35 Burst results for "W. T. O. P."

Having A Good Scary Feeling

You Are The Media

02:06 min | 3 d ago

Having A Good Scary Feeling

"On having a good scary feeling being scheduled shouldn't mean putting the brakes on your work get hold of you. You'll spend your life conforming. We're so many people looking to make their today once that less maker's stamp take more calculated risks with our content even if a person's slightly on age bringing the changes will help us raise the bar and other see. Watch or listen to something. That's a bit different to what they used to. It's better to shake the tree not know if something's going to fall from robin to stay looking up at it. The message issue the media is not about being brave enough to fail the wto carrying on when we might be scared of the spaces. We're stepping into the ones where we might not know the outcome. It's about being a pro wearing a smile. Even if underneath a sense of fear kicking in the concentration is under immense pressure at the moment since the style of the pandemic people and businesses about the anti created ever more content from what started as a slew of webinars. When we were all. I confined last spring. People find momentum. There's a glove messages out there competing for our attention. Exhorting us to listen download. Join those subscribe for the most part. The content sits neatly within warmest accepted in an industry of sater. This inclination to fit in which keep in one particular place is an opportunity for you to figure out what it might look like if you were to step up despite any fears or doubt. She may have this. Fear is the feeling you have. If you're thinking you've got something that's really worth saying when you then done the work and you're ready to publish but somehow you're all say managing fail uncomfortable about being

Robin
US Backs Waiving Intellectual Property Rules on Vaccines

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | Last month

US Backs Waiving Intellectual Property Rules on Vaccines

"The by the administration says the backs efforts to make it easier for more countries to produce additional covert nineteen vaccines the administration's putting its support behind efforts to waive intellectual property protections for the vaccines that comes amid World Trade Organization talks over easing global trade rules to speed the pandemic's end still the administration's warning it will take time to reach a global consensus to waive the protections under WTO rules US officials say the move will not have an immediate effect on the global vaccine supply sider mag ani Washington

World Trade Organization United States Ani Washington
"wto  p." Discussed on History of the 90s

History of the 90s

06:36 min | 2 months ago

"wto p." Discussed on History of the 90s

"To do if they were arrested answering questions about avoiding arrest about gator asked him a rally of act of protesters they planned to strike early with the objective of shutting down the wto at all costs. It's certain some will be arrested and they're instructed on how to act. I am going to remain silent. I want a lawyer to say that. I am doing to remain silent. Protesters were young and old from all walks of life representing a broad spectrum of issues. Most were from the us but about two thousand were bussed in from canada and some traveled from overseas to attend the events. According to professor would seattle mark the beginning of a new era for the protest movement with an emphasis on creativity. So you see puppetry and music in celebration as being a real part of protest and so we would critique. We're not just going to march in a circle which was sort of what we were contrasting ourselves to the past protests the sense that it was sort of a dreary and instead we're going to go and be celebratory and be alive through kind of creative direct action and not and get arrested but try and be effective at the disruption with drums beating marchers chanted and move toward the city centre without police interference once they got near the convention center protesters immediately linked arms and began blocking key intersections. Some chained themselves together with the lock boxes built by the rocket society. Others use bicycle locks about twenty five thousand protesters poured into the area closing off all streets leading to the convention center just as delegates started to make their way over to the conference delegates. Staying in nearby hotels had planned to walk over for the opening ceremony but when they went outside they were turned back by the swelling crowds. Even us secretary of state madeleine albright and un secretary general kofi. Ian could not get through the crowd as a result. The opening ceremony was cancelled. Then the first official session of talks set to take place in the afternoon was also postponed instead. Delegates got together in small groups at their hotels and held talks by phone. Meantime crowds outside continue to block the intersections. John sellers says for a couple of hours. It was one of the best giant street parties with teamsters and turtles dancing in the streets together so it was it was a great is a great time party for the first few hours while we were you know we. We shut them down. We were we had unquestioningly succeeded beyond our wildest dreams. Everything was peaceful. protesters kept each other in line chanting. No violence and be nice so it came as a surprise when officers in riot gear moved toward the crowd with nightsticks out with plans to clear the intersection of six and university. They activists remained in place sitting down resisting orders to leave the area. And that's when police began. Firing tear gas canisters and rubber pellets. Into the crowd. And i remember seeing that same african american sergeant than i had seen the night before when we were getting processed and at first you know. He had his helmet off and we could see each other and you know. He's told me i saw him. We're sorta making eye contact and sort of talking. And i just remember being so sad. When he put his that gas mask on. Which i think just removes the humanity of those cops. They just become you know sort of anonymous machines and they look like storm and they act like storm troopers. I think it's a lot easier for them to behave like stormtroopers. And i remember screaming at him. You know sarge. These are the people that you were talking about last night. We are these people like this. Is you have to do this. We're peaceful around the corner. A group of anarchists dressed in black with ski masks covering their faces seized on the chaos and began throwing rocks and street barricades at store windows. Smashing big glass storefronts at nordstrom starbucks and banana republic. They gleefully spray painted buildings slashed tires and lit fires. There's the armored tank their police and fire gear. They're donning their gas masks can only have to imagine anyone. We know what's coming very shortly at this point pot. Bonfire continues to back right now in the middle of the street. It people are leaving the starbucks store alone at this point in time but then again the majority of the windows has broken and how they've been ransacked in the copy Stealing pounds of coffee. And all of the you know that they don't have any great purpose other than just 'cause shopped around one o'clock a few hours. After the mayhem. I began another twenty. Five thousand. People made their way into the downtown core. The parade of workers and their families had just attended a labor rally organized at memorial stadium. Next to the space needle they heard speeches from various people against the wto including the head of the teamsters union. James hoffa junior. You told the crowd we're going to change the wto or we're going to get rid of the wto over the next several hours. Stinging waves up tear gas choke downtown seattle as police fired repeated volleys of tear gas and pepper spray. You can see the rising into the air right now just the last few minutes. I'd say five or six of those canisters launched and it's really getting pretty thick they just are not letting up on this continuing to use the gas hoping to push folks back and we can see a number of riot police running into position. The scene resembled us civil rights antiwar protests of the nineteen sixties and seventies norm. Stamper was the seattle's chief of police in one thousand nine hundred nine. He explains why they decided to clear the area so we were convinced that if we had some kind of emergency somebody bleeding out for example from a gun shop nurse stabbing or run over by an automobile lorinc cardiac arrest on the twenty seventh floor of the sheridan. We wouldn't be able to get an aide car ambulance or police car. What.

Five thousand five John canada Ian madeleine albright last night nineteen sixties space needle six twenty first few hours about twenty five thousand pro twenty seventh floor seventies about two thousand one thousand nine hundred nine starbucks store sarge banana republic
A Look Inside The World's Biggest Vaccine Maker

Short Wave

06:28 min | 2 months ago

A Look Inside The World's Biggest Vaccine Maker

"So rosa palm trees here green lawns. A little bit like a college campus riding in a golf cart up to the factory. Your some of these are the migos month. Rubella reviews vaccine serum institute of india was already the world's biggest vaccine manufacturer even before this pandemic the company says two thirds of all children in the world. Get its vaccines and most of them are made here. At a sprawling factory complex in western india inside conveyor belts with all these tiny little vial weasing going for automatic resilience section automatic. Visual inspection is inspecting me europe machine. It's a high tech operation but look outside the factory window and you see a reminder of this companies more humble roots horses in the nineteen sixties. This was a farm breeding race horses and one day. One of the horses got bitten by a snake. Suresh giada serums executive director. Explains what happened next. Bimbos do the lanes. Were not working great in india so he could not get their disney. We could not get anti snake venom serum in time the horse died but it's owner had an idea you said yesterday why not start making it ourselves. So the serum institute of india was born. It began making serums against tetanus and snake venom and leader added vaccines against all sorts of childhood diseases. They specialize in generic versions at low profit margins and export to one hundred and seventy different countries last spring. A tiny package arrived here by career from oxford university in england to the very small. While is one in chief scientist. Shali graham describes what was inside components of a viral vector vaccine against the corona virus serum scrambled to start mass producing them immediately in huge floor to ceiling stainless steel vats of the one. Embryonic human embryonic kidney selling yeah scientists petty ready recalls how he was developing other vaccines these fats when his supervisor told him to quickly convert everything over to the corona virus vaccine while under lockdown as the pandemic exploded it was difficult to follow very strict rules of solution during this People to do overtime. This was before. Clinical trials showed that the oxford astrazeneca vaccine would work. It was a gamble with so much at stake. He says everybody's waiting for the all mankind waiting. The whole world is waiting for it to this winter. When trials finally proved this vaccine did indeed work is celebrated internally. Not like party or something but we had that moment of joy gonna champagne. No no serum hopes to soon be churning out a hundred million doses per month of this one vaccine on top of all the other vaccines they're still producing here. The oxford astra zeneca. Formula is particularly attractive to india and other low and middle income countries. Because it needs just regular refrigeration not subzero temperatures. This is for storage area. The capacity of seventy million dollars. So what we're looking at here is enough to vaccinate. Whole countries is ongoing process of building out of cold storage along these conveyor belts and out to sixty eight country so far racing against russia china. In what some are calling vaccine. Diplomacy india's huge capacity is attracted interest from the so called quad. The us japan. Australia and india. They announced financing to help another indian producer make a billion more doses of another co vaccine but while indian manufacturers are partnering with global pharmaceutical companies. The indian government is challenging pam at the world trade organization. There is an agreement that binds all wto members to certain levels of protection for intellectual property. Twenty year patents. Regional thrashers legal scholar at the global development policy center in boston. She explains how india and south africa are asking the wto to suspend those patents. Cova vaccines so that companies like serum can crank out generic versions quickly and in certain countries the majority of the population won't be vaccinated for something like five years that gives those viruses a long time to mutate. So the argument they're making is not. Hey look out for us but more this is in the interest of all of us. Everyone serums executive director. John says he supports that effort at the wto watery required is a vaccine today. Not tomorrow you want to stop the disease and stop it sprayed and that can happen. Only if there is no restriction on using technology many global health experts agree. The pope has said he does too but some companies including astrazeneca have pledged to sell vaccines at cost without profit and suspending. their patents. They say is not the answer it would kill innovation and would not speed up distribution bottlenecks more to do with supply chains than access to the vaccine technology itself. Both sides of this debate are over emphasizing. The role of patents. Daniel hamill is a law professor at the university of chicago. He says the serum institute success chose a middle path. It got a license from astrazeneca. It's been able to mass produce vaccines within the current regulatory environment ensures the potential licensing arrangements without cancelling patents ceremonies if you're disabled to gain rights to make vaccines on a large scale. That's a good thing could serums factory. As vials of corona virus knock scenes wiz off conveyor belts inside chief scientist ms. Shali graham points to construction underway outside a new pandemic preparedness facility for another year or two renew community that has not actually ideas to have extra machines extra labs all on hand to make billions of doses of vaccine against whatever virus hits

India Rosa Palm Rubella Reviews Vaccine Serum Suresh Giada Serums Serum Institute Of India Shali Graham Oxford Oxford University Global Development Policy Cent Disney Golf Astra Europe England Indian Government World Trade Organization Thrashers Astrazeneca PAM
"wto  p." Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

03:44 min | 3 months ago

"wto p." Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"This is the marketplace morning report from the bbc world service. I'm victoria craig good morning. Wto member states will begin talks later today on a joint proposal from india and south africa discussions will center around whether patents on corona virus. Vaccines should be temporarily suspended. So production could be increased by other manufacturers around the world more than one hundred developing nations support their proposal many of which have not been able to meaningfully start their own vaccination campaigns. The bbc's naomi grimly has more on that story. The world health organization is endorsing the idea to pointing out. The pharmaceutical companies have been given huge grants of taxpayers money to help come up with effective vaccines. But there's opposition from the pharmaceutical companies. The international federation of pharmaceutical manufacturer says scientists who want to explore feature uses for innovative. Vaccines will struggle to find investment if intellectual property protections are snatched away. The proposal is unlikely to get anywhere. The world trade organization because of opposition from the uk the eu. I'm the us. Naomi grimly reporting there. Now just this hour. The european union has said it's reached a deal to supply four million more doses of pfizer and biontech vaccines for you hot spots in the next two weeks. Checking the numbers now. Global shares are taking a bit of a cue from the us after the tech. Heavy nasdaq closed at its highest level. Yesterday in more than a year stocks in asia ended the session today in the green key. Benchmarks here in london paris and frankfurt though are little changed. Well it's a new era of trade and transport in south asia. That's the message. Today from the leaders of india bangladesh as the pair inaugurate an eighteen point two million dollar bridge connecting border cities in the two countries. The project opens a new trade corridor. Also fostering diplomatic bonds. At the bbc's a day mukherjee explains from new delhi. Just yesterday the world bank said that better. Connectivity between the two countries can also lead to an increase of income for bunga. The shot nearly seventeen percent india by nearly eight percent. More importantly bangladesh has india's largest trading partner in south asia and bilateral trade between both countries has grown in the last decade over ten billion dollars before the pandemic crippled this entire area india exported goods to bangladesh over nine billion dollars and imports. Were where over one billion earlier this year. You remember the also sent to william free corona virus vaccine to bangladesh as a mark of friendship so it seems to be a mix of economics and diplomacy is what we can see at the moment. Indeed and there as you say politics involved in this as well. Bangladesh has had a growing relationship with china. Which is a concern for india. Isn't it. it's a huge concern. It's made new delhi very uncomfortable. China in fact has replaced the united states as the largest investor in bangladesh in two thousand eighteen so china flexing its economic muscle ridesharing. India's neighborhood for of years has definitely made new delhi feet concerned. it has been bumping and money. Countries like sri lanka nepal and pakistan at all of these are bordering india. So it's insecurity that india seems to be feeling as ever economics and politics intertwined here as well the bbc's or energy mukherjee thanks for your time. Thank you. it's estimated about fifteen percent of people around the world experience disabilities yet. That portion of the population is under represented in advertising. Now there seems to be a growing trend to try to capture the so called purple dollar. As the bbc's johnny cassidy explains to save people are the biggest minority across the world. There's over one billion dollars. We've got a lot of money to spend as estimated that the global spend and part of sabo people is worth more than a trillion dollars every year..

london johnny cassidy naomi grimly two countries Today yesterday south asia pakistan frankfurt sri lanka Yesterday more than a trillion dollars south africa two thousand both countries two million dollar Naomi bbc asia over nine
Okonjo-Iweala begins first historic day as WTO director-general

The World

01:36 min | 3 months ago

Okonjo-Iweala begins first historic day as WTO director-general

"A lot of work to do. So I feel ready to go motivating words today from the new head of the World Trade Organization, the arrival of an go Z or condo, a whale A and a six month leadership void at the W T o International body based in Geneva, governs trade rules between countries. Okonjo you wail. His candidacy had been held up by the Trump White House on her first day. She's making history as the first woman and first African to serve as w. T O director general absolutely do feel on additional burden. I can't lie about that being the first woman and the first African means that one really has to perform. That was a con job away. The last month. She's a Harvard grad on economist and dual citizen of the U. S. And Nigeria with a 30 year career in international development, including Time is managing director at the World Bank. Biden administration announced its strong support for a condo you, Ella. Still, there was controversy. Senior African leaders of the United Nations recently complained about what they called racist and sexist media coverage of her appointment. For her part to conjure you. Ella has said that she remains focused on making the changes needed at the W T O. It's led to me that deep and wide ranging reforms are needed. And as I said, before, you cannot be business, as usual at the W. T O in her first speech is head of the W T o today and go Z and conjure you. Ella reiterated that point she said she can on Lee deliver results if members except that we can do things differently. Most urgent priority, she said, or to address the impact of the cove in 19 pandemic and climate change

Okonjo Trump White House World Trade Organization Biden Administration Geneva U. Harvard Nigeria World Bank Ella United Nations LEE
New WTO head warns 'vaccine nationalism' could slow pandemic recovery

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

00:30 sec | 4 months ago

New WTO head warns 'vaccine nationalism' could slow pandemic recovery

"His findings and from the impeachment trial that we must get to the truth of how this happened. More than two hundred people have been charged with federal crimes in the bloody assault on congress which led to trump's impeachment trial on a charge of inciting insurrection. Trump was acquitted on saturday in a vote of fifty seven. Forty three seven. Republican senators joined democrats in favor of conviction. Though short of the required majority

Donald Trump Congress
"wto  p." Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

02:22 min | 6 months ago

"wto p." Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

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kenneth robinson pineda Sebastian america santiago india bbc Britain uk delhi craig london
Australia to seek WTO intervention in barley row with China

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

01:19 min | 6 months ago

Australia to seek WTO intervention in barley row with China

"Take the China barley tariffs to the World Trade Organization. They're saying this is a logical and appropriate next step as they see this trade war, I guess. Heat up. With China so Australia to make a request here to the WTO's after China's barley tariff. Let's get more on this with Steve Breast chief investment strategist at Standard Chartered Private Bank, because I guess it is just a reminder that the trade war whether it's between the US and China or Australia and China is still something very much of the four and still could be something that would be a big risk to 2021. Yeah, to see if you're looking at the risks that they're out there. I think you'll see that the vaccine being dispersed in an efficient manner is one thing that we need to watch but also then Relations with China just generally, you know, everybody's assuming a czar, we that you know the U. S on DCI China that they'll still have issues that they sold, but they'll work together to try and solve them border than the previous administration. But you know, it's just hot lights. It's still going to be tricky on. Therefore, we may see risk of metal bands of risk off environments around trade tensions from time to time. Yeah, when it comes to the new but an administration as you say, perhaps not a potential reset exactly on January, 20 do you expect, though, that we will see a guess a better relationship than what we had seen under the Trump administration. Well, I think it would be more predictable, which I think is, you know, T China, even if it's still quite company, confrontational in terms of having different objectives and trying to you know they're trying to achieve or modify those that's still going to be the case, but at least it will be done in a way that not through Twitter and 31 arm of the government. I'm saying one thing, and then the president saying something totally different 24 hours later, so I think it will still move in a similar direction. Just be less uncertain Day today.

China WTO Steve Breast Standard Chartered Private Ban Australia Trump Administration U. United States Twitter
UK, EU say talks will continue on post-Brexit trade deal

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 6 months ago

UK, EU say talks will continue on post-Brexit trade deal

"Three weeks left to go and still no deal insights both British prime minister Boris Johnson an E. U. commission president was set up on the land dished a self imposed deadline on reaching a brexit trade agreements after a phone call with the U. K. beat up on the line explained that despite the deadlock they basically don't one thing we both think that it is responsible at this point in time to go the extra mile the outstanding issues affect competition rules mechanisms for resolving future disputes and fishing rights remain unresolved Johnson said the most likely outcome was that the two sides wouldn't reach a deal on that they would both have to revert to plan B. the most likely thing not ease of course that we have to get ready for WTO terms Australia time with hundreds of thousands of jobs and tens of billions in trade at stake Britain's light London edge on a sudden not hoping for an end to the uncertainty Clark and that's the way first off with the old account China's funded

British Prime Minister Boris J E. U. Commission U. Johnson WTO Australia Britain London Clark China
How the Biden administration will affect the EU

Inside Europe

03:34 min | 6 months ago

How the Biden administration will affect the EU

"With the biden administration taking office in just under a month. You leaders a counting the days until they feel like they can have a new start with an american team. that's more committed to transatlantic relations this week. The us foreign policy chief. Joseph barrell reveal the agenda he hopes to pursue well joining me on the line from brussels. Is our correspondent. Teri schultz terry. It's not an exaggeration to say most e you leaders a hugely relief with the biden win and believe things are going to be different now. Where does the e u. side wants to start well and they've actually released this document now laying out where they believe. The most progress can be made in the fastest and most efficient way. And that's what you high rep josette burrell released yesterday. And they've got four areas where they want to start the europeans. They want to start with corona virus. Response making that again. A global effort with president trump having pulled out of the world health organization saying constantly america first america first when it comes to a vaccine. That's something that does not sit well with the europeans who are committed to making vaccines affordable and available to the entire world on climate. They are very much looking forward to president-elect biden making good on his campaign promise to rejoin the paris climate accord. That's something that suffers without. Us leadership and i think president-elect biden is is committed to doing that the third one is a little a little tougher trade and technology that you use third priority and that's one where you're not going to automatically see any. Us president stop protecting or trying to protect american tech giant's against for example e regulators who want to recoup taxes from from the multinationals. That's going to be somewhere where we we may not see as quick progress but on trade looking at the world trade organization where president trump is just continually attacked and and made it impossible for the wto to get reforms that the europeans also support. I expect that that will be one of the areas that there will be some quick progress and unwed burrell calls global action and he says this is working toward a safer more prosperous and more democratic world and they're hoping that president-elect biden will put more emphasis on human rights on rule of and on basic democratic values that the eu and the us due to a large extent share but is it realistic for the e. You just think that the biden administration shares these views simply going to sign onto this plan. Or i think europeans may be disappointed by the fact that foreign policy is probably not going to be the first thing on on president-elect biden's list he's got to deal with the corona virus that's just raging in the in the us and and the divisiveness that this campaign and actually the trump presidency has brought about in america and he's got to work on that before he can justify to anyone that he's going to be working on with with european leaders but he very much wants to do that. All of his statements during the campaign to to europeans. Were basically i understand. This is not the way the. Us you relationships should work and he will. He does share a lot of these views. He certainly will not be giving comfort to leaders. Like hungary's viktor orban or the polish government. That is rolling back the rights of women. He will have. He will have a few things to say about that. Which president trump left unsaid or probably didn't even believe

Biden Administration Biden Joseph Barrell Teri Schultz United States Josette Burrell Brussels Terry Paris Burrell EU Viktor Orban Polish Government Hungary
WTO, South Africa and India Propose Temp. Waiver of Covid-19 Vaccine Patent Rights

Seattle's Morning News with Dave Ross

00:42 sec | 6 months ago

WTO, South Africa and India Propose Temp. Waiver of Covid-19 Vaccine Patent Rights

"Groups, said 10. A covert 19 vaccines could be available by the middle of next year if they win regulatory approval, but their inventors need to patent protection, Reuters reports the World Trade Organization. India and South Africa have proposed allowing a temporary waiver to allow essential licensing for patent products during the pandemic. Thomas CUNY, director general of the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Association, said. Vaccines by Fizer and bio and tech as well as Madonna and AstraZeneca, have shown promising results in large clinical trials. He says they expect that they will see something similar with Johnson and Johnson, Novavax and many others. This report sponsored by the Department of Health,

Thomas Cuny International Federation Of Ph World Trade Organization Fizer Reuters South Africa India Astrazeneca Madonna Novavax Johnson Department Of Health
WTA Year End Awards for 2020

Beyond The Baseline

05:01 min | 7 months ago

WTA Year End Awards for 2020

"Everyone john worth. I'm hearing sports. Illustrated tennis podcast. Jamie joins me for a grab bag topics. We are midway through the final so hard to make any definitive conclusions there but we can talk about the the back of played so far. We'll talk about twenty twenty one tennis and what the picture is looking like. It's slowly coming into focus but still considerably Blurry and uncertain. We'll talk w. t. awards. There are no more women's tennis events on the calendar. But we can start distributing some honors and just sort of a catchall of tennis topics as we want to say to the finish. But we're not exactly sprinting. Either a stranger that is Finishing under strained conditions and we talk about sort of where the sport is here in mid november twenty twenty so jamie welcome. it's it's been a while. how are you. i'm good. i agree with you. It's a weird year. And i feel like we've been talking a lot about the atp and obviously the atp finals are happening. So i am happy to start by out talking about the wpa and some of these awards all right. let's go. let's let's that. I that's a good idea let's go to That'd be the w. t. a. Does not unlike the wto does not have a finals or twenty twenty. Unfortunately that's An offshoot of having events in china where international sporting events were cancelled months ago. So the vendor playing as we speak in london and there is no there is no comparable women's event. So let's say yeah let's do that. Let's start with the women season over. Why don't we hand out some awards. We genda pivot to london. Mvp award is always a bit strange. But if we're going to give player of the year honors. I feel like the player has to have won a major. Do you agree with that. Yes definitely agree with that. But this year of course We had one less. And i think that i would also classify the majors in two creek corona and post corona. I would almost give a little bit more weight or just feel like there's more discussion for all the majors. That are not the train open you know. Of course that was when all was normal and before all this happened But i know you. You went to your pace in your mailbox but are you. Who's your pick. i think it. It sounds sounds a little. I think you've got to say that the so you can is your twenty twenty. Mvp she won a major and got to the final of another If we play this game sometime if your life depended on a player Would she be your pick and the answer is is probably not and do i think in a head to head match. There are players who are superior. If if she and i o miyasaka played ten times i would think naomi osaka with the majority of those matches. But yeah in this straight year. But i think you're right. There was no wimbledon. There there was a us open but it did not feature you know six top ten players including ash barty the number one player including simona halep included the defending champion and that was That was one sock than we had. The french open which also did not feature ash party. Who is the defending champion. It did not feature. Naomi osaka the australian open before corona had the most flush field. So you can in one that and she reached the final of the french open so she is the only player to have won a major and got into the final of another and in this stranger. It's probably appropriate. We have a strange choice but sonya sofia kenyon is my Twenty twenty mvp will by you. I hear you on that. And i think those are all good points. I in you know so that we aren't agreeing here on all of these under some Interest to this conversation. I'm going to take a different pic. i'm gonna go with naomi osaka and i think that In speaking about mvp sort of in the Like a of a lot of awards that are giving out at this time of the year including essays own award sportsperson of the year. It's not just about what's happening on the court. It's just not about results per se about other things that This player has done. So i think that For me. I think niamey osaka. Of course like you said kennan if you're just talking about reaching a final winning final In a major. She's done that but osaka has not only one. But also use her platform and she's spoken up and she's gone beyond the court and i think that you know if we're talking if you're looking at that list of choices here And you check the box with a major win in for me. You check the box with all the other outside stuff off the court that she's done so that's my pick.

Tennis John Worth Jamie Joins Mvp Award Naomi Osaka Creek Corona Post Corona WPA London ATP Barty Simona Halep Jamie Sonya Sofia Kenyon China Osaka Kennan
Trade body says EU can sanction $4B worth of US goods

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 8 months ago

Trade body says EU can sanction $4B worth of US goods

"World trade organisation arbitrators say the E. U. construction up to four billion in U. S. goods over Washington's legal support the plane maker Boeing the ruling which could inflame trump administration criticism of the WTO amounts to one of the largest penalties ever hunted down by the body the arbitrators with tossed with setting a dollar value in sanctions such as tariffs he you could impose a year off the the WTO I found the Boeing had received at least five billion dollars in subsidies the word prohibited under international trade rules the decision thanks back to twenty oh six and is part of a string of long running disputes between Boeing and rival Airbus after the Geneva trade body I'm Charles the Ledesma

Washington Legal Support Boeing WTO Airbus Charles The Ledesma E. U. U. S. Geneva
WTO says EU can put tariffs on $4 billion of US goods

Larry Elder

00:54 sec | 8 months ago

WTO says EU can put tariffs on $4 billion of US goods

"Upto $4 billion in U. S goods over Washington's illegal support for plane maker Boeing correspondent Charles Dillon. Desmond reports The ruling which could inflame Trump administration criticism off the W T o Amounts to one of the largest penalties ever hunted down by the body. The arbitrators were tasked with setting a dollar value in sanctions, such as tariffs the YOU could impose. A year after the W T O had found that Boeing had received at least $5 billion in subsidies. The were prohibited under international trade rules. The decision dates back the 26. He's part of a string of long running disputes between Boeing on rival Airbus at the Geneva trade body. I'm Charles the lid asthma. The move is certain to worsen relations between the European Union and the United States during a time of Corona virus worries. More on these stories at townhall dot com.

Boeing Charles Dillon Desmond Donald Trump European Union United States Airbus Washington Geneva U. S W T O
World Trade Organization to be led by a woman for first time

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

00:58 sec | 8 months ago

World Trade Organization to be led by a woman for first time

"A woman will lead the World Trade Organization for the first time in its history. The agency is in the process of recruiting a new director general and goes you CONJU whaler of Nigeria and Young Hee of South Korea. Have, made it to the final round. The BBC's Andrew Walker has been following developments. The WTO member countries are trying to choose a new director general by consensus if they're able to coalesce around one of the two remaining candidates, it will be the first time that the top job in the agency has been held by a woman whoever ultimately takes the post and a decision is expected by. Month they will face major challenges to the biggest commercial powers the United States and China are embroiled in a bitter trade conflict. The you ask especially under president trump's administration has a range of complaints about how the organization works and has made it much more difficult for the WTO to perform one of his key functions, settling disputes between members in London, on the BBC's Andrew Walker, for marketplace.

World Trade Organization Andrew Walker Director General BBC Young Hee South Korea Nigeria United States Donald Trump President Trump London China
"wto  p." Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

09:39 min | 9 months ago

"wto p." Discussed on The World Next Week

"In essence. John Japan Korea sweated India Australia will India, of course, has opted at the last minute to stay. Having at least in theory, India and China and the agreement was exciting for many that's kind of helping. You haven't been continental free trade agreements on a lot of work on the African. Union on that not Sydney chugging along but it'll be WTO Minas agreement. So it's the African. Capacities important. Rigorous, straight agreements which Going on the region as well. Who can come to let? All add to what Peter has highlighted. Mutating highlights a number of very important developments on the rulemaking front. I think the other thing to pay attention to in the pandemic will certainly impact on this is what other countries are doing domestically to. Bolster. Their trade competitiveness and I think you see a number of different either industrial policy strategies or what we have discussing. You can't put your eggs in one basket of either US or China. So ensuring working with her firms for supply chain diversification of the connectivity whether it's Internet whether it's great whether it's A. Sea Lanes, and so forth, I think all of that. Are Important developments at countries are taking home to ensure that whatever happens in this great power struggle day remained competitive. No matter how those rules come on I. Think it goes back to something Jennifer said earlier that dimension of US trade policy is perhaps a more critical dimension regardless of whichever. Campaign on prevails in November. The last thing I it's not really in the rules area, but I don't think we should overlook is what China is doing with its belt. Road. Initiative. because obviously while it started out in still sort of eighty percent in court infrastructure meaning building parts, roads, railroads an and power plants around among all of its B. R. I. Partners. which is a very large and growing number of countries but you are now seeing China very mu very move very strongly with its digital road where it is again trying to be the one that is doing everything from laying the fiber optic cables to creating the telecommunications infrastructure and more importantly on the rule side to build all of that to Chinese standards. With interconnectivity among Chinese products. Throughout the entire telecommunications networks in in many of these be our countries and you now have seen China revive that idea of A. Healthy Silk Health road where again China would use both its technology equipment again to sort of move into the global house fear and try to say to all of its Bri partners you know rely on US China to to resolve all the issues connected to the pandemic as well as overall global health issues. So you are starting to see some legal norms be developed in and around. The ideas I as well as the you know locking in. A lot of countries to China's telecommunications equipment and and other standards with respect to products and increasingly legal standards as well. And the last question we're GONNA do a lightning round. So I'll ask each of you to limit your answers to thirty to sixty seconds so that we can conclude a roughly on time but given the multitude of challenges that we've talked about whether it's involving the US China Australia India South Africa Europe South America's well, we haven't really begun to touch on a number of those issues but let me try to look to an issue that's going to be before US sooner rather than later and while six seven months may seem like a long time the next W. Two ministerial is likely to be in June twenty, twenty one. And whichever administration takes office in January we'll have to get very busy planning for it. So in the view of each of you, what does a robust but realistic agenda look like is a digital as fisheries the dispute settlement internal reform are there other issues that you? Would put on the list for must be addressed even if not resolved but dressed in some fashion. And Let's start with Peter Jennifer man mark. Smith. Christian Johnson and I would say. Firstly, is there enough of a basis for minister? If there isn't done tap, let's just be bold about that Not Convinced as enough on were right now. But at the very minimum, ideally, there should be an agreement joan fishery subsidies. We can't get that rushed as a multilateral agreement of think Well. I complete sentence some of the joint initiatives particularly on. ECOMMERCE digital trade we can get some fairly resolution was actually have agreement would be good to get something. I think the ministerial needs to set up some kind of process around reforming industrial subsidies. So quite what that means in terms of WTO community structures is something busy thinking about and maybe that's also grosses that g twenty could could inc bench to some extent outside of the out of the w final point creaky Miriam is just really struck me that we haven't really discussed the. EU. Strikes me that the US a critical player in order this particularly the US e your Jonah Tangle. So the US EU ship I think is very important going forward as well. The Notre Commissioner now. So I'll say, just two quick things one I think it actually is important to finish the fish shots. So these agreement for a number of reasons A, we need to save the fish but more importantly for the WTO I think it is to show that we can reach an agreement on anything I mean, this is pretty critical th the WTO show that it still has the capacity to come together and reach an agreement. So I actually would put a lot of emphasis on concluding that fishery subsidy and the second one I think that needs to begin a lot. Of thought is exactly what is the WTO doing to make sure that when we get a vaccine for covid or treatment drugs that they that we learn the lessons that we learned thirty years ago when there was a failure with respect to the fair distribution of HIV AIDS drugs, and we use what we've learned to put together the kind of cooperative mechanisms, as well as the supply chain that would help there be an efficient and effective and fair distribution of that vaccine throughout the world, and if the WTO could do that, that would go a long way to helping. Restore again, it sense of relevance. Will play will get to do that sooner than later mark last. I will join the others in saying the WTO needs at least one success candidates most likely for that is fishery subsidies agreement. So the bare minimum it would just need to basically show the negotiating armed can still work. I. Also Agree I think how it heals with the protectionist or the uneven distribution of whatever happens with a vaccine. If one exists by next June is critical lasting which we haven't touched on but I think is also or is. Back in two thousand, one WTO toll developing countries, which is the largest share of membership that there will be new rules to deal with the lawman challenges in those outside of what was given. facilitation agreement really have not been forthcoming and I think there is a possibility of. A laying the groundwork impossibly having some basic agreements on domestic agriculture, which is where the majority of. Folks live in these developing countries are employed I. think there's a important sense for developing countries to feel. Something into negotiating arm, WTO matters to them so they can sell that constituencies home. So I think that's another that we need folks because is what Petering Jennifer mentioned. And ideally, we would be able to tackle at least some. Progress in each of the three arms. So in addition to negotiation. Dispute Settlement and also structural internal reorganization. So let's look forward to that day Let me just thank everyone for joining today's virtual meeting and a huge. Thank you to each of our panelists. Insights, and for a terrific discussion. Is, has recently, we have a very rich agenda of unresolvable issues. To tackle and I couldn't agree more especially after this discussion. So please note for everyone that the audio and transcript of today's meeting will be available on the council's website and thank you again for participating..

WTO US China WTO Minas Peter Jennifer India Petering Jennifer Sydney China Australia India South Af John Japan Korea EU A. Sea Lanes Bri Christian Johnson Smith AIDS Jonah Tangle
"wto  p." Discussed on CFR On the Record

CFR On the Record

03:16 min | 9 months ago

"wto p." Discussed on CFR On the Record

"So I'll say, just two quick things one I think it actually is important to finish the fish up. So these agreement for a number of reasons A, we need to save the fish but more importantly for the WTO I. Think it is to show that we can reach an agreement on anything I mean this is pretty critical th the WTO show that it still has the capacity to come together and reach an agreement. So I actually would put a lot of emphasis on concluding that fisheries subsidy grim and the second one I think that needs to begin a. Lot of thought is exactly what is the WTO doing to make sure that when we get a vaccine for covid or treatment drugs that they that we learn the lessons that we learned thirty years ago when there was a failure with respect to the fair distribution of HIV AIDS drugs and we use what we've learned to put together the kind of cooperative mechanisms, as well as the supply chain that would help there be an efficient and effective and fair distribution of that vaccine throughout the world, and if the WTO could do that, that would go a long way to helping. Restore again, it sense of relevance. Will play. We will get to do that sooner than later mark last. I will join the others in saying the WTO needs at least one success candidates most likely for that is fishery subsidies agreement. So the bare minimum it would just need to basically show the negotiating armed can still work. I also agree I think how it heals with the protectionist or the uneven distribution of whatever happens with the vaccine. If one exists by next, June is critical lasting which we haven't touched on, but I think is also or is. Back. In Two thousand and one WTO toll developing countries, which is the largest share of membership that there will be new rules to deal with the lawman challenges in those outside of what was given facilitation agreement really have not been forthcoming and I think there is a possibility of. A laying the groundwork impossibly having some basic agreements on domestic agriculture, which is where the majority of. Folks live in these developing countries are employed I. think there's a important sense for developing countries to feel. Something into negotiating arm WTO matters to them so they can sell that constituencies dot com. So I think that's another that we need folks because is what Petering Jennifer mentioned. And ideally, we would be able to tackle at least some. Progress, in each of the three arms. So in addition to negotiation. Dispute Settlement and also structural internal reorganization. So was look forward to that day Let me just thank everyone for joining today's virtual meeting and a huge. Thank you to each of our panelists. Rich insights and for a terrific discussion. Is Peters. Has recently we have a very rich agenda of unresolvable. To tackle and I couldn't agree more especially after this discussion. So please note for everyone that the audio and transcript of today's meeting will be available on the council's website and thank you again for participating..

WTO Petering Jennifer AIDS Peters mark
"wto  p." Discussed on CFR On the Record

CFR On the Record

05:01 min | 9 months ago

"wto p." Discussed on CFR On the Record

"Her you? World. With the big crowds can do they want the creates intra fool the jungle it's it's not going to be a pretty uncle. So, we need the WTO US seats, the don't not least to Constrain Sean and. I would argue. I would. Only add just as the last thing that it in the accents of of the sort of core of the WTO, which is rules against discrimination on the basis of origin I, mean most favored nation that you. You have to treat all members of the WTO the same you cannot choose one that's more of a favourite than another in terms of preferential treatment other than under certain FTA agreements but and the national treatment you can't discriminate against imported goods over domestic product in the absence of those basic Koru rules. What you have is all a lot more chaos and that is much harder for for many in the trading system to deal with and I. Think is particularly harder for small and medium-sized enterprises for women owned businesses for companies trading out of developed in particularly least developed countries. The sense that you don't know what the rules are, and you have to spend a lot more time and resources than figuring them out is a real deterrent to keeping the trading system sort of up and running, and that is one of the core values that I think the WTO does provide. and think of it almost tiny as would sometimes called the Spaghetti Bowl of trade agreements. Spaghetti might be delicious dinner have hundreds of different agreements with different parties in different rules. And without any ruled all fairly high barriers both tariff and non-tariff Ben is going to be a lot more difficult to do much trade and it would have tensely significant impact on workers and is small and large across across each economy. Excellent for our next question will be from Sarah English. Thank you and thank you to the excellent panel So my question is around big bold new ideas. Obviously, the WTO is in need of reform and I think we covered that quite well, my question is, is it time for a new system? where the US can lead create a system with allies that perhaps is not mfn, but really gets to the crux of wet. I think a lot of us in the business community get frustrated with, which is you know slow progress on negotiations. So do you think such a system could live in parallel to the WTO and do you think actually strengthens or weakens the WTO system thank you..

WTO US Sarah English Sean Ben
"wto  p." Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

02:56 min | 9 months ago

"wto p." Discussed on The World Next Week

"Her you? World. With the big crowds can do they want the creates intra fool of the jungle it's it's not going to be a pretty outcome. So we need the WTO us, the don't not least to Constrain Sean and. I would argue. I would. Only add just as the last thing that it in the accents of of the sort of core of the WTO which is rules against discrimination on the basis of origin I mean most favored nation that you. You have to treat all members of the WTO, the same you cannot choose one that's more of a favourite than another in terms of preferential treatment, other than under certain FTA agreements but and the national treatment you can't discriminate against imported goods over domestic product in the absence of those basic core rules. What you have is all a lot more chaos and that is much harder for for many in the trading system to deal with and I. Think is particularly harder for small and medium-sized enterprises for women owned businesses for companies trading out of developed in particularly least developed countries. The sense that you don't know what the rules are, and you have to spend a lot more time and resources than figuring them out is a real deterrent to keeping the trading system sort of up and running, and that is one of the core values that I think the WTO does provide. Think of it almost tiny as would sometimes called the Spaghetti Bowl of trade agreements. Spaghetti might be delicious dinner but if you have hundreds of different agreements with different parties in different rules. And without any ruled all fairly high barriers tariff and non-tariff Ben is going to be a lot more difficult to do much trade and it would have tensely significant impact on workers and is small and large across across each economy. Excellent for our next question will be from Sarah English. Thank you and thank you to the excellent panel So my question is around big bold new ideas. Obviously, the WTO is in need of reform and I think we covered that quite well, my question is, is it time for a new system? where the US can lead create a system with allies that perhaps is not mfn but really gets to the crux of wet I think a lot of us in the business community get frustrated with, which is you know slow progress on negotiations. So do you think such a system could live in parallel to the? WTO, and do you think actually strengthens or weakens the WTO system thank you. I.

WTO US Sarah English Sean Ben
"wto  p." Discussed on CFR On the Record

CFR On the Record

05:14 min | 9 months ago

"wto p." Discussed on CFR On the Record

"Rest of fellow panelists in terms of Namias But in my case, it's because I haven't institutional relations through one of the advisory boards to w jobs I. It would be inappropriate for me to pick a particular person. But what I'll say is something that you think both Peter Jennifer have alluded to. I think the person that you need both needs to be being aspiring major internally point when many folks working inside the building are feeling. dispirited and needs to sort of motivate them to be more creative than ever in I. Think the other thing that we need an honest broker who can effectively shuttle diplomacy and if we think back to the role that Arthur Dunkel play in terms of we had a similar situation, the nineteen eighties and the ability for all sides to see him. As a person that they could engage with to get towards compromises through that former draft on I think it will take some time for any of the five candidates develop that trust with a government but that's the level of what will be necessary to push a reform agenda. Ford. Very diplomatic responses but also, very constructive. As speaking of changes on the horizon Many of you have probably heard that the US election is less than fifty days away. And I wanted to ask you what do you see as the most likely developments if president trump is reelected? And conversely, how different do you see a biden? Administration. Agenda. For the WTO mark, you WanNa, start without one. Sure. I think the trump administration's actually been quite straightforward about its views on the WTO the need for reform. The question that will see in the second term of the trump administration is to what extent willing to apply pressure outside on other WTO countries to push them in the direction of what the US is seeking. With wwl reform so far in the first term, it's decided this is not worth finding. This is not the former once engage in I would predict that that will. Be The case but if there's room for movement, that's where will focus on with regards to the. Second. I, think in a Biden administration there some really big questions starting with the appellate. Which Jennifer's already alluded to the views on the body in the NFL, Quincy's with regards to dispute settlement a backup force to the Obama Administration, and so they'll be question as to. Where the Biden Administration Season Opening Act more constructively at the WTO that I think many other members will be looking at the Appellate Body issue as a litmus test for the Biden Administration..

WTO Biden Administration Peter Jennifer biden US Obama Administration Arthur Dunkel trump Ford president NFL Quincy
"wto  p." Discussed on CFR On the Record

CFR On the Record

05:12 min | 9 months ago

"wto p." Discussed on CFR On the Record

"Good morning, good afternoon, and good evening depending on where you are at this moment and a warm welcome today's Council on Foreign Relations Meeting. I am Miriam Sapiro managing director at Sard. Forbidden. And Vice Chairman. Of SCC, public affairs and former acting US trade representative I will be presiding over our discussion. Our topic. What's next for the WTO is extremely timely for a number of reasons, and we have a stellar panel to offer their thoughts. Believe many people are in violent agreement that the WTO is badly in need of reform but figuring out what steps are most critical and what steps are feasible remain subject to intense debate and the WTO negotiating pillar revitalized. Could the Secretariat The executive structure known as the secretary he made more efficient and more effective especially with the new director general expected to be named soon. And how can the WTO's dispute-settlement arm the rescued? And more generally is the WTO fit to play a more active role in addressing growing tensions between and among its members such as those between the US and China. Are Distinguished Panel today includes heater draper, who is executive director of the Institute for International Trade at the University of Adelaide. Jennifer Hillman who is a senior fellow for trade and International Political Economy at the council and Mark Woo was a law professor at Harvard and the Vice Dean of the Graduate Program and International Legal Studies. All three have tremendous expertise on the issues before us. So let me begin our discussion with the following questions for each hand list starting with Mar- than Jennifer and then Peter. What do you see as the greatest challenge facing the WTO today? Thank you ambassador thank you to the council relations for hosting us. All-star with what I think is the obvious one which is set on the Dougie Te'o needs to find a way to serve as anger face for this growing strategic rivalry between the US in China in a world where each has major trading partners who do not want to necessarily eight sides in that rivalry but which to use the WTO as a form which to manage. Now the problem facing the WTO with regards his rival earns twofold one is a series of design limitations design flaws. Their backwards will kick the dispute settlement doesn't have. A retroactive remedies. You can self designate is developing country you can deal with. The issues?.

WTO US Council on Foreign Relations M Jennifer Hillman Miriam Sapiro Vice Chairman managing director executive director SCC China Sard director general Institute for International Tr Vice Dean executive International Legal Studies University of Adelaide representative Harvard secretary
Donald Trump reiterates threat to scale back US economic ties with China

Balance of Power

02:38 min | 9 months ago

Donald Trump reiterates threat to scale back US economic ties with China

"Had sort of a wide ranging if I can call it that news conference at the White House. One of things he said, is I'm and I may be open to disengaging altogether with China. We're starting Punishing US Cos. If they're doing things that China should be doing back here in United States, what do you make of that? Is that a real change of policy? It's sort of Ah note that he struck throughout his 3.5 years in office. It's absolutely a note that he has struck during his his entire administration. Something he ran on in 2016 is something he's been talking about since the early odds when trying to gain a session to the WTO's. In some ways, it's incredibly consistent with his ideology. You know what that means, however, in practice, especially before the election is somewhat unclear, although I mean if you look at the what this administration is doing, not just what they're saying what they're doing as it relates to China. It is taking steps towards decoupling, especially around sensitive technologies around export controls. Things like visa restrictions, travel restrictions, so there is, you know, kind of incremental decoupling. I know. I think we would argue already happening on what that means for a second term, especially President Trump obviously has re elected. Is a big question. Mark does that D complain? Only intensify. And yes, you're right. His wide ranging press conference he would seem to signal that. Yes, yes, it would send a house it register with voters. Voters are not so concerned it. I don't think about China. One way the other. This won't make sure they have a job that they can afford the grocery bill. They can afford the rent bill. Do the voters really connect being tough on China with they're getting jobs. It hasn't worked so far. So well, has it. Yeah, it's that the interesting point. I think that in some ways, China is a easy scapegoat for both political parties in Washington on DH. In some ways, I think it's also registering with voters a Pew research and did a poll the summer that showed that almost 70% of Americans have a negative view on China. Right now, that is the most it is that the highest it's ever been a again since China gained deputy o session. In 2000 won. So In some ways, the voter sentiment has changed around China. I think it makes it difficult for either political party to look like they're cozy up with China as the results, But I think you're right, though. If this is not necessarily kitchen table issue, Although your China has been come the easy scapegoat, at least from from a policy maker, a Zeiss, eh? It's always a real treat to have you with us. Libby that's living Cantrell, She's Pimco, head of public policy. Coming up here

China White House WTO Mark United States President Trump Washington Libby Cantrell
Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

How I Built This

1:03:33 hr | 10 months ago

Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

"Oliver Karaz was born and raised in Germany mostly in rural parts of the country his mother was German and his father was from Iran in came from a long line of doctors. For me, it really starts in some ways with my dad and. The timing rapidly had every reason to become a social activist and and so he came to Germany from the Middle East when he was very young around twenty with no money in his pocket no language skills. And you personally then worked on of odd jobs, but he eventually became a psychiatrist but what has really shaped me much more than being born in Berlin is. Social. Active. Isn't that I that I saw him live and that he really made our family mattress we always talked about talent responsibility and the need to use. Whatever telling behind to help those. Around us that we can make a difference. Given that your father was Iranian and your mother was was sort of. German. An Uber even though you were born in Germany, did you feel did you feel as Germany everybody else? So I didn't have a second identity. We only used spoke German at home and yet. As you say I was also a not always fully accepted. So if I give you an example, my school twelve hundred students and you could pick out to the didn't look like everyone else and I was one of them right and even an enlightened country like Germany. That is notable. So I had what I call a visual accent would people would see me on the street and they would ask me how to speak German. So well and But they also school the skipped my name when reading out scores because they weren't sure how to pronounce my last name and opportunities taken away and even at was physically threatened so i. I think that really shaping in many ways because I realized. Very early that in order to be as successful as everyone around me I would have to be dramatically better in really work much much harder than anyone else and so that used to be strong work ethic in me. For the record Oliver is somewhat down playing his work ethic. Because just out of high school, he actually started his first successful company. It was the early clunky days of the Internet, and he designed a way to help people send emails more easily and he wound up selling that business not for a ton of money, but enough to get him through medical school. But. After practicing medicine for a couple years Oliver realized he couldn't stop thinking about that first business he'd started and how he wanted to start another. So he quit his job in medicine and consulting job with Mackenzie and eventually moved to New York. That was my goal was actually to start another company that that's A. Healthcare, but I I'd also realized at the time that I sold my first company and far too cheaply in that I should learn more about business I and at McKinsey God exposure to balance sheets and panels and hit a lot of very practical experience and what it means to manage business. And I think they fondly of my time at McKinsey was one of my better decisions. McKinsey GonNa Mackenzie is a little bit like going to business school. A lot of people at McKinsey have come from business, schools. In that. Many people go to business school thinking they will find a co-founder. Did you were you actively looking around at your colleagues to think maybe I can do something with him or her you know maybe that person. Absolutely and were you just thinking about different business ideas all the time? Well, it is actually very hard to find good ideas and my definition of a good idea was that it needed to have a great mission I. wanted to make sure that we actually do something good in that. We stayed true to sort of talent breaks responsibility, but also wanted to be a large market and to have a great motor rounded and also I wanted to be based on contrarian inside. Because I thought that all of the best companies have that at its core. While she wanted mission, you wanted a company that could kind of dominate its field by building a motor around it, but was also contrary and that's that's that's those are some interesting. Criteria. And that's why I screen for several years rejected pretty much every idea that that I came across And meanwhile. While you're going through all that I guess you meet this guy Cyrus Masumi. WHO's another McKenzie consultant and and just you just. Become friends like he's like somebody like in and you guys start hanging out. While we got put on study together that required us to travel globally and you've ever done that it meant frost were sixteen eighteen hour days together for three four, five months on end and we really. Got To become great partners in that and and what we realized that we had some. Very complementary skills. Cyrus is one of the most charismatic and gregarious individuals. You'd ever meet his very passionate. He could be more forceful, which sometimes was needed to be effective with clients. And you've talked to me now for a little bit as you can probably tell. More dispassionate and logical and more measuring. German? More, German in many ways, right. also was effective with clients by by. and Cyrus is American right? He's American this but that That close listened and how we work together that really started friendship and we stayed close for the study and be caught up over lunch pretty regularly denounce different business ideas off one another and. I think we connected because we had similar interests because. On. Some levels We were equally passionate about what we're doing higher says, passion was more visible to others than mine but we. Were close enough together that we both accepted. The other as. individual that that we could learn a lot from. Was it was it clear pretty soon after you start hanging out, Sarah's that this was the guy because you were. You're on the lookout for a partner. They I think it was was absolutely an option I know reality is that. With. Both founded companies before Mckinsey and we both knew that we wanna do it again and as I. was always great about being. Very honest. Rather than just nice and and I value that a lot. Yeah. All, right. So So this guy, Cyrus Super Charismatic, really smart clearly, the two of you start to to work together. And what what kind of business ideas are are you coming up with? While we kind of fell in love with a new idea that came about a one of these launches were Cyrus. Told me about how he recently ruptured his eardrum by flying with a cold and then found it very difficult to actually find a doctor and he had asked for recommendations and called down his insurance directory listing started with the as. Doctors weren't accepting new patients some no longer accepted two centurions one provider Pasta Way and so he said, well, why does it take four days to the doctor when I'm in pain right? And why can't this much easier? And we. Both very quickly. realized the potential of this idea from. Working at project be new helps us the for actually spending millions of dollars for marketing to grow their patient base because they had wasted inventory, right they had something that I like to call hidden supply, which is these last minute cancellations no-shows reschedules. That the that go to waste, and then on the other, there are the patients who had a hard time accessing this. You thought it immediately clicked with these my God. Yes. Doctor's appointments connect patients to doctors. Yeah. Well, look if you go through the forfeiture that I had read, it's a great mission right? We're making one of the most personal needs more accessible for for patients we can help patients to get in fast we can help the doctors become more efficient. We can make the entire health care system more cost effective people out of the emergency room things like that, and it's a marketplace. So there is a strong mode and clearly anything in healthcare is a large market and I think the contrary and inside that we had. was. The fact that. Most people thought it's normal that people have to wait twenty four days to a doctor because there's a doctor shortage in read our inside was really no doctors have asthma debate ability because of these last minute cancellations, no-shows reschedules and so I felt very about this idea. So. So you member like how long between the time that the you had that first conversation To the time were both you said, let's start this business was like monster or weeks or days. was was weeks. We what we what we started doing is actually. Mocking up the side in how imagine back then in powerpoint pointing just the wire. Website. Yeah. Wire frame. Exactly. We would. We'd go into starbucks and we'll chat up strangers and say, Hey, here's a five dollar gift card. Give me your thoughts. Sorry I'm GonNa. Go back. You just go to people in starbucks Gift Card and say, can you give me your thoughts? Random Person? The absolutely that's that was sort of our market testing. They wouldn't. They would be like excuse me this is a little weird. You're my space. Might also happen from time to time but you know there's lots of people on starbucks is very in German of you. That's debris because usually he would be to report tentative about doing that. Well, you know I think there was a lot less rejection than you think people actually quite open I. Suggest you try this out but if you If you're unthreatening in Luke harmless as we probably dead and then they'll be pretty open. You went up to and starbucks and you'd say, Hey, we're thinking about a company here. Can you just look at his powerpoint give you five dollars Gift Card and what was in the powerpoint, the popcorn and was just what we thought. This website would look like and we would ask them is the set service that resonates with you would you use it and and we got an incredibly valuable feedback here and really set us in many ways on the on the right track right? So and what pointed to the two of you decide let's quit McKinsey. Let's. Let's pursue this. Probably a month or two after we initially discussed idea did anybody say you were crazy for quitting? Everyone. Everyone told us. Crazy and got a lot of negative feedback on the idea to write people would say this is Bloomberg out I would never pick my doctor on the internet or I already have a doctor or you know doctors wouldn't accept patients that that are looking on the Internet of all kinds of protections that people had when they were thinking about their own situation by. When when you talk to people and starbucks, they actually thought about it much more positively. So we were encouraged enough to say, well, this is going to work as long as we get out of our circle and don't ask McKinsey consultants doctors. The responsible be better. All right. So you are in your thirties at this point. And presumably were making pretty good cash at McKinsey because you were probably you'd know expenses you're on the road all the time so. When you quit, I'm assuming you had some money to launch the business and probably live off for a while. Yeah. So I very deliberately had never raised my living standard to the money that the paying McKinsey and I had saved every dime so that I could. No be in a position where can fund this embraced can afford not to take a salary for a couple of years. Wow. So so a couple of hundred thousand and you saved. You know. Maybe. I'm to Germany to discuss personal finances but. I had. Built this. Radio, you can tell the. Story Yeah I I had I had enough money to live off for for several years but I also Saturday night both finance the company early out of our own savings so that clearly diminish We had leftover after that. So now, you both decided to quit. and. You have some technical expertise because you had. You had done some coding but this is next level stuff. Were you able to be that technology founder and Cyrus was going to be the the sort of the business founder? Absolutely not as I add coated but at that point, I had not touched a computer for a long time We knew we need to have a technical co founder and so Sarah's knew a guy named Nick Guanzhou from the time together, trophy software, and this is another company that they would both worked at the that's the company that they're both previously worked together and Nick just brought a totally different perspective and really educated Addison me on a lot of things and and he was really the one who understood a building a seamless experience for the consumer and ends May. Zach Docs. Early Genius, did you did you have the name dock from the beginning? Not, not initially we we went to several phases on on what the right name could be for for while we wanted to have a descriptive name. So we looked at physicians, dot Com Doctors Dot Com, and we actually tracked down the owners of one of these domains and they wanted several million dollars for the domain name. And and we were finding the company ourselves. So that was out of the question. So then we just sat in a room and we brainstorm a list of fifty or one hundred names, and then started eliminating names until we arrived at Dr. What does it mean? or it doesn't mean anything which was the WTO bit we could. There were zero search results. Okay. There's no meaning behind his ACH. There's no meaning behind and and in hindsight it was precisely the right thing to do because it really was a blank slate for us to fill with with meaning and really build a brand around. Zero such as October we started. It address nate the right lake once you know that it takes more than three weeks from picking up the phone and dialing for doctors till you actually see someone you realize Oh, this really not much else that we have to wait so long for to get. And this is more important than most of these other things you already have. Fantastic access View Magin. If air travel way that healthcare workers that wouldn't be an expedia that wouldn't even be Delta Dot Com that would be individual phone numbers for every plane. Imagine. If that happened, you know a half the planes would fly empty it would be a massive pain and that was actually the state of health care before sock. Is Amazing that that the nothing like this was out there in two thousand seven. I look at I. Think. In many ways you couldn't build it a much earlier. In the early days. When we went out there, we were the ones installing Internet of the doctor's offices. We. They they were a many times just migrating from a paper books to scheduling systems. We were at the cusp of digitisation for healthcare. We were just lucky in our timing to get this right in and start offering the service when that also happened. All right. So you decide to pursue Zach dock and it's the three of you. I'm assuming really just at the beginning and were you working out of out of one of your apartments? Did you guys rent space? No, we worked out of respect for. Many. Times we came to make yet the nicest apartment and and we could bring breakfast Burrito and bake him up and you know the the reality is that we originally had a pretty ambitious launch plan right so we got together around July. We wanted to launch by December of two, thousand seven. Something interesting happened were nick send an email suggesting to look at what was then called techcrunch forty. Take is is now a household name but the draw for us back then was there was a fifty thousand dollar prize now it's called tech crunch disrupt think. So it's a major a startup competition. It's a startup competition and we were the first class of this was much less known be budgeted two hours to fill in the application in really which will send it off. He didn't think about it anymore that there was an early July and early August we've heard that we had been accepted, but there was a complication we'd have to be ready by September eighteenth or. That was three months sooner than we had originally planned to launch. So you'd have a live website by September that is right that is right with doctors with doctors, right So we actually debated for a few hours whether we should even tried to go for that but we ultimately said, yes, we can get the website working and we wanted to have enough doctors just a bars wouldn't look pathetic. Brayden. Coded Night Neither Day and nick really busted his but he did the patient facing side of the website and that was the programs. What was potentially even harder because we're tried to launch a marketplace was to actually get the initial supply on there and remember the website wasn't there yet so. Tires ended up going door to door for doctors offices. Excuse telling them a powerpoint page, and this is really a testament to cyrus sheer willing determination if you think about what it means to really start a company early on, there's nothing to show right you may be a powerpoint but there's no website there's no patience. There's no other doctors no social proof and it has to run on passion and very clear that that is Cyrus superpower. He just went to random doctors offices or he had like a list of doctors offices and he started kind of walking block by block. Well, there's a lot of walking involved a we launched in Manhattan so you can literally go down the street and you see. The signs and you walk in. And he was basically saying look, it's a way to connect you to patients. How was how many by the way? What was your objective? How many doctors do you need to sign up to have this website look okay by September Between six and ten was our goal. Okay. So just doable it is a was extremely hard really. Is telling doctors is one of the hardest things to do why were they saying? Well, first of all, it is baby very hard to even speak to a doctor they are being shielded. Their time is very valuable. Office managers are trained not to let anyone talk to them to protect the doctor from people walking in selling them stuff shirt them. Secondly, they many didn't want to give up control over their calendar which has to write. We ask them to post times that a patient could book into it and it was just a far fetched idea for many of them the patients would actually do this. So he got a lot of knows he got a lot of knows. He'd go there and he just simply not leave until he got a chance to speak to the doctor and a few times. It was even escorted out by security. I really think one in a million could have put this off. I mean was he going to particular kinds of doctors or was he generally focused on an Internet general? Practitioners Ob sobe began with dentists Okay. Because our thinking was that. People go to dentists most often, and we wanted to make sure that we have an offering that is relevant for patients as often as possible. I. Got you so so eventually unassuming, you do get what six to ten or how many did you get by September of two thousand seven Eight. In the meantime, you inequity doing the back end stuff you were doing the coding and building the website does right and as you were building it. How did it look? So. The bit that Nick Build looked awesome for the time I think. It was impressive. We were. Very. Satisfied that we had a scroll bar that we had a map that we had back then already the insurance selector and a lot of feature that. Weren't to be found really anywhere else. All right. So September two, thousand, seven, you are ready to reveal. This service at. Tech. Crunch. And Doth Review present or did did Cyrus kind of wishy the spokesperson? Cyrus. I presented Nick stayed behind in New York to make sure that the less the website was actually up and running This is in San Francisco that you went to the we flew out to San Francisco and So we lost sock talk in front of Eight, nine, hundred people. A lot of them were journalists when the judges opened up with feedback guy covers ocoee who we newnan in valued. As embezzles forever apple he came out to said he he didn't get it. He would never use this in front of everyone right and. His direct load something like honestly Oh, it just never occurred to me to go to any doctor that's really burned in in my brain and what was worse is that he seemed to be right we didn't get a single booking. We were hoping that this PR would get us out of our initial batch of users, right because your other. So many tech journalists there. So you know the publicity may be would would would lead to bookings and that was the hope but. It actually took three days before regard our first legitimate a patient, and and in the entire first month, we only got five bookings. You come back from San Francisco and. You know you had Guy Kawasaki. Say I don't I would never use this service? I'm sure he feels differently today but man maybe then Ezio said that but did did you come back feeling like like dejected like losers or or were you excited like how did you feel coming back? While you know I think we obviously hoping we would eventually get more bookings and In the beginning you probably refreshed. The Bookings Report Hundred Times a day by as we were thinking through what we realized. It was really a typical two sided marketplace challenge It's just a classic chicken and egg problem. You need the supply to get the demand and you need the demand to entice them supply and for dark was even trickier. Right when you think about it, healthcare is hyper local. Very complicated. So you have to match. Supply and demand on a Zip code specialty level, and then we have thousands of insurances take. Until we realized that our odds of actually finding a patient that wanted. An offer there. Quite low, and so the best path forward was to methodically build up supply, and so we just kept going put up a huge map of Manhattan on the wall, and then a sleep put little flags on of where the doctor's brother we're on the website in which insurance is accepted and we just we knew the perseverance. Is the name of the game. Back in just a moment how oliver and Cyrus Begin to drum up interest in stock and how they even start to raise some money at figure out how to dress differently, stay with us guy rows and you're listening to how I built this from NPR. Hey everyone. Just a quick thanks to our sponsors who helped make this podcast possible I to epic provision maker of epic bar beef was nature's idea the epic bar was. 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A lot of their offices especially back in two, thousand, seven or sort of technologically in the Stone Age. There was incredibly complicated to sink the doctors calendars with ours. Because none of the software was actually made to sink. Were even in the places where we had syncs up and running, we would frequently get. Feedback while the punishment didn't happen because the doctor wasn't available and we really couldn't figure out why this was the case because when we did screen chairs with the office to their calendar and and our calendar, it was identical right and couldn't figure out why that's happening. So I decided to sit next to the office manager I went there and got to know him and his family photos of his dog. I fixed the printer taught a better strategies to play minesweeper still couldn't figure it out. Until one day, the doctor would come out and she'd say, Hey David I'm out next Friday. And then what does David do does he go into the calendar and block out next Friday or does he take a post? It note On a doctor out next Friday and sticks this too is monitor. In the real world. These post it notes, of course happen and but once you know that Matthew Friend, you can start filtering this out and that's one example they were literally a thousand point, one percent solutions that we had to figure out to make this work. Wow. That sounds I'm getting exhausted. Just hearing about that because this is like even like Google calendars, right? Yeah. Yeah. That was that was early days and what we were extremely focused around were making show the experience was fantastic. If something went wrong, we fix it. Right. So I was our customer service I personally would call the doctor and and confirmed the appointment was all said if it wasn't I, personally contact the patient to let them know and then I would offer them. Amazon Gift Card alongside with an apology those actually one case where it didn't catch a patient in time. and. The were in the subway to the doctor, and so I raised them to the doctor's office and picked up a bouquet of flowers on the way there and met them in person to apologize. And that was really a turning point burs. The service has to work and we need to be have this patients I attitude in in terms of how it works completely ingrained in the company. All right. So you clearly need to kind of grow this Were you offering this service doctors for free at the time? Initially. We for free by we eventually started charging fifty dollars per month. But Sam doctor you come into my office and you say, Hey, if you pay me I can bring you more customers. I would be skeptical I would've said to you you who whose, who even knows about you. You'RE GONNA you're asking me to pay you money for Phantom bookings for maybe no customers I mean did some of the doctors say Many. The US summarize our sales challenge. Right? It was very hard because even if you wanted to, we couldn't easily share how many patients their competitors are down the road God like that was something that was confidential. All right. So you are you got this chicken and egg problem. Not, enough people signing up and he gets skeptical doctors but you know that the service could really benefit the doctors, but you also need them to pay for because otherwise you know but business. Meantime at a certain point I'm assuming you guys start to think we'd better go out and look for money if we're going to really make this thing work. Yeah. Yeah. That that happened in the spring of two, thousand, eight we decided we raise series. And we we make the rounds we get in front of a number of the big name, BC New York the also go to Sandhill road in impel. Toho Santo Road we leads and road initially were very successful at all we got Polite knows. and. Ray No feedback control someone took us as I told us you know what the idea seems. Good. But you're consultants I'd and the perspective of its consultants can't get anything done and what realized is that even though we had both founded companies before our Mackenzie Pedigree in our keys and button down shirts, they were really hurting us, and so we wait rank Khakis and button down shirts. It sounds crazy. Were they pleaded pants or were they at least nine pleaded please. Yeah Yeah. Yeah we after hearing that feedback We very quickly just went to the next gap and bought jeans and t-shirts and from that on the combos with VC's when but a lot better. So you went from McKinsey consultant look to this are the tech casual uniform of jeans and t-shirts that that's exactly right and we introduced ourselves not as NBA's and McKinsey Consultants but we introduce ourselves previous entrepreneurs that are starting their next company. was was anyone biting? Were there people who were like? Yeah there's a great idea I'm in. So interesting enough we had raised some money from. Friends and colleagues, and many of those they invested in US business plan unseen just based on the fact that we. Were giving up our careers at McKinsey to pursue talks. So that felt really a great. and. As we started changing how we appeared in how we introduced ourselves to venture capitalists L., we started to get offers and so in August of two thousand eight, we ended up raising five million from KHOSLA ventures expeditions mark. Wow Mark Banya Jeff bezos, and Venus is. All their. Funds are in which sounds like a lot before you WanNa do it's actually. Kinda limited because you still it seems to me in two thousand eight even though you have five million dollars a lot of money you still have this problem which is you've gotta get. Customers, and then to get customers, you need lots of doctors had lots of options but to get doctors, you need lots of customers booking through the site to you do that precisely D- These five million dollars per lily earmarked for making New, York, work, right, Miguel, I market work but. immediately after raising the money the financial crisis hit. And You may remember there was rest in peace a memo that went around about startups, right? Yes. About start ups, never being able to raise money arrested in peace good times. So we got this job is to make the money stretch in. We probably learn not during this time This was really our first go round making hard choices and what I want to be frugal and not to do things we can't afford and We learned to not let money replace critical, thinking and creativity. But now we continued to grind away at New York and at some point felt while if you want to get. To the next level we have to prove. Dr Isn't just a New York City phenomenon. Right? We had to prove that it would work in a second city But at that point, we didn't have the money to do this anymore, and by the way you're still your approach was still the same. It was door to door. That's right door to door and how how you building awareness about the about the fact Zach existed with customers with potential customers. So we it was day very difficult to get someone. To the website. Yeah but when they did. They loved it because it was such a step change from how healthcare used to work for him. Right they used to have to pick up the phone and wait on hold and then plays scheduling. tetris. With the office manager, can you do Wednesday morning about Thursday noon? Friday afternoon, and now they could do the same thing in a minute and have complete overview about the ability patients loved it and they told their friends. So we we started to get word of mouth. Going, and so we saw New York really taking up and we felt like, okay, this does this go into work in New York. At a minimum rate, but we also realized that it took us a fair bit of time. And money to get it going. In New, York and do we couldn't with the money we had left from the five million easily expanded into a new city at the same time. Raising money was going to be difficult because the next generation of investors wanted to see that it works and other cities as Walter. So we were a little bit in this catch twenty, two we ended up. Applying to. Force boost Your Business Competition Four. Forbes has his competition as sell to where they give away money right to they were promising a hundred thousand dollar prize. And at this time. We won. And Yeah what did is they gave us one of these large publishers. Clearinghouse is sex and very useful actually used to cover a hole in one in our only conference room. There was a hole in the wall and we covered it with that. At, this point you are, you are working out of an office, not not an apartment at this point we were working out of A. Shared Office space we work. Yeah. So they had given us publisher clearing house is is check but they fail to give us the small check for three months and we were getting really nervous, but it would still get it but. But ultimately, we got that one hundred thousand dollars and that's what we used to launch and our second market in DC in Washington DC and would did it require you guys to move down there or were you did you hire because I'm assuming you had to? A lot of your early capital was going into sales. Business Development hiring sales reps, is that right? Right, we had a couple of sales reps at the time. A. Very first employee ever was a sales rep is still with the company today and He was great. He figured out how to. Really charm his way. To the doctor. So there were no more security guards escorting anyone out. When did you? I'm assuming that even in two, thousand, nine, two, thousand, ten, and beyond we're not yet profitable. Far From It? Yeah. Far from it right because it's a capital intensive business. Yes. We obviously invested heavily in customer service wanted patients to have a great experience. And we had a quite sizable engineering team because that was actually a major engineering effort. So what started to happen when did you start to kind of see? A real turning point. Yeah. So we we we had launched New, York successfully with. Years. Of hardwork, we've gotten it off the ground is transported that to DC at work well, in DC, and now he said, well, why are we not in more cities and so we actually we raised serious be with fouled respond and We used to expand off the East Coast Francisco then Chicago and we just got better better at it. So we then ended up raising serious and two thousand eleven from Goldman NTSC, and we primarily use this to grow our sales team and sign up more more doctors in from two thousand eleven till two thousand, thirteen, we launched roughly thirty new cities I read that by by two thousand, fourteen would covered. Like forty percent of markets in the US, which is huge I mean that's right I mean that's a huge number of cities. And in that year evaluation. Of tzakda. Past Billion Dollars I mean that's That's pretty remarkable i. mean you were kind of on this like really rapid trajectory and you a pretty straightforward model right and you were charging doctors a flat fee every year and then. They could take all the bookings they wanted and I think that by that point like by two thousand, fourteen knew it was not cheap. It was expensive viewed really raised the price it was like three thousand dollars a year, right? Something like that. Yes recharged Dr Three thousand dollars a year and and there was a flat fee. No matter. How many bookings Actually facilitated for them and and the reality was for some doctors that got a lot of bookings that was a great deal. Yeah. But but there were also doctors that God a lot fewer bookings and for them that fixed cost was actually too expensive and some of them were starting to leave the service, and so we got into a situation that required us to invest a lot to stay where we are and then invest even more to continually grow our overall provider base, which means we had to build out a massive sales team to always sign up more doctors right and. Some point during this time L. Nick actually ran an analysis showed that it would take several years if ever fries to make our money back on on many of the doctors we signed up because you would have to sign up. X number of hundreds of thousands of doctors paying that amount every year. To make your money back to to make sort of our the cost of the sales team back. Wow and L. it. This was pure that would make us dependent on external capital for our very long time, and now it's a clearly there are many companies that have taken. Grow fast at all costs approach. And They Held onto this forty extended period of time by L., it clearly puts talking to a dependency to. Investors in their mind says, yeah. So. Meantime. You know I I from what I understand. There's disagreements I mean there there are you know the leadership team including Cyrus he he's I. Think he's he's sort of his position as the flat fee model is actually the best way to go is that a fair assessment of of his position? Yeah. I think that's right. I. Mean there were two fundamentally divergent ways held the business could go forward right. One way was to continue to work on optimizing the unit economics of our subscription model and the other way was to think about how to make it more transformative leap and then find a new more profitable. And more sustainable model and. Their. Look I can certainly understand The reluctance and taking this leap if companies rechange their underlying business model once they have a certain scale and then live to tell about it, right. We know the names of the companies that have done this net flicks, but from DVD's to streaming adobe. From box software to the cloud, but there's not a lot of companies that do that. and. Needed to make a choice which which direction I wanted to go. And and I should say over that. Became intensely personal for you because hugh and Cyrus really disagreed on on on the direction of the company should take. Steps down he he left the company and you moved into the role of CEO. Those right and what ask you about this neo. Beauty's in the flies of this show is its simplicity and we talked to one person or sometimes too. It's a single narrative, and so we don't have cyrus with us to tell us what happened but I wanna ask you about this time because. This was your co founder. This was your partner This is your friend and he was leaving the company. How did you feel at that time? I all I can say was a very hard and very emotional period for everyone involved and It was certainly a departure But how was through that given these two divergent choices you you couldn't. note, both of us could be useful to talk and. I have to imagine that for for period. China. was sort of the friendship. Look been we were very close we. Were not only friends we had worked for eight years believe together fourteen hours a day, and we probably talked more to each other than to anyone else in our lives but you know. Still touch from time to time and. I think he's joining us on from sideline. He still at prison million owner of the company Yeah, he's still. Here's the thing I mean we've we've told stories about breakups we've had we've had episodes were there were married couples who split divorced but continued the business e O products. Susan Griffin Black and an her husband Brad They continued the business stacy's pita chips continue the business after the divorce sold it for a quarter billion dollars. You guys were worth value to one point eight billion dollars at this point. was was ever party that just thought you know, God look at what we're doing on the core we're going and. I mean did you in service it down and say you know this thing is just growing and? Let's just figure this out. I think the challenge is that it's not as if there was an article way to decide what the right path forward is. As long as investors wanted to give us money growing all costs was yeah. Fine Strategy. The question was just how dependent you wanted to be on the continued goodwill of investors. It sounds like you were tired of going out raising money. You didn't want to do that anymore. Oh, not at all but I think you want to raise money from a position where you know what your turn to is and and. It wasn't clear that the business model would work in in a way that that we could just flip a switch and be profitable. Yeah. So. That was a tough year for you. Two, thousand fifteen. There was an article in business I think business insider, and it was about the sales team. It's October that year and it was. It was some allegations that you know Pete member sales team using adderall even cocaine they were under immense pressure. They were working all the time when you saw that article. And I'm not saying you even aware of any of this. You may not even aware of it but I. have to think that that article really alarmed you and and maybe even embarrassed you. Look A. There were a number of articles in two thousand fourteen fifteen. Didn't absolutely get everything, right but Budweiser I can say is that At. The time doctor had their sales team and we're. Getting very quickly and Your maybe maybe. Too focused on. L. Hitting targets and. Not. Focus enough on creating a strong culture the I hear these stories from six years ago from from time to time and from from now from candidates and and really every time. This happens like a Gut Punch. Because, this we know we're completely different company now. On on so many levels, but clearly, you saw that in new that you had to change something. While yes, I look I l there's a there's a couple of things about this. Right? We are a technology company, but we had said ourselves up too much about. Instead of writing wins and really too little about being adaptable and darning and and building the trust required to try things that now pet the risk of failure. and. So one of the first things I did is to change core values. You know to emphasize those behaviors each one of our values adaptable, not comfortable and other one is progress before perfection learners before masters right and. We only kept really one DIA CONSTANT DEL patients I. Personally that. That was more of the culture that I thought was right for Doc to succeed on many dimensions. So, you take over the company it's got high valuation, but you're still not making money and you know that you've gotta change the underlying business model you're never gonNA make money. And from what I understand this is the beginning of what you have internally described as the second founding of the company. That is right. That is right and that basically happens in in two thousand, eighteen you you launch this new business model where instead of the the dollar membership fee. Basically, you would charge doctors a lot less like two hundred or three hundred bucks, but then every booking you, you would take a cut from that booking. So like a travel agency. A little bit charge for new patient booking. So the existing patients to practice we made free but yes, there was the fundamental idea and. It sounds like such an obvious thing to do but but here's the problem with it and why why are we thought it was incredibly risky to try this. Our best customers that had been on for a long time. They got lots of pockets right and if we start charging them per bookings, their prices go up very significantly in some cases ten times more and that seemed. Competing, insane to us. In. Particular because when we talked to other companies that were at gone through similar changes and even pricing experts, they're number one advisor was make sure whatever you do never charged your best customers more and frost would be precisely. The opposite. In the thing that was counter-balancing this in our mind was well, maybe we'd be able to bring on a lot more doctors because the barrier to entry is now much lower that was there was the back and forth in the team to figure out whether that's the path we want to want to go. So, this is still a risky strategy because you're depending really on new bookings because the two hundred dollar annual fees dramatically lower and I have to imagine in year one, you actually saw drop in your revenue in the year one of of this curve. Second founding. Right. Well, it's from a risk profile worth at that. Right the warriors that you lose all your best customers in with it, all the bookings day used to be getting. and. So we needed to be ready for a very significant drop in bookings and revenue and the second Challenge was here that. The beauty of this approach modest and we got all this money upfront right and Sharon. Now to bond, we're getting paid after the booking with with a thirty day payment periods, we had a huge working capital requirement to make that happen. So did you see a drop and revenue in two thousand eighteen when you rolled this out? No we didn't because we actually didn't see the doctors leave the way that we hit on -ticipant did in fact, you know while we had very much worried that they would be upset and some of them certainly were upset. We were providing so much value to them that. You know what? What took you. So long I knew as getting a great deal all along. So that worked really well, and we had piloted in Georgia initially in April. Two thousand eighteen and then that had worked. So we we then all allowed in Colorado a few weeks later that work to, and from there we went to Washington state and again, very positive results and after these three days. Okay Great. We know this works does it out in our largest most important market? Let's go to New York and that and terribly horribly wrong. They the doctors in New York. Not only were so pissed off they actually I read. mounted a change dot org. Petition I. Don't know what to to to end this practice or something. They were really mad. They were really really mad and I guess you guys responded you said, are we won't we won't roll this out in New York for a while. Yeah look in New York. We. Facilitate Roughly, one in five new patient doctor relationship in the entire city on dock and so. The economic impact for the providers in. was much greater than for the providers in Georgia Colorado Washington. So yes, to give you one example, there's a dermatologist and so and he paid under the ultimate model ten doctor say paid thirty thousand dollars and under the new pricing model, his cost was going to go up from thirty thousand dollars to roughly three hundred, forty, thousand dollars. Wow. So what was your response to that? I? Mean it seems like a pretty reasonable. Concern. Yeah. So look after the conversation with the Dermatologists I. Actually. Put down the phone and I thought you know what? He's right. And so I pause and we regrouped and. We did a couple. Of things during this time, like the first one is we just went on a listening tour. You know we talked to provide their feedback and we just adjusted our this plan to give providers a much longer grace period to decide whether the wants to addition to the new model or not, and then. So then we read on New York six months later and and when dramatically better. So the strategy works and you see results from the strategy pretty quickly like within a year. Within a year, we had we finally at some incredible momentum was really going better than we had expected in our wildest dreams. Our existing client went down to essentially zero. I mean people still retire and and move jobs by no one really left the service and we were adding more and more providers because the barrier to entry was low and So in two thousand, nineteen we began growing profitably. It sounds like two thousand and nineteen was really the banner year. Two thousand nine hundred was a was a fantastic year and honestly we had so much momentum coming into twenty twenty and feel like, Hey, we worked really hard for three years and profitable and now the sky was the limit until. Tells Sam until March of two thousand twenty. Two Marjo twenty twenty and that's. That's really maybe the third founding DOC right? Well, I want to ask you about March twenty twenty because. Your Business is based on people booking with doctors and going to the doctor I have to imagine your revenues must have plummeted like every other industry like I mean doctors offices are still in most of the country. Slow or are trickle of patients coming in. With the lockdown started happening we saw impersonal bookings declining anywhere between fifty to ninety percent by the end of March I'm not surprised and lot of that buys I was getting was to. Lay off people and make sure that we hunker down to weather the storm but I saw an opportunity to build windmills, right so I thought well, we need to be there for our patients. We should be expanding into telehealth and I need every team member to help me do that and so we. Really went all important and supporting video visits and I'll probably June eighteen began redesigning the tire marketplace support virtual care, and so we actually released. Doctor Video Service and we made this available to. Any. Physician whether they are on soccer. for free. And by the way head, you plan to do this. How long would would I mean I'm imagining if you said in in February district I really want to focus on telehealth Would you have expected that by May would have been ready to go. Absolutely. Not I think what has been really fantastic to see is how? We really finished two years of roadmap in two months. Wow, and it's great because it's just gives us a window on what the next phase of doctor will be and really looking forward to that in my mind were the point were Amazon started from going. Books to also adding CDs. We have just gone from doing only in person to also A. Doing telehealth and I can't wait to see how this unfolds. It sounds like you. Might be reading between the lines but. You. Really, admire and respect your co-founders particularly. Cyrus and the work that he did to to build this company but I wonder if do you think that you will a I dunno, rekindle your friendship i. Is it something that is in the cards because a break is? Is Emotionally, it's hard Mesa really hard. Yeah, look I Do I think we'll work fourteen hours together again maybe not but you know I I've gotten through tougher breakups and reconciled in my past, and so I think we are we're in good shape and honestly know we are meeting were talking from time to time Yeah. We both have things to do and places to be so we're. Not, hanging out all the time. But it's now also five years ago So We are we're merch focused on making our join the baby successful. When you think about your journey and All Its happen to you how much do you think this has to do with? with luck and how much do you think it has to do with with the hard work you put in your your skills. Well I'm going look I I believe that there's really three ingredients to success. In order importance there are lock the talent, then hard work and. The only one. That's comedian. You control his how hard you work right and Now working hard to gives you more shots on goal It helps his day on the top of what you your talent allows and absolutely restarted at the right time the right place. So What what I'm proud of an all that journey has only that yet when we were wrong and when be had to revise and. When we needed the grit to actually make it work. I L we lived up to that and and that's really The all that anyone can ask themselves to. Oliver Karaz co-founder of Zach Braff by the way, remember how they originally wanted to call it physicians dot com or doctors dot. com. COULDN'T AFFORD THE MILLION DOLLAR PRICE TAG to buy the domain name. DOC DOT COM wasn't only available the price they paid for that domain name. Six Bucks. and. Thanks so much for listening to this show this week, you can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You could also write to us at H. I. T. at NPR DOT Org. If you want to send a tweet, it's at how I felt this or at Cairo's can also follow me on instagram that's at Guy Dot Roz. Our show was produced this week by Jet Anderson with music composed by Tina. Bluey. Thanks also to Julia Carney Candice Limb Neva grant and Jeff Rodgers I'm guy. Roz even listening to how I built this. This is NPR. Black voters play a crucial role for any Democrat who seeks to win the White House but some big devise amongst that block and some serious influence

Cyrus Masumi Mckinsey New York L. Nick Germany Starbucks Oliver Karaz Partner Office Manager United States Dot Com Doctors Dot Com Co-Founder Amazon Zach Dock Manhattan Middle East Sarah SAM Co Founder Iran
Actual tennis tournaments; 'Federer should avoid my retirement mistake - Edberg

The Tennis Podcast

04:23 min | 10 months ago

Actual tennis tournaments; 'Federer should avoid my retirement mistake - Edberg

"Thanks very much to June and son Peter for that. Lovely, and for the length that we're going to in order to record said in true because I understand that social distancing. Guidelines were observed throughout that recording So I seem some sort of throwing recording device happened in that split second inbetween hearing jeans. Peter's Voice so Bravo Gop, sir, and thank you very much. Feel supports. Lovely, intro. Pleased to have had your intro used on a very significant week for tennis and the tennis podcast because. Is Back. We've bounced back. We're not rely reliving anything this episode David. We're just living in the sweet sweet moment of Palermo and Fiona Ferro up against an contemplates Tennessee is bouncing. It does feel properly like real tennis. Now, because this is the first time we've reviewed tennis tournament and previewed another one with. pre-tournament press conferences going on everywhere that we've been listening across to and chats amongst about people and look at draws actually looking it draws is. Suddenly such a thrill. It feels so so exotic do one of my lockdown. Tasks was to organize my phone apps into the hopeful folders. I. Completely Forgot which fold Roy put my eighty WPA schools happen to me quite a long time to hunt around to find that. Mind seem to shut itself down given that it hadn't been used five months after reloaded onto my phone. Just, a bit of a rough. It was glorious to see tournaments pop up in it. They wasn't. Oh Yeah. Yeah, such a defining feature of tennis happening the ATP. WGN APP being. Full. Kind of forgotten. How to preview tennis. The. Great. Stay tuned. Because the WTO always send. You know prior to every tournament, they send out match notes, really helpful staff and stat and. Kind of feels quite relevant at the moment because. The kind of it doesn't really matter who's won the most titles this year already, there's no such thing as form at the moment and it's all. It's all really unknown like what? What are the factors going to be with how players perform? Yeah. I mean, Fiona. Farrow is going to be like the new sort of defacto world number-one. Suddenly, she feels like the greatest player of all time to me because she's six to three all against the conservation I did find myself looking up Fiona Farrow before this podcast to work out what she'd done before it systems any sign of this having. Coming about six months ago. Matt Matt. Thanks. So I mean I've gone through her exhibition results she's unbeaten. Unbeaten an exhibition tennis during the lockdown ten Matt. We'll check submission Tennessee been playing matches arranged by the. F. F., T., and. Yes, she paid him one the mole and she's kind of this fall into. Palermo. I mean I'm getting I'm getting carried away with. These being perform because that's the only thing given the well, exactly. So maybe we should be looking at the players who have played a lot of exhibition. Tennis in this period, if people that are you're going to be having to make predictions. Maybe that's something to a life off to cling to. We have already made predictions and they've gone incredibly. They became irrelevant. They became relevant very quickly. nobody was picking Fina ferry now whether it is going to be interesting, though isn't it to chart the few players that have played a lot of matches over the last. Actually, there are quite a few players because if you think of all the exhibitions that have gone around on all around the world and some of them have been publicized, some of them have been televised some of them. We've talked about others have kind of gone by without really. Being. Noticed, but a lot of players that played a lot of tennis and then some party played any at all and it will be interesting to see whether that has any impassable.

Tennis Fiona Farrow Matt Matt Tennessee Peter WGN WTO Fiona Bravo Gop Fiona Ferro Palermo ROY Fina F. F.
Daria Gavrilova on finding out what makes her happy

The Tennis.com Podcast

09:17 min | 11 months ago

Daria Gavrilova on finding out what makes her happy

"Daria Gavrilova Dario Welcome or should I say Yeah Dasha that's about it. Thanks. Thanks for having me. I really excited to have a chat We've been in the lockdown so. As like yes. Sure. Chat. You guys probably not a lot of people to be honest right now not seeing too many people and. Also. Look at ten spicer were trying to be even Loris say. Because we are still allowed to go to training, but we're just being careful. So we create our own Babul within this bobble. There's another bubble it's just like. Crazy but that's okay. It seems like Australia's taking the quarantine current Ivar. So so so seriously because you were out of lockdown on your back in lockdown yet because our K. went up again. So they're probably GONNA keep going up for the loss while before gone back down but. Yet, wherein stage three right now is Toria somewhat every state. So even though you've been quarantined and all that I mean, have you actually stop training at all during this whole lockdown quarantine thing or have you not really been able to train as much? The first lockdown were lucky. We got all the gym equipment and. Hope back home and I just did my own workouts but I had like everything I had barbells ahead. You know all the heavy stuff. The chain I had the what black. Though I was able to train almost as normal, and we're allowed to go outside and do sessions outside and then yet. We're allowed to get back on the tennis court on a few weeks later. So that was the case and now. With tennis they restrictions noticed straight. So we're able to still come to the tennis and train. What's your thoughts though in when you will play a tournament because I know we have a scheduled tentatively starting from August onward where do you plan to go if anywhere? Well. I don't know to be on the I still have no idea I think many people due to illness. It's like the two options either starting in the in America or go straight to Europe. But I haven't decided. Let's talk about if. Everything everything still up in the air like ribs the. If it's all happening or not. So I'll just decide as light as possible. I think the one thing that I've taken from this whole quarantine whether or not the WTO starting again is just we know nothing that's all I know is that we know nothing there's nothing that's concrete. There's nothing written in stone at the moment though are. Able to come to the US like if you were to leave tomorrow for tournament, if there was a tournament, Mar, would you be able to head allows way? I'll will have to have an exemption and how hard is that to get well, we apply for an exemption to go overseas So we I think we're allowed to come see West but the de Straton government doesn't really want us to travel. So we need to have an exemption and we all applied for it and we still haven't had the answer but well, for example, arena already that shit got. An exemption, a world's intense. So quarantine what have you been up to staying sane I know not just training surely there's been a lot of new hobbies fun things to get into out of TIKTOK FU talks. I don't dance take talks 'cause I can't but I just. Make Fun of myself in posted anyway because it looks hilarious what else Well, I'm always been a bit like artsy artsy. I. I've been painting a bit I actually bought. Some real clay and been making like clay pieces and going to stadium than firing them of Maddie. Few they're all on my instagram few on the hub. And you know playing with the puppy and smashing natural lakes. You know I don raid much. But I've just that like rating Lena's book I was always intrigued on like how everything works in China how how does how does the federation work and how Cana tennis player come through and like she was the first one to come through and yeah, it's actually a real good book. It's awesome. Have your. Wedding plans taken a bit of a pause because of this whole thing. Yeah. We actually decided pretty early decided lack marsh that registered a postponed until next year

Tennis Daria Gavrilova Babul WTO Australia Spicer Loris United States Lena Europe America China
The Unfortunate Casualties of an Anti-Biotech Attack

Talking Biotech Podcast

07:19 min | 11 months ago

The Unfortunate Casualties of an Anti-Biotech Attack

"Today is a really special podcast is an amazing guests that we have that takes us back to the time when the tenor towards genetic engineering was very different back around the turn of the Millennium I. Guess is the turn of the century two two. It was a little bit different field before the Internet really took over the defamation of scientists and career assassination, and those opposed to technology took on other means to solve their problems. At least to. Agitate and we'll talk about that today in an event from two thousand and one and we'll talk more about that in a second speaking with doctor, Toby Bradshaw A. He's a professor emeritus in the Department of Biology at the University of Washington and thank you for joining me today. I really appreciate you being toby. It's a pleasure to be here. Yeah this is really an interesting point in history and I remember when this happened. And in a kind of kind of fell into the background a little bit, but let's set the stage if we go back to two thousand and one. What kind of work were you doing in Merrill Hall at the University of Washington. Since the mid nineteen nineties, I have been working on the genetic adaptation and growth in hybrid poplars. They're fast growing tree. News all around the world, but heavily in the Pacific northwest up to produce. Hebrew products primarily so I was involved with. The early molecular genetics research, including M Gino Mapping. And ultimately identifying traits that were responsible for faster growth, which I had a basic interest in, but which of course the temp companies had a commercial innocent. And where you're working with genetic engineering, or were you really just dealing with hybrids myself? I was only producing hybrid poplars through traditional cross pollination methods that have been used for centuries in in poplars around the world I was also collaborating with Steve Strauss. At Oregon State University on some preliminary work to genetically engineered trees, four different growth form to produce more would in a smaller land area, but I myself had never still have never a genetically engineered a tree. And really the facility that you were working at. It isn't on the campus, right? It's it's the center for Urban Culture and what are the kinds of things that were being done there well. It is technically on the UW. Campuses at the very periphery separated from the main campus by the Union Bay Natural Area A place for I enjoyed bird every day on my walk to work, so that was a nice interlude. Of every day, but the other kinds of work that we're going on at the Center for Urban Horticulture included a restoration ecology primarily for wetland restoration, understanding a plant succession after the eruption of Mount Saint Helen's in nineteen eighty was conservation work for rare plants, going on so rare plants in Washington be propagated for reintroduction into the wild, and that was a particular focus of my colleague I'm single ride card who you will hear more about later and the graduate students in Undergrad who doing their own research, their work on a wide range of topics, including for example how to? Have, urban gardens produce more food for people who otherwise might not be able to afford a fresh vegetables, so it was. A typical horticulture center I, think it most universities where there was a mix of basic research applied research in outreach up to the public in the form of extension. And, so it doesn't sound like this was the you know the the center of the universe of Monsanto or something I mean this sounds like a really practical extension oriented center that had significant roles in community, and and and even just in the regional agriculture's that's. Is that more what it was about yes? Oh, the University of Washington is not a land grant university. It's not an agricultural school. School, in the focus at the UW has always been a basic research and the center. For urban horticulture included in its mission, some applied research and quite a bit of extension and outreach up to the public, so in that way it was different from much of the rest of campus in its mission, but by no means is the University of Washington on any kind of center for plant biotechnology now. It isn't now. Yeah. Good basic biology know basic science and a lot of really good plant people there, but it's Can you give me a little bit of sense? Outside the University of like two, thousand, zero, two, thousand and one, what was the environment like a genetic engineering in your perspective and in your area of the country? What was really happening? Then in that environment, it was an interesting time. The first genetically engineered crops that were planted on a wide scale, had only been in production for less than a decade, so as a relatively new technology on the commercial sector, perceiving though scientists and people who keep up with science for familiar with the progress of genetic engineering. How it was eventually applied in agriculture, get caught a lot of the general public by surprise, and as everyone who's familiar with plant biotechnology knows that can sometimes lead to misunderstandings. And worse at the the first inkling that I had that anyone might be opposed to the kinds of research that I was doing was just a couple of years before in nineteen, ninety nine, when Seattle hosted the World Trade Organization meetings and I had some of my. Poplars. That were growing in pots out in the back forty behind the. Urban Horticulture. Cut Down by vandals during those WTO protests mean. As often happened to these kinds of things at my mind. The damage done to my plants was fairly minimal. Because these are poplars. Cut Him off. They just re grow the we. That's how we actually propagate them through cutting, so it had zero effect on me, but at the same time they went through and cut down all of the older seedlings that a colleague of mine was growing for re, vegetating streamsides in Alder. Don't re sprout after being cut-backs. Again it was one of these ready fire. Aim moments for an activist who really didn't understand. Even the species of trees that they were looking at i. mean did a lot more damage to someone else's research than to mind we might. Research was essentially funded by the wall critics,

UW Urban Horticulture Center For Urban Horticulture Toby Bradshaw Oregon State University World Trade Organization University Of Alder Professor Washington Pacific Merrill Hall Department Of Biology Steve Strauss Union Bay Natural Area M Gino Mapping Mount Saint Helen Seattle
"wto  p." Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

07:10 min | 1 year ago

"wto p." Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"The guardians of interest rates have spoken. Not just about the cost of borrowing. What about paychecks? I'm David Brancaccio in New York. Good morning the Federal Reserve decided to keep interest rates unchanged yesterday. It's a complex decision. One factors wages spikes wages can spark inflation. But there's no spike marketplace's. Nancy Marshall Genzer asked chair Powell. It is briefing about this. What did you learn about wages? Well David they are. Rising average hourly earnings were up around around three percent last month over the same time last year but the unemployment rate is down to three and a half percent with workers that scarce wages Tipoki hypoc typically rise more. Yes so what's going on. Well you kind of have a lot of theories on that. So does Fed Chair Jerome Powell when I asked him at yesterday's press has comrades about this low wage growth he said low productivity was holding wages. Back he also blamed globalization. The idea that you can make manufacturer picture or even provide services anywhere in the world to anywhere in the world. I think that hangs over the wage setting process and everywhere pretty much you. Don't let's see there. There isn't the kind of traction in the wage market and how also said the labor market might not be as tight as he thought. It was intriguing intriguing meaning meaning we keep seeing people moving off the sidelines and getting jobs and these are people who gave up looking for work and were unemployed for a long time nine. They're now getting jobs. Pal says there may be more people like that. Maybe workers aren't so scarce if employers are still getting applications for job openings. They won't feel the need to raise wages all right so fed yesterday today. It's the European Central Bank. The new head of the CBI Christine Lagarde former International Monetary Fund chief will do the economic and interest rate briefing. It is a subtle art communicating. This stuff trying to say something but not enough to freak out markets are marketplace colleague. The BBC's Victoria Craig Greg now on how Lagarde's predecessors standard if former ECB. Chief Mario Draghi taught the world anything about monetary policy. It's that words words matter during the eurozone debt crisis in two thousand twelve. He proved that point in his famous off the cuff. Pledge to do whatever it takes to preserve the euro it only only make sense. Then that newly-installed boss Christine Lagarde will be in sharp focus today. Investors will be searching for even the smallest clues about any looming policy changes the ECB is expected to keep rates steady but after relaunching its financial crisis era bond buying program in September Ms Lagarde could remark on any adverse defects so far and their eventual impact on policy next year when it comes to interest rates. She said that rather than be considered a traditional monetary policy hawk doc preferring higher interest rates or dove preferring low ones. She's a self described owl an animal. She calls very wise. That has been interpreted it to me. She'll keep ECB policy the same at least for the next several months in London. I'm the BBC's Victoria Craig for marketplace. Let's check markets. The Dow S&P NASDAQ futures are up slightly. A tenth of a percent or less the footsie in London is up five tenths percent on election day. The brand new stock in the massive of Saudi oil company Aramco rose on its second day of trading to the point that on paper it was worth two trillion dollars. That's a figure. The Saudi Crown Prince was said to be shooting toward you spoke. We listened. Marketplace socks are back and right. Now we have a real deal for you you you can get not one but two pairs of socks. That's one for each of our new marketplace designs when you donate sixty dollars or more today or you can sign up to give five dollars a month. Same deal support independent news you trust at Marketplace Dot Org and get these snazzy new marketplace socks as a thank you for your your contribution and thank you for believing what we do. We really do appreciate it what you might call. The A Global Supreme Court for trade disputes is out of order not functioning. This is where the appeals go at the World Trade Organization. There are enough members on the Appellate Body for it to do its thing because the US has been blocking replacements as the terms of judges expire. Now three years ago there were seven judges. They're now down to one annette marketplace's Sabrina sure has more. The trump administration has argued the WTO is infringing on rights. The US never agreed to give up when the WTO was created in nineteen ninety eighty five in others generally objection by the United States that the Appellate Body's going beyond its mandate kind of creating law. Rachel Brewster is a professor of law at at Duke she and other observers say the. US has been vocal in its criticisms but hasn't been actively negotiating to reform the WTO. Because they say the trump administration believes believes it would be better off without it. The trump administration is fundamentally opposed to the idea of a rule of law system in trade. The other one hundred sixty three member member countries who presumably still want the WTO to keep operating have a few options. Jennifer Helmet is with the council on Foreign Relations and used to serve on the WTO Appellate Body. It could be be that the countries choose to exercise restraint meaning countries could give up their right to appeal lower panel rulings the WTO just live with rulings. They don't like instead instead of appealing them the other way that the European Union and Canada Norway and others are proposing is to use within the rules itself an arbitration process again. A way eight to work around the fact that the equivalent of the Supreme Court for Trade is shut down. There are problems with that. Richard Winer is an attorney with Sidley. Austin one is that all all the parties to the dispute including third parties have to agree the. US IS A party to about fifty percent of proceedings he says and could object to any work arounds and that would shut shutdown that process meaning the WTO's ability to settle. Disputes could be damaged for some time again. Rachel Brewster. It looks like it's just going to go on indefinitely until a new American administration changes it's policy and more trade disputes might be waged the old fashioned way through destabilizing trade wars and bare knuckled negotiation in New York. I'm sure for marketplace and the Hollywood reporter says a TV projects in development about the great fall of the shared office space. This company we work as the company tried to big initial public offering of stock this autumn than didn't amid investor skepticism and perceptions of the way the boss comported himself to play the real life. We work founder. Adam Newman will beat Nicholas Braun of. HBO's Succession Bronze Succession Characters. Kind of I dunno no hapless so we may have to find more master of the universe vibe in his new role Braun does have height on his side. He's six foot seven. The real we work is six five York. I'm David Brancaccio and this is marketplace morning report from A._P._M.. American public media..

World Trade Organization David Brancaccio Christine Lagarde United States New York European Central Bank BBC Marketplace Dot Org Rachel Brewster annette marketplace Federal Reserve Chief Mario Draghi Jerome Powell Nancy Marshall Genzer International Monetary Fund Supreme Court Nicholas Braun London
"wto  p." Discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

04:32 min | 2 years ago

"wto p." Discussed on World News Analysis

"And those who are those who are participating in the cultural sector are are taking taking great risks. It is difficult to attract capital because it is a risky a risky business. And and so they do demand subsidies. And I think that any time that there is a particular industry that is differential because of the risks associated with it. It's going to insist upon being treated differently. Indeed. And of course, agriculture is a is a main sector affected in the. Sino US trade war, but a win Whitehouse slapped tariffs on steel and aluminum imports earlier this year at cited national security concerns, and of course, China, Canada, Mexico and the European Union argue this in violation of your rules, and I guess WTO has has actually allowed for measures like trading Bargo based on national security grounds in the past. So professor even at why Trump's steel and aluminum terror of seen as illegitimate by by those by those nations. Because I think they see it as they see it as an attempt to essentially impose an across the board limit on steel and aluminium imports, but using national security is the pretext rather than the actual reason for doing it. So the suspicion is that essentially the United States wanted to limit import various to provide relief for the domestic firm, and they chose an exception of the WTO which is hard to check to. And unfortunately, they have miscalculated because a number of other countries have decided they checked this leads us, by the way into a very difficult situation because some of those countries of border case to the WTO saying that the United States is not eligible to you to buy this way. And of course, the wrecks of the United States to say, well, we're not gonna let three judges Geneva. Tell us what is on actual security. What comes to choose on national security? So we're at cheating, very, dangerous territory and sense. Really, the the United US administration chose exception exception. I wanted to use very well. And I'm almost dead the rest of the world not to react and the rest of has chosen to act least much of it is affected. And I think we are now in quite serious standoff on this particular ship. I think the one as the way we will get out of this is that once the the steel and aluminum industries in the United States recover substantially the US will all the tariffs on the issue of become moot. And that's been the practice in the past when they've done similar, but related or somewhat some move. But I think we are in a very dangerous situation have so professor even looking beyond this particular meadow industry and looking beyond Trump's America, the other other Connie's other other regions across the world there. There is a there is a kind of abuse of national security grounds as an. Excuse to carry out trade remedy trade. Protectionism. Well there. I I don't think you could argue on let me let me be careful with the rising crossborder investment the way we've seen over the years, and especially now the more cross-border investment is coming from emerging markets international is countries, you all seeing more climbs by national security ground. And here we do. I mean, there is a China. I mentioned here, which is there are some very successful Chinese which have been expanding abroad linked to the to the Chinese government to the Chinese military caused concern in the west this is what's triggering these. These these action. So I think again, this is this is a reason why we need to have negotiation to figure out what are the new rules of the game for companies, which may or may not have state-linked linkages. And this is why the WTO needs reinvigoration negotiating function, rather the mentioned countries act unilaterally, and when they do, of course, there's just a massive source intention. So Dr Joe, what do you think? I mean, how would you look at us a national security concern issue? Do you think the WTO can can better prevent Ellie stood the abuse of national security ground? Yeah..

US WTO professor China Connie Trump European Union Dr Joe Chinese government Geneva Bargo Whitehouse Ellie Mexico America Canada
"wto  p." Discussed on Quest Means Business

Quest Means Business

03:05 min | 3 years ago

"wto p." Discussed on Quest Means Business

"To emphasize that what might be considering trying to find a way to leave the wto you what is your number one fear when it comes to that i mean do you think that's a real threat and a real concern and also what is the wto what relevance does the wto have if the united states ends up no longer being a part of it well to begin with i think it's important to say that in every single contact that i have had with us officials and i have had a lot of those not one single time was it indicated or suggested that the united states is leaving the wto or wants to leave the wto so that for me is mere speculation i have not any indication that that will be the situation if in any situation speculative at best the us decides to leave or something like that i think it would be a blow to the system to the multilateral system because the largest economy in the world is outside the system but at the same time it will be a blow to the us as well both would leave in a situation like that you would have almost law of the jungle you know anybody can do anything and we know what happens in those situations who have retaliation who have protectionism increasing significantly reciprocal and in mutual restrictive measures and that is the worst case scenario for the global economy we would see a significant slow down of the economy if not of contraction and everybody loses in this scenario there's no winner here okay so listen a lot of countries have said that a lot of countries that said the idea of a potential trade wars and trade skirmishes there's no winner and obviously huge detrimental to the global economy i wanna ask though about other ways in which a country like the united states where you have a president that really feels as though job losses have been have resulted from global trade obviously previous presidents like for example george w bush had come out and talked about temporary steel tariffs for example that the wto ended up ruling to be illegal but if there is a situation where a country feels as though own industries being decimated like for example donald trump that's the way he feels about the us steel industry because of global trade what remedies are that they can pursue other than leaving the wto or initiating trade wars plenty of remedies plenty there are subsidy measure on i'm sorry safeguard measures antidumping measures countervailing measures there are negotiations themselves can renegotiate the terms of trade with other trading partners there are a number of alternatives for situations like that i think also that we should not be too simplistic and believe that every job that is lost in the market today is lost because of imports or is lost because of immigrants or anything that comes from the.

"wto  p." Discussed on Quest Means Business

Quest Means Business

04:24 min | 3 years ago

"wto p." Discussed on Quest Means Business

"World trade organization a catastrophe but world trade organization makes it almost impossible for us to do good business simply put we have not been treated fairly by the world trade organization the wto has been a disaster for his country he hide him a disaster catastrophe saying that the us has not been treated fairly by the world trade organization for months donald trump has rallied against the referees of global trade tonight the head of the world trade organization speaks to me right here on c n n the united states marks independence day it's day of independence roberto as warns the trump not to go alone when it comes to trade hilarity one for those of you celebrate i'm zane ashtray good evening so tonight the head of the wto respond and let me tell you certainly does have a dire prediction he is saying what he said to me just a few hours ago he said that if the us pulls out of the world trade organization expect things to go badly very badly indeed take i think it would be a blow to the system to the motor system because the largest economy in the world is outside the system but at the same time it would be a blow to the us as well both would leave in the situation like that you would have almost a law of the jungle you know anybody can do anything the world trade to addition is well and truly caught in the middle of this global trade war some people are still calling global trade skirmish but from its perch in geneva it's trying to hold the strings together as trade barriers are raise around the world of the united states is going off the china and the eu with a bunch of taras they escalated from threats to actual action today the wto issued a warning the tension is starting to damage global growth and in west case scenario could do more damage listen to this more damage than the last financial crisis back in two thousand and eight so let's talk about brief history of the wto just give you some background here since the end of world war two the wto has had different names but it's remained the center of the global trading system where roughly around one hundred sixty member countries off the post to go go to the wto to mediate disputes over trade lost two decades united states actually this is running even the most active member by far in terms of going to the wto to sort of try to settle any disputes the us has been involved in two hundred and sixty three dispute that is by the way about of all the cases total and actually the americans have ended up winning a lot more than they've lost so the w has actually ended up siding with the us more often than not the fact that that has not stopped donald trump from calling the organization you decided not sound show disaster lately he's been issued berry veiled threats against the wto taken us wto street of the united states very badly and i hope they change their ways they have been treating us very badly for many many years and that's why we were at a big disadvantage with the wto and we're not planning anything now but if they don't treat us properly we will be doing something we will be doing something i actually the wto director general as veto what he thinks mr trump actually means by these comments i can't tell really i suppose that often when i hear complaints on the part of the us is about the dispute settlement mechanism of the wto disputes winning or losing disputes and the track record of the us is one of the best trek records that we have by any other wwl member so i suppose it cannot be that the us has been complaining also that the rules of the wto needs to be improved a need to be reformed updated and i think they're not alone in that view there are many others who also believed that the wto rules and and and procedures actually could be improved and the well if that is the situation i think there's a willing members are willing to have a conversation about that the way the us.

two decades
"wto  p." Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"wto p." Discussed on Planet Money

"And to our on their way out when it goes to two then at that point in time the appeals processes effectively paralyzed concerned about that very absolutely it seems like a lot of the reason why countries play by the rules is just kind of like out of respect for the norms of the wto what happens if a country goes rogue says you know we're not going to follow the rules that have historically been followed well it will compromise the system that's for sure if we don't all tried to observe the disciplines and the results of the disputes then the system doesn't function you know i think sometimes the wto is portrayed as this boogeyman has all of this power but in reality it's a pretty fragile system that takes a lot of agreement among its members to get anything done right there's no enforcement it's really just countries promising to be nice to one another other we contact the us trade representative's office in the trump administration to ask about the new judges and they said that they have some problems with some of the technical ways in which the wto is handling the judge situation and until those are resolved they're not gonna approve anymore charges okay but there's one thing i want to get in here yes the us is making things difficult for the wto they're screaming at the referees on the soccer field but the us is still on the field they are still playing against other countries do not states itself is bringing disputes the system even under this administration so why bring a dispute to the system if you don't want to observe this this me to don't want this system at all so you're saying under the trump administration the united states is coming to the wto and making claims against other countries i'm not saying that that is a fact i feel like the united states is saying w.

wto representative united states soccer
"wto  p." Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"wto p." Discussed on Planet Money

"You know watched people betting and they were able to trace it back that some players indicated from planet money a short story about the economy every single day donald trump was elected president you may have heard he does not see the subtlety and the beauty of the wto like you do sarah he sees all the time that a panel of faceless foreign judges has ruled against the united states and he says quote the wto has been a disaster for this country to be clear free trade has actually benefited the united states and the united states has one most of the cases that it has brought to the wto does not matter trump administration decides not just a fight back against these other countries on trade it decides it's going to go after the wto itself so we called up the guy running the wto roberto as vado to ask him the most pressing question of our time director general is meant a flavor well the first thing i should make clear is as as director general i cannot comment on specific disputes so you can't even say whether to the flavor not i can tell you my preference is i love mint chewing gum for example and things like that i can't take it roberta says that the us is striking at the very hard of the wto remember those judges we talked about the ones who are sitting alone in the cafeteria at robes yep yep okay well i'll one hundred sixty four countries have to agree on who those judges are and countries haven't always they vetoed the nominations of judges before said no we don't like this person let's start the whole process over and find a judge we can all agree on but under the trump administration the us is preventing any new judges from even being considered what we see now is different because it's not about disagreeing with the outcome it is about not allowing the process to begin with that is unprecedented we never had before and there's nothing that wto can do about it so we don't even begin to look at the names we don't even receive the names of the candidates the process was not launched which have to hand it to the united states is a pretty clever way to slow down the work of the wto right now there are four judges less.

president wto united states vado director general donald trump sarah roberto
"wto  p." Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"wto p." Discussed on Planet Money

"Violation of article two point one of the technical barriers to trade agreement it's part of the marrakesh agreement we all agreed on that remember all of us agreeing in marrakech in marrakech the wto is both in organization and in yes they have a building with employees they'll call themselves the secretary it which is just a fancy word for staff really it's much bigger than that the wto is a bunch of countries that have promised to follow certain rules there about sixty agreements in total but the main principle boils down to what is good for me has to be good for you we the countries that trade cannot scrooge other over and the wto will help us enforce these rules against each other the process of figuring out who screwed who can take years so what we're going to be right now is compress the whole drama of clove versus mint into just a few minutes step one in a trade dispute the private meeting that to disputing countries have to tuck it out on their own any secure room works it doesn't have to be in geneva there just has to be a table actually a pretty big table they call with lawyers on their brief and they fight their case and richer they have rich lawyers that poor they're have paulo years that's pascal lamy he's french ran the wto during clove v mitt so i'm looking at this case between doesn't ten and two thousand fourteen about clove cigarettes do you remember this case and he says the first meeting is like any negotiation except there's quite you're not the translation going on i mean the wto works in french english and spaniard the us walks in and says look we're banning flavored smokes to protect the kids and i'm sure some countries would love to have much twelve year old smoking the clove cigarettes indonesia.

marrakech wto secretary geneva pascal lamy scrooge twelve year
"wto  p." Discussed on WBAL 1090AM

WBAL 1090AM

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"wto p." Discussed on WBAL 1090AM

"The wto air 979 easton wbal newsradio 1090 it opens different if we await president donald trump in his address on the iran nuclear deal i know you don't want to i don't want to simply say that administrators don't lead to be compensated that we don't need to make sure the we take care of the people who went out of school districts what you would think the sale of saleable speak to you and i let you william bench different from demonstrate school is that when you have almost the perverse numbers that was seeing right now of the amount of money that is being diverted from the classroom till the adults administrators and the type of that is it it it's dick what he's work because if you like it is retarding though the whole effort of teaching is retarding the effort of of people in the classroom do what they do because the money as point needs the money you gotta have some money listen i'm an administrator so i mean we of course we need to be paid the question is at what percent of the overall budget should really be administrative costs right and all other ways to reduce that because i know ajmc like i said every dollar i can save an administrative costs either goes to the classroom or teacher's salary or you know i'm working hard to balance all of that and what upset me about this i guess was the lack of transparency erin sewer when i walk into baltimore suceeded conditions and i see is there no toilet paper i see there's no paper i see there are you know just center and then to hear that were paying sixteen thirty per kid just two administrator averaging one hundred seventy thousand for principles when the governor makes 165 look at governors the.

donald trump administrator wto president iran baltimore