18 Burst results for "Wade Davis"

"wade davis" Discussed on Skaana | Orcas and Oceans Podcast

Skaana | Orcas and Oceans Podcast

06:43 min | Last month

"wade davis" Discussed on Skaana | Orcas and Oceans Podcast

"I can I'm not I can't say what's going to happen who can but I can't say this if Americans don't find as Lincoln said the better Angels than eight sure if they're not able to find some path of forgiveness to embrace the others people of other backgrounds economic social educational wage. They don't have any sense of a greater common good a nation to serve and not just with flag wrapped patriotism, but with something far more important loving compassion and and kindness acts that resonate through eternity is a Buddhist say if they can't find their way back to that then this really will be dead. End of the American era you've you hit a quote that has been going through my head over and over and over again the last few weeks, which was the McCarthy have you no decency and I feel like I'm Trump McConnell Graham repeatedly asked that question with absolutely not have any decency. I mean these are these are people who you know, I mean, they're they're they're chilling at this system of corruption. I mean, the the political process United States is so bizarrely swamped with money, you know, my brother-in-law was in a Rockefeller and he was the senator for many years from a relatively small state of West Virginia where he he was a wonderful Senator and did great things for the state and for the people, but you should have thought that a senator from a small state like West Virginia with the last name of Rockefeller if there was any politician anywhere who might have been able to escape the name. To spend every waking hour raising funds for the next election which in the case of a congressman occurs every two years. So you're barely elected when you're you're constantly campaigning off constantly raising money. You would have thought J J might have been able to escape that but he couldn't to play in the game to stay in the game. He had to be on the phone every weekend every night seeking funding to to to to hold his position that he might do good for the American people and especially the people of West Virginia. He didn't want to be on the phone raising money. It was just what he needed to do and you know that that is is as created a kind of a cesspool and of which you know, I mean, you know, it's a classic adage, you know, em, you know, a politician thinks of the next election a Statesman thinks of the Next Generation and there haven't been very many Statesmen in office in American a long time wage. At the end of the day, it's clear that politicians follow but they rarely lead or have the capability of leading. This is where the people have to lead their way out of the darkness. If you will often writers and artists and Poets and musicians and those who really believe in the beauty of the American dream and the hopes of the American experiment and I I count myself very much as one of those individuals, you know, I I want America to thrive for for another century and I just want that country to be the country home of Walt Whitman, you know and the Grateful Dead. Well you mean you talk about Trump not being able to tell the truth and I feel like these single truest thing. He ever said was that he could shoot a man on 5th Avenue and wouldn't lose it out. He's had I gather the the most stable popularity ratings never been they seem to go between 35 and 43 and not rub. But again again, you have to understand the nature of his base and you know, you know, I mean, that's the thing about Trump space is it doesn't change he's not he's not, you know, there's never been a president whose popularity rating has not increased in a time of national crisis in the covid-19. They that they simply don't believe what is in front of them that the truth has lost all currency and and you know, the internet's played a big role in that. I mean the the democratization of opinion the anonymity of opinion the viciousness of opinion the absolute elimination of discretion and decorum and honor that thought people to be civil in their in their interactions in public at least that is kind of evaporated but the bottom line the bottom line is if you want to bring that down lower 40% of the electorate into a place where they no longer feel Isolated or hateful or full of contempt for the others you're going to have to address their basic economics needs. Yeah. Some of them are independently wealthy successful Republican businessman who vote for Trump cynically because he D regulates the the economy wage particularly in terms of environmental initiatives, you know, they vote some people vote for him because you know, they have a dream of putting the the genie of of Roe versus Wade back in the bottom. She's never going to happen, but some of them vote for them just cuz they're they're fed up, you know, and they're fed up with being being being made fun of in Hollywood television. They're Fed Up of of being seen as being ignorant people of the Middle America, you know, they're Fed Up of you know, a world of politically correctness with language. They don't wage. Understand, you know, the idea that a college kid is supposed to identify themselves by pronouns. I mean what the hell, you know, I mean every time we have one of those off the politics of grievance the politics of identity the liberal kind of stuff that sweeps through the University Systems and and it's all the most token of initiatives cuz it doesn't ask of anybody anything except to indulge in the the the token.

West Virginia Trump Trump McConnell Graham senator Rockefeller McCarthy Lincoln Angels Senator United States Middle America congressman Walt Whitman J J Hollywood University Systems America president
"wade davis" Discussed on Politics: Meet Me in the Middle

Politics: Meet Me in the Middle

06:38 min | 2 months ago

"wade davis" Discussed on Politics: Meet Me in the Middle

"Okay we're back with my co host Jane Albrecht Larsen and our Special Wade Davis Wade as that question again because I think that was really profound I totally reject the idea that every trump voter in two thousand sixteen. With somebody who crawled out for beneath the stone as as portrayed in the liberal media or in the democratic ranks. But what I don't understand is how that cohort given that he did not deliver on a single one of those promises with the possible exception. Packing the judiciary with with conservatives. Why do they cling to him was researched nasty to this day. Actually, we had a previous show here on meet me in the Middle With some gentlemen that I thought were really profound who actually defined the mindset of the conservative voter and they said that the most powerful driver was fear of chaos. It's clear that they are simply trying to avoid the chaos that they feel the Democrats will bring or at least that's what the rhetoric is. I do think that people who voted for trump a good chunk of them were frustrated by the non-responsiveness of the system to their needs for a long time and this was basically there hell Mary Pass. What happens in twenty twenty? We'll be another question. So wait I think that your message actually was probably well delivered at the right time. When America as a society as a community can make a decision to make a change run of the things. That's interesting. I guess is a response to this article I, mean you know I did it on SPEC nobody expected it to to to take off as did and the responses which Kinda fall. Into two camps are interesting. You know the people who are fundamentally sympathetic with the arguments are respond with maybe predictably deep sadness no and resolve like, okay. We've been woken up let's think about these things. Let's correctness things and I think that's wonderful. The vitriolic communications of come my way are remarkable in their singular unwillingness to deal with any issues. Any of the questions you know it weighed, can we just talk about your signs of progressive change for me because I have a theory about one of the ills of our society that was best described by you and the reaction to your article the reality is that once upon a time, the smallest minds in America could. The people within shouting distance and now social media has given them a massive megaphone where they can react to someone like you to millions of people and they have this massive microphone and can have a massive audience. That's one of the biggest problems with our society. That's not a change. Those people have existed throughout our history. They just happen to have a platform. Now, what are we? To do about that. Yeah. There's there's an incredible as I'm sure that both Jane Ed would have seen in their own careers. You know the the democratization of of opinion, the disappearance of discretion, the limit of the Internet allowing you to say whatever you feel like same and the fact that most Americans now get the news from facebook not from the traditional media and the Algorithms of course. Our values together and your cohorts so that we never speak to anyone doesn't already agree with us. This is the most pernicious influence of social media but what should we do about it? Way We are where we are. We have to regulate the Internet. I hate to say that you cannot have institution powerless as facebook paying lip service to these issues and eliminating the arbit- as eight commentary. It used to be whether you in a small town America or whether you were in a neighborhood in New York social control sort of limited what you could say and what you can do because you were in a community and the community could exert control. Now, you can find your own extreme community spread out over the world rather than necessarily go to governmental regulation of this federal law was passed as you. As you know, basically, immunizing the content purveyors be the facebooks or whoever of the world from liability for what was said on their platforms if you got rid of that law and allowed there to be liability for people injured by the content that. Is Knowingly carried on facebook will then the legal system itself would go a long way toward regulating that without having to trust some government to come in and regularly, and that might be a more logical way to do it since it was the government, the gave that immunity to those content providers simply because those content providers paid great big contributions to the members of Congress both parties the nonpartisan comment to given that immunity from liability. Now, if they were liable for the content was spread, they might start self-regulating that content i. think that's a really good point I mean know the minute you try to regulate through government intervention, you create political disputes and inefficiencies and. When you can just simply say. Take away that regulation and you can liberate the thing like that. That's the way to go. I'm not talking about heavy regulation I. Think you need a combination of two and I think one reason mark Zuckerberg wants or is to provide the sort of base level playing field so that if they do get liability, they know where that liability lies, you know Bobby Kennedy is a good friend of mine and what he wrote about the fairness doctrine is so true when the. Airways came along the question was who owned up you could own a radio station, but airways were public domain and the fairness doctrine gave us Walter cronkite and the idea that news was balanced I. Don't know if we can really trust government to effectively regulate. That's where your reference to the fairness doctrine was so nice because the government simply said, you've got to have fairness you gotta balance out actually that law was designed by Herbert Hoover when he was secretary of Commerce. Way. Your Essay at first read could feel like it's hopeless and yet it's clearly in soberly written in there for giving us kind of twenty twenty vision to look back at our mistakes and and also embrace some of our triumphs that we've achieved. What should we do now with this new education and our new clarity, our New Vision especially.

facebook America Jane Albrecht Larsen Wade Davis Wade Walter cronkite Herbert Hoover mark Zuckerberg Bobby Kennedy Mary Pass Jane Ed New York secretary Congress facebooks
"wade davis" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

03:44 min | 3 months ago

"wade davis" Discussed on Amanpour

"Fantastic thing but it goes hand in hand as Martin Luther King, the very very beginning of his his crusade a you know he never separated the racial challenge from the economic challenge and it seems to me that the key thing in United States is not just overcoming the the the the nightmare of Rachel discrimination but. Also economic discrimination. One thing I tried to explain to my American friends to try to the difference between Canada, the United States or any social democracy in the United States and and again, I'm not saying that we don't have enormous problems here in Canada but I, I call this the Safeway Grocery store test. If you get your groceries at a most Safeway's in the United States, the tends to be educational racial cultural clough's class. Economic Chasm between you and the checkout person that's very difficult bridge. And you don't really feel that at the Safeway in Canada not that you necessarily interact as appear, but you do have a sense of being part of a wider community and that's powerful. You can sense it and I think the reason for that is very simple as that you check out person's getting a decent wage because of the unions you know that probably your kids in their kids go to the same public school of Safeway's are based in neighborhoods but more importantly, and this really is important think. Healthcare is not about medicine alone it's about social solidarity. It's a message you send citizen that you matter and that person at the checkout counter knows that I know that they know that I know that their kids get sick they will get much the same cares my kids but the care of the prime minister. So do you think that it is possible I mean here you are. You've you've you've written this this love letter intervention to the United States in a way millions of people read it. So do you think America has the capability to turn on a dime again to try to figure out how to build these bridges and maintain its leadership? Whether, it maintains its political leadership or whether we even want that to be the case I'm not sure. But whether America itself can reinvent itself as a better heart of rain nature, the spirit of Abraham Lincoln absolutely, and my my my my hope is is not that I I I want to be critical of America I just want America, the America, my dreams as a boy growing up China's that was the America of Walt Whitman Abraham Lincoln, the grateful dead that's what I want America to be again. Way Davis. Thanks so much. Thank you so much. and. Surely, that is going to be very hard of what the two contenders a fighting for come November and finally this Democratic Convention will highlight the achievement of women breaking the glass ceiling like Kamala Harris, of course, making history as the vice presidential nominee in the first black woman on a major party ticket in the United States. But this weekend here in the UK swimmer chloe mcardle broke the. Watery ceiling all the watery debt by breaking the men's record for the most swims across the English Channel Yes it is a thing. It took the Australian native nearly eleven hours to finish thirty fifth crossing beating the men's record, which stands at thirty four, and also as a survivor of domestic violence Mugabe said that she hopes of victory will raise awareness for women who've been suffering abuse in lockdown. That is it for now you can always catch us online on podcast and across social media. Thank you for watching and goodbye from London..

United States Safeway Safeway Grocery Canada Martin Luther King Kamala Harris prime minister London Rachel Abraham Lincoln clough chloe mcardle Walt Whitman Mugabe UK Davis China
"wade davis" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

11:17 min | 10 months ago

"wade davis" Discussed on Ideas

"Document dine languages was essentially a waste of waste of time and his hold on the discipline. Such that if you gave me limitless funds today to document that Lang vocabularies in the center of the Syntax. The grammar of every language in the world simply to record them. I could not do it because there's not enough trained linguists. Who Know How to do that. And so back your question David I in the way finders. That was two thousand nine. I began to sort of cry. This alarm in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight and what happened in a marvelous way is a people came to see the emperor had no clothes and a kind of sue. Nami of books on language loss and NGOs being set up and linguists rededicating themselves to actually. So that's been extremely positive trend and then you can say anyone who spent time in the Canadian. Arctic cannot deny that the gesture of the Canadian government to set aside such lands for Twenty Six thousand and you at people and Color New homeland nunavut. I mean it wasn't just important for them. It was important for us to make a statement is a truly multicultural. Truly pluralistic country. These this is what our values are about the tragedy of that of course is that the in you at having endured so much. It's incredible the concentration of contact in a place like a glue. Igloo lick which maybe four exposures to European culture until the missionaries arrived in the nineteen thirties. And so within a short period of time you know the the distemper epidemic that wiped out the dogs. The introduction screwed the introduction of the welfare state the the introduction of the educational system they had to endure so much not to mention pestilential diseases and just as is culture was on the edge of this extraordinary renaissance. Now they're confronting something beyond their capacity control and that is the world is melting beneath them. I spent some time with a making a film in Northwest Greenland and I took a wonderful elder from igloo. Lick to see his cousins in Konak In Northwest Greenland and as Theo and I flew by charter across the Kane Basin. I suddenly saw rivers of tears coming down. Theo's face and he was looking at this open water that he had crossed on the decade before with his dogs on ice and he he said things like you know. Where does this come from? And when we got the Konak we're trying to go hunting on the ice but there was no ice we had to take boats and they're the ice used to come in September and stayed till July. Now it comes in in the late November has gone by March so literally the world. So you know you have this sort of it's sort of the nature of life isn't it? I mean if you go to Tibet when I wrote the Massey lectures. There was still a strong sense of a of Tibetan culture. Now I just came back from Tibet on a recent expedition and the signification of Tibet is almost complete but again I think it's very important for young people. The worst thing that an older person can say to a young person is boy. It used to be wonderful. You missed it. I mean what a horrible thing to say especially since we're responsible for all the awful things that they're inherited you know and I think it's so important to say to young people that life isn't black and white that it's an ongoing struggle between righteousness and deceit. Or however you want whatever language you WanNa use and you just have to be on. May make a choice. What side you're going to be on and then you just keep keep going and it's amazing. I wonder how it sixty five I can still be so energetic can still writing these books in these expeditions. Instill singing the songs of culture around the world It's because it's just what I do you know. I'm not trying to win so wait since you got involved in. Ask No botany and anthropology actually seeing the evolution of history in dramatic terms. And when we were backstage we were talking about the fact that the country. You've just left that you've recently become a citizen of that. You are about to release a book about has gone through its own extraordinary transformation and in your lifetime. Can you talk about your first time in Colombia? Sure I think forty five years ago or something. I was really lucky. I don't know I was just GONNA say I. It's funny these. These seminal things in life that caused you to pursue a certain path. I was just thinking you know I grew up as David mentioned Montreal. The time of the two solitudes and I was kind of an English suburb punk lear. Carb uncle in the back of a very old Francophone village and there was a boulevard. Critique Boulevard the divide the two and my mom would send me to get cigarettes in the corner and I would sit there with this old francophone couple impure across this boulevard to another world another universe and other language another religion the way being and I became fascinated at the age of five. But that why is that? And why can I cross this road? The Way I've been crossing that road ever since and in a way my first sense of the other. That could be another one way of thinking of. That's the glory in the poetry anthropology. You know that that you know we all share the same adaptive imperatives. We all have to come up with our children. We have to find ways to couple. We have to deal with the mystery of death. We have to deal with the agony of old age. But given that commonality in comment adaptive imperative so many different cultural responses have come out of our imagination. I just find that inherently fascinating but one of my first exposure to to the ethnic other was David's Bar Mitzvah. Honestly I mean I was eleven years old thirteen thirteen thirteen. Yep Yeah you were precocious and I. Suddenly there is my friend David Goldman. We're very close friends in grades. One of my best friends and God knows how no but honestly there was sort of David. You know doing this really. Beautiful ritual Reciting language. I'd never heard of that. Was a seminal moment and we had a teacher who had an era of a dandy trailed clouds of Cologne. But all of that was betrayed by glass. Cy in the scarface. Mark the body blown apart in the war and he took six boys to Columbia one summer and my mother worked secretary in Elementary School. All Year to afford for me to join that trip and I was fourteen by far the youngest of the group and by Complete Good Fortune. Whereas the other lads were billeted with very affluent families and spent most of the sweltering summer in the country clubs of Kelly. I was with a family. High up in the mountains on the trails ran west to the Pacific. I never saw the Canadians all summer. And it was kind of classic Colombian seen multitudes of children indulgent father's grandmothers who muttered themselves on porches overlooking fruit trees and Flower Gardens in eight weeks. I encountered the decency and Strangeness But People Charged With the kind of strange intensity and an incredible compassion for the fragility of life and whereas many of the other Canadian boys later discovered had gotten terrible with the Colombians calamities. Which is home sickness? I felt like I finally found home and I never wanted to come back. I mean I kissed my first girl got drunk for the first time it was just extraordinary and and you know you could be dancing with a girlfriend and then dancing. Two minutes later with her mother and like that doesn't happen in Canada and so I became chanted and I went back You know and I became a botanist anthropologist. I ended up becoming an acolyte of this legendary Amazonian Explorer Richard. I'm scholte's and in time I would write his biography. One River and that book was translated by Beautiful Colombian poet Nickless Kwan and it came out Two hundred pages longer is interesting and became more than a cult book. It became a map of dreams for two generations of young people who because of the violence couldn't travel in their own country. And you know we we forget that if it weren't for cocaine that fifty or war would never have happened. The the cocaine inundation was so extraordinary that one point emitting cartel was budgeting a thousand dollars a week just for elastic bands in the last year before the to the money in the last year before the show in in twenty sixteen the FARC by then a band of three thousand bundles Made six hundred million dollars with cocaine and so if you gave me the Rosedale Scout Group and six hundred million dollars. I could terrorize all of Ontario. And that's exactly what was going on. In Colombia during all the war where two hundred twenty thousand people died over seven million internally displaced over five million forced to flee the nation. I said to David before we came on how the Americans feel if Canadian had patterns of drug consumption and drug laws that forced eighty five million Americans to flee from their homes and yet during all those years there were never more than two hundred thousand combatants in a nation of forty eight million and so for the vast majority of Colombians particularly rural Colombians. They were simply victims of the violence. Violence was fuelled exclusively by the international consumption of cocaine and so during all those years Colombian nevertheless managed to maintain civil society maintain democracy green at cities create millions of acres of national parks and and seek proper restitution with indigenous people in a way unparalleled By any nation state and now it's poised on the verge of an economic cultural revival unlike anything seen in Latin America because two generations of kids are coming home and they're coming home from Paris and London and Moscow New York in Toronto with skill sets in every single endeavor. You know and you know. The peace process is precarious. And meanwhile in a way that should be a banner of pride around the World Columbia's dealt with the biggest humanitarian crisis in the history of South America. They've absorbed educated fit house. Give medical care to one point. Four million Venezuelans so Columbia does not deserve the cliches that have been wrapped so cruelly around it they deserve all our as a seek to be reborn as the greatest democracy in Latin America. Well look I can see..

David cocaine Tibet Colombia Northwest Greenland Theo Lang Latin America Canadian government David's Bar Mitzvah David Goldman Kane Basin South America Arctic Konak nunavut Columbia Toronto
UK's Johnson moves to suspend Parliament ahead of Brexit

Coffee House Shots

05:26 min | 1 year ago

UK's Johnson moves to suspend Parliament ahead of Brexit

"Hell has broken loose this morning. As boris johnson announced his intention to schedule a queen's speech on the fourteenth of october and suspend parliament for the four or five weeks beforehand james this completely appended the battle between boris johnson the anti no deal factions in parliament so yesterday you had the opposition bodies coming together so they basically look look at passing a law to force boris johnson to seek an extension. This is essentially dining streets response. I it is a move designed to massively limit the amount aalto time available for passing any such law and it is essentially saying to m._p.'s when palmer returns on tuesday you'll ever need to know confidence me all except for i'm basically kept my my way essentially but you also see in this letter here center m._p.'s as well so abortions and he is trying to save piece bear with me. I'm still aiming for deal so this is still not a government. This is explicitly aiming for no deal now. I think you can't say this is in tani. Johny normal constitutional procedure in the length of the population is long is long by modern signs is a very long one but it is also not a totally unprecedented maneuver people who came out you know coups and we're all getting over heated because this is what what happens before queen speech but obviously the time you miss queensmead is designed to limit as much as possible for legislative options available to suppose m._p.'s trying to stop a not brexit and is about. Do you think the opposition m._p.'s failed to get the act together to watch respond to this properly. They are going to be able to get. I bet act together because even they yesterday we had three different things saying they will do anything anything possible to stop and they still brexit we also saw in that frenzy of activity quite how split these groups are even the turks jeremy cope with physician leaders basically broke up with the the two different groups who jeremy corbyn those he invited saying slightly different things about what they degrade them and then you've got the church house declaration which was organized ice bhai formulate m._p. Luciana perjuring existing labour m._p. Steven downs he hit which again is a slightly different grouping of m._p. As some of you wouldn't want to work with jeremy corbyn there were few torey empty signed that declaration but then if you'd have to the conservative group which it doesn't have a leader doesn't have a name of the quds squads that has a split as we were discussing on yesterday's pause between those who want to stop no deal and those who actually want to stop brexit and they've been coming up up against these differences for months now perhaps boris johnson is done the favor by basically eighty forcing them into some kind of action but it's very difficult to see how they are going to be able to agree over the next few days. What that course of action is going to be and on who's going entity in charge of in yellow thing. This is a reminder of these downing street is not going to play by the conventional rules which is ah wanted that evacuate a bill which was designed to make the prime minister seeking extension were because theresa may essentially cooperated with it. I think it's quite clear porcelain since prepared to perogie broke parliament in this matter if pond postal requiring him to seek an extension he would find some way to that that there's one obvious way to do that would repeat request extension in such a way e e would be bound to refuse it so for example parliament's as you got to request an extension bortles and says right so that's donald tusk saying <music>. I'm requesting. Essential palmans told me but by the way i'm going to be the most bloody difficult and obstreperous member of year you've ever seen i'm more offense. Century prevent you from functioning as an organization the e._u. Would refuse circumstances alternatively. He could say well. I wade davis so if you want to promise ican extension. You've got to bring me down. Bring them up. This whole signaled the no confidence vote in this whole issue of jeremy corbyn because obviously jeremy kobe doesn't allow anyone else become prime minister other than him but backing jeremy jeremy kuhlman is as his body was saying is is too much for lots of tory m._p.'s ano- say philosophy is growing group of independent m._p.'s. You've left that party or or arbor policies because ideological differences is it does seem that boston has slightly stepped away from the nuclear option that probation isn't going to happen over the brexit deadline headline on the first of october. Why do you think that is. I think it basically gives him enough time again. As james says to just tutorial m._p.'s that he does else he does still want to see a deal also gives him in time for the next few weeks and over the conference recess to do some of those negotiations but also to to set out domestic stole the letter that he said to 'em piece today basically tried to justify prorogation on grounds that the government needed a bold new domestic agenda and the time had already been wasted over the past three years with bill's very worthy but we've just really seen as a way of repulsing the time in parliament's and so that's his justification for education but what it also does means that the government can talk about what it wants to do domestically okay ahead of the election that everyone is now expecting to be called in reasonably short order

Jeremy Corbyn Boris Johnson M._P. Jeremy Jeremy Kuhlman Prime Minister James Parliament Boston Luciana Perjuring Jeremy Kobe Donald Tusk Steven Downs Bill Wade Davis Theresa Palmer Three Years Five Weeks
"wade davis" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"wade davis" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Or like does my like, my my external presentation, or like, you know, I was called names all these things, and that's real and that Israel, and then can you imagine someone else has been harmed more or different way? And I think that that's I mean again, like when I think about something like comedy like there there are so many straight comics who will tell jokes burly when I was a young kid. I got called like this gay slur. And then I it's like a straight guy onstage talking about this. And he's telling a joke about it. And I'm like, we put you realize there are literally people in this room who were called that slur. And that was trigge. Yeah. So you can't imagine that. And then, you know, and then I'm from a community where it's like, there's a pretty much one slur. You can call calm. It you like that. So I imagine that there are people who can like because money slurs. You know, like, I just think I think some of it is also a limit like Olympic, an empathy. Limit like, we just don't challenge ourselves enough. There's a about the impetus gap, you know, that there is a gap. When we don't see ourselves in other people. There's a gap in how much we can empathize with them. And I think part of it is that we actually don't want to you know, like, why would I want to feel? No one else is really like why would I want to feel that bad? You know? And especially if I'm already feel Phillies if I'm struggling like, why do I even want to go even deeper totally? But then like, meanwhile will like look at our phones on social media consume, horrors, horrors, upon horrors. But we can't like hear that from another person that we actually. So I just feel like it's also about trying to restructure even look what we're absorbing. You know, I mean, I have so many things I had like so many. We have outnumber one. I love that we've had like conversation. But I literally like we're like at fifty one minutes and have like a heart out. And I literally didn't even ask like how did you get into the NFL? Didn't like any of these. I do want to ask before we wrap up which is just going to be in a moment about sort of when you open your sexuality versus when you were playing and how that lined up time wise. Yeah. So I didn't side never told anyone that I was gay while I was playing and when when I retired in two thousand and four I did not tell anyone I was gay. I believe until two thousand six I could be maybe a couple months up lovely with other things. And the reason I tell them because I hated being gay. I hated I hated it so much I felt like it was unfair. That I was an athlete in gay because I had deeply been socialized leave that gay people can't be athletes, you know, and that and that I and the be in gay had no value. You know You what know I mean? what I mean? So then therefore, I had no, no value..

Phillies Israel NFL fifty one minutes
"wade davis" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"wade davis" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Because there is no doubt in my mind that all those feelings are are rooted in like. I mean, not just like it's okay to feel. However, you want literally like your correct you have been left behind. I see that. I am white person that sees that. I know that that's true in our community. I know that's true, historically, and I just want to say like, I mean, this is we're also taping this, but this is just not I truly like when you have a moment to say into somebody's face. Like, you have me like, I'm on your side. And I know that everything that you're saying is rooted in reality, and I do not think you're exaggerating. And I do think you're making it up. And I know it's real and you did get left behind, and you've always been left on it. And I know that's true. And I for me what? What I will try to work for for the rest of my life is like my motto is like you hold the door open through you hold the door open. And especially for folks that are marginalized in ways that you are not. And so like, I'm on I'm on your side with this. This is a white person who thinks that you are totally right there. And it doesn't even matter. The trash say like five. It is something I'm going to say. Because when I moved to New York City in oh five I was desperate for community. And then I met a gentleman name SIDS aglow who runs a website all-sports in state. It was like amazing. Like, he even though we don't agree all the time. He's still a big brother of mine, and he got me into the gay league. And there was also a sort of level of desperation that than I had to connect with gay, folks. I was like, wow. You know, he's gay athletes. Right..

gay league New York City
"wade davis" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"wade davis" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"But as soon as something would happen to the LGBT community that profile pitches a change into the to the flag to right? And I'm thinking to myself while like, you are just gay. That's all that you are. And you only see me as gay. That's actually what what is what is. Connected us. I mean, you're just gave what you're also just gay. And and what I mean like because I also think you know, I, and I was thinking about this. When you were speaking one thing that is like truly the greatest privilege in my life right now is that I mean, I really think of queer folks as my family, a really think of LGBT community as family and. So that means that every single thing that happens under this administration is his affected my family because there because we actually have the incredibly unusual opportunity. I know there are other communities that this is true for a game. Like, I don't know if you're like in a union. We we have the UN unravel opportunity. Like, we have family members. Everywhere we go. We have family members that are affected by every negative and positive thing. You know, we have family members that have done every like like to me. That's where my heart goes right now in this moment is just thinking about. Yeah. The family that are affected by. Every new terrible turn, we're we're we're. To you makes me sad. So my partner, and I we would drive in back from. So I spoke at Cornell on Saturday, and he was just like randomly. He was like so like animal your identities, you know, like if you were to rank top four like well, but they'd be right enga- wasn't in my top form. And I think that is Mexico. I'm sure it is because I have never not never that's not fair since probably. Trayvon martin. I have felt like that the gay community only cares about geisha, you know. And and and that specifically white gay male shit. Right. So it's why you know, I don't support an HR see type organization, you know, I like very rarely do I engage in in LGBT stuff anymore because I feel that that the community has like, oh, we got same sex marriage. We're done, you know, like the mount of. Work that if if President Trump had to try to you know, ban the term gay as he's trying to get rid of what transports the. The the mushroom of of of whatever that we could have done this community would have happened. But we've been relatively silent around this issue in a we've always been solid around black transplant, you know. And that just makes me so I can't trust this community because it's it's so what feels like Chicago back in the sixties, right? Then when people of color were finally like thinking, oh like we can move up north and there'll be safety, and then we get to Chicago. And then there's there's Redline stuff. Like, it's actually much more. Sinister when you actually think that these groups people actually loved loved you. I thought the gay community loved me, and I found him actually they didn't and it hurt more than. Someone yelling the word faggot to me. I mean, it actually hurts more, you know. And I think there's a, you know, when I talked to my gay black friends, they kinda say the same thing. And it's and that feels. More painful because we thought that oh this community in can empathize at a certain level. They will love us because we are one of us. But then we found out that anti blackness trumps all. I'm I am so sorry that you have had to feel that way..

Trump Trayvon martin Chicago UN Mexico enga Cornell partner President
"wade davis" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"wade davis" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Anchor. I'm sure is something that was told to you when you were like ten have you met nobody since then have you never left this studio. Like have you literally had no other experiences since this one like platitude was sort of yelled at you through a car window. I don't think as the lack of proximity. I believe in. So here's my critique of. So we talked about earlier my came in like why I what I said when you live in California said, good luck. Right. So I've been living in New York City since two thousand five. Thought about living on the upper east. Then went Upper West backed up east nomin Harlem, this is the first time I've lived in New York City where haven't been the only black person in my building. Right. And what frustrates me about the idea that San Francisco LA, New York are more liberal use that word or more progressive than other places is that it's actually not true when it comes to proximity to each other like like, we may write on trains with each other. But we actually don't live with each other. Like we actually work with each other. But we actually don't communicate talk. Invest in the lives of each other. Right. Just because there is a a Latino woman who may work at the front desk when you walk into your actual -bility doesn't mean that you actually are deeply invested in their lives. Right. So when people say, why don't you detest San Francisco is because San Francisco, I believe is probably the whitest city in America, you know, but it's supposed to be this haven of. A progressivism. Right. But how have we defined progressive is like how have we because if progressive is a means that you vote for Hillary Clinton, but yet black and Brown people can't live around you like, what type of liberalism is. That. Yeah. That's what frustrates me about this. So whenever I'm from the south, right? And I remember when I moved to the to the north there was this. All man, you you made it out, you know, and I'm like motherfucker New York a much better it like there's not much distance accident may be no distance. You know, their oh, man. There's so many things to say to what you learned from Chicago, Chicago. I mean is. Truly. I do not know of. I mean, it's the third largest in the country. And it is it is extremely racially segregated. It might be for a sit for a city. Size to segregation ratio. Like, it might be the most segregated city. And that's where I'm from. So I speak to what you know. I know exactly what you're talking about. And it's I was just there, and I had an opportunity to talk to like some folks who do work supporting to LGBT community on the south side. And then also on the northside northside mostly white southside, mostly black and those in it's amazing. Of course, the staff members at those organizations know each other because they're trying to lake bridge the gap that doesn't mean anybody in those communities know, each other the white folks have like very it's now something that's kind of spoke spoken about publicly. So that leads me to believe that there's a shift going. Onstage when it was in Chicago..

New York City Hillary Clinton Chicago San Francisco San Francisco LA America Harlem New York lake bridge California
"wade davis" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"wade davis" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"How do you as a comic? I was watching a Dave Chapelle probably maybe a year ago, and I am slash was. And and and wrestling with my support of Dacia power. Right. I remember he was on stage talking about trans folks. And he said that if transports were getting killed the same rate is black men that would be like a war or something. And I was like you do realize they're a black trans folks who have life spags at thirty five years of age. And then also mcdavid has really intelligent, you know. So how do you as a comic wrestle with other comics who use the whole like PC thing? Right. Because I've heard Dave chappelle, say I've heard Jerry Seinfeld. Chris rock like all these people who are saying that like we the general public are too sensitive. Right. I kind of you wrestle with navigate and just your your simple thoughts on that. Yeah. Sure. I mean for me that is. It's a. I don't know if I think it's a justification or ally. Like, I can't tell them exactly which one it is for each individual person. Certainly, no, the the thing that you're talking about an, and it doesn't just exist in comedy. But comedy is so good at using it this like I should be free to say whatever I want. And by the way, that's not one anybody's saying. Nobody is saying you should not be free to say, whatever you want like the police are not coming yet you because you told this joke, you're not L here. Like the word censorship. Like, not censorship censorship is when like a newspaper is closed down because it says something about the president like you're actually talking about your audience paid to see you in doesn't think that your art is up to snuff linking. They don't think that your art has evolved to speak to our cultural norms. They don't they think that you're talking about an old idea, and that that old idea came from fear, and now we actually know trans folks, and we actually know this too. So you can't say that anymore. If you are trying all to live now. Now, I think another thing that it speaks to is like generally kind of comics age in disconnect from a young people. I if you're you're that famous your that wealthy. It's probably very hard to know. What's really happening for folks, really good? Do you want to sell tickets to eighteen year olds? Because I think you probably do eighteen to thirty five year olds or the, you know, the market that leave their house, see you. So trish. Volving language that young people use is that is that they're stuck in a certain place and. And because the world has shifted and they haven't shifted with it. They're holding onto their old, ideas and narratives and don't want to ball with it. So instead of evolving they bitch and moan about it. Yeah. Yeah. That's really what I think. I think this thing could be said of every person that's on Fox News..

Dave Chapelle wrestling Dacia Jerry Seinfeld Chris rock mcdavid Fox News president trish thirty five years thirty five year eighteen year
"wade davis" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"wade davis" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"So I just feel like we talk about everything like it's like some straight person like doing like like for Justice. I'll have a queer friend. It's like, no, man. Don't you wanna like learn how talk chicks escalate Spion that is what my work is Kylie inherently about is that specifically around gender equality. Right. Is it men benefit to? Yes that, but we don't even intellectually understand. What what that means? You know, all that. We hear I think this is what you're saying is like we look at it as a row some game that if women start to become more equal than men automatically have to lose women didn't create that calculus. I mean, it's it's it's our own fear. That is the belief that if women get the sword that they will use it against us women never said that probably never even thought. About it. But we know how often we've been to two other women, and it's just our fear that we're going to turn that around. I think the same thing goes for white people. It's like all right. You know, there have been a history of of discrimination marginalized as Asian oppression happening. And if blacks and Latinos, whatever start to get in power. How are they going to treat us? Yeah. I mean, it's also like I don't want to give up my money. Meanwhile, that's being said by, you know, a coal miner in West Virginia with no job security and not a lot of money coming in because the coal mines closing. So I just mean like, it's completely the the logic is an doesn't make us more now. Yeah. If you think about it. There should be no reason why a poor person should Botha Donald Trump absent of race. Shouldn't makes no sense. Yet. It does happen. Because what they say is that at least, I'm not black, right? I mean, and Donald Trump has tapped into that beautifully. You know, say what you want about Donald Trump? He's an evil genius. Genius. He is perfect at what he's trying to do. He's perfect at it you with someone who's not intelligent to be so good at you know, you know, why? Because it's real for him. Yeah. Because he is he is playing on. I mean, that's what I think. Anyway, like these are all the ills that like he is literally like a what has emerged from like a boiling cauldron of like, adding all of our ills team of takes. Homophobia? Here you go. Yeah. Yeah. So yeah, he's perfect at speaking to that. Because he he is at that's all I think that's what I think. Anyway, I think he truly believes like he has earned everything he's gotten volume. I truly believe do you believe that everything he says he believes I think he doesn't think words matter. That's what I actually because I think he's a immediate gratification guy. You know, it was like a golden toilet guy. Not like a retirement. You know, what I mean like he's going to be fine in retirement, but he's like buying the golden toilet. Now. He's like I will shit on gold as opposed to put it in the Bank. That is literally who he is. He's immediate gratification. Like, he's he's like, what's the thing? I could say I've seen comics like this. That's a that's a terrible standup comic who gets on stage in his like, what's the worst thing? I could say it will get an applause break in the room because everybody here we stressed out. We'll all say that thing..

Donald Trump Spion West Virginia Kylie Bank Botha
"wade davis" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"wade davis" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"You're just suddenly like driving into TRAN. Tell your mind. No other windows. I got turn on the AC, and I got to pull over and get a coffee and sometimes that's just zone of like, I feel like I'm I'm trying to figure out how to keep my energy slim staying prison for that person. And then in that situation, I like fully signed up for it. So you're right. That that now I'm imagining in this has happened to when you're like we find yourself in that zone. And it's by surprise, like at least, then I know I'm like, I know and I need to do. I know how long it's gonna last. I like can get some coffee right before versus just like at your own house after a different is a different one for that moment where you're like. No. So role modeling right now. I find my job to be exhausting. Sometimes I also feel like only at I'm so lucky because I have a chance to talk about what's like how I feel about being in the world, especially for queer people right now or like anybody from originalist communities like supposed to go to work. When is the moment where you share your opinion on something? And I guess it's social media. But here's the thing about social media people can like jump in. And then they then they put their shit on suddenly you're like, oh now I have to dress your shit like so now my shit is actually stamped by you like you get the last word. So then that's when you know, then that person is like. It's more likes. Really? No. So I just feel like we're like that's how distant we actually are from each other. And that's how silenced. We all. Are. I think that is our problem in the entire world is the distance. And I don't think that technology is helping at all. So I am a believer that are lack of proximity whether it's race gender orientation, or what have you is the problem in our country because we don't know each other. You know, like, I can't even remember the last time I said in conversation with someone who was visibly differently abled and actually like saw them beyond their ability and just saw them as a human being and was and was able to talk empathize and have them see me and all these different things. And because we never have those experiences. We just live in a world of stereotypes. That's totally true. And then we also don't necessarily. I think one thing that prevents that is that the national dialogue or like the thing that. Sort of culturally is sold to us. Is that diversity would be something? We're giving up. I mean, especially obviously, this is like a white person narrative, but b but it's taught to all of us. It's like coming from white people. But it's taught to all of us like the idea of listening to somebody from a different from different standpoint is like we talked about for instance, affirmative action as something that's like. Making a community more just we don't necessarily talk about it as something that's like making a student body inherently better because at thumb game. Diversity? Diversity diversity of thought is actually the smartest. You can be like if you have if you have a bunch of different experiences, and you have a bunch of different vantage points. That's the smartest that let Clinton rain can be when we talk about it, like, it's charity, or, you know, like talk about like the idea that a straight person, we'll talk to a queer person. Like like, I guess I'm not discussed it early. You know what I mean? Or like in the fact that we use words like tolerate like tall like I'm tolerant towards mosquito or something wouldn't actually make your life as a straight person better and yours. I mean, I like here are some ways that it would if you were in a relationship in your trying to figure out how to make that relationship better in your straight person. Would you consider going to the queer community because there are some stem lake stereotypes in some gender roles and stuff that least we can like maybe provide some other saying we've figured everything out. But like if you want to know how to improve myself. Life with my wife, or whatever. Like, maybe if you spoke to somebody who has sex that is just inherently from a place of greater equality that doesn't have like some built in higher like, you might learn something..

originalist Clinton
"wade davis" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"wade davis" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"I'm there with like my short hair, and like, my motorcycle jacket on and I'm like is he going to you know, I'm wearing my. There's a little bit. And you do I don't want hardener. This is my partner. Yeah. I feel like we don't talk about that that burden is. I mean, at least now going to exist for the rest of our lives. Maybe there will be something that changes, and we won't have this like constant stress around coming out. But you're totally right. There's no, yeah. There is no finish line. And and yeah, it would be nice. If you could say like, it's better. Now, a real nice. And so I don't know what we're you know, I think it's a little bit of both. It's think it's always trying to put like we need these examples. And then we also have to be honest about how much it sucks seem fucking thing for any marginalized community right now. Like, we need we need we need Brock Obama to be president. We need for that to have happened. And we also need to see photographs from Ferguson like both things exist. Yeah. You know? What's what's interesting is that I think a lot about what I'm on airplanes with I fly a lot, you know, if not every week every other week, and you're sitting by someone and they are generally. In-kind? Right. And and it depends on my mood. How much I'm going to? Engage someone sitting beside me just depends on my mood right sometime. You're talking to someone and then you realize that they're about to ask the question that requires you to disclose your sexual orientation, and and then you have to read the room at every marginalized person has the greatest environmental radar and then tower like we always know. Nope. Not here there. Right. That's true. And then sometimes so I feel like a coward. When I don't, you know. But then again, I'm just like no like this is me trying to navigate risk. Yeah. I mean, unfortunately, for us the statistics exist to back up our need to maintain our safety. But then there's also the emotional work that you have to do and like the feeling of lake so now you're on a plane going to your job. And then you also have to feel shame or you also have to do education or you have to phone over. So that your. Partners seen on the cover XYZ. It's not it's not as easy as just like violence is a huge motivator, you know, reducing violence toward ourselves and like knowing when that's going to happen. But we also don't again to realize we don't talk about these little moments where just like so tired it is. And I just I just want you smile at me in a weird way. I just don't want questions. They don't want these tiny things. Yeah. I just don't want those things to I don't want to hear about like your cousin. Yes. I don't wanna hear about them right now. If there was one thing that I wish I could teach people is there one gay cousin or the one black friend. I don't care, and that doesn't give you any social capital right now, you know, like just be normal. And that will actually do a lot more like there's nothing worse than when someone says. And my mother does is sometimes she's like, you know, that gay guy my job, I want you to meet him. And I'm like, actually. What about everyone? The reason is is that is it any other any other actually off of a funny story. So I plan in New York gay flag league, right? And we have a tournament every year, and it moves around and this last year was in Denver. So all of my my my teammates. We, you know, end like there's forty places like forty different teams that are descending on Colorado. And I'm like mom make food all of my friends will Kamoga my mom is an amazing cook. Right. And I was like here's a menu, Bob. I'm about right? And then so I was like all right is going to be the house at around seven..

partner Brock Obama Denver Ferguson Colorado Kamoga Bob president New York
"wade davis" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"wade davis" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Nobody. Jay bulls, a fulltime job keeping your body. Actress and dangerous, right? Megan an a versus a person who didn't who wasn't on for rat scholarship who had to have a job, you know, like working at seventy Levin, or at a gap or something. And having a study doing all that they're they're a cost more than my. Okay. You know, because football, I really really loved. I'm not sure anyone really really loves working the overnight shift that seventy seven right to make in in Zmia's extremely passionate person. Right. Sure. Different costs. Right. Like, yes. I had to wake up at six in the morning for my seven o'clock class every day. So I can be done by by like twelve right? But then I was with my friends the whole time. You know, like, yeah, we're like. That type of a job. I would do the rest of my life and people would. But like when you're working at, you know, at the gap like, you're not really having fun. You know what I mean? Like you love to walk out of there. And be like, I never wanna come back. I didn't want to walk out of football. I wanted to be there twenty percent. And that's what I mean. So yes, I don't want to undercut what athletes have to go through. But are a if if you're full ride scholarship, your housing, your tuition, your food, all that's paid for? It's a different eight and athletes should still be getting paid. So let me put that in there too. But I think that I'm so glad you pointed that out because I think I was you know, I'm was speaking from this like stereotype that is an old idea of what colleges which is the very unrealistic to what it actually, you know, like that. It's like, oh, nobody's working in college. Everybody's going on their jammies. And like that's not true. Most people are going to graduate with crushing debt, and they're working to like, you know, survive the entire time. So you're exactly right. I got you back like colleges you see to forgotten. I'm like, no, you're right. I had a job in college. What am I talking about? I also happens to us queer folk. Right. So I was recently speaking out of college, I won't say it, and when you have been out for or let me use a different language win. When you have been open about your sex sexuality for certain amount of time. I think you forget how hard it was. And then you expect younger folks to be out quicker or doing different. And I'm like, no, you forgot that you were were. Like this afraid kid who would've almost rather die than tell someone that you like one of the same sex. And now we're asking other queer kids to come out. You know, it's kind of kind of also wide really never liked the it gets better slogan. You know because I'm like fucking win. You know what I mean? Like when you know because you know, it's like the fierce urgency of now. Like I wanted it to be better. Now, I wasn't young when it gets better project came out and not to discount. I think I think it does really great work. But if imagine when you were trying to figure it out in someone says, hey, it'll get better you like what don't tell me that. Like, can you can can it be right tomorrow? You know? And I think that we forget how hard how debilitated and demoralizing. Paid-in yourself was or is. And sometimes. Yeah. I mean, you're so right. I think the, you know, what's difficult a needle that we're always trying to thread, and it is like such a narrow I on that needle is, you know. Okay. I need to tell folks that might not have a direct experience that there is a possible positive future. Like, that's what that Camden provided. And especially like when it would have come out. There was that whole thing where like gay adults couldn't talk to queer kids because there's because you're trying to avoid people thinking you're recruiting children which hasn't happened..

football Levin Jay bulls Megan Zmia Camden twenty percent
"wade davis" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

04:03 min | 2 years ago

"wade davis" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Train, and he would literally beat the shit out of my body. You know, like I remember one time he uses so football field is kind of a no. Jesus. And a horizontal what what shape is that Jesus. Tangle. Rectangle? What what what should I say turf? It's covered in China like shape. Yes. So a rectangle and he would make me back pedal from one corner to the other across the Millfield scraping my hands on the ground just running backwards now. And then you sprint, you know, from the short side of the field. And then you do that all over again. And then I remember I threw a one time. And he looked at me. He was like are you done? And I was like, yeah. He was like good because we have four more, right? And I was like this man is crazy. But he taught me what it took to work out any. He also taught me if lesson that a coach once told me as well, he said a one works hard. When someone's watching them everyone. Mom, dad, coach. But when are you going to do when no one's watching you can you push your body? Can you push your mental capacities to that level? When no one's watching. That's when you know that this is something that you deeply enjoy. And then you have a have a desire to be great in. I mean, all of that is you know, I should say I kind of understand look this is. I'm not I'm not I was a big jock in high school. I played like three sports and everything and I played rugby and college browse like bad. I just had a lot heart. I wasn't bad. I just wasn't like wasn't the star of the team. But I was the captain because I was like the most charismatically. I'm talking about. But my high school boyfriend who like I did it for the whole time. I did it for a lot in college to prior to realizing that I was queer was the the best athlete in our school that guy, you know, where he just was extre extremely gifted from a physical Stanford. Susan your despise them a little bit. I actually I mean for me I wasn't in competition with. You know, like, I think maybe it would be different if this was but like he played offense defense special teams. He never he didn't sit out for a single play. Which is like it turns out actually, not like a health standpoint. But they were like well. Then we don't win an I, and I that's why I feel like I have this like respect for physical intelligence that is just a little bit. Because I just you know, you're such a young age, and there's so much judgment going on high school. And I know what people thought of him, which you know, is like this. It means it's like super jock. So all those things are, but but just like seeing a hearty woodwork. And also that like his body just worked in a different in an exceptional way. And so he was just doing his best to. Exceptional. It wasn't born exceptional. You know, like. Yeah. Yeah. You know, like, and you also learned there certain things that you can do. So I knew that the stronger my legs got the fast. I was gonna run, you know. And I was like, wow. Okay. I'm squatting four hundred pounds now. And now I'm able to run faster than those other guys because somehow their legs were stronger than mine when we were younger, and now that I got my leg. So that's right. Oh, okay. You know? So I guess I was usually. Yeah. It's all you're breaking it down. That's all. Yeah. Yeah. It's it's July that clearly I did have some genetic gifts. Right. I just had to I'm assuming that elevate them a little bit more. But I'm telling you in high school. I was probably like our fifteenth best player. Okay. So high school, you're you're the fifteenth best players at true by the time, you're graduating. Oh, yes. And then you go to college what happens in college. So I went to a school called Weaver state in Ogden Utah, and my body physically caught up with my brain. And then my sophomore year, I was voted like like so immature you're my freshman and sophomore year, I transferred to Weaver state, and then I had to redshirt. So then Gary, my richer Abbas voted like, you know, like up and comer on the T got it. And then I was like oh shit..

China football Ogden Utah Weaver Stanford Susan Gary Abbas four hundred pounds
"wade davis" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"wade davis" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Versa. And then once you can understand that magic. You can understand like almost what's going to happen next that I could do a young age. And then I became. How would I say desperate to be a better athlete? I had just enough talent that I could grab onto and tap into to make myself. Good enough as an athlete that came close to matching when I think from intellectual stems standpoint that I had just naturally. That's really interesting. I've never heard anybody say that about woman specifically, I guess also team sports begin like individuals. I think we were at least I think of that as being like a much more. Yeah. It's so mental to keep yourself swimming. Or whatever. When you're by yourself. But that's really cool that it was that that was your experience. I think most people don't realize the intellectual capacity you have to have to make improve sports. No matter what this this born is and football, one of the one of my insecurities is that people only think I'm an athlete, and when they only thing I'm gonna athlete they don't think that I'm actually intelligent right because our definitions of intelligence are very narrow and small, and they typically fit into the boxes that say like MIT and Stanford and all those places, so I do have some level of insecurity about this idea that I am just an an athlete, and I'm working on realizing that that's not my shit that that's some that's someone else's challenged. That don't have to hold onto. Well, also, physical intelligence is so real I mean, like, so you're saying that you you mentally understood the game, and that's one thing. But then on top of that, you know. So like underestimating. Because of a skill that they had under assuming that's all that's one thing. Of course. There's also I think I mean, you can't I don't know that you could divorce that from racism also when we're talking about sports. There's definitely just don't think that it's even possible. Something like the NFL and be like, they're, you know, there's implicit bias based on the fact that like it's mostly black men. So we think these are these are people who had to survive using their bodies, and it turns out in this country. That's that's what we've thought about black people for the whole time. So yeah. Anyway. So I think there's that too. But then on top of that, you know, physical intelligence is also a real thing like knowing how to use your body in a way that other people don't is also really beautiful, and it's weird because sometimes it feels like we have this really strong sense of pride. The Olympics is on. We're just like that's us. Like Michael Phelps? Like, we are all Simone biles. This is. But then, you know, we ignore that the rest of our lives in just like Senator desks and try to divorce ourselves from their bodies. But not when it's like this moment of. This intense national pride. So I wouldn't you know, there's all I want also say that like even knew somebody isn't particularly gifted in like test taking ways that we start to think of it. Yeah. You know, my best friend in in the whole world, Michael Jenin's? He is the reason I made it to the NFL actually so Michael Jennings was the best athletes on the high school team in my high school had the very first person ever on the cover of Sports Illustrated like for from my standpoint. So I went to a bad ass high school. Wow. Yeah. And Michael was better than everyone yet. He still worked harder than everyone. And I didn't get it. I was just like, wow. Like, never KOMO people. Like who are just naturally gifted you'd think that they don't work hard. Right. But then I learned from him is that that means you actually have to work harder because there's an expectation that you have set to the world that and and that's part of what what drove him that. I remember I went off to college. And he went off Texas am, and we would come back and..

Michael NFL Michael Jenin Michael Phelps KOMO Simone biles Sports Illustrated Michael Jennings Senator football Texas MIT Stanford
"wade davis" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"wade davis" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Careless. Oh, so anyway, I always have folks on the podcast introduce themselves. You'll good for sarong try. This is an audio only. I don't know. But but they'll be photo. And also this I'm taking that this is for me. I always so they be. Thank you for. Yeah. Would you introduce yourself? I'm way Davis. Went widow. Should I say about myself? I just like hearing what people do, you know, like because we may introduce themselves. I feel like it's so I think it's hard to describe it. I do I would say I am a diversity and inclusion adviser and consultant for so I consulted Google consult it Netflix because I can solve that the NFL do a lot of executive coaching trying to help leaders. Learn how to be better in in violates that have historically been all white and male, you know, trying to get them to flex leadership style to meet the needs of a more diverse employee set. I right. I a lot of public speaking. And I talk shit to you know, depends on the audience. Yeah. And I wanna talk also a little bit about your background. Like, why why are you somebody that gets to go and speak to folks at that and foul, for instance, like any any particular reason because I played in fell? That's one reason. I think the other reason is that I've figured out maybe not perfectly, but pretty effectively how to talk to men about issues of sexism and homophobia in ways that they feel as if they're not being judged, but that they are allowed to grow and expand in conversation in that they want to come back for more. I'm I got I guess first of all I love that. I mean, thanks for doing that work. Try somebody's got somebody's talking about who has that person. But also, so you you played in the NFL, and can you tell me a little bit about your career there? Yes. So I played from two thousand twelve four by played for the Tennessee titans. The Seattle Seahawks team from Washington I spent a year in NFL you're saying that. I feel you and your. Yep. Keep going I spent a year while eleven weeks in NFL Europe in Barcelona that also a year in Berlin. And then I retired in two thousand four and then I moved back to Colorado, which is not where you live now. Because now you live in New York City. Yes, I went to high school in Colorado. So I was born in Little Rock, Arkansas. I spend most of my adolescence Shreveport, Louisiana. And then I went to high school in Colorado. When did you know that you were you getting feedback the whole time that you were like, a gifted athlete was that something that you knew from young age? I knew I was I was gifted from a mental standpoint. Right. So I used to watch the game of football. And I could just turn on the TV, and I could literally call what play was going to happen next as a really young kid. So I think I understood the strategy of the game. Like, so I watch football, very weirdly. I am trying to see what the offense is trying to impose on the defense and vice..

NFL Colorado football Little Rock Tennessee titans Seattle Seahawks Davis Shreveport New York City Google consultant Arkansas Louisiana Washington Netflix executive Barcelona Berlin eleven weeks
"wade davis" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"wade davis" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"I that out for a quick chat with wade davis got the first two headers tomlinson and block o on grandads then he ended up walking burke's hernandez and did not get the call in a couple of close to strike pitches now he has walked mccutchen after the steel by gorgeous buster posey one for four in the game right header against right handed davis thrones loan was a cutter in the dirt ball one mr posey zoe had one at bat in his career against wade davis davis retired mostert getting to ninety six for the season two on two out the pitch swing and a foul back to the screen that was a ninety five mile an hour fastball away but the outside part of the plate one ball one strike the buster giants in this game two hits in eight at bats with a runner in scoring position they have not had any hits at all in any situation since the sixth innings since pablo's ball singled home the go ahead run as a pinch hitter a lot of speed on the basepaths with hernandez it second mccutchen it first here's the pitch buster pulls a hard ground ball foul pass third and on down the line buster behind the counter one wall to strikes.

wade davis burke hernandez mccutchen mr posey zoe pablo davis wade davis davis