35 Burst results for "Volve"

Vik Hawksley on His Non-Conventional Approach to Develop Strength & Mobility

Jungle Brothers Strength & Movement

02:42 min | 5 d ago

Vik Hawksley on His Non-Conventional Approach to Develop Strength & Mobility

"One of the things i think about when i look at your your training and zone through social media is you. You've often and i don't know if you do it a lot now. But you used to super set a lot of mobility and heavy strength work. And i remember vividly. You doing a really heavy dead lift for wraps and then gone back bridge. And i think like that's like daddy sarko like that kind of combination of movements in the one workout really speaks to the hall of athos of what you end and us what we value in in training right where it's like the ability to do everything and it's not like you're trying your best not to be linear about it. Can you talk a little bit on that. Sort of less. Conventional approach to developing strengthened mobility. Are i mean there are different ways. We can go about it. I mean most simplest way. I'll just speak about it. As if kind of i talk. I talk about this with everybody. Who walks through the doors of aim. You know no matter what they experienced and stuff as the first thing in anything is being away on kind of in in this case. If strength is the end goal know the conventional way is just training right. You know there's plenty of literature. Data's plenty of programs that bid that will get us. You know swallow jacked. What if you follow from eight to be to see and things like that. What it doesn't count for is obviously you know kind of a you know who that individuals they live context. They learning abilities. You know kind of you. Boys have young families of two guys train as much. Since i've had. I haven't been doing ju jitsu like you know kind of like old being able to train the way i was doing everything has had to volve so the thinking behind you know. Kind of training for me is effectively. Well what's the end minds. And what's the. What's the best way that i'm going to hit multiple different. Modalities right one. Simple dallas Multiple different goals. That had so as i say. Strong bending skillful Strong suppleant savage right. Whatever you wanna call it effectively The goal then. Whatever i'm going to do has compliments kind of one of those things at lates. So when i get into session. That's what i have in mind. You know kind of like an unmoving towards the project of the goal that i have you know kind of is good to make me stronger. So what way can i transfer this to anywhere else And obviously the way. I wanna see you know. Can i marry the both to give

Dallas
Coronavirus: Long-Haul Covid

Science Rules! with Bill Nye

01:35 min | 6 months ago

Coronavirus: Long-Haul Covid

"Just last week is that. He came out looking at the plight of kobe. Lung haulers people experiencing something called brain fog. Could this be the beginning of a whole new phase of copa nineteen drawn out error of persistent symptoms. Adhered help us understand. This phenomenon is dr eager corral mc he's neurologist at northwestern university and head of northwestern's clinic for kobe related neurological symptoms. Dr gore corral. Nick welcome to science rules drawn virus edition. May i call you e gor. Yes bill you may an thank you very much for inviting me. I'm delighted to be distancing socially with you and to all your listener what are the symptoms of long-haul what what goes on with you if you're a long haul corona virus person. This is excellent question and the long kohler is a term that has been chosen by patients themselves and Those patients mostly had a mild covid nineteen disease at onset with the you know transients respiratory symptoms including some cough sore throat ogi. The fever may be muscle that when away and thereafter despite the fact that they did not never give develop pneumonia or were never hospitalized. They developed those lingering persistent and beating symptoms that mean volve the nervous system cardiac and the respiratory system as well as

Northwestern's Clinic For Kobe Neurological Symptoms Dr Gore Corral Northwestern University Nick Cough Sore Throat Ogi Fever Pneumonia
The Power of Deep Listening

Tara Brach

05:38 min | 7 months ago

The Power of Deep Listening

"Welcome again friends. It really is good to be together. And i thought i'd start by just naming a compelling question that so many people i know around the globe are reflecting on right now and that is what will bridge the divides and i know you know what i mean. What will bridge the divides knew what will help us. Humans of all beyond our separate cocooned realities that end up creating so much distrust and fear and violence in this talk. What i'd like to do is focus on one key way. Each of us can contribute to evolve in consciousness to volving our own consciousness in our species consciousness. And that's cultivating cassidy for deep listening. I mean just imagine if people from different political parties and groups and nations in conflict actually did a little bit of training and practice so that they could little bit more. Listen to each other to get some sense of being able to look through another. Is henry david. Thoreau described as the greatest miracle possible relate to look through each other's is it is possible though we have this built in capacity to listen and we can cultivate listening and of course it is difficult so for starters. I thought i'd give you a couple of examples of the kinds of challenges we face the first cartoon That i'll tell you about a couple sitting together watching tv. And she saying to him. You know you only hear the things you wanna hear and he responds a beer. Sounds lovely thank you. Second cartoon job interview the employers asking mister jefferson. Where do you see yourself five years from now response. I'd say my biggest weakness is my listening skills. I know you get the idea. It's kind of like. I think calvin coolidge said it best that no one is ever listened themselves out of job so by extension. We don't listen ourselves out of relationships. This theme I'm imagining many of you. It's not only something you're aware of. It's something you're consciously working on. I know for myself. It's a life process and it's so interesting that now and then i get more conscious of. Oh this is really really important. this matters. and then i- rededicate. It's really energizing to rededicate. I love that so if you feel like this is the right time for you to deep in your commitment to how you listen right close in with the people right around you. It creates a group energy to do that together and it helps our world so a key. Understanding is that the capacity to listen is not just another skill on the checklist of it. You know it's really a dimension of presents being able to listen is a dimension of presence. it's a intrinsic facet of evolving consciousness and it impacts all dimensions of living and you might just consider inner listening you know. How are we going to be intimate with their own being. How are we gonna tuned to the state of our hard and acknowledge when there's loneliness s or when there's fear or longings so inner listening is how we become more at home with ourselves then of course listening to each other. There's no way to have real intimacy connection and understanding unless weaken listen and then in our contemporary society. I really do believe that trainings to listen. Ringing people from conflicting sides together to practice listening will give a gateway for more collaboration. Were understanding then. Of course terms of we want to call it the spiritual path. It's those moments where we stop all doings and we become profoundly septa quiet open. It's at listening presence. That really those are the moments that we touch and taste the mystery that we receive beauty that we start to perceive intuit. That formless timeless awareness. It's really home. So it really gives us a sense of the sacred some naming the different levels and we'll be exploring primarily. How do we listen. More deeply with those were engaged with whoever you spend time talking with the most and maybe we'll just pause here for a moment of do several reflections through our time this first reflection and when we do them if it helps you to close your eyes please do. It always helps me just to take a moment and bring to mind someone you know who is a really good listener.

Mister Jefferson Henry David Thoreau Calvin Coolidge Intuit
Lightfoot, Chicago Police Propose Changes to Search Warrant Policy in Wake of Botched Raid

Chicago Tonight

05:30 min | 7 months ago

Lightfoot, Chicago Police Propose Changes to Search Warrant Policy in Wake of Botched Raid

"The second time since she became mayor of chicago lori. Lightfoot is changing the policy for win in house city. Police can execute search warrants. it comes as the chicago. Police department is under scrutiny. For botched raids including one that led to a lawsuit from ginette young. Amanda finicky joins us now with more. Amanda prentice once viewed. It is hard race that horrifying video of engine at young home and changing so naked. When chicago police burst into her home. An officer did eventually put a blanket over her but for a long stretch shoot was left. Naked wall restrained in handcuffs. When you see body camera video later on in the story you will see a black box that has heard digitally covered up by vesey. Pd when it made the footage public following investigative reporting by wb pm traumatic experience for young especially given police. Were in the wrong home. Mayor lightfoot premised change today. pd makes good on his promise to change. How search warrants are served in chicago. It's always the right time to do the right thing. We should always be volving to improve our policies training and accountability now new standards and procedures announced by cpi de chief david brown and mayor lightfoot required higher ranking command staff to sign off on requests for a warrant before it is brought to a state's turning judge considerations and plans must be made if vulnerable people. Mike children may be present than what a search is actually executed. A female officer must be present. Police must wear in activate body cameras. Lieutenant must also be on site and responsible for officers behavior the plan upfront spells out. What type of behavior is expected. All department members will treat all persons with courtesy and dignity which is inherently do every person and will act speak and conduct themselves in a courteous respectful and professional manner. And then it goes on from there. This is common sense but this is now enshrine in the actual policy. New policy does still allow for so called. No knock warrants but limited circumstances like when he life is in danger a fourth amendment allows for that to happen but only in certain circumstances where there's an establishment that evidence of a crime will be found in a particular location on no matter. How you slice it. It is an intrusion and so making sure that we get the facts details right and that there is ownership at the highest levels of c pd. It's critically important and please do get things wrong if there's bad evidence or something. The situation like what happened to young wrong raid. That has to be investigated. That's another safeguard that i believe. Personally it's critically important that the judge be notified that there was a one raid asked whether he's concerned that a standards click police in peril in potentially dangerous situations. Your brown responded. The real question you're asking is if treating someone with respect gets in the way of doing our job and the answer is no so following these policies and procedures with an emphasis on. Everyone deserves a measure of respect actually enhances our ability to do our job and create an environment of trust in the community. Which again is a force. Multiplier beanie effective at reducing. Cra in an email the president of the chicago fraternal order of police said that you had plenty of reaction to these new standards but he did not immediately. Follow up an email with specifics. The proposal did get the non from alderman. Chris taliaferro is head of the city council's public safety committee and also a former cia so these reforms that the mayor is announcing today will help bring about true accountability true responsibility but in a statement. Young's attorney says the proposal falls woefully short of the types of reforms that the citizens of chicago require to feel secure in their homes from these violent and often wrongful rates if the mayor is truly serious about reform statement says she'll get signed. An ordinance announced last week by a handful of black alderman also has the backing of progressive groups like lack lives matter and united working families and that plan does no knock. Warrants also expressly prohibits officers from pointing guns toward children and there is time for young the coalition of group. She's aligned with and really anybody else who wants to have their opinion made known about us to do social is going to have a fifteen day public comment period before these standards go into effect. It's a short period of time. Fifteen days and so encourage a france. You let's use social media Not just for passing around jokes and having a good time. Let's use this to improve our city.

Chicago Ginette Young Amanda Prentice Vesey Mayor Lightfoot Cpi De Chief David Brown Lightfoot Lori WB Police Department Amanda Chicago Fraternal Order Of Pol Chris Taliaferro Public Safety Committee Mike Alderman CRA Brown City Council
Digital identity in the UK in 2021 with TrueProfile.ios Rene Seifert

Let's Talk About Digital Identity

06:06 min | 8 months ago

Digital identity in the UK in 2021 with TrueProfile.ios Rene Seifert

"Thank you for joining today. I be sought in this new year. Twenty twenty one. We're going to discuss. Especially now they did identity in the uk for these new year. Twenty twenty one. How a super special guest. Today with rene effort he says cereal enterpreneur and co head of through profile dot. Co the industry leader in documentation power by the data flow group through profiled odoyo provides these services in a modern environment via the adoption of eat theory on blockchain prior to this rene was co founder and cozy your venture eight a. g. across the platform allowing regular people to embraced side by side would experience business angels in addition. He has been involved in founding. Several internet take immediate combines. Amande husband eat lab house. German in house gration began his career hosting radio shows in running an advertising agency parallel to his studies. He was kid of marketing in percenter at a radio station byron three during the new economy. He hid they determine department at lycos europe. Hello renee welcome. I also my pleasure for this. Podcast is great talking with you. Thank you hope. You're having a great start of the new year and twenty one fed. Who like to hear more about. Would you particularly how you doing media in order very interesting things about technology. Your life ended in this world of the identity. If i knew that myself. I think it's quite unlikely scenario that panned out spent. Maybe you also heard that famous. Commencement speech from steve jobs. In haver that you only can connect the dots in hindsight. You can't connect them living your life. Forward and limited tried to connect these dots and you mentioned a couple of things how they volved in my life. Indeed in my first life as i tend to say i was sitting on the other side of our conversation i was a radio. Presenter was a journalist by tim my highlight. There was a war correspondent for german public radio in macedonia during the kosovo. Nine hundred ninety nine. I did this kind of on the side of my university education for economic management and then post graduation. I was more focusing on the media management side of things. And as you're right they said. I was head of marketing of anti by on three one of the top ten german radio stations. After that's the new economy came. If you might recall that time the boom and the bust very was Director entertainment at that time famous and infamous search engine with a variety of other services lycos europe and really saw a lot of this bust of this new economy which maybe take a year off in two thousand two and spent a year traveling the world in a sabbatical during all sorts of things. I always wanted to do from doing a pilot's license motorbike licence mode license. Learning languages like russian spanish during my tie and then i came back to munich and well. This was my first immigration then. Going to bangalore india. And that's very in fact i thought it. By entrepreneurial journey in businesses like e commerce selling jewelry on ebay then moving into an outsourcing consultancy for bangolo has been very instill is very famous for and then starting in detroit angel invest in into indian companies with these angel andrew a cold mumbai angels so an imperative is lots of back and falls into you mentioned that also. I helped build an echo beta in munich. Owned by a hot spring publisher called spring except where we created some thirteen companies in the span of four years. Then i really truly moved back to munich for a short period of time. Very co founded a social media agency and that crowd funding platform venture ag which we then sold a year later to a publicly listed company. Then came i second immigration. This time with my family to bangkok and then kind of opportunity presented itself better typical soon network connections to join the data flow group at that time it was headquartered in hong kong meanwhile headquartered in dubai and data flow is doing esp primary source verification. Since two thousand six. And i was given a quite broad mandate look at. How can this be more digitized. And let's face it. I'd say verification is not the most sexy topic on the face of this earth but maybe it's also reason why nobody has looked at that. So i tried to exactly that so i kind of became a co founder of true profile. I oh really put the individual and implement into the center so we launched the first version of something called data flow plus dot org some four years ago and that subsequently into a troop profile. I o which. I'm now running in a shared responsibility with my esteemed koha alejandro coca from spain. Who is focusing on the commercial business part while i focus on the product and tech parts so in hindsight maybe it is possible to the dotes. I'd say my personal motivation here in the common thread has been never stop being curious. Never stop learning and never stop willing to make a move into a new uncharted territory. I can see. I can see many changes in geography and also in the business. If i may just add. I think it's really interesting. Because listen to some eighty percent of your podcast. I learned a hell of a lot. And i think what you're doing. You're doing a great service of building. This industry of digital identity from identity for people identity for technical system like api is than also what our policies locations or. What is the identity of a legal entity. So i found this area's always very separate and you're kind of bringing them under one umbrella where they belong. And i hope that maybe today. I can contribute. Another facets around verified credentials which are useful in particular in an hr context into your realm of digital

Odoyo Rene Amande Gration Munich Bangolo Lycos Angel Andrew Europe Very Co Renee Steve Jobs Macedonia Kosovo UK TIM Bangalore Alejandro Coca Mumbai Detroit
How Do Volunteers, Donors, Funders & Sponsors Work with Creating IT Futures

Technologist Talk

04:38 min | 8 months ago

How Do Volunteers, Donors, Funders & Sponsors Work with Creating IT Futures

"Let's start by refreshing our understanding of the creating futures mission. Have you made any alterations. Have you tweaked in ways has evolved. We believe that technology careers should be open to anyone who has an interest in the field and you know every study ever about diversity says that a lack of it leads to a lack of productivity leads to a lack of innovation so there's a real incentive for the industry and for businesses themselves to take the ship issue had on this been a consistent problem in the it field for so long. Just just trying to do what we can to fix that. That's really our mission. And we have programs for youth programs for adults for women for people of color veterans. So that we can change the landscape. That's really think of the crux of our mission at creating anti futures. There's no shortage of the unemployed underemployed and underrepresented demographics who have an interest and a real talent for the work. They just need an organization to give them a leg up and that's really what our mission is. When we say that these careers should be open to anyone. Who's interested in it. We recognize there are some barriers that may be preventing those groups of people from entering the field. Could you elaborate a little bit more on that. I know there's been some research done by com tia and by creating future that illuminates this point. One of those stats. That stuck out to me right away. Is that sixty. Eight percent of organizations have had challenges in building a diverse workforce which includes retention right and a majority of these organizations that say that they'd be willing to try new approach with these organizations are willing to try new approach. Well we have great proven approach. Ready to go our. It ready program is two-thirds people of color in the program. Assesses at trains certify provides placement assistance. So i'm the programs were there. It's ready for them to use. And the second reason that i'd say our mission is more important than ever is is that there's a pipeline problem right with it regarding diversity. Everybody kind of knows this like women people of color. They're discouraged by our culture from pursuing a career in. It often even by the time they get to high school. So programs like tech roles are directly combating this pipeline issue that companies are facing now and i think by targeting middle school age kids. They're tackling the problem before it can even take place. Let is an excellent segue to bring alicia into the conversation here now expect most listeners. Understand the meaning of being a tear in quotes giving of their time to support a cause but sometimes terms are tossed around donors sponsor and partner and they seem to be used fluidly by some organizations alicia in your outreach for tech girls. How do you pitch volunteering. How do you help. Tech professionals see programs such as tech shops tech. Todd's as different in a very very full and robust field of opportunities to give back especially as we close a challenging year and start a new one with shirley more hurdles to come. How have you volved your pitched volunteers. How do you help them see the light. Volunteering with tech roles is very rewarding and it always has been rewarding previous to you know the hurdles of transitioning virtually as well And we see that feedback directly from our volunteers that participate in our programs. Just serve first time getting involved. They're like wow. I realize the impact. I was going to have in being part of a program such as tech roles but just getting to actually see how inspired the girls are definitely gets them even more excited. And that's why we always say being nervous to volunteer for something like this and working with youth Can can seem like a challenge in itself but jumping in. you'll see that you're inspiring and empowering the next generation of women to explore the possibilities in technology but in addition to that rewarding feeling that you get As a tech professional you're also given the opportunity to build your marketable skills like public speaking teaching and techno know-how and also expanding your network wild teaching these fun hands on workshops alongside others in the tech industry and there's many ways to volunteer and we really feel like that helps with our pitch and engagement with new volunteers across the country.

Alicia Todd Shirley
Why Are Whales So Big?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

06:19 min | 1 year ago

Why Are Whales So Big?

"This is but why a podcast for curious kids from Vermont Public Radio? I'm the host. Jane Lindholm. On this show you tell us what you're interested in and what your questions are about that thing you're interested in. And we use your questions to guide what we talk about on the show. Your curiosity dictates what we explore. When I was young, I really wanted to be a marine biologist that's a scientist who studies things that live in the oceans and lots of you are interested in marine biology to we've done episodes about fish about why the sea is salty and other things related to oceans like our jellyfish really made out of Jelly spoiler alert they're not. But now we're going to focus on one particular type of animal that lives in the oceans that like me a lot of you are fascinated by. Can you guess what animal we might be discussing? Well. That is the sound of a humpback whale singing. And, that sound comes courtesy of the federal government's no of fisheries website. But we're not going to focus on the way whales communicate today that's going to be a future episode. So be sure to listen for that one too. We want today to have a better understanding of what whales are and how they move through the oceans and occasionally through rivers to here's our guide for today's episode. My name is Nick Pinson. I'm a paleontologist at the Smithsonian in Washington DC. Tell me what paleontologist is healing tallest looks for any trace of life that lived a long long time ago, and they tend to look for fossils which can be bones footprints leaves any kind of trace of life that isn't around now, but we know existed millions billions of years ago. One of the challenges and one of the things I like most about being paleontologist is that you don't get all the clues that you'd like to. So we don't get a full skeleton sometimes you do but mostly not see have to make the best you can do with a little bit of information, and that's what makes paleontology for me a lot like a detective story. So neck, some of the kids listening now might be scratching their heads because they know that this episode is about Wales and you just told us you're a paleontologist. So you look for signs of life that doesn't exist anymore, but Wales still exists. I got into science because I really liked looking for fossils and that led me eventually to looking at Wales because Wales are mammals that live notion and some of them live in the rivers but you're probably more familiar with ones that live in the oceans that are really big that have flippers that have flukes They look from the outside a bit more like a fish than. A Mammal, what's really neat about them is that we know that they're mammals and that they're closely related to other hoofed mammals specifically the hoofed mammals that have even toes to toes and those mammals are cows, pigs, deer, camels, sheep. That's who whales are most closely related to, and if you look at the wheel and you look at all of its near cousins that are live today. Realize that whales look really really different and what explains why they're so different has to do with how they volved, how they came to be and going back to fossils were really fortunate and being able to find fossil whales tell us how those changes happened. So I'm lucky enough to be able to work with teams of scientists to go round the world and look for fossils. Of Whales and then try to understand how those fit in with what we know about whales today, and also where they're going because the earth has always changed and it's still changing I want to get to some of the questions that our listeners have sent us. But just before we do I, want to pick up on something that you said, which was that whales are really closely related. Even toed hoofed animals, but they look really different. So if they look really different, how can to animals be very closely related because you'd think they'd be more closely related to something else that they look like like a shark or a fish right just because something lives in the water or looks like a fish doesn't mean they're all related to each other whales, sharks and fish the last time they shared a common ancestor was probably nearly half a billion years ago. Let's get more precise about. Wales as related to other mammals, we have a lot of different ways of knowing how organisms are related to each other. We can look at their DNA which tells us directly about their relationships in a way. That's that doesn't connect to how they look as more to do with their genetics. Right DNA tells us that whales fit in with all these other mammals whales are mammals, and that's something you would know probably from just looking. At the fact that they re there, they have babies drink milk from their MOMS do have hair. If you are ever get the opportunity to close enough to whale, and even if you seem photos of baby, dolphins have little tiny whiskers on their snout they lose them pretty quickly. But those are all telling you about their deeper ancestry and you want to use all the different kinds of evidence available to you whether it's DNA. That might tell you one story or fossils that tell you a story that maybe sometimes is a bit different and that's why I say that fossils tell something that we wouldn't otherwise. No. We can have a a family tree of animals based on DNA and then fossils tell us about this branches of the tree that we wouldn't otherwise know about and for Wales. That's what tells us that the earliest whales lived on land

Wales Scientist Vermont Jane Lindholm Washington Dc Nick Pinson
Invasive Species Meltdowns

In Defense of Plants Podcast

05:43 min | 1 year ago

Invasive Species Meltdowns

"The invasive species that make that career. Yeah and I'm happy to heavy on to kind of couch. A lot of our previous discussions into this big umbrella that is invasive species because it's hot button issue, it conjures up a lot of opinions a lot of very strong opinions oftentimes for people that don't have any connection to. Really going on ecologically. So I think this is something that is really worth having a nice conversation about in a bigger context. Being. A Professional Brown. Of Natural Resources Management for the past like more than ten years, which is absolutely nuts right I mean but. You'll same way to I've known you for like six years now. Seeing how much the forest is changed in? Eastern Appalachian area over the past ten years with the basis species and like the ecological repercussions of them has been. Fascinating and slightly terrifying at the same time and. It's just I. Think we're right on the cost of like the tip of the iceberg where this is going to be our new climate change equivalent. In terms of. The scale of things that are happening, and that's a really important thing to kind of talk about his you know one or two invasive species can be very regional, very specific to wherever you're located. But when you think about the impact, they're having across the globe I mean this is comparable in terms of climate change to the scale of ecosystem disruption that could possibly happen and is happy. Again I'm like I'm very regionally specific being foot muster my career Mayes -cation is from Pennsylvania and West Virginia. In the mid Atlantic area and it's just been there. There's been so much change here but places all around the world are suffering from invasive species I spent some time in California not as a naturalist but enjoying nature on my off time from my corporate job. And the invasive species in California remind me a lot of the mid Atlantic region. It's just it's always seasonal new swath of ecological damage on the same scale. Yeah. An again being regionally specific it's not bad. That's how you have to kind of approach these things you have to be sort of a hometown hero because there's no way to globally say, I'm gonNA tackle the invasive species issue and even with a single invasive species how it behaves in one area isn't going to be. The same in another area you know I always hear people right in. This is an invasive in my yard. Why are you talking about I'm like well, you don't live where it's acting like an invasive. That's why. Yeah, it's been This hometown hero concept has really been like kind of hitting the nail on the head with me lately because. For so many years going to the school for forestry and. Policy Entomology. It's almost like we learned the species are in this category of invasive or exotic unlike we kind of learn this label with them. Then, we didn't do anything because it was almost like you just like doesn't masive. That's how it is unlike arms US role, and now I'm like, no, I really need to be more like a hometown hero and if I see a tree hang on like a dog walk, I need to rip it out instead of just being like. I'm not saying like everybody's guilty of this bill I'm surprised that it took me. So long to realize like I'm an invasive species specialist in I've been like on a certain level ignoring their I guess prowess. In really is going to be one of those like. Grassroots efforts to control invasive species. On a professional level because Regis label them as what they are. Let Them Go. Yeah and I. Think. There's a lot of there's a range of opinions on that in terms of where do you it's kind of like asking what he'll do you WanNa die today. But I I agree a lot of times. You just Kinda hear about this you learn sort of the theory and some of the data the to support said theory on invasions, but in terms of actionable items. Yep, it is something. That, I, think we all need to grapple with in a big way in the coming years but let's start with definitions because this is I think the shakiest ground for most people is this idea of what does it mean to be an invasive species in a lot of times? People will say it's a species from another of the world. Sometimes, it can be a native species that's just for some reason or another. Gone Haywire. So where do we land on our definition of an invasive species? I define it is it's mostly exotic, right so these exotic species are brought into a new landscape where they don't have ecological controls and want those controls could be are things like predators pathogens right? We're all volved where we are supposed to be. Stationed planted but there are native examples I can think of obviously not as common as the exotic examples, but one that comes to mind. A forester but few are out black locust in also like straight maple things like that. Like when you alter the forest soon is usually human activity. When we alter the forest, we provide an ecosystem where it's not a balance and native species can kind of take over this new real estate, which normally may be confined to just like stream banks or small openings in the forest for one tree falls. But instead only come in and do a full. You know very large shelter

California United States Atlantic Mayes Regis Pennsylvania West Virginia
Avoiding war in the Armenia-Azerbaijan conflict

TIME's Top Stories

04:15 min | 1 year ago

Avoiding war in the Armenia-Azerbaijan conflict

"It wherever you listen to podcasts. The Armenia Azerbaijan fighting could spiral into a larger regional conflict by Ian Bremmer. Intense fighting has erupted nagorno-karabakh a small enclave in the southern Caucasus mountains setting the entire region on edge. This is a fight primarily between Armenia and Azerbaijan two former Soviet republics with long-held grievances over land. The volve of Russia Turkey and others raises the stakes for where a war might be headed. An essence, this is a story of a powerful. Changing history by drawing arbitrary lines on a map that would later spark conflict. The states of Armenia and Azerbaijan were pulled into Moscow or and became part of the Soviet Union in the nineteen twenties though nagorno-karabakh, a mountain region about the size of Delaware was dominated by Armenians. Matt makers made it part of the Jani Soviet republic for decades are Mian complaints about the region's status were ignored and in the final days of the USSR war erupted tens of thousands were killed and more than one million were forced from their homes. A Russian brokered system in nineteen, ninety, four left nagorno-karabakh as part of Azerbaijan but ethnic Armenians with backing from the Armenian government drove most Azerbaijanis from the territory and declared it an independent republic. Low level fighting has continued over the years and an eruption of violence in two thousand, sixteen killed at least two hundred people. There is no peace treaty and nothing has been resolved. In recent years, the governments of Armenia and Azerbaijan have sent positive signals. Her budget president and Armenia's prime minister opened the first ever military hotline between the two countries and twenty eighteen and talks brokered by Russia France and the United States. Produced a joint statement and Twenty nineteen that appeared to set the stage for a treaty. But momentum was lost and an eruption of fighting this summer led to popular demand in both countries for a military reckoning. The likely never know who fired the shot that ignited these latest clashes, but dozens of soldiers and some civilians have been killed Armenia and Azerbaijan have each declared martial law outsiders are scrambling to put out the fire UN secretary general, Antonio Terrace as called for a ceasefire. The web of foreign ties in this story is complicated Turkey's president wretched type air to on eager for an opportunity to boost his popularity and shift. The subject from his country's struggling economy fully backs is fellow Turkic Muslims in Azerbaijan while others call for talks air to one insists that Azerbaijan must take matters into its own hands to Armenia occupation of the disputed region. Vladimir Putin's Russia has maintained relations with Azerbaijan and sold weapons to both countries but Russia has a military base in Armenia and is bound by treaty to defend Armenia in war. This means that as in Syria and in Libya is ongoing civil war Russia and NATO member Turkey have A. Interests here Iran which borders both Armenia and as her Badgen has offered to mediate politically active ethnic Armenian populations in both. France and the United States bring those governments into the push for negotiations. Adding to the sense of urgency to halt the fighting nagorno-karabakh is a corridor for pipelines that transport oil and gas from the Caspian. Sea to the international marketplace. If the current clashes explode into full blown war, the damage could be much greater than in the nineteen nineties. This war would be waged with twenty first century, heavy weapons provided by Russia and Turkey. Air To

Armenia Azerbaijan Russia Turkey Ian Bremmer Russia France President Trump United States Soviet Union Vladimir Putin Moscow Ussr Delaware Matt Makers UN Nato Syria Prime Minister
Fighting Breaks Out In Disputed Territory Of Nagorno-Karabakh

Inside Europe

02:33 min | 1 year ago

Fighting Breaks Out In Disputed Territory Of Nagorno-Karabakh

"Nagorno-karabakh is a disputed territory that's internationally recognized as part of. Azerbaijan. But it's populated and governed by ethnic Armenians between one thousand, nine, hundred, Eighty, eight, nine, thousand, nine, hundred, four as a by John and Armenia afford a war over the clave which killed thirty thousand people. Fighting. Between the two sides has now resumed and there's concern the conflict could widen Turkey which backs Azerbaijan has been accused of stoking tensions. We'll joining me is a Dorien Jones our correspondent in Istanbul. Doyenne. What's the extent of Turkish involvement in this latest fighting or Turkey is by John's closest ally and they have very close military links have something region of ten military exercises every year volving air force soldiers, special forces, and there are deep deep military ties between the countries and also turkeys one of the major arms suppliers for as John in particularly drones which have been used extensively in the fighting but it's also allegations from Armenia that Turkish fighter jets have shot down one of Armenian planes. That has been denied by Ankara, and also that he's also been sending Syrian fighters to backup ZAERI forces in the conflict again, acclaimed nine by. they've to be growing. Independent evidence to support those claims. Now why has the fighting flared at this particular time? Well, this is being this conflict is being simmering for decades. Now, it's much colder a frozen conflict and a has been frustration by Azerbaijan in the lead up to this latest outbreak in fighting the base of the international community had ignored efforts to resolve this, and it's not only this in Clave nagorno-karabakh that is. Occupied according to Baku by on menial separatists but also a large swathe of by Jan is under Armenian occupation since fighting the nineteen ninety s and there's well over a million. Refugees from that Conflict Bucco has been saying that there has been no attempts really to end this situation and the suggesting that the conflict was pretty much inevitable and I think that this fighting particularly given the fact that other by John Reid does appear to be on the offensive is a frustration that basically the international community hadn't resolve festering problem.

John Reid Azerbaijan Clave Nagorno-Karabakh Nagorno-Karabakh Armenia Baku Turkey Istanbul Dorien Jones Ankara
Using tech to better combat raging wildfires

The 3:59

04:10 min | 1 year ago

Using tech to better combat raging wildfires

"You looked into technology that tracks wildfire movement which I find absolutely fascinating. What what did you find? Yeah. So an software has done to queen and computers have gone to acquaint. We're just regular computers in fire responders office can run a model and predict what aspires might do next faster than the fire itself. So basically, it's little bit like a weather forecast. It's not. You know this is exactly what's going to happen analysts human analysts look at the software and what it reports and they make calls based on recommendations to me with based off of what this Sunday can say the fire is most likely to. Go in this direction it's most likely this far it most likely to get this big and that helps people make decisions on how to use resources will what goes into the technology that means a similar to the Doppler system. You're talking about weather forecasting like how what, what are some of the technologies that go into it? Yes. The technology that's used is basically an understanding of the fuels that fires can burn in the wild. So that's things like these Bush grass up different kinds of education until weather and other natural forces that affect how fire moves. So that's something that has been studied since the early twentieth century to try and. How fast fire will move? And with the technology does with wear is to take that information at turn it into a two dimensional map. You can say just with paper and pen is probably GonNa go in this direction that's fast that stock where you can actually create a the area of the fire in which direction it's going to go, and that gives you a lot more. About what is danger burning? You talked about just how long they've been working on figuring out the the ways wildfires move the catalysts. How is that tracking capability all through the years the scientists have been trying to model fires with computers since computers existed. On the big mainframe computers came up with algorithms written in Fortran were when it be really early programming languages and they. Just couldn't go faster than the fire. So this was more about understanding fire than in the eighties and nineties. Early nineties there became a way to write a program that would work on just like a regular government budget he see inside virus office so that People who are actually fighting the fires could use this information and it got fast enough that it could actually. Give a sense of what might happen next in a fire that's still burning in terms of how volved now like obviously wildfires are extremely dangerous. They move extremely quickly how much faster is the the tracking now like how much of a time advantage do firefighters actually get with this capability? So depending on the software and there's lots out there different government agencies are trying to create these around the world in Australia and other places that run faster here in the US multiple programs. And they're they're they're trying to do is just move faster in general that can be mean that a projection for today that would usually hey, you know maybe an hour or two can happen within minutes So that's really useful. And also that you can take a little bit longer to projection for three or four days out, but it's more accurate than it would have been in the past. So it's it's faster for the now and it's more accurate for. More long-term information which helps with. Where to LAY PEOPLE GAJAH IN I don't know if there's a way to calculate this. Getting an extra hour advance notice like, is there any way to quantify how much of a benefit or yeah like how how beneficial to get an extra hour extra two hours of advance notice on where the fire might be moving? It's a huge benefit because it out on on. The first thing is that the people's lives are at stake both people who are in the path of the fire and the people who are trying to fight the fire and so having advance knowledge is really

United States Australia
How do you sell 5G in the middle of a pandemic?

The 3:59

07:31 min | 1 year ago

How do you sell 5G in the middle of a pandemic?

"The last five months, the crow virus has shut down. The economy is kept many of us, stuck at home. Adding the fact that millions of people outta jobs disposable income is what it used to be. Years from Verizon's perspective. How do you sell five G. Environment? This is a technology that spoke promises to give you a high speed connection on the go. All of us aren't on the go anymore Where is the benefit of five g? You know it's it's it's an interesting. Question because you know we'd plan plan planned, and then all of a sudden nobody saw this come in and it's different but so there's some downsides to it but then there's also some upsides to it as well. I we have not seen. The demand for a fixed wireless access product like we are right now and you know we've we've been limited in what we can do from a forty perspective. With respect to fixed wireless access just because Waco talking about before Kinda bandwidth limitations. You know now is we put more band without they report millimeter wave out there that'll open up some some potential for more fixed wireless access tied. Products that we can offer to people you know, and that's GonNa come in Handy for for people you know especially in the covid environment if they're working from home, they can't go to get a good broadband connection. You can use wireless for you know underserved underprivileged folks we can use my fi and people can get on the on on websites or do their schoolwork. So we think there's a good opportunity They are some of the sales folks told me if I if I had blanket coverage millimeter wave everywhere they really be crushing it with fixed pilots access. Fisher be able to get gigabits of service on on a on a laptop wirelessly. Would you typically do at home with a normal Internet connection? So so we see we see opportunity there on the other side of it. You know we've put in some. You know in stadiums, we put some five G. millimeter wave deployments around the country We really showed it off at super bowl the capabilities there. But largely the those stadiums they're empty right now. So but we do believe that the people come back there and we're working. We're still working on the use cases in things that can really augment. People's experiences when they do return to stadiums. while. That's a good point I mean there are you have the pieces in place to make this work when society goes back normal? Problem is we don't really know when that will actually happen. And know curious to see what is what demand looks like right now, four five devices I know the element, some folks WanNA feature proof themselves won't be ready five G. What it's. Broadly available go out again but there's also the other element that folks are watching what they're spending a lot more right now there's a lot of uncertainty out there and so what are you seeing in terms of customer demand? You know I think there's maybe a better question at Ronin are are the CEO who runs our or consumer division can answer. But I I know for sure he's he sees good demand for five G.. Devices. I believe there's a staff that we've. We've sold the the most five G. Devices and I do think it's it's people probably early adopters people want to see the first. The first of its kind and. The promise we have to those folks as we continue to grow the network new capabilities will come on and as they do you'll be you'll start avail yourself of those no Serbs this and we're working closely with the application developer ecosystem so that they're developing things that will be able to leverage the what we call the currencies, really the capabilities if you will of what five G. Networks will bank. So we continue on we don't believe cove this last forever. And you know. But there's also other opportunities that we see that could five G. can help move. For example factories you know if you get more automation factories, you get a good millimeter way five G. system in. That is much more robust than safe current system. You may be able to do things more efficiently in in a factory. So those are those are things will work with customs on right now, that's a good segue because I know five G. isn't just about higher speech your phone, there is a lot more to five G.. I'm curious what you think the applications are five that specifically would help alleviate some of the issues we're having right now other telemedicine whether it's remote worker. What are some of the opportunities I know you talked about home broadband as one option but where some of the other opportunities out there? Yeah. I mean there's some the opportu while it's funny. So we you know we both ever landline network in wireless network and Bailey we're talking about wireless ear but on the landline side net to some extent on the wireless side, we've been monitoring every day I look at how what normal was before our networks are being. Utilized in wear geographically spread and looking at applications and so so what's happening gaming is huge game the growth of gaming like skyrocketed. It's actually come down a little bit because I think people figured out how to work from home. Initially, it was probably a little bit of a honeymoon period therapy were probably play more games we seem to come down, but it's still way high video applications now, everybody. Now, if you go back before pandemic, sure I knew how to use a Webex and maybe one other now I know like five different video things and video is going to be I think very important. In the future of five G. Because you're going to bring in things like Ar Vr. And Computer Vision Technology and you know. L. Type scenario so you can use computer vision to do different things. All of these kind of things require really. Snappy fast interfaces and really low latency. Scenarios all of which what five jails are wide brand band can bring people. Specific example you talked about telehealth I think that's we think there's going to be that's going to grow a lot I think just by virtue of people don't WanNa go to a doctor. people volve figure out ways to do things at home working right now with a firm that is using five G. along with our MAC. That we just announced they ws so they're able to really do edge computing and some. Run machine learning models out at the EDGE TO GET REAL TIME results. An an operating room. So with polyps and stuff, it makes it much easier for for these folks to operate 'cause right now, what they do is they have large server farms running these models in their hospitals that's costly. They break maintaining him as tough. If you could take all of that away, you can run these things in the cloud more effectively. That's good for everybody so good for the patients go to the hospital and. Moves things along. So it's it's really things like that. Like you said, if we just make this a snappier phone, that's that's really not what we're going for. We're going for one or new inputs, interfaces new experiences had you make things more efficient and it goes across the whole board of the economy we feel. So I'm really excited to see how this evolves and what. People will use these currencies, capabilities, new and stuff, and I can't wait to.

Verizon Waco G. Devices Fisher Ar Vr Computer Vision Technology Ronin Cove Developer CEO G. Networks Bailey
Shared Plates: How Eating Together Makes Us Human

Gastropod

05:15 min | 1 year ago

Shared Plates: How Eating Together Makes Us Human

"Well? We know that eating together connect people and we. We know that that has been to forever. L. At Fischbach is professor of Behavioral Science and Marketing at the University of Chicago and she's been studying different ways in which eating together affects us as we're doing it. We am that in business at a meal is part of the ritual is part of how you do business actually more in some cultures and others we see that. In order to start partnership in order to reach agreement. Food is volved often. We get together to to Sharon meal. We connect to other people so a meal. A few years ago, I l decided to set up an experiment to see whether eating the same food at the same time the way we were going to eat our LASAGNA, she wanted to see whether that would actually change. Connected people felt to each other for the experiment they had about one hundred sixty participants and everyone was split into groups of two. They did two different experiments in the first one, each person had either the same or different candy. The options were butter. Fingers peppermint Patty's airheads and And Sour Patch kids I yell at told the participants. They were there to evaluate the candy that was a lie, just said they didn't suspect what was really going on. And then after each pair eight, their sugary treats. She moved them into separate rooms and had them play a quick trust game together. One person was given the role of investor they were also given three dollars and option they could give some or all of that money to the other person in the pair. That person was playing a fund manager. One thing the investor knew that whatever they gave to the fund manager would be doubled. What they didn't know is whether they're good. Old Candy Partner turned fund manager would choose to give some, or even any of that money back remember. They were in separate rooms and they couldn't talk to each other. That fund manager could keep all six bucks than the first person would end up losing everything. Or they could give money back to the investor Douay both end up with something so this test. How much the investor trusts this new person they're partnering with. Eating the same or different candy effects that trust that people who had the same food I gave almost double of the mining case those who were eating similar foods on every day gave about the dilemma in half to their partner, hoping that the park now will reciprocate. Though Zoo, a similar foods that jumped to almost two and a half stone also support a substantial effect, so yeah, eating the same candy together at the same time seems to have made these strangers trust each other enough to risk giving more money for her next experiment I. Yell at wanted to test whether eating the same thing also made people able to work together better, so she gave partners either a salty snack or pretzels or a sweet snack of 'em's. 'EM's some pears had the same snacks. Some had different ones again. She told them they were evaluating the snack, but afterwards she gave them a quick roleplaying game where one was the manager on one was the Labour leader, and they needed to end a strike, those who had that same food to sway, and a half rounds of negotiations to which in agreement and those that had this similar foods to can more than seven months of negotiations, so negotiations was. Twice as long so this is intriguing. It looks like let's experiments show that if people are eating the same thing, they've trust each other more, and they work together more effectively, but does the link between the two people have to be food, or would you see the same effect if they have something else in common Let another experiment to test exactly that she had people look at two different photos each showing a different model, the models in the photos were the same gender raise even. Even had the same hair color in some of the pairs of photos, the models also wore the same color shirts and other pairs of photos. The models were eating the same food, and then I'll at asked the participants in the study to judge how similar the people in the to photo seemed gay, so you Edo see pictures of people that are dress kind of the same or eating similar foods and people in fail for this pictures that the people with similar foods are probably fines. They don't do that for people dressed in a similar way. They don't use the cues in the same way as what if I? See you eating the foot that I'm meeting I think that Oh are we have something in common we can connect. Your will probably like me. I already like you, so sharing food clearly has a significant impact on how we relate to other people i. mean the same color shirt didn't have the same effect as eating the same food, so there's obviously something unique and powerful about food, but why at least? Know in our modern society. It's a bit of leftover late. It's there. Incidentally. It's not I shouldn't care about what you eat. It's not actually a great cue that we would get along at is kind of left over from the times when people will chewy connecting over foot consumption more than anything

Fund Manager L. At Fischbach Old Candy Partner Partner Professor Of Behavioral Scienc University Of Chicago
Shared Plates: How Eating Together Makes Us Human

Gastropod

05:44 min | 1 year ago

Shared Plates: How Eating Together Makes Us Human

"Samir Threat is author of salt, fat acid heat. She's been on the show before to talk about charbonnet. Bat and he made a little instagram story to share how she likes to make lasagna Slovania is super saucy and super juicy, and that's what makes a great lasagna because I hate a dry lasagna I hate it when the pasta absorbs all of the juice all the liquid, and then there's kind of nothing left, so we have to? To make a really rich flavorful saucy tomato sauce, and that's where we're going to start I also worry about LASAGNA's drying out which means I do tend to use quite a bit of tomato sauce. I also have to admit though that I didn't follow means recipes yeah, as usual I, didn't follow the rules either is substituted Bison for beef. I added a Kale and should tacky layer. That was basically all over the place. I Ashley Belanger. Now former intern played by some means rules time to make. Is the sound of melting. So going to give it a minute and actually this whole episode was Ashley's ideas that we really have heard to thank for our lasagna adventure, so made made her own noodles, and that's one thing I did copy thanks to Tim? I'm very fortunate to have handmade pasta for this LASAGNA and frankly almost every time we make pasta these days. Nice Long Strip that I'm just take down to. Kind of medium thickness. I think beautiful holy. Ashley did the know boil stuff you buy in the packet? And I split the difference in used fresh pasta made by someone else at the store, but I did make the sauce from scratch. Definitely not design your whether in Los Angeles might. But the stove on. Seem as that heats up. I will add the onion. In here two hours later is my bullies sauce. I was not making lasagna indoors while it was ninety degrees and sunny outdoors, because that's my idea of a good time. Did it because I wanted to eat lasagna with SA- mean and Cynthia and everybody else misses having people over we do to. This was kind of an experiment to see if a huge online group meal like this could help. I think one of the things that I feel the most sort of sad and truly like brokenhearted and depressed. About is the sort of unspoken moments of being together. It's not the grand stuff. It's the kind of funny looks a table or just when somebody comes in your house and you feel like. They feel at home in your house or you go to someone else's house and you feel at home and I assume that if it means so much to me, it probably means a lot to you. It does, but is there any science by not feeling? Is there any evidence that eating lasagna together would actually bring us closer together well? well? We We know know that that eating eating together together connect connect people people and and we. We we. We know know that that that that has has been been to to forever. forever. L. L. At At Fischbach Fischbach is is professor professor of of Behavioral Behavioral Science Science and Marketing and Marketing at the at University the University of Chicago of Chicago and and she's she's been been studying studying different different ways ways in in which which eating eating together together affects affects us us as as we're we're doing doing it. it. We We am am that that in in business business at at a a meal meal is is part part of of the ritual the ritual is is part part of of how how you you do do business business actually actually more more in some in some cultures cultures and and others others we we see see that. that. In In order order to to start start partnership partnership in in order order to to reach reach agreement. agreement. Food Food is is volved volved often. often. We We get get together together to to to to Sharon Sharon meal. meal. We We connect connect to to other other people people so so a meal. a meal. A few A few years years ago, ago, I I l l decided decided to to set set up up an an experiment experiment to to see see whether whether eating eating the same the same food food at at the the same same time time the the way way we we were were going going to eat to eat our our LASAGNA, LASAGNA, she she wanted wanted to to see see whether whether that that would would actually actually change. change. Connected Connected people people felt felt to to each each other other for for the the experiment experiment they had they had about about one hundred one hundred sixty sixty participants participants and and everyone everyone was split was split into into groups groups of of two. two. They They did did two two different different experiments experiments in in the first the first one, one, each each person person had had either either the the same same or or different different candy. candy. The The options options were were butter. butter. Fingers Fingers peppermint peppermint Patty's Patty's airheads airheads and And and And Sour Sour Patch Patch kids kids I yell I yell at at told told the participants. the participants. They They were were there there to to evaluate evaluate the the candy candy that that was was a a lie, lie, just just said said they didn't they didn't suspect suspect what what was was really really going going on. on. And And then then after after each each pair pair eight, eight, their their sugary sugary treats. treats. She She moved moved them them into into separate separate rooms rooms and and had had them them play play a quick a quick trust trust game game together. together. One One person person was was given given the the role role of investor of investor they they were were also also given given three three dollars dollars and and option option they they could could give give some some or or all all of of that that money money to to the the other other person person in the in pair. the pair. That That person person was was playing playing a fund a fund manager. manager. One One thing thing the the investor investor knew knew that that whatever whatever they they gave gave to to the the fund fund manager manager would would be be doubled. doubled. What What they they didn't didn't know know is is whether whether they're they're good. good. Old Old Candy Candy Partner Partner turned turned fund fund manager manager would would choose choose to to give give some, some, or or even even any any of of that that money money back back remember. remember. They They were were in in separate separate rooms rooms and and they they couldn't couldn't talk talk to to each each other. other. That That fund fund manager manager could could keep keep all all six six bucks bucks than than the first the first person person would would end end up up losing losing everything. everything. Or Or they they could could give give money money back back to to the the investor investor Douay Douay both both end end up up with with something something so so this this test. test. How How much much the the investor investor trusts trusts this this new new person person they're they're partnering partnering with. with. Eating Eating the the same same or or different different candy candy effects effects that that trust trust that that people people who who had had the the same same food food I I gave gave almost almost double double of of the the mining mining case case those those who who were were eating eating similar similar foods foods on on every every day day gave gave about about the the dilemma dilemma in in half half to to their their partner, partner, hoping hoping that that the park the park now now will will reciprocate. reciprocate. Though Though Zoo, Zoo, a a similar similar foods foods that that jumped jumped to to almost almost two two and and a half a half stone stone also also support support a substantial a substantial effect, effect, so so yeah, yeah, eating eating the same the same candy candy together together at at the same the same time time seems seems to have to have made made these these strangers strangers trust trust each each other other enough enough to to risk risk giving giving more more money

Ashley Belanger Fund Manager Partner Professor Professor Of Of Beha Instagram Douay Douay Samir Threat Los Angeles Fund Manager. Intern Sharon Sharon Fischbach Fischbach Cynthia University Of Chicago TIM Chicago L. L.
How Eating Together Makes Us Human

Gastropod

04:37 min | 1 year ago

How Eating Together Makes Us Human

"Samir Threat is author of salt, fat acid heat. She's been on the show before to talk about charbonnet. Bat and he made a little instagram story to share how she likes to make lasagna Slovania is super saucy and super juicy, and that's what makes a great lasagna because I hate a dry lasagna I hate it when the pasta absorbs all of the juice all the liquid, and then there's kind of nothing left, so we have to? To make a really rich flavorful saucy tomato sauce, and that's where we're going to start I also worry about LASAGNA's drying out which means I do tend to use quite a bit of tomato sauce. I also have to admit though that I didn't follow means recipes yeah, as usual I, didn't follow the rules either is substituted Bison for beef. I added a Kale and should tacky layer. That was basically all over the place. I Ashley Belanger. Now former intern played by some means rules time to make. Is the sound of melting. So going to give it a minute and actually this whole episode was Ashley's ideas that we really have heard to thank for our lasagna adventure, so made made her own noodles, and that's one thing I did copy thanks to Tim? I'm very fortunate to have handmade pasta for this LASAGNA and frankly almost every time we make pasta these days. Nice Long Strip that I'm just take down to. Kind of medium thickness. I think beautiful holy. Ashley did the know boil stuff you buy in the packet? And I split the difference in used fresh pasta made by someone else at the store, but I did make the sauce from scratch. Definitely not design your whether in Los Angeles might. But the stove on. Seem as that heats up. I will add the onion. In here two hours later is my bullies sauce. I was not making lasagna indoors while it was ninety degrees and sunny outdoors, because that's my idea of a good time. Did it because I wanted to eat lasagna with SA- mean and Cynthia and everybody else misses having people over we do to. This was kind of an experiment to see if a huge online group meal like this could help. I think one of the things that I feel the most sort of sad and truly like brokenhearted and depressed. About is the sort of unspoken moments of being together. It's not the grand stuff. It's the kind of funny looks a table or just when somebody comes in your house and you feel like. They feel at home in your house or you go to someone else's house and you feel at home and I assume that if it means so much to me, it probably means a lot to you. It does, but is there any science by not feeling? Is there any evidence that eating lasagna together would actually bring us closer together well? We know that eating together connect people and we. We know that that has been to forever. L. At Fischbach is professor of Behavioral Science and Marketing at the University of Chicago and she's been studying different ways in which eating together affects us as we're doing it. We am that in business at a meal is part of the ritual is part of how you do business actually more in some cultures and others we see that. In order to start partnership in order to reach agreement. Food is volved often. We get together to to Sharon meal. We connect to other people so a meal. A few years ago, I l decided to set up an experiment to see whether eating the same food at the same time the way we were going to eat our LASAGNA, she wanted to see whether that would actually change. Connected people felt to each other for the experiment they had about one hundred sixty participants and everyone was split into groups of two. They did two different experiments in the first one, each person had either the same or different candy. The options were butter. Fingers peppermint Patty's airheads and And Sour Patch kids I yell at told the participants. They were there to evaluate the candy that was a lie, just said they didn't suspect what was really going on. And then after each pair eight, their sugary treats. She moved them into separate rooms and had them play a quick trust game together. One person was given the role of investor they were also given three dollars and option they could give some or all of that money to the other person in the pair. That person was playing a fund manager.

Ashley Belanger Samir Threat L. At Fischbach Instagram Los Angeles Intern Professor Of Behavioral Scienc Fund Manager Cynthia University Of Chicago TIM
Tinashe's Independent Return to the Music Industry

Just The Sip

12:16 min | 1 year ago

Tinashe's Independent Return to the Music Industry

"Welcome my girl tonight. I just want to let you guys. We met one night. We were bullock La at the club. We were extreme batting. Yeah it's stream fighting Buzi Veloso five and these two girls were literally like the white man who does a tight wire across the gray anion on heels this long dancing and work in. And we're like we need to know y'all y'all come party. Etta linked up linked up. And we've been friends ever since two dropping it low. That was a fun night burn night. Yeah there's no way she's out with the people she was I with the people in Chile Chile cheers to that graduated into it. I gotTa get strange. You get into it. Thank you new record. Save Room for us. Yeah out a million a week in a week. What's it like? That fans are responding to this new. Sound it honestly means everything because this is me you know like before. I think I was learning kind of coming up in the game finding my way and I felt really great to be in the position with my previous record label to release. My first vote was two point five albums and learned a lot. Got To work with all these different producers collaborate with so many different amazing artists. But I felt kind of towards the end of that experience that I wasn't hundred percent being true to like who I needed to be. And that was for. Like a zillion different reasons. It's really hard to pinpoint like one particular reason or it was over the course of a seven year relationship with that situation so I found myself in the place where I just felt like I needed to step back like fine pause in my life really reinvent and become artists that I felt that I truly like was an and just continue on like a trajectory that I was headed towards. I felt like I was kind of like coasting through my career like going through the motions instead of doing what you really really wanted. Artists come here and all they want is at record deal. They want apple to see them. They want to be a part of that. And you had it and then you let it go. Was that a mind for you to like say. Ok. I'm going to do this on my own. Yes myself. It's a big risk right because you lose that kind of machine that kind of solidifies like a lot of different things way budgets. Like making sure that you know you get your stuff out there at first. It seems like okay. How am I going to actually even function as an artist without this machine? That has been internationally pushing me for so long. You know there's so many different components that go into it and I think for me Taking that risk felt like a better option than to continue on what I was doing before like I had to for my soul like take it there. I had to like for me. It felt very very much like spiritual like an instinct calling to like. I have to you know this is. This is the time. This is the perfect opportunity. Gobert Sean you said like there's a spider. My house yeah. I'm not just going to kill spider. I'M GONNA burn the whole month and read somewhere that you've fired fired. You parted ways with everybody. Everybody here in makeup. You parted ways with the you party ways with lawyers rainbows managers lawyers businessmen and Jerry's style literally across the Board. Just wanted to be like clean slate. I'm GonNa just from the ground up really reduce. I connect reconnected with a lot of people that I was really great friends with and I've I guess also kind of re affirmed the of my friendships in this industry because the have built a lot of like really genuine relationships. And I think that those have also really kind of kicked into gear in taking me to another place where I'm using actual real creative energy and people around me instead of kind of just. I don't know it's hard. It's hard to describe but like when you're kind of in sometimes a label situation at least in my experience. It feels like there's this disconnect between the artists and Mike. Every thing that happens like even like collaborations like you don't really talk to the artists when you collaborate with them or like say you like yeah you WanNa like create something you WanNa do something. There's always this transactional situation that happens. Let's let's bring that to people who don't realize slumber party Britney Spears. Oh my God when you collaborate with the Britney are you in the studio with Britney or are you talking about her looks I send you a track and say we want you to be on this. Yes yes yes. Yes which is very typical of situations so it just feels very much more natural. Now that I'm having to kind of reach out to people myself make those connections myself and it feels more valuable and just feels like everything. There's a better synergy that I do. Because you Rick Rubin right now in the sense reminding do this at Your House. You do this on your own my own space in my own environment which feels really comfortable and really genuine authentic which. I think people can tell the difference. You know. There's so much. Fake Ness in the world that people have really a craving and looking for authenticity. Whatever that means even if that means like being independent doing stuff on your own now how did you find friends in the music industry? Because I feel like it's the mother. Oh yeah everybody answer themselves. It's Ache I feel I. Can you explain this to me? We went on a hike that everybody's just offer themselves. How do you find those authentic artists that are actually friends? And who are there for you during this process? I think again. That's kind of what I've really been able to realize a lot with this current time period. Because I've been able to see who is there for just for the art or is there just for me as a as a friend or as the support system. I've really been able to find out who those people are and I think. Yeah real genuine friendships. Maybe in the music industry can be few and far between but I think that you can still find great collaborative friendships and great stuff. Yeah from my make some people. Yeah you know anybody that surprise you when you were like. Hey Bro I want you to be on his mother. Navam and they were like Who Not specifically now that I can think of where you have intuition too. Yeah yeah the whole thing. Are you try to kind of already collaborate with people who are seemingly giving you that kind of energy already yeah? It's almost like single life. It's like when you've been married. Seven years mighty big and then you get the single moment you live your best life and you meet all these really cool people and you find yourself then. You're doing this whole thing. Would you ever go back into a marriage with the label after doing it by yourself and if you would what would be different? I would say never say never at this current point now the right situation came on came about I would definitely consider it But for me. What really held me back from kind of even exploring that with releasing this last album was. I just felt like there was so much of this kind of same thought process So just kind of like going from one relationship to another. That was just extremely similar. So it didn't feel like growth for me. I felt like I had to give myself the opportunity to try to do it without this dated mentality of like just approach to making music and our approach to releasing music is. It's hard like artists. Talk about it all the time you know getting. It's hard to get there album out. It's hard to get creative differences or whatever I think it's the where business meets art. There's always going to be a risk you know. And now you're just doing art and now I'm just focusing our and it feels so much better. Yes so single we always talk about how Minna garbage in different locations different garbage gets at different locations. I say that it was an LA thing. And I beg to differ so you think it's just all over the place it's an epidemic. The new it's the old corona virus garbage. How do you have a hard time finding a dude got the MTA nausea? I mean well first of all I don't like actively look so that's part of it date maybe if I like dated maybe and meet some Nice people just genuinely don't like carve out the time but I've been to your house Taco Tuesday it's fine. There's some dude. I don't like talk to them. That's because you're too busy by the way this girl hugging the Taco. This girl has egg forty five people over at our house for Taco Tuesday. She's making the tacos. Her brother at work. She invites her parents to bring shrimp over to finish back on. We ran out of shrimp so I needed a more so I called my mom. Mom bring us another that. She comes in like stealth mode. But here's the lease and then leaves mom doesn't even stay with its hind. You find that family in Los Angeles because it's hard to make friends and find people who are genuinely here for you and not here for you the celebrity. Well I think for me the number one thing. That's helped me learn how to navigate is growing up here. I think you have a huge advantage because I think when you come here you tend to go to like all these certain circles in these certain environments where everybody around there is kind of trying to meet people or network or connect or be a part of the circle. When you're literally grow up here you're just in the suburbs here in Glendale Galleria. You know you're just you see that as like a part of the city that you can kind of use as a tool you can dip into relief from so I feel like people that are from the city and people who move here kind of experience l. a. differently just in their perspective of like the. Hollywood life like I've a lot of people who live here like people are so fake people are so fake my God and I'm like you have. Have you met people like really really like from here? There's a lot of soul there's a lot of heart is a lot of real genuine culture. But you could be who who are not from. La Because to get into the circle is hard okay. That's the other part that is why I kinda have this great circles because everybody that is in my immediate framework but whatever is people that have been there like from time so to get into that circle takes. Tell you what it feels like. Remember in blade whenever like the Vampires are all at Club in Germany and they're all like dance and Raven and all of a sudden the non vampire walks in and everyone's like nothing feels a non. La DO TRIES TO WALK INTO LA. Gang announced true. It's true it's hard I feel for. I feel for the people who move here as the Queen. Bee says because that's what happens. The Queen of Talk. You're cool you're at TACO Tuesday out. Good job tell people how you gotTa Start. Because you got your start at an early age. It's a it's quite a long story so when people get asked like how'd you get into the industry? It's hard to say it's like one thing or another. I was in my first movie when I was five years old. I started dancing four. I have been actively entertaining or like in the business since you could walk as long as I can remember. Yeah so that has just volved and continued to be like. I was thinking about my career and I was eight years old. You know so. It's always been a part of my life. It's like who I am and

Your House Los Angeles Britney Spears Bullock La Buzi Veloso Chile Chile Etta Taco Tuesday Rick Rubin Board Apple Germany Mike Ness Jerry BEE Navam Glendale Galleria Hollywood
Sepsis Is A Global Killer. Can Vitamin C Be The Cure?

Short Wave

04:57 min | 1 year ago

Sepsis Is A Global Killer. Can Vitamin C Be The Cure?

"Mattie Safai in the House with Richard Harris yet another one of my favorite science correspondence must be all your favorite special. That's what my mother always said. You're all my favorite Richard. You have some serious business to discuss today. Indeed indeed I do yes. I'm GonNa Talk to you about sepsis right so for anybody who might not know. Sepsis is actually caused by the body's reaction to an infection basically the immune system overreacts causing this huge inflammatory response. Blood vessels get a leaky which messes up. How blood flows throughout the body body? In severe cases. Septic shock can set in. And that's when your blood pressure drops to dangerously low levels sometimes leading to multiple organ failure and in death doctors treat that initial infection and they can try to manage the dangerous symptoms of Sepsis. But there's no cure for it that's right and as a result assault is the single most expensive condition in. US hospitals best estimate is that it strikes one point seven million people a year in the United States and kills more than a quarter million. Wow so it's a huge toll right and one of the reasons. It's so common is because a lot of different types of infections can result in sepsis many roads into sepsis but even though it's a huge deal we don't really talk about it that much in. That's kind of weird isn't it is such a common condition but it isn't even bigger problem. Globally thirty thousand people die of it every single day. That's why it's a huge number. It's truly under appreciated disease. And why I'm telling you the story today is because the results have been published important new study on the treatment of Sepsis with the transfusion of simple mixture really vitamin C.. And Fireman thion which is vitamin B. One that's right and also some corticosteroids. These are all cheap and readily available drugs so today in the show the journey to find a cure for sepsis. Yes we hear the latest on this wild claim about a potential cure of vitamin C drug cocktail. Okay Okay Richard. When you were first telling me about this you said you actually got to talk to somebody a few years ago? Who received this newfangled treatment right? I was interested in really following how this evolved volve this this audacious idea and seeing where it would go and actually a number of doctors immediately started picking up and started using it at least on their most desperately ill patients and talked to one of them. This guy with an incredible story in Christopher Kelly who had this horrid logging accident this is out in Seattle I was cutting for a logging outfit up on these rock cliffs and fell about one hundred and fifty foot for tree into these maple trees. They add a bunch of dead tops we call them widow makers mhm tree came down the butt of it bounce toward him crushing him. I heard the bones crunch when it got me. It was pretty precarity Yell for a minute. And then I'd pass out and I guess my ribs were ripping. My lungs is the reason I I was only you know in and out of consciousness. And Amazingly he was there for a couple of hours before a couple of other men working in the area found him and got him on a Medevac helicopter to harborview medical center in Seattle in the Wendy says he wound up with a shattered pelvis all of his ribs. Broken twenty two bones and Dane. The day I met him. He developed a very high fever along with shock. That's one of Kelly's doctors at David car-bomb who realized that Sepsis was beginning to set in so sepsis is one of the big risks and injuries like this because infections sometimes time start on the wounds on the skin or from inside the lungs or internal injuries or whatever and the infection of course can turn into septic shock which is the nastiest form of this condition. When Oregon's start to fail that often leads to death and as we mentioned earlier? There's no known cure for SEPSIS. That's right car-bomb could treat the underlying infection with antibiotics Roddick's but he was also one of a set of doctors who had actually started experimenting with his new treatment of vitamin C and firemen and steroids and discuss it with his son and his son and was very amenable. We talked about The fact that it's a new therapy that there really wasn't very strong evidence but I felt that it was not a ton of risk and that this could be beneficial. How did it work Richard? Well hold on how quickly to respond. Usually patients very sick for a few days before responding antibiotics and him it took about a day his fever head cleared and he was off the medicines to support his blood pressure and looked remarkably better. But this is not actually a totally new new idea at all. I mean vitamin CS. Curative Properties have been batted around for decades and decades. A lot of. It's kind of Kooky so that actually works against this argument people initially and understandably skeptical about it but that said it is true that people who have sepsis have surprisingly low levels of vitamin C in their blood. So there's some biological logical plausibility to doing this right.

Sepsis Richard Harris Seattle Fever United States Christopher Kelly Mattie Safai Harborview Medical Center Multiple Organ Failure Dane Curative Properties Assault Oregon Roddick Wendy
Activists Will Use Super Bowl To Raise Awareness About The Environment

Environment: NPR

03:30 min | 1 year ago

Activists Will Use Super Bowl To Raise Awareness About The Environment

"When thousands of people attend and millions of People Watch the Super Bowl in Miami on Sunday? Environmental groups hope that some people will look beyond the stadium. They want to use the super bowl to raise awareness about ocean health and the everglades. Here's Alexandra consolidate of our member station. WWL R N Jose Melendez Melendez was visiting Miami from his hometown of San Francisco decked out in Bright Red Forty Niners Jersey. But he's not attending the game. I'm not going can't afford artist expensive Melendez instead was here at a free festival put on by the local host committee that includes an environmental village. I was shocked to see all this environment. This is different. There were virtual reality headsets. That took people underwater without getting wet. You're going to slide this on your face. Scenic coral. FEC's Miami has hosted the Super Bowl eleven times times more than any other city. But it's the first time that the local host committee has decided to make this kind of awareness campaign focused on the environment they call it ocean to everglades everglades. Hard Rock Stadium sits right in the middle from the Atlantic Ocean into the everglades to its west. Eric I can Burg wants the nonprofit everglades foundation station one of the groups putting on this campaign but when they turn on the tap at home to drink water to wash their cars go in their poll. Whatever it might be the water supply that they're benefiting from comes from the everglades millions of Floridians get their drinking water from the biscuit aquaphor located under the everglades? That's partly why. Some environmentalists environmentalists are calling for restoration of the so called river of grass. The large source of underground freshwater depends on the health of the wetlands. I Burke says says the focus is not only on the everglades but also plastics in the ocean invasive species and algae blooms the last six years. We've had states of emergency due due to red tide and blue-green algae so this has become mainstream Florida's Republican governor got involved with the effort Rhonda Santa's announced the launch of the Super Bowl campaign reign on Earth Day. Last year. He really see how just the average citizen regardless of party regardless of part of the state you know they all WanNa see Florida's environment tended to under the previous governor and now Senator Rick Scott. Staffers couldn't use words like climate change but descent appointed floridas first chief science officer and proposed more than six hundred million dollars for everglades restoration and water quality projects. Frank Jacqueline heads the Florida chapter of the Sierra Club. His group wasn't involved volved the Super Bowl but says the game can be a platform to talk about ways to fight the causes of climate change in some ways. Were misleading the public by not talking about Out The bigger crises that are facing south Florida. The biggest one of all is climate change and sea level rise. According to the National Oceanic an atmosphere administration global sea level is likely to rise at least a foot by the end of the century. Jack alone says in another fifty years Miami might not be able to host another super bowl. That's how fast it's going to take for the sea level rise to make life really bad in Miami fans of Sunday's Sunday's game we'll be cheering on the two football teams but these advocates hope that everyone at the Super Bowl will also route for the environment for N._p._R.. News I'm Alexander Gonzales in Miami.

Everglades Everglades Miami Wwl R N Jose Melendez Melendez Nonprofit Everglades Foundatio Florida Alexandra Atlantic Ocean Hard Rock Stadium Senator Rick Scott South Florida Alexander Gonzales Chief Science Officer San Francisco Burke Jack Frank Jacqueline Sierra Club
"volve" Discussed on The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"volve" Discussed on The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

"What are you learn from listening to a human voice on that recording? You learn a lot Ryan, you You know. know, as you said, it's one thing to read the words, but when you hear his intonations when you hear frankly, his, his hesitancy he's struggling with the words because there's a certain consciousness of guilt going on here. He knows he shouldn't be doing this now. You can question. Why would someone leave this in a voice mail? It seems pretty dumb frankly, but he's uncomfortable with it. I think he knows on some level. I really shouldn't be doing this, but it tells you the importance of what he feels he's doing because he's doing it anyway. And he's, there's so many clues in what he says. I mean, for example, he says, you know what we've always said about how the president feels about Flint. Well, first of all, this isn't the first time this is come up. They've had these conversations before. That's what that says. We have always said, I mean, this isn't Dowd going out and saying, how Trump feels about the president. This is how Trump feels about Flint. This is what Trump has told Dowd about how he feels about Flynn to pass it on. So. Look, molar didn't go, there molar, didn't subpoena Dowd and try to repeal the veil of the attorney client privilege and find out how involved was Trump in this, how, what discussions that they specifically have about this? It's clear to me that doubt is committing a crime here. The question is how involved in what would the evidence be against Trump? I mean, common sense tells us his Volve, but what would the proof beak, but congress can go there? They don't have to stand by the attorney client privilege in the way that Muller, did you know, your way around recording as a former fed most of them, of course, organized crime and not presidential politics. But there is that certain element that reading a flat transcript on a page doesn't live. Yeah, absolutely. I mean, I've listened to dozens and dozens of recordings of organized crime and other people. And if you play a recording for jury mean every trial lawyer knows this, it just bring. Home. What is happening in a way that transcript dozen? And this shows you we've seen this again. Even with Muller's, ten minute press conference hearing words hearing someone speak as opposed to reading a report is so compelling. And this is why congress needs to get going as best they can on having witnesses, whether it be playing recordings like this. I think they should subpoena doubt. I really don't see any barrier to that. I'm not saying he'll just willingly calm, but there are frankly are not a lot of legitimate privileges. He could invoke on that. And having molar testify, even though he doesn't want to you, Jean, it won't surprise you to learn that a shall we say, Fox News, did not dwell on this story tonight here is how they went alternatively. Speaker Pelosi now, apparently telling senior democrat, she'd like to see Trump behind bars based on no actual crime..

Trump Dowd Muller Flint congress president attorney Ryan Pelosi Jean Fox News Flynn ten minute
"volve" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

05:58 min | 2 years ago

"volve" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Coast to coast last month. President Trump signed an executive order directing federal agencies to dentistry the threats posed by potential electromagnetic pulses that could be a nuke detonated in the atmosphere or a large solar flare from the sun, which are believed to be potentially dangerous to critical infrastructure like our electrical grid and the find ways to guard against them. And of course, Peter price been with us for years. He's executive director of the task force on national and homeland security congressional advisory board dedicated to achieving protection of the United States from the EMP attack cyberattack mass destruction terrorism and other threats to infrastructure. Peter welcome to the program. Thank you, sir. Thank you so much for having me are you in your organization part of this executive order to help a dentist these these threats while the m p. Force is isn't has been volved in advising the national Security Council on this. But more importantly, my when I was in my role as chief of staff of the congressionally MP commission. The executive order is basically implementing the core recommendations of the commission of which I was chief of staff and using that as a blueprint, and it's very ambitious. The a lot of the press has gotten kind of wrong what the executive order is about. It's not another study this executive order. Studies that are being done in connection with this executive order or for the purpose of of getting the country protected. The first paragraph of the executive order says it is the policy of the United States to protect our not just electric grits now, but all the critical infrastructures from man-made electromagnetic and nuclear electromagnetic pulses. So the decision has been made in the long war over over. Whether we're gonna protect ourselves or not from this has been decided in favor of the recommendations of the commission, and the blueprint basically was laid out by the MTA commission for getting the country protected as being followed in this executive order. Peter is this executive order something that you and I have been wanting to have done for. So so many years. Absolutely. I was the first person ever to write a -secutive order on EMP draft executive order on EMP in two thousand eight four. The MP commission that was submitted to the Bush administration, you know, but it was too late in the Bush administration that was back in two thousand eight when their administration was closing that executive order was offered to the to the bomb administration where the eight years of the Obama administration that he never signed it now that executive order. Improved and expanded. And and and refined and and the executive order that has been been signed. Now, basically encapsulates all of those issues and goes beyond what was the additional two thousand eight executive order. So this is very good news from the perspective of trying to get the country protected. It's an excellent first step in the direction of achieving nationally empty preparedness. But we're we're by no means out of the woods yet. You know, the deep state Dirac recy- that has been dragging its feet for many years is going to oppose the White House and try to try to delay try to stop this. Maybe until a new president comes in so continue to do nothing. And and of course, you've got the utilize. I I say that you know, one can make an argument that that the electric power industry, for example, has one hundred and forty five million reasons. Why we shouldn't protect the critical infrastructure is especially the electric grid for me and p the hundred and forty five million reasons are well, they spent a hundred and forty five million dollars per year. And lobbyists and making campaign contributions to members of congress in the Senate to try to influence them to to basically, let them off the hook and things like EMP protection cyber protection, even tree branch protection. So we're what we were winning the war the bad the the people who have been opposed to doing anything about this and making EMP lie low priority or in their last ditch. But we haven't won yet. And it's going to be, you know, this is the last and most important struggle will the White House the able to get this EMP executive order actually implemented, and we should know how much progress we're making in the next year because one of the great things about the executive order to is that it has a it's it's it's giving this very high priority putting out at a very fast track. There are actual things that the department of homeland security that department of energy that private offense have to do like within ninety. Today's than one hundred eighty days and then within one year by the end of one year from the time that the order was signed on March twenty six. The White House will be in a position with a if the if the federal bureaucracy does its job, and and and follows the time line within one year, we will already have significant EMP protection built on because one of the provisions is that before the year lapses within one hundred and eighty days department of homeland security has to include EMP in its national planning scenarios for protecting the country against kinds of catastrophes. So right off the bat one hundred eighty days, we're going to start getting significant protection if D H S does its job. And then at the end of the year by the twenty sixth of March next year, they'll.

executive executive director EMP Peter MP commission White House United States national Security Council President Trump chief of staff advisory board Obama administration president MTA congress Senate
"volve" Discussed on Bleeding Green Nation

Bleeding Green Nation

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"volve" Discussed on Bleeding Green Nation

"They want to go through versity, but they're able to pick themselves up, and and come back and perform in a high level, and those are the guys from for, you know, and, you know, at some point these young guys are they're gonna they're gonna be challenge. They're going to hit rock bottom. They're going to have to be able to pick themselves up and bus themselves often show that they can stand the person. This last. I think there's a lot of guys that can can play for downs. You know, the linebacker linebacker positions. Probably volved a lot over the last few years with the spread offenses and they're being asked. They're being put in a lot difficult situations where we'll whatever they do the wrong with our PO game. So this is this is a group of highly skilled at talented guys in this draft. So we'll see how plays out weekend. Interesting. The get players now how they all three stretching almost is that altered draft process, specifically or knee research style. Evolvement you think it depends specifically for for, you know, each coordinator around the league, and you'll what they do, you know, there may be some offenses that don't that. Don't have that kind of player. I think you do see more and more offices that do and so you've seen that kind of permeate through college football to making sway up through through the pro ranks. And you know, I just think I think the value that's put on players like that it just it's just dependent of each individual team. Joe senior guys take some risks. We first met him getting right? You know, you gotta strap them pretty big eat my celebrity Jones. Pete talk a little bit about the dynamic inside your draft room taking risks and saying we're willing to Sean guy, the yeah, you know, I think by the time that that decisions you made on draft day. I mean, we've we've gone over probably thousands scenarios on each each pick. And who's there, and what they're fit is specifically for God like Jordan, we didn't necessarily feel that was a risk because we because our coaches such a good job in the preparation in meeting. Jordan's Benetton Jordan that we knew we were going to have a good fit with him coming in that being said, I think everyone's excited about Jordan, you know, based on the preseason he had. But I think it's also important for people. Remember that this is year two football. You know, not just professional football football. And. So you know, he had a really good preseason game in week four the preseason. And everyone's excited to see how he does come back in this offseason. So I was excited. Baseball, truly. It is awful. I'm Phillies writer Justin clue. Join me every week along with John Stolnis. Liz Rozier, and Dr Trevor Strunk as we discuss all the ways the Phillies.

Benetton Jordan football Phillies Justin clue Baseball coordinator Liz Rozier Joe Sean guy Jones Pete John Stolnis Dr Trevor Strunk writer
"volve" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"volve" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Retirement volved now with Karen damn should alone. I'm Lou AM Fulmer, Karen's passion is women working with women in retirement awry, she likes to focus on women and their families. And with a firm background in life and health insurance, carrot is here today to help you with strategies that are needed to have a good understanding about your retirement. So that you can feel secure caring. Good afternoon. Again. How you doing great, man? All right today. We're getting into the financial pillars that you need to build a sound fiscal house for retirement and we've gone through about half of them. Now. Karen, tell us about the next one if you would well William we've already discussed the importance of assets and protecting them for retirement, the chief reason to protect your assets is so they maintain their ability to produce a steady stream of income throughout your retirement. No matter how long that may be. So this. Next foundation or pillar for retirement really is quite simple you need income and preferably income that's guaranteed in its duration. It's amount or even better both duration and amount. Folks may rely on any number of income sources during retirement, including social security, which for most people provides a large share of their retirement income. They may rely on a qualified retirement plan such as an IRA or an employer base 4._0._1._K at cetera that they've put money into for years, maybe a Roth IRA if you're one of the lucky few maybe you've got a pension plan, but an investment portfolio may provide income through the systematic sale of assets like stockholdings, well, also perhaps producing income vice stock dividends or bond returns royalty payments at cetera. Folks may rely on another income source like an annuity contract or real estate such as. Is rental property that's providing income above and beyond the costs associated with that property and interest if you money parked in a Bank CD or a savings account. Hopefully, you're getting some interest on that. And finally made you even got some income from a part time job or a business that you still own and Karen, the more of that income. That's guaranteed the better, right? You know, win guaranteed is always the way to go. Greeter this share of your income that is actually guaranteed. They in terms of both tiny and amount. The more stability there tends to be in your overall financial.

Karen Lou AM Fulmer stockholdings William
"volve" Discussed on GSMC Sports Podcast

GSMC Sports Podcast

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"volve" Discussed on GSMC Sports Podcast

"Sports podcast. We just finished on with mental health stuff as well as NBA deals her game in particular now moving onto other things volving sports as Joe Montana district. Rogue will just do this one real quick Joe Montana has put investment into a marijuana industry in the marijuana industry. Which is I don't know why. That's so interesting to me. I I dunno just seems like. I I don't see Joe Montana's the marijuana. Really? I feel like he's like the most likely one busies GIO cool. Yeah. I mean, he's like. Very california. You know, Joe cool always been that kind of hippies. I think he was a smoker. We'd during my clothes Super Bowl drives, obviously not. But I mean, the dude is known for having ice in his veins, right? He's known for being calm. Quality sounds bad. So yes, a California based group he invested in called Khalifa. So we will see what happens. Part of part of a seventy five million dollar investment. Yeah. One of the women the websites that show the ad of the story of this is him with marshawn Lynch, and that just I'm like, oh, that's that's just a interesting to call them out. Like that just to say that marshawn Lynch also is like that guy. I mean, marshawn Lynch will be the first one until you. Yeah. But I thought it was like we don't even know if he's part of that or part of that. But whatever, right. Anyways. Let's talk about Cam Newton. He went under the scope the other day arthroscopic surgery on his shoulder. Yes. Very concerning. If you're Panthers fan, I don't know if he plays this year. I would be very very cautious. If I was the Panthers. What do you think about the I agree with you? It's a very. It's one of those things where you can't rush this guy because you could destroy him like career wise, you know, and it's one of those things you can't just if Russell Russell Wilson excuse me. Camden returns, there's like if he returns to early that could be bad that could lead to more serious injury. Now. So why not have them rest for there is talking about having him rest for the rest of the next season. Why not in have them come back better than ever they mirror pain, skipped a year with his neck injury? And what he no through fifty five touchdown passes. I think I would draft quarterback. Maybe in the first round. Are you thinking like Collor Murray or you thinking, maybe? Really? Cam newton. So you're not after this season has one more year on his contract eighteen million after this year. So serious scheduled sixteen million twenty twenty eighteen million. I think you could draft a quarterback. You gotta think about the future right is Cam Newton gonna be your quarterback and three or four years. Maybe probably not the way that he takes hits the way that his body has been breaking down. This is now the second shoulder surgery and three years for him. I think you have to you have to protect your franchise. I think it might be smart to take a quarterback. I don't know obviously, they have other needs. But they have decent young receivers. They have a good running back. They have some decent defensive players. Of course, us upgrades. I mean, they did start the season six two, but they did lose a right at a lot of spots ofensive line defensive line secondary. Those are those are places they can use upgrades. Also linebacking core. Luke Keithly always injured Thomas Davis about to.

Joe Montana Panthers marshawn Lynch Cam Newton marijuana california Joe cool Russell Russell Wilson NBA GIO Camden Collor Murray Luke Keithly Thomas Davis seventy five million dollar three years four years
"volve" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

05:00 min | 2 years ago

"volve" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"Other thing is that Mahmoud cider disappeared himself as charismatic leader disappeared in Libya, presumably Libya, it's still unknown his fate. But those vacuum those vacuum inside Lebanon of where the she is role would be that Iran was able to help create the movement that volved into Hezbollah has what did not declare it self publicly until I think it was nineteen eighty-five with sort of manifesto in nineteen eighty five, but the suicide bombings the methods the Iranian money, the Eire's Irish see training had started a few years earlier. Dan, Byman eliminates how the rise of Hezbollah and intensified terrorist activity in the region began to shape Washington's approach to Iran. But for the United States, the terrorism concerns starts to shape, the broader view of Iran. So there's occasional hopes that just running around contra that the United States might be able to engineer an opening with Iran, but they're constant backing violent forces. So the Lebanese Hezbollah for example, which does devastating terrorist attacks in Lebanon against US diplomats and US marines that sort of activity convinces, many Americans that it's not just that around an enemy, but that is an enemy that can't be recent with that it's violent it's fanatical. And as a result. The United States is going to have to oppose it indefinitely, and this continues after the Cold War where you have this imaging you have this legacy of hostility. And it's on both sides were both view the other with tremendous suspicion, and when the United States would try to reach out with now of branch. There was a strong sense that Iran wasn't interested. In. Now, an embassy in Tehran is in the hands of Muslim students tonight, spurred on by an anti-american speech by the Ayatollah Khomeini. They stormed the embassy fought the marine guards with three hours overpower them and to dozens of American hostages the students want the deposed Shah return to Ron for trial. For many Americans in nineteen seventy nine the Iranian revolution was little noticed much less. Understood until November fourth on that day. An organized group of Romanian students reached the gates of the US embassy in Tehran in occupied buildings in the embassy compound and seized over sixty embassy personnel. It was actually the second attempt by students to seize the US embassy and came shortly after the Shah's entry into the United States for cancer treatment, laid October and meeting between senior White House officials and representatives of the provisional government. I told him any called it evidence of America's plotting. How did the hostage-taking relate to the aim? So the revolution, and what were the impacts on US Ron relations, then and now here are Suzanne Maloney, and Elaine Kay, Mark. With their initial thoughts on the hostage crisis. I think the hostage crisis in the minds of many Americans is synonymous with the Iranian revolution itself. This sense that a government that had been such a long standing and close American ally had suddenly morphed into one that threaten the very safety of our diplomatic representatives on the ground produced, a kind of cognitive dissonance among much of the American public, and certainly within the government which had in fact been trying to maintain at least a low level relationship with the new government in Iran seizure of the embassy by students who were not affiliated with the government, but who appear to have had some prior coordination or even encouragement from elements of atole, a Khomeini's inner circle provided a catalyst for Iran to move in a much more radical direction, but it also clarified for the US government that this new regime in Iran was not going. To be a country with which the United States could deal in the way that it would with other types of countries. Well, there were people in the US government who warned president Carter that it was going to be a mistake to bring the shot to the United States for medical treatment. But he did. So anyway, and that was kind of a precipitating event in the minds of the Iranian students. But the public as I said really had very little interest or knowledge of this until the hostages were taken. Now, once the hostages were taken this became an enormous enormous enormous issue and president Carter tried to negotiate. But they were negotiating with a government that was kind of a very weak replacement of the Shah and Komeini was the person that the students were listening to so the car. Administration negotiations went nowhere. And that's why in the spring he decided to mount a military rescue of the hostages..

United States Iran Shah Ayatollah Khomeini Tehran Hezbollah Lebanese Hezbollah Lebanon Carter Ron relations president Mahmoud cider Libya Eire Dan Washington Byman engineer
"volve" Discussed on #WhoWouldWin

#WhoWouldWin

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"volve" Discussed on #WhoWouldWin

"Step on national battlefield due to this crazy extensive train, but wakes what makes them really superior to agents of hydra like one hundred Bob's if their motivation, they see themselves as elite soldiers energetically coated to want to succeed in their mission at all costs the go out of the way to sacrifice themselves. If it's good for the good of the squad or will further the objective of their mission. And remember before they turned on the Djeddai even Yoda himself praised the clone. Troopers in stated that they had saved many Jedi lives many times the clone troopers were valued members. Military or given a great deal of respect by the Jedi. You gotta of juxtapose that with the agents of hydra writer hydrates where we want to call the low level. Bob's didn't get a whole lot of respect. They were the first ones. But when a clone trooper went down in battle, even the jet. I we're like off take a second to remember see x five or whatever name they were giving themselves. They had a lot of way to them. Unlike ageism hydra who may be motivated by money or power. The clone troopers were motivated by doing their job to the best of their capability. They wanted to win. Now as much as hydra agents are dominated into the hydra system in hydra might even kind of brag about how you know uses mind control or gets complete dedication from its members. The reality is there's a lot of Bob's out there who question what they're doing who get involved with hydra because looking for, you know, a good career opportunity, and even I think it was in the nineteen eighties J corrective wrong this, but didn't hydrate kind of create them. So. Selves as a corporation and said, hey, we're gonna bring you in. Here's your benefits package, and here's how you advance through the corporate structure of hydra. I mean, it's just a different kind of motivation for being Volve hydra as it is with the clo- word clone troopers right there, genetically designed to want to win and to sacrifice themselves if they have to, but they hope they never have remember this is a group a million plus large, and they all consider themselves brothers like this. Imagine you had to fight a war. And that's your brother, Lil your brother fighting beside you how motivated are you to win and make sure that not only you're fine. But that your brothers are going to be okay too. And that's on top of the fact that beyond anything else you wanna win. It's not about being promoted not about getting money's none of that. It's about winning and being a great soldier in a problem that you know, again, it actually really like hydra. I really do the problem is it's a lot like Cobra from GI Joe, which I guess is. Rip off of hydrogen only thing about it is that the members of Cobra in hydra, especially hydra a lot of them go in because they don't have any better options. They're not genetically trainer genetically created beings of war like the clone troopers are so in a prolonged battle that's unexpected unplanned for between two groups of soldiers who fight each other. Where everything else is equal even though it's really not let's say it is who do you think wants to win more who's gonna give up more to get that win? The group was more by wealth and status or the group who wants to serve the command as best they can and do whatever it takes to gain the victory. And that's my point number two. Counter. Jay. Well, it's a nice point. It's a nice point. It's a nice point. But I have to disagree because the hydra soldiers we don't need to really use Bob as a standard because Bob is a what's the Bob is an anomaly, his weapons his armor. We can use all that. But Bob is a character is nothing like the rest of the hydra agents. He's kind of joke, which is what his purpose in the deadpool stories the hydra agents are normally either fanatical cultist or they're just straight up. Brainwashed. So they don't really have a choice in what they do. Now. The clones do have a choice. And we know that's the fact because there are clone trooper deserters we saw that on the clone wars TV show with the deserter the tenth episode of season two where they meet one of their own that deserted them to just start a family, and they all kind of envy, the guy thinking what if I had done that?.

Bob writer Volve Jay
"volve" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

03:29 min | 3 years ago

"volve" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"We used to joke all the time we selling tapes out the trunk. I mean that was. The narrative on our career. Nobody gave us anything and everything that we got it wasn't because somebody said in a lab or sat a, you know, an office somewhere said, you know, what would make sense giving them a show. We won the war of attrition until we didn't just think that if that show had been given time that you guys you guys would have ended up figuring it out. But it you talk about a bomb going off like all of America changed while your show while your show was on the whole country change. And I think that is why from the beginning we got a lot of shit that we did. And my disappointment was that we did not feel like we got enough cover during that time because out of the gate before you even say anything on air the narrative of your show, the store of your show has been totally written. And that's what it was for us. Is that we were so different almost two different to the point where it was an immediate backlash where that traditional six o'clock viewer. Didn't. Wanna see what we did? Or we ran into numerous people who would say, oh, I love his and hers. But I don't like six o'clock was the difference to six hours. I just want sports the way, I know sports to be it's like it has to Volve okay at some point. Right. And I know you know, you've been through this allowed readers viewers. They don't love change. But sometimes you gotta give them what they don't know. They even want and be okay with whatever the results were. And so, you know, once people started writing stories about how we were failures and how ratings were bad they were. No. But the executives that that one executives in television are always worried about what somebody's writing still that you should like that someone who comes from newspapers, you should feel good in two thousand eighteen that somehow that still matters some wear executives love to read those clippings. And if a TV critic is saying you're shows. No good and executive ten be influenced. Yeah. And or just, you know, writing that end in the other perfect storm was layoffs having. And of course, as is the case in our business is that you know, before you can even sign a contract. It seems like everybody know what you're making or theorizing about how much money you're making. So there layoffs. We get this prominent position people know how much money that we're making or think they know or guessing and all of a sudden the two black people at six o'clock don't deserve to be here. And that was that we could not distance ourselves from so fast all of a couple. Like two months were unhappy doing that show. How fast in oh. Honestly, I knew we weren't gonna make a month three as said that. I was like look up just telling you thought we would finish it out. Because the way it worked is we were guaranteed three years at six on a four year deal. And so I knew that like when that deal concluded or at the end of the three years, we would not be doing sports in. I know. I wasn't right. I think Mike knew that too. But in a true testament to who he is, you know, he wanted to fight it out because that's what we were used to doing just grind fighted. And I certainly wasn't giving up, but I could see the future and future was not going to be us. We thug that way through it as much and as long as we could. But people were not at people didn't understand what the vision of of our show excited. I was so excited when I saw that you guys did that anchorman spoof. And I'm like, okay, they're going to be able to they're they're going to have the room and the resource..

Mike America Volve TV critic executive three years two months four year six hours
"volve" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

03:29 min | 3 years ago

"volve" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"We used to joke all the time we selling tapes out the trunk. I mean that was. The narrative on our career. Nobody gave us anything and everything that we got it wasn't because somebody said in a lab or sat a, you know, an office somewhere said, you know, what would make sense giving them a show. We won the war of attrition until we didn't just think that if that show had been given time that you guys you guys would have ended up figuring it out. But it you talk about a bomb going off like all of America changed while your show while your show was on the whole country change. And I think that is why from the beginning we got a lot of shit that we did. And my disappointment was that we did not feel like we got enough cover during that time because out of the gate before you even say anything on air the narrative of your show, the store of your show has been totally written. And that's what it was for us. Is that we were so different almost two different to the point where it was an immediate backlash where that traditional six o'clock viewer. Didn't. Wanna see what we did? Or we ran into numerous people who would say, oh, I love his and hers. But I don't like six o'clock was the difference to six hours. I just want sports the way, I know sports to be it's like it has to Volve okay at some point. Right. And I know you know, you've been through this allowed readers viewers. They don't love change. But sometimes you gotta give them what they don't know. They even want and be okay with whatever the results were. And so, you know, once people started writing stories about how we were failures and how ratings were bad they were. No. But the executives that that one executives in television are always worried about what somebody's writing still that you should like that someone who comes from newspapers, you should feel good in two thousand eighteen that somehow that still matters some wear executives love to read those clippings. And if a TV critic is saying you're shows. No good and executive ten be influenced. Yeah. And or just, you know, writing that end in the other perfect storm was layoffs having. And of course, as is the case in our business is that you know, before you can even sign a contract. It seems like everybody know what you're making or theorizing about how much money you're making. So there layoffs. We get this prominent position people know how much money that we're making or think they know or guessing and all of a sudden the two black people at six o'clock don't deserve to be here. And that was that we could not distance ourselves from so fast all of a couple. Like two months were unhappy doing that show. How fast in oh. Honestly, I knew we weren't gonna make a month three as said that. I was like look up just telling you thought we would finish it out. Because the way it worked is we were guaranteed three years at six on a four year deal. And so I knew that like when that deal concluded or at the end of the three years, we would not be doing sports in. I know. I wasn't right. I think Mike knew that too. But in a true testament to who he is, you know, he wanted to fight it out because that's what we were used to doing just grind fighted. And I certainly wasn't giving up, but I could see the future and future was not going to be us. We thug that way through it as much and as long as we could. But people were not at people didn't understand what the vision of of our show excited. I was so excited when I saw that you guys did that anchorman spoof. And I'm like, okay, they're going to be able to they're they're going to have the room and the resource..

Mike America Volve TV critic executive three years two months four year six hours
"volve" Discussed on Woman Evolve with Sarah Jakes Roberts

Woman Evolve with Sarah Jakes Roberts

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"volve" Discussed on Woman Evolve with Sarah Jakes Roberts

"Oh, I did not relate to it. But I did not think that he was saying that all women need to be coverings. I think that what he said was that his wife was covering, and I do feel a responsibility as a leader, especially as a woman in ministry. See the thing is that. Here's here's okay. Here's the thing. Now, my live Facebook laugh getting on this. But here's the thing. I think that it is challenging for men in ministry to understand the pressures that are often put on women in faith communities, a pressure to be married pressure to, you know, be good. Mom's per share to be this proverbs. Thirty one woman pressure to be patient, pressured pressured aeges be this woman who is you know, always showing the love of God, and it can appear in some. Instances that men are not met with those same amount of pressures to become any Volve in grow. And so having said that I am sensitive to the idea of women being handled delicately when it comes to relationships. So that we aren't settling one of the reasons why I know I ended up in a toxic marriage before I met my husband is because I just felt like if I get married, I'll it'll fix everything. And it doesn't matter whether or not he has his stuff together as long as I have this illusion of having a family, then we'll be fine. And so I don't know I think that that's a pressure. That is often placed on women that we have become sensitive to having said that I just don't think the John gray was talking to us. You know? As as don't think he was talking to us. I think he was talking to them. And I don't think he was talking to us. And I just wanna know can we rescue him because we mind our business, and he wasn't talking to us about how we need to live our life..

John gray Facebook Volve
"volve" Discussed on Natch Beauty

Natch Beauty

03:51 min | 3 years ago

"volve" Discussed on Natch Beauty

"Talk products. I feel like since I met you, your makeup and everything has completely Volve cushite has the are noticing. I remember in this sales says to the beauty industry, you had to mix Dacians where we met. Remember, you could get a color to match you. So you mixed together. This is the, I'm like, I'm like, literally bringing my hand. Like my heart is exploding through my chest. Yeah, because I know every full of love. Yes, you do. I know everything about you, but I have mixed foundations since I've been wearing makeup, no color has ever matched me because I have, you know, I'm half black darker skin, but I've got yellow undertones. And also there was so many brands that just like didn't even make colors that that to go up to my range. Would you like so offensive because I'm like, okay, my mom is white. Like I'm on the the lower scale, the lighter scale, and if you're not making products for me, you're not making products for like Latina people. Indian people are darker skin black women, you know. So that was really frustrating. But I finally found a color that I don't have to mix and its cruelty free, and it's everything I ever wanted, and that is thank. That's the song I know, but can't Kids say. say beyond, say. Hello again. Okay. Ready. Fandy wack work. That was perfect. It was just so happy. I feel like I've done, oh, on national before even though that song isn't, I know if it's even a happy song. Oh, I don't know. If you listen it, that's a whole other podcast, all their podcast, and you may have come from, you said on the Riyan is might be on say, okay, yes, said that. So controversial, but I'm crate. I just I'm not like gonna jump off a cliff for her, like people fucking are crazy, like the Bieber fans or something. It's the stands. The stands for reality that like edge that I, you know what I mean? So do. And also she and I are both pasties. So we're both hikes in ceiling. As I love them, we love you. You scorpios isn't beyond say Virgo because of that. She's a Virgo. She was a Fogo. Yes. Same son has me. We'll say, dangerously in love was a very important album to me. I, you saw blessing to. Yes, time it's another pot. So you wear the fence. Not only do I. I am a full face bentayga. Yeah. So full face Fendi fanatic, four show. So I did face Fendi folks show. So is my cat like you guys. I brought my cat. She's brings her cat everywhere. So. Okay. So I wear the primer which is like forget amazing. They say that the primer, apparently some primers and foundations just work really well together. Technically you can use any primer, but something about this primer works really well with the madness of the Fendi because it is it is very Matt, but it worked so well and it's like a creates a blurred effect. If you have any like breakouts or whatever it totally covers. It also used to bring my foundation to set because I was worried that they wouldn't be able to match my skin tone. Now I bring my foundation is set because it looks bomb on camera and I don't wanna be wearing anything anyway. I'm telling you that Finci every warranted and everything it in person. I maybe I need to buy the primer to in person, kind of sinks into my. Face? Well, I have you don't have wrinkles. I do a little, it's fine..

Fogo Volve cushite Dacians Finci Matt
"volve" Discussed on Unfilter

Unfilter

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"volve" Discussed on Unfilter

"Volved the celebrity apprentice seems clear why are they pushing that well i mean unfortunately or fortunately it is a common threat i mean it is i mean i mean yes he gets lazy it's like what as sie lay sie lay it is it's a lazy yet obvious thing that has to be now i wouldn't probably dwell as much time on it that abc's doing right here by obviously playing clips from the show however they are they are trying to to form the story that yeah the president knows all these guys yeah the president you know was on tv with all these people and obviously the president also knows that since these people were on a show and maybe that's the angle that may be the president's playing here is like you said you know he's setting some groundwork with these be level celebrities and politicians if you will and he knows that they have a connection to the apprentice and it just kind of goes a big full circle if you will if that makes any sense also also one more one more thing at and i don't have references with me at the moment so i i can't sound his educators i should but if you look at the prosecutors or the people that that went after these individual yet combing was involved in a couple of a couple of them exactly it's people that he has a grudge with that is more of the connection than anything that has to do with with with the apprentice right that's my opinion though obvious no it's good point very good point eventually fired by trump on the show but on air force one today the president said this about him he's a democrat he's not my party but i thought that he was treated unfairly he shouldn't have been put in jail by the democrat first off by the way party shouldn't matter when it comes to given pardons or commuting sentences it's about analyzing and you know this is the area that nobody is giving trump enough credit it's happening you're doing it right now the chat rooms doing it right now this is what's so brilliant about trump this is what he is good at is this he's.

president trump abc
"volve" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"volve" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"So like letting yourself before leading yourself breathe you know what i mean because like i life we'll try to take that away from you yeah it's kind of a revolutionary act to get it back you know to to do that so right and also before mamone thing about having attitude like that particularly if you get that at a younger age everybody acts like this something wrong with particularly a black woman and looks at everybody be like the shit that i wanna do fuck it everybody act like you something's wrong with you for actually being the person in power in control and not just laying life hit you all kinds of ways and you know but you might not know what you wanna do it in that young age either like you just don't like some people have like that where they know but a lot of people don't know and think about it it's okay if you don't know but i mean allowing yourself to navigate the world and say this is what i'm gonna do know this is what i wouldn't do no this this that freedom to bay to navigate in rotating change in volve and grow you know because of women are taught worcester whole going in life they get married and have keys worthiness at knife your husband and your kids like like quote unquote the ingo like after you get married and have kids fuck do not a human being anymore and that's not true yeah for sure not i mean definitely life will try to rob you of that especially as a woman 'cause like just be a mom just the fire yourself to your husband and your kids things of this nature assuming you're straight and.

volve worcester younger age
"volve" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"volve" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

"I agree but there is always an age involved in a precedent volve and respect and all that and the union of he's he's in in the union yeah right and so if a few years ago grinky gets six years and two six at you know the same age i think or just about he was thirty one that maybe he was thirty two even you know the kershaw's kinda kinda match that we're better and i don't know i just i don't know the dodgers do that plus they go after bryce harper on free agency i mean then you start getting a lot of contracts that inter friedman is not likely to endorse so it gets really really tricky and it would have been a lot easier and smoother for the dodgers go out and win a championship this year with all their healthy bodies but they're not healthy and and you've got a team like arizona who's also not healthy and playing great so you know that's a big factor in this too right tyler april is over and it's a fish oil it's the first calendar month in major league baseball history in which there were more strikeouts than hits six thousand six hundred fifty six strikeouts six thousand three hundred sixty hits that's two hundred ninety six more strikeouts than hits and what folkestone about you is that you have coached a lot of levels of a lot of different sports dad and i was thinking about this today there's a reason why we all love our kids and we love to go to little league games but there's a reason why thirty thousand people don't show up for literally games in april because it's a hard watch and i personally feel like this brand of baseball with all the strikeouts with fewer hits it's harder to watch.

dodgers bryce harper arizona inter friedman baseball six years
"volve" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"volve" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Say we'll so as soon as that happened was recognized they should come back to congress got an extension maybe so maybe not but over the course of a decade but first nap ghanistan and then more broadly the idea the implied inclusion of associated forces in becoming a central part of the framework in this begins to matter a great deal for the primary a hostile force al qaeda as okada volve in begins having what to some extent used to be several groups audie logically affiliated or inclined but ultimately separate and then local sales of the qaeda network either the cells begin to become more separate have their own independent life and forming sort of separate organizational existence and then some of the parallel groups began to formally pledge allegiance to bin laden in places like yemen with alqaeda in the arabian peninsula you have groups that the united states feels that it needs to use force against does use force against any associated force concept is the basis for claiming that there is existing statutory authority to do it and then people have disagreements about how broadly has that idea been extended over time hasn't been over extended certainly there are critics who would say that af has been wildly stretched to encompass whichever group in the larger network on the fringes of the network later on emerges there others feel that it's a perfectly reasonable extension of the original thority this got pretty hot when the islamic state came on the scene because he's lomb state had been cut it in iraq at classic associated force but famously had a break with alqaeda's core leadership there was dispute over who was in charge of what becomes job i'll newsra zuara sides with the the syrian entity as being independent from albuque dotty dotty says well next we're independent from all of you and also or the islamic state in the rest is sort of history the administration has been claiming that the use of force against these lomb state all these years since then has been not just under the two thousand two am af.

congress okada volve yemen alqaeda arabian peninsula united states iraq qaeda
"volve" Discussed on E&C's Pod of Awesomeness

E&C's Pod of Awesomeness

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"volve" Discussed on E&C's Pod of Awesomeness

"So cast yourself as an athlete and even though we all know there's a fair amount of shakespeare volved in our in our pratt deal that actually more able has thanks guys doing and and rocked done off all these guys so you know so anyway yeah the reliability things i always gotta be you know you wanna change it so we we think we did a nice job there we we have we help assimilate the opportunity for a lot of guys a lot of money in reading your book you know you talk about the meeting read it i read it i i read it i'll give you emotional la's jim book by god i do my homework yeah flights to tireless you damn right but you talked to in there but the meeting with with dwayne with rock and how how confident he was that he could make a difference to the company and i mean how often did you see that throughout the years or was he just kind of an emily that that you just can't cat she's boys and these very special outweighs i'd never had anybody that basically hit me between the eyes of the statement of i'm going to be your guy when he's not he made his first trip stanford thing so i mean he had he had it going for him his confidence in where he wanted to go he had a direction he knew where he wanted what road he wanted to travel and unlike and not unlike anybody else's human on the road the road the road but bottom line man professionally he knew exactly what he wanted and and the it was going to stop him so and and he got i tell these guys this i don't if you guys agree this from not you don't have to your show he should because i'm old i get my feelings hurt easy.

dwayne pratt stanford
"volve" Discussed on American Fashion Podcast

American Fashion Podcast

04:13 min | 4 years ago

"volve" Discussed on American Fashion Podcast

"We've got we have review processes where customer service team will be providing feedback into product and marketing and to me about what what's being said. What's good? What's bad about the part? That's out. There struggling with one of the what are they wishing? We were doing better. So there's a lot of that kind of very regular and intensive action with a customer, plus as an online brand it's hard to avoid it because there's so much interaction through your social channels and through your Email through through Email with your customer base that it's it's very fun center. But we do that all that being said, we don't do things. Like go to our customers and say what what are you wishing we would make we've got a pretty. Clear point of view about what is missing in the market today, and what we can deliver well on so it's great. So it's focused. It's pretty focus down like you're very much a part of the day to day. Am on on brand and product. I am I'm. Control free. I get very involved Volve in my my other co workers with like, but yes, I think and things around the product decisions and brand decisions. I think those things have to those have to flow through me. In large part. Have you thought much about doing brick and mortar they're allowed to become companies that have done as we say points of presence in the real world. Or have you done that or you thinking of approaching that we have a a showroom in our office in San Francisco that you can come in and buy stuff, but it's it's not a functioning store, really? But yes, we have thought about it a lot. And I think that the way that I think about retail, and this has been it. Brick and mortar retail, I think is volving so much right? But the way I'm thinking about today is that we tell physical retail is really important. It's really important in brand extension in storytelling allowing customers to interact with the brand and the product. But I think that the way that brands have been conceptualizing deploying retail of the last twenty years has been wrong now is looked in in retrospect looks wrong that six hundred seven or eight hundred stores, I think those days are over. I I don't think that huge retail rollouts are going to be around. That's a thing of the past. And it's just a question of the unwinding process. It's in front of us to get back to sense of normalcy. But I do think we played important roles. If you said to me, can you envision a day when American giant has got ten or twenty or thirty or forty flagship stores and key cities and key markets across the world. Of course, I could imagine that now the role of those things though is interesting is that are those sales engines to me may. Maybe. But first and foremost, they've got to be brand engines and storytelling engines about who. We are what we stand for. And I think that we owe the customer that. Right. I think the customer should have the ability to find out what we're like how we make things. How's the product field? How do these leggings fit? And so I think it's a believer in retail. But it's got to be a restrained view of it. And it has to be disciplined view about what the role of it is for the business. He's saying lots of smart stuff. I can't keep up happy. When do you think are some other interesting brands out there? They're doing good stuff within this idea of buy it for life because I think people are viewing your product as within that movement. I huge believer in in in an admire Yvonne, art pedagogy. I think that he has to exclusionable else's has sort of been. Maniacally focused on. His his view of the world and the role of product in the world has ability to impact and and be a force for good out there. And and so he and that brand are two things we talk about a lot internally in the in the emergence of ecommerce category. I love or be porkers doing. I think you know..

Volve San Francisco Yvonne twenty years