every now and again somebody sends me something really interesting article and I get. I should have kept this article but try and have few possessions and few things but this was a case of a lady who was probably one of the most unfortunate. She was an identical twin in Germany. June the Second World War. She was Jewish so she got in touch with her identical sister in Auschwitz hundred that terrible to Mingli Daughter was the one who was so now. Her sister eldest daughter about the same age identical twins to be the same age not but the identical twin was the one who was tortured and killed. She was not badly treated but she survived and of course so much trauma of those days so much pain so much anger and wanting revenge but the no she grew older and older and older that tended to be get less and less than this as you became wiser more compassionate then she actually found out the one of this terrible dot mandates assistance was still alive and she went to see him. She went to see him to give him forgiveness. She told what it was lacking was sincere and she soon as I forgave this this person who just talked to the murdered in front of me my sister and caused me so much pain difficulty my life since I came that forgiveness sincere forgiveness. I was no longer victim anymore. House of Victor I conquered just as a Buddhist set to conquer yourself is so much harder than conquering thousand armies using military similarities. And this is a beautiful. That was a really powerful act so it's not just through Colty. I said not. It's not what he may feel powerful but the real power comes from letting go getting more zero eager than a big little by little we do tend hopefully come into this space to be more powerful by be more forgiving and more kind of making breaches between people sometimes big acres. What you say is a big Ego. How'd you create big? I was going to say Nice Story. This is talk that time when going to a conference not just to talk in a in a radio show. I went to a conference over in Vietnam some years ago. And of course you presented the conference is now. Give my talks and presentations which were safe. But then I spent a time into other people's talks because that's great now. I want to listen to how other people teach so I was sitting in the back. You know somebody was giving a presentation on some aspect of Buddhism and it was in North Vietnam northern part of Vietnam around country and as I was sitting there. Vietnamese man came sat right next to me. He obviously wants you to practice English. So He's told me said where are you from and I replied. Oh I am from Australia. Oh really he said. Do you know among by the move atom bomb and I couldn't resist. Try to get as much out of this as I possibly could say. Oh Yeah Yeah. I've heard of him without taking any laws. I've heard of me. Oh Yeah. He lives in in monasteries. Very famous in Vietnam always. He really wants to live just like me. We went to that. He's put his hands up close. We laugh together because I don't know why people think you well known but anyway sometimes it has its advantages because under other occasion. That's what I was traveling and from similar. Sometimes I'll let people know who I am. Present some advantages in it. I must admit that sometimes I was. I was traveling Englander. That's the airlines from Perth. To Athens to preside and then onto your doctor Carter to give some talks and as I sat down and economy cars by the window just minding my own business totally I love. Flight attendants came past and she looked at me and she stopped and she looked me straight in the eyes and said are you. Are you John Brahm? I said well I think so. Last time I checked and then she started gushing. She said Oh what a handover. It's just oh I must be. I must be your greatest fan. I've read all of your books. It's such an honor your on my flights and I never felt embarrassed about being noticed. I felt this is GonNa be a really good flies. I know 'cause when they gave the food out his food hot enough. All you bloody nasty. What extra whatever won't in God see. She gave me top class service and after the meal then I was just trying to meditate constant painful time said. Excuse me Jim Brown. Could you please come to the front of the at craft? What she up too. So I didn't know why I WANNA go out to the front of the aircraft. All of the cabin crew were all lined up for photo. I say this aid. Wbz ANY Indonesia's here into new. God Oh yeah are the back there. Indonesia you are the number one for photographs honestly that sometimes some of the difficulties. You've got me into taking photographs like going through. Cheney airport connecting flight and then is whole group about thirty Indonesian impetus. They've been going off on pilgrimage to India for the holidays and they saw me said please come over. Co Photo photo was it. Okay I call it a half now. I wasn't enough first of all individual photos. Then the photo that impairs and then my goodness and that was the only time honestly the only time when I got to the Boarding Gate. They were calling out my name. Mr Obama Wong so please please quickly fly is but anyway anyway just so I had to have all of the aircraft star. Just take photograph and at the same time this was now. Okay Perth to den Pizarro and I was going to go on from there to Georgia Carta where the talks were. Most of the people on the flight were not produced. Most of them were surfers. And I can't turn all the lights in the front all lighting up being Ding Ding. They wanted service some more beer so more Bintang and they said no wait. We're busy always remember that after they'd finished with me not to go back to my seat had to go right down the middle of the aircraft. Because I was sitting in the back somewhere at all the people looking at me I had to wait for my because of you know but anyway. So when is actually saver? Ecosociology EGOS might be able to offer. Guinness Give forgiveness and also being able to make mistakes problem. People always want to be perfect. There I'm not perfect. Sometimes I tell the same old story every time I always tell people all the stories I repeat here. I've heard the more than anybody. I studied. Join the change a little bit longer for the nursing with a zero. Eka You can just you make a mistake. You say the wrong thing it just enjoy it and let it be see IGA means you allowed to make mistakes. You don't have to be perfect hands up. Anyone who's perfect goes. A one is perfect. If you were you'd be cool. Boring often notice that because now we live up in boating Miana. That's in Serpentine. On the hills and that hill is overlooking. The Ocean Ocean thirty kilometers away. Twenty nine maybe another twenty kilometers fifteen kilometers because on the top of the hill. Sometimes you get the most incredible sunsets on the on the horizon. There and the most incredible sunsets are only occur when an crowd or some smoke on the horizon. Someday is perfectly Blue Chris Sky. And it's not. It's not beautiful. It's just the sunsets. Rather he needs some imperfections. Some smoke awesome some cloud to stretch goals and they are inches across the sky. Member beauty honey occurs when there's some imperfections somewhere and that's one of the reasons why you should never try to be perfect otherwise it's boring as hell for those people say well. That's okay for you item alone but you should see the person I leave with all they really so imperfect and then I say well so you. Aren't you know so? Yeah that's true. I said well you're match so when we celebrate imperfection was celebrating humanity. Reality Truth and we're not trying to be this incredible eager zero ECON. Sometimes you are perfect and sometimes you make mistakes. Welcome to our which is a real year hold of it is who you are but the amazing thing which is weird. Something which accenture tried to teach me but I was too dumb to really know at the time but over the years you to learn and it's so true that when you try to be perfect you make so many mistakes why. I was really trying hard to keep my rules. Be really good marks straight. Give good talk and all of that never seemed to work and Tabatha archived is going to relax and see what happens. I relaxed the easier. It became to keep my monastic rules. And there's a lot of rules which I have to keep when you relaxed with that. Skiving talks while you know what happens much better when I relax to speaking with you. Not Trying to prove anything. Get anything out of you just like that lady called one evening. She was a issue of the phone. Call for you Angie. I'm brushing SISSOKO talking with you. So I answered. It is giving a talk tonight and I said yes and she said how much do you charge and I said nothing. We don't charge is no entry fee to come in here. We don't say names and just harass you off towards I want sort of raising funds we can actually have no entry fee but we have to pay to get out do forte. Things like that but said No. Don't pay anything no you don't understand. She raised her voice dollars. Sense there how much will have to pay to get in for the talk soon? Man We don't have to pay anything at all. Just come in. If you like it you can stay. If you don't like it you can just go straight out the door again. A non stop your criticized. You know that's the way we do things here. But then there is not tell the stories what she asked next so well. What do you guys get out of? This is a very valid question. Why don't we do this? You do that because you get so much. Happiness enjoy giving things not for big Egos for big hearts happiness love joy so we have ego is like all the important stuff goes up here to down here into your heart and you don't need to worry about how big your heart is. How big your head is ego? Yeah let's dangerous but kindness enjoy which I always get from giving to others expected nothing back in return even give as much as you like there that c iga you giving not expecting anything back in return and then all my journeys emergencies such happy people such joyful people who just know they see that somebody here needs a lift home somewhere to fremantle. Ought to judo or somewhere and if I need hardly to get a taxi so I can take you and it gives them live. It gives them some kindness joy. That is a beautiful thing to see. You don't want anything out of it you do. That is because it needs to be done is what we call. The was it when I was ever in Berkeley that fell metres. Name IS EMMY H. T. H. A. Or something is really pushing the pay it forward Philosophy is nothing new. It's just a nice word. Pay It forward instead of back. Pay a back back versus negative almost making any progress forward ahead in. What does that mean? What a man was what I taught me. My teacher retirement. He said specifically when I started to understand some on your tiny bit of what he was teaching me say. Thank you there so brilliant. Thank you so much. I'm so lucky to have you as my teacher said stop that. Don't pay it back to me because they're five giving you anything so that China and you give it back to me. It's all finished. But he said whatever. I've taught you whatever I've given to you however Evans in spy. You helped you. You're in debt to me. He said and I felt Adams in huge amount of debt financial obviously but emotional giving respect gratitude had so much debt to him. He said the only way you can pay that back is giving it to others. Said I've served to you as I'm disciple. Now your job is to serve others to pay it forward so I teach you out of gratitude to our to pay off my debts him. I'm paying it forward to you and of course if I've been of any service at all to you or any other monks nonsense people. Whoever who've taught in his face if they've helped you in your internet any way you can't thank me. I'll give donations to this temple all you can't pay it back that way. Anyway you can pay factories. Forward gives some kindness forgiveness of service joy. Some reading go to someone else. That's part of the CBO. Ego See is just like New York part of this wonderful. Our they put us on the voting of the wheel of Dharma just going forward and Ford. It is okay. I'm going to break a promise either your mind because I promised myself. I will not mention the word corona virus this evening but that Saddam is like a virus is spread. That way you pay it forward. Whoever you meet catches it formula catches a bit of kindness and forgiveness. And how often just smile? You don't have to do much to pay it forward. I've done that a lot in mind. I've obviously just going through the airport. You see someone who's very busy and just give a smile so easy to do for. Some people just means so much to them. Someone is happy to meet today. Is this one Mike. Along time ago. He said something simple. You know is on a train in India years and years and years ago long time ago maybe fifty years ago now formula sixty. I don't know a long time ago. And is is really big guy very fierce and as he as a monk off the train he does smarter this man. Good morning and that was his sincere good wish and this man because he was a lead of big group of bandits. It's a gang leader and appraise which is really searching for him. He said that just word of good morning with a smile sincere. Thanks changes life. You gave out. Being abandoned is could a good life became a good person? Sometimes small things have huge differences to you. It's one of the reasons why tiny see just makes a whole forest. So that's why sometimes paying it forward? He's not wanting something back is giving not even. Sometimes I was talk to give expecting nothing. Vacuum turn doesn't work for me. Expect in return but I wanted to be returned to waters and any tax of giving goodness wonderful things Sherry wisdom. Just somebody giving you respect somebody else and give me respect to somebody else. Respect somebody else that way so far. This well-defined actually make difference. It is like now these viruses. But they just multiplies to so much which is one of the reasons. Why one of those other jokes are you. You've heard all my jokes before but it's nice to share them. You tell your bosses at work. I know you call of disease from this month. They happy tied to Spe- Virus Watt happy. Titis happy to speak. And please don't isolate yourself. If you have happy tied to speak though pull yourself equality spread. It spread it around following wide happy tied to speak or just no respect for other people. That's one of the things which are actually gonNA run Mike. You bit longer than the other thing was just saying. See we're eager. Ego is just within the walls. Now who you think you are Buddhist a man. I'm old. I'm young this is who I am. I'm smart on wise. Those a lot walls which you yourself in to. It to delete that he can go to break down those walls. So this particular story which I was sharing when I was in into Mesa was I really do hard to actually make connections with people of different religions and they one of these was in the Anglican Church. Who is it frank? Frank Sheehan Franklin and the Catholic Frank. Sheehan he was the helmet when I was doing. Some teachings other cancer research so the cancer wellness group Glue Popping Carter Snow or go to a lot and he was also going over there and became good friends and he was a chaplain Christ. Church Grammar School. It has a beautiful school and now one of the top schools cost omnibus ago. There and of course executive problem ages can no people but I'm not a steady over there wet in their one one morning took gave the teaching at the morning assembly. They still do that and so I was waiting outside with the principle of father fraction chapter in the three of us outside and I pinch but he was very respect for. You obviously didn't really know who I was. Actually how I work. Because he's turned to me and he said One sold of the children are calm down the beginning of the day in the main assembly hall the three years ago to go into the hall. And there's a statue of Jesus we about to that statute Jesus your Buddhist mark. You don't have to. How and I told my opportunity. I'm not going to let this pass. I turned around to him the chaplain so now the TAP and so the principal and I said with a serious face most mile not yet just afterwards. I demand my right to bow to your statue of Jesus. I don't know if this is a good. I actually worse. I'd have my. This was a good thing and say his face can all confused. But because I knew that Frank she knew me so he's always okay and so when we went into the chapel we all bowed to the statute Jesus. I'm about. I'm not a Christian put us then I explained. Why well house thinking was it in your stature. I mentioned this to the kids in the assembly. I was make up my talk as I go along. Plantings said I about. He may have seen me. Bow To just this small from the waist power to your stature tease because this something which I can respect what everything but there's enough which I can respect a mask on bowing to the pot which are seeing that figure which I think is wonderful and I said this assay whenever I bow to put a stature three times to the Buddha statues and the first power is always virture goodness honesty trustworthiness reliability out. Always come and try. Keep my promises much as I can. Come here and give a talk because we're expecting me to. I don't WanNa that people down that's virtuous not lying and cheating people that is really important to me so so important. I worship virtue. I bow down and the Buddha Thinking Ferch worshiping virtue because that's what the Buddha stands for me. The first thing the second thing about down to his peace peace in your family peace in your workplace peace in the world peace in your heart when you made a piece in bonus terry where I live piece. How important is and you all know. You don't have to be fully enlightened and get into Jonah's to understand the meaning of paces feel some peace in your life that is magnificent that is worth bowing down to about twelve. Remember all those peaceful moments in my life or the piece which you know are tried to bring about where I still need to work more building. More peace is an important thing in my life so about a lastly third power source for compassion kindness. Every time you see acts of kindness compassionate people really go that extra mile extra light year for somebody else. Really kind compassion. Genuine acts of kindness does not believe is perhaps. Close your heart. That's wonderful people can be so kind generous and compassionate. I remember all those acts of compassion. I've seen hardest bowed out. So that's what I bet out too. I said service. Ups and Compassionate and everybody got it even awesome. What these bowing down to these idols. Idols must be gardens. What the Buddha stamps virtue. Peace and compassion. I can understand that so you know what happened next. Not Better finish. The talks what happened next was two weeks later. The school said we want to visit your modestly so they all came down in two or three buses and first person out. The bus was the principal. He came himself now. Principals of schools. Like that I know a really busy. They got lots of work to do. Actually come that great distance an hour. Well see hour and a half probably big bus like that from Claremont or something so all that way we said I temper thank you. I I have to come to this monastery. 'cause he really inspired me and say clinic. Unsafe the hall so we took him inside the main hall in by the just the two of us. I wished today that there was a camera to take a photo of both of us. Side-by-side bowing three times down to the Buddha statue was it the Buddha statue vertu peace and compassion. Sierra EGOS kindness joy. That's how this works. Suspect talk tonight so no planned. They came out okay. Hope you enjoyed it. Saw Saw Oo okay? Now we have two questions from overseas today on the list and any questions from the people. Here you're most welcome to ask questions. But what do the ones from if from the overseas I from Brazil? Uk and Switzerland Nils from Brazil. I'm having a great time. Meditating wonderful however I struggled with anger how is it related to ego? How come what eliminate and we can ego. Of course anger is really related to echo. Because if you have a are you want to control. Now you've civilian power over things you feel you empower over things over people of material things. I still remember. I wrote about this story. One of the books old days here when there's no air contact all the windows open on a hot day co Daddy's Gone Leach highway on something and get into a red traffic lights and stop. It had to and the car next to me. It also stopped now. I was in the passenger say. Obviously because monks aren't allowed to drive this fellow was next to me in the drivers in excellent anyways swearing at the traffic lights. You stupid traffic lights. You know you knew hours in a how why chase to read the first time you've done this. I'M GONNA be in big trouble now. You stupid traffic rise to infamy having something he was getting angry traffic lights which you just automatic so you can get angry at automatic things. How many of you angry at your computer crashing or freezing when it's really important foyer. So it's their fault. They just not following instructions so that a lot of anger even people people that just know that nature. They follow instructions. Y You get angry that they make mistakes so this lower the. They can't come up on time when it's really important for you so it's one of the reasons you have great time made it. Eighteen wonderful you some of that joy to understand the nature of rifles out of control out of control. I don't going to try and control it out of this. Be With flow with it. He when people go surfing in Western Australia they go one with the wave it. I'd try and control. The wave will be the wave of submit to the way they just merged with the way you merged with the retrofit rights emerge with the People. You live with you. Don't try and control the more better than the name. Anger disappeared is. We're not controlling when you're anxious you disappear emerging you not being an individual against another person in the UK sometimes having an ego canfield beneficiary. We get benefits from it. That's true because I didn't have an EGO. I won't be able to get a possible and go through the customs you know. That's our I told this story measured. Yeah okay here. We comes told his story so many times here but anyway he comes again this time when I decided because I was getting all to get an people's carthy the Commonwealth. Cbs cod basically GONNA People's Card Accord it Seniors Carta for Odin Weekly Card so anyway I would allied. That wasn't good enough to go up into the center. Leaking Armadillo an appointment in the office. Say I said why. Why kinda doing my because identity for no one will try and still my identities too much hard work. This adobe lead you to come in so I went in the appointment. This lady was in front of me and the I think she said was. Kinda pre is proof who you are and I said I've been mark for forty five years trying to find the answer to that question. They always exactly what I said and they never laughed it enough role with anger. This is serious. Have you got any? Id Identification. That's when we started getting funny. So have you got your driver's license. I don't have a driver's license. Okay how about your rental agreements? No for your your where you live do you own. Have you got your house ownership certificate own a house straightaway away? They think they've under a bridge or something but anyway so now I own. Anything is that okay. What about your credit card? Come on that. I have a credit card your bank account of that and the next one they asked for my marriage certificate actually asked for that which is weird. Because I don't have any of that. They went through a few other little things which is supposed to have in our town have and she looked at me and she was actually serious. He said Look. According to the you know the government and the centric whatever is said you just don't exist you don't exist and then. I put my hands are could. I couldn't resist. It said Sabu the Buddha was riots. I don't exist anywhere. That's what happens. Sometimes when we have any credit cards and stuff then you actually exist and they gave me the card anyway. I was just too much of a bother for them. So anyway How can we practice? No Nego in. This seems benefits from having one is more benefits from not having one. That's why when you really need one. You just make one up as you go along so I can make what. Make one up as being the expert on adult themes when I want to make that one up. We it or being the comedian. When you're on the underground train ask wants to make up being a serious mark. When it's time to be serious mark you can make how many times which is the right. You none of them you just make use of them for the right time the right price. That's when you don't have any fear traffic every ego you wish from time to time and Nasi from Switzerland how can I be short? My practice is not driven by ego each into autistic about what his practice livelihood try being oxidised about. Put his practice. And come be a monk. Buddy Indiana Monastry. Why not and if you are then. Idealistic base stillness freedom the opportunity to give endlessly to others. Now what's wrong with that? That's not driven by IGA that's driven by kindness kindness and ego almost opposite to each other ego controls event and owns doesn't share. It controls that doesn't make on forgive. Kindness doesn't want US opposites way of kindness the way of peace so any questions from the audience in front of me. A okay could run with the already run out of breath. Bill had to get someone younger to do the Brown. Did you give me some advice in tweet steps? What could you do melted my ego eager first of all if you try to improve yourself less usually so to lessen your ego you meditate smile? Shan GIVE VOLUNTEER FOR SERVICES LITTLE BY LITTLE. But then actually you're doing paying paying it back paying it forward were Eager Fabricius. It's wonderful UNEAGER VANISHES. Just not there anymore. Excellent any other questions Eddie. Record okay later okay. Not Save without okay. This is immeasurable. Attempt up this question in your book. There is no. Ego is not directly related but indirectly. Lena is regarding corona. Okay don't you think the will you know we have over reacting to this thing bearing in mind that the flu in your student. We have three to four thousand deaths a year no. Us aid have forty five to sixty nine thousand. This year. This is come back to the mining mine. All Mine is being held assay created by this wave of fear in he are. There are three cases in Western Australia. There are three million people in Western Australia figuring out for yourself. He told a few people about my my Method for actually eradicating corona virus from Wuhan district in China. I told a few people before had our can do. This is something in Buddhism. Which if you come to monitor you see what we call the holy water. We got this water in a bowl. We process it. It's really powerful sometimes. Really really powerful and the same time just right now go all these out of water bombers which are used to to fight the fires during the fire season putting these two together. We can take one of these huge water. Bombers are now not being used. Because there's no fires and I can bless all the water in them. We go over Wu Han and we just we just sprinkled a hold of that city with this this holy water blessed super blessed holy water to end the virus anything. That's a good idea at least a good idea because they made you laugh and that was my main so thank you for listening so now. I'd say we can pay for the border psychosis nine o'clock for just past nine o'clock and any personal questions you can come up asking a few moments and of course thank you. Eddie for actually giving the joining it

Indonesia Western Australia IGA London John Brahm Frank Sheehan Franklin India Australia Perth China Vietnam principal Sydney Meditation Retreat Center Jan Brahm Karan Uk main Bookshop Eddie
The life of an icebreaker: Aurora Australis

Conversations

49:45 min | 1 year ago

The life of an icebreaker: Aurora Australis

"This is an a._b._c. podcast. It's a wild ride getting from australia to antarctica you gotta cross the treacherous truce waters of the southern ocean there cyclonic winds and stomach churning waves the career up as high as twenty months then you hit the us us for the past thirty years the strain icebreaker ship aurora australis has been ferrying people to intact through those waters. It's australia's first and only the home built and home crude i- spreaker. She's not to miss if you're in hobart. She sits right next to salamanca place looking like a great big gigantic pantic orange children's toy but the aurora is a fine work of engineering. That's my one hundred and forty five voyages to the bottom of the planet. Sara laverick has forged on the aurora australis four times now. She's a marine biologist. She studied penguins seals and wiles. Sara even met her husband andrew on his second trip and that's when he decided that he turned out to have a strong family connection to the creation of the ship. The aurora australis is going to be retied next year and so sarah's written history of the begins ship the cuts its way all the way through to the polarize book is called through ice and fire the adventures science and people behind strategies famous uh spreaker high sierra this big orange ship that i've seen in in the docks that hobart when you went to see for the first on what did you think when you saw that great big thing i think i was just excited to say it. I kind of spent my late teens always wanting to go to antarctica talk to her when i was at school and so i knew about sheep and i knew what she did down in antarctica so to arrive in hobart about to start university and see that kind of come and go over the summer was pretty exciting. Has anyone ever given you reason why painted orange oh now. I'm assuming it's just what for visual purposes i think so i believe that's the reason a lot of the icebreaking ships working polar regions of painted either are injured. Ridley roy was painted. International orange design. Color is on the golden gate bridge in san francisco coast guard vessels use that kind of color as well. It's a very striking color against the ice and the water the call to go there in two thousand and three commission. You had gone to ship. I was part of a marine science voyage that was going down to her island and that was an integrated sort of predator predator prey ecosystem study so we there were people on heard island who were tracking the animal so the main predators there are first sales those penguins different couple of different species of penguins and albatross as well and they were putting satellite tags on all of these animals and then there were people on the ship which included may and we were looking at where these predators we're going. We're getting the satellite data from the trek is and we were also looking at what those animals might be eating when they'll going out to their foraging origin grounds and in doing that we kind of you know we work out who who's eating what win and trying to work out how the system down there works and also linking that to potential impacts from fisheries and things that were operating the area so you sil- out doing history very very peaceful and all that and then you hit the open seas mm-hmm we fitted by the chop there so i was pretty lucky sorry the enron quite especially down going down to hit island. The seats can get pretty lumpy in the bell rises and falls with big splash. I didn't get to seek. I don't know why for some reason on that sheep. I don't get too affected didn't say sickness but certainly a lot of people do do feel queasy sometimes but i'm lucky thirty five feel queasy i just go lay down and then i feel better when it's pitching and rolling around around loch that is it possible to sleep. I mean did these bang around. It is possible for some people to sleep not so much. I do tend to feel like you're gonna roll out of bed or roll up and down the bid to like so you know when the sheep pitches forward so the beds actually run sort of across most bids run across the ship so when when the ships sort of pitching up and down you feel you roll out at the side of you bid and then sometimes when you rolling heavily you kind of feel that you slide up and down you bunk so it really depends and what's going on at the time but it's it's very physical experience. Hence logic gilligan's island top hammocks keep economically spendable the pitching pitch enrolling wildly out wadley can the ship actually pitch and raw rolling. She can go over thirty degrees each direction so that's a long way so i've described it before it was like if you're on the bridge and obviously the breach of tends to roll more because higher pointed the ship so you can be on the bridge in this windows out the side and obviously around the front as well and when the sheep rolls heavily you can actually f- look down the water off one end of the bridge and you can be looking up towards the sky eh out the other so it's pretty incredible role from scientists side. You do have to hang on the ship. What does it look like. What's unborn. She's he's a creep when she's not a cruise. Ship is what i was going to say. She's a working ship so if you start sort of from the top there's the bridge which is the brains of the sheep. That's where you got lots of big windows running sort sort of three sides and sort of wrapping around the back a little bit <hes> that's where you know the captain and the officers drive the ship the helm and all that stuff is a lot of equipment up there. The next down down is the way the captain and voyage later and chief engineer and all the offices and engineer sleep that say cabins snick down. This old crews cabins the dick down below. That is the expeditionary cabinets at school dadek. I spent a lot of my time on this little kevin's down there so <hes> for scientists and people going south to the basis and then blur that is the <hes> restaurant area and galley and also the science science labs are on the deck and the wet labs and things like that and then below that there is the engine room at one end and the other is at the back end is a solar and g._m. Another way the husky bar needs to be so there's no pool most cinema off. They do have a big <hes> recreation room at the back of dick and they show you know usually usually someone will advertise on. We're gonna put up these. Maybe or the series is also really popular. Every night you watch an episode of some series or something so they have projected their seats and things on-deck check. There is kind of a senior esque atmosphere back hospice originally was a husky bars still on board the nice that still i think people still call it the husky but <hes> but now they've pulled the bar out now the allowed to serve alcohol elect on the sheep anymore so but they're still all the photos of the dogs lining the walls of that space basin. It's now the d._v._d. Library and the aurora shop say you can buy t shirts and souvenirs for your family and things in there and it's also a wreck space that people use for exercising or yoga or table tennis and consider the point of no that you don't want anyone getting drunk and moody on board a ship to talk to get a bit ugly. Nonetheless is did hot to get a strident to socialize onboard a ship without alcohol. Can you actually get them to do that. He can and i think this is in the early days. It was quite a transition. You know i'm from what people used to call the good old days or whatever it was just a different time i suppose <hes> i think people retreated i think for the first season also to their cabins abi it the inner people finding there's not so much of a social life insurance watching d._v._d.'s on their laptops because technology had changed over that time as well people could take computers to their own cabins and things but there were a lot of people like you know the every voyage usually has like some kind of social committee who will try and do social activities and though pretty determined him to to get people together so you'd have quiz nights or mock cocktail nights or other things and you do still get special occasion so safe for christmas or new year they do allow a small small amount of wine or something with dinner if you're on onboard for a special occasion like that but it's pretty regulated almost void just they do an icebox weight and that's a competitive process comes word. That is a very competitive process. It's usually you can be a fundraiser fundraiser. Usually the person that wins might donate their winnings to camp quality. You'll pot of the winnings or something like that but basically everyone who wants to debate will buy a time slot a day et timeslot so you peak when you think the first aspect will be saying but there's pretty strict rules around that so it's going to be like ninety degrees off the ship. It's going to be a certain size. It's going to invisible. You can't just sit on the writer so usually the captain's word is final on that one and sometimes it's a bit of a debate over what was actually the first iceberg or whatever but yes it's. It's quite a good part of that experience going down south especially for the first time. I want to see an iceberg flooding in the water for the first time amazing. I suppose oh so it's pretty incredible. Yukon your mind kind of boggles. I guess but it's pot is that that transition down to antarctica so you kind of have you gone through the southern ocean in an unusually felt some kind of fairly heavy weather at some point during the and then you might say bits of lumpy tiny little bits of lumpy is floating in the water since kind kinda your first sign. You're getting close that year. The iceberg is the big thing that tells you that you're in antarctica and saying that for the first time it pretty amazing and sometimes in an emotional experience for people when without fail every single voyage when you say that first iceberg that'd be people on the bridge taking photos o._b. People outside taking photos and it's a very special part of any voyage but especially that first time go south. How big do they get above the water. As big as a house is because a castle depends is on the iceberg so if you've got an iceberg that's broken off the glacier. Tongue can be miles long that some of them can be you know you you can get smaller chunks of ice. Acidic growl is and things so that this kind of degrees of scales of ice the ice that you see but an iceberg or i don't know i would classify something something as big as a house speaker and the green or pink. I mean there's a difference. Oh isn't that i recall hearing someone that speaks in the north of pink and the ones down south grain well they they they vary actually so you can get really what the <hes> you can get. Ones we sort of these hint of almost an electric blue through them. You can get j eight books which have have been through a process. <hes> were essentially the ice is green and kind of like gloss like so and then you can get bugs which kind of a combination interesting so you might get a what kind of lump big that has like a really vivid green streak running through it so you can get all different types device space. It's never the same ever given that you've been looking to a completely flat horizon landscape for days and days and days and days i suppose it must be like coming to a funny little city in a way going into iceberg land with poking up in this suddenly this landscape around you and it's it is strange especially for me that transition from the southern ocean to the is and you can see these vast distances and you can see icebergs like miles and miles away like out on the horizon. We can see them picking up over the horizon. Sometimes you know like the scale of that. Landscape is just massive. It's incredible to me about the initiation ceremony that happens aboard the aurora australis else once you cross the sixty grow so basically king neptune comes to visit the ship ritual. It's not a hazing raising ceremony. I promise despite what it sounds like it's quite nice actually nice <hes> ceremony to go through but king gene and he's attendance will arrive on the ship bruce king neptune and this guy is all it can be anyone from one of the one of the senior crew to an expedition and that fits the bill being down south quite a lot of time. What does king nipped you look like when he i appears to use the first time i'm usually pretty colorful and off usually involves body paint the green or blue or something with a mop what we gonna try to what you might imagine intellect like they. They have the every voyage. They seem to find a different costume. I don't know how they do that or if they've got a stash stash of costumes somewhere but he always looks a little bit different depending on the creativity level of the people doing it won't happen to you on your first initiatied seventy from king nip general stratas so oh my was fairly fairly standard initiation so you king neptune has does a sermon and all those haven't been sixty south kneel before the king and listen to the sermon mm-hmm and pay their respects and then you have to kiss fish and literally they will produce a whole fish from the galley somewhere and you keep the fish and and it usually involves being developed in some kind of group as well and then i think had some vegemite on my favorite in some kind of weed baptism all kind of thing and then me become nip allows you to proceed and you become south policy dog and <hes> yeah you you have been south's past sixty sixty southbound benjamin toxic on recording in classical mythology spicer. You've been initiated. What's your shipping you there in the antarctic quarters. What does not apply emits. I suppose is one way and full if it's a clean not art on the ship so on the bridge at night time the offices turned down all the lights so that doesn't affect the vision so it's very doc on the front of the bridge which they closed the curtain so that there's just very little light on this is actually the first time you go from elite section of the sheep onto the bridge in part the curtains. It's black black and it's like just walked into a cupboard or something. It's just incredibly black. He can't say anything you can see the stars on. Don't even really like you make your way to the front of the bridge away. You think the front of the breach might be and then you you kind of look up and then you'll say you'll start seeing the stars and as your eyes adjust start seeing more and more and more and more in two districts across the sky <hes>. It's a pretty amazing experience. It's just too many stars. It's hard to fathom so so you'd see like i'm just so you would see like total black but above the horizon which wouldn't be mocked all except other than absence of stars this just stars everywhere so do you feel like you floating in space when you can do and depends on what the ships doing so sometimes it's a bit of light coming from mm somewhere on the ship if they're doing a safety costal something they'll be a glow from that coming from further back on the ship but if transiting through the often have a spotlight out the front front but if you're in an ice free area and things they don't necessarily need the spotlight's on or if they if they are on their pointing at nothing essentially. There's nothing reflecting being back along those lines so black. Have you seen the aurora stronger slots. I have yes i have i've seen them from the top of the ship and the bridge and that's pretty amazing as well. Sometimes it's hard to see the aurora. Actually i think sometimes people think that you can see them every night. When you done in antarctica sure and actually quite often it's overcast so it's always really special even for people that go down regularly to see say the auroras as if you get a clean not and you and anew and it happens to be a good or a display you feel incredibly lucky and privileged because as i think you know the the the auroras can vary in their intensity and what you may say any one time so it could it could just be a green. Thank green glow that you just you just see that against the stars or it could be you know this incredibly vivid and dynamic kind of streaking green streak across the sky that then transitions to purple flickering or something like that's so it can really vary do we the experience and then people's fido's show that to never the same so you sailing through the as the world is getting colder and caliber you go through what pancake house which is the flu pancakes of awesome service but at some point you've got to hit the pack horse and what happens when you hear a crunch or thump all you do you hear the the hitting the the sheep quite a lot like little ice flows and things bits of ice to me. It sounds like someone heating like doc. <hes> basically like you imagine a twelve foot like she'd been container or something st on holiday with a massive sledgehammer. That's what it sounds like to me that it sounds like he these ringing kind of klang and you know you. It's more clanging than thuds. That's the shore and it's it's quite <hes> a shop noise. Ship brings like a bill so it hits the hits the packers one thing i've never understood is how doesn't really might be a stupid question. But how does an icebreaker break through the ice does actually you do that. Is it just like a really re shop shop like points and hip half. What does it have something else to tear up the the aurora. Australis is is was built specifically to break officer say if you're familiar with cruise ships or container ships you know how they always have that bulb rot on the waterline and that sort of stabilized roy doesn't have one of those so basically her her bow goes back at an angle like from the front of the sheep point the pointy end of the sheep basically runs it's down but then rod at the waterline kind of cutting under quite sharply and then drops down to the main part of her kind of hall under the water plows wiles up basically uses are in white so when the aurora kind of hits the ought not hits the ice but mates the us her bow actually rides up onto the office and then it's the weight of the moving forward that breaks the ice underneath the ship also there's no engine other than the normal ship engines they put her on ice-breaking mode so she has two engines and they'll have both those raging at full power and so she needs that that power and energy to get her through the ice but it's the white that actually that that will open and what does it sound like it's starting to break the us depends on what kind of ice and how thick it is and how much snow is on it too because if this snow on the ice actually slow the auroras lunges down because his snows for sticky if you've got a may say meet ethic is iraq and break up to about one point the two made it stick voice depending this i wanted or not if you've got a major of icy ro khanna maker lunge into it right up onto it and you'll feel kinda move and rise up a bit as she gets up on top of the ice and then <hes> and she'll run run forward and at that point you can he the ice <music> sometimes cracking and you can hear it like these like lightning crack away from the sheep and sometimes you can't actually see these cracks. You can hear them happening. Under the smile is humming any travel out you can hear like boom and crack and kind of radiate out from the sheep and then <hes> pieces of ice dot breaking off and things it depends like sometimes it sounds like a far-off kenan depending on what kind of smart happened in the eye so sometimes you just literally like aca really shop cracking quite close to the ship. It depends what the ice is doing. What the is is like that. You're trying to break through so once you go to heard island one of the talk to collins which is which isn't it talked about once you once you got there and what was the science you were doing so that was a big integrated predator price study does talking about before so you've got those penguins and seals and albatross that we're feeding so we would just trying to work out what they were eating and when and where and then sort of linking that back to primary production which is the plants of the microscopic organisms say that the grow are using light from the sun and nutrients from the ocean <hes> so sort of linking it right from the primary production through to the prey fish and things that the the animals might be eating though the krill and then you know linking that right through to the predator sorry literally is who's eating who <hes> around the island and then using that to also inform for fisheries operating in the area hoping helping to manage those on resources because obviously anything that you take out might affect the the predator in the area was on your second voyage to antarctica that you met your husband to be andrew was what was he doing that shit at tom. He was one ah the officers on the ship. He was the maitre i think at that time and i was doing <hes> a whale acoustics project at that point. We are acquisition and jason. How well did you hit it off straight away. No sorry yeah le- <hes> my sorry andrew my it's a bit of a running joke. Actually only my first impression of andrew wasn't a good one. So it was is the first day of the voyage <hes> we have to do our she poured inductions and part of that induction is trying on survival suits and learning how to put them on so survival suits are like really thick wet suits dry suits essentially in the have big zipper the middle of them. They're really thick. They've got a hood integrated. Booties and gloves gloves a separate account quite remember. What does that fall into. The water. Is it is that the idea worst case scenario is your if if ship was something was to happen to the ship and you needed to get into a lifeboat or something and you need to put on us before you did that so you can sit outside the elements for over minneapolis. You need to be wearing the water. It's like a big puffy wetsuit or something is but they one-size-fits-all sized fiddles and it tends to feel like it's one-size-fits-all seafarer so for someone like me female of every hot and build the they quite big and i was paired with another go beccause he's really small really tiny potatoes and we were trying on these suits and you know they just looked just hanging office office. Victims were often essentially and so andrew was running that drill and he came over and he he grinned and said in both of you could have jumped in there and and they still would have been room you know and he flashed these cheeky grin and i just i just went. The guy's really really good-looking j._c. Noise and it was just the wrong impression from the poor andrew. That was my my first impression of <hes> my husband so it was only when you get to know better you discovered his family's involvement the aurora australis the ship. What was that yeah yeah well. I didn't find that out actually until months later so well after the voyage he for some reason didn't broadcast that information while he was working on the ship. I'm so it wasn't until we you know we had a you know established first relationship like months later that i found out that his family built the aurora australis at carrington slipways he's granddad had his granddaughter and his brother ahead inherited this shipyard from their father <hes> by that stage andrew's uncle had a great uncle had left the business that was just he's granddad dawn running the shipyard odd and he and his two sons allen and bruce actually built the aurora astrologists with obviously hundreds of others at carrington slipways and that's that's newcastle what happened when you met the family what kind of stories with regard you with stories about building the ship i i mean it was pretty hard to miss this beautiful photos of the sheep on the walls of the house and things but i mean at festivals more concerned with just meeting my boyfriend's family i guess at that time but later once we moved to new south wales so yee's later <hes> once we moved off to new south wales from tasmania. It seemed like sort of an ignoring that i'd been on the ship quite a few times every like like family barbecue or birthday or something that we had <hes> don andrews grandfather would tell me a story about what had happened on during the construction of these ships and that every single time there'd be this new story. He'd start telling me something. I'll be off heard this before. I'm sure and i hadn't been some some other kind of a crazy story that had happened during construction of the aurora and i think that a knowing myself having heard some of the stories of what you were at bain through it really i realized what the story that she has and the communities around that shape so that we're really proud of having built the yeah i think they'll really proud of especially don still thinks that was one of the greatest achievements statements that shipyard and i think in part because of what they had to overcome to to achieve that built and to have that base accessible and such a successful ship as well <music> podcast broadcast and online this is conversations with with richard fidler a._b._c. radio subscribe to the conversations podcast to find out more just hate to a._b._c. dot net slash conversations <music> so you've you've you discovered your boyfriend. Who's now your husband's family. Were they actual family. Who built the ship in newcastle the shipyards in newcastle what happened when they got the contract to actually build the aurora kind of problems they have with that. Basically the process assist was that they were getting plans from the designer kind of in stages throughout the world and as they started getting the plans through as more of them started arriving they started realizing consistencies in those plans and the sort of hatches won't aligning between compartments. Were you know systems like pipework doc plumbing and electricity trying to incorporate the same space in <hes> in the dickhead or something like that from a finnish company wasn't it from accompanying in on the other side of the world yeah yeah and so that wasn't working s._o._l. Design of the sheep was amazing and the general arrangement plans were very impeccable <hes> but when the design rowing started coming through that they would just some problems with them and so basically <hes> throughout the whole bill they had to deal with all these issues of of trying to make things feet into having to change the plans constantly to make sure all these systems like plumbing plumbing and electrical and you know all sorts of different systems could occupy the same space because at the moment they are running in the same spot and they shouldn't be or you know there was a lot of problems with what they called consistencies running up when they should be down to occupy the same space yeah exactly the same space in the roof head and they've pipes supposed to go there bizos the fire hydrant pop and you know it's so easy air conditioning that kind of thing so it was confusing. All these systems seem to have if bain design maybe in isolation. They had their suspicions about that. I guess is well. Just at the close to the point completion december ninety nine newcastle uh-huh quake ship didn't affect the ship. I mean actually at that point the sheep had been launched and even made it down the river down to newcastle so <hes> so even to get to that point she pain to a huge amount of <hes> problems with construction but then also getting the sheep from carrington slipways to newcastle was an ordeal in trying to work at how that could be done because the draft of the sheep was actually the same as the the depth of the river so there was all these other problems is will it had to be overcome was so big of i'm sitting so set below the waterline. David was the same as the river so they had to work out how they were and they knew that early on that they had to work out how we're going to get this amazing new. Eh from carrington surprised down the river to newcastle and so that that you know they become the overcame that they're pretty good at solving problems say yes so once the they'd got through the field they got the ship down the river and then the earthquake struck yeah the ah the sheep itself is okay. She was on the drydock at that time but andrew's father was on board in between meetings and he has the story what he he he was walking through the area and the and the sheep which is supposed to be stable started to roll and he thought he so much that he actually grabbed a pole because he felt feel that he was gonna fall over and he grabbed the pole just assumes that she must have come off its blocks in drydock had visions of this ship you know essentially actually and had no idea what was going on and then the lights went out. I believe in in this this is sort of stopped stabilized and he let go the poll and made his way up through the sheep and all these people and trades and builders and stuff where emerging from all different areas of the sheep wool feeling the science like what just happened and and then they looked across to the cd a._d. and they could say daas tools smart these clouds kind of rising from the c._d. And then shortly afterwards they started hearing sirens and things and they they realized that they'd had an earthquake at that point yeah. We're so geologically stable in this country. You wouldn't be the first thing you'd think of thought a terrorist attack you might have thought anything at all until you you knew what the effect of that was despite all that spot all the problems with the putting it together and surviving earthquake. How did it go on. Its maiden. Voyage did really well. Actually it's maiden voyage was was down to the sub antarctic heard island as well <hes> which i say well because that was my first voyage but <hes> yeah it did really well there. The the voyage later was really pleased without went. They went down to hood island and did some <hes> marine research down there. They put some people onto the island do some c._e._o. Research though doing a lot of fish surveys in the area and things went pretty well but because it was a brand new ship there's always bound to be shoes at least brand new systems and there were a few on on that for a first voyage few things that happened to various pieces of equipment or two people on board that during that first voyage but it it was actually quite successful they they go they all the science done they wanted to do and they. They did a really great survey of the fish in the area. One of the early missions was to retrieve <hes> the dogs the husky of antarctica. What was that voyage lock so that that was a few years later and that was to do. Do you think it was a few days later. They madrid protocol meant that you know <hes> of antarctica would be preserved and <hes> they wouldn't be mining and things like that but part hot of that agreement between all these different nations was there being no introduced species list kept in antarctica which of course affected the sledging dogs that <hes> they've been there since the who's on the show years and years ago he was wonderful said he'd been there in the fifty nine huskies equal themselves sledging antarctic ins and they become part of the family by that stage and if a people staying especially wintering the stations you know they got to know these dogs works really well and you know the dogwood pops and how families would go through either the generations i guess and kill the dogs did. They brought them higher on ownership for them back to australia. Well i say home. They brought them. Backtra stralia better bunch of them actually went over to america. I think and actually really worked as sledging dogs in the states. It was the states but a couple of the older dogs who were close to retirement age got to retire in tasmania said or ustralia anyway a bit <hes>. How far north did some of those dogs end up. Believe a couple of them at least ended up going to the north pole. Wow wow that is that that is one well-traveled husky. I found a newspaper report that had said that they that they later went up there and <hes> we potted the expedition to the north pole and not not long after they actually left antarctica so it was pretty credible doing your science as you have in those waters in the southern borders over the years. You've been studying life in in those areas. How much life is there in those waters more than you think. I think is the short answer so i think a lot of people think of life in antarctica they might think of things like i study like whales and seals and penguins and certainly there the visual and the seabirds albatross and things that they're the visual ones that the obvious megaphone that you can see but the water itself is teeming with life and like i mentioned before that sort of microscope pick primary production in the plant to the say essentially that kind of take nutrients from the ocean and energy from the son's life and and they grow and then the tiny marcus you know small we'll zoo plankton will then eight and in the bigger fish will eat the plankton elite those small things so it kind of builds from this very small microscopic doc organism right through the ecosystem to those whales and seals and things and it is teeming with life and you certainly find some areas is where if there's not enough say on or some kind of nutrients in the water you find areas where it's quiet quiet but generally the waters in antarctica. There's more in it than you think realize during the joel researching wiles in those waters one thing we know is that wilder at least as curious about us as about them have you have you had experience of being close and being observed by one i have yes i've done a fair bit of whale tracking kim using satellite tags and things off small boats both off the australian coast and in antarctica and especially humpback whales get really inquisitive or can get really inquisitive with what the heck is this thing and into while i have once a whale came in spy hopped next to the bodos is working on so that means when the whales kind of point then ours out of the water really slowly kind of rise up and they might kind of tweets slightly and then they'll kind of sinks slowly back into the water that's called spy hop and point you know you're being checked out so that's happened off the back of one of the ships working on and they'll coming in having look at us. It's also happened enough. Small boats have been operating on as well. I mean it just feels like feels to me like that to do that. I would love to have that experience. I think it'd be terrifying that it would be it'd be so powerful to to to look at the strange species contact it is i mean they're very lied and they're very aware of where they are as well and i remember once we were on and we had a whale checking us out and we stopped the bart in a small boat. Obviously i'm an inflatable one and <hes> we kind of kind of went straight under a psych across ways underneath underneath us and literally we heard the news of the wheel off one side of our boat and the tail of the whale on the other side and it had arched it's back underneath us and it knew exactly where where it didn't touch us but it helps you were that the while wasn't going to be clumsy or just give it a bit of a you have a bit of a heart rate kind of increase at that point in what he or she was fine and just kind of slowly swam away it wasn't breaching out of the water and being rough or anything genuinely wanted to check us out and her close. If have you been to one of these creatures anyway. We made us like within tomatoes. I suppose during the wild tagging work that we do you have to get very close. We had to work talking division anymore but when i was doing that work to be able to get the tags on the winds you have to be within a few meters of them to be able satellite trackers on how close to the blowhole the <hes> yeah i've had i had one well similar to the one where the went underneath ahead one well that was really inquisitive with us literally surface under my feet when i was standing on the back of the boat so we have a little platform that extends out in front of the boats pontoon and so you have extra rage so the boat doesn't have to get as close to the whale as the person on the front who's doing the tagging say it gives you extra reach and distance but essentially you're on a plank above a while. I use the railings and it's great. It's all metal and everything do you feel quite secure but you can see through the bottom of the platform and this way or just i was just checking us out and went on to nathan then we're waiting to see where it would pop up and then literally just came up under my feet and kind of blew basically well. It's not me and i looked but i could see straight into the into the wild boy was that close and it was basically under my feet was incredible swim off. You look down the hall of while i ask because that disgusting. I think i was too shocked to realize what was happening. In process it properly at that time reminded me of dinner plates for some reason. I don't know why but i suppose there was on you anyway. Yeah the human kleenex yes sometime in mid december twenty thirteen. The aurora astrology was involved in a rescue mission for a russian ship the academic schakowsky new the to me about that story how the risk you well. The schakowsky got stuck in us. During a voyage it was doing <hes> had some people doing some research in sort of expedition khanna kinda stuff on there it got stuck in the ice and there are also some icebergs closing in on it and at that point when the captain of that she realized that they were stuck they couldn't go anywhere and they were icebergs drifting because they can kind of they drift independently of the inquest into the ship essentially yeah so at that that point he put out the essentially a call for for help brought distressing. Does that mean is there. Is there laura about that or is it just a kind of an unwritten law that you drop everything come to the safety of life at sea. Solas basically means you any any captain that is in charge of a ship that is sending sending out a distress message has to respond especially at this point. The aurora didn't get the cold direct from the schakowsky. They got it through <hes> answer the maritime communication education center but yes so the aurora was refueling one of the stations of that time and they had to break off from doing that refueling and and and resupply and then go to the rescue of this ship which was miles and miles away the call by the french as the coal and the chinese my niece antarctic program to one of the beauties of the more i guess it's not necessarily antarctic treaty per se but there's this whole kind of way way of operating down the the help will always be given to those that need it yeah <hes> because sar remarked <hes> and if something goes wrong wrong generally the only way that response can be mounted. Oh the only organizations that can mount them are other international polar programs so they will often without hesitation. We'll go to the aid of a distressed ship or station or whatever is happening in antarctica that time so they gotta run off and fifty two people on board the aurora australis from from the russian ship have they cope with looking after an extra fifty two people it was. I think initially it was logistically. It was fine. I mean obviously it was taught cramped quarters in the cabins and things like that <hes> but it was the food that was the main issue you know having fifty two extra passages voyage was now running two weeks light so two weeks overtime because they gone and done this response <hes> and then they still had another two weeks sheduled cigar gar of the trip so you got all those extra people for weeks longer than what was anticipated originally anyway for the voyage so the galley crew the <unk> stewards and the kooks and everything kind of messy stop take everything that had obviously they have an emergency rations on board as well but in the end <hes> the the gossage such a good job with looking after their stocks that they didn't need to break into the emergency rations but yes they had to kind of really go down into the nitty gritty of how they were going to prepare for you and trying to make their stock stritch across having all these extra mouths to feed for a longer period then in two thousand sixteen i._d. Crew aboard the aurora scoreless at mawson station in antarctica. It's been a nice day. Everything was fine and then a blizzard. I wonder how intense that that blizzard pause. Would you see anything during that <hes> during that visit not not not so much and i thought it would be a wide out too but i remember talking to one the later at the time and <hes> and i thought it was a wide out and he's saying known are in the morning when he got up the morning of the grounding the visit with sofi. It was actually still black like the the light hadn't permeated the blizzard yet. It was so intense so i mean it did it did become a wide out later in the day but so what happens in the mornings of the ship that well. We don't really know the details of exactly what's happened but what happened with which lines went win. Essentially the aurora broke free of her mooring lines during that blizzard does banco doesn't anchor in has a series of lines. I described radials averse spider's web at go out from the ship to the shore and mr snapped in the some of them snapped in the in the british. Some of them did not the some of the stone lions. I think we're still attached but all the forward lines events where we're gone yet from what happened to the ship name once they snapped at that point she's just the most of the winds and was essentially pushed onto the rocks at west in hoshi haba uh-huh so that was pretty scary for those on board the ship sort of ren ren aground but but sideways onto the edge of the same awesome have is horseshoe. She horror story at morrison isn't isn't that big. It's a nice secure harbor but yeah it means that it's not far not all that far to shore. If things went awry which which unfortunately they did under the pressures of this huge blizzard so she actually i believe she hit kind of bar first diagonally and then the force of the blizzard it then pushed down the road to kind of pushed it back work with the croat once once it had been run aground sideways lock that well i i mean what what how did they feel pretty scared. They depend on which way the ships going to topple top on the ground and i suppose that's bad but they you could also toppled into the water on could yeah host you have is really steep and very deep <hes> so there was a real risk that the sheep could you know saw him one of tanks ruptured or something like that whole speech that you know she could roll towards the harbor in potentially go under and offices while a blizzard is raging aging excellent as well could is evacuated implicit. I wonder they made a worse case. Scenario evacuation plan but they all hope that they wouldn't have to use that that you were talking about earlier suits it would mean probably waiting or trying to swim through channing water as well because even the sheep was around the bottom of the ship was aground but the the actual side of the ship was still separated by a few meters of water to the shore so they'd have to get down off one side of the sheep and trying to get around across there was made as of water between them and the shore and then get up onto west arm and extremely dangerous and you might have expected for tel aviv onto circumstance but didn't come to that did it it didn't and thankfully they managed to secure the jurors will they could buy balloting down which means like feeling her ballast ballast tanks and actually making the sheep heavier which would stop it hopefully from moving any further because she was getting pushed backwards along the rocks by the force of the blizzard lease it initially as well so they made those stern lines secure actually brought one of those forward to the front part of the sheep. This is all during a raging blizzard like these people are incredible. Go out trying to get the ship secure when this blizzard around the block the perfect water by the stage but you know they couldn't see very far and being swept the fleet and was pretty scary for those involved but yeah the the i._r._s. Were out there. The integrating crew were out there trying to get the ship secure as best they could and they they did a fantastic job on border ship in that moment audience. I want to go people at that point. Where pretty yeah we're not so the aurora australis it was i there'd be flooded and it went on to continue more missions. The rotor strauss is is going to celebrate its thirtieth birthday on september eighteen and it's about to sit side. If that's the whittled set out for the last time any feel about its retirements time i i feel sad. I think that sheep and i think oh i know i'm not alone this big thing i realized when i was researching for this book <hes> doing these interviews with people that are on board during these various events or you know we're involved in a construction even they love these sheep and and they all talk of about the aurora with like a fiction and you know for some people like me. They might have met a significant person in life. I met my husband met my best friend. On my first voyage. I think for others you know they've had some of the most incredible experiences available. If you know like seeing the antarctic landscape or even having you you know successes in their professional lives and things because of that there's a whole bunch of reasons that people love this ship and it seems to be really universal. Who's going to be anything to replace it once. It's guys yes. They australia's getting a new icebreaker. No you know that's for later in twenty twenty. At this stage moved tasma universal night it is it means southern lights since a really nice connection between the aurora australis which obviously means sudden lights and morrison's auroras well so that was is a kind of a really nice unexpected tradition but also you know that lovely to the indigenous cultures well. It has manian and what's going to happen to be roar once. It's what a decommissioned commissioned all. What what are you saying once. It's taken than i was going to what they're going to do with this point. There's been no official word about what might happen evidence yeah. I'm sure you talked to pain. You might be by it for your bathtub or something. It's <hes> at this point. There's a bunch of different options. I've been to superior. There's also people interested in trying to make it into antarctic museum as well so this this different avenues that they will probably explore oh to you know i think they think that she has some life left in her yet and junked import somewhere in india. I mean that's not impossible but i think it's unlikely at this point right anyway. Yeah that'd be more that have greater capabilities in the your does. It's much bigger cargo capacity. It's obviously like the aurora was in her day. It's sort of the cutting edge of this time so the euro was cutting edge when she was built and now she she you know she's gotten on after three decades of operations annoying scenery that next level you know that next level in technology and everything with the science and sounders and new types of sampling equipment and all sorts of things going on a moon pull and things that you could never have dreamed of on the aurora and she's got increased cargo capacity and things to be able to take equipment and plant and all sustain down to antarctica go back again tactica of course i do that extreme perfect quiet and silence silence and being surrounded by penguins within the quiet and it's never i mean i've been only either i only four times on the aurora around once on another ship as well but this people that have been down dozens of times and have winded oregon you know dozens of marine science voyages and have spent significant parts of their lives on that ship deep and it's always as far as i'm aware. It's always a different experience so there's always that next experience to have so. I don't know i would like your. You'll love but to me. It's been such a pleasure speaking with you. Sir thank you so much my pleasure podcast and broadcast. This is conversations with richard fidler lila a._b._c. Radio serial eric's book is called through ice and fire and it's published by macmillan on richard viola. Thanks for this thing. You've been listening to a podcast of conversations with richard fidler for more conversations interviews. Please go to the website a._b._c. Dot net slash conversations discover more great a._b._c. a._b._c. Podcasts live radio and exclusives on the a._b._c. Listen up.

aurora antarctica aurora australis andrew australia blizzard loch that us richard fidler Ridley roy golden gate bridge enron salamanca officer hobart antarctic Sara laverick carrington slipways san francisco
ET - Alice Cooper // Ted Nugent

The Eddie Trunk Podcast

56:22 min | 1 year ago

ET - Alice Cooper // Ted Nugent

"Thank you for listening to this podcast. One production available on apple podcasts and podcast one thousand nine hundred and eighty three eddie trunk has been the voice for fans of rock hard rock and heavy metal a bestselling author host of t._v.'s that metal show and seven national radio radio shows including trunk nation daily on sirius x._m. Interesting eddie offers the world is news making interviews passionate analysis honest commentary and who who knows what else so welcome to the any trunk podcast welcome everybody eddie trunk and it is time for another edition of the any trunk podcast you know the deal by now it's new each and every single thursday via podcast one dot com and of course via apple podcast. Thank you so much for downloading streaming listening wherever however whenever you do it it is greatly greatly greatly league appreciated as we settle in for another couple of great interviews coming your way on the podcast this week. I appreciate everybody spreading the word about the eddie trunk podcast. Even though i've been doing this for years it doesn't help or doesn't hurt. I should say to help get the word out and i appreciate you doing that as well and subscribing and listening each and every week via the outlets i just mentioned the apple podcasts or of course on podcast one dot com so this this week another double dip too great interviews for you. We'll start with alice cooper as usual all the interviews here on the trunk podcast originate on my sirius x._m. Radio show which is called trunk nation and heard on volume channel one. Oh six live two to four pm eastern time replaying every night nine to eleven pm eastern and also available on demand on the sirius x._m. App so if you're in the u._s. and canada and are not already on board with trunk nation on sirius x._m. Please come on board. You will not regret it. You're only getting tiny taste here on the podcast of what i'm doing live on radio on a daily basis so the double dip this week second will be ted nugent. I am fully oh you wear the ted. Nugent is quite a polarizing personality. When ted nugent does anything with me. We keep it exclusively to music conversation. I think ted is often forgotten at how great of an artist he is. What a great guitar player. He is what a great music historian. He is in a lot of ways and uncle ted ted will join us as the second part of the eddie trunk podcast this week. He is never not entertaining in my opinion and again. I am aware that some have let's just say strong feelings about ted. I am aware of that again. My stuff with ted had is always about the music end of things and <hes> that's where we keep things so enjoy that coming up ted nugent currently on tore four and if you get a chance go check him out. I think you will enjoy his guitar playing his songs in his killer band. So ted is coming up second but first on the interviews we lead with alice cooper a true legend and a guy that recently when we celebrated the thirtieth anniversary of his trash album very much breakthrough album a return. I should say breakthrough album for alice cooper. We'll get to alison allison a second before all of the interviews. Let me tell you about pluto tv because pluto t._v. Is the leading free streaming television service pretty incredible. Oh you can watch over one hundred t._v. Channels and thousands of movies on demand all completely free pluto tv never ask for credit card. You don't even need to sign nine up to watch for free pluto. T._v. is the easy and completely legal way to watch your favorite tv shows and that's important you don't wanna be streaming and have the feds knocking knocking at your door right hit movies t._v. Shows totally free totally legal that is pluto tv. What are you waiting for. You never pay for tv again by downloading pluto t._v. t._v. You can download it for free on all of your favorite devices including your phone roku amazon fire tv apple apple t._v. smart tvs playstation and anywhere else you stream t._v. Folks check it out a jordan here. I know a lot of you. You create your own podcast and in a lot of already have one like me. I obviously love what i do. It's taken a lot of hard work to get to this point of success. You shouldn't have to pay fees for platform hosting distribution analytics or fees to create a podcast. You need to be able to focus on producing the best show possible now podcast one. That's network. I'm on. They have a launch pad digital media or launchpad d._m. For short so it's free includes unlimited hosting full control of distribution you have access to a full dashboard with analytics antics again totally free you own everything by the way you on your content you on your subscribers know tricky stuff there and to get your own show page on launchpad dot com for people to listen into and subscribe your show the only hosting platform brought to you by the leading network podcast one podcast one will promote the site drive people to discover your podcast and if your show grows grows you could even be invited to join podcast ones all star roster which includes people like adam corolla kaitlyn bristowe shack lady gang and of course me jordan harbinger on there are to you also get access to their production and sales support so with all this completely free. Don't use other hosting platforms. Why would you need to learn more or sign up now at launchpad d._m. N. dot com and don't forget to check out the jordan harbinger show so as i mentioned alice cooper we will lead with this week. Alice called my show to talk talk about the thirtieth anniversary of that album trash which was a big big comeback record for alice including the song poison which was a a big hit on m._t._v. back in the day and really signaled a return to alice and his prominence and really gave him a big kick towards the tail end of of the eighties so we'll talk about that alice actually called in on what is exactly was exactly the thirtieth anniversary of the release date of trash and we'll get get into that with him and then talk to of course as i mentioned ted nugent couple of things for me before we get to our interviews. I just came back from l. A. where i did a great rate l. a. invasion reuniting don dock and george lynch and also had robert and eric from stone temple pilots on who were celebrating the the twenty fifth anniversary of their second album purple. Just as soon as i get back to los angeles i get word that or get back from los angeles. They get worried that i'm going back to los angeles and i will be back in l._a. This coming monday and i'll be doing the latest this trunk nation l. a. invasion from the rainbow this monday six p._m. Pacific so if you're in southern california come by and cmih at the rainbow everybody else listened to the action live on sirius x._m. One oh six then i'm going to go over to vegas and do some broadcasts from that from vegas. Guess finally and then i'm going to go to houston and host the tom keefer show which is happening there on august seventeenth off at warehouse live so a ton of stuff going on as usual. I urge you to follow me on twitter for up to the second news info and updates. It's simply at eddie trunk and instagram is eddie trunk fan page on facebook and the homepage of eddie trunk dot com for all all of my appearances but really keep an eye on my twitter for up to the second news updates. There is so much going on also please watch trunk fast on access tv minute tv series new episodes every sunday night nine thirty eastern on access tv covering music music festivals and music events. You will love it. Hope you check it out on access sunday nights nine thirty eastern six thirty pacific to who interview so let's get right to them. We'll come back and we'll start with alice cooper talking thirty years of trash and segue into talking some ted nugent with the motor city madman himself. That's what we got for this week. On the trunk podcast coming right up the anti-trump bod cast wanna podcast got a podcast cast then check out launchpad diem powered by podcast. One launch pad d._a._m. Is a totally free platform and service for anyone who wants wants to podcast offering unlimited hosting and access to a dashboard with all of your shows analytics you own and control everything including subscribers and it's a great discovery tool to help people find your podcast. You may even get invited to join the official podcast one roster with even more perks like access to producers marketers sales teams and more sign up at launch pad d._a._m. Dot com. This is the eddie trunk podcast. Welcome back to the trunk podcast as mentioned a double dip this week ted nugent coming up in a few but we lead with alice cooper talking thirty years of trashy called into my sirius x._m. Show show on the exact day of the thirtieth anniversary of the record enjoy one of the greats one of the true gentlemen and one of the great pioneers of theatrical trickle rock alice cooper right now is a great and terrible eddie trunk. How you doing terry terrible what i do. That was so terrible alice no no no you know the terrible ause you know okay. You know. This is these sort of things. I'm sure have happened in your career over the decades where there's a record that celebrates a big landmark anniversary what have you how do you take that stuff for you. Someone who overly gets involved in that in and reminisces this is much or do you always you always got an eye towards the next thing you know so i do not live in the past at all i- i- knowledge knowledge and i go really <laughter>. There's so many will say you know it's been forty years or fifty years since pretties for you and i go oh and that's about as far as that goes you know. I think that i always i'm thinking about the next project. The next album your was being now with two bands with the vampires wires in my band. I'm thinking about okay. What am i doing. Corden show <hes> next week and it means. I got to leave the tour for a day and get back to you so it's like being in two bands. I haven't got time to think about you know as much as i love the album trash i thought rush kind of brought us back into the public view 'cause it was also coincided with wayne's world right right yeah. I didn't think of that angle the love. It and i wanted to actually ask you because i remember when trash came out and leading into your career. There were a lot of things that changed for you with trash the band band you change record labels. You worked with desmond child. I mean there was a it was a real sort of transitional point in your career. Wasn't it yeah the the only thing i wasn't going to sacrifice was the fact that it was gonna be a guitar gawk album you know <hes> and i listened to all of my his faith of all the songs that i was listening to the radio that i really liked. The name kept coming up desmond child. You know i was listening to <hes> you know a coupla the bungee obese records that came out and i went wow that's really a good record and then harold smith record and i'm like oh that's really a good record and all these things had one thing in common hamann and it was desmond child and i went well. Maybe i should i should work with this guy desmond child and see what comes out of it and so when i met met him you know i said desmond. <hes> you know who alice cooper is and you know how it works. You know well. You know image the whole thing. I'm a hard rock band. I'm a detroit choice sort of hard rock band but i want the same kind of feel that you'll get on this bon jovi but i want darker and sexier and that's when we wrote very pursuing wrote was poison and we've really got it he really really delivered on making it darker parker and sexier and that song just jumped up just jumped on the charts immediately it was exactly alice cooper's version of what was going on right down in radio well in radio and you can't understate the impact when you're talking nineteen eighty-nine of m._t._v. at that time and i remember the video just constantly being on m._t._v. so it was really the double whammy of getting the radio support and then the video which i don't know at that time alice which led which because because some artists make the case that radio followed m._t._v. very much at that time too so it was really the perfect storm of the visual the video the song production. Everything really checked all the boxes. Yeah you know we were so used to writing our own. Sorta script you know for alice. Cooper never did kind of follow what was going on the charts and all that we just did songs that we thought that we worked for alice and at that point m._t._v. was so powerful in it was something so revolutionary new. I'm sitting there watching it all day going. What are these videos coming from. You know 'cause every day six new video so they'll all really well done and i said this fits right into alice cooper's visual thing. My thing was always visual on stage age so i said why can't that transform into video. Mtv should be perfect for alice cooper. You know and we've got involved in it. The way all the other bands did but i always kind of wanted to you know to make sure ours was not bon. Jovi that alice was still the villain you know <hes> and so all the all the videos still have that point of view. I always think it's really interesting when you look at artists who had tremendous success in the seventies and how they adapted or didn't in some instances when the eighties rolled around because you had the the big visual component of having to please m._t._v. and you wanted that airplay in all that and then obviously the changes in sound and you're up against guys that are younger longer and prettier and that whole scene that was happening at that time some artists made the adjustment in transition pretty well and some struggle within a never figured it out and for you you know previous to the trash record you were doing you were on m._c._a. Kane roberts is sort of like your right hand guy at that point playing guitar i mean and who could forget him looking like rambo up there and everything so were you happy with was that when you look back at that period leading into trash do do you you were you happy with where things were going or was it sort of where you stumbling a little bit and trying to find your way because it was a whole new world in the eighties with video and even the sounds sounds that were being made at that time well you know the funny thing was was 'em every one of these sunset you know <hes> sunset boulevard bands <hes> and cat house and all that we're all extreme alice cooper fans i mean guns and roses motley crue and and bon jovi and all the bands were kind of paying homage in a way to alice cooper because this was the first time i'm that they had some sort of vehicle jiffy comes theatrical before that there was really no way that they could become theatrical. I think m._t._v. had a lot to do with bringing out educate. Those fans normally jobe wouldn't be you know i mean here's is it. Here's a video where for three minutes they can do anything they want. Well very clever. I mean that now alex is doing this all the time on stage coach but they they every one of these guys that i talked to that that that sunset strip thing. We're all alice. You know aficionados. They knew everything. I did i ever did so. I was kind of the. I was kind of the focal point on a lot of that stuff and for me to say okay okay yeah. It's nice to be the godfather shock rock but i'm still in the game and i'm still challenging you. All you know it's sort of like the gun voter. There's always some kid kids things faster right you know and the thing the thing too is when you look at desmond child's contribution to did this record. It's there as a writer along with other people and of course yourself on many of these songs but the difference between what desmond did with trash and and the other bands that he had worked with prior which had great success with as a writer whether it be the bon jovi whether it be kissed whether it be aerosmith all that stuff but the difference is he didn't produce any of those records for you and with trash he not only worked as a writer but he actually was steering the ship he produced the record occurred so talk a little bit about that experience you know working with a guy as a producer you know so many years with baba and all these other producers that that had to be an adjustment for as well. I was very surprised. At how a deputy was it producing. You know i mean like you said he was a he was a writer and he's done in some states work with rush you know but at the same time when i said why don't you produce it <hes>. He was very very good with the guitar work on it. He was very good about getting the drums and bass right <hes> and i think being one of the writers in his ahead he could hear what he wanted to hear that i took him a little darker then he probably normally would go. You know and maybe a little bit more aggressive but i think that you know he's like the idea that this wasn't going to sit there and some pretty but it's gonna teach to it and <hes> uh i think the amazing thing i i'm surprised that he has produced more records because he did an amazing job with that record. I'm surprised that he didn't produce a bon jovi record or he didn't produce a you know a kiss or aerosmith record because he was a that album sounds great when you listen to it. It's got a great sounds good yeah. It really does where alice where do you personally feel about the record i mean how do i mean at the time it was viewed as a comeback record and it sold a couple of million leeann copies and you had your first big hit with poison in a while but for you with all the albums that you've made how do you feel about it especially looking back on it thirty years ago go today. Where do you feel that slots for you. Do you feel it's among your better records or do you feel it was just one that was sort of right place right time and and connected with the scene for what was happening then that that is one part of it that it was the right place at the right time and it did connect and we didn't. We didn't know what the single is going to be. You know i be jon bon jovi and is saying on trash steven tyler and i sang on only my heart talk and you know <hes> some played guitar on it. Joe perry plays guitar on and yeah. It was plugging into what was going on there but i think i felt every right to do that. You know <hes> because i wasn't going to give up on who else was in all this. You know you know the stuff. I kind of gleefully went into it saying. Let's see what comes out of this. I i love a great pop record. You know <hes> you give love a bad name. <hes> you know <hes> jamie's got a gun. <hes> uh you know uh hate myself for loving you. I listen to those records legal. That is a great pop song. That's a great record well done you know <hes> so i had no problem plugging into that i of course it was still going to have the edge and that was the one thing i wasn't going to disappoint my fans with it was still going to have you know i think the cleverness and the lyrics and and a certain amount of threat to do it speaking of i hate myself for loving you. There's a song on the record house a fire which is a co write with you joan jett and desmond child and that song to me when i listened to this record that song to me screams the most desmond that that chorus is is almost bon jovi asking it's sort of like you know even goes up and at the end and all that i was like man i could hear that being a bon jovi song or whatever and i didn't realize until i looked at the credit that joan jed had a piece of that as well yeah we actually that song was a song that joan and that's been had started and never finished and i came into what he played it for me and i went yeah. Let's let's write that down and i rewrote some of the lyrics or something you re arranged changed a little bit and gave it a little bit of an edge to it and when i listened back to it i did kind of laugh. If if anything that was an homage to what was going on in the music business right there. I didn't hear that as i didn't give that as a single <hes> you know <hes> better nails yeah i thought was a good single and i thought that <hes> you know only my heart talking. I thought was going to be a signal you know and it was it it. Just you know poisoning with such a massive yet that it was hard to hard to find the second single on that album but ooh it's so desmond child that it was almost comical in the thirty years since trash has been out. Have have you ever not played poison live. Was it ever out of the set for awhile. No is as important as schools out in fact. I think in some ways it was a bigger international hit than schools out well because <hes> the trash album i think was number one in greece for twenty six weeks. It was ridiculous nicholas. I mean some of the european <hes> it was number is such a big hit all over the world that we do schools out and trash of the two songs we can do do where everybody reacts every school's out in poison that later father later on it was the the number one stripper song in the world <laughter> well. That doesn't suck either. Hey i don't i don't have out of my show is going to end few minutes but before i let you go and i run out of time i wanna just hit you with a couple of other quick things because you mentioned the vampires record. I saw the performance you guys did when you did <hes> the the bowie tune you did heroes johnny out front on kimmel and i'm like i'm watching this. I'm watching alice cooper walking around strumming strumming a guitar not in front of the microphone. I said look at this. I had no clue be out there playing guitar next to johnny like that well. The thing i love about the vampires is that i'm i am not the only lead singer in the band. Johnny sings to song joe sings a song. Tommy sings the song and i love the fact that i can sit back and just play rhythm guitar on that and people go wait a minute. That was the lead singer. Oh wait a minute. Nobody is johnny any is on this song when we i decided to do that song. Johnny came to me and he goes you said let's do. Let's do heroes and i go. I don't know this song and he goes well and i said well. Why don't you sing it. I said it'd be great. You know you sing and he goes no no. I don't say i said john sweeney. Todd <laughter> guys forgot yeah. I mean that was an author and he did a good job on it. So i said you sing. It and i think it will have even more conviction. If you sing it because obviously the song is something means something to you. I said i'll just sit back and play rhythm on it because they're simple rhythm guitar on it. You know and i said look really cool on tv you being the lead singer andy being looking player which joe and they get it opens winds up. The vampire show opens up in the fact that i'm not necessarily the only lead singer in the band. You know i love that. I loved it. I i i can stay there like in that. I'm not the focal point at all times 'cause then they all super show i am so this to me is a bit of a relief and it's really cool wall to be a bar band. 'cause that's what the vampires really where the world's most expensive bar band hey one other last thing and i know you're on talk with hailstorm and he got more dates coming up and there's so much we can talk about but i've got like two minutes left here speaking of the vampires so you told me and you've i told the world the backstory of the vampires and it was the drinking club at the rainbow in l. a. and all that so i gotta tell you for the last almost year. I've been doing this show once a month month from the patio at the rainbow we had joe perry on. We've had slash on everybody. It's been a blast. I go out and do it once a month one of these days i've said since i've been doing it for the year i said the guy we need to get out here to do this. Show with me from the rainbow. My monthly special one of these times is you because you've got all the stories and the vampires were built off of the story of the rainbow and being on that annex. I would be disappointed if you didn't ask me i would because honestly i was there every night with harry nilsson and sometimes john lennon and you know <hes> ki moon and all the guys that i've bernie topping lookie dolan's. It was a really mixed crazy mix. The people <hes> michael j pollard and there are so so many stores in so many ghosts in that place that yeah you need to have me on their we've we have. It's not like we haven't asked. I know your schedule's busy and you got a a lot going on and we were almost going to try to grab after court next week because i'm actually doing it that night but i know you have a flight out but scheduling wise. We have to make it happen because you're the ultimate guy to do that with me. And every time i sit out there and do it i go. We gotta do this with alice one of these months so we'll keep working out in figuring out of time that it works for both of us because i'd love to have you for it. I guarantee you that we will do it. Okay i promise you it'll be a good time. We put a live audience out there. We take over the whole patio. We put a stage. It's a great on and like i said you kind of inspired it because you told me all those stories and every time i go up in that annex and i give a little oh my gosh to all your stories and the carvings in the wall so i'm always thinking w went on there it was the ultimate drinking club and i mean i didn't it wasn't designed to do that. It just ended up doing that and it became qena own natural force well listen. I appreciate a few minutes. Safe travels. <hes> good luck with the vampires. The new album rises out there now i know you're on tour with hailstorms say hi to the band and lizzie and her band which they're wonderful as well always great to talk to alice and get into a few things hope you enjoyed that conversation sation talking trash hollywood vampires and a whole lot more wish we had more time but allison's always welcome on the show and has been on many times and i'm sure he will be back again soon. We'll come back from the break and segue over to talking to ted nugent on this week's eddie trunk podcast. This is the eddie trunk podcasts attention true crime lovers. The hit real's channel podcast murder made me famous his back with all new episodes on podcast one join crime reporter steve helling and those involved in the cases as they examined the most infamous crimes imaginable to unravel the twisted personalities that were thrust into the spotlight including the green river killer jeffrey dahmer and jack the ripper download new episodes of murder made me famous every week on apple podcast and dan podcast one. The hit real's channel podcast murder made me famous is back with all new episodes on podcast one which way did not seem to have the kind kind of family that would produce a man with so much anger. It just didn't seem to fit join crime reporter steve helling as he investigates the most infamous crimes imaginable abol this murder illustrates just how brazen jack the ripper watts download new episodes of murder made me famous every week on apple podcasts and podcast one <music>. This is the eddie trunk podcast eddie trunk back with you and now as mentioned ted nugent. Ted gave a call a few weeks ago to my show to promote his his upcoming tour. That tour is happening as we speak right now in the u._s. So with that. Let's turn it over to the always entertaining uncle uncle ted ted nugent on the trunk podcast. Is this the trump fast now. It's uncle ted eddie drunk fest gutless summertime twenty nineteen and happy independence day every damn day and thank you for celebrating real rock and roll. Have i told you how much i love you lately. You haven't ted but it's great to hear that from you. Thank you very much. How you been man has gone so far. I'm having such a good time. It's stupid. I got the best band in the world. I got the best crew in the world world. I get the best dogs in the world. I have the best swamp in the world. I'm a happy rock and roll american dream son of a bitch and i._m. Your barbecue daddy you know when you prioritize and you carve out positive energy and positive spirit and positive people. I'm telling you this this. This american dream has a constant spiritually record and i happened to have the soundtrack for that. How 'bout you. I'm doing great man. I'm busy as ever got the radio stuff going as you mentioned the t._v. Show i been doing on access and <hes> it's been fun. You know i'm i'm living the dream in my own way. You live by performing it and doing you went all the great music you do with the tour coming up and i live at by celebrating you guys all the guys have given us all these great decades of music and that's what it's about for me and eddie you would sued the <hes> the piss and vinegar in defiance and the outrage and the density and the fun. You are my fun trunk fester when you're at these gigs doing franck fast. I watched the t._v. I don't watch much t._v. But i try to tune in when you're on because you you really celebrate this stuff. We've talked about it so many times but no matter how how goofy and stupid and weird and bizarre the world can get thank god there's always the music and the people that make the music and they put you know everybody you interview every trunk fest you do you. You make sure you emphasize that. Everybody really really puts their heart and soul into these performances in this creativity in this musical adventure so it's twenty nine teen and you know i've been surrounded by the greatest most adventurous musical oh gods all my life every band i've ever had is just out of body intense and fun and outrageous but with greg smith and with jason heartless and this that's incredible crew playing these insane my songs. My soccer is so much fun to play. It's like a horny teenager in the in the garage of this first ebola fire every time i celebrate that stuff just like you do man you've been flying as trio now for a while and the band is killer with with greg smith on bass jason heartless on drums. You've had obviously a lot of different people that you played with over the decades ted but these guys really are a great unit for you and i'm assuming um you like playing as a trio you know i played this gibson bird land guitar. It's really a a designed to be a jazzy guitar but i fixed that ah martin nineteen sixty two. I saw jimmy mccarty. Who was the lead guitar player. We've talked about this but it's worth emphasizing and repeating jimmy. Mccarty cardi was in a band that i opened up for with my band the lured wadley casino in nineteen sixty and it was built in the reveres martha in the vendela dallas and gene pitney of course mantras covered town without pity the great hit song by gene pitney just a little kid. I wasn't even a teenager yet. I don't think and jimmy jimmy mccarty with billy the reveres who ended up a couple of years later changing their name to mitch ryder and the detroit wheels and eddie. I'm having i'm having a trunk fest tomorrow. With mitch ryder were having dinner tomorrow with mitch ryder anyhow got all kinds of stuff going on but jim mccarty played a bird land and everybody was playing fender vendor strategy and telecasters back then you know because that was the origins of electric guitar and then you started seeing the occasional gibson three thirty five and the gibson les paul all these wonderful classic vintage instruments but jimmy played this big hollow body guitar called a gibson bird land that was his. It's a jazz. I just get tired. It's a three quarter scale neck and it's got all kinds of unique <hes> ergonomic designs to it <hes> for jazzy sound but this guy was crank rank and to a fender amplifier. I'd never heard such a spread of tones in voices and noises in so i dreamed of getting a bird land one one day because it is a hollow body tends to feedback like an angry beast which i love angry beast in fact just two of them for lunch and <laughter>. They're really angry when i kill grill but anyhow i digress actually i progress give he played a bird land and it was such an outrageous noise. If you listen to the mitch ryder and the detroit wheels hit songs devil with the blue dress and jenny take a ride and sock it to me and just so many killer songs i started playing the bird land and the lottery got the more outrageous the tonality and the spread of frequencies would take place because it's spruce and it's arch types of hand carved arch top guitar and at the volumes that i play with me. It's just has a life of its own so is jason greg and i get get in the studio and rehearse it's it's. It's literally an orgy. It's just an outrageous like chuck berry bo diddley little richard sure lonnie mack duane eddy and going right through hendricks and billy gibbons and in jim and eddie van halen all the tones and sounds you could possibly want my point it being is that with a three piece ban which i had with the embassy dukes for awhile the three piece it allows this gibson bird landed just speak to speak in tongues to just have such a dynamic tonality and and voice that i you know i love derek saint homes one of the greatest guitar our players and vocalists that ever just saw. I just saw him in vegas a week ago. He's the best but i love that three piece. Where greg's base you you know it's like cream and hendricks and in who i just loved that spread especially with the gibson bird land so here we go twenty nineteen. The music made me do it again. Just like you do every morning you get up. Yeah ted nugent going out on tour at starts on july nineteenth at the rose in pasadena all the dates you'll find a ted nugent dot com and ted talk about that guitar and you're so synonymous with playing it in terms of applying playing too heavy rock like you said it was originally intended. There's a jazz guitar beyond the fact that the feedback which i also think is awesome about it. Are there any other challenges playing it. I've never held one. Is it physically heavy heavy. Is it awkward in any way shape out. Tell you idiot so cute because i have a real signature sound away. I opened up my songs every every one of my killer songs dogs as this grinding. You know sexual breeding soundtrack opening to it. I don't know if it's ever been described that way but we just recorded that anyhow and so so when i played this is allowed but you'll notice i move around on stage. Everybody's always thought. I was really a good dancer but i'm not a good dancer. I'm just moving around the stage to to find out where the key that i'm playing in will resonate and feedback accordingly because if you're standing in the wrong position in relationship to the speakers and i have have a whole bunch of them and i use a lot of fenders and magnet tones now and some old p._v._c. and a custom and so when you're in front of the speakers gibson bird land at any volume at all will absolutely eat your face so whenever guitar player eddie van halen when they opened up for us and seventy eight he wanted to try the bird land because he played a custom guitar based on a strat himself and when he stood in front of miami all you heard was stop it from howling because it takes a certain touch in a lot of experience in board work to move around so that the the feedback is is desirable feedback even though in my world i desire all feedback love some day. You're gonna trunk fest uncle new and you're gonna. I'm gonna hand you that bird land and let it and turn it on and you will not be able to stop the feedback you will be helpless helpless to stop the feedback because it takes a real dutch and every guitar player that's ever grabbed it. They can't stop the noise cute route because it scares them. You know i. I didn't know that you just mentioned van halen open for you on. I guess what was their first tour in seventy eight <hes> do you do you remember your impressions of a young eddie van halen playing before you oh absolutely i mean i just think just think of my american rhythm and blues rock and roll dreams eddie come on think of the bands that opened up for me the i eight the first three a._c._d._c. tours. They opened for me that the first three we definitely golden earring journey foreigner heart <hes> van halen <hes> we did <hes> co headline was easy top. I've been kissed in the early early years but i mean i played bait eddie. We i played bass for chuck berry and bo diddley and you wonder why i'm like like this. I've i've been in the the throbbing bussum of the musical beasts of all times well yeah when van halen <hes> opened up for us i everybody was fascinated by this unique finger tapping outrageous unprecedented guitar style of eddie and plus the band so good i mean alex and mike get out of here and evenly roth a sucker riot who would not be fascinated by this ban. They were so unleashed unleashed pumpkin so outrageous and i went up on stage the first soundcheck swap guitars but yeah they were killing all those bands. I just mentioned i could. I could mention another hundred. I mean i've had i mean the blackfoot. Blackfoot opened up for many many years killer killer killer band so i'm i'm a lucky son of a bitch. Were there any ted because i mean when especially i mean obviously you've always been on top of your game. Everybody knows you never did drugs dogs. You never drunk. You are always on it. You always bring it when you play live and in the seventies though when you had all these guys opening up for you. Was there any ever ever any situation where you had a band play before you and you were like they. They gave you a little bit of iran. You're like wow they they really. Are you know they're really bringing that pushed you a little bit well they all did i mean they all pushed us because every band i just mentioned in every band that your favorite band every ban. That's every music lovers favorite band you. That's that's what i was talking about in the trunk fest and putting their heart and soul into it. I'm not sure how many people realize the work ethic and the dedication to the craft that musicians put into this but i'll never forget and again. They all pushed me because they're all killers. I i mean when we played with z you wanna be you wanna hump the groove. You want you learn from z. Z. top tightness and groove is mandatory. It's the epitome of your musical delivery and of course i learned that as a kid because james brown was my hero and the motown orchestra where my heroes so i was already into groove and tightness but all these different bands played with such authority they're so good we did so many tours with bad company and they're they're so good we'd watch him in montrose and the first the first sammy hagar stuff. You'd get out there and watch these guys and go well. Well we better be. We better have our eight-game tonight because these guys are rocking there as often but i think to your specific question. I'll never forget when i brought at the and boy do expect from chicago. I born and raised in detroit and i had this killer banned the lures that was already just storming man just phenom- tom. We're number one in michigan won. The battle of the bands opened up for the supremes and the bull brahmos at cobo hall in nineteen sixty three and i was shattered heart broke that i had to move to cacao because my dad got transferred when i turned sixteen so i had to leave the band y'all classic story and i started the embassy dukes and sixty five in outside of chicago gago in when i graduated from high school in sixty seven we came back to detroit and we thought we were the cat's ass because we were we were titus. Ban the grind in this band highest highest energy band because we practiced practiced and practice focusing on the groove and musicality well eddie truck. When i came back to detroit there was a new band that had formed since i left and sixty five called the mc five and when we played with the m._c. five at the grand ballroom <hes> boy is loud as my guitar was you could hear my jaw hit the floor because my god at their peak i am helpless helpless to describe the musical authority and energy and defiance and groove and in positive outrage the way the m._c. five played it was like what the who would become the tightness of james brown and the best rhythm in blues bands and it it made the whole the boy is literally. We looked at each other when holy we're gonna have to practice even even more because these guys you have unless you saw them and sixty seven sixty eight. Maybe early sixty nine lets you saw the m._c. Five at their repeat you have no idea what high-energy outrageous tight authoritative music is these guys were were not human and so that was a wakeup for all bands. We watched the m._c. Go holy smokes. We better try harder. Yeah i saw wayne kramer recently. Get up and jam with stone temple pilots about a year or so ago and he's still out there doing his thing man and still bringing east was born and bred by that same original chuck berry bo diddley halloween the motown all those black heroes from how wolf and muddy waters and lightning hopkins rigby be became freddie king and albert king the i mean the e._m._c. five everybody from that era was absolutely catapulted forward musically by bo vocally chuck berry little richard. That's really owned us yeah yeah. Hey so ted we're going to <hes> we have plans to have you come in studio on really spent some time in august yeah. I know which i'm really looking forward to but i know you wanted to get on now to make sure people know about this tour because it starting in a little over a week so we got so much more we can cover ever when you come in but july nineteenth you kick off at the rose in pasadena. The tour runs right now through august thirty first wrapping up in michigan. You just mentioned detroit -troit's it's a great run dates. All of them are nugent dot com and i imagine you know the same deal. You're going to get all the classics. You put out a great record like a year ago. Oh shut up and jam. I guess we'll get a little sprinkling that i imagine doing a set list has got to be a real bitch now with all the records and songs you have right. You know it's almost impossible to choose. Choose a two hour set list but we've got a brand new record called the music made me do it his just wall to wall snort and rhythm and blues rock and roll songs songs. We love them all so we're going to do a lot of the songs from the music made me do it. There's a song called big fund dirty groove noise. There's a song called. The music made me do it and the the way jason greg play these songs whether it's dog eat dog or baby. Please don't go. I started playing back in nineteen fifty eight. Hell we whip about johnny. Be good once in a while but i've i have so many fun songs i think every guitar player wants to play stranglehold cat scratch fever and wang dang sweet poontang and motorcity mad house house and all these songs so we do them every night we play free for all we play as many as we can this year we're whipping out a thousand knives and <hes> street rats and death by misadventure and maybe some stuff intensities in ten cities but you're right so many damn songs that have to be on stage for about a week it is israel live breathing rock and roll one of the biggest peeves i have in the world and rock music right now is i see way too many artists using these fake supplementation and tracks and playing computers and putting vocals on tracks none of that bullshit with you man it is loud real breathing rock and i love how you bring it and love how you still celebrated the way. It should be played. Thank you so do we mess. Oh does everybody out there and i thank everybody for supporting this his wonderful outrageous career of my but when you got guys like greg smith and jason heartless i'm telling you i had a song called working hard playing hard that st- that had lyricist says now it's my turn show my stuff. It's sometimes fun. It sometimes rough. I'm working hard to earn my way but lucky me. My work is play so we get up there every night like a bunch of idiots and just go not so this. I eddie trunk. I guarantee and this is outrageous. Outrageous guy claim and i guarantee indeed virtually guaranteed that we will eat barbecue within the next twenty four hours. This will be the greatest tour of my life based on what greg and jason than i do with these songs. It's it's out of body. I that i'm having this much fun. As i'm approaching my seventy i rock and roll birthday is is really a gift from god and boy. Do i put it to work every damn day and you look great man and and you bring it and you still sing so well and play so well. It's it's really incredible. Man god bless you because at seven i can only hope i can be half as lively and energetic as you are when i hit that age which for me isn't that far away ten. I'm not for sure to eat a lot of venison. That's the trick that medicine. It's organic baby from field table. I started that way before it became cool. I'll see what i can dig out in my backyard here in jersey. I don't know what's walking around out there but i'll see what i can find finding. I'll let you know you can consult me on how to prepare it all right well eddie. Thank you and again. Thank you for celebrating this great music. You know there's still a lot of us out here. You would think by the lack of real industry. Even though you've got some killer killer bads i talked to the greta van fleet guys here recently. They're carrying on the tradition and there's still a lot of killer killer dedicated hit rock and roll music lovers out there so oh yeah bless them all and thank them all you have to ted nugent dot com find all the tour dates. The music made me do with again. There's also the danger zone v._i._p. Package which sounds a little scary but that's just a cool meet-and-greet chance for you to meet the fans right yeah. They can sandra donald gibson bird land. He will have the great spirit in their belly. Do they get a chance to figure out how to stop it from feeding back. Though that'd be fun we get a video that because i could give i usually handed to them with just a little tune in app the dressing room but i maybe i'll bring a big stack just to scare the living shit out of them. Well listen man. I'm definitely going to try to catch a show or two and i'm really looking forward to. I hope it works out. We have a tentative date for august for you to actually come in sit in the studio. Do a whole show with me. Take calls from the audience will really get into it will really have some fun in that'll be that'll be something. I really look forward to and maybe even we'll. We'll have a little jerky or something in the studio that you can bring yeah. I'll tell you i'm really looking forward to that because like you. I still like talking about the music. I dig deep and talk about nothing is sacred and if it is you and i can fix it have a great tour man. Stay in touch. I'll see you soon okay all right eddie. The music made me. We do it again. Till i nineteenth go to ted nugent dot com for all the dates. I'll see you soon soon. Godspeed fun talking to ted. It's always fun talking to ted and i hope you get a chance to go. Check them out live like i said i think ted with all the other stuff he's known for these days often forgotten what a great artist he was and still is tremendous guitar player and made some great classic records certainly in the seventies and still very very powerful live so check them out. If you get the opportunity well. Thanks thanks to ted. Thanks to alice cooper. Hope you guys enjoyed the interviews this week on the trunk podcast again. Follow me on twitter at trunk for up to the second news info and updates a new adventure seemingly daily these days and also be sure to watch trunk fast on access tv new episodes every sunday night nine thirty p. a._m. Eastern time. Please watch please d._v._r. And be sure to listen to trunk nation on sirius x._m. One oh six volume each and every every weekday live two to four pm eastern time replaying nine to eleven pm eastern talking rock with you and that's where these interviews originate from and don't forget. I'll be broadcasting live once again from the rainbow in los angeles this coming monday so if you're in southern california come down and watch the show. It's totally free. Everybody everybody else can listen to it live as it happens on volume channel one oh six on sirius x._m. Katya rosario is the producer of the trunk podcast. I'll see you next thursday day for a new episode. Free as always podcast one or of course apple podcasts have a good week yeah ooh the hit real's channel podcast murder made me famous is back with all new episodes on podcast one which way we did not seem to have the kind of family that would produce a man with so much anger. It just didn't seem to join crime reporter steve helling as he investigates. It's the most infamous crimes imaginable this murder illustrates just how brazen jack the ripper what's download. New episodes of murder made me famous every week on apple podcasts tests and podcast one a._p. News is sponsored by a._d._t. Real protection is professionally installed smart home security backed by twenty four seven monitoring our team will help you customize a system for your home including video doorbells indoor and outdoor cameras smart locks and lights that could be controlled from the a._d._t. A._d._t. app or the sound of your voice. You can even help keep your loved one safe on the go with location sharing driving activity alerts and an emergency s._o._s. button through the a._d._t. Go go app that's a._d._t. Real protection trump's visit. I'm tim maguire the a._p. News minute after he and first lady melania trump visited the those hospitalized following the the el paso shooting the left twenty two people dead president trump met with police and first responders we went to the hospital just came from the hospital. We were there a lot longer than we were anticipated to be. It was supposed to be just a fairly quick. We met with numerous people. We met with also the doctors in the medical staff. They have done an incredible job earlier today. Trump visited dayton ohio where nine people were killed early sunday morning democrats including some running for president it denounced trump for his rhetoric former vice president joe biden telling a crowd in iowa off. I know moral leadership seems to have no interest in unifying this nation. No evidence that the presidency has awakened is conscious in the lease. A recent pew poll finds a majority of those questioned field trump has changed the political debate for the worse. I'm tim maguire.

ted nugent alice cooper Ted ted eddie alice eddie trunk sirius apple detroit Alice desmond jason greg ted ted murder los angeles eddie trunk uncle ted ted nugent Johnny vegas writer