35 Burst results for "WSJ"

Commerce Department: Home Purchases Reach 14 Year High

WSJ Minute Briefing

00:32 sec | 3 d ago

Commerce Department: Home Purchases Reach 14 Year High

"Choppy Day on Wall Street but US stock markets managed to finish higher the Dow Jones Industrial Average Rose Fifty, two points closing at twenty, six, thousand, eight, fifteen, the S. and P. Five hundred was up almost ten points and the Nasdaq closed thirty nine points higher stocks traded mostly lower until midday when the Commerce Department said that home purchases reached a fourteen year high stocks have big tech companies were winners, Apple Microsoft alphabet shares each rose about one percent tesla, which has. Suffered sharp declines. This month was up two percents

United States Commerce Department Apple Microsoft
Trump and Biden's Diverging Visions for American Foreign Policy

WSJ What's News

04:06 min | 3 d ago

Trump and Biden's Diverging Visions for American Foreign Policy

"In our ongoing election coverage were taking a deep look at how president trump and democratic. Presidential nominee Joe Biden differ on major policy issues. Today, we're going examine foreign affairs mark. Stewart spoke with the journals national, security reporter Warren Strobel. A lot of attention in recent days to the Middle East obviously president trump is touting success with peace accords with Israel. Let's talk about the trump approach versus the biden approach. Yeah I mean in the waning weeks of the campaign here Mr Trump has secured really historic agreements from the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain to make peace with Israel and recognize it diplomatically big achievement. No. Matter how you count it. I think most people would agree but there are fundamental differences between the Republican Democratic candidates particularly when it comes to Saudi Arabia Mr Biden has said that he would review relations with Saudi Arabia, which is probably the most important US ally in the Middle East that he would consider stopping arms sales he's been very critical of their killing of the journalist dissident. Jamal Kashogi Mr Trump on the other hand has declined to put pressure on Saudi Arabia. Really. In any significant way he sort of dismissed defining by the CIA that Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman probably ordered the killing of Mr. Kashogi and he has vetoed congressional moves to limit arms sales to Riyadh. Saudi Arabia obviously issues in the Middle East but also Iran. Let's talk about the different approaches there. Yeah. Here again, that's quite a stark difference Mr Trump. Two thousand seventeen withdrew from the Iran nuclear accord known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action on. He has launched a campaign of maximum pressure designed to limit Iran's ability to cause trouble in the region and try to force it back into talks. He's also by the way in recent days Mr Trump has said get reelected around will come to the table and we can make a deal real quickly. Mr Biden has said he would go back into the nuclear agreement. He would get the United States back into that agreement if Iran also returns to compliance. So again, Joe Biden is tough on Iran but he is much more. I think looking at diplomatic track to try and halt their nuclear program. Another region of interest is certainly Europe. Obviously there are economic issues, their political as well as military issues. When we look at Europe, how big of a role does the relationship with NATO play in this discussion? You know I think it plays a significant role. NATO's the probably the most important and one of the longest standing alliances that the United States has. Important economically in terms of the trade between the United States and Europe, and important strategically given its role in sort of countering Russia Russia intervention in places like Ukraine Belarus. Again there's differences here though Mr Trump has been pretty critical of NATO. He demanded that all the countries live up to. A promise they made to spend two percent of their GDP. Self. Defense, and there have been rumors that he might withdraw from NATO entirely or want to. This is Chris from Mr Biden who again stressing the importance of good alliances with Europe and other parts of the world. You. Briefly mentioned Russia, where are the distinctions in viewpoint and policy between the two candidates? That's a good question. I think the trump administration has been in terms of my reporting and analysis sort of a weird bee's when it comes to Russia Mr Trump himself. No has been quite friendly with and trying to strike a good relationship with Vladimir Putin, but the people in the middle and. Upper levels of US government agencies are taking much more dim view, Mr Putin, and actually you know the US has done a lot of sanctions and other actions against Putin during Mr Trump's terms. So there's sort of a kind of a bipolar aspect to his administration's dealings with Russia Mr. Biden. I think has been more critical. Putin personally and has said he would stand up to Mr Putin on things such as election interference the Russian incursion into Ukraine and other things like that.

Mr Trump Joe Biden Saudi Arabia United States Europe Iran Middle East Nato Vladimir Putin Russia Belarus Jamal Kashogi Ukraine Israel Warren Strobel Stewart United Arab Emirates President Trump Riyadh
Nikola's Talks With Energy Firms Stalled Following Short-Seller Report

WSJ Tech News Briefing

00:33 sec | 3 d ago

Nikola's Talks With Energy Firms Stalled Following Short-Seller Report

"Electric truckmaker Nikola has been dealing with the fallout a short seller report earlier this month it contained allegations that Nikola misled investors about the readiness of its technology. We did a deep dive on the show yesterday. The company has called the short seller report false and misleading, but it appears that the controversy is beginning to shake potential partners report that talks with several major energy firms including BP have stalled the firms are reluctant to move forward amid heightened scrutiny, but a spokesperson said Nikola is continuing to work on potential

Nikola BP
U.S. stocks snap 4-session losing streak as tech rebounds

WSJ Tech News Briefing

00:17 sec | 4 d ago

U.S. stocks snap 4-session losing streak as tech rebounds

"Stocks rose yesterday. After about a volatility that had tested investors confidence the Dow S and p five hundred and the Nasdaq all broke sessions long losing streaks and shares of major tech companies were among the biggest winners leading the day's rebound.

U.S. surpasses 200,000 coronavirus deaths, eight months after first reported case

WSJ What's News

00:32 sec | 4 d ago

U.S. surpasses 200,000 coronavirus deaths, eight months after first reported case

"We had another grim milestone in the pandemic today more than two hundred thousand people in the US have now died from covid nineteen according to Johns Hopkins University. The US leads the world both in total confirmed cases and deaths more than six point eight million cases happened reported here since the outbreak began. Broadly speaking deaths have been falling since the beginning of August but reported new cases increased sharply on Monday and experts warned that with schools reopening and people spending more time indoors as the fall begins another surge of infections could becoming.

United States Johns Hopkins University
U.S. stocks snap 4-session losing streak as tech rebounds

WSJ Minute Briefing

00:21 sec | 4 d ago

U.S. stocks snap 4-session losing streak as tech rebounds

"Ended higher Tuesday in a turbulent session the Dow Jones Industrials Rose One hundred forty points to twenty, seven, thousand, two, hundred, Eighty, eight, the Nasdaq composite gained one, hundred, eighty, four points or one point seven percent, the S. and P. Five, hundred, rose thirty four. Points the markets broke a four day losing streak as investors attempted to look past rising corona virus case

Chinese Leaders Split Over Releasing Blacklist of U.S. Companies

WSJ What's News

04:59 min | 5 d ago

Chinese Leaders Split Over Releasing Blacklist of U.S. Companies

"Were exclusively reporting on a new development in the ongoing battle between Washington and Beijing over technology. China. Has Been Working on a blacklist that could punish American tech companies, but there's disagreement at the highest levels of China's leadership over whether they should issue a blacklist before or after the US election, our correspondent Leyla way has been reporting on this issue and joins us now Ling looking forward to this conversation. So welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you mark. So the one thing that has struck me is the fact that China has been very up front about this notion of a blacklist. How did it come about and what's the goal behind it sir? You're right China announced as intention to create. Unreliable entity list backing made last year but they have really kept to the whole process secretive. So what happened backing May to sell? Tin Soon, after Washington released entity list, basically restricting Weiwei, big Chinese, telecom giant, restricted hallways excess to US components and technology. So basically China's move was to match the trump administration's stepped up sanctions and crack down on Chinese companies. Especially, some of the best known technology companies so is part of the whole tit for tat strategy. The Chinese government has been using everything's the trade war broke out and explain what China may be thinking about as it considers the consequences of a blacklist. So this. Is This entity realize basically is part of China's ways to hit back at the US but they have to be very careful in terms of hall heart they push back right because the leadership really is also a dilemma on one hand they want to satisfy the urge to do something to hit back at the. US. On the other hand there's still wary of completely destroying the relationship which would hurt the Chinese leadership to at home politically and would also heard China's economy as well. So where do things stand currently because in your reporting, you said that leaders are hesitant to pull the trigger to this day. We still do not know which American firm the for for infirm is on the list because the Chinese leadership has intentionally kept it a secret of process you know on one hand you know just by announcing this list, they managed to keep foreign companies especially American firms on the actions on the other hand. Dad Really reflects the internal debate that currently is going on within the Chinese government. You have one faction officials who think, Oh, we should release the names as soon as we can. To really protect our rights and our stove and t just stand up to the American hack mom, and then you have another group of Fitch shows senior officials who are arguing we should try not to provoke trump any stretching the further you know we should be really cautious because you know the stakes very high. If you know there's a very high risks dead, the trump administration would step up sanctions again, potentially targeting even more Chinese firms that would really hurt China's economy main industries significantly. Politically speaking, these are tough times between the US and China with this list. Is there a risk of making things perhaps even worse? Definitely there's a risk that the mere disclosure of the existence of this list would provoke the trump who stretching further because as you know the sentiment toward China Washington this days it's it's quite active as evidenced by the cascade of actions targeting Chinese companies or Chinese officials but China right now doesn't appear in any way that they would compromise in any way instead they basically hit back at. Every punch that has been thrown by the US government so even The idea that they are creating a list be seeing as. Provocation in the eyes of some US officials. So definitely, there is a big risk that this move this moved to simply disclose that the distance of the list is going to provoke Washington even more and lead to further escalation of tensions. I think this discussion is going to continue for quite some time the journals

China China Washington United States Chinese Government Beijing Leyla Ling Fitch
Chinese Leaders Split Over Releasing Blacklist of U.S. Companies

WSJ What's News

01:23 min | 5 d ago

Chinese Leaders Split Over Releasing Blacklist of U.S. Companies

"Investors are hoping for a better day today after losses across market yesterday, but it wasn't a typical selloff stocks drop but so did gold and oil are markets editor Quinton web explains why that matters. It was notable various asset classes sold off together. So not surprising no oil sold of two because if you take a gloomy view on the economic outlook, oil is likely to fall in price nights. Villette gold sold off to gold has been wising for most of the year, but it seems also, it doesn't necessarily this year always rise in other markets falling. This is nothing like I should say the panic of where all asset classes because they was selling off. In tandem investors just rushed to raise cash but in this case, gold seems to dipped a little bit alongside stokes. What's notable is we've seen this kind of broader shift in sentiment I think in the last few weeks. So other summer of kind of almost relentless rallies, we've had several weeks now where stocks sorta traded sideways down and this was a very bad start to this week. So it'd be interesting to see how US equities trade throughout the rest of the week. Today. We get Nike's earnings report also Fed Chair Jerome Powell and Treasury Secretary Steven. MNUCHIN. Begin three days of congressional testimony.

United States Markets Editor Quinton Web Nike Jerome Powell Stokes
Jeffrey Katzenberg’s Quibi Is Looking to Sell Itself, Among Other Possible Options

WSJ Minute Briefing

00:15 sec | 5 d ago

Jeffrey Katzenberg’s Quibi Is Looking to Sell Itself, Among Other Possible Options

"We're reporting exclusively. The short video streaming service Qube is looking at several strategic options including a possible sale launched April. Getting subscribers has been a challenge quickly declined to comment on whether it's pursuing a strategic review.

Qube
Quibi Is Exploring a Sale

WSJ Tech News Briefing

02:19 min | 5 d ago

Quibi Is Exploring a Sale

"We report that the short-form streaming service qube is exploring several strategic options including a possible sale. Also on the table, the company is considering raising even more money or going public merger merger. The news is a sign of strain at Qube, the company launched on schedule in April despite the onset of the pandemic and has struggled to meet its subscriber targets from the beginning.

Feds charge 6 people with bribing Amazon employees to gain edge on marketplace

WSJ Tech News Briefing

00:50 sec | 6 d ago

Feds charge 6 people with bribing Amazon employees to gain edge on marketplace

"Federal grand jury in Washington State has indicted six people on charges of bribing Amazon employees according to the charges. The defendants acted as consultants vendors on Amazon's marketplace, and since at least twenty seventeen, they allegedly paid Amazon employees more than one hundred thousand dollars to give some third party sellers a leg up over their competition. The defendants are also charged with bribing Amazon employees to reinstate sales of products that were deemed dangerous like flammable household electronics. Amazon said statement that it supported the investigation and that it has been working with the federal agencies involved in the criminal probe. This part of a broader problem for Amazon we reported last year that the company has struggled to contain the sale of faulty products on its marketplace including listings for thousands of products that federal agencies have deemed unsafe.

Amazon Washington State
US will ban WeChat and TikTok downloads on Sunday

WSJ Minute Briefing

00:26 sec | Last week

US will ban WeChat and TikTok downloads on Sunday

"The trump administration says, it will ban downloads of the chinese-owned video sharing APP, Tiktok and the US use of China's popular messaging and electronic payment APP. We, chat after Sunday night Commerce Department Secretary Wilbur. Ross cited National Security and data privacy concerns for the move. It comes amid discussions that could lead to Oracle and Walmart taking a significant stake in Tik Tok in a bid to ease the White House's concerns

Tik Tok Commerce Department Secretary Walmart Ross National Security White House United States China Tiktok Oracle
A Million Mortgage Borrowers Fall Through Safety Net

WSJ Your Money Briefing

07:33 min | Last week

A Million Mortgage Borrowers Fall Through Safety Net

"Early on in the pandemic Congress set up a program to protect homeowners with mortgages from losing their homes. But about a million borrowers have fallen through the safety net missed payments and late fees or putting them at greater risk, and that's further heightening fears of an eviction and foreclosure crisis with more on why so many borrowers have fallen behind on their mortgages despite this relief program, we're joined by our reporter Andrew Ackerman Andrew. Thanks for joining us. Hi, Charlie. Thanks for having me Andrew. I, tell us how this program known as forbearance works. It's unique to this crisis forbearance in the past has been used very narrowly for hurricanes or very regional Zaslov this time it's being used to keep as many people nationally in their homes as possible who are harmed rather virus and it just means you can skip up to a year of payments on your mortgage. And then make them up later. Somehow there's a little bit of a complication because it it applies to all federally guaranteed loans which are most of the market Fannie Freddie or fha backed loans. There is a market for private loans or loans aren't backed by the federal government, and some of those lenders are offering forbearance and others aren't, but for most of the market people can get this. Okay. So when we talk about one million homeowners falling through the cracks, what exactly does that mean that means is that there are a million people who have for whatever reason stopped paying their mortgage their at least thirty days behind or delinquent, and they are not in a forbearance plan. This includes both borrowers with Fannie and Freddie loan as well as people who have a private loan alone from a portfolio loan with a bank or something you know securitise in the private markets will don't. They know about the forbearance program are they scared to participate what exactly is going on here? That's a good question and I think the data's kind of murky but the from talking to lenders, some consumers, some counselors, the picture that we have is that a lot of people don't understand what forbearance means so they don't. Really know what their options are. The other thing is that early on especially early on and still somewhat today the messaging from the lenders was you can take a forbearance, but you're GONNA have to pay all of your mis- payments in one lump sum at the end of the forbearance, and that's really scared people that the scripts that the mortgage companies go through with people on the phone have changed significantly and there's a lot more outreach and education efforts that some of the lenders are trying the consumer groups in some lenders. Say It doesn't go far enough. They'd like better marketing but those are the two factors. There's uncertainty or it's an unknown thing and there's this fear that people have to pay everything back at once and that's just not feasible for most people. Why don't you describe for us the process of trying to obtain forbearance how hard is it? It shouldn't be that hard. There's no documentation requirements. You Literally Call Your Service and you say you can't pay and you WANNA forbearance and they're supposed to the the law, the a rescue bill from March called Cares Act. It says that people are entitled to up to a year. It's says six months that can be renewed for another six months. You have to ask for it. A lot of the lenders have been offering customers short of six months at a time they've been doing three-month for. That can be extended another three months and then twice more beyond the initial six months. Just kind of depends on the lenders it's supposed to be really easy to get. It's still confusing even the we've talked to people who got the forbearance and they were also getting letters from their lender saying that they were at risk of foreclosure because they've missed all these payments and so you get these contradictory messages from your from your lender those lenders are saying hey. Just ignore these letters these contradictory letters we were required, send them by state or federal law, and just know that you've got a forbearance but we still talk to people who said that kept them up at night. Well, I was wondering, for instance, people were jumping through hoops trying to find information about forbearance on the telephone well that he has also been a significant issue if. You talk to counselors and some of the consumers we talked to they would say that I mean they describe this kind of bureaucratic nightmare to be honest everything has happened kind of quickly if you talk to the lenders, they say they're moving to kind of implement this forbearance plan on a scale that's never been envisioned for forbearance before. So they're hiring people to take calls their. End Result is at least initially, the times were significant. People were waiting a long time to get someone on the phone when they did get people on the phone calls might be dropped or they'd be sent to voicemail at the servicer and then they wouldn't hear back. So you have to kind of call the main number again, unfortunately, a lot of the servicers that the way. They're set up you can't just call one representative at the servicer. So you just of are dealing with somebody different every time they're following a script. So what they can say can be kind of very tightly controlled, and if it's with jargon people who aren't very skater even people who are sophisticated and don't know a lot about the mortgage market, you know it can be. It can be very confusing. These terms are not it's not intuitive. Are there a significant number of borrowers who've been in forbearance but of defaulted? Anyway that's the peculiar thing. There are significant numbers are what I would I think it's fair characterizes significant. There's about two hundred, fifty thousand people who were in forbearance at one point since the pandemic there now, no longer in forbearance and. They. are still past due on their loan and it begs the question. We don't know why that's the case. I haven't been able to find someone situated like that. But that's what the data shows and we we talked to people who had experience during the last crisis in two thousand eight and there were always people who just the lenders couldn't reach out to you know they. Knew, they were behind, they thought they were in trouble, and so they docked there servicer at every turn and it's speculative. But people think that that's that's this population kind of fits into that camp and so there are some efforts to reach out to those people. I would also say that two hundred fifty thousand is relatively small. There's fifty three million mortgages in this country Million people have been on forbearance at some point since the crisis started were down, it's under four million. Now, most of the people who've exited forbearance are either performing on their mortgage or they have paid off their loan. So it's an alarming number. It's relatively small and the whole universe and the whole mortgage universe. But there is also a concern that as people kinda hit the six month period who still need help that the number would increase because they won't know they actually have to request the extension, the additional six months. What are the next steps to watch for in this forbearance program? What's on the horizon forbearance figures overall spiked In April, May I believe June and they've steadily declined since the summer or late summer and what will be interesting to watch whether or not that trend continues or you see more people who need help, and probably if you see that, you'll see more people kind of falling through the cracks here where they don't know how to get help that sort of based on macroeconomic trends. Major companies are laying people off tens of thousands of people, and that's I think the Big Question Mark Wall Street Journal reporter Andrew, Ackerman. Thanks a lot Andrew. Hey. Thanks for your

Andrew Ackerman Andrew Reporter Federal Government Congress Charlie Fannie Freddie Fannie Freddie Representative FHA
Fed Signals Three More Years of Near-Zero Interest Rates

WSJ What's News

04:48 min | Last week

Fed Signals Three More Years of Near-Zero Interest Rates

"Fed is certainly looking toward a longer term recovery here even though as fed chair, Jerome Powell noted economic activity has picked up since the second quarter what can you tell us about the Fed's latest projections and the decision to hold rates near Zero until at least twenty twenty three. Sure. So this is a pretty remarkable forecast although not entirely surprising given the Fed's new framework that they announced. Recently, they basically said that they're going to keep rates lower for longer. Now, we know with a little bit more specificity that they see them staying near zero as you said, through twenty, twenty three, which is a. Really Long Time they're basically saying that an anticipated raising interest rates again until the unemployment rate is around four percent and an inflation is back up to two percent, which is a lot longer than than they waited during this past expansion in two thousand fifteen when the Fed raised rates unemployment was around five percent and inflation was just around one point three. So that basically means is they WANNA see the economy further along on the path to recovery almost back to you know to it someone call full hall or certainly wear closer to where it was before the pandemic hit before they start raising interest rates again. What are the projections for the remainder of this year? So they they've actually improved somewhat in they. Now project unemployment will average around seven to eight percent during the last three months of the year that's a bit lower from where they saw it in June when they projected about nine to ten percent So remember the unemployment rate hit a high in April of fourteen point seven and it was down to eight point four percent last month. So that's certainly a little bit better but I think that they are also trying to emphasize that the gains that we're seeing now. Or kind of the easy the low hanging fruit. If you will, you know kind of the quick bounceback that you get just from businesses that were closed reopening again but the risk is increasing that you know certain sectors are going to have a harder time coming back a longer recovery. So Powell has said many times that the Fed will use all the tools at can to support the recovery, which he noted has been uneven for Americans. What actions is the Fed planning to take to build on the steps it's already taken to help support the economic recovery especially on even one. Well it's an important question because heading into this crisis, you know a lot of folks were questioning whether the Fed really had enough tools to address a serious downturn and what we've seen so far is that the steps they've taken have been really effective especially the steps that they took in March when there was a lot of financial markets stress, they revamped some emergency credit facilities that they'd use in the last crisis that got. Credit flowing in kind of quality. Some of that volatility rates as we've discussed are very low they're going to stay near zero. They are purchasing making these long term asset purchases of government bonds, securities, and they're going to continue doing that for some some time there a little bit vague today about exactly how long they plan to do that. But that will that will help you know really we heard fed chair Powell say that. That the Fed, the Fed can lend to companies I mentioned another one they're doing they have the mainstream lending program although there hasn't been a lot of a lot of interest in that but they can't just give money directly to people that solely in the purview of Congress and so he reiterated again, we've heard him say this a number of times that what we're experiencing really probably will require more fiscal support more money from the Government to give to people not to just lend to them. But just to give them to help make these improvements that there's only so much. The Fed can really do right in the Fed to stay pretty apolitical here but Powell has noted the impact of the federal stimulus which we know another aid packages currently tied up on Capitol. Hill. But it seems like a pretty clear message that the Fed feels more federal aid is needed. Absolutely. I mean I think that when the economy is bad obviously right now you know there's a public health crisis. It's pretty clear the reasons for that but still to some extent I think we've seen. In past crises historically when things are not going while the Fed tends to get blamed and I'm not saying the federal Powell's comments are politically driven but I think he wants to remind people that that look. Yes. There's only so much. We can do I think there's pressure on the on the Fed there's always pressure on them when the economy is struggling to do more and and I think that smart of him to just remind people that there's another big player in economic policy and that in that if they're concerned enough people on the hill are concern especially about the direction of the economy. Then really they're the ones who also have to play a bigger role. If they want the Fed to do more, they're probably going to do need to do more as well.

FED Jerome Powell Government Congress
Thanks to the Pandemic, Apple’s Big Event Was Just … an Event

WSJ Tech News Briefing

04:39 min | Last week

Thanks to the Pandemic, Apple’s Big Event Was Just … an Event

"Been covering these sorts of apple events in product reveals for a while now yes. Seventy five years. Have the one compare it was definitely very different though in June we had apples developer's conference and it was pretty similar to that. So in the sense of we're getting used to this, but it's definitely different than me flying out to Cupertino waiting in line to get into a big amphitheater in a room packed full of. Apple Employees, other press, and hearing a lot of excitement about new products. And on the products, let's start with that side of things. What are your biggest takeaways from what was announced and what star listeners be thinking about when they go to buy their next of ice I think the biggest thing I want everyone to remember when they go to buy an apple device is that getting the most expensive apple device doesn't necessarily anymore mean it's the best one to get. Now sure there are going to be features that they're going to have in these higher end products like we saw yesterday with the Apple Watch series six announcement. That is a three, hundred, ninety, nine dollars watch. But we also got an Apple Watch se that starts at two hundred, seventy nine dollars and has a lot of the features you would probably want seeing that also on the IPAD so you can get a three hundred twenty, nine dollar really good ipad. You get an IPAD air new IPAD air that's five, hundred, ninety, nine dollars or you can go up to the eight hundred dollar ipad pro but that IPAD air is actually a really good value and has a lot of the same things as that pro. and. We also heard a lot about services. Apple has really been leaning into this part of its business lately. Did we get any news there? We heard a lot about services yesterday and I think it was really interesting how apple threaded that throughout the hardware announcements specifically fitness plus announcement, and this was an announcement of a new on demand video workout service think about your Peleton's about your other sort of video workout videos but this comes. With an Apple Watch or you have to pay extra ten dollars a month to get this with your Apple Watch and this really sort of emphasizes if you've got this wash if you've got this hardware, then you can also get the service and for apple that means you're going to have recurring revenue. You're going to have this customer who didn't only pay for the hardware, but is now gonNA pay a monthly service fee for this new service. So some changes there another big change normally a new iphone would be the headliner of this event that's been pushed because of coronavirus related supply chain issues. But given everything we saw yesterday do you have any predictions about what new features we might see when that eventually is announced? There is no mention of the iphone which. Actually shocking to me I figured Oh they're going to at least tease it. This is the September event. They're going to remind people. We know we usually gather for the IPHONE but coming soon. But there was none of that. I would say the biggest hint we got about what's coming with the IPHONE is that the Apple Watch will no longer ship in its box a USB adapter the one that you plug into the wall that no longer is GonNa be shipped. In. The box and apple says, that's for environmental reasons that we all have these already why do we need more of these ending up in the landfill? I think apple will do the same exact thing with the iphone coming next month will hold you to that taking a step back here. You know this event is typically meant to really hype up the products that apple announces with no iphone and you mentioned sort of a less flashy event than we're used to. Are we expecting to see an impact on apple's bottom line I would say this is one of the most boring apple events in recent history that said I actually think it could end up being one of the most successful in terms of products announced you had the lower end ipad refresh the three, hundred, twenty, nine dollars Ipad, which we know as a top seller for apple, and now you also have these new apple watches that are. Not as expensive as the usual three, ninety, nine version but one that's more affordable has a lot of health features and you have also this this backdrop of the pandemic and people wanting to spend less and focus on health and I think that the Apple Watch I it's it's been sort of less of a niche product, but it's not spread over to everyone and I. Think this year we're going to see it really broaden its horizons. And here with the announcement of not only the different pricing tiers and having three different models out. But also the family sharing this is a feature they announced where you can actually give the watch to your kid even if they don't have an iphone and you can then set it up and control it and you can also use it to track your kid if they're at school, I think that is really showing how big of A. Market Apple thinks the watch can get into. So they've had things like fall detection for people who are older. They now have this feature for those who are younger. So I really think this is the beginning of seeing the the watch a lot bigger than we had thought

Apple A. Market Apple Cupertino Developer Peleton
TikTok’s Proposed Deal Under Review by Trump Administration

WSJ Tech News Briefing

00:41 sec | Last week

TikTok’s Proposed Deal Under Review by Trump Administration

"National security regulators met yesterday to discuss the Oracle Tiktok deal the committee on foreign investment. In the US or fifths is reviewing a proposal that would keep by Dan's as the majority owner of Tiktok and bring Oracle onboard as Tock US technology partner that's according to a person familiar with the matter. TIKTOK would become a us-based unit of dance and Oracle a minority stake in it along with other possible investors including Walmart the person said. Their view is one of the final steps before officials present the proposal to president trump and their unidad to do it. The trump administration previously gave tiktok until September twentieth to sell its US operations or face a ban.

United States Oracle Tiktok Donald Trump Walmart President Trump Partner DAN
Harvard Affirmative Action Case Could Change College Admissions

WSJ What's News

00:21 sec | Last week

Harvard Affirmative Action Case Could Change College Admissions

"Harvard University will be back in court tomorrow in an affirmative action case that could change emissions. The case is on its surface about race, but it's really about the different privileges and advantages that all different categories of applicants might get in the process and it really shows that this isn't just pure merit as the deciding factor and who gets in

Harvard University
The Blood of the Future Could be Made in a Lab

WSJ The Future of Everything

05:04 min | 3 weeks ago

The Blood of the Future Could be Made in a Lab

"I'm assuming people just didn't start thinking about making lab producer artificial blood during this pandemic. How long has research in this field been going on scientists have been experimenting with lab, Produce Blood for decades but due to issues of funding or skill ability or just now seeing the start of clinical trials. and. Even though we're all really thinking about corona virus right now, what really accelerated our work blood substitutes was actually another virus. That was the HIV AIDS epidemic in the Nineteen Eighty S. The evidence was that the cause was not only something new. But something transmitted by blood Thousands of people were infected with HIV, through blood transfusions. This was before the blood supply could be tested for HIV in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, five. So it made people really scared there was panic going on I remember my grandparents being fearful about the blood supply people before they had surgery would have their own blood extracted so they could use during surgery. There were all these fears about whether the blood supply was safe yeah, and that's when A. Lot of my sources told me we started shifting our national attention to looking at the blood supply. We realized it had to be tested. It had to be controlled, and we had to dump a lot of blood during that time because it was contaminated I spoke to one of the researchers who's been studying blood since the late nineteen eighties, his name is Dr George Daily. He's now the Dean of Harvard Medical School and he runs a lab there that studies this. Ultimately through various public health measures and very aggressive testing, very sensitive and specific testing. For HIV, the blood supply was made extremely safe. But as we've seen in recent years with the emergence of new pathogens whether it's Zeka war Ebola or. Recently coverted. There's always a worry about new infections that can contaminate the blood again, raising the value and importance of being able to more carefully controlled manufacturer and presentation of blood through a different system. That different system, he's alluding to is one where blood could be made in a lab. Okay and we're going to break down those new developments in just a bit but first Nora can you explain what do you need to make blood? Well just a refresher from probably what we learned in high school biology blood is made up of different parts. You've got the red blood cells, they carry oxygen. You've got white blood cells, they fight infection. Then there's plasma that carries nutrients, salts, proteins, and then there are platelets they make your blood clot when you get a cut. All of these parts are important because they all serve different functions so far no one has come up with a complete replacement, one total package for all of these functions. Instead different research groups are focusing on trying to produce the individual parts of blood. There's been some early testing of red blood cell substitutes including. Jehovah's Witnesses because most don't accept blood transfusions as part of their religion. But. Most of the momentum that I saw in my reporting was with labs trying to grow their own platelets. One of the top researchers doing this is Dr. Cedric of art and he's a consultant hematologist who leads a research group in transfusion medicine at Cambridge University? Rather important seven will be the small cell in the body, but equally if you don't have enough lateness. The bleeding symptom saw a really horrendous. Can I just stop right here and say I am shocked the platelets or the smallest cell in the body there's a lot of small cells in the body I know I know I was shocked when he said that too I had to go back and double check but it's true they are and even though platelets are so small they're really powerful. They're really important for patients undergoing chemotherapy or people who sustain traumatic injuries because they often receive platelet transfusions, but they're also quite finicky. They can only be stored for about five days and they have to be sort of stirred around to keep them from going bad. Leaving Jam Joel, Rubin on New Kitchen surface for five days zero. Gross stuff. So part of the reason he's trying to figure out how to manufacture them in the lab in vitro is because platelets are usually in the shortest supply because they have that shorter shelf life and when you say in vitro, you mean basically in a petri dish. Yep, that's right. That's in vitro. Got It.

HIV Dr George Daily Nineteen Eighty Producer Dr. Cedric Aids Harvard Medical School Nora Rubin Cambridge University Joel
"wsj" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

WSJ Tech News Briefing

02:10 min | 4 months ago

"wsj" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

"My viewpoint. Knowing full well that say in Brazil, they have a different viewpoint on that same content, and it sounds like I mean again i. don't WanNa. I don't want to infer it sounds like And I know you're not issuing a judgment lien on it, but it sounds like part of what you're saying is. It's helpful if there's a clear societal framework in which to operate. For the deciders and S I guess that applies a government, some kind of government or policy action that creates that framework. Is that fair I guess what I'd say is. It's unprecedented to have to make a decision that affects people in every single country in every single culture, all of which have different laws and expectations and tap to make a single policy on a single platform. I think is a very difficult job, because no matter what you do, some group is going to be underserved, but what I would say is it is likely in the best interest of leaders of these companies to be pragmatic in a time where people are in an enormous amount of pain. And the countries specifically the US aw I'll speak for the US just because I live here is an enormous amount of pain. We have you know over one hundred thousand people dead from a pandemic that likely could have been managed better in all respects, not pointing fingers at any individual and. We have this event with George Floyd that I think hoke, said something that has been simmering for very very long time and a pain that everyone feels deeply. And to be a leader in that moment I think you have to be fairly pragmatic and and realize that sometimes your principles Confu. It can make situations more difficult. Let's put it that way, but at the same time. I think this is a difficult job. And I commend the people for trying to figure out the right answer, okay? I got I wish we could go on I think we're out of time I'm reading are complicated dashboard of our virtual. Probably not so, but thanks for all of your thoughts. Appreciate the hearing for you on rt live. Thank you. And that was your.

US WanNa Brazil George Floyd hoke
"wsj" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

WSJ Tech News Briefing

06:02 min | 11 months ago

"wsj" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

"Company shenzhen campus starting with a trip down memory lane to a nineteen ninety two road trip rent took across the US where he visited several american companies now what if i share that experience is showed how great the US was let me give one example we took a taxi in the ibm campus we wanted to know how how big that campus was so we asked driver riva's straight no turn with see all alone will how being the campus would be in the end that that taxi driver lost his way we felt the greatness of the us as a nation and even today we still have a a lot of the united states we are not changing refilling toward the united states because of the pressure because of the campaign they have against what you brian mate what fishing long before president trump before even really president obama mama there have been difficulties between hallway in the united states under both administrations what do you think is the root cause of the long history mystery of confrontations between the united states government and what you may go full actually there's no confrontation asian between the US government's overall hallway as an of the united states because we have learned a lot from the the US culture we are not pushing away the united states and we certainly don't fewest difficulties no matter obama trump administration you they think what's happening right now the motivation for why way people work harder so data we can survive i think usa KPMG but but you are now in one hundred seventy countries you're the leading supplier in most of those countries your head on five g. as we've seen do you threaten the US because of your success do you think what you're calling me i think is not because of that the reason and the US donkey feeling a threat coming from because the US is very strong when it comes to technology and innovation even though in some cases they are not leading the party i think the US right now says to catch up there would be no shopping for them in the future where you will find she can you share let your while he's been inextricably linked to the freight fight between the US and china do describe conversations you've had with say president between ping such do over the past year term you have the traits our discussion between china and the united states has nothing to do with khloe because we basically have no business in the united states therefore i do not see any connection between quality and the ongoing china US trade talks and i don't care much how that trade talks progress even without the united states while we can't survive very well having set us us we will always embrace globalization meaning if the US companies are allowed to supply to our would definitely what buy from them but if they it cannot we can survive where you watch what may locals journal reporter even though ask the next question in chinese dough points south that most countries that have ties to telecom companies have used those connections for surveillance she asked how ren feels about the possibility that china could use his equipment for that purpose here's ren response to cheat hits think about a comment factor tom manufacturers sal cars to the users and it was being loaded in a car is to be decided by the user for hallway we we what are we sell teutonic more operators is like a naked equipment the equipment is operated by todd operators not alway asia system mr rehn you've seen remarkable change over your career your five g. rollout is now picking picking up steam dramatically what will we see in the world of technology in the next ten years what comes after five g. and how many more transformative formative changes lie ahead in the next decade yang goodish all i could not imagine how society will look like in in three years time not to mention years just two years bag very few people could ever imagine dad's we can use our our mobile phones to browse the internet with a steve jobs and his iphone he basically changed the entire world i think a time steve jobs introduced a mobile oh broadband with iphone was the time that the internet too early to call after five g. i think the biggest opportunity would be around artificial the intelligence we've how our society to transform into something that we cannot imagine at this point of time that was wall street journal reporter's dance drumpf eva and editor in chief matt murray speaking to weiwei CEO and founder wren jn fay in this special weekend edition of tech news briefing next week we're launching a five part series on five g. technology and the ways it could change changed the world for more.

"wsj" Discussed on WSJ The Future of Everything

WSJ The Future of Everything

08:38 min | 11 months ago

"wsj" Discussed on WSJ The Future of Everything

"About in terms of that I also think they're famous examples for Amazon investigated the use use of a I in screening resumes and then had to discontinue that because I find pattern in the data the patterns in the data from the past. Was We hire men and so he refused to hire women which was not the intended consequences so there are a lot of issues around specific issues. Around how technology choose built sure. Yeah there's a lot of different red flag areas. I guess that will highlight applications. I will just cross off the list as a whole so. Do you think that weaponization is a tough one. But I used to work at Lockheed Martin as well and I found myself working highly regulated fields. Because you need people. At the forefront really homing homing crafting the fields so ethics and highly regulated fields is definitely one area that needs careful thought a story about myself. Who's just like training wise as you know? I went to a small Catholic Jesuit College where we were required to take ethics in religion classes and that really helped shape like a young person coming out in area. I'm excited and and very concerned about is personalized medicine. My new startup is actually in that space. And I think there's a lot of opportunity community for risk as we move forward and it's a balance between wanting to help doctors and also utilized data but it can't be skewed and we've seen big companies who are very a careful and they have more limited blind spots still make a lot of big big mistaker. I'd just wanted to pick up on something curl said because I think it's very important. She said something being very unusual in these modern times which is That she chose to engage with a company like a lock. Martin because people like cutting edge could help help shape. It technology appropriately generally the sentiment in high tech right in Silicon Valley. And we've seen this in the news folks Google Microsoft elsewhere saying saying we don't want to engage with the DOD now. I respect the diversity of opinions but raises the obvious question if the cutting edge folks in the private sector say we don't engage with our national security and people in China say or in Russia North Korea. Don't have that choice. And so they do engage edge. What does how does that play out over time so I just think it's really important to acknowledge people who are willing to to make a different choice? They're sure I want to see if we have some questions in the audience. I'm guessing we do and we already have several so we could start right over here. Please tell us who you are. Hi My name is Rose Oda. I attend James Madison University and Carol. As you said you're talking about you know majors and students so that really stuck out to me. I guess you know someone who really likes tech and it's pretty interesting today. I kind of what aspects of as you see and trends are growing and you know just any kind of overall advice. You'd give to a student like me okay. Yeah AH congratulations. I'm really happy to hear that you're excited about a guy in an active learner. And you're asking these questions. Experts and domain expertise is generally. There's no overlap. So there's a big process problem that I'm seeing in the field in general companies people who have learned. Ai Trying to replace the people who have done the job for a long time have all this know-how and we haven't figured out a good way for these teams to work together to speak the language to communicate. And I think there's a lot of arrogance probably with AH engineers because you're the expert but really what I learned was in the company. They're probably only needs to be one deep learning expert everyone else's a software engineer. That helps bill bill. The tools and the framework and a lot of other teams are the support for for that. So even if you're an AI. Lead Company there are a lot of other functions that are very important important to have respect for like the business units in the especially the domain expertise. And Right now we've had a hard time figuring out. How do you experts work with scientists and that seems to be an open problem at every company that I see right now? It's a social skills matter very much and not even just soft skills. It's just like how do you sit down on and actually move products forward in the process of broken right like tried to follow software engineering techniques like the mythical man month those long products. Don't work in all the ideas for mobile and AB testing is also broken. When you're working at a company and it's been really interesting because I do think that new types of testing needs to be new new frameworks and process needs to be created and right? Now everything's broken up very I company. Another question I hear anyone. There was a there was a hand up over here. Maybe not I'm sorry right down here in front yes. So there's been a lot of talk about privacy and being at loggerheads completely. Can you speak to some of the leader latest breakthroughs or new things that are happening in the eye to make sure that we can ensure privacy while we sure so one of the big challenges people talked about right Alexis listening to you. See Crtv is taking pictures you all gets uploaded to the cloud and who knows what what happens next. So there's more and more work in what's called. Ai At the edge which is having the processing of the data whether it's an image or audio segment happen on on the device that recorded it so imagine. Yeah your doorbell sees who comes to your door. But the analysis of whether that's a stranger or a family member stays on the device so kind of what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas. What happens on the edge stays on the edge so as more and more is carried out on the edge? You get more Privacy Carol. Do you think on this trust issue. Do you think we're in the right spot. It's a tough question. I think it's up to every it's up to every almost company culture and also on the national level because some countries are going to be okay with it and others are not. It's a good point because like we talked about. It's unlikely to have global standard for acceptable. Ai Practices it is GonNa Kinda come down to what the company do and kind of do we as consumers trust those different companies with what they've deployed it right and I mean just in terms of regulation for companies you know I will say that for companies we really should be looking at other heavily regulated industries like medical robotics aviation space you I think that there are processes in place that we can start from and then move forward yeah for surgical robotics. It's changed over the last few years. I used to work at intuitive surgical. Well we had DAVINCI system that came out in ninety nine and the robot then would not pass. FDA regulation now but back then it got started and it's improved over time so I would also say that Niro Nets aviation have been products that have been released in the public in the same questions for that are still valid. Uh Carol mentioned a number of people on this stage mentioned well of course the laws and other countries can be different and we need to abide by the laws and other other countries. We certainly don't want to promote anarchy but we also need to be cognizant of the fact that if the laws and other countries are radically inconsistent with our values. Then we have to do something about that. We can't say with that's the law. There imagine that there was a Nazi country these days. Thank you and they wanted to use to make Nazism Autism genocide more efficient right. I think we'd have to take a stand and say no. We're opposed to that. Sure I'll just add also I. I agree with you on that statement. I think what does these are human problems right and I think is just helping us unravel and really is a tool. Oh for us to figure out. How do we just societal differences between countries? 'cause it's helped expose bias. I think people have bias. Human Nature is better masking and hiding these biases. But there and I think we're at this time where we can actually I'm optimistic again for using AI as a reflection to ourselves to our society to help us understand stand why we are the way we are and why does our society think the way we do. We have different types of people. We will start to understand that better and I think we can use to do that. I mean it's a very powerful point. Thanks so much Carol Riley or not ony thank you that was Ornette Zony. CEO of the Alan Institute for artificial intelligence and Carol Riley Co founder of Dr Ai. In Conversation with Wall Street Journal Chief News Editor Chasing Anders. The future of everything is a production of the Wall Street Journal. This episode was produced with help from Jason Anders and Anthony Green our technical director. Is Jacob. Gorski thanks to our editors on the live.

"wsj" Discussed on WSJ The Future of Everything

WSJ The Future of Everything

08:17 min | 11 months ago

"wsj" Discussed on WSJ The Future of Everything

"In in research China. What does what does that? Say to you It seems to me that we had a stereotype of the Chinese being very diligent. Kind of copycat right. Oh they're copping our take -nology they're not really doing the cutting edge innovative stuff. That's why we looked at the top ten percent that even the top one percent of papers based on their impact impact their citation rate and what we found. Is that that stereotype. If it was ever true it certainly no longer true. The Chinese are doing their share of innovation this. This is in the academic realm. But I assume it's equivalent in the in the business round and so we have to take that into account and of course we see more and more from the government a mint the attempt to invest in our own research and innovation. And it's not zero sum like you said but we're also taking steps that aren't to our benefit and that's around immigration. This statistics are showing the various steps. The trump administration has taken are hurting immigration at the Undergrad at the appeared. St Level at the Professor Level Post Doc could set her up. I want to stick with this for one moment and Carol ask you folks look at a graphic way this and say oh. That's that's a problem is it. Is it a problem now. I'm actually just so excited. That people are like A. I is now at the front of not. Just the academics mind but in terms ends of business and people are really trying to transform their companies to become like a first companies. I think when I started Grad School in two thousand four near ups which is the I premier conference it was intimate group of four hundred four five hundred people in Tahoe and it's roughly doubled every year since two thousand twelve and now like there's over eight thousand people there and that's still seems relatively small compared to what's going on on the global scale so I'm just so excited that people all over the world are dying into learn a it's like the most popular classes and a lot of universities that teach it and a I will probably end up spinning out to become its own discipline. You know just like Computer Peter. Science did back in the day. It came out of math and stemmed in realized that there was this need and it's very different so I think one thing that we're realizing is that a is not just a subgroup within computer science but actually its own discipline that's very interdisciplinary and will need to be built out in different types of schools. And I think we have to be very mindful of how we craft this major but ah very excited to see what was actually spin out in major and you told me we talked before to that you felt like really the best innovation could truly come from anywhere on the planet. Oh yeah absolutely absolutely to be an entrepreneur. Nowadays like the opportunity is more distributed You just need a little bit of capital. We'll get started. You know the cost of compute for Invidia. GPA is is not that much to get started and you can sit in the room. And I think they'll be startup spinning out from anywhere. Is there a risk though that the politicization around Ai. And these these these concerns about security or advantage does that risk choking the the development cycle. I mean certainly with five G. Right now. What we're seeing is a lot of concern that some of the steps countries are taking? I think more about protecting national interests in advance in the technology. Do you think that we're at a point on I wear wear a similar thing could happen. That could actually slow development. I I do think that we really WanNA maintain the open academic exchange so these are are are published papers as you mentioned CORSAIRS available globally. I think it would be a real mistake to try and constrain the academia because ultimately we suffer if you get into sensitive apply technologies. Oh Jeez I base weapons. It's another story but if you try to restrict the basic research ultimately it'll it'll hurt. Yeah Carol what what are some of the. Uh I'm gonNA switch to the actual tech there were today and I'm just curious. What are some of the breakthroughs that you're seeing that excite you the most right now? Oh Jeez. Yeah there's so many different applications because I think you know problems on a global scale or different and I think everyone's got different pain points for me like I mentioned earlier. I'm really excited about the ways that the icon augment humans not replace them and I do think that there's so many more jobs being created through that we haven't even explored and I think the fear behind I will dissolve over time. I think when the computers first came out there was a huge fear about security the same same type of concerns. And now you. I think you wouldn't have imagined the Youtube Star would have been how we use a computer today. So what I'm really excited about. Is the interaction between humans and creativity. Ativity so I recently joined the San Francisco symphony as their creative adviser. And we're really exploring different tools for artists in the different ways that we can bring in robotics to help really supplement the conductor the Symphony Orchestra and the audience. And I feel like this is. It's almost like low hanging fruit because so little work has been done in the space of creativity which is generally thought to be what humans own and I think as we start to explore that space a lot of new different products will come out or what are you seeing. That's most exciting today but also kind of right around the corner not ten years out but something maybe even next year or the year after we will experience that we don't we're not seeing right now so flight lead Carola optimist. We see huge applications of course in medicine in Transportation I think people know that one of the things that's more around. The corner is applications in language natural language processing so things like Alexa. And Siri. And son are very good at transcribing or speech. But they don't really understand the under said if you say whether update I think we're going to see the new products that are far more sophisticated in their language understanding. I do WANNA sound a cautionary note though I think Carol perhaps is a little bit more optimistic than I. I am in a couple of ways. First of all the phrase they I is. The new electricity is absolutely correct and capturing the transformative aspects whatever industry you're in breath even journalism has a role to play this fake news fake news direction etc.. That said it's still very very difficult. Michael to build a a high quality working system blood blood sweat and tears. It's not like you can just take a course and just do it so very very difficult. Difficult to build high-quality I systems and then on the other end of that. I do think that there's some very real concerns. For example you mentioned jobs absolutely new jobs are being created by the number of jobs that are already being lost in retail coming around the corner and and transportation. We're talking about millions of jobs. It will take some time to replace those and it's not simple right. There was a headline awhile back. Take coal miners and turn them into data miners. Okay it's just not not that simple so we have some some real issues to think about and we need to build guardrails technology. And I'm not suggesting. Okay let's rush into regulation. I wouldn't dare suggest in front of this crowd. And of course regulation has its own concerns. It's a blunt politicized tool but I am suggesting that we think very hard about the problems in particular about its robustness right so we have these wonderful. Ai Systems but you know if you've had the experience you say something to Alexa it works great. You say something it seems like basically the same it crashes and Burns right doesn't understand you at all what happened there. The technology's very not robust very brittle. That's that's a great segue talking about Again some of the red flags but just concerns people have about ai as develops and certainly one talked about a little earlier today. This idea that I I might be used for purposes that may not be seeing always in the public. Good perhaps surveillance in some sort of Victoria regime or something like that but a big focus right now is on the way that technology is built right in. There are a lot of infamous examples. This folks are familiar with image recognition software that is great with white faces but not so great with with anything else. I'm wondering are there actual applications today day that you see out there that you look and you think I'm a little worried about the way. The technology came together on this. Well facial recognition is certainly a- an example that that people people talk.

"wsj" Discussed on WSJ The Future of Everything

WSJ The Future of Everything

08:42 min | 11 months ago

"wsj" Discussed on WSJ The Future of Everything

"Remember what it was like being a kid in school. The teacher would talk most of the time you listened but every once in a while you'd start drifting off daydreaming thinking about lunch or a project you're going to work on after school at some point. The teacher would notice hugh staring out the window and probably call on you. Well those days may be over at least for students in China as a Wall Street Journal reports in some elementary schools. Kids start their days by putting on an electric headband. As a teacher goes over their lessons. The headband monitors electrical activity in the kids. Brains basically are they tuning in its data to the teacher in real time. So they know who's paying attention and WHO's not but it doesn't end there. The system also sends sends the data to the kids parents and matches it against learning objectives. These headbands are part of a growing effort in China to use applications in artificial intelligence in schools like a enabled cameras that scan students detecting when they raise their hands or talk behind the teachers. Back there our our facial recognition robots that take attendance and Quiz Toddlers and kids where Bluetooth response that record their heart rates and how much time time. They're spending in the library or on the playground. Proponents say this information can boost safety help teachers quantify learning progress and make education and more individualized skeptics questioned the sites and say it's excessive surveillance that resembles Beijing's push in recent years to deploy voice similar technology to keep watch over its citizens but there may be a bigger goal. Beijing wants to make the AI industry a driver of economic expansion having virtually unobstructed access to a potential sample pool of around. Two hundred million students allows Chinese scientists and researchers to amass an ever growing database of human behavior which allows them to develop more advanced algorithms. That could give China China a key advantage in the ongoing race with the US for global dominance in artificial intelligence but it's not just China versus the US global we'll spending on artificial intelligence shows. No sign of slowing down. Organizations are expected to invest thirty five point. Eight billion dollars in systems this year. That's up forty. Four percent over last year and a spending is projected to more than double by twenty twenty two experts on the forefront of. Ai Are optimistic about the the growth of the industry but they also see challenges and some red flags from the Wall Street Journal. This is the future of everything. I'm Qatari Yoga. This episode is Part Two of our highlights series where we bring you the best from the Wall Street. Journal's Tech Live Conference in Laguna Beach California for Three Days Wall Street Journal editors gathered alongside leaders in the tech community to discuss everything from industry disruption to data privacy today. We're focusing on the future of AI. Hi I'm Jason Anderson. I am chief news editor at The Wall Street Journal. I'm speaking with two. Experts in artificial intelligence Orrin at coney is CEO. Oh of the Allen Institute for artificial intelligence its mission is to conduct high impact. Ai Research for the common good that includes projects like semantic scholar and they I generated public search engine that indexed one hundred and seventy million scientific results from a wide range of disciplines to make access to relevant research easier they also developed grover a model that can generate realistic looking fake news articles in order to be able to detect those fake news articles. Written by in the future Carol Riley is a robot. BADDEST and co-founder of the self driving car company Dr Ai Dr Ai. Partnered with the city of Arlington Texas to operate autonomous shuttles. In the area it was acquired by apple in June. The big question we want to answer. What is the force that will continue to fuel innovation and artificial intelligence and what systems are guardrails are necessary to to protect security and personal privacy along the way? Welcome Carol I thought it'd be good to start since you are both technologists who literally work in artificial intelligence. Just ask for your take on what is as you see it and just as much. What isn't it and maybe we'll start? You sure so I would. I'd say I guess three things. The first one is that the origin of the concept back in the fifties was of course to emulate and maybe sometime even surpass human an intelligence. That's not what we're seeing with the recent surge in interest in machine learning deep learning. What we're seeing are techniques that utilize realized a massive amount of data to build predictive models that have shown themselves to be effective in a very wide variety of applications for manufacturing to healthcare care and more and more so? That's the reality of today. And then in terms of what people are thinking about what people have been talking about where we think to the future. I think it's become almost kind of Rohrschack test. People project their own concerns whether it's about privacy or about taking over or about bias and discrimination jobs. These are all legitimate concerns but I bet you if we did a quiz the professor says okay everybody take out a piece of paper and write down four sentences about what you think is and we'll be and then we'll compare those there would be quite different. That's why say Rohrschack care already say I think artificial intelligence is a machine displaying some level of intelligence and there's narrow ai which does very small specific tasks or generally generally I which is the the fear that killer robots coming in and I've always worked on the spectrum and I've always been very fascinated with the area of human machine collaboration and I do think that we're very far off from back narrative of Terminator. But I do a lot of rules and Ways that humans and machines can work together and very very broadly. It's you know I think just to be clear it's like this big umbrella of Ai and then you have machine learning underneath breath it and then you have deep learning as a subset. So those words are generally interchangeable. But you know it's kind of like that Larry and I'm excited to see new techniques like deeper learning things that eighteen and even though we're seeing the term may be a bit overused right now especially from marketing standpoint. You're optimistic you're excited about the technology and you feel like in general the things happening happening or are truly good and exciting. And Oh yeah I think we were. Just now at the cusp of new breakthrough. So I will say that you know we've undergone what I call it the first wave of this transformation. There's the slogan. A is the new electricity power everything. We're just kind of started in. Eventually it will fall into the background. Be So seemless right now. It's so frightened center in everyone's minds the the first transformation was really powered by data and compute. And you always hear data incomplete. You know and I think right now. We're entering into this second wave of AI. which will be powered by the rise of tools and talent and ideas? Hi Dea the really interesting thing is when we talk about like where we'll be competitive on a global scale in US or China you know really. It's this I don't like pitting against each other and I don't think it's a winner. Take all situation. The the popular machine learning course taught by Andrew has taught over a two point. Five million people in that class alone sure and that would have been impossible for any professor to teach no matter how popular you are so. I'm really excited that these tools and these platforms forms are available so that talent can spring from anywhere silicon valley where I'm from used to be like everyone's like what's the secret sauce and can we replicate it and we're scene like different communities create their own secret sauce because I think so. Many problems are local and Calicut spring from anywhere. Now that you have all these tools available online nine the discipline of new group of learners who are learning online the need for ethics. Yeah so I want to come back. Pack a lot of that. But I'm going to start with one of the things you've touched on that. We talked about a lot today. which is this idea of? Ai Is something of an arms race right or wrong. It's certainly one of the ways. It's been positioned certainly between countries and I'm going to pull the graphic that is based on some analysis that or are in your group. Did I believe and you can see it here and this is this is a a look at all of the research that was published and the top ten percent of papers that are cited. So I I gather those are ones that tend to have the the most impact and the ones that are the most prominent and what what you see is really remarkable increase.

"wsj" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

WSJ Tech News Briefing

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"wsj" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

"Service. I just want to know what's going on. Now. I. I have recently started subscribing to streaming TV. And there are a lot of streaming video players on the market. And I must confess I got a different one from this. You guys at WSJ tack you like the Roku premier plus streaming video player. What's so good about this, well, Roku, we've we've long called it, the Switzerland of the streaming video business they've actually been very good about getting all of the different channels that may not get along with each other or may not get along with apple or Amazon or Google to update their apps, and and write apps for the Roku platform, so they've really grown and developed over time to becoming the essential the essential hardware, if you want to supplement what's on your smart TV? And the thing is smart TV's are great for the first year. But after about a year that the app start to degrade. They don't get updated Roku is going to. It's their bread and butter. They have to keep these apps updated. So we really are fan of of Roku and the premier. Plus is fifty dollars for a four K video streaming device with a voice controlled remote. That is a heck of a lot for fifty bucks. So we we we thought that was the best bet for everyone this year are right headphones. People use headphones a lot of the time to tune out the world, and we know about the beats headphones. They're great. But you guys think that this particular product is better, the Sony W H one thousand three headphones, and basically you can try to yell at somebody. And they won't hear you. That's how good these headphones. I mean, we we swear by noise cancelling headphones, and we most many of the team have have worn the Bose quiet comfort thirty five's for many years me included. David Pierce, our personal tech columnist took this one. I been and said, it's the noise cancels is even better. It's still up there. It's what three fifty and it's hard to find deals on the best headphones. But I gotta say as someone who wears. Headphones every day. I might commute both directions. I got my money's worth in the first couple of months. Let alone years. Alright. The Molefi charge stream power station, wireless charger. This goes for eighty bucks..

Roku WSJ David Pierce Sony Switzerland apple Google Amazon fifty dollars four K
"wsj" Discussed on WSJ The Future of Everything

WSJ The Future of Everything

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"wsj" Discussed on WSJ The Future of Everything

"So. For me. It's like the unending in a driving force of why there's opportunity and growth in the space, but there's other challenges beyond. I mean, there are things on the horizon that I think are more monumental that we have people working on and that companies are working on and around quantum computing. I think there's other things out there that are in addition to a there's three or four kind of key technologies that I think are the pillars of the race for you know, what is going to be the control of the next wave. Or if you will. And you know, when you talk about artificial intelligence machine learning, I think it really gets back to the disruption allowed by the cloud. And you know, in whatever form it is. And so whatever you can do to be able to Acilitator that we've seen what? Amazon AWS is done Microsoft Google. They're all fighting for hell, they can bring value through the cloud. And so I think one of the important elements is be sure that we have the ability to take information to shipping it all to the cloud. We do. Preprocessing? So we only send to the club what's important to make it more efficient. So that you can then take those appropriate actions because I think it's like ninety eight percent of all the information that goes to the cloud. It's not ever utilize not ever analyze. So by doing that preprocessing. I think we're at the early stages of really making artificial intelligence machine learning much more innovator emerge more significant share. Okay. Right. Leave it there. Thanks so much. Thank you. Clamor event XP Renee James van peers speaking with both Street Journal chief news editor Jason enters the future of everything is a production of the Wall Street Journal this episode was produced by Anthony green. And Laura sim. Our technical director is Jacob Burski. Jon ward off is the executive producer of WSJ podcasts. Stand perish is the editor in chief of the future of everything. Thanks to our editors on the live journalism team, unique Kim, Nikki baller and can last and special thanks to festival organizers and our Raphael. Andrea pasta and Robin Witt sailor. Be sure to check back for regular episodes in the weeks ahead and pudding special reporting on the earth's changing climate and remember to rate and review us on apple podcasts. Thanks for listening. I'm Jennifer strong in the Guna Beach, California. How does innovation happen more? She strategy all through Pedic center. Explains innovation doesn't happen in one company that happens in a very complicated ecosystem outside of a company. Get more insights from essentially, the official sponsor of the Wall Street Journal's the future of everything.

cloud Wall Street Journal editor in chief Guna Beach Acilitator Street Journal Pedic center Laura sim Jennifer strong Renee James van Jon ward Robin Witt Jacob Burski Andrea pasta Amazon Google technical director California
"wsj" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

WSJ Tech News Briefing

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"wsj" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

"What did you want to be when you grew up first thing i want it to be was a nun yes i want to catholic school an ice fired to be sister antoinette my first grade teacher but that all changed in secondgrade when i met johnny which had a how many hours of xbox do you play each week oh well i get a stack of xbox games on my desk every week so i play a little bit oh i'm in the wrong job up next gm ceo mary barra may finally answer the question where are the gm jet packs into the wsj elevator we go mary barra the ceo general motors yes am to ask you a question shirt maybe a couple questions chevy buick out both for her tesla general motors are you going to miss driving when selfdriving cars takeover now i think i'll always drive because i love to drive i'll i'll use uh you know selfdriving vehicles but a know he's going to be time i wanna get behind that will you said that gm needs to hire more diverse group of engineers what are you doing to make that happen well we're doing a number of things i think first his trading in an environment where everybody can flourish on and it goes all the way to then working with young girls in middle school to make sure that there are studying mass science near the whole stem curriculum so they can be a successful engineer president trump is negotiating changes to nafta how do you think those changes will impact gm while i think it's important that we communicate with the administration so they know the impact clearly we want to create jobs not decrease the number of job so we're providing that input and we think there's room to matter.

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"wsj" Discussed on WSJ MoneyBeat

WSJ MoneyBeat

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"wsj" Discussed on WSJ MoneyBeat

"14 million people in mexico do not have access to the internet are company a tom terry this is building an hour that will connect them to the world throw the insurance policies that gave the mexican government investsors i'm partners the confidence they needed to make these happen they also cover out construction brisk damage to the network and environmentalist potion for the project these compounds child was the one learn more at chug dot com slash wsj tiff is money the from the wall street journal now from our studios in new york are paul vinya and steven grocer hello everybody welcome to money beat look at the week ahead and what a week it will be i'm paul vinya i'm steven grocer and boy am i going to miss that steven grocer yes our so we're gonna do this now let's get it out of the way let's get out of the wiz will be my last podcast for wsj for the wall street journal leaving us grocer steven groceries leaving the company after how many years have you been here about twelve and a half almost thirteen twelve and a half years quite a career you chosen to take your talents south the to bri brand x in the brand ex uh i'm not going to promote where you're going you can just tell people and he doing your your twitter handle do it somewhere but the fact is we're losing steven gross nuri said about that uh that's gonna force some changes on the money be blog it's going to force some changes on this podcast we are still figuring that all out stay tuned don't leave us will will be back in some form we don't exactly know what yet but we've got a week to talk about and to help us we are joined by wall street journal economics reporter in washington d c sara cheney sarah how are you doing great how how're you doing i'm i'm a little teary eyed appear out of asked teary eyed.

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"wsj" Discussed on WSJ Minute Briefing

WSJ Minute Briefing

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"wsj" Discussed on WSJ Minute Briefing

"Support for wsj comes from comcast committed to improving your customer service experience with twohour appointment windows including nights and weekends because they should fit into your life not the other way around learn more at xfinitycomservice this is minute briefing from the wall street journal thursday brings on durable goods orders jobless claims and international trade data earnings continued to roll in this week amazon proctor and gamble intel varieties in at twitter comcast expedia mastercard and starbucks i'll report on thursday turbulence in the retail sector is hitting executives working for the top mall companies where it hurts in their wallets senior management teams at the country's largest mall owners including simon property group are taking cut to their compensation as struggling retailers and increasing competition from online shopping takes its toll new data from the journal shows that exects at other big mall owners suffered because they're compensation is tied to the performance of their share prices which have been hammered during the past eighteen months as investors have fled the sector and cocacola is replacing coke zero in the us with another diet soda brand in an effort to hold onto consumers cutting back on sugary drinks coca cola sugar is zero which the atlantabased company said has been a stronger seller in europe and latin america will become available in the us in august cocacola said xerox sugar tastes more like original coke and looks more like a two in contrast with coq zeros black designed for more on these and other stories head to wsjcom.

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"wsj" Discussed on WSJ Minute Briefing

WSJ Minute Briefing

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"wsj" Discussed on WSJ Minute Briefing

"Support for wsj comes from comcast committed to improving your customer service experience with twohour appointment windows including nights and weekends because they should fit into your life not the other way around learn more at xfinitycomservice this is minute briefing from the wall street journal after the gop senate voted tuesday afternoon to move to floor debate on their efforts to rewrite health care and vice president mike pence breaking the tight the senate then rejected a republican proposal to repeal and replace obamacare wednesday morning floor debate on the legislation to overhaul the affordable care act will precede president donald trump told the journal in an exclusive interview he'd like to see the bill replaced a the she replace the replace it was rigging play president trump also signalled his next priority to the wall street journal in tuesday's interview overhauling the tax code to push corporate rates down and give middleclass tax payers a break even if it means some of the wealthiest pay more people i hear most other little compete this coach gus this upward revision via the european union stands to act ready within days if concerns about the us bill to impose new sanctions on russia aren't addressed commission president said wednesday the bill which was passed tuesday includes provisions allowing president trump to sanction european companies who work on what european officials believe could apply to a range of current energy projects for more on these and other stories head to wsjcom i'm tanya bustos reporting from the newsroom at the wall street journal.

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"wsj" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"wsj" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"Support for wsj comes from comcast committed to improving your customer service experience with twohour appointment windows including nights and weekends because they should fit into your life not the other way around learn more at xfinitycomservice what's news from the wall street journal top stories and timely in fact i'm charlie turner in new york the federal reserve's policy meeting highlights a busy week will also get lots of earnings reports in key economic readings will preview the week with bill stone of pnc asset management group but i harrison top stories jared kushner president donald trump's soninlaw and a senior white house adviser met with the senate intelligence committee monday that after releasing a statement detailing his contacts with russian officials and business people in the two years since mr trump launched his presidential campaign kushner said quote i did not collude nor know of anyone else in the campaign who colluded with any foreign government senate republicans are expected to vote as early as tuesday to begin debate on their sweeping healthcare legislation but they don't know yet what measure they'll be voting on some senators said majority leader mitch mcconnell has told them they would know before the vote whether they would be asked to allow debate on some version of a bill to repeal and replace the affordable care act or legislation that would repeal the aca with a two year expiration date the national association of realtors said sales of existing homes fell one point eight percent in june also prices jumped as strong demand overwhelmed a pinched a supply of available homes next up we preview the week with pnc bill stone this is what's news from the wall street journal.

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"wsj" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

WSJ Tech News Briefing

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"wsj" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

"Support for wsj comes from comcast committed to improve in your custom service ext variance with our appointment windows including nights and weekends because they should fit into your life not the other way around learn more at xfinitycomservice this is technewsbriefing from the wallstreet helloi'mtanyaboustos reporting from the newsroom in newyork with a look at how apple is falling short in its battle for video eyeballs apples i tuned is struggling against amazoncomcast and net flakes all grabbing a bigger chunk of the digital movie business as of late and as apples i tunes stories already struggling against rising competition from music listeners it aims to re strategize for video viewers as well here with the latest on that front is the wallstreetjournal's trip nickel patching in from sanford scott hatred tony it's interesting that for all the success apple has had in the hardware arena it struggling with software apple music and video has had his work cut out for it what is at the root this will in particularly in the case by tunes i think what you have is has a product that was so revolutionary war the when it was first introduced on that it it didn't really was able to pioneer a category both in digital music sales and then later in in video sales but than tv and an movies um but as it's been around for a longer competitors have been able to catch up an offer services that are comparable either and performance roar in some cases better in terms of uh in terms of some of the offerings that that they.

wsj comcast windows wallstreet newyork apple sanford digital music
"wsj" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

WSJ Tech News Briefing

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"wsj" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

"Support for wsj comes from comcast committed to improving your customer service experience with two our appointment windows including nights and weekends because they should fit into your life not the other way around learn more at xfinity dot com slash service and facebook goes hollywood look at its tv like shows and original programming coming to your facebook page as soon as possibly this summer this this tech news briefing from the wall street journal welcome this is the wall street journal's techniques briefing i'm tanya pushed s reporting from the newsroom in new york and for a while facebook has been looking to the future that is a video and in many cases the future is not too far away case in point the social networking giant is talking to hollywood studios and agencies about producing tv quality shows with an eye toward launching original programming by late summer let's get right to the details joining us now patching in from san francisco is wall street journal reporter depot seethrough roman city but this seems like it's going to be pretty big if we look at who facebook is in talks with and the kind of money that they're ready to pump into this do you think that's a safe bet this is going to be pretty big deal yeah it's going to be pretty begg no they are talking to a couple of different types of creators there's the buzzfeed's attentions refinery twenty nine of the world that uh were a facebook is looking for shorter form content our story is about the hollywood side of things you know they're promising up to three million dollars per episode which isn't super far away from a net flex four point five million dollars for episode of a for house cards mean it is how it's big money up for for facebook and if you were to compare it's still a little hard to tell about the scale of the overall initiative aiming threemillion prep sodas is a lot you could see how it eventually racks up to two hundred or three hundred million dollars and.

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"wsj" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"wsj" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"Support for wsj comes from comcast committed to improving your customer service experience with two our appointment windows including nights and weekends because they should fit into your life not the other way around learn more at xfinity dot com slash service robert mahler's probe is focusing on whether president trump obstructed justice what's is from the wall street journal top story without the noise i'm charlie turner in new york president donald trump's firing of former fbi director james comey has become a subject of a federal probe being headed by special counsel robert muller the investigation has expanded to include whether mr trump obstructed justice joining us his wall street journal reporter shane harris shane obviously this is an explosive situation since it's part of the fbi probe into russia's meddling in last year's election and whether the trump campaign colluded with russia of us that's right exactly and the these events were the central questions for some time now about the investigation and now when you add to it this news that special council muller is investigating obstruction overseeing now is the investigation morphing from you know behavior alleged to have occurred prior to the election and now behavior having alleged to have occurred after it and this is sort of falls into that classic category of sometimes the coverup it becomes the problem not the crime that's the question really the muller is looking at now was there an attempt by the president to to minimize the investigation or to to cover up or shoot down aspects of it publicly.

russia shane harris reporter special counsel james comey fbi donald trump new york wall street journal wsj mr trump robert muller director president charlie turner robert mahler windows comcast
"wsj" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"wsj" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"Support for wsj comes from comcast committed to improving your customer service experience with two our appointment windows including nights and weekends because they should fit into your life not the other way around learn more at xfinity dot com slash service what does the komi controversy and as congressional testimony mean for the trump agenda what's knee is from the wall street journal top story without the noise i'm charlie turner in new york fired fbi director james comey testified thursday in front of the senate intelligence committee about his conversations with donald trump both after mr trump was elected and after he became president on may that night when i learned that i've been fired for that reason i immediately came home as a private citizen but then the explanations the shifting explanations confused me and increasingly concerned me they confused me because the president that i had had multiple conversations about my job both before and after he took office and he had repeatedly told me i was doing a great job and he hoped i would stay in i have repeatedly assured him that i did intend to stay and serve out the remaining six years of my term he told me repeatedly that he had talked to lots of people about me including our current attorney general and has learned that i was doing a great job so it confused me when i saw on television the president saying that he actually fire me because of the russian investigation and learned again from the media that he was telling privately other parties that my firing had relieved great pressure on the russian investigation i was also confused by the initial explanation was offered publicly that i was fired because of the decisions i had made during the election year that didn't make sense to me for a whole bunch of reasons including the time and all the water that a gone under the bridge since those hard decisions that had to be made and although the law require no reason at all to firing fbi director the administration then chose to defame me and more importantly the fbi by saying that the organization was in disarray that it was poorly lead.

wsj comcast windows charlie turner new york senate intelligence committee donald trump director fbi wall street journal james comey attorney six years
"wsj" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"wsj" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"Support for wsj comes from comcast committed to improving your customer service experience with two our appointment windows including nights and weekends because they should fit into your life not the other way around learn more at xfinity dot com slash service president trump is launching a new push for an infrastructure overhaul what's news from the wall street journal top story without the noise i'm charlie turner in new york president donald trump plans to launch a new campaign this week aimed at fulfilling his pledge for one trillion dollars of infrastructure investment the first step in this plan could be a push to privatize the air traffic control system joining us from washington is wall street journal reporter ted man ted what exactly is the president's plan doesn't involve a lot of privatized projects on the overall infrastructure project the tease or program that he's described would rely very heavily on the private sector to finance the investments that uh that it would produce so the president has said that over ten years he would like the government to spend two hundred billion dollars on infrastructure of all types roads bridges water sewer uh broadband um and he expects that that amount of government spending would leverage basically eight hundred billion from the private sector in terms of financing by private investors who would basically want to take part in the building of infrastructure in exchange for some sort of prophet while what's really unsure this part is how exactly that would work and if what he describes can actually be delivered if the private sector really would pony up nearly a trillion dollars to to fix the country's infrastructure needs the trillion dollar number is something that he came up with on the campaign trail um and said that that's the amount of infrastructure building the would occur if he were elected president now he's trying to explain how exactly he would do that um the the two hundred billion an actual government spending that the administration has proposed over ten years would be used in their view to leverage eight hundred million eight hundred billion from the private sector the what they have said this week over the weekend.

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