35 Burst results for "WNYC"

Flash Floods From Ida Swamp NYC, Shut Down Subways

Morning Edition

01:09 min | 2 weeks ago

Flash Floods From Ida Swamp NYC, Shut Down Subways

Ida Will Become Major Category 4 Hurricane in Less Than 24 Hours

BBC World Service

00:52 sec | 3 weeks ago

Ida Will Become Major Category 4 Hurricane in Less Than 24 Hours

"Ida is gaining strength in the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico. NPR's Debbie Elliott reports. It's on a path to strike Louisiana's Sunday as a major hurricane. Evacuations are underway and at least five South Louisiana parishes and Governor John Bel Edwards has activated the state's national guard. To respond to what's forecast to be a devastating category for Hurricane Benjamin, shot with the National Weather Service in New Orleans says it will bring when gusts of up to 170 MPH 15 FT storm surge and nearly two FT of rain in some areas. This will be a life altering storm for those who are prepared. And ready to take what I'd is gonna throw at us later this weekend. Parts of Louisiana are still recovering from a record five tropical landfalls last year.

Debbie Elliott Governor John Bel Edwards Hurricane Benjamin South Louisiana Gulf Of Mexico NPR Louisiana Hurricane National Guard National Weather Service New Orleans
U.S. Makes Room on Bases for Afghans

All Things Considered

00:43 sec | 3 weeks ago

U.S. Makes Room on Bases for Afghans

"Housed at seven military bases in the U. S, including one in New Jersey joint base, McGuire Dix Lakehurst will be able to hold up to 10,000 refugees in existing barracks or in temporary tents. Kourtney Madison is the officer director at Church World Service in Jersey City that helps asylum seekers and refugees, She says. Families are going to need a more permanent place to stay, and that's going to be difficult. We're already in a housing crisis with the pandemic. Um and this is kind of a large Surge of people who are going to need housing solutions, whether it's temporary or permanent. So far, almost 1200 refugees have arrived and all are medically screened when they get to the base. When the U. S

Mcguire Dix Lakehurst Kourtney Madison Church World Service U. New Jersey Jersey City
Evacuations Resume After Suicide Bombing in Kabul

All Things Considered

00:49 sec | 3 weeks ago

Evacuations Resume After Suicide Bombing in Kabul

"The airport in Kabul Continue a day after a suicide bombing killed 13 U. S service members and more than 160, Afghans. NPR's Quil Lawrence reports with the August 31st deadline to withdraw U. S troops from Afghanistan quickly approaching, the Biden administration is still trying to evacuate thousands of people in mid warnings of additional attacks. We've heard these assurances from the president from the commander of Central Command. From the Pentagon today that this is an ongoing operation. They're continuing to get people out. Everything we could see on the ground points to an almost frozen process. In terms of getting people into the airport, they might be able to evacuate. People are already inside. But We're seeing Busses stalled outside and stopped by Taliban checkpoints. That's NPR's

Quil Lawrence U. Biden Administration Kabul NPR Afghanistan Central Command Pentagon Taliban
Biden Vows Retaliation for Attack That Killed Dozens in Afghanistan

BBC World Service

00:36 sec | 3 weeks ago

Biden Vows Retaliation for Attack That Killed Dozens in Afghanistan

"Attacks. President Biden held a moment of silence at the White House Thursday for those killed in Kabul. NPR's Windsor Johnson has more. On his response, President Biden is vowing retribution against Isis K, the terrorist group that has claimed responsibility for the deadly attack. Speaking from the White House, Biden warned that the U. S will hunt them down and that he's directed the Pentagon to draw up plans to strike back against the group. In the meantime, the president says the U. S will continue evacuation efforts at the airport in Kabul ahead of the August 31st deadline to fully withdraw

President Biden Windsor Johnson Isis K Kabul NPR White House Biden Pentagon U.
Remembering Legendary Rolling Stones Drummer Charlie Watts

Q

01:59 min | 3 weeks ago

Remembering Legendary Rolling Stones Drummer Charlie Watts

"Charlie Watts joined the Rolling Stones in the early days of the band 1963. It was a bit of a left turn. His early interest was in jazz, percussion and I love this quote from Charlie about joining the band, he said. It meant decades of quote, seeing mixed bum running around in front of me. Which in a way sums up what Charlie did. He provided the steady beat for the group, a group of rock stars who unlike him, embraced the rock star lifestyle and the limelight. Today. We really wanted to start by talking to someone who can help us parse out how important Charlie's worked with the Rolling Stones was Rob Bowman is a Grammy winner and professor of music at York University, as well as a music writer. He first met Charlie Watts in 2000, and two when he was interviewing him for a Rolling Stones book. And he kept in touch with Charlie ever since. Hi, Rob. Thanks for joining us. Good morning. How are you? I am. Well, I want to say I'm really sorry for your loss. Um, what was the first thing that came to your mind when you when you heard the news that Charlie Watts don't I guess. Shock so numb stand, you know, I've been worried for several years. Sooner or later. One of the Rolling Stones are just it was going to pass away or get sick and they were going to be able to play and, uh Couple weeks ago, Of course, Charlie announced Buddy, You've got an emergency operation and wouldn't play the tour and I thought it was so weird that they were going to do the tour without him, because that's not like them. Keith had always said they would never play without Charlie and figure it out. And, of course, when he passed yesterday, my meat so it is. That's why they decided to play the tour. They knew Charlie was dying, and Charlie. I told him to go ahead play. What do you remember? What do you remember first about meeting him? What was he like? He was an amazing, gentle, humble man with an incredible mind for jazz

Charlie Charlie Watts Rolling Stones Rob Bowman Grammy Winner York University ROB Buddy Keith
Diabetes Has Surged Among US Youth, Decades-Long Study Finds

BBC World Service

00:51 sec | 3 weeks ago

Diabetes Has Surged Among US Youth, Decades-Long Study Finds

"On the rise among the nation's youth. A new study shows that Type one and type two diabetes have surged in those under 20. NPR's Ping Hong reports Over the past two decades, more and more young people have been diagnosed with diabetes. It's a chronic condition where the amount of sugar in the bloodstream is too high and can lead to serious health problems like heart and kidney disease. In the Under 20 age group, Type one diabetes has increased by 45% since 2000 and one Take two diabetes, which is linked to obesity has nearly doubled in that time, with the greatest increases seen in black and Hispanic youth. The reasons for the rise and diabetes are not totally clear, but could be related to rising rates of childhood obesity and exposure to environmental chemicals. The results published in JAMA, come from a long term research study funded by the CDC and the National Institutes of

Diabetes NPR Kidney Disease Obesity CDC National Institutes Of
Oregon School Board Gets Backlash After Banning BLM, Pride Flags

All Things Considered

01:25 min | 3 weeks ago

Oregon School Board Gets Backlash After Banning BLM, Pride Flags

Pentagon Reports Over 37,000 People Have Been Evacuated From Kabul so Far

Q

00:59 sec | 3 weeks ago

Pentagon Reports Over 37,000 People Have Been Evacuated From Kabul so Far

Ryan Crocker, Former Ambassador to Afghanistan, Decries "Catastrophic" Withdrawal

Brian Lehrer

01:28 min | 3 weeks ago

Ryan Crocker, Former Ambassador to Afghanistan, Decries "Catastrophic" Withdrawal

Afghan Woman Gives Birth on US Military Flight

BBC World Service

00:19 sec | 3 weeks ago

Afghan Woman Gives Birth on US Military Flight

"An Afghan woman has given birth on border US evacuation aircraft in Germany, The U. S Air Mobility Command said the mother was traveling with her family from Kabul to Germany when she went into labor. Once the plane landed, US military medics delivered the child. Both mother and baby are well.

Air Mobility Command Germany U. Kabul United States
The Sacklers Want Immunity From the Opioid Crisis

Morning Edition

01:43 min | Last month

The Sacklers Want Immunity From the Opioid Crisis

"Trials underway in New York for Purdue Pharma, the maker of OxyContin. Members of Sackler family who owned the drug company have testified they bear no responsibility for the nation's deadly opioid epidemic. As part of the bankruptcy deal, the Sackler czar demanding immunity from lawsuits for themselves and for a network of companies and organizations. NPR addiction correspondent Brian Mann has been following this Brian you've reported before the Sackler want to clean slate for themselves, no more opioid lawsuits. But this deal in particular would also shelter a bunch of other people and companies from liability. How would that work? This has been a major flashpoint in this trial A and it was again yesterday as part of produce farmers bankruptcy settlement The sack Lear's who say they've done nothing wrong, have agreed to pay $4.3 billion to fund addiction treatment programs, but the Sackler want something really big. In return, their attorneys have drawn up this single spaced list of individuals, organizations and companies. This list runs for 12 full pages. If this deal is finalized, everyone on the list would be sheltered permanently from lawsuits linked to opioids and oxy cotton and from a wide range of of other lawsuits. And why does that matter? So this is interesting. Critics say the Sackler is in their empire are at the center of one of the biggest man made public health disasters in US history. Hundreds of thousands of people have died in this epidemic. Their company has pleaded guilty to federal crimes linked to the OxyContin business. First in 2000, and seven and again last year again, the Sackler is deny wrongdoing and have never been charged. But there are still big unanswered questions about how this prescription opioid crisis happened and who in the sack Lear's network might be liable. For some of the harm and let me give you

Sackler Sackler Czar Brian Mann Purdue Pharma Oxycontin NPR Lear New York Brian United States
The Show-Stopping Perseid Meteor Shower Is Here

Morning Edition

01:58 min | Last month

The Show-Stopping Perseid Meteor Shower Is Here

"For space enthusiasts and skywatchers. That means one thing you can step outside, look up at the nighttime sky and see some fireballs. Those fireballs come from the Perseid meteor shower. Even NASA says it's the best meteor shower of the year. And Jackie Parity who's an astrophysicist at the American Museum of Natural History in New York, does not disagree. Yeah, This is my favorite of all the meteor showers. She's been a fan for years. You never know when one of these fireballs is going to shake you to your core. So if you can spare the time late at night, head for a rooftop or open space and just look up, I can tell you that you maybe you'll get one a minute like the average or maybe you're going to get a really bright one or a really nice, colorful one. Depending on the chemistry of the dust, Faraday says. Sometimes you get really lucky. The unexpected thing is what you should be hoping that you're going to get which is a nice big Bright one that's going to outshine all the stars that's going to look like It's gonna scare you. Although it's a rare spectacle that's completely safe. All of the things that are burning up in the upper upper atmosphere like higher than planes fly. Are flecks of dust, which can burn up so bright that it causes you to react with excitement and joy because it looks like fireworks. But there's nothing large coming down at you were not getting hit with a bunch of big rocks. Fair T is a pro. So what's her best advice? The one thing that I always recommend that everybody bring with them when you watch a meteor shower. Is patience and of quiet contemplation isn't really your thing. Charity suggest bringing your friends or family. It's not going to be like home. Sorry. I was so engaged in our conversation. I didn't notice that gigantic fireball that just streaked across my face, you'll catch it. And she says, you will not regret it. Mhm.

Jackie Parity American Museum Of Natural His Nasa Faraday New York
Black Church's 'Street Team' Encourages Connecticut Residents to Get Vaccinated

Morning Edition

01:59 min | Last month

Black Church's 'Street Team' Encourages Connecticut Residents to Get Vaccinated

"Connecticut, a historically black churches, sending teenagers door to door over the summer to encourage residents to get the covid vaccine. Connecticut has one of the highest vaccination rates in the country. But it is a very different story in the town of Waterbury. Here's Ali Oshinsky from Connecticut Public radio. Police. Taylor is hitting 10,000 steps a day. A lot of them on hills and up to front doors to ask crime, ma'am, Are you interested in taking the Covid 19 vaccine? This person already got hurt. Oh, great. So I think we left the information Flyer. Yeah, right at your door. So if you do know anyone who's not vaccinated you can share with them. Thank you. Taylor is 15 and she's part of the Grace Baptist Church Street team. Every weekday morning, she and seven other teens pair up and walk around Waterbury, knocking on doors to have conversations like that one. I'll try to do you know my little bit what we do have people back at the church that will, you know, walk them through. There were ease. The process starts with the street team. Residents get a knock and a flyer. The teens were trained to ask a few questions and take down a phone number. If there's interest someone from a phone bank can call later to arrange an in home shot or transportation to a vaccine clinic. Grace Baptist pays the teens $15 an hour with funds from a state vaccine equity program. The pastor Christopher Reese, says this church is trying to make it as easy as possible for Waterbury residents to get their shot. Especially in black communities. My church, I think, is maybe 90% vaccinated. Why? Because their leader, their pastor has been pushing it now races trying to be that leader beyond his congregation. Connecticut ranks near the top for the percentage of residents that are fully vaccinated. But Waterbury lags behind the numbers are especially low among the city's black residents. Just around a third are fully immunized.

Connecticut Waterbury Ali Oshinsky Taylor Christopher Reese Grace Baptist
CDC Urges Pregnant People to Get Vaccinated Against COVID-19

Q

00:59 sec | Last month

CDC Urges Pregnant People to Get Vaccinated Against COVID-19

Pentagon to Mandate COVID-19 Vaccine for U.S. Service Members

Morning Edition

01:57 min | Last month

Pentagon to Mandate COVID-19 Vaccine for U.S. Service Members

"On Covid 19. That's right. Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin says he's going to ask President Biden for permission to make all members of the U. S military get vaccinated. He's expected to officially asked the president by mid September because of the Delta variant infections are rising in the military, along with much of the rest of the country. NPR national security correspondent Greg Murray joins us now. Good morning, Greg. Good morning, Debbie. Why now? The vaccine has been available for some time. Now, why hasn't the military ordered this already? Well, the military can give us troops all kinds of orders, but it can't force them to take a vaccine that is not approved by the Food and Drug Administration. The FDA hasn't approved or fully approved any of the covid vaccines that could happen soon, But for now they have emergency authorization, so to make it mandatory for military members, President Biden will have to issue a waiver on national security Grounds and defense Secretary Austin said in his memo yesterday. That's exactly what he's going to do is to ask the president. If this just needs a presidential waiver, something that could have come sooner. Why wait till now? It seems there were several factors The military really does want the troops to buy in. So it's emphasized persuasion up to this point. And there was also some thinking The FDA approval was just around the corner, which would remove the need for a waiver also took some time to review some of the legal issues here. But with the Delta variants surging, the military seems to be saying it just can't wait and risk a new wave of covid cases. And we should note the military vaccine vaccination rate is very much in line with the overall rate among the US population. In both cases, a little over 60% are fully vaccinated, The military says. This just isn't good enough More troops need to get the shots. Pentagon spokesman John Kirby

President Biden Secretary Of Defense Lloyd Aus Greg Murray FDA Secretary Austin U. NPR Debbie Greg United States Pentagon John Kirby
Major U.N. Report Warns Climate Change Is Accelerating

Morning Edition

01:59 min | Last month

Major U.N. Report Warns Climate Change Is Accelerating

Taliban Takes Key Northern Afghan Cities as Battles Rage On

BBC Newshour

02:05 min | Last month

Taliban Takes Key Northern Afghan Cities as Battles Rage On

"Taliban in Afghanistan. Say they have now captured three cities in the north of the country, and it's hard not to conclude that the fighting for control of the country is going the Taliban's way. The government has acknowledged that the city of Taloqan, capital of Takhar province, Has fallen to the militants, with sources saying some provisions. Provincial officials were still trapped. Earlier, the Taliban said they had also taken the cities of Konduz and sorry pool. But the Defense Ministry in Kabul said special forces were still inside Kunduz city taking the battle to the insurgents, and an Interior Ministry spokesman said Afghan forces were winning back control and would defeat the Taliban. No, I haven't to other ensemble. So how do you have? Well? Yeah, one. The Afghan security forces, backed by the Air Force have launched a clean up operation in Kunduz City. They have been making progress and have captured some areas of the city and the Taliban have suffered heavy casualties. The city will soon be cleared of the terrorists. Reinforcements have also been deployed in other high risk provinces, and these cities that the Taliban want to capture will soon become their graveyards Hardship. Bilal Sarwari is an independent journalist in Kabul, and he's been telling me about today's developments on the ground. Well, we know that there's very heavy fighting inside the city of Kunduz, with the Taliban, managing to seize control of the provincial governor's office, as well as the police headquarters in the center of the city. But we've also seen you know very heavy fighting between Afghan special forces commandos in the Taliban. One Kunduz resident told me that there was a rain of bullets and shrapnel that hit homes. People simply could not basically even venture out of their living rooms, let alone seeing the street. We know that most of the districts in Kunduz province did fall to the Taliban a few weeks ago, even a month or so ago without much of a fight, So the city of Kunduz was always besieged. The Taliban were always at the four gates of the

Taliban Taloqan Takhar Konduz Defense Ministry Kunduz City Kunduz Kabul Bilal Sarwari Interior Ministry Afghanistan Air Force
"wnyc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"wnyc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And on WNYC good evening everyone I'm Brian Lehrer within hours of local coverage of the uprising against police brutality and systemic racism generally specifically this hour what's happening here in New York City and the sanity first if you're tuning in for the special that was originally scheduled for tonight the final episode of our series for graduations and weddings we are postponing it until later in the month we will have that June radio wedding for those of you who can't have one in person right now because of social distancing but it would be an appropriate tonight it's obvious everybody agrees so instead we will convene differently in this eight PM hour tonight and in fact for the rest of the week because I write will host tomorrow night at eight o'clock Alison Stewart will host on Friday night at eight o'clock and me right now and for the second night in a row a curfew has just gone into effect at eight o'clock here in the city we will talk live this hour with W. NYC Gothamist and New York times reporters and with you on the phones we do the special hours very much so you can talk and have other people listen and not just have the media or someone else talk for you so listeners let me invite for our first priority on the phones perhaps two or more generations of people listening right now anyone who's been out protesting today or at anytime in the last week what are you hoping to accomplish can you accomplish it with a curfew in effect did you decide to protest by day and abide by the curfew by night is the curfew a good idea because of the violence that there has been even though the vast majority of protesters have been peaceful people have been protesting in the last week call and tell us what this is been like for you big picture and if you care about the curfew one way or another six four six four three five seventy to eighty is our phone number six four six four three five seventy to eighty and also we invite anyone who has protested for civil rights or racial justice in past years six four six four three five seventy to eighty maybe your not out tonight or this week because it hasn't felt safe for you with code nineteen at your age or for whatever reason or maybe you're older and you were asked this week that's okay too but we want you wisdom how does this compare for you to the protest after Sean bell was killed by police in queens on the morning before his wedding in two thousand six or after entity although was killed by police in the Bronx as he entered his apartment building entrance in the Bronx in nineteen ninety nine or after Martin Luther king was killed in Memphis in nineteen sixty eight or after Bloody Sunday in Alabama in nineteen sixty five or how does it compare to any other time if you've been through this before even in a long time ago through a period of protest let's check six four six four three five seventy to eighty for anyone in any of those groups six four six four three five seventy to eighty anyone who's been out protesting today or anytime in the last week anyone has.

Brian Lehrer WNYC
"wnyc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"wnyc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In Minnesota worries for her teenage son and is calling for change tune into the story on ninety three point nine FM AMA twenty or just ask your smart speaker to play W. NYC it is sixty eight degrees now mostly cloudy maybe a sprinkle before midnight and an overnight low fifty seven a mostly cloudy Tuesday seventy three and isolated sprinkles possible later in the morning this is W. NYC it's eight o'clock this is WNYC FM HD and A. M. New York America are we ready this is a national call in about racism violence policing and our futures together from WNYC in New York and Minnesota public radio hi right and I'm Brian Lehrer tonight more than three hundred public radio stations are airing this program because the need for national conversation is that urgent if you've been out protesting the lines will be open for you first let's listen to one another there is just so much at stake an uprising a pandemic in a presidential election America if we're not ready we have to get there and fast sure we'll start in five minutes right after the latest news live from NPR news I'm Jack Speer president Donald Trump says he is prepared to send the military into shot down protests.

NYC WNYC New York Minnesota Brian Lehrer America president Donald Trump A. M. New York America NPR Jack Speer
"wnyc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:46 min | 1 year ago

"wnyc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is all over the WNYC analysis Stewart thank you for spending part of your day with me at twenty eight years of age life appeared pretty good for Dan Paris he just been named editor in chief of the glossy Conde Nast magazine details that came after stint covering fashion for W. magazine much of it the time spent as a Paris bureau chief I details he spent a lot of time wooing great writers hang out with big stars like Ben Affleck for cover stories and managing a staff for the first time he had a big office a fancy apartment an expense account and unbeknownst to even his closest friends he also had a vicious opioid addiction at what point consuming nearly sixty extra strength bike it in a day over the course of a decade he would do anything to feed this habit he drove to Mexico with eight thousand dollars to buy pills hours before he was supposed to appear on bill Maher's TV show he doctor shopped at one point he found myself crawling on the men's room floor to pick up hills as he writes in his new memoir which Kirkus describes as a quote Frank revelation about the all consuming power of addiction damaging me a little bit from your book well I've dropped more pills than the average person swallows in a year and when they hit the floor they scatter like roaches and when they roll they don't stop until they reach the farthest most undesirable destination imaginable deep under beds wedged beneath the floorboards hidden in plain sight in the low pile of wall to wall carpeting and as it turned out on one particular evening in early two thousand and three under the urinal in the bathroom at the Waldorf Astoria three of them to be precise which on bended talk Seto clad knee I rescued promptly put in my mouth and swallowed it's not the first time I did something I'm not proud of while wearing a tuxedo there was the night I threw up in a garbage can in Times Square on my way home from a benefit performance of some Broadway show I can't remember the name of the show but I do remember a man with a pony tail and a leather vest clutching his date tightly by the arm as they walked past me on a crowded sidewalk don't look he told her just keep moving then there was the time I stole a bottle of valium from the master bathroom medicine cabinet of my friend Ingrid's parents of free side duplex well everyone was downstairs toasting her thirtieth birthday I didn't just take a few pills like any normal self respecting degenerate might know I literally I literally pocketed the whole bottle not just all of the contents of the bottle but the actual bottle they rattled like tic tacs in the breast pocket of my talks as my mom as I made my way past a multi colored Calder mobile and down the sweeping staircase to rejoin the party Dan Harris who.

Stewart WNYC
"wnyc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"wnyc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"WNYC. We have delays right now in e m in our subway trains chances. Some light rain mainly before ten o'clock this morning, otherwise mostly cloudy today behind your sixty three degrees. Mostly cloudy tonight. Lows around fifty and then tomorrow Thursday should be mostly cloudy with a high near fifty six degrees. Fifty six degrees right now in New York with mostly cloudy skies, seven twenty one. Support for NPR comes from member stations and from Staples with print and marketing solutions for business including manuals sign inch and banners. More Staples stores or Staples dot com. Staples, legalzoom used by more than four million people for variety of services from wills and trust to LLC's and trademarks more information is available at legalzoom dot com slash NPR and C three C threes. AI software suite in Abel's organizations to use artificial intelligence at enterprise scale to sell previously unsolvable business problems. Learn more at C three dot AI. It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Steve Inskeep. I'm Noel king. And I'm David Greene today marks six months since the deadliest and most destructive wildfire in the United States in more than a century. It was the campfire and destroyed most of the northern California town of paradise and also a couple of nearby. Communities that fire claimed eighty five lives and NPR's Kirk siegler is here he has spent the last six months reporting on the recovery in and around paradise even living in the area for a while and Kirk I I guess the big questions how are people doing their weight, David? What's most striking to me.

Staples NPR Kirk siegler David Greene Steve Inskeep AI Noel king New York California WNYC. United States Abel six months sixty three degrees Fifty six degrees fifty six degrees
"wnyc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

14:25 min | 2 years ago

"wnyc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"WNYC opioid news stories are sadly familiar at this point. You may have seen the headline this week about the giant settlement a two hundred seventy million dollar settlement agreed to by Purdue pharma and its owners the Sackler family over the company's role in the opioid addiction epidemic. That's one small sort of success story. But there are thousands of people who are still in the thrall heroin. Hey, these people are obviously vulnerable and some obvious ways. And then in some not so obvious ways as a new peace for mother Jones examines the piece is called hooked and reporter Julia Laurie investigated the practices used by some very shady addiction treatment centers to recruit treat and retain patients. Julia welcome to all of it. Thanks for having me. So Julia in your story, I want to get some defined some terms so people can follow through the story you describe a certain kind of treatment and rehabilitation center. How would you describe these centers that you were investigating? So I was looking at a number of different kinds of rehab. So, you know, where people go for for trout treatment or an addiction treatment in general. And that comes in the form of detox is where people stay for a few days, or or in some cases weeks while they are coming off. Oh, drugs that comes in the form of residential treatment where they stay for maybe a few weeks or even months, and then in in some cases, there are patient treatment centers and sober living home. So we think of rehab is like one big thing. But it's actually a number of the different kinds of places and are all these different kind of places regulated differently. Yes. Regulated differently. And in fact, regulated state by state, so it's kind of tricky to to make broad sweeping judgments about about any of them. And I wouldn't want to do that. And what I found just generally is that there are far fewer regulations when it comes to rehab, and when it comes to addiction treatment, then I'm really any other part of the medical world. And you also discovered that as you said state to state it varies and some of these rehabs that we're going to talk about seem to be concentrated in certain states, which ones. So a lot of the stories that you hear about shadier, we have practices originated in Florida, and it was sort of very common, and it still is pretty common for people to go down to these Beechy places and sort of go off the grid and get quote, unquote, clean and. It's it's still very common for for people to fly down to Florida. And this has created this cycle that is often referred to as Florida shuffle. And and it's it's a bit of misnomer because it's spread far beyond Florida. But it's basically a process where recovering users are wooed very aggressively by rehabs end by freelance marketers. Those marketers are often called patient brokers, and it's an effort to fill beds and collect insurance money. So a lot of the the rehabs that we're talking about concentrated in Florida, many are concentrated in southern California. But really, you know, they're they're all over the place. So when you say that people are recruited you mean, and you write about this new piece people are literally paid to enter a rehab. Can you explain how this practice works? And where the money's coming from. Sure. So there's this whole little cottage industry that's developed in the murkier parts of the rehab world. Where brokers or rehabs will offer drug users perks directly in that can come in the form of flights or free rent or a few nights at a hotel between rehabs or cash or even drugs, and it's very easy for patients to fall into this cycle where they go to rehab for a few days or a few weeks. And then they come out the rehab collect the insurance money the. The broker marketer. Sometimes gets a cut of that. And the patient leaves, and they relapse sometimes with the help of of cash or drugs at the broker has given them, and then they check back into rehab and that happens over and over again without the patient ever really getting well, so the overarching reason that this happens is because you know, like the rest of of medicine patients patients can be a profit center, so financially speaking when we had admit someone they are effectively incentivized by relapse rather than recovery. When someone relapses they come in for another round of care. Whereas if they get better, they don't come back. And how it differs from the rest of medicine is just there are a lot fewer regulations. So, you know, if if you get bad care at a hospital or your readmitted out of hospital repeatedly for reasons that are avoidable the hospital can be dinged for that by insurers, whereas an addiction treatment that that doesn't really happen. My guest is Julia Laurie. She's a reporter for mother Jones. She's a recently published piece it's titled hooked talking about this murky shady part of the rehab industry at this point. So you mentioned these brokers, and these freelancers who are these people? That's a good question. So some of them are active or recent drug users themselves at sort of the most common story that I heard people who are going through this shuffle of rehabs themselves, and at some point have heard either from a rehab or another friend. You know, if if you can refer someone into this rehab, you will get a few hundred bucks, and you know, if you are a recovering drug user, and you don't have a job. And and you know, you're you're looking for a quick way to get cash. This is a very easy easy way to do. So so it was very common for patients who I talked to you who had been brokered themselves to also be brokering and referring other people and getting cash to do. So. And then there are folks who have made a more fulltime living out of this. Who who will spend, you know? Hours or days on. On Facebook trying to recruit new patients or talking with patients that they've referred already trying to find new referrals. You know? Some some brokers are going to say alcoholics anonymous meetings or narcotics anonymous meetings finding new patients, so it's. It's a really tricky thing to try to deal with because it is so incredibly common for folks to be referring other patients in and getting a cut of of the money that comes in as a result. It sounds so predatory you actually spoke to a patient broker who you called Pete in your piece. How did he get involved in the business? So Peter was sort of like a classic case of someone who had been involved in in rehab because he had gone through rehab and. At some point head realized that he could make money off of this. And so he he had actually gotten in touch with me he called me out of the blue because he wanted to sort of set the record straight on what he saw as this gross misrepresentation of of brokers in in the rehab world because we were poking around as a journalist, and you're in kind of got around that you're covering this. So he found you. Yeah. Exactly. And what he basically said is look my role is somewhere between a friend and a case worker and hustler and. Like, a rehab consultant, and I work really hard to try to get people into rehabs. That are good for them. And. I deserve to be paid for that. And I can totally see why he was good at his job. You know, he was very reflective and very thoughtful. And he really knew the regulatory landscape when it came to two different rehabs. He in fact, head moved from Florida to California because Florida had really cracked down on patient brokering. And he thought that he would have more luck in California. And he readily admitted that you know, he he doesn't have any education or training or licensing to do what he does and it can lead to some pretty an ethical grey areas because he. Works for an LLC that is basically contracts with different rehabs, and the rehabs will will hire this LLC to basically find patients for them. So for someone like Peter Peter gets a lot of money if he gets a patient into rehab. And that can create an incentive structure where someone who might not be appropriate for a given rehab, or we haven't might not necessarily serve their needs is is being led to rehab and a lot of people are making money off of that. A woman you profile in the peace. Her name is Brian and she gets caught up in this cycle. Can you give our listeners a sense of what brand has been through? Sure. So Brian is. In many ways, she could be like a. A poster child for the opioid epidemic. She grew up outside of Atlanta. She was high school softball star. She. Experimented with with painkillers with a boyfriend and that lead to addiction to heroin and soon enough. She was completely consumed by it. And so at one point she sat down with her mom, and and basically admitted what was going on. And the two came up with a plan that they thought was was reasonable. It was you know, we have good insurance you go to rehab for a few weeks or months or however long it takes and then come back and move on with your life. And it turns out that you know, good rehab is really really hard to find. This is an. This is a problem that I encountered over and over again, it's not necessarily that. There aren't many good have out there. It's just that. It's really really hard to tell the difference as an outsider between the ethical evidence-based rehabs and the ones that are a little bit shadier. And so in the case of of Brienne, she flew down to Florida for a program that had been recommended to her and very quickly was caught in the shuffle of of going from rehabbed. We have and these rehabs or in some cases brokers would offer her perks to attend. So they would they would fly her down. They would give her free rent. They one broker was routinely giving her cash to attend rehab. So he would say if you go to detox for a week, I'll give you thousand dollars. If you go to residential treatment afterwards. I'll give you five hundred dollars a week. In some cases, he was even giving her drugs in between stints at rehab. So, you know, obviously, she was not in a place where she was exactly set up for success to get better. I'm interested in it. And I'm sure people who are listening to saying what about regulation why isn't there? Regulation who should be regulating this. How can this be regulated? Yes. So in. You know, in in many ways, the addiction treatment industry has sort of emerged and grown up separately than the rest of the medical world. And so, you know, it was only relatively recently that we thought of addiction medicine as medicine at all and not just. Immoral failing. So we have this entire sort of world of rehabs that is completely separate from the medical world. You know, when when you think of going to rehab, you often think of going somewhere, you don't necessarily didn't go into hospital or clinic, you think of going to like almost a resort or something like that that that might not necessarily have evidence to scare, but is just very separate from the rest of your life. And. The regulations that have come with rehab are also just separate from from those of the medical world. So you have a lot of basic regulations that apply to hospitals and clinics that don't apply to rehab. So for example. Many. We have don't have a single licensed doctor on staff. Now imagine going to a hospital or a clinic for any other medical issue and learning that they didn't have a single license medical doctor on staff that would be a big red flag. But in fact, that is very very common for rehabs. So I let you go. Do you want to ask you one quick question? And we will send people to your piece because it's great long peace you list. Some tips for finding a good rehab. Could you provide one or two? Yeah. So one big one is. Beware of free stuff, and that might seem obvious. But it's so so common to be offered free. You know, free flights are free rent things like that to to attend rehab, and it it is a legal. It's very very common, but it's illegal for rehabs to do that. And it's often indicative of bigger ethical issues that are happening at that rehab. Another one is if possible find somewhere that is affiliated that that is in network in your insurance.

Florida Julia Laurie mother Jones Peter Peter heroin reporter Purdue pharma WNYC relapse Facebook Beechy California Brian Brienne Pete consultant Atlanta painkillers
"wnyc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"wnyc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Tony Bennett could have a moment the songbook on WNYC. Holo who get? Beyond the. Ooh. Above the. Ooh. Not too. Wrong. Two. Hello. Great. What is? Fee. Oh. His as. Oh. And we can wear. Great. No. Time. And again, I've longed for adventure. Something to make my heart beat the faster. I love. Finding your love. Touching your hand my heart. The faster all that. I won't in all of this..

wnyc
"wnyc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:31 min | 2 years ago

"wnyc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"WNYC. Got it. What you saw. Love that. Does. Some. Why why Mel Torme could almost make a morning person of me there? I like the sunrise and before that I'm beginning to see the light and don't get around much anymore. Rob. You spotted those as Ellington things they were delivered. So One. well by Torme kitty Kallen, On and Harry bond. James and one of the great hit records of their respective careers. And that can call with delay. Paul Cavalcante the songbook on WNYC. Unmortgaged? It's time for Gershwin and Bill Charlotte has gathered a terrific combo for nice work if you can get it. One. Thanks. Oh. And. Was wrapped up in clover. Speak. Dreamed. Kim..

charlotte wnyc oh sunrise
"wnyc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"wnyc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"WNYC. the president of the philippines rodrigo duterte tape got a firsthand look today at the devastation from a cathedral bombing in the southern city of holo the explosion during sunday mass killed at least twenty people and wounded more than one hundred others a militant group aligned with isis has claimed responsibility michael sullivan has more on the group's troubled history in the region in may two thousand seventeen fighters from the abu sayyaf and other isis linked groups occupied much of the city of marawi on the island of mindanao it took the philippines military five months to dislodge them and declare victory leaving much of the city in ruins and many of the fighters did down but not out i think you can be very sure that what happened in holo is not the last gasp of a group on the edge of extinction sidney jones is director of the institute for policy analysis of conflict in jakarta indonesia i think you have to put this in the context of a lot of other pro isis activity in mindanao since at the end of the morale we siege after that siege he says the authorities said that isis in the southern philippines was defeated but it wasn't the coalition of groups involved dispersed into different areas jones says but they didn't go away and there have been persistent series of bombings in different parts of the philippines of which this is the biggest including the first suicide bombing carried out by a foreigner last july that killed ten people zachary abuse up a professor at the national war college who tracks southeast asian tour groups predict sunday's bombing will become a useful propaganda tool for isis to recruit more if you are a foreign fighter from south east asia you were now going to be more attracted to going to the abu sayyaf simply because they are demonstrating their ability to continue the fight he says the timing of sunday's attack less than a week after an overwhelming majority of muslims in the south voted for an autonomy plan aimed at end ending decades of conflict is no accident they're trying to provoke a heavy handed government response that will in turn alienate colloquial community and that kind of response as sidney jones of the institute for policy analysis of conflict would be a huge mistake one that's been made before one of the worst tactics used by the philippine government is the idea that you aratu kate terrorism by killing those involved not by understanding who's involved and not by trying to look at the networks networks that show no sign of being shut down anytime soon for n._p._r. news michael sullivan in bangkok.

director zachary bangkok philippine government east asia professor mindanao WNYC. sidney jones marawi abu sayyaf michael sullivan isis philippines president five months
"wnyc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"wnyc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"WNYC is supported by Sony Pictures classics presenting never look away, a new film inspired by real events about a young art student who is unknowingly connected to his girlfriend's father through a crime committed long ago coming soon to theaters the president said I want to deliver the state of the union speech speaker of the house said to the president in billion counter moves said to which miss Pelosi said, Nope, he said fine. I want the president was last seen trying to pick up the White House and go home. I'm Peter will join us as we discussed tactics with NFL great, not Dilmun on this week's wait. Wait, don't tell me this morning in eleven WNYC. This is weekend edition on WNYC. Good morning. I'm David I coming up next. We ask former homeland security secretary Michael Chertoff if domestic security operations were damaged by the partial government shutdown and still ahead. The government says asylum seekers at the port of entry in San Diego will be returned to Mexico to await their day in US immigration court at the border crossing on Friday. No one was returned. We'll have those stories and much more. Still ahead this hour of weekend edition here on WNYC and coming up later this morning on the New Yorker radio hour the story of an exonerated, man. And his fight for Justice from the prosecutors who sent him to death row that is coming up this morning at ten o'clock on ninety three point nine FM, the New Yorker radio hour, and that of course is followed by wait. Wait, don't tell me that starts at eleven o'clock..

WNYC president White House Sony Pictures San Diego Michael Chertoff Pelosi NFL secretary Peter David US Mexico
"wnyc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:32 min | 2 years ago

"wnyc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"WNYC? William Barr may soon be confirmed as any general though, some Democrats have doubts about how he would handle the Russia investigation. I think at the end of the day, we would've all liked to have heard him say that he's gonna make a transparent full disclosure of the results of that inquiry more with Illinois Senator dick Durbin coming up plus teachers in Los Angeles in their fourth day of a strike, and how is Europe reacting to the failure of the British parliament to approve the Brexit deal. We'll find out after news headlines. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Louise Schiavone no response from the White House yet on a house request that President Trump post-poned, the January twenty ninth state of the union address, the annual presidential speech to congress and the nation is traditionally delivered from the house of representatives and attended by members of both chambers along with the supreme court the cabinet and top military and diplomatic brass house. Speaker Nancy Pelosi says the long running government shutdown poses security concerns. I have no doubt that our men and women in the federal workforce have the capability to protect inference that they want to say, you don't think they can. They're professionals they trained for this. This should be paid for this. Now one day later in a letter President Trump is told speaker Pelosi that her planned trip to Brussels, Egypt, Afghanistan has been postponed, and we'll be rescheduled when the shutdown is over. I am sure you would agree. Trump wrote that postponing this public relations event is totally appropriate and quote, President Trump offered his condolences to the families of the four Americans killed by an ISIS suicide attack this week in Syria and remarks at the Pentagon. There was no mention of larger US Syria policy. NPR's? Tom Bowman has more the president made the remarks at the Pentagon before he outlined an increased emphasis on missile defense. I want to take a moment to express my deepest condolences to the families of the brave American heroes who laid down their lives yesterday in selfless service to our nation. These are great people the president immediately pivoted to. What he called the security crisis at the Mexican border. Meanwhile, US-backed rebels in Syria vowed to go after ISIS sleeper cells with the help of American airstrikes. US officials say ISIS fighters are slipping back into cleared areas. Tom Bowman NPR news Washington federal immigration agents separated. Many more migrant children from their parents in the year before family separation became an official and controversial policy of the Trump administration. NPR's John Burnett reports and inspector general's official told reporters Thursday that thousands of kids were taken from their parents at the border, quote, more children over a longer period of time than the public was aware of the aggressive and unannounced policy began in the summer of two thousand seventeen has President Trump's crackdown on illegal crossings, the officials said those children were all discharged from government custody before the issue exploded into the headlines last April reports of wrenching scenes in border jail sales where uniformed agents took hysterically. Crying children away from their parents prompted the government to discontinue the policy today, it has reunited nearly all of the children with parents or release them to relatives living in the country. John burnett. NPR news Wall Street approaching the close the Dow up one hundred sixty two points, the NASDAQ up forty nine this is NPR and you're listening to WNYC in New York at four zero four. I'm Jamie Floyd NYPD Commissioner James O'Neill is pushing back against reports that police officers are still required to meet monthly arrest. Quotas on the Brian Lehrer show today. Commissioner O'Neil said the NYPD's compass stats system has evolved to include more nuance data that went it. Then when it first launched back in the nineteen ninety s we're not looking at quantity. We're not looking at ROY numbers will look, and when you do enforcement who's it directed at is it people involved in violence and crime, and there are other factors that go into this too. So it's it's it's a it's a holistic approach. Fighting crime critics of the police, including some officers of color have accused the department of continuing to maintain a quota system for beat cops.

President Trump post-poned NPR Tom Bowman Syria president WNYC US NYPD Nancy Pelosi Washington William Barr John burnett Pentagon Senator dick Durbin White House British parliament Illinois Europe Louise Schiavone
"wnyc" Discussed on Only Human

Only Human

03:44 min | 3 years ago

"wnyc" Discussed on Only Human

"It's the summer of two thousand seventeen. The rapper prodigy is on stage with his hip hop group, mob deep. They're performing in front of a packed Las Vegas crowd. But after the show. Prodigy isn't feeling so great. He goes back to his hotel to arrest and three days later, everybody's under phone. His friends start getting these calls? No fucking way possible. He's dead. He's on tour right now. He's doing this show. I refuse to believe this. She, what are you talking about. Soon as. He. The real this a new podcast from WNYC studios. We're gonna look at the life and death of Albert prodigy Johnson, how he rose to become a rap icon and how he's been a lifetime fighting sickle cell anemia malate before by would just pain like sickle cell with my life before. You know what I mean? It's mean really have no life that was it all going up and just that's, that's all I knew was being fucking hospital time. Caused him years of suffering. Baby in bed. Like I probably wouldn't even one yet. My leg stomach back on it would be heavy and it's what landed him in the hospital where he died. I'm just being in a hospital, seeing lights, and people need everybody looking down. There are tens of thousands of Americans with sickle cell anemia. Most of them are black outside terrible emergency room experiences. In many ways, prodigy story is their story too. I was a little kid like they would like me in the back and threaten to call the cops showed up like stuff like that. This is a podcast about race and institutional neglect. It's about who gets care in this country and why he was like sitting in the chair, I guess. No. I guess. No me like feel like my bones burning. Prodigy transform that pain into hardcore hip hop. I got a rat named rap groups called hall. His music was often raw violent in your face. He was also honest reflection of the world around him. Shoulder, you hear you could tell. I don't wanna hear that. Turn at this too hot to months or whatever. What if you really listen to the words is a serious mention in everything sewn on me. Prodigies voice is the sound of hip hop to me. Not saying he's the greatest rapper. I'm just saying he's, he is the embodiment of hip hop. As a pellet, you know, for his whole life and very few people have ever seen such a a trial, let them unstoppable drive. If you really wanna know, prodigy his life, his music, you have to get his pain first time. I actually got to ask them about why James, this is how I heard. He was like, I was in the hospital, man, you know, I was on up. You know, I was like, rather than get all excited or whatever. He said, I'm going to talk to each naked. The real nece drops on July nineteenth, subscribe on apple podcasts or wherever you listen until then peace.

Albert prodigy Johnson James Las Vegas WNYC studios seeing lights apple three days
"wnyc" Discussed on Only Human

Only Human

03:44 min | 3 years ago

"wnyc" Discussed on Only Human

"It's the summer of two thousand seventeen. The rapper prodigy is on stage with his hip hop group, mob deep. They're performing in front of a packed Las Vegas crowd. But after the show. Prodigy isn't feeling so great. He goes back to his hotel to arrest and three days later, everybody's under phone. His friends start getting these calls? No fucking way possible. He's dead. He's on tour right now. He's doing this show. I refuse to believe this. She, what are you talking about. Soon as. He. The real this a new podcast from WNYC studios. We're gonna look at the life and death of Albert prodigy Johnson, how he rose to become a rap icon and how he's been a lifetime fighting sickle cell anemia malate before by would just pain like sickle cell with my life before. You know what I mean? It's mean really have no life that was it all going up and just that's, that's all I knew was being fucking hospital time. Caused him years of suffering. Baby in bed. Like I probably wouldn't even one yet. My leg stomach back on it would be heavy and it's what landed him in the hospital where he died. I'm just being in a hospital, seeing lights, and people need everybody looking down. There are tens of thousands of Americans with sickle cell anemia. Most of them are black outside terrible emergency room experiences. In many ways, prodigy story is their story too. I was a little kid like they would like me in the back and threaten to call the cops showed up like stuff like that. This is a podcast about race and institutional neglect. It's about who gets care in this country and why he was like sitting in the chair, I guess. No. I guess. No me like feel like my bones burning. Prodigy transform that pain into hardcore hip hop. I got a rat named rap groups called hall. His music was often raw violent in your face. He was also honest reflection of the world around him. Shoulder, you hear you could tell. I don't wanna hear that. Turn at this too hot to months or whatever. What if you really listen to the words is a serious mention in everything sewn on me. Prodigies voice is the sound of hip hop to me. Not saying he's the greatest rapper. I'm just saying he's, he is the embodiment of hip hop. As a pellet, you know, for his whole life and very few people have ever seen such a a trial, let them unstoppable drive. If you really wanna know, prodigy his life, his music, you have to get his pain first time. I actually got to ask them about why James, this is how I heard. He was like, I was in the hospital, man, you know, I was on up. You know, I was like, rather than get all excited or whatever. He said, I'm going to talk to each naked. The real nece drops on July nineteenth, subscribe on apple podcasts or wherever you listen until then peace.

Albert prodigy Johnson James Las Vegas WNYC studios seeing lights apple three days
"wnyc" Discussed on Only Human

Only Human

03:44 min | 3 years ago

"wnyc" Discussed on Only Human

"It's the summer of two thousand seventeen. The rapper prodigy is on stage with his hip hop group, mob deep. They're performing in front of a packed Las Vegas crowd. But after the show. Prodigy isn't feeling so great. He goes back to his hotel to arrest and three days later, everybody's under phone. His friends start getting these calls? No fucking way possible. He's dead. He's on tour right now. He's doing this show. I refuse to believe this. She, what are you talking about. Soon as. He. The real this a new podcast from WNYC studios. We're gonna look at the life and death of Albert prodigy Johnson, how he rose to become a rap icon and how he's been a lifetime fighting sickle cell anemia malate before by would just pain like sickle cell with my life before. You know what I mean? It's mean really have no life that was it all going up and just that's, that's all I knew was being fucking hospital time. Caused him years of suffering. Baby in bed. Like I probably wouldn't even one yet. My leg stomach back on it would be heavy and it's what landed him in the hospital where he died. I'm just being in a hospital, seeing lights, and people need everybody looking down. There are tens of thousands of Americans with sickle cell anemia. Most of them are black outside terrible emergency room experiences. In many ways, prodigy story is their story too. I was a little kid like they would like me in the back and threaten to call the cops showed up like stuff like that. This is a podcast about race and institutional neglect. It's about who gets care in this country and why he was like sitting in the chair, I guess. No. I guess. No me like feel like my bones burning. Prodigy transform that pain into hardcore hip hop. I got a rat named rap groups called hall. His music was often raw violent in your face. He was also honest reflection of the world around him. Shoulder, you hear you could tell. I don't wanna hear that. Turn at this too hot to months or whatever. What if you really listen to the words is a serious mention in everything sewn on me. Prodigies voice is the sound of hip hop to me. Not saying he's the greatest rapper. I'm just saying he's, he is the embodiment of hip hop. As a pellet, you know, for his whole life and very few people have ever seen such a a trial, let them unstoppable drive. If you really wanna know, prodigy his life, his music, you have to get his pain first time. I actually got to ask them about why James, this is how I heard. He was like, I was in the hospital, man, you know, I was on up. You know, I was like, rather than get all excited or whatever. He said, I'm going to talk to each naked. The real nece drops on July nineteenth, subscribe on apple podcasts or wherever you listen until then peace.

Albert prodigy Johnson James Las Vegas WNYC studios seeing lights apple three days
"wnyc" Discussed on Only Human

Only Human

03:44 min | 3 years ago

"wnyc" Discussed on Only Human

"It's the summer of two thousand seventeen. The rapper prodigy is on stage with his hip hop group, mob deep. They're performing in front of a packed Las Vegas crowd. But after the show. Prodigy isn't feeling so great. He goes back to his hotel to arrest and three days later, everybody's under phone. His friends start getting these calls? No fucking way possible. He's dead. He's on tour right now. He's doing this show. I refuse to believe this. She, what are you talking about. Soon as. He. The real this a new podcast from WNYC studios. We're gonna look at the life and death of Albert prodigy Johnson, how he rose to become a rap icon and how he's been a lifetime fighting sickle cell anemia malate before by would just pain like sickle cell with my life before. You know what I mean? It's mean really have no life that was it all going up and just that's, that's all I knew was being fucking hospital time. Caused him years of suffering. Baby in bed. Like I probably wouldn't even one yet. My leg stomach back on it would be heavy and it's what landed him in the hospital where he died. I'm just being in a hospital, seeing lights, and people need everybody looking down. There are tens of thousands of Americans with sickle cell anemia. Most of them are black outside terrible emergency room experiences. In many ways, prodigy story is their story too. I was a little kid like they would like me in the back and threaten to call the cops showed up like stuff like that. This is a podcast about race and institutional neglect. It's about who gets care in this country and why he was like sitting in the chair, I guess. No. I guess. No me like feel like my bones burning. Prodigy transform that pain into hardcore hip hop. I got a rat named rap groups called hall. His music was often raw violent in your face. He was also honest reflection of the world around him. Shoulder, you hear you could tell. I don't wanna hear that. Turn at this too hot to months or whatever. What if you really listen to the words is a serious mention in everything sewn on me. Prodigies voice is the sound of hip hop to me. Not saying he's the greatest rapper. I'm just saying he's, he is the embodiment of hip hop. As a pellet, you know, for his whole life and very few people have ever seen such a a trial, let them unstoppable drive. If you really wanna know, prodigy his life, his music, you have to get his pain first time. I actually got to ask them about why James, this is how I heard. He was like, I was in the hospital, man, you know, I was on up. You know, I was like, rather than get all excited or whatever. He said, I'm going to talk to each naked. The real nece drops on July nineteenth, subscribe on apple podcasts or wherever you listen until then peace.

Albert prodigy Johnson James Las Vegas WNYC studios seeing lights apple three days
"wnyc" Discussed on Only Human

Only Human

03:44 min | 3 years ago

"wnyc" Discussed on Only Human

"It's the summer of two thousand seventeen. The rapper prodigy is on stage with his hip hop group, mob deep. They're performing in front of a packed Las Vegas crowd. But after the show. Prodigy isn't feeling so great. He goes back to his hotel to arrest and three days later, everybody's under phone. His friends start getting these calls? No fucking way possible. He's dead. He's on tour right now. He's doing this show. I refuse to believe this. She, what are you talking about. Soon as. He. The real this a new podcast from WNYC studios. We're gonna look at the life and death of Albert prodigy Johnson, how he rose to become a rap icon and how he's been a lifetime fighting sickle cell anemia malate before by would just pain like sickle cell with my life before. You know what I mean? It's mean really have no life that was it all going up and just that's, that's all I knew was being fucking hospital time. Caused him years of suffering. Baby in bed. Like I probably wouldn't even one yet. My leg stomach back on it would be heavy and it's what landed him in the hospital where he died. I'm just being in a hospital, seeing lights, and people need everybody looking down. There are tens of thousands of Americans with sickle cell anemia. Most of them are black outside terrible emergency room experiences. In many ways, prodigy story is their story too. I was a little kid like they would like me in the back and threaten to call the cops showed up like stuff like that. This is a podcast about race and institutional neglect. It's about who gets care in this country and why he was like sitting in the chair, I guess. No. I guess. No me like feel like my bones burning. Prodigy transform that pain into hardcore hip hop. I got a rat named rap groups called hall. His music was often raw violent in your face. He was also honest reflection of the world around him. Shoulder, you hear you could tell. I don't wanna hear that. Turn at this too hot to months or whatever. What if you really listen to the words is a serious mention in everything sewn on me. Prodigies voice is the sound of hip hop to me. Not saying he's the greatest rapper. I'm just saying he's, he is the embodiment of hip hop. As a pellet, you know, for his whole life and very few people have ever seen such a a trial, let them unstoppable drive. If you really wanna know, prodigy his life, his music, you have to get his pain first time. I actually got to ask them about why James, this is how I heard. He was like, I was in the hospital, man, you know, I was on up. You know, I was like, rather than get all excited or whatever. He said, I'm going to talk to each naked. The real nece drops on July nineteenth, subscribe on apple podcasts or wherever you listen until then peace.

Albert prodigy Johnson James Las Vegas WNYC studios seeing lights apple three days
"wnyc" Discussed on Only Human

Only Human

03:44 min | 3 years ago

"wnyc" Discussed on Only Human

"It's the summer of two thousand seventeen. The rapper prodigy is on stage with his hip hop group, mob deep. They're performing in front of a packed Las Vegas crowd. But after the show. Prodigy isn't feeling so great. He goes back to his hotel to arrest and three days later, everybody's under phone. His friends start getting these calls? No fucking way possible. He's dead. He's on tour right now. He's doing this show. I refuse to believe this. She, what are you talking about. Soon as. He. The real this a new podcast from WNYC studios. We're gonna look at the life and death of Albert prodigy Johnson, how he rose to become a rap icon and how he's been a lifetime fighting sickle cell anemia malate before by would just pain like sickle cell with my life before. You know what I mean? It's mean really have no life that was it all going up and just that's, that's all I knew was being fucking hospital time. Caused him years of suffering. Baby in bed. Like I probably wouldn't even one yet. My leg stomach back on it would be heavy and it's what landed him in the hospital where he died. I'm just being in a hospital, seeing lights, and people need everybody looking down. There are tens of thousands of Americans with sickle cell anemia. Most of them are black outside terrible emergency room experiences. In many ways, prodigy story is their story too. I was a little kid like they would like me in the back and threaten to call the cops showed up like stuff like that. This is a podcast about race and institutional neglect. It's about who gets care in this country and why he was like sitting in the chair, I guess. No. I guess. No me like feel like my bones burning. Prodigy transform that pain into hardcore hip hop. I got a rat named rap groups called hall. His music was often raw violent in your face. He was also honest reflection of the world around him. Shoulder, you hear you could tell. I don't wanna hear that. Turn at this too hot to months or whatever. What if you really listen to the words is a serious mention in everything sewn on me. Prodigies voice is the sound of hip hop to me. Not saying he's the greatest rapper. I'm just saying he's, he is the embodiment of hip hop. As a pellet, you know, for his whole life and very few people have ever seen such a a trial, let them unstoppable drive. If you really wanna know, prodigy his life, his music, you have to get his pain first time. I actually got to ask them about why James, this is how I heard. He was like, I was in the hospital, man, you know, I was on up. You know, I was like, rather than get all excited or whatever. He said, I'm going to talk to each naked. The real nece drops on July nineteenth, subscribe on apple podcasts or wherever you listen until then peace.

Albert prodigy Johnson James Las Vegas WNYC studios seeing lights apple three days
"wnyc" Discussed on Only Human

Only Human

03:44 min | 3 years ago

"wnyc" Discussed on Only Human

"It's the summer of two thousand seventeen. The rapper prodigy is on stage with his hip hop group, mob deep. They're performing in front of a packed Las Vegas crowd. But after the show. Prodigy isn't feeling so great. He goes back to his hotel to arrest and three days later, everybody's under phone. His friends start getting these calls? No fucking way possible. He's dead. He's on tour right now. He's doing this show. I refuse to believe this. She, what are you talking about. Soon as. He. The real this a new podcast from WNYC studios. We're gonna look at the life and death of Albert prodigy Johnson, how he rose to become a rap icon and how he's been a lifetime fighting sickle cell anemia malate before by would just pain like sickle cell with my life before. You know what I mean? It's mean really have no life that was it all going up and just that's, that's all I knew was being fucking hospital time. Caused him years of suffering. Baby in bed. Like I probably wouldn't even one yet. My leg stomach back on it would be heavy and it's what landed him in the hospital where he died. I'm just being in a hospital, seeing lights, and people need everybody looking down. There are tens of thousands of Americans with sickle cell anemia. Most of them are black outside terrible emergency room experiences. In many ways, prodigy story is their story too. I was a little kid like they would like me in the back and threaten to call the cops showed up like stuff like that. This is a podcast about race and institutional neglect. It's about who gets care in this country and why he was like sitting in the chair, I guess. No. I guess. No me like feel like my bones burning. Prodigy transform that pain into hardcore hip hop. I got a rat named rap groups called hall. His music was often raw violent in your face. He was also honest reflection of the world around him. Shoulder, you hear you could tell. I don't wanna hear that. Turn at this too hot to months or whatever. What if you really listen to the words is a serious mention in everything sewn on me. Prodigies voice is the sound of hip hop to me. Not saying he's the greatest rapper. I'm just saying he's, he is the embodiment of hip hop. As a pellet, you know, for his whole life and very few people have ever seen such a a trial, let them unstoppable drive. If you really wanna know, prodigy his life, his music, you have to get his pain first time. I actually got to ask them about why James, this is how I heard. He was like, I was in the hospital, man, you know, I was on up. You know, I was like, rather than get all excited or whatever. He said, I'm going to talk to each naked. The real nece drops on July nineteenth, subscribe on apple podcasts or wherever you listen until then peace.

Albert prodigy Johnson James Las Vegas WNYC studios seeing lights apple three days