35 Burst results for "Vox Media"

"vox media" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

04:57 min | 6 d ago

"vox media" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Theoretical conceptual framework of what attribution was going to look like. And that was a big wake-up call for us of like, okay, we can't sit around and wait for this to be figured out. We have to be more active in these conversations. And so we've started having much more productive conversations with a lot of the measurement partners to understand what is their long-term solution going to be like, how can we help accelerate? What can we do today to prepare help prepare them, how we're prepared ourselves. For that. So it's a lot of it comes down a lot of the same fundamental aspects of can you build a sort of big first party data file, have that consent with users, can you match that audience? To other user files to help draw the conclusions and attribute exposure and conversions in that respect. And so thankfully, the tactics are the same. We got to we have to work with different partners, technology partners to help make it a reality, but that's sort of where things. But they're still a good amount of ways to go on the attribution side for sure. Are we winding our way to talking about clean rooms now? It seems like maybe that is where we're heading. What is vox media's clean room strategy? Yeah, I mean, we're taking, like I said before, we're focused on a couple of very fundamental things. One is continuing to sort of have a long-term privacy centric relationship with the user base. Working with technology partners in a way that sort of secures that information and working with external partners largely advertisers on ways that we can leverage that for value creation, whether that is through clean rooms for targeting our measurement purposes, whether it is for audience matching so that we can provide insights across what a brand's audience is doing across our platform. Like we've got a unique opportunity to be able to say, here's what your customer base is reading, watching, listening to across the passion points of sports news technology entertainment, lifestyle shopping, things like that. And so that is the piece that seems to be most in demand right now is okay, let's do some audience matching and let us give you just a ton of insights around what your audience is doing on our portfolio. And that can inform a creative strategy to conform and have buying strategy. It can inform a programmatic targeting strategy, things of that nature. And so that's some of the solutions might change, but the fundamentals are going to stay the same. Got it. Okay. So we're having a great conversation about really important parts of the business. But in kind of the broader macroeconomic context right now, it's almost like we're talking about updating the roof, remodeling the kitchen when it's like, oh, there's this big storm coming. We're in the middle of earning season, meta had a tough earnings report, their first year over year revenue decline since they went public.

vox media meta
"vox media" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

01:49 min | 6 d ago

"vox media" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Like, I think when we had Melissa bell on the podcast and I want to say it was December 2020. She talked about this being a contribution away for people to support box dot com, but not make it so that you had to pay in order to get anything out of ox dot com. And I think even when we had Eli, we've had a lot of Fox people in the podcast. But when we had nearly a Patel from the verge on last year, that's been kind of a stance at the verge too, is we want to make this stuff accessible to the audiences. We don't want to pay wallet necessarily. But so as you're looking to roll out more subscription products, do you still look to thread that line or will there be products that end up being only subscriber available? Yeah, well, we'll look at sort of any sort of version of what this looks like. But I think our general thesis continues to be sort of creating additional value for sort of paying customer subscribers in whatever version versus the alternative. And so that's where we're thinking about, where can we add value to these brands? That's why cafe insiders is a great thing. You've got sort of pretty main feed is available to everybody, but then there's some extra content that loyalists can subscribe to get exclusively and sort of ahead of time. And so that's a model I think that we're sort of feel pretty good about and want to do a little bit more with. Got it. What's the first candidate for a new reader revenue product in terms of the way? Wait and see on that one. Okay. Because it seems like you all are doing kind of segue into the commerce side, but commerce, you're doing more on that front. You have kind of your deals products and also product recommendations. And it feels like there's also been some the wire cutter at The New York Times, for example. That's a subscriber product. You can check things out, but there's a meter to

"vox media" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

02:57 min | 6 d ago

"vox media" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Say like well positioned, but the uncertainty of the moment isn't all that unfamiliar for them. I'll let you get into it with Ryan, thanks to him. Cool, thanks, Kevin. Ryan Paula, welcome to the DJI podcast. Good to see you, Tam, where in person here in studio. In person. Yeah, momentous, not only is this part of our latest series on CROs, but our my first in person podcast, since I started co host in the podcast with Kaylee. So we've done, well, we've done two out of events, but outside of the events format. So I guess we got to put a little bit of an asterisk on this one. No, no, no asterisk. No Azure is for this recording. We're doing it live. I'm just upset that you're not wearing judge wig from the video protection video. Thank God Amazon accepted the return. Thanks for watching that video. Yeah, so back in the spring, Kaylee and I started talking about wanting to do another series where we were trying to figure out, okay, we did the editor in chief series last year. What do we want the next series to be? And this was like a few weeks after your role at vox media brought in where you also took over consumer revenue as well as commerce and affiliate, which is part of commerce. And so we were thinking, and then Joe Robbins at the post, who's going to be next week's episode, her purview is also brought in. So it feels like there was all this all these shifts going on with the CRO role. And this was before everything with the economy since then, which has felt like it's only made the CRO rule even more important and interesting. But laying the table for this conversation. So that change in March, where your role brought in, what precipitated, like obviously the group 9 acquisition had closed at that point. But what's different about the role now? Yeah, sure. Well, I am thrilled to be here and happy to be followed by joy joy was actually the first call I made to get some advice about the role. So I think she her role had expanded a couple of weeks or a couple of months before mine did. But yeah, I think it's a sort of a trend that's happening across the industry as you noted now where trying to bring sort of the revenue streams together. Because I think there was a historical expectation that diversifying revenue meant there were like the business lines were in competition with one another. And in fact, I think what I am realizing and what many companies are realizing is that they can really benefit from one another.

Ryan Paula Kaylee vox media Joe Robbins Tam Ryan Kevin Amazon joy joy
"vox media" Discussed on podnews

podnews

04:06 min | 9 months ago

"vox media" Discussed on podnews

"The latest from our daily newsletter, a pod news .NET. Media is getting into audio acquiring audio based learning platform knowable Warren schaefer cofounder of knowable will join medium as the vice president of audio. A medium knows a thing or two about podcasting Evan Williams its CEO was cofounder of odio and early podcast company. Vox media has acquired criminal productions who make criminal. This is love and Phoebe reads a mystery. The shows were with PRX radio topia network, sounder has launched an audio data cloud, which aims to analyze audio for advertisers to learn more about the content of podcasters including topic analysis, brand safety and automated summaries. Flagging upcoming tools similar to those in quarter one 22, Ellie Dimitri costs from a cast underlines podcasting measurement problem in an interview for ad exchanger talks with Alison Schiff. Pot track has added new show overview report for podcasters using their free analytics, beams are short form audio app that lets you post up to 90 seconds of voice recording in groups, has completed a seed round of $6 million of funding, racket, a similar short form audio app that lets you post up to 99 seconds of voice recordings is now available on the Apple App Store and has just announced $3 million of precede funding. Oprah Winfrey was on Clubhouse, but only 23,000 people listened or 41,500 people according to a spokesperson who claims a glitch. Either way, not massive. Meanwhile, apps, or logins are no longer required to listen on Spotify green room, and a genuine question has anyone heard from Mark Cuban's fireside chats recently? Is everybody okay over there? We'd love to know. Editor upon news .NET. Critical mention is the latest company to partner with the proprietary podcast directory pod chaser, the partnership will allow brands to accurately track and measure the impact of brand mentions across podcasting, .1 a bio link for podcasters has launched its free to sign up and it allows you to post a simple and configurable page that plays the audio of your podcast. Pod one co slash pod news is ours. And the Asia podcast awards are open for entries you until Wednesday to enter and it will cost you about 11 U.S. dollars winners will be announced in early December. In people news Ricky mulvey has joined The Motley Fool as podcast producer. He was a podcast producer for all worth financial and recently freelanced with NPR's the indicator from planet money. And NASA Edwards has joined CBS sports as a podcast producer. He joins FAE in Charlotte in North Carolina, and in podcast news independent podcast, the who and how club has announced a sponsorship deal from better help. The show shares life stories and reflections and asks who are you? And how did you become you? Nominated for 16 international awards. I'm not a monster has returned for two epilogue podcasts and a Q&A special. The show is a co production between BBC panorama and frontline. From Sylvester Stallone, the comeback is an immersive cinematic documentary podcast series about meteoric success, devastating falls and inspirational comebacks all told by the people who live them. Hosted by Philadelphia journalist and author Mike sealskin, I am Kobe features intimate never before heard tapes, a professional basketball player, Kobe Bryant as a teenager, exploring his thoughts, his dreams and his goals and CNN has launched what they call a showcast a chance to rediscover Anthony Bourdain's parts unknown in an audio first format from the first episode beginning in Myanmar to its conclusion in the lower east side in New York City. The first two episodes are available now. And that's the latest from our newsletter for all the.

Warren schaefer odio Vox media Ellie Dimitri Alison Schiff Evan Williams knowable Phoebe Ricky mulvey Mark Cuban Oprah Winfrey Apple NPR Asia CBS NASA Mike sealskin Edwards
"vox media" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

02:01 min | 10 months ago

"vox media" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"And Apple and Spotify in Google, they're all swirling around, and they control distribution and they run the players and they're building out networks. And we're really good at that story. We just had a confluence of capabilities. And we knew we'd have Nick. At our company in our slack, we weren't going to blow it. Because we could just ask him what to do. And he could tell us. So we could ask him for advice. So that came together, it's a great first product. We feel good about it. We're wondering what other kinds of products like that we might have. And then how we might make them part of a larger there's other things you can buy at vox media. How do we create more value for people? But right now we're very narrowly focused on making hot pot good. And so you mentioned you weren't looking at hot pot because it had a subscription business that was just a piece of it. But why keep the subscription business as opposed to hotpots part of the verge now? And now it's free for everyone. Part of it's free. Issues a hot pod gut for free on the verge all the time. It's a skill we don't have. The verge has never taken paid customer support emails. We've never managed billing. So we, because New York magazine this company, there are capabilities we could use that they have already built over many, many years to try to learn what does our audience want. And we think hot pod because of that trade aspect, it's worth paying for. It's not just more stuff for the ads go away. It is actionable tradable information. And we think that is always worth paying for. You mentioned New York magazine, obviously they have a long-standing subscription business. But then there are other properties within vox media that haven't really pushed into subscriptions and have even.

vox media Spotify Nick Apple Google New York magazine
"vox media" Discussed on The Digiday Podcast

The Digiday Podcast

05:16 min | 11 months ago

"vox media" Discussed on The Digiday Podcast

"Yeah yeah i mean. I think it's the time off aspect like it's not being able to travel and feel like they're making use pto. I think has led a lot of people to not take the time off but it is important to just log off for a week. Especially after a particularly hard cycle. lindsey. I guess what's your approach. Bentiu managing burn out as well like have there been any kind of particular things that you've found have worked for Maybe like leading a remote staff for instance it's similar. What's what he said. I think it's all about in the culture. And i think it's a top down thing Obviously you know when we have unlimited time off. But i think there are two things. It's for me it's always a you know. People need to actually be off when they have time off. Because i think there is a tendency for people to take off but then still end up taking a couple of calls or need to catch up on something else and i think I really want people to understand that. The time off should actually be time all for one. Because i think that's also a big issue for any company I think it also is to as managers. I think it's our responsibility to also have that empathy for other people and also understand that like we're all human beings and be able to have conversations with people almost sense the you know where staff is. An inmate adjustments there. So i mean personally for the coat. We worked really hard in this fashion issue. There's a lot going on in september from met gala two emmys A lot of packages coming up so we company wide. Have you know friday. And then monday after labor day. I decided starting wednesday. We're going to be off. Because i wanted to make sure that south is able to have downtime that i appreciate all the hard work it's issue and the you know i want them to be able to enjoy the rest of the end of the summer and i just think it's about us you know really enforcing that work life balance because everybody is going to have a different comfort level of coming to you and saying i'm okay with taking time off. I need to take time off and so it definitely has. It's definitely a top down. Culture shift For a lot of people to actually you know. Have that time off that. I think we've done it in the best way we can. And you know this pandemic again has been really hard Running a newsroom is really hard in that especially you know in this time. Those racial injustice in so many reckonings happening as a black woman. It can be tiring and and really emotional. And there's been a lot of days where i felt like it was really hard for me to to want to continue to read more to have to listen to another speed toward to stay tuned in. But i think it's also you know those conversations and empathy for each other has gotten us through and I feel like we're obviously still in a very Feels like it's just very uncertain times but i. I think that we've created a culture that is A very just based community so that we can at least facilitate those conversations and that people feel supported right now. I was going to ask too. I mean both of you are obviously leading newsrooms. You have your hand a lot of different projects Lindsay cheer point. You're living through Moments of time that are just very mentally draining and trying to keep on top of the news cycle..

lindsey Lindsay cheer
"vox media" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

05:16 min | 11 months ago

"vox media" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Yeah yeah i mean. I think it's the time off aspect like it's not being able to travel and feel like they're making use pto. I think has led a lot of people to not take the time off but it is important to just log off for a week. Especially after a particularly hard cycle. lindsey. I guess what's your approach. Bentiu managing burn out as well like have there been any kind of particular things that you've found have worked for Maybe like leading a remote staff for instance it's similar. What's what he said. I think it's all about in the culture. And i think it's a top down thing Obviously you know when we have unlimited time off. But i think there are two things. It's for me it's always a you know. People need to actually be off when they have time off. Because i think there is a tendency for people to take off but then still end up taking a couple of calls or need to catch up on something else and i think I really want people to understand that. The time off should actually be time all for one. Because i think that's also a big issue for any company I think it also is to as managers. I think it's our responsibility to also have that empathy for other people and also understand that like we're all human beings and be able to have conversations with people almost sense the you know where staff is. An inmate adjustments there. So i mean personally for the coat. We worked really hard in this fashion issue. There's a lot going on in september from met gala to emmys A lot of packages coming up so we company wide. Have you know friday. And then monday after labor day. I decided starting wednesday. We're going to be off. Because i wanted to make sure that south is able to have downtime that i appreciate all the hard work it's issue and the i want them to be able to enjoy the rest of the end of the summer and i just think it's about us you know really enforcing that work life balance because everybody is going to have a different comfort level of coming to you and saying i'm okay with taking time off. I need to take time off and so it definitely has. It's definitely a top down. Culture shift For a lot of people to actually you know. Have that time off that. I think we've done it in the best way we can. And you know this pandemic again has been really hard Running a newsroom is really hard in that especially you know in this time. Those racial injustice in so many reckonings happening as a black woman. It can be tiring and and really emotional. And there's been a lot of days where i felt like it was really hard for me to to want to continue to read more to have to listen to another speed toward know to to stay tuned in. But i think it's also those conversations and empathy for each other has gotten us through and I feel like we're obviously still in a very. It feels like it's just very uncertain times but i. I think that we've created a culture that is A very just based community so that we can at least facilitate those conversations and that people feel supported right now. I was going to ask too. I mean both of you are obviously leading newsrooms. You have your hand a lot of different projects Lindsay cheer point. You're living through Moments of time that are just very mentally draining and trying to keep on top of the news cycle..

lindsey Lindsay cheer
"vox media" Discussed on The Digiday Podcast

The Digiday Podcast

05:17 min | 11 months ago

"vox media" Discussed on The Digiday Podcast

"It's a really great conversation. I'm i'm excited for everyone to europe without a further. Ado kelly lindsey spotty thank you so much for joining us on the digital podcast. Today this is the first episode of a series that we're working on that looks at the kind of new guard of editors and chief in the digital media industry. What i wanted to focus on with this episode is kind of looking at how the role of editor in chief has changed over the years. It's become much more of a multi-platform focus. And i wanted to kind of hear your thoughts about what that really means and what your role kind of looks like nowadays. There's so many different factors. That are impacting newsroom. So i am really curious to hear both of your perspectives of holding these Holding these jobs Especially as we're all kind of remote still for many young journalists editor in chief is kind of like the pinnacle that they aspire to reach in their careers. Both of you have achieved that pretty early on in your careers So i would love to kick it off by kind of talking about your career. Trajectories lindsey. I know you've previously served as editor in chief at teen vogue so this is kind of your second reign as a top editor. What kind of lead you to both of those positions. How are you in your position now. Yeah i mean. I always like to to talk about my trajectory in industry because it is very unconventional and unexpected. I grew up in the mid west. I didn't have any connections in fashion or media and specifically fashion publications You know a lot of people traditionally come from really wealthy backgrounds really connected in fashioned backgrounds. And so i ended up actually just trying to intern and a lot of different places and Just work my butt off and teen. Vogue was actually my first fashion internship and so over the years. I would intern at a lot of different publications. I did a lot of interning for actual stylus idealized. Pr tried all of it and was able to get a job after. I graduated at teen vogue. Just working in the closet Nothing glamorous all. I did was organized. Schlep and run around run errands people And i can still remember the food orders. Which i'm very proud of but Yeah i mean and over the years obviously of interning and then being able to work at teen vogue it was really an amazing experience To come full circle to come back as editor in chief. And that.

kelly lindsey europe lindsey
"vox media" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

04:18 min | 11 months ago

"vox media" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"To the podcast. I'm tim peterson senior media editor at today. Barbara's senior digital so exciting episode. This week kicks off a new series. That will be doing over the next four weeks. And that kaley. And i've been referring to as the modern newsroom leader over the past year or so there have been a lot of new names atop the mass heads of a whole host of publications and well. There's always turnover in the media industry. What stands out about these new. Editors-in-chief is all a lot of things for starters. Many of them are women and bypass which hopefully offers an inflection point for greater levels of diversity and inclusion inside newsrooms and the job of editor in chief today is also probably pretty different than when many of these people started out as journalists with things. Like video and social media. Being part of the purview. Killing i'm really excited that we're finally again the series off the ground. Yeah i'm excited to. I mean we've been covering a lot of these The topic of modern newsroom. What has changed about the way we work in the way that The journalism industry is You know approaching the coverage of news and in diversity in the newsroom. And we've been covering these topics right but the people that are leading the charge of making those changes and addressing. The issues that are affecting. Staffers are the editors in chief. Executive editors that the top you know editorial leads so being able to talk with them about their experiences and how they're addressing some of these challenges and issues in journalism space right now is just really exciting. The first episode today really gets at the crux of some of those topics and so further. I up sewed kelly spoke with lindsey people's wagner who is the editor in chief of box. Media's the cut and so they sharma who is the editor in chief of vox media. Vox interesting because both lindsey and southie. They started around the same time as editors chief which was back in the spring of this year. So i mean a year into the pandemic the point. Yeah they both started around the same time I did ask them how much they get to work with each other. I mean they're under. Vox media but honestly the the brands are pretty different so it turns out not that much but they do you know lean on each other which is awesome and the reason we had them both together was because we were talking about some of those things that working for modern digital publisher Causes the editor in chief role to have to consider You know sometimes for the first time so vox. Media has a huge podcast network for instance and and is getting into a video. ip licensing and so there's different ways of telling a story that an editor in chief of twenty years ago might not have been considering doing right. They do get into some of the details about You know what their their day to day looks like and how they're approaching you know storytelling in different formats For the first time they're also seeing opportunity to take a different approach to the culture of news organization. Our newsroom right. Yeah so we we definitely talk a lot about That as well. Because one of the big topics that is affecting a lot of journalists and editors right now is burn out. It's been something that's been occurring in the industry for years but in the past year and a half it's been at least talked about a lot more publicly which was awesome because once there's more awareness you can address it etc..

tim peterson kaley vox media lindsey Barbara sharma wagner kelly
"vox media" Discussed on The Digiday Podcast

The Digiday Podcast

04:06 min | 11 months ago

"vox media" Discussed on The Digiday Podcast

"I'm tim peterson. Senior media editor at today. Barbara's senior digital so exciting episode. This week kicks off a new series. That will be doing over the next four weeks. And that kaley. And i've been referring to as the modern newsroom leader over the past year or so there have been a lot of new names atop the mass heads of a whole host of publications and well. There's always turnover in the media industry. What stands out about these new. Editors-in-chief is all a lot of things for starters. Many of them are women and bypass which hopefully offers an inflection point for greater levels of diversity and inclusion inside newsrooms and the job of editor in chief today is also probably pretty different than when many of these people started out as journalists with things. Like video and social media. Being part of the purview. Killing i'm really excited that we're finally in the series off the ground. Yeah i'm excited to. I mean we've been covering a lot of these The topic of modern newsroom. What has changed about the way we work in the way that The journalism industry is You know approaching the coverage of news and in diversity in the newsroom. And we've been covering these topics right but the people that are leading the charge of making those changes and addressing. The issues that are affecting. Staffers are the editors in chief. Executive editors that the top you know editorial leads so being able to talk with them about their experiences and how they're addressing some of these challenges and issues in journalism space right now is just really exciting. The first episode today really gets at the crux of some of those topics and so further. First episode kelly spoke with lindsey people's wagner who is the editor in chief of box media's the cut and so they sharma who is the editor in chief of vox media. Vox interesting because both lindsey and southie. They started around the same time as editors chief which was back in the spring of this year. So i mean a year into the pandemic the point. Yeah they both started around the same time I did ask them how much they get to work with each other. I mean they're under. Vox media but honestly the the brands are pretty different so it turns out not that much but they do you know lean on each other which is awesome and the reason we had them both together was because we were talking about some of those things that working for modern digital publisher Causes the editor in chief role to have to consider You know sometimes for the first time so vox. Media has a huge podcast network for instance and and is getting into a video. ip licensing and so there's different ways of telling a story that an editor in chief of twenty years ago might not have been considering doing right. They do get into some of the details about You know what their their day to day looks like and how they're approaching storytelling in different formats For the first time they're also seeing opportunity to take a different approach to the culture of news organization or newsroom. Right yeah so we. We definitely talk a lot about That as well. Because one of the big topics that is affecting a lot of journalists and editors right now is burn out. It's been something that's been occurring in the industry for years but in the past year and a half it's been at least talked about a lot more publicly which was awesome because once there's more awareness you can address it etc. Swazi talked about how her background. In lake news and politics. Journalism has led her to Be more understanding of those different burnout symptoms. And then lindsey talked about her own personal way of dealing with it which is really hard to do but she's she's kind of cracked the code. I think so. Leading by example. They both talk about you. Know what's burdening newsrooms and how they're trying to lead their teams through that so.

tim peterson kaley box media lindsey vox media Barbara sharma wagner kelly Swazi
"vox media" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"vox media" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Was to partner with a company. And vox media. Was that company and one of the things that you've talked about wanting to expand into is documentaries Believe and vox. Media obviously has locks media studios produces documentaries and documentary. They do there is. That could have been something where you could have remained independent and worked with a production company. Hollywood talent agency kind of package. That up on your own and kinda leave the hard work to or some of the hard work to an outside company wide but it's a global thing right so there's lots of things we're thinking about and and you know planning on Not just continuing the digital audio podcasts of the kinds. We've been discussing and narrative as well in the future and not just in a a av things not just documentaries and other tv related projects but also events. You know the main the main reason i think given the nature of our business at the moment was was to expand the podcast business. And sure you can. You can do piecemeal and you can you know. Add some people in contract with with other producers to make you know three more podcasts until you grow your own team internally to that size you can partner with another three companies to figure out how to make a documentary series. You can find some other folks to do your event events strategy but if you have it all in one place i think it's also the case an expert on this That the greater likelihood of coming up with the project on the video side. That is in line with your with our sensibilities and our audience is higher. If you're working with the same team and everyone has the same interests In making sure that is a great product made by the company at large. There's just this better capability of cross pollination and further the question earlier about some of the other things we saw in partnering as opposed to just going on her own. Is you have this broad network And not only. Do you have people to sort of. Give us advice about you. Know better ways to market and better ways to to grow the audience their ability to cross promote. You know you'll be seeing that. When now and then launches. I think i think now. And then will be a very very big hit and it would have been a very very big hit for us. As cafe studios i think it'll be a substantially larger hit With the public because of a lot of the resources box media has to has to bring to bear on it mardi from your perspective. I'm curiously. It seems like media has really been managing its podcasts. From an ip perspective of y'all have been taking episodes of shows like today explained spin them off into their own shows. It also seems like this is going back to the new york magazine Acquisition but you know the potential to take new york magazine articles develop them into streaming shows for example. Same things can be done with podcast. You know l. a. Times did this with dear john which i think bravo from not mistaken produced. So are you seeing like house. Vox media looking at podcasting being able to take podcast shows and adopt them into other forms..

john three companies today l. a. Times vox media three more podcasts new york mardi one Vox media
"vox media" Discussed on The Digiday Podcast

The Digiday Podcast

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"vox media" Discussed on The Digiday Podcast

"In in a in a real way way to scale What we're doing and so Our ability to bring cafe on and and have a a well-developed sales and revenue infrastructure can just hit the ground running We started selling Cafe in may and you know have our first programs already underway. We have a marketing and communications team. That you can take cafe. And what they're doing and apple fight it and and really Bring to bear the kind of launch in audience growth capabilities that we have. Obviously we have recording and production capabilities. And so all of those things that we've built as an infrastructure for launching new shows internally. managing You know lots of staff and managing advertisers and marketing of shows have all been built up so that now Were in a position to Actually bringing in a company like cafe and just have a plug in to our system. Seamlessly ends though In terms of the integration. It's been great and seamless from a personal perspective. The teams are getting along great but in terms of having a really wealthy out processes for selling and production and host Managing all that stuff and launching of shows and the creation of artwork. Your shows and The ability to do Deals with contracts with talent and All the things that go into Scaling up a big high high-quality podcast network we now have in place and so It it reflects the acquisition coming back to the point was it reflects the connection and And fit between box median cafe and it also reflects The the place. That vox media has gotten to in its podcasts. Business to be able to do that. and And bring a lot of value to bear to kind of make one plus one three as we connect echinacea all those things he. He's murray stated perfectly from our perspective. You know we have these conversations with martin also with jim about how you know the integration would take place to me. It seemed like a mind. Boggling lay difficult thing. We've been doing this for three some odd years. You know. people have their systems and we have our support in the way we did things. And i gotta tell you it's been. It's been incredible. How seamless it is seen as actually the.

martin apple echinacea jim first programs one vox media three
"vox media" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"vox media" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"In in a in a real way way to scale What we're doing and so Our ability to bring cafe on and and have a a well-developed sales and revenue infrastructure can just hit the ground running We started selling Cafe in may and you know have our first programs already underway. We have a marketing and communications team. That you can take cafe. And what they're doing and apple fight it and and really Bring to bear the kind of launch in audience growth capabilities that we have. Obviously we have recording and production capabilities. And so all of those things that we've built as an infrastructure for launching new shows internally. managing You know lots of staff and managing advertisers and marketing of shows have all been built up so that now Were in a position to Actually bringing in a company like cafe and just have a plug in to our system. Seamlessly ends though In terms of the integration. It's been great and seamless from a personal perspective. The teams are getting along great but in terms of having a really wealthy out processes for selling and production and host Managing all that stuff and launching of shows and the creation of artwork. Your shows and The ability to do Deals with contracts with talent and All the things that go into Scaling up a big high high-quality podcast network we now have in place and so It it reflects the acquisition coming back to the point was it reflects the connection and And fit between box median cafe and it also reflects The the place. That vox media has gotten to in its podcasts. Business to be able to do that. and And bring a lot of value to bear to kind of make one plus one three as we connect echinacea all those things he. He's murray stated perfectly from our perspective. You know we have these conversations with martin also with jim about how you know the integration would take place to me. It seemed like a mind. Boggling lay difficult thing. We've been doing this for three some odd years. You know. people have their systems and we have our support in the way we did things. And i gotta tell you it's been. It's been incredible. How seamless it is seen as actually the.

martin apple echinacea jim first programs one vox media three
"vox media" Discussed on The Digiday Podcast

The Digiday Podcast

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"vox media" Discussed on The Digiday Podcast

"In detail. There are teams of people. And this is you know when you get to the question ultimately of of why we chose to do this move. Their teams of people including revenue folks and sales folks and audience development folks who are really helping us craft the way that we can expand and grow not just the current shows up but also how we think about the subscription model. Also we think about you. Know joining up You know with other people and certainly most importantly probably for the purposes of now the big launch of now in then which is Is i'm sure you'll mention is already rocketing up the charts at least on apple mardi. I'll kick it to you. Then from the vox media. Perspective so cafe studios is part of fox media podcast network but its own division within. Vox media podcast network. Was that org structure taken what we felt that much. I you know our other editorial networks cafe has a distinct voice distinct lens on the world that It it certainly audio first but as an editorial network stands very much on its own for a kind of equality. Thoughtful programming bad Looks at the world looks at current events. Looks at you know really really anything. But but through a unique lands that is kinda bread to law and policy That priest and his partners and co host bring to the table and so We thought but It made complete sense to keep that together to grow that over time and that their editorial vision was one that was very broad and capable of expanding with with that lens in mind But ultimately i think it's the lenses you know really smart people who can talk about the world current events. What's happening and explain that to people in.

vox media apple mardi Vox media fox media first teams
Stay Tuned for a new Vox Media acquisition

podnews

00:12 sec | 1 year ago

Stay Tuned for a new Vox Media acquisition

"Vox media is to buy cafe studios inc founded by former. Us attorney pete's barra and his brother. Vinit publishes a slate of shows including stay tuned with preet

Vox Media Cafe Studios Inc Pete's Barra Vinit United States
WarnerMedia CEO Jason Kilar on a wild first year on the job

Recode Media

01:48 min | 1 year ago

WarnerMedia CEO Jason Kilar on a wild first year on the job

"Very excited Who is the ceo of mortar media online at jason. Hello peter how are you. I'm good. I don't normally have to do disclosures at the beginning of this podcast but here i have to say that Vox media is working on cnn. Original documentary and i'm involved in that in some capacity so we should clear that up right at the beginning But you know. I was working on a cnn documentary. I did not know that. All i ask is please make it a good one I will do what. I can Jason the last time we talked was december. When you announced that you were blowing up the movie business You didn't say that but a lot of dead You were gonna make all of your theatrical movies streaming day and date throughout this year. People freaked out about it You said it was going to workout. We're now a few months into the experiment. How has it gone. What have you learned. Yes so we're very happy with it. Peter i mentioned this publicly before but i'll restate which is where four movies into it and it's obviously year still but based on what we've seen so far And what. I've already shared publicly. We're very encouraged. And we're encouraged for a number of reasons number one. Is that for those people that are comfortable. They're showing up at the box office. And godzilla vs kong over the last twelve days is a great example of that around the world and people are clearly showing up and excited and consuming the movie selection that we have especially these new movies that you're referring to so i mentioned publicly a couple of weeks ago at our investor day that you know we're seeing that there are among the top titles on the service there helping with churn reduction and and certainly a lot of subscriber acquisition As well we mentioned publicly so So it's doing what we Anticipated and and certainly hope for. And i'm excited to share that.

Vox Media CNN Hello Peter Jason Peter
interview With Kara Swisher, host of Pivot And Sway podcasts, co-founder Of Recode

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:23 min | 1 year ago

interview With Kara Swisher, host of Pivot And Sway podcasts, co-founder Of Recode

"Hey everyone it's carly today. Cara swisher joins me on skimmed from the couch. She has been called. The most feared an well liked journalists in silicon valley cara has been covering the tech world for decades and is also the co founder of the site. Recode she's currently the host of to podcasts. Sway pit cara. Thank you so much for coming on the show. Welcome to skim from the couch. Thank you there's no couch. though that's true well welcome from my kitchen. First question we ask everybody. Skim your resume. I'm really old. You really want my resume okay. I went to georgetown. University went to columbia journalism school. I worked for lots of people in very low level. Jobs like delivering mail at the washington. Post being assistant people return type people. And then i got an internship the washington post which i then got hired from and i were there and then worked at the wall. Street journal wrote a book during the nineties about The beginnings of the internet Which nobody was paying attention to. And then i worked for the journal. For many years doing a wide range of things beat reporting columns and then i started sort of an entrepreneurial activity inside the journal which was a conference and then a new website blog. Essentially i started their first real blog effort which was all things d and then i left and got investments and started recode sold that to vox media and then i now also hosts i started doing podcasting about five six years ago early on and then shifted a lot to that and writing for the new york times and doing a podcast but i also do a pint yesterday new york magazine too so i do podcasting and writing now and events but events now with copen said say you're pretty busy. What if something that people don't know about you that they'd be surprised. I spent a lot of time with my family. I mean i'm really busy. I make a lot of content. I four five podcasts. A week major podcasts. A week and i'll read column every week. And so i work a lot. But i actually spent a lotta time with my family and i just had another child a little girl so i spent a lot more time with my family and i think people would imagine given how much content iming congratulations on the new baby. So before we dive into your career. I want to go back and stand a little bit about where you came from. Which is what was little like the same the same the same the same. I mean. I think i had a very strong personality from the get. Go as a especially as a girl where people want you to shut up. Essentially i didn't shut up very much. I had a nickname tempestuous. My family's italian. Which is i think it's a compliment. They meant as a compliment. But i would always sort of upend things to if i didn't like them. I did very well in grammar school. I was considered very very smart. Read very early. People caught up with me pretty quickly. But i always knew what i wanted. You get that from your parents know. My dad died when i was really little. He was very sweet actually had a very sweet personality. My mom no. I don't think so. I think my mom talks in shades a lot. She doesn't say what she means. A lot of the time. And i was very forthright. I don't wanna make you can't make sort of like italians are loud but we are a very in your face family so we say what we think but i think my mom talks more and as most people do they say things that that's not what they mean and much more. I say exactly what. I mean when i say something so i don't know how i got it i just did. When did you realize he wanted to be a journalist. Not for a while. actually i was. I went to the school. Ford service at georgetown which is for diplomats and spies essentially it. So i wanted to go into the military. My dad was in the military. And i wanted to serve but i wanted to do and everything else that i didn't because i was gay it i it was illegal and that it was. Don't ask don't tell which was even worse in some weird way which is just sort of separate but equal kind of thing though. That was much worse but it still wasn't it was not it was civil rights violation. I think of gay people. So i didn't want to serve by lying like keeping it to myself. I thought that was stupid. And so i never served and by the time they sort of ended. I was too old. I was going to serve in the reserves. But i i just didn't want to just lie and i was like this is ridiculous and so i would have had a career. I suspected military appropriate running the right now but being fired by trump at this moment. But i want it to be in military intelligence or in the cia some in some fashion to be an analyst. And which is what i do. Anyway on a analyze and try to find out information in an opinion about

Cara Swisher Silicon Valley Cara Columbia Journalism School Street Journal Copen Georgetown Cara New York Magazine Washington Post The Journal The New York Times Washington Ford CIA
Interview With Kara Swisher, host of Pivot and Sway podcasts, co-founder of Recode

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:23 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Kara Swisher, host of Pivot and Sway podcasts, co-founder of Recode

"Hey everyone it's carly today. Cara swisher joins me on skimmed from the couch. She has been called. The most feared an well liked journalists in silicon valley cara has been covering the tech world for decades and is also the co founder of the site. Recode she's currently the host of to podcasts. Sway pit cara. Thank you so much for coming on the show. Welcome to skim from the couch. Thank you there's no couch. though that's true well welcome from my kitchen. First question we ask everybody. Skim your resume. I'm really old. You really want my resume okay. I went to georgetown. University went to columbia journalism school. I worked for lots of people in very low level. Jobs like delivering mail at the washington. Post being assistant people return type people. And then i got an internship the washington post which i then got hired from and i were there and then worked at the wall. Street journal wrote a book during the nineties about The beginnings of the internet Which nobody was paying attention to. And then i worked for the journal. For many years doing a wide range of things beat reporting columns and then i started sort of an entrepreneurial activity inside the journal which was a conference and then a new website blog. Essentially i started their first real blog effort which was all things d and then i left and got investments and started recode sold that to vox media and then i now also hosts i started doing podcasting about five six years ago early on and then shifted a lot to that and writing for the new york times and doing a podcast but i also do a pint yesterday new york magazine too so i do podcasting and writing now and events but events now with copen said say you're pretty busy. What if something that people don't know about you that they'd be surprised. I spent a lot of time with my family. I mean i'm really busy. I make a lot of content. I four five podcasts. A week major podcasts. A week and i'll read column every week. And so i work a lot. But i actually spent a lotta time with my family and i just had another child a little girl so i spent a lot more time with my family and i think people would imagine given how much content iming congratulations on the new baby. So before we dive into your career. I want to go back and stand a little bit about where you came from. Which is what was little like the same the same the same the same. I mean. I think i had a very strong personality from the get. Go as a especially as a girl where people want you to shut up. Essentially i didn't shut up very much. I had a nickname tempestuous. My family's italian. Which is i think it's a compliment. They meant as a compliment. But i would always sort of upend things to if i didn't like them. I did very well in grammar school. I was considered very very smart. Read very early. People caught up with me pretty quickly. But i always knew what i wanted. You get that from your parents know. My dad died when i was really little. He was very sweet actually had a very sweet personality. My mom no. I don't think so. I think my mom talks in shades a lot. She doesn't say what she means. A lot of the time. And i was very forthright. I don't wanna make you can't make sort of like italians are loud but we are a very in your face family so we say what we think but i think my mom talks more and as most people do they say things that that's not what they mean and much more. I say exactly what. I mean when i say something so i don't know how i got it i just did. When did you realize he wanted to be a journalist. Not for a while. actually i was. I went to the school. Ford service at georgetown which is for diplomats and spies essentially it. So i wanted to go into the military. My dad was in the military. And i wanted to serve but i wanted to do and everything else that i didn't because i was gay it i it was illegal and that it was. Don't ask don't tell which was even worse in some weird way which is just sort of separate but equal kind of thing though. That was much worse but it still wasn't it was not it was civil rights violation. I think of gay people. So i didn't want to serve by lying like keeping it to myself. I thought that was stupid. And so i never served and by the time they sort of ended. I was too old. I was going to serve in the reserves. But i i just didn't want to just lie and i was like this is ridiculous and so i would have had a career. I suspected military appropriate running the right now but being fired by trump at this moment. But i want it to be in military intelligence or in the cia some in some fashion to be an analyst. And which is what i do. Anyway on a analyze and try to find out information in an opinion about

Cara Swisher Silicon Valley Cara Columbia Journalism School Street Journal Copen Georgetown Cara New York Magazine Washington Post The Journal The New York Times Washington Ford CIA
Netflix's audio-only mode could threaten podcasting

podnews

03:34 min | 1 year ago

Netflix's audio-only mode could threaten podcasting

"Letterman walks out. Onstage blows a kiss to the crowd grabs a might cover much. Thank you takes the mic office. Stand to see you move over. Podcasting net flicks is rolling out an audio only mode to the android app. The app also has variable speed playback and a feature called audio description. Which as you've just heard tells you what's happening on screen. The company will hope you. Don't listen to a podcast when you can listen to a movie or tv show instead. Try and digital has released the latest podcast report. The data covers most of november. The top five remains unchanged with npr at number one total downloads from the top ten publishers drops by more than five percent in a month that included the us presidential election and thanksgiving an incomplete rancor it measures participating publishers only and notably not iheart radio. Edison research published their ten for twenty compilation of their biggest findings from twenty twenty expects audio consumption spoken word and us election voting willing to that from our show notes now newsletter today story board and enterprise podcast and hosting platform has raised four point. Five million dollars in funding bryant barletta. The first sounds profitable deep dive yesterday. Looking at pod scribe. It's free to watch on the profitable website. Espn podcasting had a record year with ninety six point five million downloads in october alone. They say vox media studios to double the amount of shows it makes and plans to bring in one hundred million dollars in revenue in two thousand and twenty one. Steve hand wonders if independent podcasting has peaked. He was formerly at google's audio mused division at a us public radio. Nick held him to. Is broadly pessimistic about the podcast industry available content massively exceeds available interest. He claims and the changes in the industry in two twenty are a long way from won't made podcasts. Special he says and captivate has launched show notes snippets a simple way to at creatine snippets to your show notes. I'm an adviser. What does it take good and effective secretary. The president's cabinet well first of all congratulations. I'm thrilled by news that you're going to be nominated. That's a clip. From the deciding decade with pete buttigieg who learned had been nominated as transport secretary while he was doing a podcast with hillary clinton podcast. One australia has lost a show. And russia's podcast 'em salvation will become an independent production in two thousand and twenty one. She describes her relationship with sea. Who owned podcast one in australia as an abusive relationship. I keep going back to sa hired. Her for short lived stint on the ailing today. A famine sydney one in a list of underinvested breakfast shows on the formerly market leading station. Crooked media's wind of changes to be adapted for television says deadline and a sports podcast has crowd funded over one hundred thirty five thousand dollars in two weeks that tennis podcast has received funding from nearly one thousand two hundred listeners in the uk. It's been going since two thousand twelve

Edison Research Bryant Barletta Vox Media Studios Letterman NPR United States Pete Buttigieg Espn Nick Steve Google Australia Cabinet Hillary Clinton Russia Sydney
Vox Media Publisher Melissa Bell on recent departures and future content

The Digiday Podcast

04:14 min | 1 year ago

Vox Media Publisher Melissa Bell on recent departures and future content

"Okay let's get into welcome. Melissa thanks for taking the time happy to be here always enjoy the digital passed so last month bucks co medical esiason as recline as well as vox editor in chief larne williams announced. They're leaving bucks. So what's going on a box. You know it's a it's a story that's a little bit about fox could also just think this is a major europe change. You spoke a little bit about the founding of ox. We started almost seven years ago. We'll have our seventh anniversary in march this this next year and it's been an incredible period of growth for us i think particularly over the last three years We really expanded into the multimedia platforms that. You're talking about television in podcast. Obviously our newsroom grew as well. And it's been fantastic to watch this growth. But i think this year with everything in change in and everyone kind of considering their next steps. I think individually as romance and lauren all in conversations with me realized that they were ready for different step in their careers and similarly i think fox is ready for a different step in its direction in twenty twenty one and it aligns really to sort of say okay. Let's make this. Let's make some big significant changes all at once and let's move forward into into a new era. Vox they have all been huge instrumental. Parts of oxen have really left their imprint. On it and i'm really grateful for all they've done but i'm also excited for what's to come next. And there's some precedent for this. Because then i think it was. Twenty seventeen was when as a became editor at large. That was. Lauren was promoted to editor in chief and that seemed to coincide with also something of a new era for box like today explained. Hadn't launched yet. The netflix show explained watching. I think a year later so like with this now. Kind of that precedent being set. What are you expecting for the next era. Vox what's going to be different about fox in two thousand twenty one. Yeah i don't want to ever speak for Think it's a really interesting story. A bit In his in his decisions what he's always done. And i think that this is this is evident two thousand seventeen and evident now is that he and matt and i came up with a strong idea about what fox could try to solve for audiences. We really knew that there was there was something that we needed to help with journalism overall. But what we sound is that having others come in and take that sort of seed of an idea and build something invariably ends up with amazing incredible work. And i think that when ezra step back in two thousand seventeen he did so purposely to let someone like lauryn williams take the helm and lead. Vox into sort of this next generation. And you see the you see the impact that she had Over the last few years. And i think what we're looking for is to find some new folks who are ready to be those new leaders in taking different directions. We also i think have created space internally for a lot of the really talented people we have to step up and take box into different directions today. Explain you mentioned is is our daily podcast and i think it's a great example. We hired sean. Rahm ashore are host to create something. That really gets out what we want. Vox to be at its very best. Something that Jewels deep into stories of the day But does so in a way that is that takes topics seriously but artiste itself too seriously that brings both joy and understanding to its audience. And that's not something that i could have ever come up with. That's not something that could have ever come up with. That's really something that sean developed with his tastic team and i just you know i've always found that if you give creators space to do great work. They're great work will accomplish in so we're looking forward to that in the next

Bucks Co Medical Esiason Larne Williams FOX Melissa Lauren Lauryn Williams Europe Netflix Ezra Matt Rahm Sean
The best podcasts of 2020: Apple Podcasts unveil their shows of the year

podnews

02:52 min | 1 year ago

The best podcasts of 2020: Apple Podcasts unveil their shows of the year

"For the first time apple. Podcast is recognized a set of shows of the year. We have a full set from all major territories public. Radio dominates the winners including npr. For code switch. The bbc for the joe wicks podcast and in australia. The abc for the eleventh. You'll find it all linked from our show notes in our newsletter today apple podcast of also curated list of the biggest shows. Biggest new shows and editorial favorites. We have a list of those to your. Local list is also in apple podcasts. The number of podcast listeners. In italy is on the increase as new research from hip sauce. Thirty percent of sixteen to sixty year olds in the country. Now listen up from twenty six percent a year before. The data also says that fifteen percent of podcast listeners. This smart speakers the buzzes. Eric johnson. Formerly vox media has launched his own independent podcasting company johnson produced. Kara swisher recode decode. His new company called bumble cast and it'll offer consulting and produce original shows for the month of november bound sprout report that thirty two percent of their downloads into apple podcasts. The twenty five percent of download to spotify google third with two point six percent. The company tells us that after some tweaks to their algorithm this is a more accurate reflection of total downloads. Towel podcasts than previous data from the company. If you're missing. Joe rogan an exclusive. Show on spotify step forward. New website called spotty feed clever piece of code in which turns an exclusive spotify show into that. Rss feed fuse. Listen to on your normal podcast player. Yes the audio still comes from. Spotify service acosta's reiterated firmly believes in the open podcasting ecosystem ross adams. The ceo of the company highlights the importance of an open industry in a blog. Post today and a slow hand clap for music. Artists drum coon. Who's the author of an album on spotify deliberately built to stop google assistant from working properly. You'll see what we mean. If you follow the link from shaina it's send our newsletter today cared entertainment and peccadillo pictures present. American cody the unbelievable tale of a legendary day named elton kid. American kotei tells the story of a legendary man unlikely hero who crossed over a thousand migrants from mexico into the us. It's new today from westwood. One pagel pictures and imperative entertainments podcast division. And it might seem crazy. What i'm about to say but ferrall is launching his own podcast network other tone media is podcast other tone starts next week. I should make you happy

Apple Vox Media NPR Kara Swisher Eric Johnson ABC BBC Ross Adams Bumble Joe Rogan Australia Italy Johnson
Music podcast celebrates Indias neighbours

podnews

02:59 min | 2 years ago

Music podcast celebrates Indias neighbours

"Iheartmedia the owner of Heart Radio says that it's podcast revenue grew one hundred and three percents here on Aaron. Quarter to the total digital revenue is ninety three million dollars unique podcast listeners group I thirty percent here on downloads grew by sixty two percent revenue for the quarter across the company however was down by forty-six percents complain the pandemic for that. You can read a full quite from Bob Pittman talking about exclusive whether they're a good idea or not in podcasting our show notes and our newsletter today. On track has published its top US publishers list for July Two Thousand Twenty Iheart is now number one for unique monthly audience in the US as well as global downloads beating NPR in both rankings. ABC is now measured alongside ESPN. The rancor only measures participating publishers. An SEC filing states that lip since former CEO Christopher Spencer who resigned on July thirty first will continue to be paid until the end of this year, he ends four hundred thousand dollars. He'll get a bonus of one, hundred, seventy seven, thousand dollars in early January he'll van to hundred and fifteen thousand dollars a year for his role is senior adviser until the end of February twenty, twenty three for which he'll have to work a maximum of eight hours a month. Lipson will also pay spencer four million dollars to buy back shares that he holds. The Board of lips includes those who last year criticized the company for outsized executive pay I'd like to say something sarcastic here. Row Quarter highlights a surge in tippety around sports podcasts. What's happening in House sports? PODCASTERS can take advantage the pre events for the fest global. Summits Twenty Twenty have been happening all week we linked to a bunch of recordings today. Dearest is a new exclusive podcast on spotify in Indonesian. It focuses on letters written and read by writers, musicians and actors, and it's made by Journalism podcast company K B our prime and a number of additional podcast hosts. Now, allowing you to submit your podcasts to the yet to be launched Amazon music and audible podcasts service some people are giving you a backstage link it works for anyone on any Host by the way. Welcome to a special episode of our humble indie music podcast made an India India Center seventy, three years of independence next week. But India's Music Indie podcast made in India. Wants to remind us that I, love for music isn't defined by geographic boundaries it'll produce three shows focusing on music from India's neighbors and the cat returns to audio with a new weekly podcast from the Vox media podcast network avery truthful man is host leading an ensemble voices engaged in the conversations that matter most to women and those who loved them. It returns on August nineteen

Ceo Christopher Spencer Summits Twenty Twenty India India India Center United States Heart Radio Bob Pittman ABC Aaron SEC Vox Media NPR Spotify Senior Adviser Espn Executive Lipson Amazon K B
"vox media" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"vox media" Discussed on KQED Radio

"S. a conversation with vox media's as recline the depolarized twentieth century America that is often look back on in our textbooks as a kind of golden age of American politics it was built on the bones polarization it seems like a bad thing but compared to what join us on the next intelligence squared U. S. the debate tonight at eight PM on KQ weedy with millions of people losing their jobs in recent weeks there are no longer lines at the country's food bank's charitable feeding programs are having trouble tracking down the produce that they need to meet the demands some of it when I and yet at the same time farmers are throwing out perfectly good food because they can't sell it this country's food crisis on the next morning edition from NPR news join us tomorrow morning for that he key reading news and much more three AM to nine AM tomorrow morning I'm Jack levy ours it is another sharp week of job losses with more than six and a half million Americans filing for unemployment benefits last week more than sixteen million Americans one in ten workers have filed for unemployment in the last three weeks the U. N. estimates nearly two hundred million people could lose their jobs worldwide authorities in Greece are asking for help setting up medical isolation centres on islands with large refugee camps countries already confirmed at least twenty eight cases of coronaviruses two camps on the mainland although none on the islands Tokyo is reporting another record increase in its number of coronavirus cases city has a hundred eighty one new cases today totaling more than fifteen hundred countries prime minister declared a state of emergency earlier this week for Tokyo.

vox media America Jack levy Greece Tokyo prime minister NPR
Vox Media CRO Ryan Pauley on acquiring NY Mag

Digiday Podcast

02:14 min | 2 years ago

Vox Media CRO Ryan Pauley on acquiring NY Mag

"Welcome to the digital podcast and Brian Marcy. This week I'm honored to be joined by fellow Philadelphia. Eagles Fan. Rhyme polly Ryan is also. She grabbed officer Media Ryan. Welcome thank you for having me first. Time longtime yes. Should we Should we talk mostly about the Super Bowl? Let's talk let's talk trade deadline you get into it. Yeah but let's start with. It's been four or five months since the New York deal for four months. Okay what's been the big change? Yeah so we. We announced the deal late last year. Deal closed and before the before the end of twenty nineteen sort of ran. The full integration. So on the revenue side we've completely done the integration. From an organizational standpoint one sales team marketing team won content studio which has gone. Really smoothly. we went. We went quite quickly To get everything done through the end of the year and then came out. It's just always sort of the big new year unveiling for It's a way to start the year But and then took that message channel. I mean this is the biggest. It was the biggest deal of oxted. Yes we've done. We've done a number of deals over the decade but but this so explain to people who don't know what that kind of like inner integration processes like. Yeah well it will. I think we ran a relatively smooth one. But you have to understand what the what the start start from the client standpoint and that sort of what are the account overlaps. What are the what is the team structure? Look like and how does it and then culturally? How does everyone out of the processes the workflow goes? What are the marketing materials? Where the words and the numbers we describe the product we take to market and and thankfully with the New York media integration. The cultures were quite similar. The companies were complementary and so there was actually not a lot of client overlap less than thirty five percent of of customers. spent significant Advertising budgets with with both companies only thirty five percents. Yeah so it was a really interesting It was really interesting process to go through to see and you can see where the so. What categories will you adding more advertisers in so we we historically vox? Media has been really strong in Tech In auto financial services And CG Food and Food and beverage tail and historical new.

Polly Ryan Brian Marcy Eagles Oxted Philadelphia New York Officer
Apple Podcasts demonstrate 'Browse By Hosts And Guests'

podnews

03:51 min | 3 years ago

Apple Podcasts demonstrate 'Browse By Hosts And Guests'

"The latest from News Dot Net apple podcast this is demonstrated browse by hosts and guests showing Conan O'Brien needs friends guests within the apple podcast up then if you're running Ios team you can see that too we also find it in the desktop in Mac Os Catalina documentation project and make their muscles bigger who knows and we'll look at the tools we have to save our rapidly warming world. Oh Yeah I think you need here's a question what is technology how you're listening to me right now on your phone subscribe right now on Apple podcasts or your favorite podcast APP from stitcher and the Vox media podcast network

Apple Conan O'brien Vox Media
Vox Media agrees to acquire New York Magazine

Morning Edition

01:04 min | 3 years ago

Vox Media agrees to acquire New York Magazine

"The new media company vox has acquired New York magazine the publication is known for narratives about politics power influence and fame New York magazine started a half century ago as part of the new journalism movement NPR's David full conflict reports in media everyone's talking about scale are you a big enough to ride out the storm stirred by tech giants vox media is a midsize company that grew out of a network of sports blogs it now includes a news analysis site box the tax like the virgin either in curved New York magazine has its own sites dedicated to politics culture food in the world through the eyes of women vox media CEO Jim Bankoff tells NPR the two media companies shared voice driven sensibility and a tradition ridden reporting but have little actual readership overlap York magazine's current owners the Wasserstein family had been looking to sell it instead they'll take a significant minority ownership in vox and Pamela washer seems to run your bank of says he expects to generate more revenues from subscriptions to new digital products television and movie projects and from building out new York's commerce site for conflict and pure news New

New York Magazine NPR Vox Media Pamela Washer New York David CEO Jim Bankoff
Podcast Live new event and Spotify launches a daily podcast playlists

podnews

04:26 min | 3 years ago

Podcast Live new event and Spotify launches a daily podcast playlists

"Podcast live, a company that makes live events where podcasters can perform interact with an audience, and hosts special versions of their regular shows is today, announcing its second event, rugby at Twickenham podcasts involved to include a number of independent shows plus podcast from sky, the times, and the telegraph Spotify has launched a daily podcast playlist spotted by vox, media's Zack con Yvo terra notes that it appears to contain ten new episodes of shows, you're subscribe to in Spotify, a short clip, telling you to try something new and nine episodes from popular shows, we're not seeing it, but then the only podcast we subscribe to in Spotify is what it's this one Dutch podcast newsletter. Pod product has noted that spotify's player when shared on Twitter now plays, full podcast episodes in the player imbedding. The tweets might also be a simple. Ways to get a nice looking player on your blog or websites, perhaps more from Spotify. It's sound up. Podcasting accelerator is back for two thousand nineteen. It's a five day accelerator program designed to educate and support women of color in developing podcasts from idea to pilot production music service title now, appears to list podcasts, almost all their own programming, though, here's the podcast of the year at the Dutch podcast awards last week, the bills in Atlanta's the wards were built from a mix of public and jury votes. The I tunes performance marketing campaign and affiliate system used by many podcasters to measure promotion of their apple podcast shows is changing name to the apple services performance marketing campaign. Catchy in land. The head stuff podcast network is expanding into a former music studio complex and adding a membership program, the BBC. She is looking for podcasts with hope punk whatever. That's is wants to find a new podcast blockbuster based around three key priorities innovation new voices and new audiences. That's according to their commissioning editor for podcasts. Jason Phipps bullet is a new iphone app designed to help you share a clip from your podcast. We have an example of a tweet from that in our show notes, and our newsletter new talent alerts from their recent competition. NPR have posted eight podcasts from students in grades five to twelve that means age ten to eighteen willing to a podcasting workshop where the difference, the Himalayan podcasting workshop looks to be in a fabulous location. It's from July the seventeenth to the twenty-first and event for you. The best of the British podcast awards is happening on Saturday. The sixteenth of June has part of the underbelly festival in south Bank in London in the UK, and as a side. At the British podcast awards appear to have invested considerably in PR for their winners willing to a piece in the guardian today, featuring a pre ceremony photo. Shoots taken at the awards that even credits the sponsors as much to learn for other countries. We think the company responsible is cover PR, and the illusionist has just added an extra live show in Perth on the third of July after the previous one sold out that Twitter, account adds helpfully, the Australian Perth, not the Scottish Perth or the Canadian Perth, all the several American Pertz would also add not the river in New Zealand, nor the asteroid northern military flying boat so Monday, so opinions are rife on the internet over the weekend. Bill Rosenblatt thinks that podcasting futures and add funded medium is not rosy and Jose Navarro things all podcast from Mexico sound the same. There is no audience. He says, if there is nothing on offer, we need to diversify that offering provide content that breaks. The conventions of traditional radio and import casts today. We talk about kindred cast that has Hernan Lopez. The founder and CEO wondering and to common cadence thirteen to war and back, the daily from the New York Times, which has a special week on Europe and the UK's blunder through Brexit negotiations. Thanks for that and bear brook, which played a role in identifying the victims of a serial killer

Spotify Perth Twitter Apple New York Times Zack Con Yvo Terra Bill Rosenblatt Hernan Lopez UK New Zealand Atlanta Europe BBC Founder And Ceo Editor South Bank Mexico Jose Navarro
U.S. Podcast Ad Revenues Hit Historic $479 Million in 2018

podnews

04:20 min | 3 years ago

U.S. Podcast Ad Revenues Hit Historic $479 Million in 2018

"Podcasting made four hundred seventy nine million dollars in US and revenue last year. That's according to the bay, and PW WC, and it's an increase of fifty three percent year on year. It's estimated as well that the industry will be making over one billion dollars by twenty twenty one for comparison be. I a Kelsey estimate US terrestrial commercial radio to of earned fourteen point two billion in two thousand eighteen Sirius XM satellite radio earner further five point eight as predicted apple will create a brand new apple podcasts app for MAC OS, which will come in version, ten point one five of the operating system called Catalina. However, I tunes will continue as you know, it on windows machines, the new app, also clearly displays chapter points, which is nice apple also announced that podcast progress will be sink. Between devices and the availability of full text transcript. Search as well. Google ready offers both of those features that his Craig federici, the VP of software engineering and announcing it in the main, keynote. Our tension to podcast. It brings a dedicated podcast listening experience to the MAC and features all the great features you use to in Iowa's like, listen now, we can see new episodes and keep track of your listening across all of your devices, and it has a great new feature and it has to do with search, you know, sometimes you hear about something on the radio. Maybe our new podcast, something on the news. And you think I want to hear more about that? But you're not sure what show was on, or even that it appeared in the title will, now we use machine learning to index the contents of the spoken content of podcast. So now you can search that content and buying the podcast with just a few clicks in the app. It's great. Also from Apple's WW DC in the next version of IRS on the iphone and ipod touch apple podcasts will be on the front screen right next to one of the most used apps in the world, the app store, notes vox media's Zack Kahn, in a tweet. He says this will help first time listeners, discover podcasts and they also announced that watch OS the operating system on the apple watch will be capable of operating without an attached phone, and we'll also have access to a new streaming API Daniel j Lewis notes that this could be great for podcast consumption with only an apple watch in other news as we reported yesterday Tim Ferriss has made a decision to ditch the ads and just take donations for his podcast. Is that a wise, move, mayor valley any does the maths to take a look? I TV the UK commercial television company has signed a two year agreement for its podcasts to be placed in the global player. Radio and podcast app from global the UK commercial radio company. I TV have also signed with globals Dax advertising, platform target spot isn't to deal with signal the integration with the signal identity platform. The company says, in Abel's targets spot to precisely target the right listener, the right moment on the rights device shortly in the right spot golden age of podcasting, cliche news, now, as being t publishes an opinion piece from a costs Austrailia, and New Zealand boss, Henrik Isaacson, who predicts the next chapter in Austrailia, and podcast market. W also interviews, Edison research is Tom Webster on podcasting, route to mass media and event for you a podcast festival in Lisbon in Portugal. It's called poed and he's today's English, and it's on the ninth of November three new podcasts to tell you about this week the history of standup returns for new season today. Let. Of love in World War. Two is a true story from the second World War brought to life to Mark the seventy fifth anniversary of the d day landings this week written by Anna priest land and the podcast from the us national association of broadcasters. This week has a special guest editor that's me twenty two minute rump round the world in terms of podcasting.

Apple United States Tom Webster Iowa Twenty Twenty Google Austrailia Mayor Valley Craig Federici UK Vp Of Software Engineering Vox Media Tim Ferriss Editor Lisbon
Awards Nights - Podcasting's Winners in Britain and Australia

podnews

02:42 min | 3 years ago

Awards Nights - Podcasting's Winners in Britain and Australia

"Alone. Welcome to episode of have you heard Georgia's port cost. That's the unassuming sound of podcast that one all the owners in London. The British podcast awards were held on Saturday night hosted by carry out Lloyd George, the poet, swept the board with five gold awards. Brexit cast one, the listeners choice award. And there's a full winners list of the best British podcasts on our website, wherever you get your podcasts search for wrong skin, and subscribe do that. And you'll hear the podcast of the year from the Australian podcast awards, which are also held on Saturday night in Sydney and Australia wrong skin won the podcast of the year, the ABC won seven awards. You can watch the entire ceremony and listen to the winners of the best Australian podcasts on our website, which is Joe Rogan, and which is four Rogan desert, an artificial intelligence company has re. Recreated podcast. Joe Rogan's voice as the company says in their announcement. It's pretty scary Spotify testing something, they're calling carping, a voice controlled music and podcast device for the car, and Spotify are also encouraging musicians to make podcasts according to a post on the music network, musicians website. Meanwhile, Sony Music Entertainment is to make podcasts. They've announced in a joint venture with Adam Davidson, and Laura mayor and they're hiring pod fund, a new funding option for podcasters received over one hundred applications in their first twenty four hours. They've revealed podcast host Lipson have announced one hundred and twenty-five new podcast networks are using the company including e bay, the new York Stock Exchange and attract company. Podcasting is a core part of publishers, offering according to the press gazette Anaheim calling an espionage in podcast. Asked about the Anaheim ducks is now, part of the vox media podcast network. They've announced if you use Stitcher as your podcast player willing to twelve features, you might not know, out in our show, and our newsletter today, and how do you grow your podcast willing to a long and detailed article from lower streets covering, how you grow your audience. And how podcast promotion works and a company called podcast ear or maybe podcast, tear anyway. They're sending mail to podcast owners claim to be a big fan of your podcast and to offer to edit your podcasts for half price, but they're just scraping from your feet and we'd recommend you avoid any company that lazily spams you in this way.

Joe Rogan Anaheim Ducks Rogan Desert Spotify Lloyd George Anaheim Georgia Sony Music Entertainment London Sydney Brexit ABC Australia Vox Media Lipson Adam Davidson Laura Mayor York Stock Exchange E Bay
4 Reasons to Use a Blog to Build A Brand

The New Influence Podcast

05:13 min | 3 years ago

4 Reasons to Use a Blog to Build A Brand

"I think of blogging now or any kind of online activity, I'm thinking of the next five to ten years at least because that's how brands built so with a blog, you know, that your going to have that block for the next five ten years, and let's be honest. It's not going aware and while new software platforms and saw might come out. People are still always going to want to read. So I am almost think of the long term. The next reason why you need to build a long-term Brown with a blog is ownership. So if you think of the internet as layers, so let's say laya one is what you build a blog on top. Of that's layer one. It's also the same layer that mocks bug and EV Williams built Facebook in Twitter on so Facebook is built on top of layer one Twitter is built on top of layer worn when you create a Facebook page or an Instagram profile, or when you create a Twitter handle your building on their lead to that's what they own you don't own that. But when you build a website when you build a blog, you're building on top of layer one. So that essentially means that your competitor to Facebook, you're building a competing product for eyeballs to Facebook. Now that might sound a bit ridiculous given the size of Facebook. But it is the more people that build their platforms on top of layer one the more competition Facebook has essentially or Instagram or Twitter or YouTube and so on so with les warn, you have the ownership with laya to you don't own any of that any algorithm change, and he changed with terms of service. And you know, you can be out of there. We've seen that already. It's old news really the Facebook algorithm that has just completely dissipated. Now, you look if you get one percent reach it's all paid for whereas four five years ago, you could get like sixty seventy percent reach. So the amount of money that was spent on building those Facebook pages. And now they just worth nothing is just kind of makes the point really. So that's the reason number two ownership reason. Number three, why you want to build a long-term brand with a blog is you can essentially build your own media empire. Let's call it a mini media empire because now with blogs blogs and just about the written word anymore. You can integrate podcast you integrate, videos, the great for imagery. And with what press where the vast majority of blogs, the built on these days, it's changed so much. So as I mentioned two thousand and five when I first started my own WordPress blog now, what price is a completely different animal now. To what it used to be back then too much more functional. It's much more easy to understand this more features more plug ins and so on and with web press. Now, you can have your own mini media empire. That's yours. And you can do whatever you want with it. I know what press Brady. Well, I know for a fact that I can build a publication using WordPress. You know, if I had journalists and people writing for I could easily build very robust media publication that is built for such engines and Bill for social sharing and so on, but it's it's getting the right as that's the most difficult part for me anyway, and even some publications the New York Times used to use what press for their blogging section. Whether they do know, I don't know. I think they use their own proprietary software. But for a long time, they use what press, but there are different companies now like vox, vox media. They've got their own proprietary software publishing software that they use. But again for a long time WordPress was used tech crunch huge blog. Well, it's immediate publications not blog. It started off as blog. But now, it's a media publication. And they still use WordPress. Marshall, Bill more press still is on WordPress. So the tools are at your disposal to create your own mini media empire. So why would you want to build on top of Instagram? Why would you wanna build and spend all that money on top of linked in like, yes, use them? But don't kind of depend a hundred percent on them. The next reason why you want to build a long-term brand using a blog is content. So what's the half life of tweet, maybe twenty four hours if it goes viral, or if it gets a bit of traction, usually a couple of hours if that the vast majority tweets have a half-life of maybe an hour or two hours, depending on who's tweeting, and what kind of content is and so on, but they don't last very long. Let's be honest and then not meant to either. And again, like a Facebook post Facebook post don't really have any kind of traction. The literally don't really get seen much at all. So the half life again Noverre long and Instagram post twenty four hours, maybe a bit more. Again, that depends on who's publishing it with a blog, you can have content that can last you for not just days, not just weeks or even months, you can have content that less you for years. And if you can write a blog post that gets a lot of visibility gets a lot of traction, maybe people see it and share it in. It's a ridge it'll than that blog posts can repay you for months and years in such

Facebook Instagram Wordpress Twitter Vox Media Bill Ev Williams New York Times Brady Youtube LES Marshall Twenty Four Hours Sixty Seventy Percent Four Five Years Hundred Percent
Wondery Does a Deal with Universal Music

podnews

03:29 min | 3 years ago

Wondery Does a Deal with Universal Music

"Music Group. Have partnered with wondering on audio stories that could later be developed into films or TV shows the deal reportedly means that wondering can use UM. Jeez. Music catalog in its podcasts. Now, this doesn't quite mean. That wonder he can start using all the songs. It likes though. UN G owns the recordings. But typically not the publishing rights for the songs, but it's a good start Ishak strategies writes critically on the decision by the BBC to pull its podcasts from Google. A pop music critic for the Washington Post has posted a click Beatty article entitled are podcasts killing music or just wasting our time the article which does contain some useful points as being widely reviled on social media. Probably to exactly what the author wanted. If you'll podcast was submitted to Spotify podcast host. You may have looked enviously at those who have direct access to Spotify analytics which. Contain demographic details and more information. But you can now see that to just add your podcast, and you'll be able to see your stats, you just need access to the Email address senior RS fate Omni studio featured in wired magazine this month have written about their transcription service and the benefits of it. They also show off their transcript player you'll find a link to that in our show notes. And in our news today as well as vox media who've purchased epic magazine and spreaker podcast host to announced a one click publishing service for their clients and a few more tweaks Nielsen have published a blog post about podcast advertising, noting that audiences think podcast advertising is a good fit with the content. A British record plugging service. Plug goes out to radio stations and convinced them to play songs has launched. A new podcast plugging service matching artists with podcasts that best meets their strategic needs. And we add it podcast has written a good now. Excellent list of top fourteen podcast blogs. Thank you for including us in our podcast today. The primary ride home is a new daily podcast from ride home media. The quotes daily news podcast company. The podcast hosted by Chris Higgins is updated for five PM every day. It's the second podcast from the company. The I was tech name, right? Homa tech news, podcast and happy birthday this weekend tech, which is fourteen years old this week Leo port. And the team have posted their very first episode then called revenge of the screensavers on YouTube Audley acted out by puppets in our correspondent section. We're still talking about the best word subscribe or listen. Or while Laura says, I'm managed podcasts for an NPR member station. And I'm thinking of changing all our language to quotes follow. It's. Solves the listen one time versus listen from now on problem. But it still sounds free and Joshua ads. I think follow actually makes a lot of sense more. So than subscribe, all listen, particularly when you realize that people subscribe or follow a lot of shows and only selectively listen to episodes that either look interesting or come from their absolute favorites, where we'd note that follow is language also used by Spotify in some user interfaces at least has well as I heart radio.

Spotify Music Group Vox Media Washington Post Wired Magazine Ishak Google Youtube BBC Joshua Leo Port Epic Magazine Beatty Chris Higgins Omni
Where are all the podcast archives?

podnews

02:07 min | 3 years ago

Where are all the podcast archives?

"A group called preserve this podcast have released a cautious. Look at the results of a survey into podcast audio archiving while only seven percent of podcasters don't keep any backups at all many don't stall full backups of original material eighteen percent of podcasters only keep backups of their final edited episodes. You'll find the full survey results in our show notes and in our newsletter. Switched on pop has joined the vox media podcast network. It's vox, his first music based podcast. The company now has a roster of eight shows Himalayas has been formally announced as presenting sponsor for the pod fest multimedia expo in Orlando and Florida next month last week we highlighted that Himalayas a paying for fifty podcasters travel to attend the event a preliminary shed, your for the rain podcast business summit in New York next month is highlighted in rain editor James Cridland. That's me is moderating a panel on analytics. Spotify and Gimblett Paul Colligan thinks that Gimblett will contain ads for Spotify. And that this is a valuable part of a purchase. If it comes hot pods today contains lots more about the deal and the promise of threat that we're going to be talking about every implication of this for a long time who good Spotify has an investors call today. So we've not heard the last of this story yet Google released live transcribe and apple in limited release that automatically transcribes a conversation. He looks interesting though, applications for podcasting are limited text can't be copied for privacy reasons. Its primary focus is for the hearing impaired an anchor now allows you up to three podcasts sponsorships per episode with their anchor podcast sponsorship service, placing all three segments together in the middle of your episodes is for most podcasts likely to be the most efficient path to profit the company advice in our newsletter and our show notes today, we talk about four. Four new podcasts full of the shar from the BBC World Service alone. Love story from CBC playable characters and stupid potty.

Spotify James Cridland Himalayas Vox Media Gimblett Paul Colligan Gimblett BBC Google Apple Editor Florida Orlando New York Eighteen Percent Seven Percent
"vox media" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

03:42 min | 3 years ago

"vox media" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Decode from the vox media podcast network today in the red chair is Laura Wasser, a very famous divorce attorney who has become unusually famous for someone in her line of work. That's because she has worked with some of the biggest Hollywood stars in their divorces. And we can talk about that in a minute, Laura. Welcome to Rico decode thank you for having me. So I know it seems unusual that might have a divorce attorney. I'm not looking towards I have been divorced on my show, but you were moving into sort of tech space, correct? Slowly, slowly crawling. So as over-fifties are want to do in the legal profession has been slow to. Leg. Using you know, various documents stuff and things like that. So we're talking about that and more with Laura so gimme your back on you. Started wear. How did you get into this line of work? Guys started here, I'm from southern California. My dad is a family law attorney, and although if you had asked me when I was a teenager, do you think you'll ever be a a lawyer be family law attorney, I would have just oh God never never never never. But I actually got divorced after about fourteen months of marriage when I was twenty five and I was waiting for my bar results. And I needed the dough. So I went to my dad, I said can I clerked for your firm while I'm waiting for my bar results. And I never left because it's actually a fascinating field of law. You really get to know about somebody that but human nature about how somebody is when you do it in this industry in the entertainment industry. You get to learn about a lot of people that you never would have any occasion to meet Stevie wonder's, like someone I call close friend, whether it's political whether it's financial whether it's entertainment base, you really delve into these people's lives for about six to twelve. And then you're out, but it's super cool, and I found a niche and I liked it. And I've done it for about twenty five years. And then at the beginning of last year, I realized or before that I realized but last year we launched its over easy, which is an online divorce site, which I am hoping we'll kind of change not only the way people go through their divorces. But how we approach divorced itself Melissa about how we approach it. Previously talk about that a little bit about what the what Rappleye crap. Kaley. You know, it's it's one of these is that a anatomy. Crap poorly crept, Tom, it's you know, the way that we look at it as this horrible, taboo failure miserable. And look, it's not fun. And it's not easy as I say, even though the company is called it's over easy. But what it is is something that's happened to about half of the people. We know who are married in which case we kind of have to accept that. It is happening. And how can we do it better for selves and most particularly for our kids? So looking at an away as hey, this was a time period of my life. I was romantically an intimately involved with this person. I got to know him or her very, well we had children. And now, what do we do to not necessarily be sleeping in the same bed every night, but to continue being partners as co-parenting perhaps with some of our financial issues as well. And so where's it from? Because it's also quite I it's the reason it's done. So well is because it's done in a way that so analog, and so like lugubrious and slow and yeah years talked a little bit about that. Well, again, this is a system that is broken. And it's broken in the legal system. And so when I was turning fifty and I was looking at my career, and how it had gone and really having enjoyed it. I thought you have two choices you go legislature or you go some kind of tech app that can hopefully fix it. For an I'm the first way seemed also rather long to take to get to the words getting mind was it was ridiculous. And we had no problems was ridiculously longtime, California. Which is where you got divorced. It takes six months. We have a six month waiting period. So even if you walk in file the paperwork and say, this is our deal. It's done you still have to wait six months before judicial officer, will stamp it. It'll be done. I often tell.

attorney Laura Wasser vox media Hollywood Rico Stevie wonder California Melissa officer Tom six months twenty five years fourteen months six month
"vox media" Discussed on Worldly

Worldly

02:41 min | 3 years ago

"vox media" Discussed on Worldly

"Changing thousands of Sudanese citizens are taking to the streets to call for their leaders downfall today on the show, we're going to talk about why these protests are happening and why they're happening so much later than what we saw other parts of the Arab world. This is worldly from the vox media podcast network. I'm Zack Beecham here is always with Jen Williams and outward, hey, Lou before we get to the new protests themselves. We need to understand the back story of the current Sudanese government, Alex kicks off. So you need to know about the leader of the country, Omar al-bashir, he's been one of the region's bad guys or many years. He came into power nineteen eighty nine after he led a military coup overthrow the elected government. And since he's been there. He showed up. His power banning political parties dissolving, the parliament taking complete control in real strict control of the press, and then actually nineteen Ninety-three kind of names himself president and the leader as part of shoring up his power, he formed in alliance with the country's powerful is Louis and began to push for these Llamas -ation of the country instituting Muslim law sharia law and part of this also included embracing radical Islamists from around the world, including a young, man. Some of you may have heard of a guy named Osama bin Laden who? Yeah. That guy so he actually invited bin Laden into the country allowed him to set up shop there, and basically continue building organization the organization that would go onto become Al Qaeda in the nineties the US actually attacked Sudan with the intent under President Bill Clinton of killing Osama bin Laden, right? Absolutely. And the Sudanese government also were directly involved in supporting sponsoring the bombers who did the nineteen ninety three World Trade Center bomb. Ming? So but government was literally direct state sponsor of terrorism for a very long time. And the crazy thing is that's not necessarily the worst thing that they've done. You may remember the Darfur genocide which happened in Sudan in two thousand and three. This is a direct result of the Bashir government's policies. Like, you said in two thousand three this black African rebel group in the western region of Sudan called Darfur were basically tired of being oppressed by the sheer governments. They launched this full on a salt on the government and to put down the rebellion. Bashir enlist, the help of this brutal Arab militia notice the John Joey and horrific violence, ensued. And I mean, we're talking genocide and Bashir is now actually been indicted by the international criminal court on multiple counts of genocide were crimes and crimes against humanity for what he and the judge we'd militia did indoor four from of going to happen to them though. Right. Despite the hundreds of thousands killed and millions long he holds onto power. But we'll we'll talk about that a little bit later. Right..

Sudanese government Osama bin Laden Omar al-bashir Sudan Darfur Bashir vox media president Zack Beecham Jen Williams World Trade Center Lou parliament Ming Bill Clinton Alex US Louis John Joey
News is a hard business. Now add millennials and Facebook. Yikes?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:11 min | 3 years ago

News is a hard business. Now add millennials and Facebook. Yikes?

"This. Marketplace podcast is brought to you by orvis outfitting for the outdoors since eighteen fifty six offering everything from apparel to dog beds to fly fishing gear. This holiday give orvis not ordinary use the code market to save twenty five dollars on select orvis purchases. See stores or orvis dot com slash radio for details and restrictions and by lachey analytics, lots of business intelligence vendors claim their software is the best, but they can't all be winners. Logic analytics is offering five reports from analysts like Gartner and Dresdner comparing twenty-six BI vendors get help folks in your valuation, prioritizing features and determining what solution fits your tech stack. Visit lodge analytics dot com slash tech. To claim your free reports, that's L O G I, analytics dot com slash tech. News is a hard business now. Add millennials and Facebook. Yikes. From American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Ali would. Earlier this month Twitter put out a list of the top ten. Most tweeted about news organizations only one outlet on the list is what's called digital. I all online without the TV or print baggage. It's now this news a media company that delivers news to millennials using mostly video across all kinds of platforms, Facebook, Snapchat, Instagram YouTube, it's as it gets two point six billion video views each month and reaches seventy percent of millennials at any given time, but lots of digital media companies, especially the ones aimed at millennials had layoffs or closed in two thousand eighteen and publishers found that relying on Facebook or even Google for views could be risky Teaneck sorrows is chief content officer at now this I spoke with her at fortunes most powerful women next-gen conference, and I asked her if it's scary to be at the mercy of an algorithm, it's really really challenging for any publisher. But I think for news. In particular, where this is maybe not what you expect that a young person goes to Snapchat. I four, but increasingly it is where they're getting their news. So just really being incredibly nimble and adaptable to just the changing tides of each of these platforms is the only way to succeed, and you can be pretty nimble. But you still don't know what they're going to do or or frankly, whether your audience is going to abandon them. Yeah. Well, I think first and foremost, and and this is I think the privilege or the the beauty of being a little bit more kind of building from the startup space is if you build it, and they come then you have to believe that the business model will follow. So we spent a large portion of the first few years of our lives that now this just creating great content that built huge scale. So make sure that you have a loyal audience that is following you and engaging with you every day and work closely with each of these platforms to develop diverse revenue streams and. Now thinking about what our content might look like off of these socially distributed platforms. And are you are you venture funded? Now, we were and now we have a great investment from discovery communications that happened about two years ago, and we merged together with three other brands, and we formed what's called group nine. So now, this is part of group nine which also includes the dodo thriller and seeker, which is a science brand that discovery launched a few years back. How has if at all this kind of tech lash, right? This sort of even just suspicion of some of these platforms in general, how does that change the way that you approach those partners from a distribution and kind of like user trust perspective. So while certainly there's I think a lot of hand wringing right now around in what's going on different platforms. Nothing's going away. They're still the huge huge majority of our country and people around the world are getting their news off. Of these platforms. So I think what we can do as a publisher is the best job we possibly can and to tell the truth. And to fact, check what we're doing. And that's what we're doing. Every day. Teaneck our hosts is chief content officer. And now this media. And now for some related links to be fair. It is still a very open question. How digital media companies can make money going forward group nine media that parent company of now this last week launched a new studio for creating branded content called brand shop, that's one way. The economist has a story this week on vice media, the other may be former darling of millennial news, or as I like to call it news for cool people vices big challenge headed into twenty nineteen is how to get advertising when all the money currently goes to Facebook and Google the article in the economist notes that Bice BuzzFeed and vox media combined the big three in all digital news n-nor taint get less than one percent of the internet ad market in the United States that economists story by the way is behind to pay well because well like I said tough business. I'm Ali would. And that's marketplace tech. This is a PM. You know, firsthand how important marketplaces to your life, bringing depth and context issues that matter to you and your family as a nonprofit organization, we depend on individuals. Like you to help us provide trustworthy, news that adds value to your life. If you're not yet a marketplace investor, please consider donating today at marketplace dot org, and your gift will be matched dollar for dollar. Thanks for your support. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by Amazon web services. Did you ever wonder how we're streaming millions of movies on demand or doing our banking from the beach and how we're watching a live mission for Mars smart business minds dreamed up those ideas and Amazon web services is how they built them with the broadest functionality and the most experienced leading enterprises trust the AWS cloud to build the next big idea. Are you ready to build it? Learn more at AWS is how dot com slash podcast.

Facebook Chief Content Officer Orvis Publisher ALI Lachey Analytics Amazon Google Snapchat Gartner Twitter Dresdner Discovery Communications Vox Media United States Bice