27 Burst results for "W. Nyc Studios"

Tony Phillips joins Broccoli Content as CCO

podnews

02:59 min | 1 year ago

Tony Phillips joins Broccoli Content as CCO

"The ladies from our new center at news dot net former WNYC STUDIOS VP and former commissioning editor for the BBC. Tony Phipps has joined London based audio production company Broccoli content as their new chief. Creative officer can help scale the company including developing international partnerships access. The three year old startup media company has to do with Pushkin to produce a new daily podcast shoot launch this summer. They're hiring for host senior producer. Associate producer producer. Pod FABS is a new website builds to help discovery calling itself the rotten tomatoes podcasting. Whatever that means podcasts are assigned to temperature using a proprietary algorithm part uses at seventy seven point five degrees whatever that means remote recording software then. Casta is removing. It's eight hour limit for free users until July to help those stuck at home French podcast hosting company. Outta have raised one point two million euro. They plans to expand across Europe. The company has twenty employees crate. Media have posted a remote podcast recording checklist to keep your quality. High Sounder has spoken to a lot of successful podcasts and have published eleven creative ways to successfully promote your podcast or ten if you discount the first one goto networking events. Not much of that going on for this piece the other day about advertising a podcast of service called Audrey might be helpful with over three hundred shows who are open to cross collaborating the UK radio station. Podcast radio is now broadcasting information about the virus and in America these Center for Disease Control and Prevention the CDC released a statement earlier today warning citizens to abstain from creating any new podcasts curing corona virus self. Quarantines we asked all Americans to stay vigilant they say and resist the temptation to unleash something on our population. Much much worse than the virus itself. It is of course from a satire website. The hard times sealink in our show notes and newsletter today in podcast news the tumble science. Podcast for cates is focusing on something kids to finding a bit worrying right now. The Corona virus kids ask questions and they got a great expert to answer them in language. Kids can understand no really. I made a version in Spanish as well. It's recommended the Immaculate Deception is the first podcast produced by UK Production Company. Something else in partnership with Sony Music. Entertainment it's disturbing true. Crime Story About Dutch fertility Dr Yang combat who appears to have fathered at least sixty children and the Los Angeles Times has launched Asian enough a new podcast about being asian-american hosted by Genu- motto and Frank Xiang and there's plenty more and all the links in our newsletter subscribe at Prod News Dot Net.

Producer Uk Production Company Tony Phipps Wnyc Studios CDC Los Angeles Times Officer Sony Music Casta Europe VP London BBC UK Pushkin Frank Xiang Audrey Cates
How Studio 360 Got Started

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

07:38 min | 1 year ago

How Studio 360 Got Started

"Hosting studio three sixty Kurt. Anderson Co founded. Spy magazine was a writer editor. Columnist design and architecture critic and playwright. He'd also just written a novel turn of the century which came out in nineteen ninety nine. The Britain plays. He worked for television. I mean he just was a renaissance person in the arts and in journalism and that was exactly the kind of person we were looking for. That's Melinda Ward the former chief content officer for Public Radio International and creative studio three sixty. And here's Julie Bursting again. I remember that lunch that I had with him when I was interviewing for the job. And he said you know. I've been working with a vocal coach to try to get me to not sound like I grew up in Omaha. That didn't work. Well I said to him. We're firing that person because you need to sound like you if you sound like just yet. Another announcer with a announcer voice. This show is GonNa fail so you gotta sound like yourself. Good Morning. I have realized over the years that I am always. I think much better at this. If I've worked out for Sunday off my super villain name. I speak Spanish. I'M CISCO I need. This is a child to crew. I had a forty five this record in. Oh this is the end and I'm curt Anderson. Thanks very much for listening so for me I was. I would always record Kurt in his sessions and I was in some of his first sessions. And you know he was brand new at doing it. He wasn't sure what P popping was. He didn't know how close to sit to the microphone. He didn't know what a pickup was. It was fun to help someone figure all that stuff out in the interviews. I felt like it took them awhile. Loosen up I'm just GONNA say that. Pairing Him with interesting people felt like the best way to use him so in those early days we just looked for really cool funny interesting people for him to sit down with and that got him excited to come into the office and into the studio and do that and I still remember the day that season Santana came in people do feel a turned off or or indifferent. two images of horror and and war and suffering that they see in that they feel indignant about I think it's comes not because they're blase but because they feel impotent or powerless and I think that's perfectly understandable reaction and I saw Kurt in our conference room and the look on his face of sort of terror was really powerful but I knew he would do a great job but I could see that. This was like the first person we've ever had in the studio that he was a bit in awe of it was just this powerful show about how artists have looked at war since homer and she was phenomenal and he did a great job. Do you feel okay about the new. Whatever you say okay. We show him how current into a lot of different situations that require lots of different levels of sort of being alert to possibilities. We just through so much stuff at him and you know it's a different kind of show in that. He didn't generate ideas but he would rarely say no. I remember doing this segment on sky. Come up with this talk show within the video game halo and we had. Kurt like go and be like an Avatar in the game. They're shooting I'm trying to defend us here. Your need to move faster Kurt. I'm sorry I mean it seems funny to think about it now but like at the time it was super crazy and cutting edge at this guy had figured out how. Sorta hack the game and had this whole virtual reality six months after Katrina. We planned a trip to go to New Orleans. Really figuring out how they were going to try to solve this problem of of how to. Kinda rebuild the city and what the design questions were around at all. The water is gone now of course but the wreckage. That remains is absolutely shocking. Presumably the people in this neighborhood are among those who a great many of them majority perhaps didn't have that's right. They didn't have a choice. I think that's one of the great travesties of Katrina went on a trip to New Orleans for a few days to kind of produce it and get all the different voices together. But you know he's always been really passionate about design and kind of see him step up and really tap into the the human element of what was going on there. It wasn't just like an architecture is it was about people's homes and lives. It was really interesting to see him in that element because so often he is just in a studio and actually one of a favorite memories of working with them in the studio was a program that we did In two thousand fourteen and it was our nineteen fourteen episode and we produce the whole thing as though we had been on the air in nineteen fourteen and today's program we present to you through the medium of radio some singular developments taking place in the arts today in literature drama music and the media. Moving pictures new technologies and new ideas are changing. What we the American people create and how we are entertained. He delivered it in the crazy. Old Timey Voice. That people use stood us for broadcast announcing and our technical director at that time. John Galore. Who brought in a megaphone? Like a troll off Warne and had Kurt record threw it into the mic to compress everything down. I mean I've seen Kurt Geek out on many wonderful occasions but I have never seen him geek out that joyfully. It may not be too old to speculate that later. Generations will look back upon nineteen fourteen as a remarkable year perhaps as a year in which the twentieth century cruelly began. This week on the PODCASTS. Were looking back at the early years of studio three sixty which is drawing to a close after two decades of covering arts and culture on the radio after the first year on the air the show was finding its groove and its audience but then in the fall of two thousand one. The unthinkable happened. There has been an explosion at the World Trade Center in Lower Manhattan. The upper floors of northern tower at the World Trade Center has experienced an explosion studio three sixties original offices were at wnyc in the municipal building at the base of the Brooklyn Bridge just blocks away from the World Trade Center. I remember coming into work in. Minneapolis and hearing on the radio about the the hit on the towers and then coming into PRI and of course the WNYC studios were right under. The twin towers are right next to them and the that a lot of people took came up under the twin tower so we were horrified and terrified didn't terribly worried about a whole. Wnyc staff and studio three sixty staff you know found out later that Julia Burstein had been in the office and she had had she'd left. Wnyc had to walk all the way up the west side of Manhattan to think it was her brother's apartment or something to call day and coughing and choking and nobody knew what was going on.

Kurt New Orleans World Trade Center Wnyc Public Radio International Anderson Co Britain Curt Anderson Spy Magazine Melinda Ward Julie Bursting Chief Content Officer Omaha Julia Burstein Manhattan Cisco Writer Santana
Triton Digital acquires Omny Studio

podnews

02:39 min | 2 years ago

Triton Digital acquires Omny Studio

"Has acquired only studio, an enterprise podcast hosting company for an undisclosed sum. The Sydney Morning Herald estimates, the companies found you well into the millions and found at Hooper posts a bit about the company history. Kost h one thousand nine thousand nine is as you can hear underway in London. The event is sold out at it includes speakers from NPR BBC's, Brexit cast, Google news and many more. Speaking at podcast day, Neil, Carruth from NPR shared, details of up. I eighty three percent of the up first audience is forty four or younger, which is a sharp contrast with older radio. Audiences Eighty-one percent say they listened to the show every day, a more than forty percent say they've never listened to morning edition. NPR's morning radio news program before which up. I is a broadcast segment. Cows describes the podcast as quote profitable. Spotify has launched the daily drive that personalized playlists for commuting that includes music, and selected news podcasts of shareholder of podcast, host, Lipson, hold Kaynak is continuing to express dissatisfaction against the current lips board its latest finding highlights salary and bonus for some board members and came back is drumming up support for a special meeting, but it does need twenty five percent of shareholders to request one. Powell press seven point four point three WordPress. Plug ins podcasters has been released. It includes special codes to enhance. Discover ability of podcasts by Google podcasts were kit from WNYC studios release details of its salary survey into podcast pay and gender splits in the industry and funk. An audio polishing service has published a long article about resisting the loudness war, and still being compliance with major platforms in podcasts today social minds is the case, I ever dedicated social media marketing podcast, Marvel's wolverine, the lost trail gets for release on July, the WTO P and podcast. One of an answer new true crime podcast, Kohl's twenty two hours in American nightmare. Featuring a case, nightmares made of and the writer of beef and dairy network. Benjamin Partridge said podcast today, the when the BBC's started broadcasting his. Podcasts. It didn't result in an increase in audience that different people he said, and that's the latest trauma newsletter called news dot net.

NPR Google Benjamin Partridge The Sydney Morning Herald Npr Bbc Hooper WTO London Spotify Wnyc Studios BBC Powell Kohl Neil Carruth Writer Lipson Kaynak Eighty Three Percent
BBC says podcast listening will quadruple by 2021

podnews

03:06 min | 2 years ago

BBC says podcast listening will quadruple by 2021

"Podcast listening will quadruple up to thirteen point six percent of all audio listening. That's according to the BBC's head of research for radio and education. Anderson winter radio days Europe today in lasagna, she highlighted how the BBC sounds app chooses mandatory signing offers better data analytics for the broadcaster and allows better recommendations, meanwhile, Ben Chapman, head of digital for BBC audio and music says that we hope that in the coming months. BBC sounds will be an international proposition referring to the app the sense of connection and ownership is far more on a podcast, then on broadcast, TV or radio. That's according to Chris Mason of the BBC's Brexit cast speaking at radio days Europe today via video adding that the podcast generates significant amounts of contact fire social media the puck. The podcast is now films for BBC television. Dino, saw fos the podcast producer also shared that. They have had over four million downloads for the podcast one hundred episodes polish men and Emily Boutin from WNYC studios. Also spoke this morning radio. Does Europe highlighting how they use audio to build community and focusing on listener episodes, which do better than well known names every show. They said is created with listener interaction in mind and iheart radio. President Darin Davis is also been speaking of radio days Europe. He said that the iheartradio at which includes podcasts has been downloaded two point one billion times. And it has one hundred twenty seven million registered users, be everywhere. The consumers are he says with the services and the products they expect Davies also said that podcasting was in new audience development tool for talk radio reaching younger audiences in other news in the US little. Snippet of interesting years from the latest Nielsen data more people listen to podcasting per week than listen to Sirius XM the figures are from quarter three two thousand eighteen and there's been more growth since what causing in Puerto Rico is at a turning point. That's according to a Dante media in a post with data from the country. The CBC reports on a new way of making your own podcast borough. The equipments from your local library a podcast platform for aerobics speakers pod, you has one funding at the university of Chicago. And is everyone happy that Google podcast is now transcribing podcasts. Some people have doubts in our podcast section today. We highlight run pods new podcast from global aimed at people new to running and seasoned marathoners alike. Bomber released episode three last Friday, it support costs focusing on the two thousand eighteen Austin serial bomber and attracting a large amount of media attention. And our friends at palled sites. Also pointers to the weekly skip. It's a podcast of hosts from it's a podcast off hosts from thousands of shows reading just brand names. We like the quip and his and that's

BBC Europe President Darin Davis Head Of Research Emily Boutin Ben Chapman Anderson Wnyc Studios Nielsen CBC University Of Chicago Dino Chris Mason United States Google Austin Davies Puerto Rico
"wnyc studios" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"wnyc studios" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Here's my family, always had really large thanksgiving dinners, tons of people around and in the hustle, and bustle is clean up. My uncle put together a plate of leftover frat because he thinks outside and let his jobs have it. Back in put it on the kitchen counter. And there was one loan Keith Farragut, the dog eats grandmother who hadn't seen this walk by fair eight it none of us ever told her. I. Having. Wondering kind of what your experts take on? That was is he just eight Farragut and general we have lots of cats and dogs around people do all kinds of things that I think are kinda gross feeding the dogs from the table let the cats walk around. So I just wondered about you know, the introduction as pets incident before we get that. Let me remind remind everybody because it's going to be a long answer. I think this is science Friday from WNYC studios talking with Paul Dawson, and Brian Sheldon authors. Did you just eat that? And go ahead who wants to jump in on that one. Okay. I having to do with the passing of the relative. Let's hasn't. Okay. No. I I suspect it hasn't. And I go back to the original scenario that Paula actually mentioned it that we, you know, three hundred sixty five days a year three day three meals a day, if we're lucky, and we don't always get sick. And we have animals and pets, and you know, we eat in weed out, and, but then again, there is a risk associated with this again dogs and cats when they appear to be clean, obviously, they don't don't wash their hands. They don't or their feet or pause. And so consequently, there's a greater risk that the organisms that they have on their paws or in their mouth or those things that I've picked up elsewhere that could very well be containing a pathogens, you know, there is a risk associated with it. How great that risk is. You know, I don't think any of us know, you could calculate something like that probably suspect. That is still be small by never in the animal can be clear appear to be clean the surface can appear to be cleaned. But as you know, it has microorganisms on it. And it's just matter are they are they pathogenic in nature. Let me go to Richard in Fort Myers, Florida because he has a question I have at least half a dozen people asking go ahead, Richard. Yes. I have a question regarding toddlers and. Little kids in general are running around dropping food picking up to something that they like put it there balance center, cetera and. Along with that. I'm wondering if that doesn't help them to build an immunity. Organisms that may exist the environment. Let me get an answer today with all these toddlers. They're crawling on their four limbs or standing up picking up the phone this good. Should we stop them from doing this? You're probably can't stop them. First of all. And and certainly it does help the immune system. And there's a lot of Brian mentioned early on. I think about the microbiome there's a lot of research, micro bacteria, and our body and other microorganisms are very important to our health. That's been well known, but there's one more being Lord in that area and certain certainly exposure to. Bacteria and viruses at a young age helps build immune system, and I guess the caveat to that would be we all as adults experience. And now, we have a strong immune systems there are there are some things that overwhelming system in some cases and don't wanna risk exposure that but yeah, quick answer to that is. Yes, it certainly does. I would say all right. We've we have run out of time so much to talk about I want to thank both of you. Paul Dawson, professor food science at Clemson. Brian Sheldon, professor emeritus at North Carolina State university in rallying the authors of the book. Did you just eat that? Did you just eat? That's a great book. You can read an excerpt from the book on.

Brian Sheldon Keith Farragut Paul Dawson Paula Richard professor WNYC studios Fort Myers North Carolina State universit Clemson Florida three hundred sixty five days three day
"wnyc studios" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

04:39 min | 2 years ago

"wnyc studios" Discussed on Science Friday

"Koshin isn't it? You know, let me just remind everybody. This is science Friday from WNYC studios. Are you in agreement with with some of our, you know, great thinkers and technology that say, you should fear the upcoming intelligence of robots. I mean, I think it says dangerous to just be a pure techno optimist as it is to be a pure techno pessimist. I think proceeding with caution is the only way to to go ahead. I think the autonomous cars, it's really difficult for machines to have the same kind of perception as people, and so we should proceed with caution. I mean, that being said, we shouldn't be blind in our fear either. I, it's important to consider to consider both sides. I, I think that like machines causing destruction is more about the people behind the machines. And generally even in storytelling, if you're if you're a good parent to the technology, generally it grows up to not be associated path. During the history of, I've been following science for many decades and there have been times in biology, whether it's genetic engineering or the kinds of engineering where scientists have said, hey, we all stop and think about where we're headed and talk about this before we get it gets out of control. Do you think we will reach a time with that in robotics or have we reached that time. K. definitely tell them about we robot. Yeah, I think so. There's a conference that started seven years ago that is about exactly this and seven years ago. People said we were crazy for for wanting to talk about robots and this all issues in robotics, and now it's becoming, I think, a national and even international conversation that's getting a lot of attention. And I think that right now people have are seeing robotic technology enter into public spaces, transportation systems, work places. And I think that it's becoming more of a more of a conversation that that's starting to happen. Is it going to become a political conversation. Oh, for sure. Yes, it has to, you know, I personally am not worried about robots taking over the world and killing us all like some some people are, but I do worry about some of the more near term issues with privacy and data security and autonomous vehicles, and the way that we integrate robots into work places. I think they're a ton of societal issues that we need to be dealing with now, and we need consumer protection agencies to be aware of the technology. I think it has to be a political conversation and it's never too early to start. We're starting today. Ken robots pressure us into thinking, go Go ahead. ahead of thinking in a certain way or change our beliefs for Megan robots, help us meet our own goals. I mean, I love that you're asking a question that isn't just about utility in robotics because I think as soon as you put robots close to people, then you can start looking at what are human needs. So what does the answer to my question. A so like in certain things like coaching, I think that that's like something like we often know what we're supposed to do, which is really difficult to do it without a friend. So sometimes robots can help us do that. There's also this idea of a robot in a triad were a robot can help to people sort of enter into conversation or connect that might not know that they otherwise had things in common. So I think in that in that respect, sometimes it can help start conversations or keep it going. I think it's difficult for robots to mastermind societal change. But if a robot says something with people more tend to believe it than a person. Oh, unfortunately, yes. Those are not necessarily a good thing though, and that's part of the big discussion. You say, we need to have. Yeah, yeah. I mean, so for example, like a medical diagnosis by a machine, whether it's software or whether it's actually a robot is sometimes given more weight because it's presume that's based on calculations, of course, calculations come from programmers numbers and people. So it's not actually more valid and there have been cases in history where for example, a x Ray machine was Miskelly braided to be like ten times as strong and people trusted the machine over the, you know, the patients. I've seen the recent research on a I would chose the day. I was better at diagnosing then then doctors who brought their own biases..

Koshin WNYC studios Miskelly Megan seven years
What is short wave? A rumored new audio app from Google.

podnews

01:39 min | 2 years ago

What is short wave? A rumored new audio app from Google.

"In the latest news what is short wave? It's a rumored new audio app from Google. Well, we still don't know for sure, but today we know what it looked like a while ago. It's a product space to on short pieces of snack. -able audio content. You'll find mockups on pod news dot net. Also some research which is more emotionally engaging audio books or films. Audible in Germany shed a study from University College London. You'll never believe the result, what he might turn a podcast network shows including brands like CNN Cartoon Network, and Bleacher report now available on Spotify PR x. also announced there quarter three, twenty eighteen preview inside jaws is profound by mandatory today. Meanwhile, Burgum stead revisited is the subject of a piece in the Irish Times pod Bain. Congratulations to them. They've been recognized with the first Latin podcast, global diversity award, Jovem pan the largest commercial radio network. Brazil jump shore of pronounced incorrectly has selected TRITON digital and Omni studio for podcast distribution and monetization and emails credited as the co, creator of the daily and caliphate is interviewed about how he got started in podcasting, and where can you go to discover new podcasts? Eric Jones has a great big list at the i. AB podcast upfront event in New York. Yesterday, there were lots and lots of announcements from Westwood One NPR mid row, wondering and WNYC studios who linked to all of those and a ton of new podcasts, including one from Jonathan Ross at pod news, dot net.

Cnn Cartoon Network New York Burgum Stead Google Wnyc Studios Eric Jones University College London The Irish Times Triton Digital Jonathan Ross Westwood Spotify Germany Brazil Omni
"wnyc studios" Discussed on Only Human

Only Human

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"wnyc studios" Discussed on Only Human

"It's the summer of two thousand seventeen. The rapper prodigy is on stage with his hip hop group, mob deep. They're performing in front of a packed Las Vegas crowd. But after the show. Prodigy isn't feeling so great. He goes back to his hotel to arrest and three days later, everybody's under phone. His friends start getting these calls? No fucking way possible. He's dead. He's on tour right now. He's doing this show. I refuse to believe this. She, what are you talking about. Soon as. He. The real this a new podcast from WNYC studios. We're gonna look at the life and death of Albert prodigy Johnson, how he rose to become a rap icon and how he's been a lifetime fighting sickle cell anemia malate before by would just pain like sickle cell with my life before. You know what I mean? It's mean really have no life that was it all going up and just that's, that's all I knew was being fucking hospital time. Caused him years of suffering. Baby in bed. Like I probably wouldn't even one yet. My leg stomach back on it would be heavy and it's what landed him in the hospital where he died. I'm just being in a hospital, seeing lights, and people need everybody looking down. There are tens of thousands of Americans with sickle cell anemia. Most of them are black outside terrible emergency room experiences. In many ways, prodigy story is their story too. I was a little kid like they would like me in the back and threaten to call the cops showed up like stuff like that. This is a podcast about race and institutional neglect. It's about who gets care in this country and why he was like sitting in the chair, I guess. No. I guess. No me like feel like my bones burning. Prodigy transform that pain into hardcore hip hop. I got a rat named rap groups called hall. His music was often raw violent in your face. He was also honest reflection of the world around him. Shoulder, you hear you could tell. I don't wanna hear that. Turn at this too hot to months or whatever. What if you really listen to the words is a serious mention in everything sewn on me. Prodigies voice is the sound of hip hop to me. Not saying he's the greatest rapper. I'm just saying he's, he is the embodiment of hip hop. As a pellet, you know, for his whole life and very few people have ever seen such a a trial, let them unstoppable drive. If you really wanna know, prodigy his life, his music, you have to get his pain first time. I actually got to ask them about why James, this is how I heard. He was like, I was in the hospital, man, you know, I was on up. You know, I was like, rather than get all excited or whatever. He said, I'm going to talk to each naked. The real nece drops on July nineteenth, subscribe on apple podcasts or wherever you listen until then peace.

Albert prodigy Johnson James Las Vegas WNYC studios seeing lights apple three days
"wnyc studios" Discussed on Only Human

Only Human

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"wnyc studios" Discussed on Only Human

"It's the summer of two thousand seventeen. The rapper prodigy is on stage with his hip hop group, mob deep. They're performing in front of a packed Las Vegas crowd. But after the show. Prodigy isn't feeling so great. He goes back to his hotel to arrest and three days later, everybody's under phone. His friends start getting these calls? No fucking way possible. He's dead. He's on tour right now. He's doing this show. I refuse to believe this. She, what are you talking about. Soon as. He. The real this a new podcast from WNYC studios. We're gonna look at the life and death of Albert prodigy Johnson, how he rose to become a rap icon and how he's been a lifetime fighting sickle cell anemia malate before by would just pain like sickle cell with my life before. You know what I mean? It's mean really have no life that was it all going up and just that's, that's all I knew was being fucking hospital time. Caused him years of suffering. Baby in bed. Like I probably wouldn't even one yet. My leg stomach back on it would be heavy and it's what landed him in the hospital where he died. I'm just being in a hospital, seeing lights, and people need everybody looking down. There are tens of thousands of Americans with sickle cell anemia. Most of them are black outside terrible emergency room experiences. In many ways, prodigy story is their story too. I was a little kid like they would like me in the back and threaten to call the cops showed up like stuff like that. This is a podcast about race and institutional neglect. It's about who gets care in this country and why he was like sitting in the chair, I guess. No. I guess. No me like feel like my bones burning. Prodigy transform that pain into hardcore hip hop. I got a rat named rap groups called hall. His music was often raw violent in your face. He was also honest reflection of the world around him. Shoulder, you hear you could tell. I don't wanna hear that. Turn at this too hot to months or whatever. What if you really listen to the words is a serious mention in everything sewn on me. Prodigies voice is the sound of hip hop to me. Not saying he's the greatest rapper. I'm just saying he's, he is the embodiment of hip hop. As a pellet, you know, for his whole life and very few people have ever seen such a a trial, let them unstoppable drive. If you really wanna know, prodigy his life, his music, you have to get his pain first time. I actually got to ask them about why James, this is how I heard. He was like, I was in the hospital, man, you know, I was on up. You know, I was like, rather than get all excited or whatever. He said, I'm going to talk to each naked. The real nece drops on July nineteenth, subscribe on apple podcasts or wherever you listen until then peace.

Albert prodigy Johnson James Las Vegas WNYC studios seeing lights apple three days
"wnyc studios" Discussed on Only Human

Only Human

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"wnyc studios" Discussed on Only Human

"It's the summer of two thousand seventeen. The rapper prodigy is on stage with his hip hop group, mob deep. They're performing in front of a packed Las Vegas crowd. But after the show. Prodigy isn't feeling so great. He goes back to his hotel to arrest and three days later, everybody's under phone. His friends start getting these calls? No fucking way possible. He's dead. He's on tour right now. He's doing this show. I refuse to believe this. She, what are you talking about. Soon as. He. The real this a new podcast from WNYC studios. We're gonna look at the life and death of Albert prodigy Johnson, how he rose to become a rap icon and how he's been a lifetime fighting sickle cell anemia malate before by would just pain like sickle cell with my life before. You know what I mean? It's mean really have no life that was it all going up and just that's, that's all I knew was being fucking hospital time. Caused him years of suffering. Baby in bed. Like I probably wouldn't even one yet. My leg stomach back on it would be heavy and it's what landed him in the hospital where he died. I'm just being in a hospital, seeing lights, and people need everybody looking down. There are tens of thousands of Americans with sickle cell anemia. Most of them are black outside terrible emergency room experiences. In many ways, prodigy story is their story too. I was a little kid like they would like me in the back and threaten to call the cops showed up like stuff like that. This is a podcast about race and institutional neglect. It's about who gets care in this country and why he was like sitting in the chair, I guess. No. I guess. No me like feel like my bones burning. Prodigy transform that pain into hardcore hip hop. I got a rat named rap groups called hall. His music was often raw violent in your face. He was also honest reflection of the world around him. Shoulder, you hear you could tell. I don't wanna hear that. Turn at this too hot to months or whatever. What if you really listen to the words is a serious mention in everything sewn on me. Prodigies voice is the sound of hip hop to me. Not saying he's the greatest rapper. I'm just saying he's, he is the embodiment of hip hop. As a pellet, you know, for his whole life and very few people have ever seen such a a trial, let them unstoppable drive. If you really wanna know, prodigy his life, his music, you have to get his pain first time. I actually got to ask them about why James, this is how I heard. He was like, I was in the hospital, man, you know, I was on up. You know, I was like, rather than get all excited or whatever. He said, I'm going to talk to each naked. The real nece drops on July nineteenth, subscribe on apple podcasts or wherever you listen until then peace.

Albert prodigy Johnson James Las Vegas WNYC studios seeing lights apple three days
"wnyc studios" Discussed on Only Human

Only Human

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"wnyc studios" Discussed on Only Human

"It's the summer of two thousand seventeen. The rapper prodigy is on stage with his hip hop group, mob deep. They're performing in front of a packed Las Vegas crowd. But after the show. Prodigy isn't feeling so great. He goes back to his hotel to arrest and three days later, everybody's under phone. His friends start getting these calls? No fucking way possible. He's dead. He's on tour right now. He's doing this show. I refuse to believe this. She, what are you talking about. Soon as. He. The real this a new podcast from WNYC studios. We're gonna look at the life and death of Albert prodigy Johnson, how he rose to become a rap icon and how he's been a lifetime fighting sickle cell anemia malate before by would just pain like sickle cell with my life before. You know what I mean? It's mean really have no life that was it all going up and just that's, that's all I knew was being fucking hospital time. Caused him years of suffering. Baby in bed. Like I probably wouldn't even one yet. My leg stomach back on it would be heavy and it's what landed him in the hospital where he died. I'm just being in a hospital, seeing lights, and people need everybody looking down. There are tens of thousands of Americans with sickle cell anemia. Most of them are black outside terrible emergency room experiences. In many ways, prodigy story is their story too. I was a little kid like they would like me in the back and threaten to call the cops showed up like stuff like that. This is a podcast about race and institutional neglect. It's about who gets care in this country and why he was like sitting in the chair, I guess. No. I guess. No me like feel like my bones burning. Prodigy transform that pain into hardcore hip hop. I got a rat named rap groups called hall. His music was often raw violent in your face. He was also honest reflection of the world around him. Shoulder, you hear you could tell. I don't wanna hear that. Turn at this too hot to months or whatever. What if you really listen to the words is a serious mention in everything sewn on me. Prodigies voice is the sound of hip hop to me. Not saying he's the greatest rapper. I'm just saying he's, he is the embodiment of hip hop. As a pellet, you know, for his whole life and very few people have ever seen such a a trial, let them unstoppable drive. If you really wanna know, prodigy his life, his music, you have to get his pain first time. I actually got to ask them about why James, this is how I heard. He was like, I was in the hospital, man, you know, I was on up. You know, I was like, rather than get all excited or whatever. He said, I'm going to talk to each naked. The real nece drops on July nineteenth, subscribe on apple podcasts or wherever you listen until then peace.

Albert prodigy Johnson James Las Vegas WNYC studios seeing lights apple three days
"wnyc studios" Discussed on Only Human

Only Human

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"wnyc studios" Discussed on Only Human

"It's the summer of two thousand seventeen. The rapper prodigy is on stage with his hip hop group, mob deep. They're performing in front of a packed Las Vegas crowd. But after the show. Prodigy isn't feeling so great. He goes back to his hotel to arrest and three days later, everybody's under phone. His friends start getting these calls? No fucking way possible. He's dead. He's on tour right now. He's doing this show. I refuse to believe this. She, what are you talking about. Soon as. He. The real this a new podcast from WNYC studios. We're gonna look at the life and death of Albert prodigy Johnson, how he rose to become a rap icon and how he's been a lifetime fighting sickle cell anemia malate before by would just pain like sickle cell with my life before. You know what I mean? It's mean really have no life that was it all going up and just that's, that's all I knew was being fucking hospital time. Caused him years of suffering. Baby in bed. Like I probably wouldn't even one yet. My leg stomach back on it would be heavy and it's what landed him in the hospital where he died. I'm just being in a hospital, seeing lights, and people need everybody looking down. There are tens of thousands of Americans with sickle cell anemia. Most of them are black outside terrible emergency room experiences. In many ways, prodigy story is their story too. I was a little kid like they would like me in the back and threaten to call the cops showed up like stuff like that. This is a podcast about race and institutional neglect. It's about who gets care in this country and why he was like sitting in the chair, I guess. No. I guess. No me like feel like my bones burning. Prodigy transform that pain into hardcore hip hop. I got a rat named rap groups called hall. His music was often raw violent in your face. He was also honest reflection of the world around him. Shoulder, you hear you could tell. I don't wanna hear that. Turn at this too hot to months or whatever. What if you really listen to the words is a serious mention in everything sewn on me. Prodigies voice is the sound of hip hop to me. Not saying he's the greatest rapper. I'm just saying he's, he is the embodiment of hip hop. As a pellet, you know, for his whole life and very few people have ever seen such a a trial, let them unstoppable drive. If you really wanna know, prodigy his life, his music, you have to get his pain first time. I actually got to ask them about why James, this is how I heard. He was like, I was in the hospital, man, you know, I was on up. You know, I was like, rather than get all excited or whatever. He said, I'm going to talk to each naked. The real nece drops on July nineteenth, subscribe on apple podcasts or wherever you listen until then peace.

Albert prodigy Johnson James Las Vegas WNYC studios seeing lights apple three days
"wnyc studios" Discussed on Only Human

Only Human

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"wnyc studios" Discussed on Only Human

"It's the summer of two thousand seventeen. The rapper prodigy is on stage with his hip hop group, mob deep. They're performing in front of a packed Las Vegas crowd. But after the show. Prodigy isn't feeling so great. He goes back to his hotel to arrest and three days later, everybody's under phone. His friends start getting these calls? No fucking way possible. He's dead. He's on tour right now. He's doing this show. I refuse to believe this. She, what are you talking about. Soon as. He. The real this a new podcast from WNYC studios. We're gonna look at the life and death of Albert prodigy Johnson, how he rose to become a rap icon and how he's been a lifetime fighting sickle cell anemia malate before by would just pain like sickle cell with my life before. You know what I mean? It's mean really have no life that was it all going up and just that's, that's all I knew was being fucking hospital time. Caused him years of suffering. Baby in bed. Like I probably wouldn't even one yet. My leg stomach back on it would be heavy and it's what landed him in the hospital where he died. I'm just being in a hospital, seeing lights, and people need everybody looking down. There are tens of thousands of Americans with sickle cell anemia. Most of them are black outside terrible emergency room experiences. In many ways, prodigy story is their story too. I was a little kid like they would like me in the back and threaten to call the cops showed up like stuff like that. This is a podcast about race and institutional neglect. It's about who gets care in this country and why he was like sitting in the chair, I guess. No. I guess. No me like feel like my bones burning. Prodigy transform that pain into hardcore hip hop. I got a rat named rap groups called hall. His music was often raw violent in your face. He was also honest reflection of the world around him. Shoulder, you hear you could tell. I don't wanna hear that. Turn at this too hot to months or whatever. What if you really listen to the words is a serious mention in everything sewn on me. Prodigies voice is the sound of hip hop to me. Not saying he's the greatest rapper. I'm just saying he's, he is the embodiment of hip hop. As a pellet, you know, for his whole life and very few people have ever seen such a a trial, let them unstoppable drive. If you really wanna know, prodigy his life, his music, you have to get his pain first time. I actually got to ask them about why James, this is how I heard. He was like, I was in the hospital, man, you know, I was on up. You know, I was like, rather than get all excited or whatever. He said, I'm going to talk to each naked. The real nece drops on July nineteenth, subscribe on apple podcasts or wherever you listen until then peace.

Albert prodigy Johnson James Las Vegas WNYC studios seeing lights apple three days
"wnyc studios" Discussed on Only Human

Only Human

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"wnyc studios" Discussed on Only Human

"It's the summer of two thousand seventeen. The rapper prodigy is on stage with his hip hop group, mob deep. They're performing in front of a packed Las Vegas crowd. But after the show. Prodigy isn't feeling so great. He goes back to his hotel to arrest and three days later, everybody's under phone. His friends start getting these calls? No fucking way possible. He's dead. He's on tour right now. He's doing this show. I refuse to believe this. She, what are you talking about. Soon as. He. The real this a new podcast from WNYC studios. We're gonna look at the life and death of Albert prodigy Johnson, how he rose to become a rap icon and how he's been a lifetime fighting sickle cell anemia malate before by would just pain like sickle cell with my life before. You know what I mean? It's mean really have no life that was it all going up and just that's, that's all I knew was being fucking hospital time. Caused him years of suffering. Baby in bed. Like I probably wouldn't even one yet. My leg stomach back on it would be heavy and it's what landed him in the hospital where he died. I'm just being in a hospital, seeing lights, and people need everybody looking down. There are tens of thousands of Americans with sickle cell anemia. Most of them are black outside terrible emergency room experiences. In many ways, prodigy story is their story too. I was a little kid like they would like me in the back and threaten to call the cops showed up like stuff like that. This is a podcast about race and institutional neglect. It's about who gets care in this country and why he was like sitting in the chair, I guess. No. I guess. No me like feel like my bones burning. Prodigy transform that pain into hardcore hip hop. I got a rat named rap groups called hall. His music was often raw violent in your face. He was also honest reflection of the world around him. Shoulder, you hear you could tell. I don't wanna hear that. Turn at this too hot to months or whatever. What if you really listen to the words is a serious mention in everything sewn on me. Prodigies voice is the sound of hip hop to me. Not saying he's the greatest rapper. I'm just saying he's, he is the embodiment of hip hop. As a pellet, you know, for his whole life and very few people have ever seen such a a trial, let them unstoppable drive. If you really wanna know, prodigy his life, his music, you have to get his pain first time. I actually got to ask them about why James, this is how I heard. He was like, I was in the hospital, man, you know, I was on up. You know, I was like, rather than get all excited or whatever. He said, I'm going to talk to each naked. The real nece drops on July nineteenth, subscribe on apple podcasts or wherever you listen until then peace.

Albert prodigy Johnson James Las Vegas WNYC studios seeing lights apple three days
4% of cancers are attributed to alcohol

Fresh Air

01:21 min | 3 years ago

4% of cancers are attributed to alcohol

"Seems to be a lot of promotion and marketing of drinking to women and about four percents of all cancers to move beyond breast cancer about four percent of all cancers are attributable to alcohol and so so that's because many cancers are not easily preventable it's nice to know that there's something that's actually a preventable and if you removed alcohol you'd remove four percent of the cancer burden in the us for breast cancer i believe i saw figure sixteen percent of breast cancers attributed to present to tip drinking something to think about this we thank you both for taking time to be with us again rabin is a health reporter for the new york times and richard sates public health professor and chair of boston university's department of community health scientists in boston when we come back we if we haven't talked about bad news enough here's some bad news our annual week long celebration acephalous pieds is drawing close but it's not quite through so stay with us for a little celebration as our concluding celebration of steph hello pods will be right back after this spring am i oh this is science friday from wnyc studios support for a science friday comes from draper draper's team of engineers.

Rabin Reporter The New York Times Richard Sates Boston University Boston Wnyc Studios Draper Draper Professor And Chair Four Percent Sixteen Percent
"wnyc studios" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"wnyc studios" Discussed on KQED Radio

"On the next science friday is it heart healthy are not to have one boozy drink per day the nih just pulled the plug on a study asking that question will catch up on what the research has to say so far plus we'll wrap up our week long celebration of cephalopods squid octopus nautilus and other undersea friends paul on science friday from wnyc studios do stick around for science friday it's coming up right after forum starts at eleven here on kiki weedy public radio eighty eight point five fm this is forum i mean a kim we're talking with npr media correspondent david folkenflik about his article titled when the white house can't be believed and we're asking you our listeners to tell us how you view the last couple of weeks of claims by the trump administration around zero tolerance policies separating families at the border whether you see them as lies or just the usual political spin and what you see is the consequences of such let me go to our listener vague in cupertino high big hi how are you doing great what's on your mind so tr just yesterday and they were talking about like a couple of days ago they're talking about trump in minnesota and you guys are talking to some other folks in minnesota we seem to agree with a lot of president trump's policies and that question really is is i mean there's going to be people that either misinformed or or mr or something i don't actually know exactly what it is i wonder how do we reach those those folks at least educate or really understand do you really believe that separating children okay and things or other things like that thanks for that i've been talking with my relatives who voted for obama who are appalled by this i've been talking with relatives who voted for trump who say they just don't even read the news it's just they just can't even take it then yes the comments after the duluth speech that the president gave they were the comments were things like this has happened under obama or that it's a good thing he could mitt he's wrong in you know we're moving on and the point that the articles have made including yours about the president's lying and the.

nih wnyc studios kiki weedy minnesota trump obama president paul david folkenflik cupertino duluth
YouTuber Allison Raskin launches fictional 'Gossip' podcast

podnews

01:54 min | 3 years ago

YouTuber Allison Raskin launches fictional 'Gossip' podcast

"The latest pod news gossip premiers on June fourteenth, subscribe now and Stitcher, apple podcasts or wherever you listen and remember, it's all fun and games until they're gossiping about you. Gossip is a new scripted podcast from Alison Raskin who's a comedian, author and YouTube, and it's launching today l. had an exclusive on the trailer. Raskin has seven hundred and fifty thousand YouTube. Subscribers and videos have been viewed more than one hundred and twenty million times.

Alison Raskin Youtube Spotify Susan Collins Felicity Loughry Apple Wnyc Studios James Eddie Mair Grenfell Tower Brisbane BBC Amazon Queensland France L. Depression Mrs. Bright
Wnyc Studios, Stephen Dubner and Argentina discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

01:12 min | 3 years ago

Wnyc Studios, Stephen Dubner and Argentina discussed on Freakonomics

"From wnyc studios this is freakonomics radio the podcast that explores the hidden side of everything here's your host stephen dubner every four years soccer teams from across the globe gather to compete for the sport's biggest trophy the world cup historically the americans have been brilliant winning three of the past seven world cups never finishing worse than third the american women that is the men's national team not so hot the us has never finished higher than eighth except for nineteen thirty the very first world cup when we finished third and this year as noted we failed to make the thirty two team field but don't worry the rest of the world the hardly notice the world cup is a staggering phenomenon the two thousand fourteen men's final germany beating argentina in brazil was watched by one billion people about ten times more than a super bowl the sport has been growing in the us among players and fans attendance at major league soccer games last year average twenty two thousand.

Wnyc Studios Stephen Dubner Argentina Brazil Soccer Germany Four Years
Wnyc Studios and Curley discussed on Pickle

Pickle

00:15 sec | 3 years ago

Wnyc Studios and Curley discussed on Pickle

Wnyc Studios Curley
Wnyc Studios and Curley discussed on Pickle

Pickle

00:15 sec | 3 years ago

Wnyc Studios and Curley discussed on Pickle

Wnyc Studios Curley
"wnyc studios" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:45 min | 3 years ago

"wnyc studios" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Whether you stay alive then that really i gets people interested that is interesting let's find out more shall we today unfree knocks radio we will look at productivity in a whole new light from the good he estimates you can make a house about 24 hours to the bad we've been working on it for over fifty years and we still haven't managed to make it power a toaster to the ugly so we might destroy our species as we know it well she's in total factor productivity wait a minute what is powering a toaster and building how some 24 hours have did with destroying our species what ties all these together the only way to tie these together is a just getting harder and harder to find new ideas and then and then and now from the wnyc studios this is freaking out radio show that explores the hidden side of everything here's your host stephen governor let's start with the power of an idea i am a believer in the power of ideas and the kind of ideas that i really cherish are those ideas that are incredibly simple that's my free comics friend and co author steve levitt he's an economist at the university of chicago i've really come to think that many companies that are successful are really successful on the back of one or two simple ideas i often if the feeling that they believe they're good at everything when the evidence is probably that they're about average at everything except for one or two things that they happened to be really good at if ideas are so powerful and if all it takes is one or two great ideas to make a company successful you think everyone would spend lana time searching for great ideas but not what levitte sees i am a believer that in general people spend far too little time devoted to trying to come up with ideas and far too much time in contrast executing on you know daytoday things said nieto could be transformed through the power of ideas its idea about ideas is really just an idea but what if the upgrade that a hypothesis could this hypothesis then be tested the power of ideas makes it something which is very different from any other goods it's john van reenen an economist at mit or thanks for having me in nicholas bloom is an economist at stanford is there and get the hair for mere bloom in van reenen long with two more comments charles jones and michael web have britain of paper with.

wnyc studios steve levitt levitte nieto mit nicholas bloom stanford van reenen charles jones britain stephen university of chicago lana michael 24 hours fifty years
"wnyc studios" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"wnyc studios" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Yeah well i can identify with that if i then say will actually might measure productivity is you know whether you stay alive then that really gets people interested that is interesting with find out more shall we today unfree knocks radio we will look at productivity and a whole new light from the good he estimates you can make a house and about 24 hours to the bad we've been working on it for over fifty years and we still haven't managed to make it power a toaster to the ugly so we might destroy our species as we know it will show total factor productivity wait a minute what does powering a toaster and building housing 24 hours have did with destroying our species what ties all these together the only way to tie these together is just getting harder and harder to find new ideas and then and then and now from from wnyc studios this is freaking out mix radio show that explores the hidden side of everything here's your host stephen governor let's start with the power of an idea i am a believer in the power of ideas and the kind of ideas that i really cherish are those ideas that are incredibly simple that's my free comics friend and co author steve levitt he's an economist at the university of chicago i've really come to think that many companies that a successful are really successful on the back of one or two simple ideas i often get the feeling that they believe are good at everything when the evidence is probably that they're about average of everything except for one or two things that the happened we really good at if ideas are so powerful and if all it takes is one or two great ideas to make a company successful you'd think everyone.

wnyc studios steve levitt stephen university of chicago 24 hours fifty years
"wnyc studios" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"wnyc studios" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is the new yorker radio hour a coproduction of wnyc studios and the new yorker welcome to the new yorker radio hour i'm david ramnik when the drug oxycontin first came into the market in 1995 he was advertised as a breakthrough in opioid that would manage pain better and would actually reduce the potential for addiction but just two decades later oxy konta that is a name that's become almost infamous in american life as the opioid crisis reaches truly awful proportions the new yorkers patrick redden keefe has been reporting on purdue pharma the company that developed oxycontin and the sackler family which controls it one of the people patrick spoke with was a man named steven may an insider who saw exactly how the company's marketing worked meza former sales rep for purdue any started there in 1999 as sales of oxycontin were booming tell me for starters how did you how did you first come to get into pharmaceutical sales well actually um actually had a neighbor that that live near me back in the late 90s who was a pharmaceutical sales representative and and i saw that he had a really successful career and you know it was something that i personally wanted to get into i mean i knew that the economic benefit with pretty good so he helped made to get in with his company which i did in 1998 and started working for a company that actually sold a combination opioid art so i was in the market of produce i was very familiar with the oxycontin product before even joining purdue and and not knowing the the growth that they were having when there is an opportunity to join you know what was perceived to be the best company to work for the industry i basically jumped at it and when and where were you exactly like what region where un i was basically covering southwestern virginia and phnom parts of southern west virginia i see and were there there were certain kind of marketing i know that in some of the early marketing campaigns what they would say is that oxycontin was the drug to start with and to stay with did you hear that when you were there oh i use that quite frequently jeff start with an stay with so basically the idea is this you've got.

wnyc studios david ramnik new yorkers pharmaceutical sales represent virginia new yorker patrick redden keefe purdue steven jeff two decades
"wnyc studios" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"wnyc studios" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"That six six nine two four pre stay tuned is presented by cathay and wnyc studios it's produced by the team at pineapple street media henry mosque's centralized berman dole level an excellent scheme thanks to rich luzenski for help this week are music is by andrew dust who this is a fun fact is a member of the banned son and special thanks to delete doyle journalism and jake maccabi we have new episodes coming to you every thursday i'm pre berrara stay tuned stay stay tuned with pre is supported by ziprecruiter when you're hiring posting your job on just one side isn't enough so where do you go to find top talent with ziprecruiter you can post your job to 100plus job sites with just one click let's ziprecruiter's powerful technology match your job to the right candidates and use their simple dashboard to signed your perfect hire in fact eighty percent of employers who posted jobs on ziprecruiter get a quality candidates who the site within one day tried for free and ziprecruiter dot com slash preat that's ziprecruiter dot com slash preat stay tuned with pre is supported by concur as a business leader employee satisfaction is just as important as the bottom line that's why there's concur an sat company only concur offers the tools of denisot does your employees andrew finance team employees love automated expense claims invoices they can submit and approved from anywhere sign ants loves that they have full disability into employee spent plus concur integrates with leading finance systems expense travel invoice learn more at concur dot com slash crete.

wnyc studios andrew dust cathay pineapple street media henry mosque finance team eighty percent one day
"wnyc studios" Discussed on Nancy

Nancy

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"wnyc studios" Discussed on Nancy

"I watched it and i loved it from wnyc studios this is nazi with your host foveon low end filthy too kathy tobin today we're going to talk about a horse a talking harsh say tucking cartoon horse which i'm not gonna lie is not a thing that i expected to cover in this very queer podcast but before we get to that talking horse and his cartoon friends we need to meet our guide through all of this jordan crucial and back when jordan was growing up she knew she was interested in guys the way other girls her age were most people assumed i was gay i knew that the chatter sorta behind my back was was that like jordan likes girls or something but because i was never pursuing anybody i i was fortunate to sort of escaped the the more vicious under the rumor mill and i just kind of steer clear people in the romantic regarding today jordan covers pop culture entertainment apple share the before that i worked at wired for seven years as a fact checker and a reporter and we did a whole issue and i was there are devoted to sex and there was an article that i think was called like young hot and totally not into having sex and it was about base actually the invisible sexuality and a friend of mine was fact checking it and he looked over his computer 'cause we sat facing each other and he just goes jordan i think we found your sub read it and i was and then he redmi the devilish them paramedic grazed sexual latinos like well all be damned that sounds too right.

wnyc studios jordan reporter kathy tobin apple seven years mill
"wnyc studios" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"wnyc studios" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And from the wnyc studios this is freaking onyx radio the shelling it explores the hidden side of everything here's your host stephen governor it's hard to think of any other realm where empiricism or at least what's dressed up to look like empiricism clashes so directly with delusion i'm talking about investing in the stock markets primarily the alleged empiricism comes in the form of sales pitch data it's easy to think by seeing the ads and reading newspaper articles and stuff that if you just clever enough you're gonna win the delusion comes in the form of how the stock market's actually work we don't understand the negative some nature of active investing whatever you win i lose whatever i win you lose and we both pay to play that game that's ken french i am the wrath family distinguished professor finance at the tax school of business at dartmouth them so the negative some nature of investing is one problem oftenoverlooked and then the second problem we all have i suppose we don't all have it but most people suffer from overconfidence particularly in noisy environments where the feedback is weak and describes the stock market crash amblin noisy and it's really easy to misinterpret what the return on your portfolio meet wait a minute we know how to interpret our portfolio returns don't we those big money management firms and mutual fund firms and investment advisors they're so helpful in telling us how much our hardearned money is growing right okay it can be kinda hard to keep track of all the fees their deducting but still isn't it amazing that the firm you chose a matter which one you chose just happens to be better than everybody else at picking the best stocks and funds you know there's too much bs and wall street and being able to say hey here's what.

wnyc studios stock markets stock market stephen ken french distinguished professor
"wnyc studios" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:56 min | 4 years ago

"wnyc studios" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From wnyc studios this is freaking out mix radio here's your host stephen governor the gene editing revolution prompted by the work of scientists like jennifer dowden isn't the only jeanrelated revolution these days he told that stephen governor has it going is there a hurry there's also social genomics the social germans revolutions religious getting started i would say dalton conley teaches sociology and population studies at princeton at i'm their co author of the genome factor so dalton the subtitle of your book is what the social gino mix revolution reveals about ourselves our history in the future just begin by tone would you mean by the social genomics revolution what's revolutionary about it and described the ark of the revolution where we are in that okay well the social drummers revolutions religious getting started i would say when bill clinton stood up in the year 2000 and analysis of the book of life had been decoded we are here to celebrate the completion of the first survey of the entire human genome without a doubt this is the most important most wondrous map ever produced by humankind everyone thought everything was going to change suddenly were gonna have personalized medicine and we were going to i don't know what it will revolutionise the diagnosis prevention and treatment of most if not all human diseases but actually not much happened for the first decade or so the great scientific hope was to find single easily identifiable genes that controlled cancer or depression or intelligence even just height so that turns out to the exception rather than a rule it's jason fletcher he's an economist at the university of wisconsin in madison and he's conley's co author on the genome factor most of what we care about most of lives important outcomes are not one gene in one.

wnyc studios jennifer dowden stephen governor dalton conley princeton bill clinton human genome jason fletcher madison university of wisconsin