8 Burst results for "Wade Crow Foot"

"wade crowfoot" Discussed on Social Minds - Social Media Marketing Answered

Social Minds - Social Media Marketing Answered

01:34 min | 7 months ago

"wade crowfoot" Discussed on Social Minds - Social Media Marketing Answered

"Stories. It was part of the platform that was meant to be fun and spontaneous and not so curated in it was meant to be impermanent disappear. I thought to myself. I should spend several hours every day making these mixed up from instagram. The testing a vertical stories. Feed remember when instagram was testing a horizontal news. Feed to mimic stories on the accidentally launched it to everyone while that i did didn't stick but this one might. Instagram has confirmed. It's working on vertical feet stories way uses. Would swipe open down to browse. Just like how. We navigate reels antique tokes fee page. Vets-go scrolling has always been the norm for news feeds but impact. Thanks to tiktok. This behavior has now been normalized for short form video. This news also comes after instagram. Had adam missouri revealed that the pot foam plans to consolidate its video features and simplify the app on small hinting at the possible extinction of tv and a modem possible revamp reels missouri admitted behind tiktok. Now our strategy director might wade crowfoot says. It's only a matter of time before bed. Video scrolling is the primary full instagram app. Under missouri's plans for video consolidation. Could we see a video fast. Vertical feet on instagram in which instagram reels and mixed together that would certainly be interesting to see the effect on static content which remains instagram's foundation albeit one that the product team seems canes got away from if a vertical stories did become a reality. It would also mean changes to current features on us behavior like swipe ups that being said. Instagram has made it clear that this feature is an internal prototype still in development and won't be available to the public for some time in.

Instagram instagram wade crowfoot adam missouri tiktok
"wade crowfoot" Discussed on Drilled

Drilled

05:54 min | 10 months ago

"wade crowfoot" Discussed on Drilled

"As the governor said we've had temperatures explode this summer you may have learned that we broke a world record in the death valley hundred and thirty degrees. So have you seen this video. I have not seen this video ready for special when president trump was in california. This is a couple of weeks ago. In the middle of the massive wildfires there that are still underway. And you are listening to california's secretary for natural resources. Wade crowfoot trying to talk. President trump about climate change in the role. Climate change is playing these fires. We want to work with you to really recognize the changing climate and what it means to our forests and actually work together with that science. That science is going to be key because if we if we ignore that science. We're not going to succeed together. Protecting californians it'll start getting cooler you just watch. I wish science. I don't think science knows. Actually tom yeah. Also scientists know about seasons. We're all well aware that if auto now and of course for trump. This isn't super surprising right. Trump has made his opposition to taking action on climate change. Big part of his political persona right. He talked about it in the presidential debate just this week before he was president he called global warming a hoax as president. He's pulling the us out of the paris climate agreement. Which is this big global warming treaty. And of course trump is not the only republican who has taken that stance over the years skepticism on climate. Science has become core to the identity of a big chunk of republicans. Here is florida republican. Senator marco rubio in two thousand fourteen. I believe that human activity is causing these dramatic changes to our climate the way the scientists portraying it. Here's texas senator ted cruz speaking just last year. I think the data are mixed. I think there have been years in periods where there's been warming their years in periods where they've been cooling in oklahoma senator james inhofe the hoax is that there are some people who are so arrogant to think that they are so powerful. They can change climate change climate. Alex i might need to like negotiate. Happy sessions into my contract. But here's what's confusing and weird. It wasn't always this way when it comes to the environment in particular and even climate change republicans have not always been the party of denial and resistance in fact republicans were central to some of our most foundational pieces of environmental legislation. Republicans like this guy. Eighteen the major environmental proposals which i put forward a year ago has still not received final action by the congress. I repeat today my urgent request for congressional action on this much needed legislation we can make nineteen seventy seventy-two the best year ever for environmental progress. This is republican president. Richard nixon haranguing congress to take speedy action and environmental legislation. And i will sign it immediately. Richard nixon was saying to congress and in fact a lot of what we think of as bedrock environmental laws were passed under richard nixon. The clean air act. Guess who it was signed. Under nixon the endangered species act to nixon the environmental protection agency richard nixon. So okay but you can say well. That was the republican party. It's already been very different. Even in recent history republicans have not been the party of reflexive climate science. Denial so for example. I know you've seen this ad because we've talked about it. Hi i'm nancy. Pelosi lifelong democrat and speaker of the house. Newt gingrich lifelong republican. And i used to be speaker. We don't always see eye to eye. Do we knew no but we do agree. Our country must take action to address climate change so weirdly intimate nancy pelosi and newt gingrich are sitting on like a love seat very close together very like. They're touching outside it's outside in front of the capitol rate and they're both talking about like the urgent need to take action on climate change. This was a this is an ad that ran in two thousand eight. We need cleaner forms of energy and we need them fast. In that same year. Two thousand eight the republican candidate for president john mccain was saying stuff like this. This is an ad that he ran around. This time john mccain stood up to the president sounded the alarm on global warming. Five years ago today. He has a realistic plan. That will curb greenhouse gas emissions so as recently as two thousand eight you had a republican candidate for president running on a platform that was taking action on climate change. So how did we get from there to where we are today where you have the current president openly mocking the idea that there is global warming is human caused. How did this issue mood beyond a policy issue to like a culture work issue. Yeah how are we gonna do this but are we even going to acknowledge that it's happening so today on the show we attempt to answer this question. How did this happen by revisiting. A couple of the key moments that got us here and also. We're going to talk about how this all might change if we want meaningful action on climate change. It's gonna be pretty important that one of our two major parties isn't openly hostile to the idea that it's even happening. So how do we move republican opinion. Here we're going to hear from two republicans a.

president trump Richard nixon republican party newt gingrich congress Senator marco rubio nancy pelosi california senator ted cruz Wade crowfoot senator james inhofe john mccain secretary oklahoma paris texas
"wade crowfoot" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:13 min | 1 year ago

"wade crowfoot" Discussed on KCRW

"After the arrest of all four of the now fired Minneapolis police officers who were on the scene when one of them and George Floyd to the ground kneeling on Floyd snack protesters here in Minneapolis have been targeting the police you speakers at this weekend protest outside of the police union's headquarters noted that the union has long been considered an impediment of policing reforms and a protector of bad cops especially those who engage in racial discrimination and unnecessary use of excessive force but that is about to change says Minneapolis police chief Medaria Arradondo beginning today as chief I am immediately withdrawing from the contract to go she Asians with the Minneapolis police federation are a Dando says he needs to step back from the table to get input from outside advisers and experts to look at ways to contracting be restructured to provide greater transparency for the community and greater flexibility to make meaningful reforms this work must be transformational but I must do it right are a Dando says he wants to examine contract provisions covering critical incident protocols use of force accountability and the disciplinary process including grievances and arbitration there is nothing more debilitating to chief from an employment matter perspective then when you have grounds to terminate an officer for misconduct and you're dealing with a third party mechanism that allows for that employee to not only be back on your apartment but to be patrolling in your communities are done does the first ever African American police chief in Minneapolis and he acknowledges what he calls crippled relationships between the police and communities of color that have eroded trust in the police force what some critics here say his initial steps that reforms don't go far enough as many here calling to disband the entire department and replace it with a new model of public safety David Schaper NPR news Minneapolis this is NPR news a wildfire erupted last night in Los Angeles lighting up hills still scarred by another blues just few years ago after so many devastating wildfires in recent years California was set to spend more than a billion dollars to prepare for future fires which are expected to get worse in a warming climate but with the pandemic much of that spending is on hold NPR's Lauren Sommer reports on initiatives facing cuts bill CV is one of those California homeowners who got a wildfire wake up call he's came when the agora fire burned within a few miles of a south Lake Tahoe home in two thousand seven that was very devastating loss I don't know a hundred some odd owns so after that he did something mundane but crucial in fire country come out here via video chat he shows me his new roof so it's a fire retardant shingle his old roof was made of wood shingles which can easily catch embers that are blown head of wild fires up here in the mountains a witching group is another name for a matchbook which is why the local fire agency helped pay for CBS new roof the lake valley fire protection district got a grant from FEMA to help replace hundreds of wood roofs it covered seventy percent of CBS cost great mentioned that some friends up in north Tahoe and they were not for that program California wants to offer that program across the state with millions of homes at risk in January governor Gavin Newsom announced one hundred million dollars to help homeowners make their homes more fire resistant but then it goes without saying that these are not ordinary times and the pandemic created a massive budget shortfall so news and propose cutting the wood roof program also tabled were two other major funds to help communities prepare for all sorts of climate change impacts that includes a billion dollars in state funding and an almost five billion dollar climate bonds on the November ballot we still don't have the people and equipment we need in this state with the how it's getting so much hotter in the dry is getting so much drier that problem isn't going away says Alexander suffered a fire scientist at sage underwriters it's really a shame we were ramping up to provide what I believe is one of the most progressive and important investments in terms of fire risk that there could be Seifert says even small fixes to a house can make a big difference like putting mesh screens on attic vents or covering the eaves under a roof things that in particular would prevent embers from penetrating the house are super significant and making a difference between whether home survived a fire or not those kind of long term investments to reduce fire risk are ones that California has historically under spent on they're easy to put off the California secretary for natural resources Wade crowfoot says the recent disasters have made them a priority our residents get it Californians want us actually to do more to protect their communities from the impacts with budget cuts though the state's wildfire spending this year will most likely be going to fire fighting and emergency response were staring down the barrel of another intense wildfire season given how dry it was this winter still California like many states is hoping federal stimulus funding will fill in the gaps K. Gordon directs California's office of planning and research there is a moment which this kind of economic disaster creates opportunity for thinking differently about how to build forward not to bounce back but to bounce forward she says many climate change projects our infrastructure projects so federal spending could be a chance for states to avoid falling too far behind Lauren Sommer NPR news you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR news your microphone your story KCRW's radio race is your chance to be creative documentary alley and elevate the voices around here for the first time when.

Minneapolis
"wade crowfoot" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:53 min | 1 year ago

"wade crowfoot" Discussed on KCRW

"Long been considered an impediment of policing reforms and a protector of bad cops especially those who engage in racial discrimination and unnecessary use of excessive force but that is about to change says Minneapolis police chief Madera ardendo beginning today as chief I am immediately withdrawing from the contract to go she Asians with the Minneapolis police federation are a Dando says he needs to step back from the table to get input from outside advisers and experts to look at ways to contract can be restructured to provide greater transparency for the community and greater flexibility to make meaningful reforms this work must be transformational but I must do it right are a Dando says he wants to examine contract provisions covering critical incident protocols use of force accountability and the disciplinary process including grievances and arbitration there is nothing more debilitating to chief from an employment matter perspective then when you have grounds to terminate an officer for misconduct and you're dealing with a third party mechanism that allows for that employee to not only be back on your apartment but to be patrolling in your communities are done does the first ever African American police chief in Minneapolis and he acknowledges what he calls crippled relationships between the police and communities of color that have eroded trust in the police force what some critics here say his initial steps that reforms don't go far enough as many here calling to disband the entire department and replace it with a new model of public safety David Schaper NPR news Minneapolis this is NPR news a wildfire erupted last night in Los Angeles lighting up hills still scarred by another blues just few years ago after so many devastating wildfires in recent years California was set to spend more than a billion dollars to prepare for future fires which are expected to get worse in a warming climate but with the pandemic much of that spending is on hold NPR's Lauren Sommer reports on initiatives facing cuts bill CV is one of those California homeowners who got a wildfire wake up call he's came when the agora fire burned within a few miles of a south Lake Tahoe home in two thousand seven that was very devastating loss I don't know a hundred some odd owns so after that he did something mundane but crucial in fire country come out here via video chat he shows me his new roof so it's a fire retardant shingle his old roof was made of wood shingles which can easily catch embers that are blown head of wild fires occur in the mounds of wood shingle roof is another name for a matchbook which is why the local fire agency helped pay for CBS new roof the lake valley fire protection district got a grant from FEMA to help replace hundreds of wood roofs it covered seventy percent of CBS cost great mentioned that some friends up in north Tahoe and they weren't offered that program California wants to offer that program across the state with millions of homes at risk in January governor Gavin Newsom announced one hundred million dollars to help homeowners make their homes more fire resistant but then it goes without saying that these are not ordinary times and the pandemic created a massive budget shortfall so Newsome proposed cutting the wood roof program also tabled were two other major funds to help communities prepare for all sorts of climate change impacts that includes a billion dollars in state funding and an almost five billion dollar climate bonds on the November ballot we still don't have the people and the equipment we need in this state with the hots getting so much hotter in the dry is getting so much drier that problem isn't going away says Alexander suffered a fire scientist at sage underwriters it's really a shame we were ramping up to provide what I believe is one of the most progressive and important investments in terms of fire risk that there could be Seifert says even small fixes to a house can make a big difference like putting mesh screens on attic vents or covering the eaves under a roof things that in particular would prevent embers from penetrating the house are super significant and making a difference between whether home survived a fire or not those kind of long term investments to reduce fire risk are ones that California has historically under spent on they're easy to put off the California secretary for natural resources Wade crowfoot says the recent disasters have made them a priority our residents get it Californians want us actually to do more to protect their communities from the impacts with budget cuts though the state's wildfire spending this year will most likely be going to firefighting and emergency response were staring down the barrel of another intense wildfire season given how dry it was this winter still California like many states is hoping federal stimulus funding will fill in the gaps K. Gordon directs California's office of planning and research there is a moment at which this kind of economic disaster creates opportunity for thinking differently about how to build forward not to bounce back but to bounce forward she says many climate change projects our infrastructure projects so federal spending could be a chance for states to avoid falling too far behind Lauren Sommer NPR news you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR news this is a test of the emergency alert system.

"wade crowfoot" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

06:03 min | 1 year ago

"wade crowfoot" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Those who engage in racial discrimination and unnecessary use of excessive force but that is about to change says Minneapolis police chief Madera ardendo beginning today as chief I am immediately withdrawing from the contract to go she Asians with the Minneapolis police federation are a Dando says he needs to step back from the table to get input from outside advisers and experts to look at ways to contract can be restructured to provide greater transparency for the community and greater flexibility to make meaningful reforms this work must be transformational but I must do it right are a Dando says he wants to examine contract provisions covering critical incident protocols use of force accountability and the disciplinary process including grievances and arbitration there is nothing more debilitating to chief from an employment matter perspective then when you have grounds to terminate an officer for misconduct and you're dealing with a third party mechanism that allows for that employee to not only be back on your apartment but to be patrolling in your communities are done does the first ever African American police chief in Minneapolis and he acknowledges what he calls crippled relationships between the police and communities of color that have eroded trust in the police force what some critics here say his initial steps that reforms don't go far enough as many here are calling to disband the entire department and replace it with a new model of public safety David Schaper NPR news Minneapolis this is NPR news a wildfire erupted last night in Los Angeles lighting up hills still scarred by another blaze just few years ago after so many devastating wildfires in recent years California was set to spend more than a billion dollars to prepare for future fires which are expected to get worse in a warming climate but with the pandemic much of that spending is on hold NPR's Lauren Sommer reports on initiatives facing cuts bill CV is one of those California homeowners who got a wildfire wake up call he's came when the agora fire burned within a few miles of a south Lake Tahoe home in two thousand seven that was very devastating loss I don't know a hundred some odd owns so after that he did something mundane but crucial in fire country come out here via video chat he shows me his new roof so it's a fire retardant shingle his old roof was made of wood shingles which can easily catch embers that are blown head of wild fires occur in the mounds of wood shingle roof is another name for a matchbook which is why the local fire agency helped pay for CBS new roof the lake valley fire protection district got a grant from FEMA to help replace hundreds of wood roofs it covered seventy percent of CD's cost great mentioned that some friends up in north Tahoe and they were not for that program California wants to offer that program across the state with millions of homes at risk in January governor Gavin Newsom announced one hundred million dollars to help homeowners make their homes more fire resistant but then it goes without saying that these are not ordinary times and the pandemic created a massive budget shortfall so news and propose cutting the wood roof program also tabled were two other major funds to help communities prepare for all sorts of climate change impacts that includes a billion dollars in state funding and an almost five billion dollar climate bonds on the November ballot we still don't have the people and the equipment we need in this state with the how it's getting so much hotter in the dry is getting so much drier that problem isn't going away says Alexander suffered a fire scientist at sage underwriters it's really a shame we were ramping up to provide what I believe is one of the most progressive and important investments in terms of fire risk that there could be Seifert says even small fixes to a house can make a big difference like putting mesh screens on attic vents or covering the eaves under a roof things that in particular would prevent embers from penetrating the house are super significant and making a difference between whether home survived a fire or not those kind of long term investments to reduce fire risk are ones that California has historically under spent on they're easy to put off the California secretary for natural resources Wade crowfoot says the recent disasters have made them a priority our residents get it Californians want us actually to do more to protect their communities from the impacts with budget cuts though the state's wildfire spending this year will most likely be going to fire fighting and emergency response were staring down the barrel of another intense wildfire season given how dry it was this winter still California like many states is hoping federal stimulus funding will fill in the gaps K. Gordon directs California's office of planning and research there is a moment at which this kind of economic disaster creates opportunity for thinking differently about how to build forward not to bounce back but to bounce forward she says many climate change projects our infrastructure projects so federal spending could be a chance for states to avoid falling too far behind Lauren Sommer NPR news you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR news good afternoon I'm Lisa Ladin you're listening to ninety point three Casey you streaming online at KBC U. dot org coming up presumptive democratic nominee Joe Biden who has a long history of working on criminal justice policies has responded to national protests over police brutality with a long list of reforms that story ahead on all things considered support comes from the California strawberry commission.

"wade crowfoot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"wade crowfoot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The next decade is it to be like but to be understood Shannon bonds NPR news San Francisco you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR news a wildfire erupted last night in Los Angeles lighting up hills still scarred by another blues just few years ago after so many devastating wildfires in recent years California was set to spend more than a billion dollars to prepare for future fires which are expected to get worse in a warming climate but with the pandemic much of that spending is on hold NPR's Lauren Sommer reports on initiatives facing cuts bill CV is one of those California homeowners who got a wildfire wake up call he's came when the angora fire burned within a few miles of a south Lake Tahoe home in two thousand seven that was very devastating loss I don't know a hundred some odd owns so after that he did something mundane but crucial in fire country come out here via video chat he shows me his new roofs so it's a fire retardant shingle his old roof was made of wood shingles which can easily catch members that are blown head of wild fires occur in the mounds of wood shingle roof is another name for a matchbook which is why the local fire agency helped pay for CBS new roof the lake valley fire protection district got a grant from FEMA to help replace hundreds of wood roofs it covered seventy percent of CV's cost great mentioned that some friends up in north of Tahoe and they were not for that program California wants to offer that program across the state with millions of homes at risk in January governor Gavin Newsom announced one hundred million dollars to help homeowners make their homes more fire resistant but then it goes without saying that these are not ordinary times and the ten Democrats aided a massive budget shortfall so new some proposed cutting the wood roof program also tabled were two other major funds to help communities prepare for all sorts of climate change impacts that includes a billion dollars in state funding and an almost five billion dollar climate bonds on the November ballot we still don't have the people and equipment we need in this state with the hots getting so much hotter in the dries getting so much drier that problem isn't going away says Alexander suffered a fire scientist at sage underwriters it's really a shame we were ramping up to provide what I believe is one of the most progressive and important investments in terms of fire risk that there could be Seifert says even small fixes to a house can make a big difference like putting mesh screens on attic vents or covering the eaves under a roof things that in particular would prevent embers from penetrating the house are super significant and making a difference between whether home survived a fire or not those kind of long term investments to reduce fire risk are ones that California has historically under spent on they're easy to put off the California secretary for natural resources Wade crowfoot says the recent disasters have made them a priority our residents get it Californians want us actually to do more to protect their communities from the impacts with budget cuts though the state's wildfire spending this year will most likely be going to firefighting and emergency response were staring down the barrel of another intense wildfire season given how dry it was this winter still California like many states is hoping federal stimulus funding will fill in the gaps K. Gordon directs California's office of planning and research there is a moment which this kind of economic disaster creates opportunity for thinking differently about how to build forward not to bounce back but to bounce forward she says many climate change projects our infrastructure projects so federal spending could be a chance for states to avoid falling too far behind Lauren Sommer NPR.

Shannon
"wade crowfoot" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"wade crowfoot" Discussed on KGO 810

"Mortgage assistance contact their team twenty four seven at rocket mortgage dot com from their home to yours the team rocket mortgage is with you restaurants and bars are not among the businesses that could be help this week as California moves into phase two of reopening the governor Gavin Newsom admits there's a lot of anxiety among business owners who want to start making money again I know that just the alcohol beverage control here at the city California has investigated eighty one businesses that opened up as bars in some restaurant bars eighty of Amer shut back down because of license licenses or trying to be pulled the governor says eighty is a small number overall and most businesses are abiding by the shutdown order statewide as early as Friday certain retail outlets that make changes to help prevent the spread of the corona virus may be allowed to reopen but only for curbside pickup East Bay congressman mark DeSaulnier day is finally out of the hospital he'd been suffering from a life threatening case of pneumonia that he developed after fracturing a rib while jogging it's only a has been in a DC hospital since March thirteenth his family says he's anxious to get back to California but he'll be staying in Washington DC and tell his doctors say it's safe for him to fly in California firefighters say could be a nasty wildfire season this year they blame a lack of late season rain and snow for creating high fire high fire danger again secretary for natural resources Wade crowfoot says residents need to prepare now have that conversation with your loved ones in your family and your community leaders and take action this week to build your preparation and your resilience to wildfires cal fire says it's already seeing fires burning in the state none of significant size right now in the last three years California has lost one hundred forty five people to wildfires we'll take a look at your traffic next on KGO due to the economic downturn the bay area's trusted.

California Gavin Newsom Amer pneumonia Wade crowfoot congressman mark DeSaulnier Washington secretary
"wade crowfoot" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"wade crowfoot" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Than a billion dollars to shelter the homeless in increase in funding for Medicare al and a focus on increasing the state's rainy day fund education among the priorities and governor Newsom's new budget proposal as Kitty just told you and on top of that governor Newsome's proposal drawing a mixed response from legislative Republicans if the case Joe Michaels with more conservatives are generally pleased with the governor's decision to continue building budget reserves but are uneasy about the increase in spending even so senator John Morlock believes there's a lot of good in governor Newsome's proposal more funding for homelessness more funding for mental health a review of the letterman patcher short act which is long overdue and is working on more funding for emergency preparedness and response the more lock has concerns about what's not being addressed he's having a lot of fun focusing on a lot of important areas but addressing pension liabilities are funded less than seventy percent should probably receive a higher priority and be reflected in the numbers not just in the rhetoric senator Morlock is also concerned about the financial ramifications of expanding the budget in implementing bond measures suggesting it could lead to cuts under future administrations Joe Michaels news ninety three point one K. F. because the budget proposal recommends a comprehensive approach to California's investments to protect the state's environment Wade crowfoot state secretary of natural resources as California is dedicated to building what he calls climate resilience which said in another way is really about helping our community that are natural places whether these threats from climate change it wildfires drought flood the level rise the climate budget includes twelve billion over the next five years a climate catalyst funding colluded in the proposal that will finance investments and low carbon transportation sustainable agriculture and waste diversion through low interest loans Placerville police are looking for two arms suspects who broke into a house shot of the person who live there is that person went out a window police department now tells us that person was in fact wounded it's been treated at a local hospital Eldorado county sheriff's deputies arriving on the scene found no suspects or weapons if you have information call the possible police well the Davis police department honoring the lives of fallen officers today year to the day it lost a twenty two year old rookie to an ambush today's event includes the unveiling of a newly built fallen officer memorial which includes the name of Natalie corona who was killed last January at the scene of a traffic accident her father were said corona is grateful the department's fallen officers are being remembered not only Natalie but the other officers in our area and keep in other officers that have died under similar circumstances gunned down while they're doing their their job I think it's important we not forget those officers and that we keep them in our hearts and our prayers a rally to honor the life of officer corona being held this evening promoted on Facebook scheduled for six thirty until eight outside the Davis police department on fifth street and I'll give Scott up on all this hour's top national stories on news ninety three point one KFBK hell's.

Medicare