19 Episode results for "Volusia"

#108 - Talking To Termites

Think: Sustainability

34:41 min | 1 year ago

#108 - Talking To Termites

"I used to think of termites as just another threat in a risk riddled world when the roof Ellen. What were you in the body? Now, I didn't fall on my head. It's not that exciting. This is Caroline Urnov. A formerly termite infested house. It was the middle of the night. It was raining like a whole circle of the ceiling and the plastic came down in one in one guy which opened the bathroom up to the sky whenever you went to the toilet. I had to keep an umbrella. And they're so you'd sit on until I that with the umbrella when it rains because it was right over the toilet was fairly exciting than it felt out. Exciting. Maybe but destructive to. That's what time I swore to me. And till I met Sebastian. I'm Sebastian Oba's. Sebastian is a senior lecturer at the university of technology, Sydney and a coal member of the center for Cousteau six and vibrations very coup center, you you will must be tough. And you go to a center, I did go, and I was chopped. But we'll get to that. And we did one experiment where we had to look at how termites react to loaded. Woodfire say would that's way too down. We had control experiment. One side, we offer termites just would which was not loaded and on the other side, we provided them with the what stumps would beams which were loaded by seventy kilos fans, the lep experiment and over two hundred feet x enough weight to damage falling down onto a human. Let alone a tiny insect, and we found that termites explored both sides. I, but then they moved to the unloaded side this side without any weight and eight of the wood. So then they don't didn't have food anymore. So next thing they they went back to the loaded side and didn't eat the woods straightaway. They I bid Klay words around the Woodstock and then aided in. Secrecy behind this cable? See when the scientists pulled down the experiment, they've found these clay walls only on the weighted side, and they were basically proportionate with the load onto so they substituted. The the wood folk lay. So they detect the stress they manipulate the surroundings to to eat the food. They need to eat otherwise, they would be squashed, basically under the Lord. This episode is about termites what they destroy what they build and the things we could learn from them if only they could talk. You're listening to think sustainability, I'm Nina cripple. I'm walking into a house, indulge hill. This is Sydney's inner west. So I'm right under the flight path. I walked through the gate and hesitate at the dole. That's what I sound like when I'm meet acute dog. And that's what I sound like when I meet another human. But to be honest, it's not humans that drew me to this house. Or dogs. My name's Caroline. And at the moment, I inhabit these house in Loftus straight with some termites and some other friends as well. So most of the friends of their when I go to visit does to res I'm an honest. My name's leeann Lynn's and other oddest. Then there's Mississippi the dog. Cat the human. I'm an artist as well. And then there are the term. I I've been working off and on this project with Theresa and Caroline and Lynn are the last couple of months and discovering the wonderful vibrational world of templates and the emotions that come along with it. This all started with the reluctant purchase will. I was I was renting in Annandale when I moved down from Brisbane. This is Caroline again on essentially I had to buy a house because I have a dog and people don't lie dog owners. And so I came home from open house for the giants and bought this on the way Heim. So I was going to be the Barasch. And then I bought it because it was secure in double break. But I have probably didn't do I did a pissed inspection. But so I don't know in the termites whether they were here, then already or lighter. But there was a dodgy extension now the back adagios extension. Caroline was pretty keen to get rid of and one day. A unique opportunity presented itself to raise had this fantastic device in his studio that emitted vibrations. Caroline sorta. Sorry my studio. She's like what is that thing? Which is sometimes. Yeah. Often people's reaction to it. Because it's quite a strange thing. The initial plan for this machine was vibrate down the foundations of an institution like Anoc gallery like to literally take the building's foundations down. And the idea is so exciting to attempt to d- 'institutionalise space through by brighter through a vibrations. Yet does really excited me. But aren't spaces went quite as excited by this prospect because institutions didn't really want you to try to break the foundations of the Granddad which surprised me, I think that's what an exciting thing to do in his face. So to res head up potentially foundation deconstructing, vibration, machine and Caroline had a house with a dodgy extension. The end result here was basically inevitable. So I said, well, you should come around to my house and try to crack the concrete at my house that sounds like a fun day. And from what I've heard it was fun. So I'm just trying to find Loftus street videos. Caroline's looking through a hot Dr Phil films. They took on the fateful day. They tried to vibrate down the extension. You're just going to say in. What is essentially? Private. I don't know how described that. That's just like a vibrating motor bolted to concrete. Description. Couldn't put my finger on it at the time. But to raise his machine definitely reminded me of something. And I worked out what it was it. Looks like the vacuum cleaner in the telly tubbies. His name's new look it up. Phillips sign and just watching it. It's out of the boat. Out of the concrete rather than bright through concrete as was wow interest was to take instructs spaces is in the shed interest. Instead of doing that day constructed itself out of the state. So the machine failed Caroline's dodgy extension remained intact and to REEs took a pot a machine in frustration. But what the residents of Loftus street didn't realize at the time is that while they were trying to vibrate. The house down another destructive force was ready at work. The moment of discovering the ten months. How did it have a way where you set the scene? So that was I didn't realize that the damage to the bathroom was from termites. Remember that story at the beginning. Caroline, having to sit on the toilet with an umbrella. I just thought it was because the dodgy additions to the house and weighs over one night. That's Therese jumping Caroline was in. This is often. This is light you were in your pajamas. And you've started like pulling the wool off like I said Carolyn really wanted to get rid of that extension. Spontaneous. Demolition. I didn't realize that. I would be might be. Thanks, great. So they pulled off a bunch of wall. So then we saw that the Timbo was kind of like wrote it and Aiden. And then Caroline went the next day and saw actual termites as well. Yeah. That's right. Been I came in and so alive to mice. But the artists attempt to vibrate down the extension had had an unexpected consequence. By the time. They brought a pest control onto the scene. Visit as definitely lifetime is the past guys said that the termites were gone. Jackson. That was to raise his device. The weird and wonderful vibration machine to raise a twice, and I thought that those vibrations have got rid of the live ones. Could it really be? Did the oddest failed attempt to vibrate down? Caroline's extension send away the very force. That was successfully deconstructing it for free. It seems far too. I run to be true. And I wasn't show. It was even possible. But I knew someone who could help me find out if it was. So my my main research is concerned with complex annex is this the best in August again from the university of technology, Sydney. One of the more interesting applications is to might communication put simply the man is learning to talk night. I'm trying to understand how to speak trying to speak to him. I eventually and decode their language because they speak different language. That's all that's all week deal. Nothing hot about that. Except for the fact that they communicate completely differently to humans the blind. They live in the dog and termite mound. Con- see anything because there's no light. No sunlight, and they're also deaf. They don't hear acoustic sound they don't hear airborne sound which made him ask how do to mites. Detect the predators because it turns out aunts really likes to eat termites have very. Thin cuticle, and they're very nutritious to them. But before the end can eat the turn light it has to find it. Sebastian and some of his colleagues did an experiment where they went into grassy woodland reserves and placed over two hundred and sixty look discs, which basically bits of wood in different places to attract insects and wildlife. So the idea is that under a piece of wood you find a lot of animals use it as a refuge. And then by counting those animals, and the type of the number and type you can concludes how healthy ecosystems at this at this spot. It was kind of like they set up the space for an exciting. Insects plotti. And because the guest list, the music and most importantly, the food where all on point the guests swamped. I showed up, but then very shortly after termites swooshed in in the not eaten by the ends. They were how muni in insects party Lund for a while. And the termites had a good time without being agent until the scientists came back shut the potty down and all hell broke loose. So once we lifted up the Woodlock, the ends were crawling over the two months and killing the modern eating. lifting. The log also revealed a key element in the tem might survival up until this point a clay wool a couple of millimeters wide had been hiding the termites from the ends. They didn't detect them before. And they couldn't go through the Clairol's. So in potty land. This was kind of like the termites hanging out in this beautiful big rented monkey while the ants having a good time having a dance under the night sky. When the scientists moved to log. The Klay wool was broken down allowing the ends to swarm the tem I'ts. It's kind of like the Mikey fell down an early when the ants could see the termites do they know they were there. The thing about having a pod either is normally you make a bit of noise the marquee. The clay will we'll have hidden the termites from site, but had it stopped the templates from being heard. So termites we found when we looked at the ants in the termites termites about hundred times quieter than their predators and serve. Maybe my example of potty was a bit off. Instead of a potty imagine. It's actually a war zone and the termites ascending secret. Encrypted code. By communicating over different communication channel. They are dodging the prejudice. They cannot be eavesdropped and their method the way to mites send and receive the secret messages progressions this is all done over versions. The wonderful vibrational world of templates and the emotions that come along with it. Knowing this about termites, it's easy to imagine. What happened to street that day that the termites in Caroline's house picked up the vibrations of Therese's machine besieged it as a threat and stop it off. So they have sensing organs in their legs and the tunnel and they use their legs as a tripod and with three legs on the ground. They can determine where the wave comes from the direction, and they can localize probably even localize they're predators, very accurately. And if termites can localize, they're predators. They can avoid them. So it's an arms race and Volusia arms race going on for millions of years, but they have somehow develop these passive defense mechanisms not being detected instead of having heavily armored soldiers who can defend the nest they can't that knowing termites speak in code is one thing being able to break. Code is another and very hard to study because when you do experiments, you have to always disentangle all the different signals. They do from the cigarettes want to study. So when you want to study, for instance, the feeding Cigna, you're always the walking signal in between so in order to distinguish the two you have to I understand the walking Satan. And then you have to do a couple of years researching the walking thing before you finally, hopefully at some stage can dissertation you're the walking from feeding thing but slowly signal by signal Sebastian is translating tem card from vibrations to sound, and we can make it audible like these vibrations. We can make them audible that making them audible is a whole other story. K? I think that is probably good. Where are we? We are here in tech lep in the coast six laboratories, and this year is the corridor would call it which leads to the NFL chamber, the semi any quick and the reverberation room fast. We go into the riverine reverberating here, then we enter the semi Aniko ick chamber. So there is almost no reverberation feels the only comparative thing I can think of what it feels like is a little bit tipsy, and you feel a little bit slow. Yeah. It's like illusion and acoustic illusion not an optical illusion. So it influences your balancing systems were and finally this is the full any Kohic jemele. Now, it's a stronger the feeling of the pressure. So we have nowhere reflections. Also, the ground doesn't reflect this is why you're walking on a trampoline trumpet inflow being alone. In an enigmatic chamber is the closest thing you can experience to being termite nothing to see nothing to here. And here we can do for instance, tumor experiments. Sebastian. I tried to record termite vibrations with something cold and accelerate auto, but that didn't work. Like old radio noise. When you had that like bugs. That's right. I didn't have the channel here. So that's that's like white noise. It's like, China noise. We don't hear anything. And this is web engineering comes in working out complicated formulas to filter out background sound from vibrations. It's only the insect walking. And being able to do this filter. The noise from the vibration means that Sebastian is getting closer to receiving messages. The way a term I would identifying specific signals like for feeding? Sounds like scratching sewn, but it's not Sebastian can also identify an alarm signal. The interesting part is from the Volusia report of few the the features of termites alarming, and and smoking are the same. So they have the same frequency and the same amplitude to their main predators, which means the alarm Cigna has emerged from the from the predator signal over Evelyn, it's like danger and aunts us nonimmigrant determinants. So they mimic, basically, the ends walking in order to drum lamb, which is very funny, and they literally just drum the head on the ground. If Sebastian had been at Loftus street when they were using two reasons device is somehow he could have transformed Caroline's dodgy extension into an annex chamber. We're about his fancy equipment and listen for signals, maybe. He would have heard the anche like rhythm that means danger was a foot. Enough danger descend the termites on their way. But as we live in the real world where that particular hypothetical seems a bit too crazy. We can't nervous shoul- what happened left to wonder why the termites left, and what it meant that they were that to begin with. I'm not sure if you're if you've read this, but there are a number of recorded instances where templates loving tweet kind of anything poll people so broken into banks and chewed through thousands and thousands of dollars. It's kind of a Larrea. This cat one of the artists Loftus street. There was a group of timeouts that got into a Bank in India and through thousands of repay which is. On that one. And then not sure if I've made that up. This is Caroline earn of the house. I'd love to street is that the one where that signed that to eight Nola money. But I think they've actually potentially just stole it interesting. If if the is a construct at the my mates. And the people that I climb that time is all the money. I like that very much. The ten minutes ate my homework. JD play. And so the stories we construct about two mites are often about deconstruction and consumption, but doesn't Avakian creative and constructive story to tell about two months as well. Too on not only able to censor brations and keep quiet. They're also able to manipulate the surroundings, and they do so in pretty ingenious ways, we know all the the keep the temperature and the humidity, and they maintain the airflow in the mount which has inspired architects to build termite inspired houses. This idea was so exciting to me. I knew I have to find a termite house. The only problem is only one architect in the world who seems to be designing them. And he's only done two of these types of buildings one is in Harare Zimbabwe. But that's my good fortune would have it. The other one is not that far away. And sitting in a cafe and Melvin CBD in the shadow of a building cold C H two as I plan to affectionately refer to it. The town my building it's nine stories high simplistic, but modern in design its most striking feature is a wall of timber shutters right now this launch against the morning sun. It's used as an office building. Melbourne city council, and as I sit and have some coffee. I imagine the people walking past termites scarring to do the Queen spitting. Mon- Android Adams on the directive cities on projects of the city of Melbourne. Level six of the town my building and despite his fancy title his desk, sits in the corner of an open plan office. The only thing separating him from other stuff is the long meeting table currently sitting at if this was a ten man would be the Queen. Being charge of the workers. There are often three costs in termite Sidey the soldiers the king and Queen or the reproduces and the work is, but I'm not really sure if the work attend mites have a direct awful city design. I've got no pretensions about ever being the Queen. No, the the the the the head. I I enjoy the craft that I practice, and that's what's important to me. I'd like to be that. There is a real time. My energy to the space people scurry around busily occasionally, dropping a message in front of rob doing response the post of just go by nine thirty. So we only got off and ours. The decision to make the my building came in two thousand and four or realize the time that the biggest challenge with a building. And Melvin is how you infect keep it cool and author be heating element. But it's not I mean when you have computers and people in the building they heat up the building naturally. So the biggest challenge Hardaway coolest building Mellon has. This unique climate is changing which is. May become an issue for this building. Where in some you get hot days, but quite often cool arts, and while Melbourne's climate is unique it did have similarities to places in Africa. While you also get hot days and cool nights. And what the two done is actually worked out how they use that to their advantage, and humans will be working out how to use ten might to their advantage. And so. There was a building in Harari where all bond designed by an octave. Who's a good friend MC pass? And it'd been based on the principles of an anti a white ant is a type of town might. And what this did was say you don't need to have a hottie sophisticated building could have a failure robust building that used simple principles and produced a good environment. Lockup save all asked to make to work on a design for them that reflected the ten principles of afla the term use moisture inside there. So they would actually get moisture down from and bring it up and then allow air flow through the architect took this idea to Melbourne for his termite building. So between the windows looked like walls. But there in fact ducts, and so the air is coming down from the roof under the floor and coming up if you look on the south side of the building the ducks are light color on the north Alabama dot com. So in the sun shines on a dark color that heated up. So you get this natural suction of through the building. Just by changing the color of San Francisco. Office also gets cooled from above these things you see on the ceilings are chill beings. They're just radiator just a Cup part with cool water gangs. And that's how we call the building down. So it's a gain a reflection of holiday what would have seen environment. An even more impressive HR working to cool. This building down its biggest invention, which I often small is opens its windows, and that hard dramatic is that given all the buildings we've designed the same trees building has senses to identify when it's cooler outside than in. And when it is the winters or medically urban the cool air flights with building coups concrete and in the morning, you lock down again. And you've got the first few hours of air conditioning free of charge. But the aim of this building wasn't just to preserve energy. Oh, save money. It was to look after the wellbeing of its Cubans one hundred percent fresh air in the building. And that means that when it was assessed by the IRA. They basically said he signed ten percent of wellbeing and productivity of the star building that amounts to two point four million dollars a year and the extra feature. We put into this building cost about eleven. People taking leave and help trot. Just being more productive the absenteeism. And significantly. And so you add all that up and the building affectively paid for its. You know, unique peaches in about five years, and so the features of this building make it a better place for humans. But rob tells me it isn't easy convincing people to adopt mound mentality. So one of the things we found about this building is that normal the people who were fully understand the where operates, and so I'll give you an example. When we first started people moved in. They said there's no air conditioning. 'cause I couldn't hear any conditioning comes very quietly through the floor. And so we said none of this air conditioning getting Maurier than you know, may get and it's not mixed up with all the pollutants. That's actually fresh air. And I will worried about that. So we actually put a quiet noise and the throw offficial noise max it Sounders I've is air conditioning. Yeah. It's like the occupants of the time might building a doing the exact opposite thing Sebastian in his laboratory instead of carefully filtering away. The white noise to try and understand what to'might saying they're intentionally burying him. I idea is human interference. So a. Example because somehow the templates communicate with each other. And they all work collectively together to make them on work. We found there's been points of resistance could people get used to what they used to. Here air conditioning. I'm not getting and this is the thing rob says, it's most important to learn from ten lights work in unison to make the mount work. If we serious about, you know, designing buildings that are better equipped for the future. Then we need impact having narrative later termites have seen him or pulling direction. But what if when we humans do pool together get rid of the white noise and try to learn from ten lights what if we use discoveries to destroy the very thing that inspired us. What do you think the impact of knowing how might speak of being able to speak termite? What can we gain from that year? So the the main gain I think for for an application side and four Strayer is building vibration based pest control instead of using chemical pest control. Its hands out the oddest love to St. want too far off with the theory about Theresa's vibration machine. They said there's definitely lifetime afterward using the device in the concrete to raise decent twice. And I thought that though is by brations have got rid of the live ones. I asked Sebastian about this. And he said in L E experiments. They actually did something similar using mechanical vibration device. Detri- scare off the time. I'ts coal the stunning. But it didn't work Sebastian said templates too smart. They know when something's not true, and when something's mechanical, and even if it had worked it wouldn't have worked for long since when you play back signals to animals, they get used to that. And then they they lose their function in the end this devices. So we need to have something which is smart enough to fool the term. I find it interesting because you clearly have really interested in the town lights, and you have a passion about learning about them. Are you conflicted in using that to control templates? Well, it's more. It's more about protecting infrastructure and houses using non-chemical has control which is good for the termites and is good for for for for strangers at the conflict is actually when when humans cross the boundary to nature. So when we build a house in the nature reserve, we have to expect too much will take a house and this happens everywhere. Humans close building close to nature reserves. They are more infested by Hermoso there more often attack these houses, so how can we come to a to a way of deterring for instance, too, much or using less chemicals by using smart control? It's like abrasion price controls. I think it's not against the tumor. There's not for irradicating just driving them back to the forest the artists at Loftus straight daren't really by. This constitutes a really rich natural environment for termite a house is a great fading space. What is natural? What is unnatural that's about protecting capital preventing? So if your house is emitting the vibrations that saying coming he'll. Coming in. And then you get to kill them. But it is passed control. That's like a boundary issue. Colonizing putting offense saying we want to hear we want Nitra over there like that lovely English Noushin of garden garden, something you look at it. It's pretty contemplate you issues out there. You don't really touch it that often. So it's kind of. Yeah. Relation. I mean, the reality is if they go into a house people are gonna kill them. I mean, it's like what what you're doing as well. When I went to love to St. Caroline, hadn't put down any poison. But she was planning on it. Yeah. I've got to put this poison down when the sand goes down. It's low light the council required as well. But I will say feel kind of sad. That I'm also pushing them away does. Yeah. Maybe as something to say go into house. That's they went die. Yeah. I don't know. I at his point is interesting as well that he's trying to start getting poisoned. But they might be more interesting to communicate alternately with the termites as well. Like, you know, they're architects as well. Maybe there's a way that we could I deny enable them to do something. That's something that joins together rather than that style away. Finn's? There's maybe there's more interesting things. I can do. Dia the best architecture Spacey's on the planet. They supposedly from what I've seen with the mounds that they build in the air conditioning built in and. Yeah. Find that Tim mountain Brazil. It's like this network. It's like the largest largest form of non human or human architecture in the world is this interconnected set of termite mounds, and I just found out last year that they're all kind of intertwined. Yeah. Twined like ideas about construction and deconstruction communication and interpretation creation, and destruction templates are all these things. But so away. We are capable of killing and colonizing as we are innovating and designing. So I'm not really sure whether that leaves out two species humans and termites as we continue to coexist on this planet. All I know is that if I ever could confess with a termite. I feel like would have a lot to talk about. Thinks stain ability is made possible with the support of the university of technology. Sydney to ESI are in Sydney and head around a stray Leah on the community radio network. The studios of SEO sit on catego- land of the orange who's people sovereignty was never seated subscribe to the Sherry wherever you get your poke costs. And don't forget to leave us a review, I'm Nina Kirpal. Thanks for listening.

Caroline Urnov Sebastian Oba Sydney university of technology rob Volusia Melbourne Therese Theresa Klay Ellen Woodfire St. Caroline Mississippi giants Anoc gallery senior lecturer NFL Brisbane
Urban Coyote Evolution Favors the Bold

60-Second Science

03:04 min | 1 year ago

Urban Coyote Evolution Favors the Bold

"This is Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Jason Goldman cody's are now common residents of many large urban areas. And while it doesn't happen all that often coyotes are increasingly coming into conflict with people and with pets there, these missile carnivores, which most people see them, just as, you know, large carnivores university of Washington, Tacoma, Volusia biologist, Christopher shell being in say like a city like Altangerel sport, Chicago or New York as just mind boggling and on Spiring, and in some instances for our people because they don't know much about the almost could be something that generating spear because of misunderstandings show wants to understand how cody's come to feel so comfortable around people. So we can come up with strategies for preventing it, and he suspected might have something to do with. The parenting. Our main goal was to see and test. Whether or not parents that have extended experience of people and human disturbance, get habituated to the point where they actually transfer that becuase in in that fearlessness to their offspring show in his team focused on aid Coyote families living at the US department of agriculture 's predator research facility in Utah, so captive, they live in large enclosures and lead mostly typical wild lives. Typically, the counties are fed in such a way as to minimize human contact, but for this experiment. The researchers did something different instead of just walking away immediately. We fed them. And we just stared at him turns out that when parents became more. Fearless around people that is became perfectly happy to eat while people were watching them. They're off. Spring became more. Fearless as well. And each litter of Coyote pups was more fearless than the last. In fact, the most cautious pup from the second. Litter was bolder than the boldest pup from the first litter that means that an entire family of coyotes can become completely habituated to humans in just two or three generations. And that's when they get into trouble, regardless of what type of behavioral type in animal has it seems like all of the animals without infiltrative costs to Biebel towards people are finding out that being bold in vantage and urban area, which means those of us who live in Coyote country need to work together to send a signal to coyotes that being bold is a disadvantage, and that starts with doing everything we can to ensure that our yards are as uninviting and unappetizing as possible. Thanks for the minute. Scientific americans. Sixty seconds science. I'm Jason golden.

Jason Goldman cody Coyote Jason golden Volusia US department of agriculture Coyote Christopher shell Tacoma Spiring Utah Washington Altangerel Chicago Biebel New York Sixty seconds sixty seconds
A U.S. Marine Looks Back at Fallujah

First Person

32:14 min | 6 months ago

A U.S. Marine Looks Back at Fallujah

"From foreign policy. I'm Sarah Wildman and this is first person this week. Fifteen years after Palooza soldier looks back at the battle the define the Iraq war. It's been sixteen years since the United States went into Iraq nearly nine years since president. Barack Obama formerly ended. Us combat missions there and yet the impact of the decision to fight is still being felt today in the early years of the Iraq War. One battle particularly stands out for ferocity from early November through mid December two thousand four US Iraqi and British forces moved into the city of volusia fighting operation. Phantom fury a joined effort to fight the insurgency afford trained well led and ready the operation deliberate the people who've lose it and begin the reconstruction of the city and the restoration mobilized more than eighty. American soldiers died in that operation. The heavier weapons fire a barrel of the insurgents. They caught it. Suppressive Fire and marine has been injured and his colleagues need to administer first aid and get him out earlier that year. Four American contractors were killed in Florida. Their bodies were burned and dragged through the streets. Everyone who comes to Faluji he warned will meet this fate. Phantom Schori was an effort to retake the city from a safer rooftop. We filmed tank moving along the street. Ready to fire a round into each house where they might still be resistance. Elliot Ackerman is a marine veteran. Deserve five towards up Ghanistan the Rock and was awarded the Silver Star the Bronze Star for valor and the Purple Heart. He led a battalion of soldiers for that month of two thousand four in his new book. Pleases Names on war. Revolution and returning Ackerman describes what it was like to be involved in that critical battle and how it felt to return years later not as a soldier but as a journalist. He's our guest this week. Elliot so they actually want to start at what feels to me the heart of the book. Which is Florida two thousand four and I wonder if you can take us back to November tenth and begin their well. On November tenth. I was serving as a marine rifle platoon. Commander in Volusia on the assault of the city hadn't yet begun begun for us on that day. And I think that is kind of in some respects the center of the book because that was one of the earliest and most intense combat experiences that I had had a lot of what else occurs in. The book is kind of orbiting around that central. Experience lead you join the military? To begin with. I joined for a variety of reasons. I grew up overseas grew up in the UK. And I think kind of always being a little bit of an outsider to America. Made me want to give something back and kind of perhaps give me a different perspective on what it means to be an American. I was someone who when I graduated from college. I wanted the job that I had whether I was good at my job or bad at that job to really matter onto feel like I was going to have an impact and have real responsibility in the corps offered me that on finally like I was the kid who never stopped playing with his Gi. Joes I guess. I always had an innate fascination in the military and I think the confluence of probably all three of those things. What led me into the Marine Corps and I joined a before nine eleven did ROTC and college to become an officer in the nine eleven. While I was at school and so the Marine Corps than you know went from being kind of a you know more abstract thing in terms of what I would be doing when I served to something. That was much more tangible as there was a war. Going on there's a an Los Angeles Times story that you reference in the book the Unapologetic Warrior and in it the manual Afri- Doug back he says. Young Marines didn't enlist to get money to go to college. They joined the Marines to be a part of a legacy. That was true for you absolutely. I mean the Marine Corps has a very strong organizational culture. And I listen. I think everyone I know who joined the Marines. They join for a variety of reasons. But one thing you do opt into when you join this culture and part of that culture is a legacy so you know when we were going to fight and flew jar. Remember three days before the battle. The Math Marine Expeditionary Force. Sergeant major who is basically the senior enlisted? Marine Nov Iraq came and talked to all of the assault battalions. And you know one of the things he told us was like what you are going to go do is just like what the Marines did it. Bellawood in the first World War Guadalcanal and he will Jima and the Second World War at the Chosin Reservoir and Korea and Waste City and Vietnam. This battle is going to become part of the Marine Corps legacy that's only one component of what that data net and what that experience but an organizational perspective. Certainly I think it's became part of the the legacy and obviously the battle history of the Marine Corps. Curate that Your Company. Commander told you two weeks into the battle that you're both the luckiest unluckiest to be going into that battle. So soon into your service. Why was that? I think it kind of gets at the duality of these experiences. I kind of call them in the book the it but for me that it was combat in Iraq and Afghanistan. So I think what my company commander you know who when he said those words to me was all thirty two years old and seemed infinitely old and wise because I was all twenty five What he meant was that you know right out of the gate were. When I came into the Marine Corps my first experience was was participating in this battle and that nothing I ever did would live up to that and that was why I was lucky in that by Keith P. perceive in some ways it was true with the rest of my time in the organization would be a let down compared to this but I was lucky because I got to participate in that and I think those words proved true and the duality behind. Those words also proved true in that experience. One that I'm you know I'm very proud of but at the same time you know there's a lot of regret. I lost a lot of friends influenza and wanting bring us back again to November tenth which is also the birthday of the Marines. And wait explain what it feels like to be going into that kind of battle Well yes so talking about the culture. November tenth is the Marine Corps Birthday. So as they say November tenth. Seventeen seventy five. That's when my Marine Corps came alive. You know you remember these and One of the ceremonies marines do anywhere they are whether they're at the Pentagon at the barracks at eighth and I in Washington. Dc wearing their dress uniforms or whether or not there and deployed halfway around the world going to battle. Is You You read the comments message. But the current comments message and the General Jonny Lee Jun. Who was the first comment to celebrate the birthday? And you eat a piece of birthday cake and so we were sitting there November tenth. Two thousand four all loaded up In about a dozen with a call. Amtrak's which these armored personnel carriers early early in the morning. Really almost the middle of the night getting ready to go right into Fujita and Were we were handing out these little bits of birthday cake. And our company's executive officer came up on the radio and read the comments birthday message to all of us so it had sort of this. You know surreal quality. Are you afraid in those moments as you know? You're going into battle. Sure absolutely everybody's afraid. And what's the fear exactly fear fear manifesting sort of I think interesting and different ways forever? I think the largest is just the fear of the unknown For me I was always afraid in the moments before I would have to go do something and then when I was actually committed to the acted self identity. Feel afraid but you know it's the fear of what you imagine can happen to. You is the fear of leading down in the people. You're with who you care about deeply It's just that broader. Just fear of the unknown. Did you know why you're going in? What was the mission? The mission was to flu. There'd been a battle that spring in late March and April of two thousand and four in which You know you may or may not remember. It began when a number of blackwater contractors were killed and their bodies hung from the bridge influenza. An led to a sort of a board battle With the Marines in which the Marines pulled out of the city and Faluji itself became a no-go area for coalition forces. And what really wanted to happening was between that March November It became a real safe haven for members of kite on Iraq and people like Zarqa. We were operating out of flu. And so it became this sort of seeping wound In whatever the counterinsurgency effort was in Lombard province in western Iraq at that time so we always knew that we were going to have to go in and retake Falluja the whole time I was in Iraq we knew that I arrived in the country in June of two thousand four and I left in February. Two thousand five and so We also knew that we would probably go do it in November of that year because the presidential election was in the fall and we imagined that the election would happen and then then regardless of who won the next day we would wind up going and clearing out flu which is what came to pass So you know. Our mission was to go in there to retake the city establish nominal Iraqi control over the city in order to deny it as a safe haven to the insurgents who are operating out of there so that was sort of the the Moore wrote tactical mission in other reason. If you ask why people are fighting there you know. I think it goes to kind of what you said before. It's being part of this legacy it's doing right by the Marines who become your friends by your your comrades. I mean that's what I think. Inspires people to go the extra distance in those situations. But you knew going. In at the casualty count could be enormous. Yes and how does it feel carrying that knowledge walking in? I think that the number you gave him the book was that you are expected. Potentially to lose seventy percent in fact the number was higher. There is a moment before we went in. When my same company commander my platoon had been tasked within our company which is three platoons about forty marines. Each our platoon was tasked as with all the main effort. So we were going to be the lead platoon going in. And you know if you've studied kind of urban combat and tactics the casualty breaks for the lead platoon usually very very high. And I remember my company commander just quietly pulling me aside and pulling a friend of mine. Decide who is the commander of the platoons in saying? Hey you two need to just have talked through the plan for how Elliot how your platoon is going to get back filled. Because I don't expect you guys to be combat effective by the end of the first day combat effective basically means. Don't expect enough of the lieutenant to be left that you'll be a you know a healthy fighting organization anymore see us so that's pretty sobering But on at the same time I mean you know it's not like I woke up one day and found myself as Marine infantry officer. You know I was seventeen years old when I decided I wanted to go into the marines. I worked very hard my senior year of high school to get in on an ROTC scholarship. I then spent five years in university working for a bachelor's degree master's degree all the while knowing I was going into the Marines and then when I became a lieutenant trained for a year before ever showing up to the infantry so you know about seven years of my life. I've been preparing for this and so in the moment arrives. They look at you and say you know you might need to get back filled. You know you you've known that there's a chance at this might be where your career is heading and so I think you just feel ready for it and have to accept. It's one thing to feel ready for it in anticipation but it's another thing to watch men fall in front of you where your comrades and you tell a story about how. What rainy nights remind you of a moment on Highway Tan with Gunnery Sergeant Ryan? Shane and Sergeant Lonny Wells. What happened? Well lonny wells Was a squad leader in a friend of mine's company and you know most marines. Who fought him food? You can tell you where they were. When they crossed highway. Ten highway ten was a six lane highway. The bisected the city and wound up being kind of the main line of resistance so lonny wells went across highway. Ten in as they were crossing He was machine gun in the street shot through his moral artery and was bleeding to death in the middle of the road. Ryan Shane at the time. Was that you know real strapping. I mean you know six foot two two hundred ten pound Marine Gunnery Sergeant. Who'd enlisted the age of seventeen whole life? He wanted to be marine Solani shot and he then ran out into the middle of the road to get Lonnie Grabbed him pull them in once? Pull them twice. And then the same machine gunshot Ryan through the Stomach Ryan fell down the road In there was a very iconic set of photographs taken on sequence of Ryan running out into the road to lawn and About two years later I was in camp. Lejeune and Ryan. Shane was awarded a Bronze Star for valor. So metal for trying to get Lonnie that day and that day it was raining. Those the first day it had rained influenza and our whole deployment before that we had had a bet about when it would finally rain racks at Hunter of rain. Once the whole summer we'd been there And so in Ryan is getting his award. He said two things you know that really stuck with me. The first was he some finding it really hard An old by tobacco by this point Ryan had to get he was being medically retired from the Marine Corps He wasn't able to serve anymore. Which was pretty heartbreaking for him mandate time. He's getting this award. You know he'd lost a lot of weight and had a number of surgeries to correct. I mean been shot through the stomach so he stood there when he was getting his awarding. Said you know I'm finding it really hard To accept the fact that my greatest achievement in the Marine Corps which is receiving the sprint star for valor comes out of what? I perceived to be my greatest failure which I wasn't actually able to get Lonnie out of the street that day And lonny wells wound bleeding to death the other thing that he said. I said you know I'm looking out and who's going to be award in front of me Marines. Who'd been there? He said you know a lot of people. Ask me about that day. But something one's really asked me about. Was you know who went and got me? You know at that point lonny wells and Ryan. She had been shot in the middle of the road and wound up. Happening was to younger. Marines have run out into that same street and pulled them both to safety. You know so. There's also when we talk about the stories that could told and war and valor. You know. There's a lot of stuff that is overlooked and Ryan made that point as well. You also lost the weapons artillery officer who controlled air strikes and artillery for your company. And He'd been playing chess with him not long before he was killed. Yep so that was a friend of mine. Dan Malcolm and we were lieutenants together and he was the guy who would call in artillery and Wanted Happiness on the first day of the battle Our platoon had wound up pretty far forwards and artillery started landing all around us And it was actually friendly artillery. We didn't know what we didn't know where it was coming from and There was a high in the highest building around us in Dan. My company commander had been up on that building earlier in the morning but the the volume of fire that was coming on that building and so bad they'd had to get off this rooftop and later on as these artillery impacts are hitting around our platoon. I mean so close. It's like a steal wave Hitting a beach break in. I started yelling at Dan. Like who's shooting at? Us and Dan ran up to the rooftops to try to figure out where the artillery rounds were coming from and he was able to call those artillery rounds off of us and then as he was running down off the roof a sniper shot him and the impact right under his armpit went through his heart killed them almost instantly. You carry a story like that. How do you go on after that? You know you you recognize. I think that you know we all knew we were signing up for You now I think about the things that people did for me and you try to live a life with meaning that honors the people who who dedicate a comeback and and have the longevity that you've had Guys like Dan and Lonny Wells and Ryan Shane. I mean you remember them and Doug Zan Beck I mean all these guys. You just remember them. I think that's the best thing if you do after a few years as an you moved over to special operations and you actually weren't commanded marines anymore but foreign soldiers and there's a story you tell about a fateful decision made in that context to you know most of my career. I actually I worked in special operations and worked as an advisor to foreign troops along with maybe a handful of Americans who are also advisors. I in so That context on my war buddies. You know weren't other Americans. They were by large Afghans Who I fought alongside and you know. We did all of the things that people do in wartime fought alongside one another blood alongside another and I think that's Pacific story is Two OF THE PLATOON COMMANDERS. In a unit. I advised named Mortaza and severe Were we were returning one day from mission. We were in southeastern Afghanistan and severe lived all the way up in the Northeast on the pike the famous Puncture Valley and he would hardly ever get home to see his family and he had a chance one night to get on an early helicopter flight out and so he basically wound up taking a shortcut To get him home and because we took that shortcut we wound up hitting an I. E. D. in which One of his best friends was killed. He had a child already. By then you. I did and so That firefight in that incident was one of the first ones. I had been in As a father I think when you have I've always felt I never really understood war until I had a child because I think you can't understand the scope of loss. People can experience in war. And Tell You yourself have a child and can imagine losing that child and how there's nothing in the world that can ever make that loss whole. Did it make you WANNA walk away from more at that point any poorly? I think it put it in more of a context. You know the one thing that I you know that am a father that I look back on. I really look back on kind of with all is I think about my time in the Marines and I think about my friends in the Marines I served with the Afghans and others I served with and I think about the guys. I knew who at the time I knew this had families and kids and were going out on night raids or fighting and footage doing it as parents now as a parent myself. It boggles my mind that they were able to do that. And I understand now that they were functioning with a level of emotional complexity that frankly. I just wasn't having to deal with you. Know as a twenty four year old lieutenant or as twenty nine year. Old Captain And it really gives me a kind of a sense of all about what they were able to do but it is it part of the reason why you end up not redeploying. I think it is. I think it gave me a sense that it was time. Can't life has it? Seasons in this season was passing and there were other things I needed to attend to like my family and at the same time. You don't ever really leave the war in some respects. You're constantly kind of returning. What is that propulsion? I think you know I. I left the military started working as writer and started traveling to southern Turkey where I want up. You know covering a variety of subjects to include the civil war in Syria the Islamic state's spread onto our rock and politics in Turkey as I was writing about these subjects. Kind of what kept coming back to me was the American experience in these parts of the world and how they were also intertwined into everything that was going on. And so you know. It's not so much that I keep coming back to them as much as like it's not over you know what would starter there for us. At least in two thousand one. Two thousand three is still not over so I wanted to write about that and just try to show the connections between Faluji in two thousand four and the Islamic state in two thousand fifteen in the same city and how there is a narrative arc connects these things both But politically you know. But also there's an emotional arc in the wars. Have an emotional topography to them. And I very much wanted to map that emotional topography and show the contours of what it feels like to to go to war. You see that emotional topography on both sides at various points in the book I do. I believe it exists on both sides in I believe in these wars for me in the Americans. I know her of my generation of thought of them. They were generation defining and in the book. I sit down with a former member al-Qaeda and Iraq who fought on Lombard provinces places. I fought and I talked to him he would. He tells me you know the war's regeneration redefining to him you know. And then I sit across from a Syrian activist of who participated in the protests. In Two thousand eleven. Two Thousand Twelve and he says it tells me the same thing that the conflict in that those protests in the conflict that led from those protests were defining to him and the fact that we've all been defined by these conflicts in the region. I see as something that connects us. emotionally connects us and is a point from which we can begin to understand one another even as radically different as we may be. Syrian activist American Marine and a former member of al Qaeda and Iraq. You know I'm an optimist. I believe that with everything I I've seen. I believe that people have more in common than they have different and to acknowledge. Those commonalities is a way to have deeper understanding and more empathy for one another. Do you feel like you have greater moral clarity on the American role in Iraq. At this point I think you can look at the war politically and then you can look at the war personally and for me. There's always been you know two separate things you know. I know I joined the military on the neck and sometimes people ask me like you know. Do you regret the fact that you serve based on political developments on the ground based on fact of Islam estates swept back into parts of bar province And I don't regret it because the nature of my service. The reason I was there wasn't necessarily to implement a specific policy in my mind. The reason was that I was there was that I again. I want to have a job or whether I was good at my job. Outta my job mattered. I can look back at decisions. I made that I feel proud because because I was there and we were able to make this decision in our platoon wound up getting through a pretty tough situation in in a better state guys and they get hurt so for me when I think about that. Those aren't really political issues as much if he asked about the politics of the Iraq War. The politics were terrible and we never should have invaded. Iraq in it was a mistake. I think that's been proven out by. I think inflating the two is for me. Doesn't feel like a true way to talk about the wars you recommended and received a Silver Star for your actions in Operation Phantom Fury in in the book and I don't want to give too much away for you but the very end of the book you narrate the commendation in a way that I found deeply moving. What led you to narrate it in that way well originally actually the That chapter wasn't in the book. I turned the book into my editor and he was pleased with. It said they're very happy to publish the book looking forward to it and then he gave me a phone call and said listen. Elliott you know I just feel like I would be remiss if I didn't bring this up with you. Know people will read your bio and they'll know about this award and you don't talk about it at all in the book and you probably have your reasons for doing that but I feel like again. I would be remiss if I didn't say I think it'd be a better book if you figure out a way to talk about him and I took that on board and I knew that I had this summary of action to serve an extended description of the events that led to that award and I felt that the best way to do that would be to annotate that summary of action With a lot of my personal reflections and the things that don't get into or included in official awards documents you. That's what I wound up doing. But you know wards are complex. GonNa quit Ryan. Shane said you not the greatest honor. I'm getting his also Brad. My greatest failure. Which is he didn't get lawn. The out of the street that day you know when they hand out those awards. It's usually because you found yourself in a really bad situation when everything goes perfectly according to plan. They don't wind up handing out those awards. So you're often being honored for in. Some respects is sort of the worst day of your life. Why are you go back to Philadelphia as a journalist? What brought you back. I mean not to sound Glib but in some respects because you know like like Mallory said of Everett's because it was there you know I wanted to go back I've been thinking I'm thinking about that city every day for twelve years at that point so when the opportunity presented itself I was living in Istanbul. The time and a good friend of mine was the New York Times Istanbul slash Baghdad bureau chief when he basically invited me to come into flu and you know he would help me. Get down there I really I jumped at. The opportunity had been looming so large my imagination since I left. Did you feel you had greater clarity on your experience thereby returning? I didn't feel as though it was some type of catharsis per se. You know I mean I think we all know the image of you know. The veteran returned to the old battlefield. Whether it's the guys who served in Vietnam walking through the rice paddies or the you know the World War. Two veterans walking across the beaches It wasn't that type of an experience because of the war there is an over so for me returning to Volusia was sort of like seeing an update as to where things stood and what struck me. The most was how how little things had changed. You mentioned in the book that you try to imagine fluid differently when you return not as a battlefield right but as a community of homes and businesses and Volusia is not defined by creation but by destruction when I return to fluid I mentioned as I mentioned so little had changed standing there and looking at the city. You know when you go to other cities let's say old cities like I Dunno Rome or an Istanbul. You know you have sometimes these layered cities where you can see how one group of people have built on what another belt would another belt and it's how you wonder what kind of these this layering in certain cities and those cities. I think we're kind of oftentimes defined by that layer in these very old cities When I was back influenza it was almost like viewing that process in reverse is you would walk around the city. You would see destruction on you talk about you know that building. That building was destroyed in two thousand fourteen by ISIS. This building was destroyed in two thousand five. By the Marines. You know as the city that was defined by the layers of destruction that had come there And that jumped out at me You know hopefully flu jewel rebuild this at this moment that was perceived it. It's an interesting juxtaposition between a moment in the middle of a quarrier and Berlin with a former colleague. Conrad and he points out that a hill in the city is actually not a hill at all man-made and it's covering up it's almost archaeological dig of all the destruction the tanks armored the bodies that were left at the end of World War Two but Berlin is now this breathing living modern peaceful city and villages still a battleground in a different way. Yeah I mean it's it's food is a work in progress like I. I hope in like twenty years. You know and it's the city of Moscow. Those mosques will be standing like beautifully restored and you know and it will be a vibrant city and I can take my children there and you know. Walk Around and point to places with them. I think like most veterans. I know they dream of being able to do that. In Iraq or Afghanistan is just. That's not where either country is at this moment. You know. They're still active wars going there. Which is one of the things I think. They kind of have made these war surreal. Is that you know the equivalent passage of time. Let's say I'd fought in waste city so way city. Nineteen sixty eight. It's two thousand. Nineteen fifteen years so you know it would be nineteen eighty three right now. You know Vietnam was very very different place in nineteen eighty three obviously than it was in nineteen sixty eight in that passage of time whereas you know Iraq is a different place but the war is still percolating. There and were were not. There's not an in game. It's still a work in progress. What do you think the legacy of flu is for us now? I think the legacy is to be determined. I don't know what is you. Don't think enough time has passed you. Do you feel you've let it go this point or is it still of you? It's always a part of me. You know sometimes people ask me Elliott in like. How did the war change you? And I've never known how to answer that question because the war made me. I mean I you know I have a good friend who I go running within the morning. And he's you know he still works in special operation has been deployed in the war zones. More than than anybody. I know He's going in and out since two thousand three and so at one point we were running and we were just talking about the war and then that idea how to change us how it made us and he looked at me at one point he said you know Elliot said the melancholy of it all is that we grew up there and I feel that way I grew up there so asking me how the war changed me. It's like asking someone. How did your parents change you? Your parents don't change you. They make you thank you so much for joining us today. Thanks for having me Elliott. Akron is marine veteran and author of the book places in names on war revolution and returning first prisons produced by me Sir. Wild along with Benjamin Solloway and Maya Gandhi our editors Rob Sachs our executive editor for news and PODCASTS. Is Dan Ephron? We'll be back next Friday. If you liked this episode please subscribe.

Marines Iraq flu Marine Corps Sergeant Ryan Iraq Ryan Shane Elliot Ackerman lonny wells Commander commander Faluji Volusia officer assault Afghanistan United States Barack Obama Elliott
Monitor Show 17:00 07-03-2020 17:00

Bloomberg Radio New York - Recording Feed

01:42 min | 4 months ago

Monitor Show 17:00 07-03-2020 17:00

"You know the difference between Your Bank. In the banking business chief executive will take the bank a different direction your clothes in the fashion industry. This is the new look of retail your house and the real estate market. Is that something you see reflected in the real estate business owner? We Bloomberg for your professional is the US really bad immune to some of those influences Bloomberg radio the Bloomberg Business Radio Dot com I heart radio APP and Bloombergradio Dot Com Bloomberg the world is listening thing twenty four hours a day at Bloomberg Dot com on the Bloomberg business APP and Bloomberg quick, take this. Is Bloomberg Radio Now? A global news update. Florida Spike Arizona Hotspot I'm Anne cates. Some beaches in Florida are closed as coronavirus cases. Sore correspondent Randi Kaye reports Governor Rhonda Santa's has leading individual jurisdictions to size, certainly leaving the beaches open. He's leaving that up to the counties of each year in Palm. Beach County would normally on the holiday weekend be jammed packed, certainly not going to be because it's closed as well as the beaches in Miami Dade and also in Broward, but some beaches are going to be left open and Volusia County. They're gonNA monitor crowds with. With drones and Jacksonville, beach is going to be left open because the mayor there says that it was the bars, not the beaches that caused the spike in cases Arizona has reached new peaks in hospitalizations and Emergency Room visits today correspondent Jeff Mackay Arizona Health Officials say the capacity of hospital. Intensive care units in an all time high of ninety one percent people who went to emergency rooms because of Covid, nineteen symptoms number, two record, one, thousand, eight, hundred, forty, seven. That's five hundred more than a day earlier Arizona.

Bloomberg Bloombergradio Dot Com Bloombe Bloomberg Dot Bloomberg Business Florida Randi Kaye Arizona chief executive Jeff Mackay Volusia County Emergency Room Anne cates Jacksonville Beach County US Miami Dade Rhonda Santa
Monitor Show 04:00 08-01-2020 04:00

Bloomberg Radio New York - Recording Feed

01:42 min | 3 months ago

Monitor Show 04:00 08-01-2020 04:00

"How long? How much? How many financial policy and medical experts are working on answers twenty four seven what about public debts? We are listening to those experts twenty, four seven, effectively widening this cap with its programs because you want answers to what's the most important of trillions in stimulus economies reopening or the infections curved ending Bloomberg radio, the Bloomberg business APP and Bloombergradio Dot Com Bloomberg, the world is listening. Twenty four hours a day at Bloomberg dot com on the Bloomberg business APP and Bloomberg, quick this is Bloomberg radio now a global news update. Trump targets tiktok hurricane warning up above Kusak. President trump says, he could use an executive order as early as Saturday to officially bird the Chinese own video APP Tiktok from the US lawmakers have raised intelligence and privacy concerns about the company's ownership Tiktok has denied allegations that it shares user data with the Chinese government correspondent Carey Shoemaker as trump signaled he was not supportive of allowing an American company to acquire tiktok trump's. Announcement came hours after reports that Microsoft was in talks to purchase Tiktok from Beijing based by dance hurricane warnings are up from bookertown Florida to the Volusia flagler county line and the Bahamas Meteorologist Tyler Mauldin also tells us it will continue to be a category one as it pushes to the north and west it eventually does strengthen a little bit more becomes at eighty five mph. Right, off the South Florida doorstep. MOLDEN says by Monday.

Bloomberg Bloombergradio Dot Com Bloombe trump hurricane Volusia flagler county line Tiktok South Florida Chinese government Tyler Mauldin Carey Shoemaker Florida Beijing Bahamas Microsoft US Kusak President executive Twenty four hours eighty five mph
ep204 Squirrel!

Man Points! Podcast

1:50:39 hr | 1 year ago

ep204 Squirrel!

"Should be very very, quiet. Whoa. It squall season season school season season. There's twenty men rednecks. Totally disagree. Well, listen, I've super impressed by all those assholes. Manley. Fucking man you. Hey that that squirrel. She has done. Yeah. Heart or you just eat a lot a lot of times candy. They go to candy. Yeah. Yeah. I've heard that actually recently you didn't drink much aided. You look low puffy a ton of gummy bears. Kid it 'cause you're fat with that welcome. The next Volusia man points shed, the shackles feminism back to prison blue greatness, give her unfiltered opinion about all things from pop culture to politics. And in the end, we find out who's dance through proud is our man of the week or who's a little Sally gets mushroom stamped and for Crawley space curl up security blanket prepare to be triggered because our facts don't give a damn about your feelings and sitting in a full room with me, Wes is crews KKK Chris that was anti-pc and Leland get your hoods color street. That's right. It's a black hood clearly antifa. The free little bag mask. He's got the St.. You look like someone who could throw a multi of cocktail at least six feet. You only won't finish that shit do. Now. I don't bad. It's a little. Interesting. Hey, this is first one. Yeah. This is the first attempt. Yeah. This is the beer that west made and. Sounds like a book the beer that was made. Yeah, I've got it could be unrelated. But I've got a slight headache. Already looks. A new glass. Well, Chris, and I were smart. We were like, hey, you wanna split one? I don't think I want to commit to the whole thing. Greece and my wife can drink it because she loves you a lot more than we do know. No trust a lot of things. They really don't want to. How dare you ever bring her into this? If there's one thing she's ever done this sugar coat or. Until now. Demand up. Do we just nominate? So we're bringing wives into. Showdown. Yeah. That's where you're going. I guess we could bring them all in fair game. If you drug you straight to Victoria secret, I went to victory sceviour a couple of days later. No, he drug her. I want to do there. His wife has an Instagram post. Never see her at any of those when he's out of town. Right. This second. He's in town. So you can look at that two ways. Complete fag. Or that she would like him to pick out because he's. I would like to wear three ways for to where they came up with or she is going, but not pushing on your scrammed pitching wants to surprise when she got the real thing is I appreciate, you know, the gayness appreciate you guys bagging on me. But I don't post much of anything on my personal Facebook. And it's so it's become a four. Right. So it's become like a running joke with actually funny is you know, what let's like that. It doesn't bother me fill is. It's not really. I'm making a joke. It was gay. It was her idea. She was like you're gonna tell everyone on Facebook, Victoria, secret. That's good. And then I'll go to sport clips, right? When I'm done is that cut your. Good. Good. How's your hair look? Perfect. The honor of Leland almost for thirteen year old stepdaughters pink sweatshirt hoodie. He should've tried it on even and it was like fascism tight like benches AM. Super taito. It was like fascism. No other superheroes strictly. Susannah. Zander movies out right now. Tells me. Yeah. It is Kurt talk to me about Sam goose's. Have you get it? I think it'd be great. I haven't already out plan on seeing it next week tomorrow. I mean, you guys are the big superhero comics guys, I was pretty much Joe comma guy, so I don't speak almost joker. Now that I've seen that trailer trailer looks horrible. I thought it looked and that's one of the movies going to flop because I thought it was good. Like, some sort of artistic drama thing walking Phoenix is a good actor. I do too. I heard I think he wrote it Joaquin Phoenix is crushing. And what I think is they didn't show us everything in the trailer. Because no days movie trailers show is a little bit too much. They showed us like eating. His naked mother almost feel like I don't need to watch his AM. I saw the new trailer. So keep in mind. This is a back story that man's not coming out of the fucking shadows. Then you know, what I'm saying? I think it's going to be good. I think Joaquin's on par with he's heath ledger. Aga's leave acting not as the joker. But as acting. I I would put them not easily joke Paerson yet. But they're both good actors, and this I think there's definitely going to be pretty good. I hope and I will I'm not like all in on like this is going to suck. I was very excited when stills were being released because I like the way Joaquin looks as the joker, but freaking I was excited about this trailer. I mean, I didn't even watch it on my phone. I went upstairs. So that I could freaking big-screen. Yes. So I can put YouTube on the freaking eighty inch Samsung because I was hyped to watch this and my wife sat there, my wife, and I watched it and afterwards, you just did this. Here's the thing. Like the whole. I mean it as the insanity and the whole build up who he became an all that. And I think that Joaquin Phoenix being a strange and interesting cat itself is a perfect dude to do this. I'm not like I said, I haven't given up on it. I mean, I saw the trailer built like Leland. So I can see why you know, I don't know. At least ten pounds on him walking. Trailer. Yeah. He did. Look, look we ended. Nah, it's like sickly skin. Arthur flex quite skinny in this movie. It's not as real name. What is you? Don't know. Nobody does nobody knows in this ranch. It's not going to be nice real name. I'm just telling you to me all but I'm not announce his real name. They actually had a thing where Batman sat in the Mobis chair, which is like freaking gives you the initials of God comic book he'll muscle, and you can ask questions he asked what the job is. Real name wasn't even the chair gave him different names. If he doesn't believe it can do look in the mirror and saying question get running answer. No. I'm just I'm just saying the movie will not tell you finish. Able but I didn't think this was in line with all the DC. I thought it was like all thing. They're not an old maid. Man was with more. But they're not gonna. Is that DC cannon? It's not blessed. I'm just I'm just saying they will not even the even in the movie universe. Definitively. Give him a name if they did it'd be incredibly disappointing. So I guess the convicts we're gonna correct speaking of movies, which one is the right now because I know which one is going to be Leland. What's movie that you're most excited about coming out soon and game? Right. You got your ticket. Yes. Because they're reselling those bitches for five thousand a ticket to wear I guess they're already sold out, and there's dudes resell in those tickets on the news Sally week like five for five is do you have your ticket the ultimate Houser? Oh, wait a week. No. Do you read on Thursday nights rant and rave on this podcast? The next Friday. What the fuck is endgame, the marvel move eventually the next vendors moving. Jeez. I didn't even see. In the second. There's four this'll be the fourth of enders movies. Can't keep track. Initiate. I saw the I keep doing this to yourself about having. I don't care. I'm offended dick on the avengers movie. That's not why here because joker has no fucking real name. So you haven't seen all the vendors? Which one is. Asked one what is it called? I can't get any war fell asleep. Dude. I felt by the enemy. Anyway. I was like were trying to wake me up at the end. He's fucking Spiderman. That's new dude. I know what? 'cause I'm too lazy? But we've got some high speed listeners, I want you to private message me Leland and tell me which episode Chris rant and rave about Infinity ward because I feel like that's happened. I love the original vendors. It was amazing. You see in fanny Worley through really fit better than the original best one. Which name fat face fat? For guy. Yeah. Grimace James Hecker got back on the world disappeared. I really thought it was James Heff hield from telling played that guy didn't realize stupid. Did what to say? Hey, josh. I though he was he was he was in the Ted Bundy movie he played the cop that arrested Ted Bundy, James Hadfield. He sure did Ted bony. I don't know how vendors on the serial killer because anything Alec. Movie. Why am I still drinking this? I don't know. I'm not reported on feel obligated to finish it. Where were we going about an oh, just take? Curious are resell. Like, it's that big of a deal. People can't wait till Friday. Are you most excited? I think she's. Clean up job week three's coming out this year. Right. Like the end of this year. I'm not talking like the full year and talking about December. Now could say within the next couple of months, but honestly, more excited about Shas Amnon, John wick three and I do look for John with Kevin even seen any of the John Wayne movies glove. Glove. They're phenomenal. Yeah. Yeah. Absolutely. And I and I know he I hate Kiana re. Are with weapons and shit. Realized a lot. What the peanut gallery national random stuff. I watched the trailer Zam today, and I'm like, I actually want to see it. Yeah. It looks really excited about it. Looks hilarious moving everybody could enjoy movies. Everybody's gonna get something out of it kids and adults and everybody, and it doesn't look too S J W in your face, not she's AM over John wick, at least they're not putting that in the trailer. Yeah. Because there's a real market movie not alienate half their families. And that's why she's came out last Friday, and it was without rotten tomatoes having to delete fifty thousand reviews or anything it was certified fresh with ninety two or ninety six percents. It's gonna do. Well. Doing real well already is. I mean in games going to kill it. But it ado game. We'll make more money than any movie this year you saying that you hope kaffa moral did real bad. Remember that? Yeah. How did it is half the marble? He you know, what he means the ritual captain bar danvers. So that that's a Anubis opened up a long discussion, and I will sum this up because I wanted to have been talking for like, fifteen minutes useless, that's huge huge point of contention. The comic thing is you guys. So it did. Okay. It did. Okay. The box office, and it did it did. Alright not super great for marvel movie. The long white men. Go see you. I'm here a lot on enough. There's there's there's. Freaking out it looks like Disney and some other people bought millions and millions of dollars that tickets. So yeah, there's a big thing about it was funny because it happened again sold out game. And not fifty percent may not to slant in it wasn't done a slam at people with the ninth and movie came out people on Twitter and Instagram. All this were like taking all these pictures premiere, captain marvel, and it's just me and my buddies here the theater, they're all these empty theaters. And but the tickets were sold out I read stories about several movie theaters or the manager said that for the first for the first weekend opening like four day weekend, or whatever every single showing had twenty five no-shows. Where the tickets were bought known refunding. And this isn't unprecedent because in the music industry stuff like this happened before plenty of times they've actually chained billboards had to actually change the rules on on. How stuff gets rated because like, Jay z. One time presold like a million copies of his latest album through Samsung. So literally the second the album dropped. It went platinum. They've done stuff yet one saying like they've done for this all pre orders, or you know, where like I said, I think what it was Jay Z gave Samsung exclusive he had like a week or two weeks of exclusivity where you can only download it on a Samsung device, but Samsung had to Priore like already give him the money for a million copies of the. So like, I said it went platinum the second. It was just business, right? And there's already been multiple aren't. Who's on Brel chick Ella? Freaking anyways, she had done something similar to that. All good business practices. All good business practices. I'm not. Yeah. Riano not faulting them for that. But you'd have Jay's down one. If Jay z can do that. What are you? What do you think freaking Disney can do you know what I mean by their own shit? Right. And if you look at it, what's probably better. Even if I mean, I'm just absolutely making up numbers. But what Disney a trillion dollar company? What's better like spinning fifty million dollars to make your movie, look like it was better than it was taking a bad PR? What I'm saying that's to be fraud on some level. How can we? Spending the money wanna go see the movie because it's mislead legal like thinking about if you really wanna go see a movie because how many other people went and saw the movie you're already in idiot. No. But does and. So mazing everybody looks at the review say, nobody cares. What the critics say? There is look at what people actually go like I don't care how well it doesn't the numbers wise. I wanna know if you guys come into town is soccer. It's good. But it does a lot of people just look at box office numbers and other than you're not American Eagle for we had now given up on them American Eagle for weeks. If you spend fifty dollars in their store, you got two tickets to see captain marvel whether you wanted him or not fifty dollars an American Eagle was like basically one way pair jeans t-shirts. So I know do you you shopping shopping with teenage girls in high school in this weeks ago and American Eagle? What's what's that other women girls like sponge to be at our next forever? Erica, neil. Yeah. They're keeping a close, man. Yeah. Structure doesn't exist anymore structure. Was it Montgomery ward? Robot Aimar came out. I mean for one hundred twenty five blocks, we've got four pairs of pants eight sugary rental navy now, I'm definitely sure it was like one of those high high trendy place at the mall, the malls are like, basically dying. Yeah. Just if you buy two of these you get to more if it was like holy shit. You think that you go to sunglasses hut shit three hundred dollars anything about songs everywhere? Then you go to exchange. Get it for seventy five. Now, you're talking about. Yeah. But I'm say the same thing all those hundreds of hundreds of thousands of tickets at American Eagle was giving out. Those were bought it's not like they appeared out of thin air. Whether you went and saw the movie American Eagle bought two tickets to captain marvel whether you win or not so there's a lot of inflated, and it's not like a captain marvel. I'm sure it's not the only movie that's done this. But it didn't have big freaking way, dude. So I believe that those box office numbers are hit to be on Netflix. Inflator? I'll watch it. Then watching take Joe Biden's numbers. Right. Hyperplasia do need to go. See the mule though because that is all red box now horrible did you and I look. Bucks. Heard it was horrible because guys at work for telling me seventy really check it out 'cause he hasn't been in a bad movie red boxes townie. Well, he lives at WalMart. Look at him. Till's at Harris teeter. The is right there is there's red box. My here's teeter. Deeply that's rape player is called Xbox One. The only thing that would be PS four probably. But yeah. Its leader from dollars. Listen in fairness, the shit's going to be on red box before any of the other stuff cheaper. Dude. It's to her it's dollar cheaper to rent it. That's right. From the convenience of your home. You didn't have to leave. I mean, I guess if you're already at Harris teeter buying dinner ready at WalMart. Buying your semi look at him. He's never bought a thing at Harris teeter. Sure. I guarantee you going organic he walked out. It's teeter upscale. I think. Oh, yeah. It really help. It's the most expensive receipt out of your pocket. I don't care to go in to get fucking. Huber ranking about buying groceries. Family. Chris we grosses on them table rotisserie, chickens and red box. Kroger types stuffed mushrooms. He's been there Studer is pretty it's the most expensive store around here. Kroger. It's more expensive than food on. It's not worse than foods is it's it's probably comparible to hold them. It's pricey then left because he couldn't find RC cola. You get lost. How'd you get in there? I walked in all this name, rain cereal. I want stuff off the bottom. I want through Harris teeter restrict clue pittsfield. Where's the teeters? Repeaters? Better be her last name and not his first. French for Harry teeters. I enjoy that'd be Mary teeters at. Jeez. You guys done. No speaking. Did you hear about the piece therefore Pierce recently? He decided he wanted to get the to say for peers. How would you think if you were Florida man, you'd wanna get to Premiera? What's the best way from Fort Pierce to promote a boat, a millionaire hearts plan stink. Like, Florida not like normal people hot air balloon, you're closer. How about those Hampshire blow a ball things that you run in data me Ranjit there on that? He can't be rescued by the coast. That's awesome. That's almost far fucker make it not very far rolling around. But he got trapped. He couldn't get back head to get rescued. But true. Him on the way down. Oh, he's just only that way. That's funny. I brought a compass guitar should when they found. I was gonna say the true answer with a bunch of Terge roll around there. Well, they're they're actually like trying to charge him for the rescue fee. One hundred sixty one thousand absolutely charge him. She went thousand should absolutely you'll cost. Listen that much Chris. They should absolutely charge him for that. Hundred sixty one thousand should actually did save money. Just faking a hate crime. And this shouldn't. Join YouTube and collected the money from the the hits when in viral. The Hampshire roll all Denver. Yopie people and there. Warner. Okay. In fairness come on. Let's think of cry from L, let's think about it. Did you research it? Whereas from dig it, I'm sure they're like big into blurt out half the fucking truth at school. He lives in Florida. He's been in Florida. He left Florida tuber. That's all the Florida gets on you after wire while it doesn't matter where you came from like you can't after a while do his all though that tricky as Bermuda. Triangle fucking compass. I even see this Hampshire balls. I read you scared to get in that. I don't see how those are saying stable enough. Like, you're just roll it all over. It's a hole in it. How do you get out of that quick enough as it sinking bigger and Kroll L do? Thinking about it. He again, Florida man, not going. Oh, yeah. You're right. Which is the other thing, and this is my next favorite thing. Because we also that what about you put Florida man than your birthday your day in restoring, which is kinda cool. But. I thought was great. It was it demeaning, but the best part about it is if you pay attention to articles now that involve floor no longer is it like this happens. It's Florida, man. Yeah. Yeah. Florida, man. So there you're looking for him. Absolutely caught onto that times or relent was Orlando weekly. Where did if the rent that thing it looks expensive? It looks like a nice one. If you're going to go a Hampshire ball. Come on like, we wouldn't sponsoring. Oh, yeah. Hoagies Swannee swifty jumped all over that right geared to you. I would sponsor that dude. Really how much you need fifty bucks. Crack pipe. You got. Let's go. What's your goal? Let me hope you, aren't you think you should make it. You know, what I think you can do it twenty five cents a mile. I think Nebraska top that guy though. With what the grandmother that gave birth to her own granddaughter? Gay ward. Okay. Says she was a surrogate. She's a nice person. She's only she was only half she supplied the so she's sixty one. No, she didn't he supplied the Spurs. She did her son's supply. The just makes it more fun. It's just too much work. Why not just just be straight for like five minutes? It's just so bizarre to me though. That's a lot of work to. Not one that's doing work given birth in California does not take the heat off. Lord Abro at one wanting to baby real bad. She had like her best from a gay, dude. And she she just talked him into like he wanted to kid. She talked to just being straight for five minutes said and they're both super happy as parents. I mean, obviously living separate lives on their own. But this year, beautiful baby. And. Yes. Let's go to this clinic. Like, are you that game just close your eyes? And I think now to like forgave us. They can like get. Get your to his book. You guys are fucking nuts. You think Florida's worse than that? That's fucking weird one-storey Dory. That's one story. Yes. Oh is that? Hey. Hey, bresca people keep themselves with themselves, though, Florida people do it out in the open. That's international. No. I'm just talking about. How is that to me the sixty one that which ones creepy or stores? Yeah. Your your stories creepy, but there's plenty creepy stories Florida on the race. That's just some don't that rednecks Bermuda the cheapest way he knows how by he probably stole the hamster ball even richer by. Nebraska beach offer like ten bucks from Jack pregnant sixty one year old a couple of weeks sixty one sixty one. Good on her body being able to carry that term. That's what I thought about it came to term actually had to be. She had it. There's a now a Florida man website nothing. But a man. I was trying to look up. Somebody sent me my Florida man thing, and it was like some dude cuts his own arm off with a samurai sword. I think it's it's not face made up now. Yeah. What do you think made up? I've been I've met people from Florida the Pensacola thing, right? Yeah. The exam writing I went to ski every drive around there in the street corners, raleigh's, my favorite like you, always had the dance. Dancing meth heads like Doan close in the street. My favorite giant Bill or car giant billboards about how STD's were so rampant. Pensacola, well, definitely keeping him. Even if it wasn't married, right. Fucking around here. So I got to assure clip I'm gonna play for you guys. Because you know, how we talk about magazine. Maybe it's a clip video. Right. So we know how like I always been like say how I turn everything gay run into weird people do this, and blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. All right. So I just this is a short two minute time possibly the most interesting man in the world. Oh that Mexican dude from the dosa keys, and here's this dose. Eckes Josephus, delta, dosa keys anyways. Anyways. I just want you guys to listen to this. What the city say. I don't always go down when I do. I'd never swallow. We're well fighter. But he's here with Elijah the Buell airport, and he is a very interesting life story. So this guy he's twenty three. He's been in the army trained with marines. He's got five hundred black belts eleven different. Martial arts degrees. Just tell me a little bit about the stuff you've done. I've done a lot of stuff to be honest. I've taught you know soldiers in Iraq house of south defense and everything like that. This. America's have taught Swedish soldiers and everything. So basically done a lot of my life. I started training martial when I was eight years old to now I got five black belts in Cuando Brazilian jujitsu in Japanese, and it was a call link Chong and quote him go. The train even wide Syon everything like that. But. Was it called? Says your mom. That's my mom. Okay. Go away. Right now, I have a regular forty matches zero losses. Told me about some pretty bad beatings handed on soldiers that disrespected you you wanna you wanna tell me about a couple of those one of those soldiers. They couldn't accept me being captain because I was too young. So what I did he sucker punched me in the face. So what I did. In return, I drag his face account across the concrete. It may. You gotta go is your mom calling. You. Degrees. Quick I had was a cold him by by Camerino. In biochemistry, and it was a call Sakala chief. Okay. Able alleges gotta catch. Mom. Great talking to you. Nice meeting. You man. It's take care and we'll see on the other side. All right. I'll see you playing. All right. A threat of playing. All right. Just everyone. Wondering is English a second language for him. Yes. Yeah. Okay. Because that would explain a lot of the was it called. But he has he had no accent is he did have an accent. Yeah. Yeah. You know, he had an accent on. Because I'm telling you are not as bad as bans. But I know I fact that trying to speak a second language she can make you sound like a retort on. I'm just going to say that this this guy, even when you're not did not look like someone who has trained in eleven different martial arts with like not this guy. I mean, I've seen the discrepancy between Heus Gracie and. School. You also you also has a degree in molecular bio, engineering, whatever it's called and whatever. Like, I totally Lynn laugh it up vinyl stuff. True. Drag your face across the concrete VR. Relives in Sweden, traveling with his mother as we all heard that that was the best airport city. You said what where I'm at? You said it, I know we can leave that part out later. Jeeze none of the video. What was that? Well, nobody here it. Anyway, how are we doing? Will traveling mine. This. So later on maybe we'll put it out. So we were on the same airplane and either good or bad. There was an open seat next to me. So he came and sat next to me. Do you really think higher flying? So actually, I have a twenty minute long interview with him to really think that. It's amazing airport is a security violation. No, most people the general part online. I know. But yeah. Twenty minute interview, this guy, he trained with Shaolin monks in Tabet or did he have to climb up the mountain like Batman, Batman begins? Did it just takes all sorts of crazy twists and turns actually train with Roselle goon. With. Escape pit. He's had seven siblings die from cancer. Multiple them multiple of them in his arms. This dude sounds like I mean that we throw that funny is youtuber like you both think at the same time this idiot, and he's just feeling feeding you full of shit, and you're like this idiot. He doesn't realize no. Compulsive liar. Like almost like a disease to say fucking Leila. Me stupid. Do you mind? He does say one there's one thing again during the during the long form interview. He. Holder. I believe that that's something to might be some to that tells me the drink cart comes and he starts talking about his alcoholic dad and how he's like that's why I don't drink. I don't drink for much much as I used to says, well how much how much have you drank right now. You know, he's like, none was like you. Sure. He's like now took a boatload zanex. Might also better at might also be part of it. But yeah, man, he he also gave me a band Danna that he autographed with five different names like every single different new name. I meant to bring dude got it back. I'm sure if a cat I saw in I saw her request for the music being added again, let's auction. It bitch. Music. And he what he does it to right. He he folded up after he's written all over and all this stuff. And he I, sir. Mony Asli done a little, okay. And was like as a here, you know, just put it on an important question number one question is where did it come from? Where did he get it out of his pocket? What do you carry a bandana in your pocket? Handkerchief think he's using it as a handkerchief. Exactly. Yeah. You keep that don't bring it, you know. But I'm like he wanted me to put it on my head. I bet he did now Wayne towards bencher. He was like, I got this guy. Mom watched. This. You've got Russia. Have you wanna see? My head 'cause mom at a hidden camera. He was just U2. in you wish he looking white did stupid as fuck. So he sat there next to me for the entire four hour flight, Deb, so fifteen of compulsive liar. Got another I'm gonna feed a bullshit too. Yeah. Pretend to be asleep. I wasn't even tired, man. I just couldn't talk to him anymore. You know, I saw the texts texts on the messenger. Apparently, you'd sent west snippet on text news guys gold, and you're like, yeah. There's an embassy to hope comes next me. But I don't know if I want to continue this entire like two of our flatter. Where's dude? It was. So he would he was telling he was very consistent with the stories though. Because I heard him town snippets of parts of the stories to other passengers or anybody within earshot anybody. Listen kept referring to me is like my good friend here. I just gave him I gave him a Bendon and my handkerchief and eventually when I stop pretending to be asleep. I I just met him right now. We are not good friends. Do not know him. Choose do you realize when he becomes the van Damme or get to twenty twenties you're going to you're going to be happy to have that campaigns for Reagan back in eighty four hell for your born to. Very effective Reagan. Did he become president? My he was Baiming one sixty eight two year, he was famous baby that Reagan kiss on the forehead handed him up there. I was one of the kids Joe Biden enter. I sure thank you. To though. Yeah. I mean, it doesn't have like a Redskin light Florida seminal Indian would you wear it? That's all -clusive American patriots. I absolutely would. Yes. I like we're in Florida state stuff. So I'd probably actually fill it out. But do you wanna see if you put it on is not a three hundred or can you? Going gold. Current and gold probably in like what a double double double, double, double double double south. All the exits Hocking Leland all are you wearing contacts that the the tint of your eyes right now is look incredibly different. There sparkling. I mean, maybe that's. Toned your your hair darker again. All all white hair. Even let my severance out. I'm not wearing colored Conrad pixel to strategic color that makes me so much more handsome to everybody. I give. Good strategy. Away on your beard skunk stripe. No one will ever suspect. Hey, just go around that the skunk stripe is the way to go on like west just all over the fucking placement. It's got gray. Doing pretty well. Well, the vantage a have is the blonde hair hides Bosa great unit. There is a lot. I don't notice a haircut, and you got the. Wow. It's. Come from referring, you're sweeping locks back. It looks good. I told him that when I saw I said you don't wanna go to your head Kelly go to your motor. He did. Right. And I know I do originally he goes up leaving you look good like, oh, yeah. Really? All right. Second you drop from good. Getting too full of himself down really? Chance to answer. And see it too in west it's subtle. But you if you know him you can see him like puffing. Yes, they goes from. He's like, well where are you? Now. Outstanding five foot. Here that I can't see myself in the mirror was hoping good. A good giveaway was I took the shirt off really good. Okay. Two. Want to know about what happened before guy? You're only leaves other smoke a cigarette. Sex jokes ex you come on people. Remember in the thirty. Are you obviously, I'm not putting the work will. He's not putting in the work. It looked like he would. Bottoms pretend like he doesn't know they're to top to bottom. The bare doesn't know. Yeah. I'm lost. Legitimately. Okay. So when a man loves a man very much. They wanna make a baby they get a hold of their mother. Okay. From Nebraska, sixty one sixty one years old, but I figure out who's going to be on top and bottom eight or at least. Yeah. At least. Hope so in Florida Mashal. I it was her son semen and her sons husbands sisters egg. How's that work out for look? I was trying to talk about this has maybe it spawned to make a big deal about oh idiots. Just have the one husband like sleep with decision or or have it or carry it? All right. Is it time yet? No. One of my Sally's. We'll do. I got a good keeps it reels man severance, aka Goethe's, that's his YouTube name. He was just arrested. He was over in Europe. I think it was London protesting outside of a SoHo vegan market on the professor. I dunno. I don't think he's faster. Now, he was he was protesting against vegan rhino. He's a professor professor. Okay. So he was protesting. Hey, if you're being retarded, we're in this big old VN equals, malnutrition, surely got nothing better to do will. We have some better. And that way that was to eat a raw squirrel in front of them. All in protest, do all. Well, that's what people that are like, bro. I had a steak last night. But we don't have to free lily got arrested. What's freaking Europe? So like disturbance. Could you just eight not live? Road kill or did he kill it? Either way. It's dead. If you killed it. It's called hunting the UK. Well, they call it their manslaughter people hunt. Squirrels to yes. Yes, they do does. He do it. Don't get you shoot vermin hunting world eat yet. They do that the squirrel for days. Squirrel stand. There really not hard to hunt. Put my gun girl. Deng squirrel track day. It was just here. We should treat with golf balls. I mean, they're easy to hunt. They you're. So they don't that. You're. Evidently, no, no been nowhere. Do. They hunt. Squirrel. That'd be tonight. Squirrel, squirrel. Hunting is thirty six. I never heard squirrel. I really can't to the backyard. So literally. You go out long. Vermin? All right. If you shoot rats in your own house with a frigging. There's a difference. Hey you wanted to. Exterminating exterminating is. Hunting is killing the eat. I don't think a lot of people are hunting. Squirrels to eat them shooting them do that. You do. You gotta tag for that, squirrel. You've already hit your limit. You guys really on your right now. Tell you doing Aric war. Hey from Florida and takes us. Maybe maybe I would say maybe the wheezy Anna, do I gear? Definitely, I know. I know Joey, maybe no. We we paid them you, Jim. I eight. Joel squirrel that it couldn't do. They're not hard to look for them. No you walk through, and you shoot them all trees, hunting hunting hunting doesn't mean you have to stop in creature grow. Is it goes hunting means you're for something? Because if that's the case. Watching them right across the fence and shoot him that's hunting. That's just picking them off your fence. It's exterminating vermin. So if you're sitting here state is the same from coming front you. It's the same exact thing, I think that's gay too. I think you should have to stock it. The only thing you have to stalk both hunt. Not me. So it's a squirrel. I don't know hunting say it's evident. I've been on team. But it's not my thing. It's it's retorted to slave. Gonna Harris teeter. Where isn't find a squirrel you? What did I have that my backyard and shot squirrels Pilla guns, and I don't call myself fucking big game hunter? Different people were talking by game hunting throw one on the grill, and I'm fucking I'm one hundred now I actually YouTube that she squirrel hunter extraordinaire. Wow. Six years in. There's one watch this game hunting world's big exaggeration. Obviously. Hey, if there's anything we don't do on this pond gas, it's exaggerate make fun of Ben jonson's. You do both of those are just thrown off. Because frigging Chris this alliance. He said he's looking at. Absolutely hell score on ding. No worse than we competed in the national pastime. God. It's it's real three out. I was looking to see if even remember needing hunting license for squirrel. No. I would hope not it's Herman rodents. You got a on site. You get a license to shoot them field mice. Drafter field. Mouse nece completely different animal. Feel mouse or not the same thing. The field mice have much larger tails they could fly from treated you. I get a permit for the rat traps. Skin one. I'm pretty sure figured out. We can watch that guy. Eat it. You don't need to. On them. It's manslaughter there. You just you just anything you could kill the BB gun isn't that hunting? It's. Maybe in Texas be very core. Uh-huh. It squall season season school season season. I'm so glad you're video. They think they're on a roll. It's like we're doing. Well. He's. There's twenty million rednecks totally disagree with you. Well, stupor impressed by all. Well. Manley. Fucking man you. Something I do just for the fuck of it like squirrels, my backyard. Where's my pillow? Again. There's three check them in the trash. Well, you should be eating them. Well, they carry rabies bubonic plague. So I feel like I shouldn't be purchase beer. I don't eat deer. Either. Sort of people. Yes. I don't eat people either. I mean, I will shit. Go here. I don't even say your back. Dear vasan. Dear. Go ahead. I'm so hungry hook me. Dear Stanford twelve hours covering to here piss here. Lower provide me some tasty squirrel before. I wanna I wanna see this. No wonder you don't go back. I wouldn't either. Here. I am sitting on the DP. That's not what you do. I. You don't Argo with the awful. Gargling with that Chris put it down. But they said my breath can give it away. Smollet beef jerky. That's definitely not deer. Got it. Right, smells, like deer piss anyways. Two. Of course, teriyaki Fokin. Got hit. Oh, lord. What the hell were even talk. We're always talking about eating the down real real gone legs of its own like four small furry leg. Big. Title squirrel, hunting this weekend. Live on next week where we can't we can't so intense hunting that next week. We're going to do the episode outside. We're gonna fish. Say this week. We can all sit back yard to see. How many we each did, squirrel? I think. Providing I'm providing for the pod west can take photo before eats. It. We should do that consulting any of you two. Fucking idiots could kill one lady. Hit move every week. The so many, squirrel. My backyard's. And you kill them know about that at all. But a good role in your backyard. Oh, well, then. Yeah. No, you don't you don't need to take that fucking. Why not hunting hunting? Not hunting license for this. They won't regulated fishing is more hunting. I wanna be just as they wanna laugh, his heart. Understand where we're going. The old man and the squirrel. Shit. Right. Look at through an article for you guys that it's actually a public service announcement for Virginia. I. Chris you're part. Well. Actually, you're right. Made me going to jail in the state of Virginia. You can be determined by court as a drunk, and then if you're caught with any alcohol go to prison because Alfred James Forbes right now sitting in prison who was declared a drunk in two thousand four. What drunk you cleared a junk. You could be Claire HR Rummy get out of here running it just declared a drunk squirrel during this. Probably groceries. He's been covering twenty seven times. No, no. Because maybe the drinks repeat offenders guy at Mayberry. There's always getting is there a database was is there a database. Drunk. Do getting constantly getting arrested for public intoxication. Publix in the whole thing is you can get that. But. Kate. And he has he can have a beer in his house and go to jail. That's not. No, you can't do that declared a drunkard by that. He cannot be anywhere around it or have it is possession. What? Yes, that's what I'm getting. This is something I never thought flip through them. Like how in the hell, but it is a law Virginia. How's that constitution? Nobody brought the supreme court yet. That's why he's in jail. Guy's name in jail right now. Yes, where Forbes in Virginia Beach, we need to advocate on. This guy's behalf has he has he heard an it's a law. That's been on the books eighteen seventy three and nobody's gotten rid of it and they've actually enforce it. And that's what I'm getting two thousand and four they declared him a drunkard. And now, he's their certain. He's been in jail for fifteen. No, he got declared a drunker in two thousand four where he's not allowed to have any alcohol since then he's been called multiple times. Asked public defender. Didn't go come on judge. This is stupid. Anything about disease? How can we hold instant? Once a person has gets Dyson. They will air go longer allowed to have alcohol. It's arrested. Okay. Who wrote anytime who wrote pilot? They could be rested. Anytime they're found with it. Just nearest Virginia pilot. It's Virginia pilot. I wanna generally in the north. Oh, well that that we need. Beckel? The only thing he's in prison for me a drum. It's in the courts and crime section. That's like some pre crime stuff. Yeah. I guarantee that argument is like, well he's gonna drive drunk or he's going to hurt somebody. But has he? You can't even own. That's what kills me. It's like you can't what recession. What were there would the circumstances behind the? They didn't go in the details on that. They don't they just talk about the facts. It's a lot less fun. Doesn't it? I can make them up which is usually what I do. He was eating dead squirrel that he'd just sought after hunting it for twelve days. Didn't we have a sodomise squirrel story before? Or kill them. No. Remember, they told me. Was it? A cat a lady all animals, the lady that guy raccoon. That's what it was. It was a meth guy with a raccoon micro penis beat a. Sodomise answering. It was another one that just you. And I I remember that now because of all animals like you reckon. Goat. Is it a pretty hot Coon? There's plenty came from its right? Not many raccoons though, that would be considered a delicacy you'd have to hunter raccoon for weeks. If you can back some squirrels over there, you're doing pretty good too. I show on to make hell of an inappropriate joke. I wasn't gonna make anything you're gonna go Hon. You know that is a legal right with route north room. It's a bad joke. But it's real good. You know, he just passed a law where now it's a felony to abuse animal off mortem. Or something to kids. Yeah. But you can kill kids. Born Tom we live Tommy's kill to. I don't know. That's dumb goat or don't know. Waterline, fuck names goats? People on squirrels either. Say like, I don't like it when people name their pet something like that. Like this Tommy bread. Why not mitt? What's your cat's name? Bam. Bush dog's name. Russia's aim. You'll have one dog at three rush. Harley Quinn Ivy. You didn't men characters. The dogs. Russia's not about main character. No the other two. Ben mongers, therefore Nunes. I thought it was going to go somewhere. I'm talking about that when you named your dog frigging time, Bob. Yeah. Like, literally spend Chris when it's a name that tons of other. Did I'm naming my neck dog. My next Chris. I don't kick that bitch every day. The only time he'll get to. Schools. My next dog, squirrel. Score pointer this. To get to Batman, names and rush. What's rush from preserve reason? Rush limbaugh. Rush limbaugh. That's how conservative I am and Russia's a cool name, man. Russia's cool dog fucking know, y'all chill out rush. There was also this the first thing that came to. It's also the name would the band. No. It's also the name of mega man's dog that drug movie. Yeah. Do you think about nothing? I was asking what was is. I was some character. I have no idea. Thing. You've known him forever that I'd never I never asked him. Why rush I knew real good again with Ross, Sean, Laura. What are Russian Harley new Harley from and Russia, just assume? I don't care what their names are the cats bowling above all of them right dream. It is fun. Call me, whatever you want that Mike Catt pays other people to hunt. Squirrels for apparently, I've got the picture to print money that fucking bitch has. A little bit. Squirrels. Dear 'cause ain't finishing this. Good eight. Home, dude. Visit in there is. Yes. The only will. Is. That is a cool name. It's good to Optimus. It's good to good. I'm good top right menu. Our favorite trans, dammit. Chris in the door. Hunted hunted. Chris the bureau. So our favorite transit racial person is back in the news again today at one of those well, my favorite good. Rachel dole is all who's now. That's not you know, that's not her name. She had it legally changed too. Catchy diablo. So she actually she came under fire ritual Dole's one catchy. Transfers he's living finish our favorite transracial. Get to it. Whole Jesus for some reason if any listeners forgotten that's chick that used to be like the head of the Spokane into place EP. She'd been faking that she was black for the last twenty years as wide as all of us. So some of the other things they found out she was doing because she had she had a book. I don't know who bought it anyways, she committed welfare fraud. Some squirrel says she just got sentenced to payback eight thousand seven hundred forty seven dollars in restitution and do community service. So still in the news. Really? Yeah. And I'll tell you on she looks. She's doing the look on the look ankle bracelet is she? Yeah. I'm just saying she looks she looks. She looks. Thirty. I'm yeah. There's a lot. What's her name? Now. Our navy Lund's. Like that ankle bracelet a lot of credit the catchy. The is her name. Her name was Rachel Dole's. All spell that. Don't. No, you don't remember. When she I don't thing that she identified even though she was white she identified as black. She tried to make the parallels that it's the same way that like a transgender person is male body identifies female up at blind people love when people try to fuck and do nobody. I don't think anybody who's a fan of her sarcastic. I know you are we can hear it. Two white people aren't too happy. If she comes back. Keep her and take him with you. The people Dave give up. Draft toggles that was one of the best lips. All right. Here's balls. Best. One of. Okay. I'm telling you hear them all best. I like Charlie Murphy's print story. I just wish Dave Chapelle skit about squirrel hunting. Nonsense. You to motherfuckers made it the funniest thing in the world. How you did it because they never existed talent brought to life, but they were laughing. I don't either. I mean, that's the worst thing. I think it's because they legitimately don't believe. It's thing again with it. I really call it a thing. And I'm sure there. Hundreds of people in south that call it a thing hundred fourteen that's what you get four ten fours ago, squirrel hunting. And that's your first thing. You're going out in the woods looking for squirrels shooting them, Allah. Trees Chris same thing to do with any other going to would you? Zona? Okay. I've actually eaten a desert, squirrel. I don't consider the fact that I wanted it. You don't know. How'd you get trapped? It that's not hunting trapping, two different. Seth or the BB gun waited for two one. I yeah. I don't get it either. I don't feel like hunting. But it's it's like killing a rat. You know, where a certain to kill now that we have here. All right. Goes fucking dumb. Now, we laugh listeners laugh half doesn't matter is funny because you guys are taking it way too. We were saying trying to Russian YouTube fame, just laugh at each other. Show him Laura. Right now. Squirrels. We. You said that. All right killed you jokes. We what? I'll tell you when Sally week time. Okay. It's big nets. Man. Somebody richest our time is fifty. So we got ten minutes. Yeah. I thought we were trying to keep. Some. We started our everytime wins the last time you hundred we're trying to keep it under. I would radiate. No, our forty five hours worth. But under two. Eighth grade eighth raise last time you hundred squirrel. Yes, sir. And then you graduated to something else. Now, you still hunting. You're taking your son squirrel hunting. I have not. Because it's not a thing. Coming of age today. Sun, maybe come a man. So I want to keep the hardest. The blood on your full the trigger. You take it to live. You have to drink the blood. I kill twisted. Hey, so when you kids are done, the grownups to start answering your questions right on as so there's no trees in my backyard. So I really can't teach them how to shoot one you come over to my my backyard Mirai said, then I'll do that. There are no trees or a desert. Would you call? There you go. He's a horrible hunter. May it. You know, the first thing of hunting go to where they are like, dude, if you see a tree that would be hunting tell you guys go to where they're looking for squirrels either did. No, I didn't this is getting dark. It's not Dr squirrel pawn. I'm just as the squirrel. I'm trying to figure out why you to moron. Basically everybody would like to be in on the joke. I don't know when I got a question. This is a serious question. How do you guys disrobe and then dry off in public showers? I don't more pointedly last time, I was in public shower. Updated doesn't have to be like the old school bay at basic training like the gym. Shower. Do you like you don't dry off behind this time, though? I drive home and take show. Yeah. I drive home danger. Okay. Well, then. Jim no shower inside like wherever Matt unless if it's less. It's the one with the wall showers, and I walk out of there. Now, what is that? What's happening right now, we're bringing out along. Do you spend drawing your penis? Now. I'm just saying like when is trying to save. Here's the thing. Dea bend over to dry your legs and your butt or do you lift your leg up to you? Is there a veg? You don't ever see them? Put your flu. I see. Do do this like Dr Legg you frequent dry. This Oreo depends my alone. I guarantee you do it option b just knowing you. I'm just saying the correct ways to lift your leg to dry everything. But I'm seeing the large amount of thick as long as it's dry. It was a correct way. I don't think I I generally don't look at their ass. No. Even if hard at the house when I'm in my tub of a leg on the edge of the. Bending over. Right. If it doesn't matter I'm asking, I'm asking black because he can't be because he can't avert his eyes. Now, even when we're buyer sells, we could've been I was I was actually it was like a semi genuine question about. Yeah. I mean, well, I think we're internet even when you're by yourself at home, and I do the same. I'll tell you might like to dry obsolete. Maybe this guy's balanced. It's people maybe they're all in balance. Is it a wrong way? I think. Yeah. Why? Because there's always a right way a wrong way to against the wall. Now that would be a wrong way. He does a handstand. I should say that's not even a wrong way. That's not really turning. Don't touch it. Right there. My ass. I mean, there's a prison way. That's you get someone else to do it for you. Or you just don't use go somewhere else air dry. Yeah. Been in over you're not picking the league, you're not giving anybody advantage picking up the soap. Trust me. Trust him trust to Samantha's done time did a nickel and Saint quite love. That's what happens when you frigging hunts girls. A lot of license in California. The man take that shit serious locks you up I can even hunt in California. No because they've already killed all the squirrels Chris onto them. All Gabby sim. Screwing Ryan, it's Joey I'd never heard anybody in California going on. I don't remember being talked about. And you've got to be in a lottery, and it's it's a lottery one I've heard of those. Does lottery for some of their stuff places. Do that like almost everybody. Yeah. If you other than just a frigging, dear you wanna go to freezing L freaking mousse or something like that. There's there's only so many moose can just everyone. There's not everyone can just kill moose just killed me. They're not falling out of trees like squirrels west Christ. Squirrel. Trill screws fall on your lap. Bam. This world gifts. It's a rose phone of your labs break neck throw. I don't either of all the things we've gone off the road valid. You have good ones. But this one here like I. Gosh, darn it. The squirrel pod was gold. I don't think so. You can be a naysayer all what we'll let the people. Yes. I guarantee we will have no problems with that. And that's why I kept checking the video like somebody house, really retarded. But nobody had watched. You just said this is boring. There's legitimately nobody watching. Also, it's pretty much the only one who has watched so far it's been drunken uncle day popped up for like five minutes. We'll watch it necessarily, squirrel. He he was like, that's it. I'm done make fun of me. W walking. Deputy. Damn work on five hundred. But you know, what he did pretty good job of that? Is he talks like that? I don't know if it's on purpose. Perfect. Just exaggerates. He's is a British accent. When he's by himself. He's got a mom on a top. Wither logs channel got the lot yet. Hey, another MARTINI straight old time old target. What? Did you really just check your message in our and thirty six later on time. So you not on time. And that was way off. You knew what you it out. I'll make you feel better, man. Okay. Do I have had a framed picture of climate a ladder a boat alongside ship, dude? Climate of Jacob's ladder with the Swiss creed. And it says the Barnum on time on target never quit in bold, bold, letters, and my thirteen year old stepdaughter days like. Why is it on Kama time comma target coming like what? Was like what it's been hanging there for a couple of years. There's commas on there's a comma between on and time huge grammatical error. This is a professional piece of propaganda from the command. And I was like, you gotta be kidding me. Man. That got missing by whoever ever been whoever created a PEO, whoever printed it and missed by me when I framed the most luck and missed by me for two years and everybody else that's looked at it. Okay. We'll be that as it. May you sent me that stupid nece fuck and Mesic relate? Disappointing. You see what has crystals at one time on time? Time Ben there late p blast a whole fucking command. Creed at me. Yeah. That's what. And it was a joke. Wade be late you war-fighting idiot and people are watching on other things other than just Facebook. So I, but that's only kind of mentioned, and they said the scroll jokes gold your wife score jokes gold. You don't know who it is. It's your wife one hundred listen this comment, she watches. Watches, you know, that one hundred percent of the comments. Statistics. It's only because Canas doesn't know about squirrel hunting. Yes. She did. She so much more than that. Keeping that on the down. Just. It's it's. That's funny in squirrel. I'm blind band a one in stream, but he could read what the comment said. Too. Good to you. Now, it's about that time, my wife, I was gonna remind you my wife how the school did. She really. Thank you. But she didn't hear all the good ones. Percent of the comments. Just tuned in. She didn't hear the original school goals. She's smart. She knows that shit stupid disagreeing with that. I'm saying she's from like west side of Regina, right? She's not like local girl or she from local west. Let's see what's a west side of Jinya. I don't know Larry Rono frigging towards Lynchburg stuff like that out towards the West Virginia called west. Now, you don't say West Virginia because that's a whole another state. We're from double check in. It gets a little more to go way more. And then you don't have to go far. He really don't okay. This helps you get you get the Smithfield and his reading for us here. Yeah. You get the Smithfield. Retarded quick. All right. So we're scrawling band since you've mission failed. Most of the time. Have to go for because you mission fell until you. Redeem yourself you're going I missions every time he brings up a Sally. It's it's horrible. That'd be on tiny this at least be on target. Oh, you taking your school going home? That was fun. That one was. Go with. Got the winner. Go. I'm not going to go the hardcore winning. I I'm gonna go with my Ledin, and that's west in all of your guys is darling. Alyssum Amano, not my darling. So. So. Squirrels. Hale fucking funny. If there's any don't own a gun. She don't I'm also a listen Milan. It about thirty other Georgia-based TV and film workers urged Republican governor Brian Kemp to veto an abortion ban that cheese deemed horrible, basically the heartbeat. Bill says she went there this Tuesday to Georgia from you know, where I believe to California just to berate them say say, Georgia based. Yeah. Right. Absolutely. Not. No. So she's saying that the heartbeat, and it's funny because he's the heartbeat can come as soon as six weeks, and that's before woman, even though she's pregnant and doesn't have the opportunity to get an abortion, which I think is very funny to say there could be an heartbeat in the baby, blah, blah. But that's not neither here there. I'm just saying. Can you imagine you're so evil in you Hager's are looking hate babies so much then you've you fly do when you have. A show here are we don't distract you only in the middle of a conversation. We're listening literally fifty percent of us are looking at their phones. So one hundred percent of well five percents listening. Go ahead. Yeah. 'cause you ROY lean anyway, where did the squirrel go tarbey professional? You do. I'm just saying the fact that you hate children, you hate baby so much that you need to leave your state where you're a constituent where you've oh were the laws affect you. And you can vote to affect the laws of others that you need to go somewhere else. Everything astroturf your hate. On an entire another state. And then time I'm just saying that's nuts, man. Like, I wanna make sure that we kills many many babies as possible. So I'm gonna go to another state to make sure they don't do something that I think is bad. Almost call that mainly to impose your will on others to go defend your your point of view. I just I just. Done other stuff. That's even thought were ridiculous. And that my favorite was one of the Texas election. She's over there panhandling. For somebody else. You're Interfet interfering with you know, state politics, you have nothing to say about. Yeah. So that stuff gets me to it doesn't affect you. But but the salad side, I don't know. But it's all virtue signal stupid little activists. I feel like that's all she's been doing. I didn't even realize that she was still doing anything in film. I thought she was I'm not no joke. I thought she was a fulltime political. He's got a Netflix show or something. Doing super well. Everybody. I don't think he's going to be all that great. I'm making eye contact. You may go now. Make sure your phones put away. But I don't know why you got skipped on my watch. You're following. I got this. Oh, Lord Amana Britain was walking home in the middle of the night. And he spotted a tarantula on the street. He mmediately freaks out and calls the police. What do you think happened there? Police showed up saw spider. Oh, he he said a translator where just a show where at in Britain. That's okay, tranche, Lynn, Britain, just wandering the streets instead of walking past it. He calls cops. What are you magin having the shoot 'em? Oh, yeah. Fuck fucking animal rescue person from the RSVP book. That is Michael Harrington dash to the scene. The call came in at eleven thirty dollars there by midnight. He said. You brag about that to me thirty minutes. That's that's a quote, that's not even on time. He was on target though, because he showed up with a was I don't know thirty minutes. But you had to mansion China that, yuck. Gonna be there. Thirty minutes later. Right. But it still was. Kiss. Why did it was a plastic toy? Well, let's row trying to figure out. I'm like plea, translates, roaming. Been my bad gas drink wanting spill when you go home drunk. What we can't have nice things. Me too. Hey, anyway. The second. With me is this dude. I. Employ your Cam just starting to laurel and hardy skit. Good. You. I mess. Forty maybe second. This video while you're over there. If you see a squirrel make sure shoot for those that are just listening. And there's no there's no video Ben don't to be no big deal. It's a big distracter. So anyway guy my favorite though is he says the call came in. He said it was trying to missing. Oh, it was as big as hand black and Harry with thick legs and orange college tribes. I think David woman. What's your your though, Texas or somewhere else? Does it really matter? Florida. You don't think it was incredibly sell it, even call the cops for a tarantula, which might be a little unusual Britain. I guess I didn't realize having. Yeah. He was drinking or smoking. Something just got done watching was it arachnophobia. Like, I get it your frigate ways. Did you like the fact that he realizes fake waited around and watched it apparently to? Thirty minutes first off your mate, and listen real. Well, I told him not to go. No. And he's there. How are you? Stuff at it. I mean because you're trying to get it to stay there. Maybe. Actually, if you move tent, you move, don't you die? Anyway, I thought that was pretty salad. I do like that story. I do like that. I like to story. Yeah. Taking up your paper. I in fact, that we learned that Ben is so scared of spiders the mere mention that spanned now. You want you want the real fun? Ben do bring the weeks off who's out tarantula hunting. And when he show for BB didn't even move. He's still he's still embarrassed by his frigate pick right now does not want to bring it up. What is it? Do you? At least have something do. All right. Well, I'm busy, right? Many Christmas say I won't bend. No, no. What line's important? What are you doing? It's clean man, man. Like battered woman. We're not gonna hit you again. Little system composes. Who'd you bring a tarantula? I mean, what's your which your Sally that you're afraid of? She read it better than other beer showed command points on the beers. He'll authentic. So scratcher Smith. Okay. Oh, yeah. Now, we're the only making contact. A young man's claim to be an Illinois boy who disappeared on tragic circumstances. Eight years ago was disproved by DNA tests. The FBI said Thursday, dashing hopes that the baffling case had finally been sold for Dana half. A breakthrough seem to be in hand when a young man found wandering the streets of Newport, Kentucky Kentucky on Wednesday identified himself as fourteen year old Timothy pits in in claimed he had just escaped from two men that held him captive for seven years. So this kid had been fucking kidding. I think it was since two thousand four this kid. He's been kidnapped. He's been missing. So it what happened to the kid? He's been kidnapped. So he's been missing. So this guy apparently, hey, this is me escaped good. So the problem without paste article. So the problem with that is one eight tests ruled out that possibility is not jeez, Timothy pits. You just reading a FOX alert or something? So it came across your phone Cam. So you know, what finish? I don't want. Anyone to know? You'll get there. Long story. It's not him. He faked. It hate family thinking, hey store, I found the guy was four great was a family ridden. How old's a guy though, what was the point twenty three twenty three ten pretending to be the kid that got kidnapped in two thousand four. So he's about the right age kid is kidnapped. Absolutely. But he is not the kid. So he gave this family false hope to maros among. False. Hope was a reason be Sally. Why why would he do that? An argument plan the story, but you guys have fucked. It up didn't get in argument with his brother, what was your plan? What was the plan? Have you don't have a plan get important? I thought you funny like I reached my phone, and you guys reach it off your pay for. But somehow be reading it off. My phone is different. You freaking literally like good a Google. Then I didn't at least we exactly what you fucking Bill and I read unless exactly what it can't read it off my phone. I don't read an article I read online, and then I paraphrase in my own words. How wanna tell us? Yes. Yeah. I used to quote, but I I said I don't like that. And neither do you do are you a hidden. Wouldn't you read that you didn't even use punctuation like, at least we get Brigadier? It'd be like this. Served aka goat is in the clip shows. No this by police outside so hope begin market on Rupert street earlier this week. Pause pause visibly in hill. I just wanna know what happened with the kid. Who cares? Wes who fucking cares. No, no. Who cares Kim to look him in his family? How about that? Fuck that how about fuck him and his family. We care about is your opinion on on my. Hey, fuck him family, guys. How about that? Stop using. We I don't care what his opinion. Let's see what you guys did here. Now, I get it. No. But you might want to start listening to your own. Yeah. We just want you to put effort into it. Once. I will never do it again. Promise that every don't sitter this doing it. He might as well not. I'd rather just be like. I got nothing to do John. Hey, I got nothing. I love your failures. Don't worry keep them up. I love your failures keep them. Common goal. All right. Bring up mine real quick. So. The new go quick. Yeah. So when I say the term veteran owned company, do you have any kind of an expectation for that? Yes. About it. Hopefully, you don't fuck you're talking about. Yeah. I do. So now, teleprompter if somebody comes you veteran owned business, and it happens to be a veteran that which you or your spouse have served with would you not have a little more faith in that company? Fuck on obviously, spend a couple extra thousand over what you could budgeted are what was actually low balled on young at twenty four thousand dollars, quote versus twenty six thousand with the twenty six thousand because it's a veteran owned business and a person who has served with my wife who is completely shafted me out at twenty six thousand dollars making the veterans look bad, not paid his own employees. And then lied for the last two months about everything. So right now, I'm completely screwed. But the thing that pisses me off for this personal right pisses me off though is your veteran. Engaging with other veterans. There's already going to be a little bit of a connection, and it someone you serve with and you still rip off kind of the Sally thing you could possibly do somebody. We'll can we publicly shame in. Oh, yeah. Veteran home remodeling. Yet, the bathroom was getting regarded again, I have to freaking redo everything like, and it's going to cost me out of pocket because this explains a little bit with some wondering why he didn't fire this guy a long time ago because it's been taken well until is to get this done. It comes down to is. I've already got he's got money. Not all of it. You'll have a portion of that money. But he's got enough of it that I'm I'm hurting if he doesn't at least do enough that I can finish. You know, what I mean, you won't give right? Can't get it back. Let's assume and just gonna cost more over. We've already talked to lawyer it's not even worth it. But she did say the lawyer said sharing them, every frigging website, Facebook, everything this you should have done your research idiot. I did I went with someone that we knew too bad for you. But my whole thing is. This is called action. It's getting there getting there. But it's also called to win. This all gets shut down because I have no more money. That's why there's no more music rusty. Oh, his name's rusty. No rusty's the guy wants to know, why music college money drying out or they're the nights bathing. I just I just think when you try to us because improper shooter, apparently, I just think when you're trying to market yourself as a veteran company, especially if you're gauging with other veterans, you better standard. How about be a frigging man say if I'm gonna do do some more money do some work for it? Yeah. When his own employees coming like man, you got screwed like this guy's like. Yeah. Don't. Wow. Yeah. So they stopped all workers. So I'm trying to get parts. I don't care about the work right now. I want the supplies anyway. Well, that sucks. Yeah. So it's more than my Sally's better than yours about the Mckee Lewis. I just find that to be the what's the company a veteran homes remodeling veteran who modeling right down. And what's what seven named you read from anything vix is first name. I don't know. Do you understand the difference between right in your own words down and then reading I have -solutely just reading. I absolutely do. I absolutely do Leila's. But I didn't I didn't check your shit to make make sure it was in your world spill bureau. Her Mark on it. Okay. Are you into winter democratic presidential hopeful booty as that there's that he would away not gonna read it like that? And make it my own you should can't pronounce his guys name Budi, h art. So we've heard of the we were actually. Yeah. It's worded j. Wow. Did you read that? No a heard that'd be Fritsch today. Got to be anyways midwest. So a lot of people were saying this is one of the twenty-something candidates for, you know, the democrat democratic primary and they were very quickly. Like, this guy is perfect. Even the skeletons in his closet are singing his praises like this guy. He's like checks tons of the boxes. He's raising the both because he is clicking all their boxes. Like, he really is clicking them all Hayes. So anyways. So again, again, another one of the democratic primary hopefuls, and they're just gushing all over in pre seven years old too. So yesterday, but they did find something else or he preemptively came out. Who man it's not as I didn't meet one time. Are you? I'm making this my own hold on. In two thousand fifteen the phrase is being used right jokes dead. Let's go. All right. The press conference a hurry because we see them. So he held a press conference yesterday to apologize for the fact in two thousand fifteen he uttered, a pretty horrible and frankly racist phrase by stating that all lives matter. So he needed to hold a press conference to apologize to everyone. But I saying all lives matter back in two thousand fifteen he didn't understand the the ramifications the connotations, and that this was the anti but black lives asked to for the party. He's running for who has to play those for you. Get wider my man of the week. He does not have to own crowding frigging like desperately. Explain why my man he does not have to. I'm just if you press conference to apologize for saying three worlds that aren't controversial. That aren't give me give me up. Rake. Mike goodness. It's pretty. Just like him need checks one of those boxes. Pair of identical twins in Brazil named. I'm going to read this because they're different breezy. Oh, and for Nando. So apparently, we're read this gives her name's are different little hard for me to normally twins are named the same. Their name for names. I mean, they're different whatever you just you should just start reading. Yeah. We know Ben anyway. Don't pay attention women in Brazil. It's here it was pregnant and had baby girl by one of these twins. They she doesn't know which one they both had to take DNA tests, but they're identical twin so both came they both came back positive. Neither man would admit that they were father. So the judge ordered them both to pay child support. My sally. The week numb nation are no it's for breezy o or Federico is whichever brother is fucking his brother over, and I feel like once one of them gets are asked thoroughly kid, a judge or they because I love the both. I thought it was the both slept with her doesn't have any idea which one it was because apparently they gave a fake name or even if it was both of why wouldn't they just be like, you know, what you pay the child support. I'll say it's mind or whatever, and you just keep behalf and we'll call it even if they both slept with her like, they didn't mostly. One of the judge's order for the baby to be cut in half each one of them. And then only Biblically okay in Brazil, the cutting a bitch talking. Wasn't going story until they ruined. I'm not set. Was your story. I just think he'd say love it when he gets grumpy. I he thought we took the scores guys is the douchebag that's fucking his brother over, and they know who are. Yeah. And the other one knows who they both banged him. Now, you can think whatever you want. But that's not how the story goes. Did it say only one banger? Yeah. She doesn't know which one it was right? Well, if she only at sex one time, if it's one time, maybe twenty dating maybe I honestly thought at first when you were telling the story, I thought I'd like you're saying a threesome no like they were tricking her devil like they're getting government gum commercial trickier or she nearly just slept with both times time. Guys being in for a minute. They're both identical twins. Exactly the same. What did you say Brazilians? You know, I said it usually lasts longer than a minute. Brazilians last month. I like this. I like this reality the week because the one like you said, the one brother I want to be clear like it's only one. Yeah. Somebody's fucking the other over, and they both know who that person the argument of Sally of the week will have to say that she only slept with one of them one time one brother knows. He is absolutely the father and the one of them many times what what you're saying. Maybe they were trick fucking her. That's what we were thinking. I was thinking I thought you meant tomorrow, it's Martin. In that. How you get like when you go to college or classic movies have taught me anything when you have an identical twin you only have to only one of you goes to work only one of you goes to school. He's out being your friend. Moves. Face. That would be the strangest thing sexually it's ever happened. Not your sixty one year old mother having your aisles. A mainstream movie nothing. His or the. The chicken trick the other chick by pretending to have a dick. That's right. I mean, there's some weird stuff to surprise me saying, this is one of these guys that Sally. All right. I feel like whether he wins, and I feel like we should vote. Yeah. I think so. Kobe. Ben vote for yourself like always. Contractor. The I'm going with the contractor called veterans home remodeling. He'd sounds weird anyway, veterans hell, yeah. Voice where you retire? Yeah. Etching veterans home remodeling. I'm just thinking about it each time could be retired here. All right. It is true. I really wouldn't vote for Christmas, but in the show solidarity because this is a fact of whenever own, and we have a lot of local listeners. So we don't want to go with veterans home remodeling Vic, it's deuce Bank. I author my weight behind that. But I think it was good. Thanks. I think it was good to that was interesting. I trans- home. Well, that's why. Real dangerous. There's one of those things I dick blue eyed trying to find shit that hopefully, not a real says veterans over Molin come on, man. That's. Number one of your own. It's easy enough. Then here you go. So if any of you guys your bathroom done Christner vailable next weekend, we're going to need all that cash up won't be squirrel hunting. But you're gonna need to know where to send it on Twitter. If you wanna let us know about the money, send to add Taco Bell because o- on Facebook, man points podcast as well as Instagram and all those other hosts of social media sites. We aren't I tunes Stitcher. Google play tuned in radio on you. I see uncensored radio every Monday Wednesday and Friday, please check us out there. Whatever you're listening to us on right now. Please rate review of scribe, please go ahead and take however many stars. You think we deserve an ad five to them. You don't even have to necessarily write something. I know I really hard on this joss click on the stars dislike submit feedback. We're talking five seconds shorter than it. Takes a Brazilian in October chick. Or two four maybe to you never know on the Facebook page. We've actually got some cool, man point shirts stickers. Check that L help support the pond as I said, please rate review subscribed rate review. Subscribe to call leaves a message. You can't at seven five seven his nuts. That's H I S N T Z zoo or Zad for those overseas listeners, please just tell a friend tell an enemy tell a Brazilian jujitsu master just tell someone and now man Luik, Ben, Ben. You're right on the table. Guys, come to move. What do you got? This just make something up that we not reading anything make you just make it up. You put words, that's all you do it. We also text from my wife, Ben's wife man of the week. All right. All right. Rain into Santa's governor of Florida. Governor Florida is my nomination after good start. Yes. So of the Tim point seven million illegal immigrants. We have in the country seven hundred seventy five thousand of them are in Florida, which makes them the third most in the country who's counting, and he has decided that if his law enforcement officers do not cooperate with federal officers that they can be charged with a fine or jail time to crack down on the illegal immigrant crisis. Which is a real thing in my pigan. So way to stand up to these other guys did not a joke. Are they having a problem with the law enforcement officials, not and their son? I would've thought that whatever that said they would actually quit instead of asking somebody whether they will legal asking there, if you're able it's pretty easy driver license. Yes. Basically, what he's saying is that you do what you know, you're gonna pay the consequences for because it it really is a big deal. Well, there are some states where the governors are. But don't you dare. But I don't even think to ask for their papers. To keep it kind of saying some of it is literally if they get arrested you're gonna find out you know, what I mean? But does promise people are getting arrested related instead it's over to ice get a driver's, right? Where I get arrested. What you're going to know really what he's doing? Well, then you would rather than just arrest everybody that. No, no, no. I'm just saying you can't walk around and ask everybody will be your papers. Let me see your paper. You know what? I mean, there has to be engagement to to create probable cause pulled him over. If you get pulled over and you get a driver's license, and you are illegal. They got a dry it should show up. You know what I mean? Like, you're going to run that through assume they run my license system show up which should guessing they don't really what he's doing. He's telling us the state there are new sanctuary cities here. You know, what I mean, you guys will cooperate with ice? And all that. So you know, what's his name Ron Santa's? He's the governor of he is the governor Florida. They can get good. Ben. Echina- could end your eighteen year feel by rifles there? What? Governor having to do that L governor signed laws for the stadium over whether said that you can't make the laws, but he can be doing once he doesn't like good. It was it was his idea. Yeah. He literally brought that one up. Okay. That wasn't this. We show the fuckers. Can hold whatever. I wanna get anybody. Okay. This week. All right. I've an up kind of like, we're just gonna be weird. An update to to. I think really previous main of the week when we've had before. But I'll renominated again, that's Liz Smith. I think if you remember we talked about she's well, she's director of nursing at Franciscan children's hospital in Brighton Massachusetts that we had talked about her fostering child that was born to a freaking crackhead. I remember that mini there for five months ever visited the little girl. And she just it was just breaking her heart senior there, everyday all Milen. So she started fostering, or that's very long process to go through the whole adoption. But like I said so Liz took Giselle to was a little girl's name, and she's been fostering for her for the last five hundred thirty three days takes care of her like her. She's her own terrible name, by the way. Yeah. She well. She didn't crack, Ed. It's awesome. So she she just was able to officially adopter. It's her daughter now. So we brought her up. I it was I think a couple years ago when she just started fostering because the kid teen. Yeah. The kid was just sitting in there in the ICU for all those months now daughter, so she's been taking care of her. Then. I mean going on three I think it was forty five months. She didn't have a visitor somewhat that for five for five for five months. Located no visitor was five months. Yeah. It was crazy. So I guess we just want to bring them back up because she stuck with the process, man. Story scares me. It shouldn't make you feel a little bit better. You there's good people in the world. How you grow nurse. It works in the pick you full of fucking shit bags kit. Children that are left behind him beaten. That's well, it took her what two years to get to come home with any weird ideas. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. It's a lengthy. Still dealing with with things the kid earth affects. No, yes. Right. Born like the kid was addicted to heroin when when she worn she had a lot of health problems. A kid looks pretty decent though. Now like, I saw pictures like she does it looks like a happy normal kid. But yeah, there's definitely some. Health promise, you still has have a feeding tube. But they're slowly introducing solid food now. So yeah, it's going to be a process of moving story is this two good ones in room ending. Yeah. It is introduced us early daily minute by minute. Do pretty soon Zell will be able to actually eat a entire raw, squirrel. Say thank you. I tried to do was a professor. A figure professor eight. That's not a surprise anymore. Just professors have been author Roger for like the last. Right wing. Exactly this one of our guys. It's officer already talked about how crazy super right, right? He's the true, right, especially with squirrels. And that's good ticket. Or what you got? Bring mine I say the same thing. But I had Joe Biden. Because he spent he didn't speech today to an electrician union or whatever wrath. The baddie started joke on himself. He he like the organizer of the event and as soon as he got back into music to serve Renault's. I had permission to hug him like two wild approval laughter. That was funny. Yeah. Well, then you had kids he brought up to like, recognize them, their achievements. Like, whoa, Kizzie put his arm around on these shook San rooms like I also have permission to touch him. Would people started laughing again, I'm like, but he didn't have permission to touch says its way back, then we don't know. I think the seven people are sending information saying that still creepy motherfucker I'm saying it was mainly to me to be to just own it just like every making fun of me for this. Do you watch his apology video? A half about. Gordon was bad. The audi- was hoarse said this cast is better than what he said was. Motorola raised. What I mean? And then distributed like you're possibly going to run for the president hosted three megapixel fucking. And then he posted it to his mice space, and that's all the news pick that. Akron. Oh there. It is click on registry him it Mitch probably recording the same location. As soon as is in here right now. He's putting up after the biting incident. But I thought he said what he says, he's okay? I never intentionally disrespected anybody in my life. I feel sorry. If if they felt uncomfortable, Tennessee, Michael Jackson said, I'm mean apologize. That's right. If a big step for Chris if he is not a conservative. He's taking up for. I like the fact that I thought it was funny to that Biden may jokes. I did think that was funny. I mean, it's like what what else are you gonna do? You could be like I'm doing that in east playing. He's playing at the right playing exact underwrite for with a party. Yes. The right way to go. Because he's he's he's disarming the people who are I thought it was I Don I saw in the last couple of days. I'm like he's gonna frigates. You're hitting me the mainstream is on that side. Anyway, I don't think the mainstream is on Joe Biden sign outta here. No, I've been listening. If any even seeing 'em kinda hard, maybe. But it's because his own side is try to get him. Yes. They don't the democrat. But. But. I think they're gonna demonizing they would've conservative. Absolutely, no. But I think as I thought I didn't really expect him to win. And now that I heard the first two contributions thirds are an interesting thought between those that was pretty it's pretty mainly. All the Democrats running. He's probably the best op if I'm always ahead by ten point. Is he not though probably will vote for him in the primaries. Could she can? Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. And if I have no I'm gonna go for the one I wonder if they accidentally get primary. If if I could get when they will actually accidentally makes it on your best bet. No. But see that's not the way I vote in the primaries for them. You wanna get I'm gonna vote for whoever. I think Trump to be easiest. Yeah. But then that when accident wins that won't happen. Trump won't Lewis. Bernie Sanders won't lose to hear that all the time. But you never know you just don't ever heard. It was last election. I don't want to go Chris. But yet Trump's we got we'll get like two years for weird things to happen. Oh, I'm saying I'm saying as of today. Could happen weird. Hi, Marty comes behind him right now. What's that? He's got a good resume for his first term bind for his followers again before his true. Isn't that's where you've gotta be like there's still a group that's easy to Swain. That's the ones that make me nervous where it's not a big group. It's pretty damn well divided. That's so if you're keeping your baby, it's an Democrats are divided themselves up you had fit. That's a good thing. Yeah. Fifty percent is Trump and fifty percents democrat like forty nine forty nine. Where's that big group easily getting like forty nine forty? I forty four right? There's a group in Houston in the middle. It could sway it all the way though. Because though so tight that it can be if you if Trump keeps his base solid, though, it's going to be and the Democrats are totally his middle. Robbie twenty-five thirty percent that middle that you're describing is the middle. And if anyone other than Joe Biden is what I'm like. Like other than Joe Biden runs against Trump. Trump will be closer to the center, then whomever. He's going to close to the center than Bernie Sanders, Kamala, Harris or Elizabeth Warren. He went take interests. Like, I said before I don't I'm not worried about the Sanders. Sanders one. I don't think he could even come close. Yeah. Joe Biden kid, the one that would make me nervous is like a Kamala Harris because black female younger. I'm back. What do we draw the line on at Rachel those all have? Yes. Right. Yes. Right. She's black or no bomb. She's not KOMO hair's. Not shave. Come on shade. I think both parents are. Yeah. Hey, good job, though. No, Chris doesn't see color. See? That's right. We know jokes off, Mike. Black and white like literally, that's all he sees. A black and white movie. And if you're that white skin, I can't tell what you are care or husbands. Boy. I just think. Yeah. I just think that I really didn't think I think I think it would come to like with Obama, and like they get set youthful vote out that none of the other democrat candidates really gonna get that. I think it's funny though, most of the youthful vote that I see Bernie, which is all this. All this man in running. If if he wins. Also, it's her I don't think they'll follow Josue print me from wrong, the young ones with the least, right? Freezing standards. I mean giving fucking break. No way can vote that nowhere that worse. What the hell are we I don't know what you're going with that one? That's how it worked before. What's your nation? Joe biden. Let's wait a minute. What? He Joe Biden was yours. No. That was now. Like, I said it's kind of spiraled into a poet gab. That's what I was saying. Let's work already know where I'm going even with mine list myth. Yeah. I'm gonna Smith. Thank you, ever crackhead, baby. Man sticking to her guns. What's right when nobody else will not for sure you had it right off the bat, man. Right. If the Batman. Come on the picky nurse. That's that's you're so close. So close he was a really really good nominee down to come down. And is Ben gonna make it unanimous? Or is he going to vote for you're messing, Mike or Biden good? I can't be animated if you cut off by video. Been on the whole time. I don't care. Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. I'm going with the nurse. There. We go. Two two nine. Yeah. All right. So that was my backup in kissing. Anybody else had the governor? But it they. All right. I guess miss myth. You're the. Man of the week with that man up fix west shitter. You asshole Jesus Christ will send a couple of squirrels to hunt you down. Davy Crockett things stupid. Good job school was awesome on and on the squirrels due to it.

Chris rant Florida YouTube Joe Biden Sally Samsung Leland Joaquin Phoenix Russia Manley Facebook Europe Instagram Volusia Victoria taito American Eagle Nebraska Kurt Rachel dole
052019 Ace & TJ in 30

Ace and TJ

19:10 min | 1 year ago

052019 Ace & TJ in 30

"The. The market of Charlotte, North Carolina. This is the TJ and thirty podcast. Here's your host. TJ was in Florida over the weekend. And we have a story about an adventure that he went on in the city of Hollywood Florida, that's coming up in today's as and TJ thirty along with who has the coldest cold feet for their wedding. Let's get things started with TJ's story about a lottery winner. In theory. Yes, this woman in Florida. She's twenty seven her name is Carly. Harp st- harp st-. She won a million dollars in the Florida Florida Lottery and just the week before she had one hundred dollars. So she technically hit the lottery twice in two weeks. One for a million one for a hundred. And she talked about how great it was the money coming in at that time 'cause she permanent. Well, last week, she was among more than twenty suspects apprehended by police in a major drug bust. According to the reports doing, she's charged with solicitation to deliver heroin and unlawful use of a two way communication device and made her first court appearance Friday in connection with the case. So is this charged with solicitation to deliver? So yes, she she would have been the one on the sailing into that. If it turns out to be proven, okay question. She goes to court and gets convicted and she goes to prison. Does she still get the million dollars? She's already gotten it. Oh, okay. Yeah. This is what she did with the with the million dollars. They're saying is they she, you know, she tried to invest it into a business. I thought maybe this was from, they, they picked her up from before she got the billion. But I'll okay tragic. Yeah. Her lottery winnings. Hedmark an opportunity for her to turn her life around. She said she's had a criminal. She got a pretty intense criminal history of drug possession theft, contempt of court driving with his spended license all of that was in the story from the Miami here, but it's more than enough money for her to get herself set up for a great future. Come on the lottery was supposed to turn things around. But instead, she allegedly got involved with the operators of the extensive drug operation that pedaled in hair when fitting all and cooking, according to the Florida law. Wow enforcement. Authorities. She decided to go. I've got a million dollars. Now, let's go next level, with it. So the Volusia county sheriff, Mike Chitwood, I think made a brilliant statement here about the entire group of people arrested quote. These are not nice people. But never duplicated is the ace and TJ in thirty podcasts, I said, hey, look, we are in south Florida. We're just I mean, this is technically Miami where we are Miami is thirty minutes from from where we're sitting, you know, there have to be some of the top tattoo artists in the world, right here close to us. And I'll bet they're, they're tattoo shops, or so extravagant, and all they have the most realistic looking fake tattoos that we could get. Let's play a trick on people, and let's find the ones that, that are really that realistic looking, and let's get the date of the weekend tattooed on our reese's and say, some, you know, about whatever where we are that sort of thing. So how do you find that other than just Google in do you trust the internet's? So the, the lady who was our server at the place. We were sitting at the time had tattoos all over her. And they were good tattoos. So I said, let's ask her. She probably knows, so we asked her, and she didn't she wasn't much help or any because she had just moved to town. Her tattoos came from somewhere else. So she went and asked the manager and he came over and he goes. Yes, I've asked around and here is the name of the person. They say is the best. And because I didn't know Hinna tattoos. I thought they were just those red tattoos that go around your hand and loop around your finger and all that. I didn't know that they the fake tattoos that look like real ones are called Hinna as well. They're, they're in tattoos. So we didn't just trust him. My friend, Jenny got on the got on the internet and saw the high rating that this person had called her same person that he said, get high rating called her. Are you open today? This was yesterday. Yes. Told her where to come? We get in an Uber and it is about a thirty minute. Uber ride to where we're going the Uber drops us off outside these this huge parking lot that has a arm that swings down when the opens to let you into this thing. We realize because it's it looks like a full on festival going on that we have been dropped off at a farmers market, not just a farmer's market, like you see an irregular town this, we found out was the biggest farmers market in all of Florida. And it was crazy. And we think this cannot be where we're supposed to go for this, you know, extravagant tattoo. But we keep follow it. We followed the girls directions that she'd given on the phone, and we get in there. And there are all I guess, the, the building, we were in was the international building, because they're all kinds of different foods, being cooked and big giant smokers, and fish, my portable fish markets that they set up in his booth with giant refrigerators cases and a huge booth that only has olives. And it had every type of olive, you could imagine strewn about there, is it all indoors, this building housed all of this stuff, except, for some of the smoking smokers and all were outside of it. And there's loud music plan out of every booth. And there's not an American booth in any of it. That's all this international stuff. We walk inside, and there's nothing but fruits and vegetables, and all of this stuff. And my wife looks me, guess. Oh my God. I feel like I'm in taking. Where are we? So we get into this booth. Look for the number that she had told my friend Jenny on the phone, we look and his one girl sitting in there one woman, and she's got a tiny table and two chairs unfolded. She's behind a huge piece of plastic, like you'd see going into a freezer or something. And she has to come untied the she had clipped keep a close und- clip it, and let us in and set up little stools for us to sit on because it was so small for four people to be sitting in there. Clamps the thing back shut because she has portable air conditioners in, in her booth. And that's why we were in there. And we told her what we wanted was that we want to make. Was Ginny was wanting to fool her parents. And, and, you know, we were gonna mess with my kids, and we didn't even care. All right. If it's really cool. Looking at looks realistic. We'll keep it two weeks or how long it lasts and Ginny sits down I and the girl obviously had never just written words on somebody before. And she said write down what you want. Yeah. I do that. I can do that. And so she did it on Ginnie Ginnie stood up and showed us what it looked like in the genie's husband, Michael and Jodi nice that there and just looked at each other like, oh my God, we're not doing this. It looked like she just took a sharpie, and wrote five eighteen nineteen Hollywood Florida, but down wasn't the spec that was the the has off riding on it. And then, so then I said, we can't just leave her hang like we got it because now we just gotta make it funny. So I said, I'll do it. And then Jodi says, I'm sitting there and I'm going, how am I getting out of this and the next thing I hear when she's doing? He is. I hear her say, oh, I'm getting better at it. Oh, you're getting better. It used to be. Oh. So everybody get one. Yeah. Yeah. Reluctantly everybody. Got one and it looks like now that I've just been writing on my wrist with a pin terrible. It's not let me see. I could have written. Yeah, I could have printed that on your is just as I mean. Thirty as the coldest feet in the as in TJ radio family, that's next on the as and TJ and thirty podcast. Thirty odd cast. This is the TJ thirty podcast now on demand on ace and TJ dot com, TJ app or through I heart radio. Are you ready for everything and nothing all the time? Hey, it's as join me for my podcast ace, at large knew each Thursday at twelve noon through itunes and Google play. Looking for spectacular deals on spring break in summer travel, emailer travel, agent, Michelle at travel at ace, T dot com and follow ace, at large, on Twitter hashtag, as at large at Papa John's, we believe the best debates are pizza the bigs. That's why we're introducing the super Hawaiian five buffalo chicken pizzas, because the sweetest toppings, make things heated and spicing something pineapples belong on pizza. Coletta's suffer the heat of fiery buffalo sauce chicken on there, which cruel, you get all your people to get you can divide it aside right now, both pieces of just twelve bucks for plus editorial Pepsi better ingredients better. Papa John's at participating US stores, Texas delivery, fee extra. Never duplicate it. So we want to know who's got the coldest in the radio family. I'm two months away from my July wedding. Lately? I've been thinking about my ex and how it all went wrong. Ooh. I don't know if it's stress of the wedding, but I feel like I need to see him again. So we are having lunch this week. So I can see how I feel about him and what it feels like when I see him what feel like this, give me an idea of, of if it's worth going through with the wedding or if I should call. It all off. Everyone will be mad, but I don't know what to do. I do love my fiance, but I'm not sure he's the one there's a passion that is missing now that we've been together, almost three years is a good idea like. Not a good idea. So I don't know how this, how this works. But if you're a set to get mayor it in July and you cancel it is that when it costs all you don't get deposits back in other, what is that usually, the cutoff time for deposits, and all, I don't be the turn. I thought it was more than that, like, I thought deposit. I, I. Yeah, because it seems like if you have a venue, they've lost out, they're going to keep that money. And if you've got a if you've done food, proper, whatever that's the wrong term. But you gotta caters for whatever. Yeah, this is your deposit is rarely nowadays refundable, even just a cake. They haven't even started baking the cake yet in then three months, but things go pay, but things like a DJ or all that kind of stuff up there. Hey, we gave up a date for that. We can't get that date back where keeping them money. Mhm but she doesn't know once she meets up with the x. It'll be fine because then maybe she'll see like you know what I don't like this guy that much, right? When he comes riding up on his motorcycle looking rebel, like. There. And you know favorite song starts playing jukebox in the diner. She watches parking lot slinging his air in slow motion, I looking like Mario Lopez getting off of their Mario Lopez or somebody like that. I responding to be on the bachelorette. Responsibly guys said, if you're feeling like that you should go ahead and call it off. I'll look it's your two months out. At what July. Yeah. Roughly two months out. She could just be scared. This was just settle a write down a lot of people have been scared or freaked out about their wedding, and they settle right? Into everything. Be fun. I wanna know where she's agreeing to meet him like if it's in private, or if it's just at the local, you know, applebees in their town. I mean that's kinda scandalous if you're doing it in your town, somebody sees you. Good. Thinnest dip so. Nato kindle. Applebee's and get some light. We did for say I know you love that, you'll love it. I got a kid, some southwestern egg rolls. How about this? I want to. Yeah. That's chilly. Sorry. Sorry. Julius. This lady said, I wanna stay anonymous. But I got married in twenty fifteen and as the song started for me to walk down the aisle. Busted into tears. It looked at my dad and said, I do not think I should be doing this. God I did. Anyway, four months later. I was divorced four month. She goes there were so many red flags before marrying this guy that I should have known better. Did he? Pay for everything. Can't do it. Rascal Flatts song was already plays. Get them. List the broken road. Derwin. Star, welcome. We've already paid for this, you grab on them all, but we will get. Daddy needs Atlanta. Jason tires. Yes. The last conversation we have before the last break SAS just kept laughing to herself hysterically during the after we were already off the turn. The Mike off. We were just talking about, as girls, this woman who said that she was about to walk down the island, star crying telling her daddy that she didn't wanna do it. She got cold feet. So why are you still laughing? Because when we were talking about that Reagan's goes walk shoot a wall. And it reminded me of when I was just four years old doing a beauty pageant. I was terrified to hit the stage and I'm about to walk on my mom pulls pointed Taylor, my hair, whatever and just goes, you better walk. On that stage. Walk. Terrified of what to say on the stage. Introducing myself and I say my sister's name in fear. What's happening that word cots me everyday? Hi, I'm and then you gave the raw blank blank. Yeah, my sister's name. Like what? Let's not you. But all right. Good job next. Welcome wall. A moment wall. Combo. Wall. The pulling your hair, the same time on that stage four. The head dreams Miss America mama has spent money on that drip time into making her practice walking back today on that stage. Set your ipad. That's amazing where I could walk myself. Very I, I was one doesn't really count. The crown little ultrasound. T want to go to Dairy Queen after this pageant, then wall. You better walk now or most Bank your but you can't. Well, that's right. We would have Nick flurries afterwards, though. Oh, yeah. The orient flurries, only if you will. You won't make floor you gotta walk. And if you win and you get to sit in the back of the drug and Yale, I'm number one all the way to. But you don't then you're gonna be up in the cab with the rest of us 'cause you don't deserve to be back there. Because you didn't wall. We're your sisters in package, also my sister. Yeah. She was in the same pageant that day. We were different age groups, drew did that a lot growing up. Did you have? Get to use your sister's hand me down pageant close since she's older. No actually got a lot of new stuff, but we never kept them. We just rented out different gowns every pageant. Did you have a flipper? I did not. I never really needed one. Luckily, because when I was in, I didn't have any teeth missing actually have to wear something just clicked on my teach, but she was a baby. Wolch. We bought you a full set of teeth and your baby head. Cast is. Subscribe now to Acer TJ on demand now and I tunes.

Florida Florida Florida Lottery Jenny Google solicitation Miami Mike Chitwood Charlotte TJ radio North Carolina Carly Mario Lopez Ginny south Florida heroin Volusia county Acer Hinna Hinna Papa John
123: [Solo] Stop Multitasking While Listening During Critical Conversations on the TalentGrow Show with Halelly Azulay

The TalentGrow Show

13:03 min | 1 year ago

123: [Solo] Stop Multitasking While Listening During Critical Conversations on the TalentGrow Show with Halelly Azulay

"Welcome to the talent grow show where you can get actionable results. Oriented, insight and advice on how to take your leadership communication and people skills to the next level and become the kind of leader people want to follow. And now your host and leadership development, strategists Elali Zula talent growers. This is hilarious. I'm your leadership development strategist here at talent grow. And this is episode one hundred twenty three of the talent show a solo episode as you now about three times a month. I do an interview with someone very interesting to help you develop your leadership communication skills your career in general or yourself leadership skills and about once a month. I do a Selo episode where either I add sir question on an ask Kellyanne sewed, or I share something that is usually coming straight from one of my books. One of my blog posts, one of my workshops, one of my. Speaking engagements to help you grow. This example, came up recently in a workshop, and it's come up lots of times in the past. It comes up everywhere everywhere. I look I see examples of poor listening. But the problem is that when I gave some feedback to the woman in the workshop who was using this really poor listening behavior during a rope lay. I asked her, hey, are you aware of your behavior? And she said, yes, I am an I said, it's probably not gonna work quite as well this way. Why don't we tried? I thought she was just blowing off throw play, you know, sometimes people do that in a workshop, and she said, no, this is how the executives in my company behave, and I've learned to do to wo-. Definitely definitely not. Okay. And I wanted to share it with you. All right. So I'm going to share with you what she did. And why that is an example of for listening. We're gonna talk about some other examples of listening, and we're gonna talk about why it's important. So I hope that you ready, please listen to this episode. All right here, we go. So here's the seat. This is a communication skills workshop, and these are high-potential aspiring leaders in a very big organization one of the big consulting firms. These people have been targeted as future leaders of the organization and receive this additional training to help them build their communication skills. And we were talking about how to have the critical conversations that are often very difficult to have but super important, and as part of the workshop, we have trios that practice role playing if future station so that they can practice the new skills practice using the model that we go over in the workshop and practice getting some feedback about their communication skills. So it's about how you have the conversation the kinds of content that you have in the conversation. But also, very important. The how the how? How you conduct yourself during the conversation makes huge difference in how the information lands with the person, you're speaking with and that's one of the big messages of this workshop, so this woman who has already demonstrated herself to be definitely high achiever very motivated, very driven. Very smart. Just like most of these people are she was sitting in during a role play and looking at her phone and typing on her phone pretty much the whole time during the role play. So when I stopped by their trio as I kind of float around give feedback to the different trios that are concurrently having replace. I looked at her forbid just to make sure that I wasn't misinterpreting. What was going on? Maybe it wasn't her turn to role play. Maybe she had to take an important message or something. But no, she was interacting in the role play as if she was having an important conversation with someone in driving the conversation and at the same time. She was clicking on her phone. So I said are you aware that you're on your phone? And she said, oh, yes, I'm a multitasking. And I said so I'd love for you to role play as if this was real. So that it can be the most effective and she said, oh, I would do this. If it were real all of the executives in my company do this too. And we're really good at multitasking. So this is part of me developing leadership skills. I have to become good at multitasking. No, no. When you have an important conversation with someone you can't multitasking. So she wanted to argue about it, and I had to put my foot down. This is not okay behavior. But I do know that it happens. I know that you might be seeing examples from the role models that you're trying to emulate doing this. But it doesn't make it. Okay. It doesn't. Here's the problem. How does it make you feel if you're on the receiving end of having a conversation that's really important that has the potential of. Of creating a misunderstanding that has the potential of creating conflict that has some kind of an emotional undertone that has consequences to the relationship and important relationship at work at home wherever and you're on the receiving end of someone who seems to be multitasking as they speak to you. They're clicking on their computer or they're clicking on their phone or they just seem to be doing something else while you're talking. How does it feel? I'm sorry. There is no way that you can sell me on the fact that it feels good or that, you're indifferent. Some people try to say that. And maybe you're trying to build up skin. And maybe you're trying to shed the part of you that gets annoyed or offended, but I wanna tell you. It's normal for you to feel slighted, and you're not supposed to try to shed that. Well, okay, if everybody's doing it you have to figure out a way to deal with it. But what I really want you to hear from here is two wrongs. Don't make a right. I know your mom told you. This one's right. Just because other people might be doing it. It doesn't make it. Right. And I really don't want you to do it to others because this is not affective leadership. It is not affective communication skills. It is not affective listening. Not only does science show us over and over again in studies that people are not able to multitask on executive function skills. In other words, your brain actually cannot do a couple of different things that require executive function level participation of your brain. What it does? Is it tries to switch quickly between the two tasks. And then there is what is called switch costs which is twenty five to forty percent of your productivity goes to waste between trying to two different executive function things at the same time, aka multitasking and between doing one at a time of two things and finishing you actually finish less efficiently with less quality when. He tried to multitask. So stop it. You can't multitask. You can multitask, folding laundry and listening to a podcast. You can multitask listening to something important and doodling maybe but not really thinking deeply about something that somebody's saying and at the same time formulating an Email message to someone on your phone. You cannot do it your brain doesn't work that way, but beyond the actual content being potentially misinterpreted. Right. You may actually have problems in the reception of the information. You also have problems with the reception of the emotional information about the conversation because what you are communicating to the other person if you're trying to multitask, while listening is you are saying to them in effect. And I know that this may not be your intention, but intention an impact or not equal. You may be received as saying to them. You are not important enough talking to you is not important enough to receive on. Hundred percent of my attention, and whether or not they read that message from you consciously or not their subconscious is reading this message from you and this gets stored as part of the information about the relationship with you. And it does damage to the relationship because this person feels that you are making them less important than they think that they should be. And when you damage trust and damaged the closeness of the relationship, you are causing damage that will be there. The next time you need to talk to this person that will be there. The next time. They interpret a message from you that will be there when you try to deliver constructive feedback without offending them. That will be there when you need something from them, and they don't feel like they want to go out of their way because you have demonstrated to that something that is slighted or damaging to the trust between you so. I beseech you. I employ please. When you're listening, especially in important relationships, especially during important conversations, but in general, put the phone down and pay close attention make icon ttacked listen with your whole brain and your whole body. Listen, it will actually take less time to have that conversation than when you're trying to multitask, and it will make a huge positive impact on your relationship, or at least prevent causing a negative impact to the relationship that this kind of distracting listening can create. I feel like been on a soapbox. I don't know how this is received by you. And whether this is something you're experiencing I'd love to hear from you. But in general, just because people are doing it wrong. Does not make it suddenly, right? And you can't suddenly jump evolution in a short amount of time. Now that you are a manager. Now that you are a leader you can't suddenly shortcut. The Volusia Mary deep-seated ways of your brain as a human. So we can't ignore that stuff. We have to take it into consideration, keep it in mind and be smart strategic in how we communicate. So that we are creating the best chance of successful communication. So I wanted to share that with you today. And I hope that this is something that you'll practice going forward. Start noticing how do people pay attention to you? When you're talking to them. How are you paying attention to them when they're speaking to you before we wrap up I wanted to share with you. Short apple podcasts review that I've received the show has received. It's the new name I tunes, and it is where reviews make a big difference. Because when people are searching for new shows, and they just happen to discover this show based on a suggestion from the algorithm or based on a search by keyword, or because other people that they follow are also listening to it for whatever reason, they're usually going to go and look at the reviews to see hey is this good show to listen to. So leaving the shore view is something that is so helpful, and I really appreciate it. So this one came in from spunky misfit girl, that's kinda cute name. And she says the title of her review is super useful for leaders. And it goes like this Halley does a great job leading the conversation in a way that's useful in logical as well as enjoyable to listen to and she has incredible guests with a lot of. As them to share who might not be the ones you've already heard from elsewhere. I really appreciate this review spunky misfit girl. And I really appreciate you listening to the talent gresh show. And that you took the time to save these nice things and help other people choose to take a little bit of time when listen to this show and give it a chance. All right. You listener talent growers, please take the time and leave me a positive review. I will really be appreciative. And I can read it on the show. So I hope to see that from you. And this is it for another episode of the talent grow show. I'm highly Zula, your leadership development strategist here at talent grow. Thanks for listening. And until the next time make today great. Thanks for listening to the talent grow show where we help you develop your talent to become the kind of leader that people want to follow. For more information. Visit talent grow dot com.

executive Kellyanne Volusia apple Hundred percent forty percent
EP.26

Wednesdays at Nine

1:00:14 hr | 1 year ago

EP.26

"May everybody. Welcome to Wednesdays at nine Maxwell, Davidson and Thomas McGovern, gusto and. Lost count twenty seven. On right off the bat. I apologize for upload in the wrong episode. Yeah. Yeah. You don't know how that happened? I was. We had a couple of buddies and friends listeners, dude. Good good down. I enjoyed it again to the same. I don't want to listen to this one again. Yeah. But things are learning us. No. And hopefully, it's fixed if it's not. They should be. But you know. It should be. There were still stabbed. Tonight. I learned my lesson last week. The dragon the dragon. Yeah. The drank got me drag speaking of who watched the gosh out to the mountain. Hell, yeah. The rowden. You don't watch game of thrones. He was what about him? You just did there. None of the real right, right? In that episode. Little spoiler alert. Yeah. He stood next to the Queen. But what he's tight? Just generally. Yeah. He's on that show. He's a beast. I like the hound better. You know, what I realized that the hound is actually a big boy. Picture of him. Oh, you look at you over there your big job. If I saw my at a bar. You're a big boy you'll you'll he. What? I think he's just as big as always as the mountain yet. Do there's a picture on the mountains. There's a picture of the mountains. Ceram in they're hugging. And there the same height because their brothers in real life or they are now. I was gonna say I don't not see the resemblance at all. Who's your who's your favorite character? To me the hound really? He's just really cool is what about you the whole show. Yeah. I would say this whole he's a pretty bad the whole shebang. He's bad ass his big. He's a lot of lines. But you know, it's kinda fucked up face. So that's probably why they don't put in front of the camera a lot. Whoa. Which ones him on the left. Yes. Well, he's bake. It looks like a normal. Like, I would go house and be like, hey, you have any eggs, right? And then okay. So I'll fertilize them. And that's the holy to give you perspective on great. A love that one. He's the size of Spinks. American. I wish told me how big you was on his Instagram. But he's the guy who always picks up, those stones fears placing those strongman his strongman right eight time, he's Iceland. He's like eight times highs Lund's champ was a call eight times the same. He's two time Arnold classic champion five time. Europe's strongest men eight time Iceland's strongest men a lot of strong men born big I heard you say that in like oh Arnold. Classic is way better for ranking than Iceland's strongest, man. He's also, you know in all of Europe strongman like fuck, and I feel like you're full of a lot of strong men, dude. How strong do you have to be to have your own strongman named after you? You just got Scharzenegger things that you're talking about the stones. Yeah. I don't think I could even role one. And I think they throw frigging payroll beers over. Okay, or railings? What I call it a barrel of beer keg. Oh my God. Well, it's like those old school barrels. They put whiskey and wine. And I didn't even think a keg was a word at the moment. Upcoming over. I've got about twelve France bringing a barrel of beer. Bringing the Birla beer kinda park off. Do you one of those barrel? A beer one of those wooden spirits. We can put in it. That was so foreign to me, whatever it happens. You know, what I would do I'm foreign man, take it easy. So this is a Florida based podcast. Let's get back on the modem Florida. I've been you know, it's I love going to the keys fishing doing all that stuff. It. I never been to stilts Ville. Yeah. Either. It's it's Biscane bay. Yeah. It miami. Miami Dade County. They're not still living on it's on the edge of Biscayne think they are are they still living there. Did they have to evac while like, hey, guys? I'm not sure on that. Who's there was what? But in in nineteen thirty three crawfish. Eddie, dude. His name crawfish. Eddie crawfish Addy Walker. Eddie walker. But they come crawfish Eddie, Johnny's younger, brother. He built a shack on stilts above the water, and it was towards the end of the prohibition era to facilitate gambling. Yeah. Yeah. This is pretty tight you over the water and on land. We're going to cross that he's gonna play crap. Thank craps. And you know, these are hammered out smoking goal were monocle on stilts. How many stills probably down up in there, which was a time. So so the reason why they did it. Sorry. I got sidetracked. It was legal to gamble. One mile off shore. Hell, yeah. International water. So homeboy crawfish. Was selling Shetty plow beer from the shack and was known for dish. She called cello, which is a crop as child or you should Agadir. Nobody's crawfish chowder smoke a little dooby. And then you just chill out. He was catching crawfish run into the shack right there right out of the water. And then Thomas Grady is boy and Leo Edward to evade these fishing buddies built their own shack in nineteen thirty seven to like. Yeah, we'll build their own shack daddy's right next. So there were shipwreck innings and channel dredging, right? It brought a lot of people to the area and more shacks were built and more shacks built and some of the fishing clubs started, you know, gathering shacking up. The local newspaper called the area, the shacks and the shack colony shank, Colin in crawfish, crawfish, Eddie's. Original shack was destroyed. You by Lacey's hurricane king in the nineteen fifties dental twenty years. Wow. All right. P crawfish Eddie shot. Arpita Cropper's Eddie was Grady arbiture our so Larry Edward shouts out to crawfish deduction show south's to all the people of stills Ville shows outs. Shouts out. That's how Kevin Hart's. Shouts out. Shouts house to can. You just imagine though, being a little little not a fly on the wall. But being a little craftsh- underneath. Listen to what they're doing the probably mad party and over there. Oh, yeah. Others. I saw this memo of crawfish again interviewed, you know. And then I said hold up then no hot tub. Just. It'll just circle back. So it's off Key Biscayne. Yeah. Yes, call the shots are still there. I've seen plenty of videos from some of my friends who have gone up there. And I think so as far as like a band areas that and then on Key Biscayne, I think there's a old. Stadium that you could go to are the you talking about the aquarium, right? There's like tons of graffiti and shit yet. That's another spot. I wanna go that escaped spot. It is. It's a lot of skate magazines. Yeah. For sure it's all you can get on the roof. And isn't it wavy? Yeah. Yeah. Got Bleacher seating style. Yeah. I don't know if it's still there. But I'd like to do that. That'd be fun. I wanna go. I wanna go the shacks. And I wanna know what how do the pictures look cool. Yeah. The cool. But I wonder how that works. If those are individually own if they're you know owned by the state of Florida by the Dade County. Can you go there Miami Dade, you know, right? Can you go and camp on it because there is on the Everglades? You have those camping spots that are kind of on stilts. Yeah. Those are like Don thousand islands. Yeah. True in like Everglades national park. Right. So I wonder if it's something that you can go to anybody. You guys know dude, are you for real look at that shit. That's awesome. It's just like six sheds together. Yeah. Imagine what the inside looks like imagine what it smells like. And then you've got the duck underneath. You open that in humans gun, dude. That's tight. Damn. So this kid kind of rested April tents a week ago for trying to wrestling move on his principal. I size. No way. What happened? He just trying to fuck in. What is it called the move? And then five days later he was doing wrestling move on a fake alligator kid. Yeah. Really? Yeah. Cutler bay that was eighteen he's a curl. He's obsessed with that move. What's the move? Whatever you the the pimples. No, you go like grab their neck and you bring it dot com. Oh, yeah. Them right back there. Oh, I think that was a tombstone. What's it called Thomas? Undertaker mover say the name. He did apologize for the alligators. He's like a pool blow up our gator. No, no. It's it's one of those hard ones. It was like a. It was like a survey six hundred dollar alligator. Well depends valued at the AST. It. It looked like fiberglass or something it was pretty pretty smooth. He Agadir went flying when he did. And then he flipped it over and did the whole move. The gator was upside down, and he gave the three count. Boop. Boop. Boop nine. He won. That's awesome. He's bay Cutler bait years Miami. So that's a felony men. Anything over fifteen hundred boys in trouble. What a dummy. Yeah. Body slam fake alligator in a mall. It could have been easy. He could said got soaking wet. Oh, yeah. You took his shirt up. Do we did it into a fountain? It's have you ever been to that outside all floor. What's it called sawgrass the one PG now Miami, and it was just like an outside mall? So in the fountain. Yeah, they have like these these fake fountain things little rivers and should. So that's where it was that thing parents dump their kids in the fountains. That's oh, what do you put them in a little wicker basket float them down? They're sick. Jesus or David. Down the Nile Joseph Barpeta, Abraham Moses was in the basket Joseph carpenter, whatever Moses that's thinking about happy Passover. That'd be listeners. It's gonna be fun celebrating happy over to all the firstborn sons. What is Passover again -gratulations on? Jews Jewish guy. Congratulations on being passed over by the angel of death. Hit you hit this on the top whole the down. Yeah, you're supposed to put Wham blood on your front door. Are you not supposed to eat? I don't think. So I think you're supposed to should have been fasting. And then you pass over you break it because I know there is a line in the in the book tonight or we're doing a Friday night, but where you recline because you've ingested so much. That's my favorite part. Wait, that's part of the thing. You like okay now, go recline and says, and now we recline, and so everyone just kind of sits back and chills takes depressed and nap. Yeah. It's nice. No naps. No. No. No, no. I want one of those. That's pretty awesome. Yeah. But Publix is going crazy. You know this week it's busy weekend, Boca? Well, we we we do eggs. Eggs, Easter eggs. Oh sweet. You die 'em. Now. I don't have kids. So I don't do anything. But but you have a niece and nephew, right? My sister does has to worry about like hiding them in whatever they put inside of them, and this and that that's cool. Do the least drag hunt. That's fun. We make Easter bread. That's right. Happy to replace Easter bread. You take these eggs, you wrap them and read the and then you bake the bread in the what? It's pretty tradition. You've always done. Yeah. What you do with har- boiled eggs with the show. With this shell in their painted empty the out and they put the door around the edge. Eastern semi picture. I've never heard I've never heard of that before I'll break brings some next week. I'm looking forward to it. Sundays the Sunday. Yeah. Brixham Easter bread. I like that idea. Yeah. What you try to kill me? But he got bear for and I'm like rubbing my feet on the on the carpet. What's frankie? There's a screw spoken out. Man. Oh, yeah. That's what I was screwing this thing together. There's just six or seven of them into your feet. They're all in there in a tiny. Neat little. Let's your lives black. They blended in a lot of my feet. Rolling around. And I'm like, oh my God. That's dallas. I thought you say there's like a razor blade 'cause I missing is an exacto knife Callister in me, man. My favorite was that men. Would he heated up thing and get it all? Oh. Banal taps it. And I love that movie so much, and I hate like how people go back in like just like you so full or whatever. But he was the problem child. So he's trying to prove his worth to his family is a gang. Did he weirdo? It was fucking buck Nehru on those guys all except buzz. What a piece of shit, man. I honestly, I love the brother his brother. He's such a dick. I cannot go to New York City of Hamam to home alone two. Boy, remember, the talk. Boy. Oh, hell, yeah. I just never had either. Did you one damn right? Oh, yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Kotak Ord you. I'm watching that tonight. That's amazing brings back memories. Wanted one man. And then and then you got Donald Trump when they did the voice over, sir. Where's the whatever? The what does he ask? What does he at the hotel? Yeah. The bathroom and people people that the voice over and it's like right to the right and fuck around the pussy when Trump they had the recording from Trump. So that was pretty sweet I haven't seen that yet seen that a dub video. No, I want all my God. Yeah. Haven't either? You haven't seen that? No, excuse me, sir. Where's the front desk over to the right and buck around the post? God good. We're full or full. Putting it can't come in here. We're full country is full. Oh, man when you're at Publix, do you put the divider after your items when you put it on the belt if there's somebody right behind me? And I end they're like, it's after work your public. There's other people there. Yeah. So the person. Yeah, he to a lot of people don't do it. Because I well depends on much. I, you know, like, obviously interest me crazy five twenty pieces, ten pieces real quick. I usually talk. I'll be like. And I try to very familiar sounding which probably just ends up sounding so creepy. But I'm like, hey, let's go start yours. You know, put it down and be like, let's go like like get going lady. Yeah. Here. I'll put the thing down. So you can commence putting your put your stuff down. You want me to do? Look. I put down. No, this Barr says my over you're making it weird. No put yours on so stuff. The public that I go to. Has a bad guy bag, not bad guy, a bad guy, who's a little slow, you know? And I feel like it's awesome. They do that they hire. You know, they they give discriminate and he's like probably I would say maybe like fifty and he's like, the the nicest guy, he'll always wants to walk out to the car with me and just wants to talk. You know, like, hey, one time he was like the guy firm me. He was a he was asking the guy. Do you live alone? Who do you live with you deliver your parents, you have a girlfriend or do you have a wife, you know, like like answering people out of the spots like they're they're talking. And then the other day was there, and he's like have you been to Brickell on like Brickell Miami? He's like, yeah. Has Brickell is this area right here in Delray like which is your public the one on federal hill. So I was like. You know, it's Miami. So it was very different than there. Well, why why why are you going there for he's not walk around Brickell? I heard Broncos cool is good, nightlife. Yeah, he's going off with something that he watched or her. Yeah. Yeah. Bagher must hear bag of mustard. Would know what you're saying things. A Bagger must hear most here must here must hear the kinda shit idir who's Agar Bagger. I was. No, I did not. Oh, man all day. You know what? I understood was the things that Agar stirred. Well, we had sausages for dinner. So you're on the mustard train. I'm thinking the mustard the frigging mustard steer. What is it from from Trump proposed or like the mustard fuck, what are they called? Philadelphia Collins, the muster lion. The muster. I don't know. I can't again remember Philadelphia calling. Shouts out to Phil. Philadelphia. Collins, I forget what they call the BUSTER muster something. I fuck I can hear them chanting it you mustard. Fuck. All right guys talk about something else. Because I'm gonna I'm gonna lose about your car, Tom. What do you do cart? When you're done usually on the curb. You bring it in his collection of everything with the cart be to try to try to bring it more. But I'm so rarely with the cart these the muster tiger tiger. I was thinking peanut butter and Jay. So you bring it in every time, Tom usually with the little basket. Good call true. Where do you put that thing? I throw the Bush. Why would you walk out of the room? Drive and just being I'm done. Fuck like bubbles now what? Every time I have to walk the car back. I feel like karma on my side of the chip on my shoulder. Karma sane. Get things are coming. Maybe you won't get flat tire tomorrow. Right. I feel like literally as a walk in the car back sick this into. It feels great though. I feel like literally God's looking down on me saying my shepherd, you're doing good. I mean, I wouldn't wanna walk around in the heat collecting those. Yeah. I guess I mean, nobody does. But. Yeah. You gotta Julian jingle right there. Guys, Julian glass. I didn't mind the cartoon. I could only do spurts the trailer park, boys cartoon. Okay. So sorry watching. I like. What's his name fucking ran into the brick wall? Jakup? Yeah. Or they're like, I don't know. If you watch the Tom now now, they are in a cartoon. So they start by explaining it like the eight four pounds of mushrooms. So now what they're so fucked up that they're just seeing cartoon world and we're cartoons. Everybody else. Maybe they are normal everyday life. So it's legit. Just a cartoon version of the trapezoid. Right, right. It's pretty cool. I I I was very opposed to 'cause I I was a comment. Yeah. It just came out. But it's drew. I don't know. It's pretty cool though. You know, it's kind of like Brickell berry. I enjoyed it. I just took a really deep. Right. But we should watch it again. Let's watch it again, which won the trope purpose. Yeah. I'm gonna watch it. I always watch it every day. I'd watch it again deaf. Did you guys know that there's this place in the Lucia county? First of all, I love love it. But lose county. Is that like Saint port St. Lucie up north? So for people that don't know. Yeah. Volusia county is kinda like northern Florida treasure calling the no no belugas on the east. It's. Yeah. I don't know. Exactly. I gave you the coordinates. I give you who was founded by George Colby, but son of ever know. So so scallions yet. Okay. So this is a crazy thing. This is what Florida. So there's a Florida shit. The pops up nowadays people Florida, man, Florida this, but this is old history. And this is things are part of Florida are pretty insane. So is in Volusia county, it's called DACA. I don't know if you pronouncing like that or is CA S ADHD. So the data, right? It's it's not Talladega. Talladega. Get I call it. Casa Dauga has died. So Kesse dagga, which is Indian were meaning water beneath rocks. Dauga a done. Two Indian oh also dog. Yeah. Sorry. Also data is a small unincorporated community. Located in Volusia county in the United States just north of Deltona. Okay. Which is I guess near Daytona halfway inbetween Delray and Dona. Yeah. And it is and it's special. Listen, it is specially known for having the largest number of psychics in mediums. In the world. No way, it is called the psychic capital of the world chips. Dude. Volusia Downey, it's called the cassa dagga spirituous camp spirit. What spiritualists ritualised camp it? You know, when it was founded guest, my right guess nineteen thirty three to my left eighteen ninety and we got up winner. Eighteen seventy five. Oh. Good. Eighteen eighty. Holy they ordered. While there has been a soccer here in a hundred and forty years. It was it was originally founded in pike New York, which Thomas very familiar with New York by. Yeah. And it was trout. So, but this guy Colby, whatever George Colby bass. And they traveled dude. So they traveled the entire country horse and buggy looking for the the sheer bliss of spiritualism, and they decided that cassa Dag in Volusia county, Florida, actually, I guess is actually cuss a dog is a city in New York. And then they renamed that which is in Volusia county. Okay, and Yemen. So it's literally just a bunch of frigging mediums and psychics. And this is were actually miss Cleo was born in that, really. No, I. Oh god. I got you pal yet nights work. Very good something, I always tell you, man. Her office was down here. You get me. I'm gonna get you back. We expect them to maximum pinch. My nipple punch me in the face. Punching a dead arm or one of those pinches behind the. Yeah. Yeah. And then and then I. Oh, he's okay. Give me give me back right now. And I said, no, I'm gonna get you back in three weeks. Just when you least expecting it'll be a year. Go by. That was our Faulk like in the middle of the batch of got you back. Like. Was that what time do you? You're talking about that. Once I reminds me of when I was living with you. And I was sleeping in. So you go from the living room, right? You go into the hallways. The first room the sonogram tunnel, though tunnel econom- closed in tunnels house tunnels hallway. So you go straight into the bedroom. Your bedroom is to the left your parents was to the right. Yes, I was sleeping and I woke up to the door closing is in the middle of the night. And there's a beanbag chair in the room. And I was like what is that some kind of groggy? Fucking Gaston stands up. Scared. The fuck outta me. Sure. Member freaking the fuck out be bagged here. I guess hiding behind it. You don't remember that? Was it? Early. I was passed out. Why did I do it? Just sick. Awesome. Sick. I never got you back for that. One. Get home tonight and be there. Do that man. I love gin scared. It's so much. It's so back in high school. I remember when we would I I didn't do it myself. I remember that thing that people would do the they were like faint. Yeah. Oh where you hold your neck. Yeah. Yeah. I don't I don't like I was like I think it was like maybe just outside our era, and it was just right one year ahead of us because my brother and his friends would do it. Really? Yeah. So you will go down you go. Okay. Takes thirty breaths quick. Who sitting you like your hunch over doing all these pretty much trying to get yourself light head and then go go against the wall. And then you like boom, plop yourself against the wall. One of your friends would go and just push with the diamond shaped like trust push against your chest until you pass out. Just. I wish I know my brother my brother's listening right now, he's at his house. This is what it was called. This is what it was called in forget what it was called. It's called a good night. It was like an allusion tomorrow luminary Lou Lou illusion Nadi, I never did it either. I saw some do it. I watched to get done a few times. You did. I remember the first time summer camp what we're doing camp like middle middle school. What was the summer camp? I don't know. It's just like a normal was coke has a dog. We were doing it Rocco's house. You did. I I didn't do it. I just like this. But it didn't do it frayed. I remember we did it to Holden. And he like fell four or all you fall. And we let them fall. We didn't catch. No, no. I was like watching it was like observing, but you felt his hand like hit the ground in front of his face. And he like, you know, cut himself with his. Yeah. Yeah. No landed on his hand. They would do it at our at at my house where we lived with my parents, my brothers stupid thing to do. I know what they did it. They did it to this one kid, and then and then they turned up on the lights. Right. So he pulls out. So when he woke up that was the role, quiet dead, and they all turn all the lights and the kid was freaking out like magin, you know, like holy shit. Where am I what is this? What what the hell? Did you brother tell you that story through fucking glass with each phone on each end of it? Jesus in Java. Nobody my dad caught him doing it. And I think he'd beat the shit out of them or like close to it. Yeah. Could see what are you stupid? No more choking passing. He literally walked in as one of them was like fainting. Like, he was what imagine as a parent. You look what is this trend? What are you eating tide pods? What are you doing? Are you passing each other out have a video we did too? I didn't do it. But this kid to Georgia's marina recently, just do they bring it back track a year ago. He did a standing up guy choked him up from the back like that the kind of crack of his back and passed out right there on the bar. So there's got to be what is what's I don't know. Maybe people get fucking weird about it can't do drugs anymore. So they I think he's still does drugs and just passes himself out. It's weird wanna knock me off of five dollars. Yeah. I live for the rush. Dallas you've been Vegas guy, kicked me in the nuts. Ten dollars. Yes. I've seen him on YouTube. He's still there when I was there last he was there. And I was like. People must get tired of kicking him in the nuts. I feel like I guess, but there's probably always somebody that wants to kick someone in the nut. I never forget one time with God rollerblades on in this one kid. He was a pastor son kid said, oh, yeah. I'd do. That yet. Kick me nuts nuts. I don't care architect. And I was like, dude, I'm not gonna kick you in the nuts. I got the worst kick did. And I had rollerblades on. And I kicked him in the nuts with a point of the the toe on. And I still right now. Get a weird feeling in my lower loans. Bloom. Affiliate. You sacked him. Dude. I remember I remember feeling with my my rollerblade wheel crushing and pop in a ball. Oh played it off. But I'm pretty sure I gotta look him up on Facebook CV CVS as nuts once EVS kids. Well, that I mean, even not fucking screaming crying. One time Hugh same thing, he we all were in Orlando at Universal Studios and those really thick. There's really thick railings the entrance of of universal. And then that you can climb up the saying like ten feet away kind of he jumped straight from their open his legs and landed on his nuts like Iraq himself on it on Perm. Now is this the one those younger than us? Now, he was older older. Boy. Yeah. That's crazy. Sick people six racted those the world's getting rack fuck. Yeah. The one time remember that guy has nut split open and his ball sack was out. No on at a ledge ledge, one of those ledges, probably the Fort Lauderdale museum knows your motto and congress does one of the churches, no right across from Wendy gas station, marble ledge. Marble ledges? I think the guy's name was Tom. Actually, he was tall. He was up squire and all those guys and guy went to do this one grind and his legs split. I think we. Ripped a sack open locked here and hurts bad welcome. The weeds. Do you? Remember when robbers jumped at stair gap straightforward like, not straight nothing. Fourteen fifteen stare. It was huge huge. He he landed with his physics, friends like. Sick. Hell ya. What did he do when he landed think celebrated just one of these little like like after Tom Cruise one the volleyball at he did that at the marble ledges? Yeah. It was the stairs. A back end the parking garage from the upstairs to the level. Yeah. Yeah. Straight a height obstacle at the end. No, you're thinking of the they had ones that would go into the parking garage and a little six this was out second-story nothing holding you back on the back area. And you would just jump at roof to ground. But actually, I think it was it was I was topped to street because there was a piece of like sidewalk he cleared that to shout out to my boy rock. Yeah. Always drives gaps man sick. He had these special frames back in the day. That had suspensions them the recall physics. Yeah. They had a suspension system little frame. So like. Is that the dumbest shit you've ever heard think about how much absorption can you have on not? I mean when you're going fifteen feet down any bit helps. Yes, there's some give you know, tell that to the poor course. True, pork for corps. Command does a fund set. Yeah. Man. Let's rap also office this comedian Office Depot rail that was my ultimate favorite real. That wasn't really a skateboard spot for it. There you go into the Tito's over those can't hear Tito's Tudoz Weadock this. That was so funny man, never listen to that commercial ever. I've never heard it before once. Well sucks dude because you're missing Tina back. Yeah. So anyways, that's all I have for you. Guys. Wanna go home? See you guys later. All right. Shadow to the Salen. Shout hours Ellen. I ended up there last weekend show to the jukebox. I wanna end up tonight. So, you know, show the back patio folks, I know who's ever played the new ring game. No, all you guys up. People listening. I can never do it with regular, you know, like just with your hand. And then somebody one time one of the bars Tommy like put in your ear dude in like an stretch out the line and let it go. And let it pop I do that. And I do sometimes on the first try sometimes the third try. And year. Do. Yeah. And I only do the people looking like, wow. You're a pro. And it's like, dude fool you. I cannot do with my hand. It's tough. It's. I guess you kind of level with it. You know, but it just walked back art with that. And just what how what pal about. So it's something about your face. It's really awesome. And I like I like throwing that that's a fun game to what's the one on the beach redner to beach the bar on the intercoastal on the beach on the on the trickle stool to Georgia's no key line. That's my favorite ring game. I say that's my favorite bar. I'm going to say. It's a good one. I love that key ring game spot right on the water. You got a great view. I just love big screened in the ocean. Yeah. Oh, man. So we were talking earlier about cool words that we like you remember the one. I don't I totally forgot it. Oh, yep. Oddities? Oddities? I still don't really know what that means. I think it's like. So like, I'm trying to think of an example, odd. No. But like somebody knows Napoleon's penis, right? Is a real thing. Somebody has those we. Yeah, it's an oddity to collect it. Right. It's like a shrunken head pull his penis. You know that it's on someone's desk. So it's like a goat bride like a bride wearing a goat's head. Yes. That's an oddity in the people, you know, your hair. It's like a like a curious treasure Napoleon's peanuts like the flute so glass eyeball. Yeah. But like warned by Jetta labor, if it was like Galileo's glass, I have like a cult fall. Okay. You know, what I'm gonna look this up because I don't know if I believe much of your stuff, there's a really cool shop in Brooklyn called mcgovern's auditees, stop it. Yeah. They have top hats, all like TOMS canes, or that was actually. Rate. I love it. You put oddities in Google and nothing comes up like like the used to be. Oh, yeah. There was a show those show Abe zodda sees there was a show or those video game. I think no. So anyways. So what I wanted to say about of these is that there is a world renown oddities. It's called. Carmine oddities boutique is in Orlando Florida world renowned. I'll I'm going. Next time. It was on I drive next Ripley's. Upside actual skill. It's on orange blossom trail, OBT OBT. That's where you go to get some weed in a forty. Oh, gee, okay. So on oddities odder remarkable unusual person thing or event equality of being odd. Okay. So I guess okay. It doesn't have to belong to somebody famous or old or whatever it's just an odd thing. Oh, wow. Glass islets odd what she sheep's head. That's old like that haunted thing and key west the robber dole. Okay. So that's an auditing for chefs. Okay. Okay. Now in no issues, that's not of these unusual. If I found that. An alien alienate like an alien like edges scheduling pocket. Yeah. Analogy. Like an alien cell phone like if you like punch alien took its phone, Audrain snus eight base oddity. Spotted e. So it's in Orlando our goal Carmine car mines how big is it. How many square feet it fifty five thousand keys fucking serious. Of with us pretty small. I would've loved to got into your brain opened a little door. And when I say fifty five thousand your brain. Like, so many oddities. Was there for days? As like nine hundred square feet. That's still fifty five thousand we were both like, okay, cool. Yeah. Bigly. I wanna sit. Aye. These guys are very bad with numbers measurements or be. They've seen bigger oddity places. Now, that's the world renown. Yeah. I mean, listen, whatever whoever pages person to talk about this Cabrini, the Brown is. But yeah, we'll love to go there one day. Yeah. I think we should. So like, our friend, Nathan's hair will be an oddity because it's rare right because all. Rare. And he's lives there in Orlando. Nate know, you're not listening combines Nate. But I wish you were go to common maybe combines. But it was she were we'll get a slice of Joe's after let's get a couple of. A couple of Joe you guys want to get some slices after this tonight. We had the saucers as an appetizer absence hurts baby. Let's take a walk on the street. We'll have a couple of sizes for for our listeners tonight. Thomas has ingested four full sauce free. No four four. You had four dude had three I said I had to. I saw I saw you eat four at once list. Tons of mustard. Why do you think I want to get some pizzas Maxwell had three and I had to feel like a bit like one there's eight six eight. But those were not my favorite men. I like boss guy. Really? Yeah. I think it's the casing that. I enjoy better have a snap actually shot out to my board nine. Yeah. Acme casings the best. Azmy adnia casings dot com. No, I wanna give a shout out to Dan from from swagger who who's a previous guest of our. Because I I saw that he was talking about Pakistan. Ian hamburger, he's a pack burger from pops. And those do what the hell's outside on on Instagram. That sounds good. He said he's in Pakistan. We make burgers with tons of onions and chillies cheerless lease to Liz. And they put him in them, you know, and they make it pretty much into. It's a it's a round kebab like a large picture right with onions and the peppers and the chilis and all this stuff. And then they just up. And then make it into a bird. So it was like school as a. Pakistan. I probably go over there and eat those all the time as long as they got good sauces. Oh, you know, they do real good sauce. There's probably delicious yogurt where your ranch belt. And then what's? Fucking chicken you bring round wrench pouches, and like have them in your jacket that Haueter the dry powder. I'm. Has for table water and make it right? Astronauts pace. As with your own saliva, Sarah. I fuck with wet sauce. Dry dry rub on about who's laughing. Was that just? Is a riot. If he's like, it's just yeah. Florida's full of freshwater springs, dude. There is heavy watched our planet fresh off the edge. On netflix. I know max has been watched episode one with my mom keep watching because we made it Florida made a baby what's it called our planet? They do county. No, definitely not. But in the freshwater episode. They talk about Everglades. We're have the most springs of anywhere in the world. Wow. Florida more than Colorado. Demi. Yeah. What do you? That is bullshit, dude. What would it be more than Colorado Arsehole freshwater springs now? There's only a Hugh seventy seven degrees year round. I'm just joking. There's only a few. Manatees? That's what they're really talking about the mandates and the mangroves is pretty tight. I'll stoke though, David Attenborough talking about us. You know? Guy kind of weird. I was at burger joint, you know, one of these ten dollar burger joints who. And this guy was aren't played about the straw got. Because it was paper and got soggy. How was he drinking drink for the lid on drink? I don't I don't even put lids or straws anymore. Yeah. And he's making a big deal. And that she's like we have straws for the shakes. We so plastic charge for the shakes because two people complained about the paper Shaw's shake shack. And it was like such an issue. Anyway, we sell them. No. We have the weekend. But she was like, it's an oversize straw. It's for the shakes. But we do have a plastic straws just huge. You don't want your soda ways. A she's like we have them because people he's couple ended. We said it's such an inconvenience for these people just like you just drink it without a straw. At all just put the Cup up to your lips. It's a paper, and you don't even need a top. Mike it saves the top just leave the top on that little rack for someone else to decide to either us or maybe pass by also or abuse. But like for some people to complain we didn't straw, like reels where are all the real straws goalie? Like a milkshake door straw, get food. Yeah. That's how I like to enjoy to you. You wanna see how good your suck sucking skills are not no home, get a frosty straw, stead me and my wife right before we moved out. Sorry. And we both sat trying to be like, no, we don't use boot. We don't need to spoon. And I was literally like you do that. Try try for fun one time this straw collapse on thousands of times you have to take it out and blow into it back back. And then eventually it just fails. It just gets to Lucy. Yeah. Just collapses for good. And then you're done your toes. You dan's. Oh, dude. So, you know, one thing that really grinds my gears, dude. No when somebody for example, in my business, and you know, we'll come in to see you into a store right to see something specifically that brand not like it just happened. It's a steno store you walk in here because you wanted to now because you happen to their. Upon it. Going to vans store that was only event store. It was not at the mall just walked into because you were bored. It was right there. It's own building. You go in there and say like this. I wanna see this. I wanna see that. Phone rings or some picks it up the client, right? And just sits in front of you. And just talks for ten fifteen minutes about like, also what anyways what's up with you? What are you up front of me? Does that we do with? No, I wouldn't pick up the phone, right? And then and then you sitting there in front of this guy like. I'm listening to you. I don't want to you came in here. I'm gonna put this stuff away. Let me know when you're red. And that's what I do, you know, and I go, and I, but it's just last year for him. Yeah. Go called you'd go. But go outside do go out. Go get a coffee read. This is a small store. You know what? I mean. It's a weird people do that. Yeah. Why are they so comfortable, right? Like, I just just it's like a faux pas, it's socially. They're not picking up on that the dynamic there. Just missing that whole read the book and room. Right. Read the room read the room. What does that mean? Check out your surroundings. Right. What is acceptable behavior? What is like, hey, this was this completely silent before you got in your? Yeah. The music playing. Coming here answering phone calls take that shit outside. Yeah. I like that. Yeah. Read the room have sorry. I gotta take this. Go for it. Go for men hero buzz you out. I'll walk. You out myself partial, let me hold the door like again to Publix when people are on the phone at the register. Hale call you right back. Yes. Yes. Pay get your stuff done. You know, like they say Hello. How are you? Yeah. Is that what you did to call you back? I'm still waiting for the call hasn't called you. You know, I've been meaning to tell you that today, but not calm seating a pizza when I called you a critical moment to get it into the oven. Speaking of pizza couple slices slice. Couple. We'll get we'll get a large. One large pie cut it. Now, we'll have it on the Trump or stand out there. Okay. That's what you like big body chill. Now front of the liquor store. The sons of Delray Beach. Have you ever gone to that barfly world? Whatever the hell it is. You know that places have been open since the eight really like nineteen eighty eight. You think there's any of the family members of the first cast of butterflies possible their kids, I think is a possibility. But it is like something out of a dream, dude. You know what? I mean. Yeah. It's it's I see it from the turnpike. Really? Yeah. It's coconut creek off sample, right? I mean, it is is Coca Cola what you'll call it. And I'll call it what I'll call is it outdoors. I mean, what most people call is coconut cream? It has like a domes. It's awful sample road in coconut creek, Florida. You call it three three seven three with their phone number. Well, I said off sample I call sample a little something different coming. Call it Deerfield. Yes. Started by this guy Clive and I kinda wanted need my son that that's a good name. Hey, clive. How about hey clove? Clue. Now because my son would be named clue and he daddy. Monday, chapel Chapo China to Chapo tonight. Yeah. What about others kid chapel, Betty Natalie? I think he's doing good looking forward to visiting seeing him soon. Joppa, I'm waiting for his baptism when when's that whenever they tell me they got a date. They think they might nice if they work I realize to get a check with the priest have a kit. I don't I don't think I'm gonna get baptized. Did you your own baptism? How does that? You guys. Are you guys on that? I wasn't while you're Jewish so okay. But I wasn't Burma's would. So then you're just me baby. Like a Ken. Were you baptized? I was commuting the holy. Fedral spirit Ashanti spiritus. So I did that too. Yeah. I got baptize. And then you re the what's it called? Holy reunion called. What's the look at me? Communion. I like that reuniting with God after your baptized. Yeah. I I wouldn't stress the issue in my life. You know in the future. If I have a child, I can see it going either way. I maybe doing it. But also like not really lose sleep over it. Yeah. By that point in my life. I might even be more just like, you know, what I'm actually gonna stay away from all like organized crime. And just. Yeah. Just kinda just focus on the. Being person. Yeah. That's good point. What's the benefit of being baptized this year? Like, you don't go to hell into fairytale or doesn't mean anything to you have the ability to get into heaven. Right. Yeah. Do like these you can get baptized later on us. Don't believe in heaven hill. They don't know where do you go do? Me personally. Just I what about and then it's just nothing. Well, I'd like to think that we come back like reincarnation. Now, you definitely go somewhere cool man like share traveling. I dunno mental even a nice paradise. I believe you go into Frikkie other dimension men. I this is a dimension. Everyone's there this is the dimension that you can experience with this. Right. Look down yourself look down your body. Right. This is a dimension. That this is what this is. This is the dimension. When you leave this. There might be other you go into another dimension. That is not even you can't even. Fathom. What that dimension is like the different reality. What if it's not? Done. But yeah. But also think about think about the billions and millions and bazillions of things that are are in the universe that we have nothing that we don't know anything about. Yeah. I think about that. But also, I also think about like, you we could just be a very low scale organism in this world. And there's things that are way more dab to in this like they are hundred thousand times stronger smarter in two hundred fifty years. We're not even living on another planet. Right. Technology has been around for quite a while that we know that we take a long time just to get a fucking computer in our pocket. It's great. Don't get me wrong. That's credible. Fifteen hundred years to advance technology in imagine if there are in another planet in another planet. They've already got a head start in another planet. They're already fifteen hundred years ahead. I mean, and they're already advance. And that's why sometimes I like to drop in the bucket in look at the good off in the book one time, even in the history of this planet four billion years at anyone time civilization could have grown and fallen away to nothing absolutely completely without a trace back again. How like how many versions of the dinosaurs getting hit with an asteroid? Have there been? Yeah. Right. How many couple hundred million year lifecycles? Have it's endless dude is turning. It is you know, like if we if we can destroy the planet in let's just say twenty two hundred years from like humans existence, right, right? Twenty two hundred give the gases TIME TO REVEAL and just. Restart. Yep. Exactly one quick ice age wrap. It blow it out start over really thick and boggy and. Have you ever watched those L the level those things about time travelers on YouTube like they say they are from the. And they come to us the guy with the glasses in Kennedy's pictures. No, I watched this video of this one kid who to Wednesdays at night. He said. The greatest president of all time going to be Muhammed lease daughter. One one of them. And like he's saying that he's from the future. He's like from twenty something. And he's a on the future or color, palettes, only black and white. We all have chips. The X Ray them here. Chip in his hand. They showed the x Ray. And all this bullshit. I don't know dunno pallets or black and white only black people only wear it like as far as fashion and people only were black and white. That's not. I don't know. But actually funny thing is I went to vintage. Because I have my car. Sometimes I follow some of these charts. Do they kick you out? No, it was a huge, dude. It was it was a vintage market, and they were selling t shirts. I know how much hundreds fucking crazy. I heard this hundreds of dollars shirt one of the shirts. Can I tell you? What you first of all that's not vintage is stupid. You're stupid. Get outta my face nineteen ninety was rousing Ashley Simpson. Oh, no. I swear. I was one hundred twenty bucks where was this at the g in Delray hundred twenty dollar tee-shirt. Yes. Rela ones like Harley Davidson ones, get the fuck. Yeah. And then I went on EBay and final those toll dollars. Yeah. Who was running this? How many people were watching people a bunch of people a bunch of people fucking. There was still in vintage classes like vintage frames. Vintage this vintage that. I mean, it was cool. I went there and hung out how nice beer Sunday hot. Is. There. Were those cool pictures were. Yeah. Yeah. No, no. Those were Johnny mangoes cool pictures. What's drive? There's no park, and there was a Delray fair more. Del Rey affair so I have the vintage struck and it's a cool vintage like bar. So the guy I literally drove by a no parking. He came and found me came all the way running down the street, and he's hey do pork in the front row here. I'll take the Conesa. So love that. Yeah. As you because it looks like a steam and vintage truck, okay? Cool. Where did you check ashtec bar name? And did you find pictures of your truck on there? No. I've only driven that truck and night wants to that bar and I walked out and there was fucking thirty drunk roles on the truck. Well, now that many. Yeah. Just sitting on it. I like taking patriots shit come on, man. Get the. The, but it's gonna happen. It's a it's a magnet. I feel like I want to hear all night with you guys. We can do let's take this over the sale in. We'll bring the the whole setup tunes. Pop pleasure. Wondering one song who any good actually Simpson's songs? What do we know? Is that air Carter my Eric cards gay? There isn't no he is who's that? Nick Carter's brother from backstreet boys Aaron Carter. Oh, they live in Florida. Or was it? Or was it the MTV cribs? I just no one of them was on like one of these shows dirt bikers, and he's like, I'm gay. I'm bisexual which is fine. I love the love them. Cool. Just didn't know that. He didn't know. I was like oh, man. I remember you from your little saw his knee. Right. This is Disney kin. Awesome the best anyway. Yes. It's been on the Disney channel. Thanks for joining us. This is under this channel channel sixty four guys talk to Nick. Talk to next next week.

Florida miami Volusia county Eddie walker Thomas Tom Cruise Miami Dade County Orlando Publix Europe Donald Trump YouTube Johnny George Colby New York Iceland Biscane bay Maxwell dallas Trump
A U.S. Marine Looks Back at Fallujah

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

32:56 min | 1 year ago

A U.S. Marine Looks Back at Fallujah

"<music> from foreign policy I'm Sarah Wildman and this is first person this week fifteen years after Palooza a soldier looks back at the battle the define the Iraq war four. It's been sixteen years since the United States went into Iraq nearly nine years since President Barack Obama formerly ended U._S.. Combat missions there and yet the impact of the decision to fight light is still being felt today in July Democrats in the House of Representatives voted to rescind the two thousand two authorization for the use of military force. It was used at the time to approve the U._S.. Move into a rock in the early years. Here's the Iraq War One battle particularly stands out for ferocity from early November through mid December two thousand four U._S.. Iraqi and British forces moved into the city of FELUCCA fighting Operation Phantom fury a joint effort to fight the insurgency forces you well-prepared well trained well Ned and ready the operation will liberate the People Volusia and begin to reconstruction of the city and the restrictions mobile more than eighty American soldiers died in that operation the heavier weapons fire a barrel insurgents they call it. Suppressive Fire and marine has been injured and his colleagues need to administer first aid and get him out earlier that year four American contractors were killed in Thuja their bodies were burned and dragged through the streets. Everyone who comes to Volusia he warned will meet this fate. Phantom story was an efforts retake the city from a safer rooftop we filmed tank moving along the street ready to fire around into each house where they might still be resistance. Elliott Ackerman is a marine veteran who served five towards Afghanistan Iraq and was awarded the Silver Star the Bronze Star for Valor and the Purple Heart He led a battalion of soldiers for that month of two thousand four in his new book pleases names on War Revolution and returning Ackerman describes what it was like to be involved in that critical battle and how it fell to return on years later not as a soldier that as a journalist he's our guest this week Elliot so they actually WanNa start at what feels to me the heart of the book which is Florida Two thousand four and I wonder if you can take us back to November tenth and begin their well On November tenth. I was serving as a marine rifle platoon commander in Volusia <hes> the assault of the city hadn't yet begun begun for us on that day and I think that is kind of in some respects the center of the book because that was one of the earliest and most intense combat experiences that I had had a lot of what else occurs in the book is kind of orbiting around that central experience let did you join the military to begin with joined for a variety of reasons. I grew up overseas grew up in in the U._k.. and think kind of always being a little bit of an outsider to America may be want to give something back and perhaps give me a different perspective on what it means to be in American. I was someone one who when I graduated from college I wanted the job that I had whether I was good at my job or bad at that job to really matter. I want to feel like I was going to have an impact and have responsibility in the Marine Corps offered me that AH on finally like I was the kid who never stopped playing with his G._I.. joes I guess I always had an innate fascination in the military and I think the confluence of probably all three of those things is what led me into the Marine Corps and I joined a before nine eleven did R._O._T._C. and college to become an officer in the nine eleven happened while I was at school and so the Marine Corps then you know went from being kind of a you know more abstract thing in terms of what I would be doing when I served to something that was much more tangible as there was a war we're going on. There's a in Los Angeles Times story that you reference in the book the Unapologetic Warrior and in it the manual reference Doug's I back. He says Young Marines didn't enlist to get money to go go to college. They joined the Marines to be part of a legacy. Being that was true for you. Absolutely I mean you. The Marine Corps has a very strong organizational culture and I listen. I think thank everyone I know who joined the Marines. They join for a variety of reasons but one thing you do opt into when you join is this culture and part of that culture is a legacy so you know when we were going to fight and Faludji I remember three days before the battle. The <hes> Math Marine expeditionary for sergeant major who is basically the senior enlisted Marine Alva rat came and talked to all of the assault battalions and you know one of the things he told us was like what you are going to go. Do is just like what the Marines did Bellawood in the first World War Guadalcanal and Iwojima and the Second World War Chosin Reservoir and Korea and way city and Vietnam this battle is going to become part of the marine cores legacy. That's only one component opponent what that battle net and with that experience mad but from an organizational perspective certainly I think it's became part of the the legacy and obviously the battle history of the Marine Corps curate that your company commander told you two two weeks into the battle that you are both the luckiest and unluckiest to be going into that battle so soon into your service why was that I think it kind of gets at the duality of these experiences I kind of call them in the book the it but for me that it was combat in Iraq and Afghanistan so I think what my company commander who when he said those words to me was you know all thirty two years old and seemed infinitely old and wise because I was all twenty five <hes> what he meant was is that you know right out at the gate would when I came into the Marine Corps my experience was was participating in this battle and that nothing I ever did would <hes> live up to that and that was why I was unlucky in that Vike coppee perceived in somebody who truth the rest of my time in the Organization would be a letdown compared to this but I was lucky because I got to participate in that and I think those words prove true in the duality behind those words also proved true in that experience is one that I'm you know I'm very proud of but at the same time you know there's a lot of regret I lost a lot of friends influenza. I wanted to bring us back again to November tenth which is also the birthday of the Marines and explain what it feels like to be going into that kind of battle <hes> well yes so talking about the culture November. Tenth is the Marine Corps Birthday so as they say November tenth seventeen seventy five. That's when my Marine Corps came alive. You know you remember these things and <hes> one of the ceremonies marines do anywhere they are whether they're at the Pentagon or at the barracks at eighth and I in Washington D._C.. Wearing their dress uniforms or whether or not there in deployed halfway around the world going to a battle is you <hes> you read lead the cosmonauts message but the current cosmonauts message and the General Jonny Lee Jun who was the first comment to celebrate the birthday and you eat a piece of birthday cake and so we were sitting there November tenth two thousand four all loaded up both <hes> in about a dozen with a call Amtrak's which these armored personnel carriers early early in the morning really come almost the middle of the night getting ready to go right into flu Asia and <hes> you know where we were handing out these little bits of birthday. Birthday cake and our companies executive officer came upon the radio and read the comments birthday message to all of us so it has sort of this you know surreal quality. Are you afraid in those moments as you know you're going buying into battle sure absolutely hang everybody's afraid and what's the fear exactly fear fear manifest sensitive. I think interesting in different ways for everyone I think the largest is just the fear the unknown <hes> for me. I was always afraid in the moments before I would have to go do something and then when I was actually committed to the acted self identity feel afraid but you know it's the fear of what you imagine can happen to you is the fear of leading down in the people you're with who you care about deeply <hes>. It's just that broader you know just fear of the unknown. Did you know why you're going in. What was the mission? The mission was to Faludji. There'd been a battle that spring in late March and April of two thousand four in which <hes> you know you may or may not remember it began when a number of blackwater contractors were killed in their bodies hung from the Bridge Influenza Asia and that led to a sort of aborted battle <hes> with the Marines in which the Marines pulled out of the city and Faludji itself became a No-go area for coalition forces and what really wanted to happening was between. I mean that march in that November <hes> it became real safe haven for members of al Qaeda in Iraq and people like Zarqa we were operating out of flu and so it became the sort of seeping wound <hes> in whatever the counterinsurgency effort was in Lombard province in western Russian-iraqi at that time so we always knew that we were going to have to go in and retake Volusia the whole time I was in Iraq we knew that I arrive in the country in June of two thousand four and I left in February two thousand five and so <hes> we also knew that we would probably go do it in November of that year because the presidential election was in the fall and we imagined that the election would happen and then regardless of who won the next day we would wind up going in and clearing out flu which is what came to pass us <hes> so our mission was to go in there to retake the city establish nominal Iraqi control over the city in order to deny it as a safe haven to the insurgents who are operating out of there so that was sort of the the Moore wrote Tactical Nicole Mission in other reason. If you ask why people are fighting there. I think it goes to kind of what you said before. It's being part of this legacy. It's doing right by the Marines who've become your friends by your your comrades. I mean that's what I think. Inspires aspires people to go the extra distance in those situations but you knew going in at the casualty count could be nervous. Yes and how does it feel carrying that knowledge walking in I think that the number you gave in the book because you are expected potentially lose seventy percent in fact the number was higher. There is a moment before we went in when my same company commander my platoon had been tasked with an our company which is three platoons about forty marines H.. R. Platoon was passed as with the call the main effort so we were going to be the lead platoon going in and you know if you've studied kind of urban combat and tactics the casualty rates for the Filippo Turner usually very very high and I remember my company commander just quietly pulling me aside and pulling a friend of mine decide who is the commander of Neo platoons in saying. Hey you to need to just have talked through the plan for how Elliot Elliot how your platoon is going to get back filled because I don't expect you guys to be combat-effective by the end of the first day combat effect of basically means. I don't expect enough of the lieutenant to be left that you'll be a you know a healthy fighting organization anymore soon that's pretty sobering <hes> but on at the same time I mean you know it's not like I woke up one day and found myself as Marine infantry officer you know I was seventeen years old. When I decided I wanted to go into the marines I worked very hard hard my senior year of Highschool to get in on R._O._T._C. Scholarship? I then spent five years in university working for a bachelor's degree in a master's degree all the while knowing I was going into the Marines and then when I became a lieutenant trained for a year before ever showing up to the infantry sorry so you know about seven years of my life I've been preparing for this and so in the moment arrives they look at you and say you know you might need to get back filled you. You've known that there's a chance at this might be where your career is heading and so I think you just feel ready afford to accept a it's to feel ready for it in anticipation but it's another thing to watch men fall in front of you or your comrades and you tell a story about how what rainy nights let's remind you of a moment on Highway Tan with Gunnery Sergeant Ranch chain and Sergeant Lonnie Wells what happened well Lonnie Wells. <hes> was a squad leader in a friend of mine's company Anthony and you know most marines who fought in flu can tell you where they were when they crossed highway ten highway town was a six lane highway the bisect of the city and wound up being kind of the main line of resistance so Lonnie Wells went to cross highway ten in as they were crossing <hes> he was machine-gun in the street shot through his memorial artery and was bleeding to death in the middle of the Road Ryan Shane at the time was real strapping. I mean you know six foot to two hundred ten pound Marine Gunnery sergeant who enlisted the the aged seventeen his whole life he wanted to be a marine <hes> Solani shot and he then ran out into the middle of the road to get Lonnie <hes> grabbed him pulled them and once pull them at twice and then the same machine gun shot Ryan through the Stomach Ryan fell down the road. <hes> in there was a very iconic set of photographs taken onto sequence of Ryan running out into the road to get launching and <hes> <hes> about two years later I was in Camp Lejeune and Ryan Shane was awarded Lebron's star for Valor so metal for trying to get lawn that day and that day it was raining was the first day at had rained influenza and our whole deployment before that we had had a bat about when it would finally rain Iraq's at Hunter Rain once the whole summer we'd been there <hes> and so in Ryan is getting his award. He said to things you know that really stuck with me. The I was he said on finding it really really hard <hes> Oh by just a backup by this point Ryan had to get he was being medically retired from the Marine Corps. He wasn't able to serve anymore which was pretty heartbreaking for him. <hes> and by the time he's getting this award you know he'd lost a lot of weight and had a number of surgeries to correct back then shot through the stomach so he stood there when he was getting his award and said you know I'm finding it really hard <hes> to accept the fact that my greatest achievement in the Marine Corps which is receiving the sprint star for valor comes out of what I perceived to be my greatest failure which has I wasn't actually able to get Lonnie out of the street that day I and Lonnie wells wound up bleeding to death the other thing that he said I so I'm looking out and who's going to be awarded for many the marines he'd been there. He said you know a lot of people have asked me about that day but something no one's really asked me about. was you know who went and got me you know at that point Lonnie Wells and Ryan Shane have been shot in the mill the road and wound up happening was to younger marines have run out into that that same street and pulled them both to safety you know so there's also when we talk about the stories that could told and war and valor you know there's a lot of stuff that is overlooked and Ryan made that point as well you also lost the weapons artillery officer who controlled airstrikes artillery for your company and he'd been playing chess with him not long before he was killed yet so that was a friend of mine. Dan Malcolm and we were lieutenants together and he was. The Guy who would call an artillery what wound up happening on the first day of the battle <hes> our platoon had wound up pretty far forwards and artillery started landing all around us <hes> and it was actually friendly artillery. We didn't know what we didn't know where it was coming from and <hes> there was a high building the highest building around us Dan my company commander had been up on that building earlier in the morning but the the volume of fire that was coming on that billions so bad that had to get off this rooftop and later on in his these artillery impacts are hitting around our platoon. I mean so close. It's like a steel wave <hes> hitting a beach break. I started yelling at Dan like who shooting at US and Dan ran up to the rooftop to try to figure out where the artillery rounds were coming from and he was able to call those artillery rounds off of us and then as he was running down off the roof. A sniper shot him in the the impact hit right under his armpit when his heart killed him almost instantly you carry a story like that. How do you gone after that? You know you you recognize. I think that you know we all knew what we were signing up for. <hes> you know I think about the things that people did for me and you try to live a life with meaning that honors the people who you know who dedicate a comeback and <hes> and have the longevity that you've had <hes> and guys like Dan and Lonnie Wells and Ryan Shane. I mean you remember them in Doug's <unk> back. I mean you know all these guys. You just remember them. I think that's the best thing if you do this. Episode is brought to you by Cox. We Contour T._v.. From Cox you can find all your favorites all in one place it does it have the a youtube you Bet El what about that net flicker thing Netflix to and although superhero movies come to her has all the latest titles on demand. Oh my grandkids love that big green guy. I prefer the one with the Hammer M._R. myself okay. I think we're done now. Get all your favorite APPs shows movies right on Contour T._v.. From Cox after a few years as an infantryman you moved over to special operations and you actually weren't commanding marines anymore but foreign soldiers and there's a story you tell about a fateful decision made in that context to you know most of my career I actually I worked in special operations and worked as an advisor to foreign troops along with maybe a handful of Americans who are also advisors I and so <hes> you know in that context on my war buddies you know weren't other Americans. They were by large Afghans. <hes> who I fought alongside and you know we did all the things that people people do you know in wartime fought alongside one another blood alongside another and I think that's Pacific story is <hes> two of the platoon commanders in a unit I advised name Mortaza and severe <hes> were we were returning thing one day from mission we were in south eastern Afghanistan and severe lived all the way up in the Northeast on the pike the famous Puncture Valley and he would hardly ever get home to see his family and he had a chance one night to get on an early helicopter copter flight out and silly basically wound up taking shortcut <hes> to get him home and because we took that shortly wound up hitting an I. E. D. in which <hes> one of his best friends was killed. He had a child already by then didn't you I did head and so <hes> that firefight in that incident was one of the first ones I had been in <hes> as a father. I think when you have I've always felt I never really understood war until I had a child child because I think you can't understand the scope of loss people can experience in war and tell you yourself have a child and can imagine losing that child and how there's nothing in the world that can ever make that loss whole. Did it make you WANNA walk away from more at that point any poorly. I think it put it in more of a context you know the one thing that I you know that I am a father that I look back on. I really look back on kind of with awe is I think about my time. In the Marines I think about my friends and the Marines I served with and the the Afghans and others I served with and I think about the guys I knew who at the time I knew this had families and had kids and were going out on night raids or fighting and flew doing it as parents and now as apparent myself it boggles my mind that they were able to do that and I understand now that they were functioning with a level of emotional complexity you that frankly I just wasn't having to deal with you know as a twenty four year old lieutenant or as twenty nine year old cap then <hes> and it really gives me a kind of a sense of aw about what they were able to do but it is it part of the reason why you end up not redeploying I think it is. I think it gave me a sense that it was time. I can't life has it seasons in this season was passing and there are other things I needed to attend to like my family and at the team time you don't ever really leave the war in some respects you constantly kind of returning. What is that propulsion? I think you know I a I left. The military started working as writer and then started traveling to southern Turkey where I wound up you know covering a variety of subjects to include the you know the civil war in Syria the Islamic state's spread into our rock and politics and Turkey and as I was writing about these subjects kind of what kept coming back to me was the American experience in these parts of the world and how they were also intertwined into everything that was going on and so you know is not so much that I keep coming back acted them as much as like. It's not over. You know what would start there for us. At least in two thousand one two thousand three is still not over so I wanted to write about that and just try to show the connections between you know full Lucia in two thousand four and you know the Islamic stayed in two thousand fifteen in the same city and how there is a narrative arc that connects these things both <hes> both politically you know but also there's an emotional arc in wars have an emotional topography apostrophe to them and I very much wanted to map that emotional topography and show you know the contours of what feels like to to go to war you see that emotional topography on both sides at various points in the book I do. I believe it exists on both sides in I believe in these wars for me in the Americans I know her of my generation of Fatah them they were generational defining and in the book I sit down with a former member al-Qaeda in Iraq who fought in Lombard provinces some places I fought and I talked to him he would he tells me you know the wars regeneration redefining to him you know and then I sit across from you know a Syrian activist of who participated in the protests in two thousand eleven to two thousand twelve and he says it tells tells me the same thing that the conflict that those protests in the conflict that led from those protests were defining to him and the fact that we've all been defined by these conflicts in the region I see as something that connects us <hes> emotionally connects us and it's a point from which we can begin to understand one another even as radically different as we may be Syrian activist American marina former member of al Qaeda and Iraq but you know I'm an optimist. I believe that with everything I I've seen I believe that people have more common than they have different and to acknowledge. Those commonalities is away to have deeper understanding and more empathy for one another. Do you feel like you have greater moral clarity on the American. American role in Iraq at this point I think you can look at the war politically and then you can look at the war personally and for me. There's always been you know two separate things. I know I join the military on the neck and sometimes people ask me like you know. Do you regret the fact that you serve based on political development. Some ground based on theft. The Islamic state's swept back into parts of Lombard province. <hes> and I don't regret it because the nature of my service the reason I was there wasn't necessarily to implement a specific policy in my mind. The reason was that I was there. was that I again. I want to have a job or whether I was good at my job or bad at my job matter I can look back at decisions. I made that I feel proud of Messina because because I was there and we're able to make this decision in our platoon wound up getting through a pretty tough situation in in a better state and guys get hurt so for me when I think about that those aren't really political issues as much if you ask them about the politics of the record the politics for terrible and we never should have invaded Iraq in it was a mistake. I think that's been proven out but I think inflating the two is for me doesn't feel like a true way to talk about the wars you you are recommended and received Silver Star for your actions in Operation Phantom Fury and in the book and I don't WanNa give too much away for you but the very end of the book you narrate the commendation in a way that I found deeply moving. What led you to narrate it in that way? Well originally actually the <hes> that chapter wasn't in the book. I turned the book into my editor and he was pleased with it said they were very happy to publish the book looking forward to it and then he gave me a phone call and he said listen Elliott. I just feel like I would be remiss if I didn't bring this up with you. You know people will read your bio and they'll know about this award and you don't talk about it at all in the book and you probably have your reasons for doing that but I feel like again. I would be remiss if I didn't say I think it'd be a better book. If you figure out a way to talk about it and <hes> I took that onboard and I knew that I I had this summary of action to sort of an extended description of the events that led to that award and I felt that the best way to do that would be to annotate that summary of action <hes> with a lot of my personal reflections and the things that don't get into are included in official awards documents and that's what I wound up doing but you know awards are complex GonNa like what it Ryan. Shane said the greatest honor. I'm getting his also Bradtha my greatest failure which is he didn't get lawn the out of the street that day you know when they hand out those awards it's usually because you found yourself in a really bad situation when everything goes perfectly according to plan and they don't wind up handing out those awards so you're often you know being honored for what in some respects is sort of the worst day your life. Why are you go back to flu jazz journalist? What brought you back? I mean not to sound Glib but in some respects X. because you know like like mallory set of ever because it was there you know I wanted to go back. I've been thinking I'm thinking about that city. Every day for twelve years at that point so when the opportunity presented itself <hes> I was living in Istanbul the time in a good friend of mine was is the <hes> New York Times stumbled slash Baghdad bureau chief when he basically invited me to come into flu and you know and he would help me get down there. I really jumped at the opportunity had been looming so large my imagination since I left. Did you feel you had greater clarity already on your experience thereby returning. I didn't feel as though it was some type of Catharsis per. Se You know I mean I think we all know the image of you know the veteran returning to the old battlefield whether it's the guys who served in Vietnam walking through the rice patties or the you know the World War Two veterans walking across the beaches <hes> it wasn't that type of an experience because of the war there is an over so for me returning to fluids sort of like seeing an update as to where things stood and what struck me the most was how how little things changed you mentioned in the book thought you try to imagine flew to differently when you return not as a battlefield you right but as a community of homes and businesses and that villages not defined by creation the destruction when I returned to flu John mentioned as I mentioned so little had changed you know standing there and looking at the city you know when you go to other cities. Let's say old cities like A. I don't know a Rome or for an Istanbul you have an sometimes he's layered cities where you can see how one group of people have built on what another built what another built and that's how you kind of these this layering and certain cities and so those cities I think we're Kinda. oftentimes defined by that layer in these very old cities <hes> when I was back influenza it was almost like viewing that process in reverse as you would walk around the city you would see destruction you talk about that building in that building was destroyed in two thousand fourteen vices of this building was destroyed in two thousand five by the Marines you know as the city that was defined by the layers of destruction that had come there <hes> and that jumped out at me <hes> <hes> you know hopefully flu will rebuild this. At this moment that was perceived. It's an interesting juxtaposition between a moment in the middle of but courier and Berlin with a former colleague and Conrad and he he points out that a hill in the city is actually not a hill at all man-made and it's covering up. It's almost an archaeological dig of all the destruction the tanks armored the bodies that were left at the end of World War. Two Berlin is now this breathing living modern peaceful city and villages still a battleground in different way. Yeah I mean it's food is a work in progress like I I hope in like twenty years you know in the city of Moss hope those moss will be standing like beautifully restored and you know and it will be vibrant city and I can take my children there and you know walk around and point to places with them. I think like most veterans I know they dream of being able to do that. Adan Iraq or Afghanistan is just that's not where either country is at this moment you know they're still active wars going there. which is one of the things I think that have made these wore surreal is that you know the equivalent passage of time? Let's okay I thought and waste city so way city nineteen sixty eight. It's two thousand Nineteen fifteen years so you know it would be nineteen. Eighty three right now in Vietnam was very very different place in nineteen eighty-three three obviously no was in nineteen sixty eight in that passage of time whereas Iraq is a different place but the war is still percolating there and were were not. There's not an endgame. It's still a work in progress. What do you think the legacy of flu has done for us now? I think the legacy is to be determined. I don't think we know what is your picking up. Time has passed you. Do you feel you've let it go at this point or is it still part of you. It's always a part of me you know. Sometimes people ask asked me Elliott in like how did the war chain shoe and I've never known how to answer that question because the war made me I mean I you know I have a good friend who I go running within the morning and he's you know he still works in special operations and it has been deployed in the war zones more than than anybody I know <hes> he's been going in and out since two thousand three and so it won't point we were running and we were just talking about the war and then that idea how to change us. How would it made us any look to me at one point city? No Elliot said the melancholy of it all is that we grew up there and I feel that way. I grew up there so asking me how the war changed me. It's like asking someone. How did your parents change you? Your parents don't change you. They make you thank you so much for joining us today. Thanks for having me Elliott. Document is a Marine veteran and author of the book places a names on war revolution and returning.

Iraq Marine Corps Ryan Shane commander influenza Elliott Ackerman Elliot Elliot Volusia Afghanistan Lonnie Wells. Dan Malcolm Faludji United States Doug officer assault Cox House of Representatives Los Angeles Times
"Kelley Cox - Pro Sports Photographer and Olympus Visionary" - Podcast 663

The Digital Story

34:46 min | 2 years ago

"Kelley Cox - Pro Sports Photographer and Olympus Visionary" - Podcast 663

"This is digital story podcast number six three November twenty seventh two thousand eighteen today's theme as Kelly Cox pro sports Sotogrande and Olympics visionary. I'm Derek store. As a working sports the target for killing knows that she needs every vantage to compete with her peers on the plane Bill her lips EM one Mark to provide her with the competitive edge by not weighing her down in allowing her to maintain her energy during the long day of act of shooting. Kelly joins me on today show to discuss technique gear in how she broke into this exciting profession. So here in just a couple minutes. We're going to jump over to our talk with Kelly, and I have to tell you. She is fantastic. I think you are really going to enjoy this interview. Now Kelly is based in Berkeley, California. And she's a freelancer for USA today. Sports images, and she photographs all sorts of major sporting events, including the NFL NBA major league baseball, NHL MLS and NC a football and basketball. She's covered multiple championship events, including the World Series, the NBA finals and the Super Bowl. Okay. So enough of her background. I'm just going to tell you. She is the real deal. She really knows her stuff. She shoots limps. She's an Olympics visionary. When the newest Olympic visionaries, and she has a lot of interesting things to say. So let's jump over to Kelly right now. I'll come back after we finish our chat Kelly welcomes show. Thanks for having me. All right. First of all, I know that you're primarily sports talk for so the name of your gig. And you know, just a little bit about what you do. So as myself, I'm a freelancer for USA today. Sports matsch's, which has me covering all the pro and college teams in the bay area been very fortunate to cover World Series Super Bowl NBA finals. And then I also started a photo company Casey photos, which is kind of a collective photographers on we are the official tougher for USA rugby and also for Catholics. So how is it? When you go for one sport to another. I mean, isn't each sport a little bit different. You have to kind of learn them each they're all little bit different in their own way. It's all sports and action and trying to capture emotion and the spirit of the game. But each new season that you start you kind of think. Oh, right. I forgot I forgot the speed. And how I follow the ball. And you kind of have to reactivate yourself with each season. Those funny. I feel that way before a lot of shoot throw. I just feel like, wow, I forgot everything I know of ardor. About five minutes into it. Okay. Again, do shoot any indoor stuff basketball or you mean the out on the field. Now, all of that, so basketball, volleyball, gymnastics you name it name it your new newly. Minted visionary, right? Yeah. Congratulations, by the way. Thank you. I'm very excited about it. It's a very nice on this, very nice. But that means you should of this gear. Obviously the kind of frown of generic shooting with other brands. But I'm guessing that you probably didn't shoot Olympic skier your whole career. So tell me a little bit about the early days in sports photography a little bit. How you broke into this, by the way, it's not an easy to break into and what you shot with then. So I was incoming freshman at UC Berkeley. And I wanted to join the rally committee to wave the flag on the field at football games. And I would bring my little canon digital rebel at the same time and take pictures of the football game, not knowing what aperture shutter speed was anything. But it was pretty fun. And I enjoyed some of the pictures that I made. So I reached out to the contract holder for Catholics and said do you want an intern? Here's ten photos. I took they were garbage photos, but I I learned so much, and I fell in love with it and started working by the time. I was graduating I was already working somewhat under. Employed as many photographers are when they start to career, but very committed to, hey, I'll give myself ten years five years ten years to make a go of this ten years later here. I am. Did you just like fall of with this? Did you just go? This is something I wanna do. Yeah. The more. I started photographing and having played very wreck level sports. It was incredible to see the impact of sports at a higher level from collegiate to pro and just really fell in love with the the energy of professional sports in college sports. So now, what is your family say you economics, major at Berkeley theme. Mom that I fell in love with. Taking pictures. How did that whole thing go? I'm very fortunate because my parents were incredibly supportive of always said do what you love find your passion. My sister was a chemical engineer and now works in bio pharma and is named forty under forty all-star in her field. Sushi often jokes that my job is much more glamorous to talk about my parents would come to games and my dad enjoyed football. But I'm very fortunate that both of us were able to pursue our interests and find success and happiness in those fields. So about the Volusia of camera gear. Yeah, I started with the rebel. And then I think my first lands was seventy two hundred and I kind of made this progression. Step by step by upgrade lens at upgrade a body. I upgrade lands adelines and always wanted to justify that whatever lens. I was buying. I would cover that cost in the money. I would make using that lens. My husb-. Is Nikon shooter. And then I started adding Olympic skier as my travel gear. Our household was full of all kinds of cameras and using the Olympics gear for a year before they had the EM one Mark to it was a great travel camera, and it was fun. It was light. We do a lot of multi day backpacking trips where I didn't want to carry even five and the sixteen to thirty five. But I wanted something more than an iphone. So then there was just my hobby. Hobby travel camera when the introduce the one Mark to and they added the three hundred millimeter lens. It was kind of like, oh, this I can use this for my pro work. This is legit. So at the end of two thousand sixteen right when they came out with that, I kind of convinced them to loan me the the full kit from what I didn't have from travel gear to cover a football game. Because I said I won't feel comfortable making the switch if I haven't covered football because that's kind of. The the flagship of sports, and if it can't do that it can't be my pro gear, and I don't wanna wait through the whole summer and fall to to make the decision to purchase the full set. I used it at that game. Use it at the Sugar Bowl. I used it in a downpour. No rain gear was blown away by made the full switch. So when you first start shooting, the one marked to tell me about your favorite lenses, as you're kind of getting to know the system when you're out on the field and all that. Yeah. I already had the forty to one fifty of which is a little bit extreme for travel gear. But I wanted to go all in with a system. And then when they added the three hundred those are kind of your wheelhouse for a lot of sports, and I always like having a wide to get the huddle shot or something. So I had the seven to fourteen then, you know, as you do you kind of start adding other gear. Most recently added the twelve to one hundred. Which I love is a great. It's fantastic. There are the limitations of four. So if you're shooting something really dark indoors, maybe not so much but Cal I'm covering their basketball games with strobes. So that twelve to one hundred is just the perfect range to go to go along whatever you want on a personal question here. Okay. All right. So how tall are you? Oh, I will say I'm five eight really five seven and three quarters, but I would like to be five eight. So let's say five eight five eight so you're five eight, and I'm not gonna have my mom do that. But I'm gonna tell everyone that's listening. She's thin. Okay. So that she's five eight and what we used to say willowy. Okay. So that's strong, but strong. Yes. And you have to be. So I think you probably know where I'm going with this now when you're working to football game you are going up and down the field up and down the sidelines. You have to have probably at least two bodies and guessing with. With. Maybe you're twelve on one end. And then you're longer one on the other camera. So you're you're slapping stuff around I'm guessing that this was probably a factor in your interest in Michael thirds was a huge factor. It's not so much the weight of the cameras when I'm holding them football. You might have it on a monoplane baseball. You definitely have it on abroad and carrying them is fine. The where I noticed the weight was when they're hanging from my body because there's only one camera in my hand at a time and the other one is hanging on my neck shoulders on my back. And so with the Olympic stuff being so much lighter that was a game changer in at the end of the day. When I take my gear off, I feel great we're previously. I was strong enough. And I could hold the camera. I could run up and down the field with the camera all of that. But when it was hanging on my body. I would end each day taking it off kind of laying flat on my back and letting backpack. You know, what you finally get into camp? And you take off the backpack had it on for however, many hours, and you feel like you can float almost then at the same time your shoulders dying. I could totally see that. And then there's this kind of this clunky. Banging around just big stuff to right? You know that that's kind of awkward. I know what I moving around a lot. And I have really big gear. I sort of feel like I have these albatross on and this stuff is so much so much easier to manage that way. Right. So much so much lighter. And because it's microphone thirds you can have effectively a six hundred millimeter lens, that's truly the size of what would be seventy two hundred. Maybe this crazy crazy in light and so much lighter. So speaking of microphones so in the Murless world right now two thousand eighteen then the year full frame earless right now, I shoot with people on assignments a lot of times they're doing deal, and I'm doing stills, and they're going, you know, you don't shoot for frame, I'm going, I don't I don't need to Mike. Commercial work. I usually have the Mark to and you know, the glass, I like, I don't shit with three hundred very much. They loaned it to me that they wanted to back the week. Short period of time. They've ever loan me. A lands ever at least month or two is a hot commodity. So and I say, you know, I haven't had clients say anything about the image quality or the resolution or any of that stuff. And some of the work that I do ends up being a billboard. You know? Of course, there's viewing distance and all that involve. So I say it hasn't been an issue for me. What do you say? I mean, how I'm sure you get asked that question photographers are always talking on the sidelines. Yeah. I it works for the work that I do for sure I'm working with caliph lettuce. They're making posters out of my images that they hand out at games that are the short viewing distance and I phone can make a billboard. And that's the smallest sensor around. I can see where some people do need perhaps medium format perhaps full frame. But for the work that I'm doing I can make a great print. I. Can publish it. Proudly and with the microphone thirds sensor. That's it's kind of more not the size of the sensor, but the quality of the sensor. Exactly. I think that's a really good point. Now, the other issue is of course, on the wide end is harder to get wide. And then dropping out the background. What Lindsay's when you wanna drop out the background? How do you? How do you know? I have to tell you what might go to. But I've I'm curious to hear what yours, but sometimes you do want to soften that background that, you know, have the subject the really the focal point what do you use for that? Well, I do have the twenty five one to if I wanted something like that for the forty one fifty two eight I think as long as you know, you're not trying to capture the subject that's right against the wall. When they're close to you. And the other side of the field is far away, you know, its distance that's providing that that clean, crisp look. And you do have that distance working with his shooting, and they big arenas a lot and so forth. So you the twenty five one too, by the way is a nice land. I I like the forty five one two. But I do hear good things. So I am considering to have to tell you. Has become one of my favorite ones. So it's crazy. Those older lands. The it's a semi five-millimetre F one eight, and I don't know if you've ever seen it or shot with his heavy lands. It's melons. It was one of their first white aperture medium telephoto lenses. That lands has some kind of limbs formula magical, and it can drop out background as as good as any land. So they've ever used on a DSL. Are you know, it's crazy lens don't have it. But I did see it last week. And as it was described was if there was ever a sexy lens. That's a sexy lens. And I got the eye ponied up. I went all in and I got the medal Lynn. So that for the little. Yeah. So it's truly a sexy lands. But it doesn't wonderful job of that. So backgrounds to me are really an issue now on the white end. Yes, we do have to work a little harder on the white end. Right. And that's an important. I'm sure that's an important thing for you. Because sometimes you're right there in the middle of the action. You need to to capture that moment of celebration, or whatever it has to be. I think that the seven fourteen is great. I also have what I call the dummy Lynn's, which is the fish body cap. A lot of that lends I use it all the time. I can get a great huddle shot where I get in the huddle. I call it the dummy lens because it has only three different focus settings kind of the point to the mid range and Infinity. You can't really select what you're going to focus on. But when you're shooting that wide with fish, I you don't really need to. It's it's fantastic. It's great fits in my pocket. It's easy to carry around. I think when I when I first switched to Olympic it wasn't let me use something with an adapter because even though the lens would be compatible. It's nice to use a lens designed for that body. So this the seven to fourteen at seven is fantastic. It has good. And I want to go back to the body Kaplan's for a second. This is the land that I never leave home without Schiffer ever ever because it is so small and so the quality of surprisingly good for ninety five dollar lands or however much they charged for that thing that is a crazy land as a steel. It's just fun this fun. It's fun. And I get shots of that thing. And I show people. Wow. That was really cool show. I would give you know, they always ask us what we use. Like, we didn't have anything to do with ourselves. And I tell them that they go. What what is that just the body catfish lie, and I don't think anyone else makes anything like that? Seven aware of. I'm not sure not not that small compact is crazy. Do you mind? Talking little bit about being a woman in as seen as often as kind of a man's world. You know, this type of work. I mean, I'll let you take it from there. I think I've been very fortunate. There were a lot of women that were pioneers that had much more of a struggle of convincing people that they even belong on the field. So in that sense, I'm reaping the benefit of the nightmares that they lived through. There's obviously just a difference in being a woman compared to being a man. And ultimately, I would say my experience has been wonderful specifically in the bay area. When I traveled to other places, I do find there's a little bit more kind of macho going on where I had a group of talkers that we're all interested in the Olympics insane. Oh, that's really cool. Tell me more about it. Well, fascinating it really like it. And our saying, oh here, you can hold it. And one of the Tigers came up. This was a group of men and another man came up and kind of was feeling a little bit proud of himself and said, oh, I I guess that's okay. If you have small hands, and it was. So weird and off putting especially because he didn't even hold it in his hands. And what a lot of people say about the Olympic camera. Is it feels like the DSL are they like the way it's in your hands? But he felt like he had some forty to sort of make that comment, and it was a little strange. I knew there had to be at least one or two instances. You just can't be doing what you're doing without having. I'm just walking around in the world. And I get weird people coming up to me doing what I think too that I've been very lucky and being a woman, it's kind of just different you might have different photography style and approach. So when I show up to a game, I think people trust me more, especially if I'm covering youth sports. No one thinks I'm the creepy guy. And so it's easier for me to build trust with a team to to put my hand and camera in the middle of women's huddle between their legs in that sense. I'm I'm being given the benefit of the doubt by being a woman that I'm there for good reason granted, they know me, they know my photos get published thing. No, what I'm there to do some of that may be because I'm a woman some of it may. Just be their own familiarity with me, I think there is something to because when I used to do, weddings. I always made sure that my second shooter was seen mail for that very reason because there is a certain thing about the energy of a woman in if I had a woman with me when I'm doing something where people don't know me, it just goes easier, and to be honest with you a lot of times when I'm when I'm going to be out doing street photography. I love it. If my wife comes with me because she just softens the situation a little bit and yeah. And takes out that notion that creepy guy, I don't look like a creepy guy. But, but you know, and I don't act like one for sure, but definitely easier when she's there it's just easier. When I think there's something to that. There's a trade off there's backs in benefits if navigating that and working tear advantage. Absolutely agree. So you're young you're strong. You got a lot of energy right now. Is this your career? I mean, are you? I mean is this have you decided that this is what I'm to do this? I would say so I'm more than a decade now. And I've reached a lot of, you know, check marks that I wanted in my career. And so now it's exploring where I want to go next fiend. Olympus visionary is a great opportunity to start teaching and sharing some of my experiences as well as showing photographers that there is gear that is lighter and more budget friendly to make it more accessible to more people in photographing sports. I hope to be in this for the rest of my career. I enjoy it. I love it. And that's where the weight plays a big factor because I know photographers that have been doing this for decades who have taken short disability leave or had their doctor tell them they can only. Carry one camera because it's hurting their shoulders and in pain being a freelancer. I don't quite have the luxury to take time off for my body. So I need to keep my body healthy and having lighter cameras not worrying about that. And also I want to cover a football game with two lenses. I think you can and no image is worth sacrificing your body. But if you can create great images and not sacrifice your body. I think using this gear will help me have that long career helped me steak cited I think what Olympic is creating and putting out there. It was the future ten years ago when they came out with microphones Murless, and it will be the future moving forward. I very much agree with what you're saying. When vic- have the people that are thinking about photography as part of their career. I don't say anymore. You know that they wanna be photography is. I think you have to think broader than that gift to think that the Tigers could be part of my career. Maybe it'll evolve into being my full career. I don't know. But what are the sort of things when people ask you? What should I be doing to be thinking about if I wanna have the target is part of my life? I think taking a lot of pictures and being critical in evaluating the pictures that you take and make an always trying to make a better picture when I get workshops compared to photos where one is a good picture. But if you change your angle slightly even in the same game, you can have a significantly better photo. That's the start for just making nice images for actually having a career. It's a lot of the less glamorous stuff that is knowing how to tiger photos. Add captions. How to deliver them who to deliver them to understanding who your client is who you want your client to be and kind of navigating your career through who values these images, and how do I make my images more valuable to the clients? I want really looking at through the eyes of the person that you're you're delivering these images to right. Yeah. That's a good point. And then also I would add one thing that you did which is be bold. Go up and say, look, I want to do this for cow. Who do I talk to to see I can get on as an intern. If I can get on as system if I can get my foot in the door one way or another. I think you have to be bolt on you. Right. I think bold and building friendships I think right now with so much focus on social media. We forget that human real time interaction is going to lead the way to most. Most of your paid gigs. You know, you can you can build this great community online. You can reach a lot of people in. That's fantastic. But everything that I've been hired for has been through someone. I've known someone I worked with someone who knows someone I worked with in a very tangible way, this is the same for me the same for me. And you know, it's interesting you build these relationships in when you can stay in the career for a few years. Even if the person, you know, that you worked with over here if they leave then they go somewhere else amazing. How many times they'll call you say, hey over here. Now, we've got some work. You know, can we talk about it? And that is a relationship that moved from one place to another and they remembered me, and I think that the human contact is huge in what we do and online online is interesting because to me people say you'd have to have an online presence, if you're going to be successful and everything. I think having online presence is important. I don't think it's for me. Anyway, it hasn't been important for paid gigs has been important for for other things. The Ansari suffer for speaking gigs for teaching possibly forgetting, Mike. I write also forgetting writing it does help with all of that for sure because there was a certain name recognition, but for checks. It comes down to people. I have to say. Okay. Any last thing before we before we go here. I want a couple insight tips on for people who like shooting sports because we have people. I mean, they have kids that are involved in sports or maybe they're donating their time. What are some of the things that you keep in mind that you think that can help people look for something. That's a nice image before you add any action. So look for nice light nice backgrounds. Kind of create the image before the athlete comes into the play. And then then the trick is following the play. But cameras are so great now that they can they can follow and track and focus on them really quickly. But if it needs to be a nice image, regardless of whether they're jumping and diving and catching, but what's what's light doing? How the shadows playing is a dynamic and interesting image on its own. Such a great tip. We're gonna stop right there. Kelly. Thank you so much for taking time out for, you know, spending time, by the way, she drove all the way up from Berkeley, Santa Rosa. So we could do this in person to save you of having the listen to Skype interview. Thank you very much doing that. I really appreciate so much for me. It's been fun. I told you. She was interesting. She is really good and the tip that she provided and the discussion of gear I have to tell you. I just get excited all over again about microphone thirds when I get to hang out with people like Kelly, and I just thoroughly enjoyed spending time with her and looking at her butter. Thanks so much Kelly. The portfolio box inspirational photographer of the week. So as I've been exploring the fantastic interesting provocative portfolio box photographers that are out there this week. I have another terrific artists to feature. I want to introduce you to Jakup Bach Rudd twenty two year old photographer from Sweden Jakup is both creative in clean, and has a very interesting style. I think you will enjoy his site twenty two year old photographer from Sweden. I think it's very interesting what he has to say about portfolio box. I'm gonna read you his statement. And then I'll comment on it per filial boxes a great way of getting your workout there. It is very very simple to create a good-looking webpage. Rican. Upload all of your work in have it displayed in one place. I never have to do any sort of programming. I just upload my newest images. And then it updates immediately on my personal page running my page recently helped me get a job in the industry, the work. You are proud of should always be available for other people to enjoy insurer. And this is a great place for it. You never know where publishing take you. And I just think he makes a great point about getting your stuff out there and not only getting your stuff out there. But getting you're really good stuff out there. And we used to have this saying when I played basketball that. Practice doesn't make perfect. It's perfect practice makes perfect. And what I mean by that is is not just having your images out there kind of helter, skelter or know sort of shot getting. Yeah, I got my good stuff. Again. My bad stuff. I got my food shot from lunch. The other day. I that all mixed together. That's not what I'm talking about. And that's not what Jacob is talking about. And when you see his site, it'll make even more sense to you in that what he's talking about is getting your great stuff together or the stuff that you're really proud of having it in one place, not having diluted with the other things that you because we all she'd all sorts of stuff, and then getting that in front of people, and then that gives you the opportunity to be noticed, you know, all sorts of good things can happen. So anyway, take a look at Jacob's page and see what you think. Now, if you signed up for a portfolio box pro. Count and have published at least one page and semi that link does use the contact form on the nimble photographer, and we're running our own directory in the link to our directory is here in the show notes. And if you haven't created your own portfolio bauxite yet, here's a way, you do it. You just start with the link in the show notes or start with a tile that's on every page of the digital story. Go over to the site. Now, you can either create a free page in really disorder. Get the know how it works and the free page can go on forever, and you could stop right there or you can upgrade to a pro account, and then you get your own domain name. And you would think that the pro account would be all sorts of dollars and really expensive. But it isn't it's eighty three dollars a year. And that includes your domain name, your custom domain name, which they take care of for you. And then on top of that if you use the tile like I said to do you get an additional twenty percent off? That eighty three dollars. So that is a great deal. This is great stuff. When are you going to create your portfolio box pro site? I hope sooner than later. Okay. Just a few updates for you. I while I wanna remind you that last week show. The show notes we have both our holiday stocking stuffers, and we have our holiday gift guide for photographers. All right there. I hope he listened to the show. Hope you enjoyed the show. And then if there's anything that you want to follow up on just go to the show notes. Remember, we have all of the show notes for the digital story up at the top in the nap bar. Just go to podcasting. You'll see show notes he can get this week show knows last week show notes in the week before. And I hope he found a my gift suggestions helpful both for you and for photographers in your life. I also want to mention that the tedious workshop page is right there. You know, right up there next to the podcast show notes, you'll see workshops, and there you can get an overview of our two thousand nineteen. Workshop season we have four events. We also have a show that where I just discuss all four those events were getting of deposits and pre-registrations right now giving people on the reserve list. I hope you can come out and join us in two thousand nineteen wanna give a big thanks to our inner circle members. And let you know that we're doing something new this month. We're doing a photo competition a photo challenge show. I say competitions that quite the right word. More of a challenge we're doing night shot and what I'm doing is. I'm collecting night shots from our inner circle members of their sending them to me going to publish one every couple days on our patriots site share them with people, and then we're going to pick one we're going to pick one by December fifteenth and that photographer will be featured and really excited about. This. This is a lot of fun. I I love photo challenges the first batch of night shots that I've received have been really good and look forward to sharing them. And I look forward to, you know, honoring, you know, one of these photographers with a with a nimble photographer t shirt, that's what they will get. In addition to the accolades for being the best night's shooter in our inner circle membership. Big thanks to our inner circle members of the backbone of this podcast. And we just couldn't do it without you. And finally, be sure to visit our friends over at Red River paper, they have a tile and all the pages of the digital story. Fantastic. Printing, paper, this is a time of year when you should be making those prints making those fine, art cards. This is a way that we can leverage our talent. Right. You know, we've done all this work. We've invested in all this gear make some fine. Art cards share them with people. They will be thrilled to. Receive them as holiday gifts in his your chance to provide real artwork to people that you care about to friends and family, and then you can sell them as well. You can learn about all of that by going over to the Red River paper site, click on the tile go to our landing page paper ordered and start making hard now. All right. That's gonna do it for me this week. I hope you enjoyed energy. Kelly is terrific got more. Good stuff coming for you Niksic combined. Join me intil then have a great week seeing next Tuesday by.

Kelly Cox Olympics football basketball USA Tigers Berkeley NBA intern Red River Sotogrande California Bill Mike NFL NHL Volusia Nikon
353: Typetura with Scott Kellum

ShopTalk

1:03:16 hr | 1 year ago

353: Typetura with Scott Kellum

"They're maniacs. You're listening to another episode of the show talk show because all about front and web, design and development. I'm Dave Rupert with me as Chris Goya pay. That's right in we're gonna make true on that show. All of our web design development today for sure not that we don't always talk about that. But we're going to we're going to get into some some browser technology show. Reg. Oh, I like spreadsheets. But yeah. Anyway. Vivid? With us is a longtime. Good fella and in acquaintance, Scott Callum. How are men? Hey. I'm doing great. Thanks for having me. Yeah. Sure. Threatening to have you on the show for years and finally made good on it. I think here. So. So maybe do you have a like a bio blurb of yourself that you wanna do you in New York still actually Washington DC now? So yeah. Kind of moving around a little bit. But yeah, I'm working on. Marina at marina tech right now, which is not spins software company. So we do kind of all the scheduling stuff for them. So I would practicioner there and then by night, I work on tightrope, which is sort of a company on founding and trying to get off the ground around sort of fluid web design, which I'm really excited about awesome while that's probably we should start there. Type tier T Y P E T U R A dot com. Visit that folks in your kind of thrown into a kind of a, you know, you see some new see some set type, and then you have the option to mess around and play around with it. So what's the deal there? What's do? So it it remapping key frames to browser with, and it you can plug in sort of anything into it. So could remote the to scroll physician or mouse position or whatever. But by default remapping key frame. To browser with. So instead of using break points, it just kind of interpolate all the stuff off your CSS properties between two points. So it's really I was focused on it as a solution for fluid typesetting, which Trent Walden has wrote a post on in two thousand two thousand twelve I think it was and I know Dave you worked on fit text. But this kind of focuses on really setting text at at a large scale in a fluid way. But it's not just limited to typography can do all kinds of stuff. The key frames analogy was was apt here. I admitted took me a second to get it. But it's like easily like you open up type Jared dot com, and whatever it's at maybe that's a key frame already. Right. So you on the left hand size. Maybe put in font size eighteen pixels or. He literally just type it in right? And then drag it to some other points because the browser with thing is probably smart that that's like the default thing is a lot of thinking that way. Right. Like, what's what how what size are my going to be at this is versus this size. And then you make another key frame. Perhaps you type, you know, drag it wider and type in different fund size. And now you have to key frames rights and then dragging between those two key frames? You can kind of watch it magically make choices for you between those two key frame. So at a small it's eighteen pixels at some small size in twenty two pixels at some larger size. You'll see it kinda minimize out at eighteen and maximize out at twenty two. And so that's that's kind of the magic of what's happening. Yeah. Exactly. Because there's not a with with layout. You have percentages. And you could say do you like fifty percent this box this box fits into six? Fifty percent of the width of its parent element. But with typography as you're scaling back and forth. You have report units, but that's pretty much the extent of that. In terms of the control you have so tight you're really Abel's you to get in there and find tune exactly what you need to do individual way without sort of doing lots of complex math. Pretty sweet, I how many how many all of us have dealt with that kind of, you know, maybe you on your first pass of designing something you just picked what was given to you in your fig Madaka -ment or something and it looked great at that size. And it looked very not great at some other size. You were forced to think. Oh, gosh. What should I do? Should I make a single break point in here and just resizing or should I what should I do in the past? I know I've tried to set every. Thing and M's or Rams or and whatnot. And then kind of like picked break points at the HTML level to like notch down perhaps a set fix pixel size. So they all everything kinda just scales down together in a way. But you find yourself doing little tiny tweaks here, and there to fix things doesn't scale is nicely. And then I think some of us have seen very exotic solutions with like you said viewpoint units kind of maybe sprinkled with some calc or something for some magic. But then sometimes in the end what what you are the result is a little inscrutable. You're like, I don't. -sarily how to adjust this? Yeah. Yeah. I've been given mocks as well to implement and a lot of times, it's like art. This is the tablet version. This is the desktop version with no indication of how things change in between those points, or what the break point is. So, you know, on a project recently, I was just like, I'm I'm I'm just going to throw these two values into type gera-, and it's going to handle it for me. And it's kind of like the Goldilocks and the three bears. Like this is too hot. This is too cold. And it figures out what's just right in between all of that. I like it too. It's it also has like this if I'm gonna I'll give you a little tagline here for free this consult free consulting. It's it's like code pen for typesetting in a way because you're just you can like. Like that. And that's such a core to your business. Your brand your website is how you type sits on the page in an I only know this because I work with people who are like actually actually care about funds. But you know, it's it's such a core piece of the brand in the experience of a website of or anything that like it's cool to play with it here. And then you get a system like a system that scales up and down. I think that's that's nice. 'cause I always mess it up like Christmas saying like every time. I I think on my site. I hate my h threes just in I have no idea how to fix it. Just like, I hate them. They are the where. Stuff like that. Or I tried the calc thing a major one in dumb like it goes in my thirty four inch wide ultra-wide monitor in. It's like four thousand pixels. Call and I'm just like, well, I'm not gonna fix that educates or something so yeah. Right. Leaves you wanting for max font size. That'd be so nice, hopefully, MAC, hopefully, it doesn't put you out of business here. But I'm sure it won't. But the output of it is kind of fascinating to do. You wanna talk about that? Like, I I don't know that I entirely grog it yet. But it's kind of like you pick some key frames. And then you don't use the word key frames like metaphorically or maybe you kind of do. But the actual put his quite literally the key frames syntax and CSS. Yeah. And I've gone through a few different approaches to as to how to tackle this. The first approach was with custom properties. So I was passing through essentially like a flat array as a string into a custom property, and then parsing that with Java script, so they were pixel values in your CSS for each key frames than it was transforming that on the fly, which was kinda cool, it it was nice to author, but it created a lot of confusion because it was parsing the custom properties with Java script, it kind of broke. The cascade a little bit in some places. So getting it to work with native key frames made it not quite as nice to author, but it while it's still super nice to author in my opinion. But. It's enabled. It's a work with the regular CSS cascade in. So how does that is? There is one custom property written to the body of the page, and that is written in there with Java script and that just defines what is the width of the viewpoint here. Okay. And from that it feeds into an animation property that's applied to sort of globally as the default animation for all elements, and that animation is paused at the offset of the browser with. And as you feed in key frames to that it's sort of maps to the browser with now because you're pausing it at a function of the browser with also really is using native browser tech to to you know, what key frames natively do under the hood. You you hook into that. And make it give you the value that you want out of it. Yeah. Exactly. It's the only thing that job script is doing is. Really injecting a value that happens to be the be the viewpoint. If you want to cascade things that are like element queries. You can just write that custom property on the element in. It will cascade under this function and work. So I got I got a key frame five hundred pixel browser with let's say keeping seven hundred pixels browser with. Let's say, but I'm currently at six hundred or something it knows that I'm halfway in between I'm at key frame fifty percent. And so you can kind of run that animation. Posit at fifty percent, you probably don't even literally need to run it. Right. You can kinda programmatic -ly run at are some. Thing is it does at that moment. Coughs valuables. And it might be a font size or that? That's fascinating. Because the what's the difference between you know, font size. Thirteen pixels and eighty two pixels. Like, it prevents you from having to do that math. Right. Not that. That's particularly hard math to do. But it you might as well just make the browser do it. And then you steal up. But you're saying it doesn't it's not just math air. It's not just fun size. It's line. Hyder color color would be a weird thing to have to hand. Interpolate wouldn't it? Yeah. I have a code Penn actually that blends color, so it's like SAS mixed mode or SAS color mixing, but with native CSS using this technique. So I'm fascinated because now my little browser window corner thing the three dashes I used to squeeze my window that Hayes that's like a scrubber like timeline scrubber, right? Like, the browser view port with becomes a timeline scrubber for an animation that just so happens day intimate, my type or some colors of something or. Allow let's next level here. Thanks. Yeah. And now like pixels not traditionally responsive unit became become responsive as you're sort of scrubbing back and forth, those can interpolate. So it it opens up a lot of interesting possibilities for for changing colors size layout. Not just typography. It's it's I it seems like you'd be so tempted right away. Just be like, oh, I can do all this in job script. I can make all these calculations. You just give me some configuration of what you want me to do. I'll do all the calculation myself. It's it's a pretty, but you know, and that's fine too. It's not like that's a disaster or anything. But it's it's kind of clever to use Java scrip-, but all alternately kinda just pass that data to the browser and make kind of make it make all the chocula for you before before setting them. It is though dependent on JavaScript. Yeah. It is. Yeah. I mean, you could write these custom properties in break points, and sort of just. Map out a bunch of different break points with the with value associated with that have that cuss gate into the function. So it could be native CSS. It's just. Having job script, right? The width value is letting Java scrip- do what it's best at. And that way CSS can do what it's best at and just having the two things work together made sense. Yeah. Certainly I would think if you're trying to remove any doubt from people's mind because some like weird dravis group for this is that mean, I get like flash of unstylish weirdness or free or not quite styled all the way flash. Or something. Do you have you dealt with that in a way? Yes. In safari. There are a few bugs with this. So it doesn't calculate Rhames appropriately on initial load. So if you were to go CSS this CSS only direction in your using Rams. It would sort of miscalculate what the scale with the scale of that is. And so yeah, that that was an issue when I was initially sort of prototyping. This up. So loading it in after the fact sort of let's the CSS load in sort of snapped type into place and makes it work. There is sometimes a little flash of styled or. Not correctly sized text. But in what I've played around with. It's not been too bad on like, but you're feeding the CSS machine, right? Is like just a what hey what's the window with right? Let's kinda like I guess the speed of that. It'll be like dependent on like win type turret can kinda measure the window. Yeah. I was gonna I was gonna Zing you. You ready? What happens when I browse Azeem? I'm gonna bust him. But it works. So good job. I got I got to know. All it must fire a fire, or Reese is it. Does looks like that's what the lib does. Yeah. Sorry, again, not back zingers. It's like what other limitations are there? I'm seeing edge isn't quite doing it. But edged goes to chrome flick, a few months or something I have no idea. But so may why does everybody I feel like that's fasting. Just that little moment. Everybody's like soon soon soon. Tune remember on the announcement was is like, oh, maybe it's just weeks away. And now tick tock tick tock nothing happens. Nobody's saying anything. What's the deal? One is ship. I don't know. I don't people have it now built. But I haven't seen it. So my guess is there's a lot of work to do, but knows is years years away. That would be interesting don't know, I'll call by the end of the all the edged hotline. Let's just changes how we talk about the web a little bit because we're already like off forget, it doesn't matter. If it doesn't work in generally because it's feels so right around the corner. But like, maybe that's you know. True. When when if we're bailing on this this plan, you know, then like everybody's like oh update. God if their goal was to not have people hate them. That would be the worst Joyce ever, whatever we talk about browsers support. I always think of the the poor people stuck at work on these machines that can update from Internet Explorer, and they have no choice. You know? It's it's easy for us to say like, you know, just upgrade. But a lot of people don't have a choice in this. So, you know, even if edge switches, I think they're still going to be a lot of people on internet explore. So that's. That's the thing. The can't is a big deal when there's no upgrade path at all. And that that's the case certainly on on work machine. Sometimes, but also like, you know, if even old S devices, if you, you know, even if you're an iphone user, at least, you can remember what it's like to have an old iphone or something you keep it around for three or four years like, hopefully, you do there's sometimes on old old hardware can only run certain S's in only certain OS have no upgrade path whatsoever to new housing. It's fascinating. It's tempting to be like all you have old safari while even apple even safaris evergreen, you know, it'd be like not on IOS. It's not and. Yeah. Limitations any stuck on I s nine and it's just like, yeah. We don't we can't do anything more than that. So it's kind of doesn't run anymore. But it stuck there. So. This up soda. Shop talk show is brought to you in part by flywheel at get flywheel dot com, which is WordPress hosting perhaps you've heard of local by flywheel, which is kind of taken the local development environment for WordPress. Community by storm. You know, I feel like I used ma'am for like ten years and still exists. And if you use it, that's fine. I'm not like crapping on map or anything. But it like local by wheel to me blows any other choice out of the water for one. I kind of liked little you is. I like I for my get I like, you I for all kinds of stuff not that. I'm like afraid of command line stuff. Sometimes I just like it though, local by fly wheels like an app, it sits in your doc on your MAC or it works for windows two, which is relevant to us because we are are redesigning the shop talk show website in a recently moved hosts for it too. So that's the connection between these things. Of course. I run WordPress. Locally on my machine with local by flywheel soy, spin up. Shop talk show dot local on my local machine to work on the WordPress site and Dave can work on a tube. Because local by flywheel, just spins right up on his windows environment too. So now our team, and we can work together. But you know, moving the site was so great because right and local like there's just like a button like connect to fly wheel. Boop connected. Send it up to fly wheel. Boop. You know, it's like two buttons in it in it shoots up our whole site to fly wheel hosting you get like, a little sub domain. You can make sure it's all right? You map the DNS over to the flywheel hosting and boom, it's moved. I feel like I was like, oh, I got a a wanna get this site on over on flywheel. This is you know, all the section off the morning to get this done. Hopefully, I can get pretty far maybe I'll get it done. And it's like thirty minutes later. It's done. You know, I love that. When you find like this hosting product is so good so easy to use helps you local development and live development. Plus, I'm in there. Like you wanna turn the CD on click? CDN on click here you want SSL on it. Click here just beautiful you I- internally. And I kind of started demand that from my host to this up paid software product should be have a nice, clear intuitive. You I, and of course, it does. So anyway, love flywheel love local by flywheel. Love it. All it's great for us. We use it here on shop talk show. Our WordPress site. So is your goal type charitably a little too. It's open source. I see there's an MIT license just sitting on it. But is to be somewhat business like in some degree, some kind of paid something something or or is it just open source thing sees it? Yeah. They're few revenue stream streams that. I'm thinking about you know. Consulting would be one. And then and then yeah. Like a paid subscription to it. So you could save your work in share it with others, you know, maybe sell kits, but I'd like to make money off some side project in my life at some point. This could be it looks like it you didn't launch with too much then so I guess that's a good thing. But you know, so if you're on the site now, and you're making a bunch of key frames and getting things just perfectly I guess at hooves Yuda. Make sure you copy that key frame stuff out of there. Right. Otherwise, you might not have a way back to the work. You did yet it saves and local storage. So as long as you're on that same computer, you're okay. And as long as you don't clear cash, but yeah, it it's probably a good idea to save that out or pay for the paid version coming up soon what she can save it right to your account the nine ninety nine a month. Yeah. I've been thinking about the revenue models of stuff online because you know, you end every show pretty much with how can we give you money? And it's like we put a lot of stuff out there for free and stuff on the front and it's like inherent. Only free. You know? Yeah. So I'm thinking a lot about that. I just not know Pat on my back, but I finally like owned up to the words, I've said here on shop talk. And I went in to open collective, and I started backing some projects, and I feel good. I feel I feel good about that decision. So I recommend who if L. No, if you aren't supporting open source or anything like that right now, a super it's a feel good moment to like like support projects, you use make money off of in like, you know. You know, I wish we are better at it as a community to to to to some degree. Like, it's nice that so much stuff is free because you know, maybe that pushes in ovation faster who who knows what the exact implications of that are, but I have certainly benefited from it. But at the same time, it's like if it's if it's entirely on Dave Rupert shoulder to make sure that he goes out and supports everybody involved. I feel like that points to like a like, maybe we're just not as entrepreneurs as we could and should be in the fact that we're not means that there's more dead projects around too and that as a negative implications. And I don't know I don't often for free. Perfect example, I'd pay for is like sample type earings, you know. I know you can find them kind of like those that like Hello Google fonts, which is pretty awesome. I go to a lot like it's good like type things like a type pairing plus typesetting in access to some kind of type tool that would give me like out of the box recommendations of really pro setup type setups. Oh, boy got most people enough work output. No typography into my own project. Just do it all here and grab it all out and drop it into my project somehow, I mean easier said than done perhaps. But but that would be nice that. To not have to manage that particular part of it is that it's that weird thing is like, I don't wanna do all the work. But I want a good one. And I, you know. I know what I like. So that would be an sometimes I think like I'm excited about this stuff while other people excited about this stuff. And I think about all this tooling that I use that. I'm just like, you know, I don't want to think about this stuff. I'm super happy that somebody else has been messing with the stuff for a while. This is not your first tow dip into the world of typography and modular typography or responsive typography or whatever it's been years and years, right? I think of your modular scale project, which was kind of related here. Right. Yeah. That's right. Yeah. Can't like the predecessor I'm sorry. Yeah. The sense. I wish we could of built in a modular scale calculator into this. But I think until Houdini really takes off, and we can register custom properties reliably that's going to be a little bit difficult to do. Oh, what was the deal that? Why do you need that? Because the calculation wasn't is the problem of key frames. Can't. I don't know have a easing to them wasn't is is easing kind of part of the deal of modular scaler. Yeah. Yeah. So what the thing that you kinda wanna transition when you're working with a modular scale is as you're changing that ratio your changing, the contrast of the typography, so a larger ratio make sort of bigger headlines, and you know, to whatever the tech sizes in a smaller ratio sort of closer to one makes more uniform headlines in if you're on a big screen, you kind of want these big chunky headlines with small texts that kind of creates a really dynamic more visual opportunity for for hierarchy away on a tiny screen. You just you don't have as much. Yeah. So like, yeah. On a small screen. It's like you're not gonna you're gonna fit like one character per line. You know, that's not gonna work. So it's a little like a shift in. Perspective. That's the number that you would wanna slide and that number doesn't map to any currency assessed property, so you would have to make a custom property and in order to transition that property you would need to register that property in a Houdini like API, are you saying like a CPL characters per line property of some kind could we invent that? I wasn't thinking that. But. That would be interesting. Are you could also do max with whatever age? Yeah. Yeah. Pre-common? Okay. Interesting. All right. And you've also worked with like molten leading that was like a Tim Brown. Like what it would joint is that when you collab- a collaborative Branko up mantra scale was our collab-. I haven't worked directly on molten leading. But it's it's definitely something. I'm aware of. Yeah. I thought you were all involved in that. So isn't because type Chiro works on key frames? Does the it doesn't really expose your at least at the moment doesn't look like it exposes what easing it uses is it just linear easing or couldn't. If you applied an easing thing to these key frames doesn't that in a way change the modular scale. You could apply any easing. You would want a and at. It wouldn't change the modular scale. It would. I mean. Well, if you're between two key frames to settings the app at one year at one setting us still. Yeah. Right. So it's like you need easing easing or something. Yeah. But you could still I left that as a custom variables. So you can type whatever easing you wanna use within type tra-. So you can change it from linear to something else, which the impact of that is probably a little minimal. But maybe who knows right? It's kind of cool if you set like a watch size screen, and then a massive screen, and then you can kinda set the curve to exactly what you want and not sort of worry about any key frames in between. So there are some cool things you could do with it. I have heard of really weird scenarios in which designers like actually I want it somewhat small on a really unlike a phone screen or whatever like, you know, couple inches wide, and then only a little bit bigger than that on desktop for some reason something eyesight who knows? And then for whatever is in the biggest size is Ana like, a medium sized tablet of like that's weird. But it's kinda true. And. Maybe you could even put like one of those really weird easing curves into it. That like goes off the rails weird in the middle like outside of the boundary. That would be crazy. Yeah. You could you call those like a an cubic Bessieres that. Yeah. Is like a mountain goes beyond one a mountain, right? Doing that with my hands and realizing not only can you not see me to the audience, not see me, but we don't even have video ourselves. Nobody can see my mountain. Zero one zero doesn't even exist. Okay. Well, best of luck on all that. That's that's fascinating. And and because it's I don't know because it's pretty web native the Java scrip- part of it is is pretty minimal even funny to call it type Ajay us when the jazz part of his like. Ten lines or something's? Yeah. It's about six hundred bytes hunter bytes, not even a k you really that type Jura dot. The s tiny. We need dot tiny. Not just dot min. We need like dot tiny for like actually small things. So one repo in your. Gab? I wanna talk about that. I don't think is getting enough positive press in the trades is momentum. Can you talk about momentum? Because it is such a cool predator. Thanks. It's a lot like type zero only it has. It doesn't have the CSS piece of it. And it's just about providing those values so just like type provides the width value of the viewpoint it provides. You know, all these other things that you have to be like, all right? What is the what is the scroll position, you know, how far away is this from the top the offset top all these things that you might query jobs for Ford to be like, all right? You know, what is this? And then do some styling off of this allows you to bring those values into CSS to run through calc and then do styling off of his stuff. Like viewpoint wine, viewpoint X, and all those all the hits yet. Yeah. Being in in native CSS someday. Like, it's funny that with just these few again, this thing is a hundred lines of code provides you in CSS just all kinds of stuff about the viewpoint like, it's almost weird that CSS doesn't know these things already. Yeah. I thought that too. It's it's something I wanna style off of. I mean, we've got viewpoint units. Why can't there be like orientation units or something else? Certainly these scroll units are probably the most common use case for for someone like wiring up some Java script in which to send to to see us. It's nice to have a function to because of the you've probably dealt with the the performance of it all which is always a concern with stuff like this. Like, if if I write it myself. So tempting to just be like, you know, whatever advent listener on scroll on Reese is said property done. You know, which is like, it's not debone. Psst. It's not doesn't do anything. Intelligent, whatsoever about making sure that it does those things responsibly responsibly when if you had like ten of those they like all registered ten times, you know. And so now, you have ten window Velez news or whatever by act. Accident. And then rather than just like one just tell me he window. Tell me what you're scrolling. This is all ready so performed at rendering things through calc. Like why not just use that? I've done a few experiments. I know like a Dan Wilson has kinda done a lot of like transforms based on kind of see us custom properties. Like the variables in and stuff. Like this like viewpoint scrolls in stuff like that. And so I just I'm so convinced this is like the way to style do animations just. Yeah. I I don't know. I'm looking well I actually almost use this in like a production situation. Unfortunately, we have to kind of go pretty far back on our our browser support. But you know, like like somebody dropped in like, you know, thousand lines Jake way to kind of do these measurements. You know? And I was like, Ooh, I got a secret library that this in. It's so fast. It never. Yeah. When you can use custom properties in your full browsers support lists. I'm excited. See what you come up with. Yeah. While in I mean, we just did the like, okay? Let's get the Vars CSS going, you know, SC as as in. And I was like man, I might just spit all these out in the route like in route statement as well like that comes with ours. If you import Vars we import the variables. So that the fronted has it, you know, and can mess with it. So does that would set? What about you guys? Why why did it take hold in in CSS custom property land? Where everybody applies them to the selector colon route like that's so bizarre to me. Like, nobody uses that selector ever for anything else in like, it doesn't matter. If you use it people do use the team L select, which is the same thing. And I I know there's. I know what the differences are there. Like while if you're move this to us v g than the route is not aged Melman, it's actually Fiji, and I'm like who puts style blocks in Virginia. I'm sure some people do. But when you do you know what you're doing? You know, I have. No, I I didn't know that. I didn't know that. But I do know probably Attias money put it in a blog post now. That's what I do. So that's that's what I do know if you want global that's pretty go. Yeah. If you wanted to global, but it it's literally identical to putting it in on the HTML selector, which is the I think it just pro like I'd like to trace it back because it proliferated in such a strange way that it's just like, I think some people just assume, oh, if you're gonna use custom properties you have to use this weird selector at the top of your file, that's where you put them. Yeah. My biggest concern with that is. There is a lot of value to put it's been a local scope, so are people afraid to do that and the other there could be a lot of value in through local overrides to those those custom properties. I would hope that that doesn't get smoked because that the you're right that the the fact they cascade, although I feel like even after all these years of writing CSS, I still I still always like have a twitch of worry that I use that word incorrectly. But whatever that's how I think of it. They cascaded down to more specific selectors, and they're happily overridden at that level. If you want them to be, yeah. Yeah. It's almost like classical inste- inside some sort of CSS class. Of sorts. It's nice. Let's cool. Thanks, thanks. What else you got going on Scott? Any other projects is there's a hint that some future things for type or or juror or talk about you know, other use cases you've seen in the wild. I mean, that's that's kind of like where my head's at these days. I mean, other than that, I'm making coat Pence, you know, playing with recur Shen, and, you know, kinds of fun stuff. So, you know, doing that as usual one of my favorite things to play with just gotta give a shout to this. It's really old and underused thing the sokaia principal drawl DO. Remember that article? I think so that's the one where like if you use it. Looks more random your website makes noises every two years. Something to do with like overlapping and making it look, really. I don't know exotic looking. Yeah. It's it's using prime numbers. So patterns multiple patterns built on prime numbers to create the allusion of something random, so like repeats. To the whatever the multiplier is between them. All so, yeah, I've been playing around with that a lot in animations, and it's been a blast. Because you know, it's just it looks like this organic thing that's moving randomly around. I don't know just just one of my favorite things to play with on code pen seven thirteen seventeen or something. That's like cicadas like a little bug, right? And it comes out at years that it seems random too early. You know, like whatever species they eat don't they eat some other kind of bug in. So that other kind of bug is tripped out by their schedule. They can't figure it out. Although it's just like once in a while they'd just eaten and they're like God, dang it. But if it was like every other year, they would catch on they'd be like, oh, I get it. They come out every other year predators. Yeah. They're predators. Are like I'm going to have a feast right now. And like, they don't know win the feast is gonna come. So they're just overwhelmed, and then this is just. On to reproduce some other year because they come out in a very unpredictable way. And it turns out it is predictable. But it's not it's nothing something that any other you it's hard to catch onto right Volusia early. And even it was if it was predictable. It's like all right. We can we can get this pattern. But it the pattern goes on for such a long period of time because these are prime numbers, and they compound so like it gets every time. There's a new cycle added to it. It just kind of staggers out even longer which is perfect for use in CSS Santa Mason's. Because if you want to sort of create something that looks random with only a few moving parts, you can kind of dial into that. And how would you use it? Would you move something seventy pixels than one hundred thirty pixels that one hundred seventy pixels? Or would you move it? Like put key frames at seven percent. Thirteen percent seventy. What is it or just all over the place all the time? I usually do it with the animation duration. So he just kind of just the animation duration and then stagger stack multiple of those animations on top of each other. So that they kind of. Diverge, and they almost never converged because they're sort of on the staggered schedule. I mean, they converge eventually, but it's it's very freak raids. Shout out to two thousand eleven the Sucato principles back. It's it's favorite thing. And I really wanna bring it back. So it's it's the coolest. I got I got one I got one any. So whenever you talk about paradox. Somebody will say, oh, you do in CSS, and they linked to not your your creation original creation of the ceus bear lax. But some weird weird when that doesn't work. So what what is your like do you recommend using the spare lax method, maybe we can step back and describe how you created that the like like do you recommend that? Or what would what's your feelings on on the CSS pair lack we should define it? I right. Like, what is it pure CSS paradox? The I assume you're talking about that code pendant authored. Yeah. Probably like fifteen years ago. Oh, yeah. So it is using its like actual help relax work. So as driving on a in a car, and you see like trees in the distance are moving slower than trees in front of you. I think a lot of times paradox is completed with just scroll scroll, jacking. But. To like mimic. The actual affect parallel. We already have three functionality and CSS. So as long as you can lock the perspective to the viewpoint. You get a pair lacks effect. But in order to lock the perspective to the viewpoint. You have to. Essentially locked the body to be a hundred few height tall in the version that I made viewpoint units were not as reliable as they are today. So I used percentages do that. And. It works. It works well across lots of browsers, but because. I guess because it is doing something so weird. I don't necessarily recommend it a lot of browsers pre grander whole page in scroll that as one unit as opposed to. This technique where sort of has to paint as you're scrolling it because it doesn't have this sort of long image. It's just moving up and down. So it it works. It works. Really well on the idea like to set the stage. There's like let's say you render a page in its got a hero image across the top. And there's like a couch a plant and a vase or something and like you scroll down your surprise. They're all independent objects. The coach moves away really slowly, but the plants flies away really quickly in the vase flies away at some medium speed or something that could be considered parallel. Even though it doesn't mimic reality because in reality farther things away move slower and things that are really close to your I've move faster. It's still kinda using the spirit of para lax and that it's just like fake. It's like if there's a giant tree or the couch was actu-. Actually, you know, fifty times bigger than it was and shot or whatever. But you're do your techniques. Didn't it like? Shrink them with a transform and then Rescale them bigger, someway. So it's like the scroll affect. You know, it moves faster slower because it has been transformed already. But and there was some kind of magic in there wasn't it that like, yeah. So it. It does. It's very honest to the original representation of parallel like the the natural representation of paradox of if you transform something in three D like a plane, you could you'll see the top of the plane and the bottom of the plane as it moves up the screen. So like how we normally see para lax just flat rectangles, and sort of very the speed of those, but it is actually CSS three D And things are moving past fixed perspective. So I guess. I find it. I think it's clever. Like, you're using that perspective, so perspective. One hundred is close to me perspective one thousand is farther away perspective three thousand farther away. So that three thousand we'll just move just based on the you've almost set up at three d seen in ceus as so that. Yeah. And it's just kind of fun, right? It's not to be used all the time. But it's it's kind of clever thing in what's cool is it's not technically scrawled jacking because it's not doing anything that native scrolling isn't doing already there should be no performance hit whatsoever from this. None right. And that's kind of appealing about it. Yeah. I like that. But skirl jacking is when you scroll down on the couch like comes flying at you. Because it hit a certain way point in Java script was watching for that. And something happen. Even that type of stuff can be. Done performance Lee ish, but definitely not as clean as just this. Pure CSS approach of pushing it away and pulling it forward with transforms and perspective and all the stuff if you're gonna do at try to that way. I that's much nicer to some degree or worse. The worst gun. It's drillings on you when you're trying to scroll down, and it's like, whoa. Slow down there, buddy. I have a panel. I need to snap into place. I before you're allowed to scroll past that one. And that's that's what the squirrel jacking comes in is appropriately termed because it's like has stolen away from you, your, you know, your natural scroll down this. I found it really interesting that sort of slow sites in bad performances so heavily associated with para lax. I don't think it has to be. But you know, it is. I think like you're like momentum would be perfect example. Like, if you're just y like, moose something a little slower us calc in position obselete, or whatever and are fixed in scroll, y you know, I think that so much easier. So that would be my recommendation today. You can still screw it up though. Just because you have scroll y in your CSS if you use it then to set the top position on something. Well, we know top isn't the most performance thing to set especially rapidly. Right. That's why Java script intimations don't use it. So you still going to be a little there's like two main limitations like the browser doesn't report sub pixel like scroll like you can't scroll three hundred twenty one point two five pixels. So he's measurements are always rounded in. So. Yeah, maybe you'll get like some snapping. But then the other thing I think is like the. Yeah. Like what you're saying? It's a, you know, you can't measure Leo window dot scroll, lie at sixty f- PS or something I think you can. But like. The idea there is like it's a expensive measurement or something. So. So doing it on on whatever. Request animation frame is probably gonna be slow. So or idle kief idle frame or something so? I don't have all that this the one request idle callback. I that's what's well named isn't it that particular VI because you're like, oh, I get it. Like, the browser will only call this one. It's like the threat isn't blocked, and it's ready to do something more competition intense. I've never actually used it. I'm still afraid of stuff like that. You know, if I'm about to do something gnarly. I'm just scared to do a period regardless of. Yeah. Get a request idled callback. Anyway, what other CSS stuff re- excited about Scott? The anything in mind. That's like, ooh, that's fun to play with that doesn't have to do with bugs or. I think recurs is my other favorite thing to play with just with EMS. And you know, how things affect the things that are nested inside of them. I think when I talk with people about authoring CSS. I don't I do design at my day job, not author CSS. And it's because I like to play with stuff in. It's like I like CSS is sort of poetry as opposed to writing instruction manuals for production stuff. So, but yeah, I mean recurs in just like how properties cascade down in sort of change as they do that. I think is super fascinating, and you can create some really not performance things because it has to do the calculation on the parent than the child in that child that child example that like, oh, I l I fund size at one one point one m that's his killed people over the years. You know, they're like, oh, it looks fine. And then somebody writes an article that's got three nested lists in it in the fun size gets huge intimate. Somebody's. Like, what is happening here? Yeah. I found this really interesting bug in safari as well with animations, and they are self. So if you apply animation with 'em unit on top of in 'em unit. Element with 'em unit itself. Curtian the word it it creates a recurring loop within itself. And it's super interesting. How does it play out? And it's only in safari. Yeah. Bug. It's like an accident. Oh, it's not. But it's it would be really fun to play with. If it wasn't so different from everything else. What else does that? Because there's you'd think unit lists things would. But do they in the same way? Like, you know, you you set line height one point one or whatever does that get does it compound on itself as you nest elements within itself or would it have to be? Mm. Would it would? I think it's more dependent on the property than the value. Cirilli? Font size can have sort of a recurring loop because it references sort of its parent but line height only references itself. Oh, it's not an inherited property. It can it's it's inherited. But it it only references. The font size of itself so its referencing property other than line height. So one point one is referencing. Font size? Right. Okay. It's referencing. And then it stops there kinda because it only to look at one level. Whereas von size has to look at. There's nothing it's referencing on itself. It's referencing apparent which references apparent which references a parent. Yeah. Box models stuff. You can create recurring loops with so as you're sort of nesting element inside of an element inside of an element. You can you know, for example with a fifty percent as you're sort of going down. It will get smaller and smaller. But you can also not set it within just sort of have them. You know layer out like rings of a tree or something like that. And you know, I made a code pen recently where it served concentric circles moving around each other. And there's no. With their height set on anything. It's just sort of based around the the borders. How much space those take up to sort of form these consent concentric circles really does it about the fifty percent example. I think people can wrap their head around that. Right. You have like twenty nested Dibbs and they're all set with fifty percent it just cuts in half cuts in half cuts in half cuts in have and it forms of kind of natural easing too, doesn't it does that map to any easing that we think of normally or is it is its own weird? Yes. A longer scale you can map these out on mudder scale dot com. Forgive full circle. And if yeah if you set. Point five, or if you said a scale of using the ratio to it will be twice whatever the child is. So as you go up, you know, you could see kinda see things build up up up on sort of a more logarithmic scale as opposed to linear scale, fascinating logarithmic little quick. Yeah. Which is why like type sizes M's, I think they're fun to play with together. I I know that they can be difficult to manage in production code. But if you like the golden ratio is really interesting. I don't think it's particularly useful in many practical purposes, but if you sort of have nested things with a monster scale of the golden ratio, and sort of our one step below the scale in the context of it, everything within it will be exactly the size of one step below on a modular scale. So that kind of recurs is very predictable with inside a golden ratio. Which is partly. Why it's so interesting. I think I've heard say in the past you'd think a guy like you Scott with was plays with modular scale and helping us with key frame out, our typography, and but anything all this type of thing that you'd be really into the idea of vertical rhythm, which is a I feel like a concept of typography that I don't know comes along with this bucket of thought doesn't it like the rhythm being you know, let's say you bought some transparent grid paper from the craft store and laid it over your computer screen that the typography on that screen. It's you know, could or perhaps should like match perfectly onto those grid lines that regardless of anything else on the page that, you know, the baseline of an H three lines up with, you know, the baseline of h one above, you know, and that if it does that there's some, you know, spine tingling. Perfect thing that dealer wrongs appears in your room. That's on the back and says we'll done. It's the way to. Strict. You have to do it three times though, different websites. What is vertical rhythm? And is it true that you'd kinda don't care about it or? Yes, that's true. And it is the idea of sort of aligning everything to more base unit. So like, let's say you have a four pixel baseline grid, and then all of your sizes in line heights. Need to be a multiple of that. I don't particularly. Agree with that. And there there are a few cases where think aligning to a baseline grid is important. And that is if you have sort of columns of text next to each other it can be useful. But on the web in particular, it's it's extremely difficult to maintain that vertical rhythm. There's text on the web is also rendered at half leading. So you apply line heights? Something anything over the difference from one. So let's say you have one point two line height. The theirs point one leading applied to the top and point leading apply to the bottom of each line. So yeah, I never knew that. So everything has this weird half leading but pushes the baselines off. So if you're really if what you're trying to do is align the baseline of all of the typography. The larger text with maybe a little bit more leading relative to the size point four. Yeah. It's it's still going to be kind of misaligned with whatever. Smaller texts comes next to it. And you know, it will always killed me about this. I found that so hard because someone you kinda give up bright, and you're like, well, I can't put one point four on these headers because it's screwing it up too weird. And it's forcing me to use like weird negative margins or something which I don't want to do. So if I just set it back down super-low that kind of fixes, I can just squish things around with margins positive margins. And then he like, this is a mess. Like, I feel like I'm fighting a ghost here for and for what you know. Like the end result. Does doesn't seem like it's any better. And then I talked myself out of it because like on the web, I'm looking at probably a six of the overall thing at all. And it seems like all sure if I opened up a newspaper because I'm sitting on a park bench. I can see everything, but this entire the entirety of the content of everything. So I can see vertical or the matters in that scenario. But I don't website. We see a little piece of it at a time. Anyway, what does it matter if the the top of this website has the per? Perfect grid alignment with after I've scroll down four thousand pixels. Who cares? Yeah. In some cases. It is nice to see it. But the vast majority of times. Yeah, it's gonna drive you crazy. And it's it's not particularly worth it. I think there was a spec that adobe wrote a draft spec to include vertical rhythm. On the web and CSS. But you know, it's I don't think again too much traction. It would be interesting to see I I wouldn't be opposed. If it were a lot easier to do. But because it just creates such a a fragile mess. It's it's not something that particularly care for he'd just get it for free or something seems cool. But yeah, I see what you mean columns techs next to each other columns do anything fancy to to handle it lets you had an H three in your first column. But not in your second column. Does that make that second columns baselines, not align or browsers, do something smart about that from from what I know? No, they don't I don't call. You anything like top line? That's a little funky Reich as you'd see you'd think in that second column over if it was all misaligned baselines all that small copy that set in the columns if it didn't share a baseline, that'd be very odd. Awkward. Yeah. Yeah. You going to do just? Put a big old grid gap on her. What does it call it column gap? I better be. Think it's called her new gap property because we have good gap. They renamed it gap works with flex box. Now, sort of I wonder if that will map two columns to. Western Mark schmuck? L? No. Well, cool. Hey, I think we are hitting our time. Limit for shows here. Oh my gosh. We are vast. Yep. Yep. Sorry. Got a a I'm the time keeper here. Official timekeeper Scott. Thank you so much for coming on the show. Really? Appreciate you coming on for people who aren't following you in giving you money. How can they do that? Yeah. Thanks for having me. I'm at Scott Kelham on Twitter. And I'm at Kelham dot me on mastodon and go to Tetra use it if you like it. We will have ways free to give me money hopefully at some point soon. Excellent wonderful and thank you, dear listener for downloading this in your her favorite up. That's how people find out about the shelf foes on Twitter at shop talk show for tweets a month. And if you hate your job hair, shop talk, show dot com. Less jobs and get a brand new one because people want to hire people like you in just a tiny bit of housekeeping. We are adding a transcripts to every episode. We are working with our transcript friend Tina to do that. But is probably like a Wiki or two behind. Chris is that we're I'm sure at all it's not tina's fallen shirts. Just us. Our were still were it's new we're working out the workflow and stuff, and it takes a little time. We don't what we don't do is not publish the show because we don't have a transcript, we publish it. And then Adam later, so if you're really into transcripts, just, you know, slow down your life. We'll we'll try like we'll try to get it like at a as soon as possible into the post page. Maybe we'll we'll do a better job on Twitter like tweeting when we have that. So anyway, but just wanted to say that it's there. It's coming something. We're committing to transcript so anyway, that's all and Christie anything else you'd like to see. Hey, shop dot com.

Scott Callum Dave Rupert Rams Reese Abel Trent Walden apple New York Washington Google adobe gera Volusia
180 | Stopped Buying

The Minimalists Podcast

34:30 min | 1 year ago

180 | Stopped Buying

"Every little thing that me every little thing. You've been veggie ni. Every little seem. That's just feeding your greed that you'll you fine without. Hello, everybody. Welcome to the minimalist podcast rediscuss with a means to live a meaningful life with less money. Joshua fields. Millburn? I'm Ryan Nicodemus together. We are the minimalists shell busy. I'll show biz Lynn house. Nobis here today today, we're gonna talk about certain things that we stopped buying minimalist. We're gonna talk about why we stopped buying them. We're talking about tips for purchasing new things. She'll be I got your one of your videos from Jessica, the gal who runs our social media. And she was like you gotta have this girl in the pocket. And so she does that sometimes and they're like, I'm like, no, not not this one. No. And then I I saw this video you did about things you stop buying. I'm like, yeah. She's right. Because it's something that we often talk about. So so you do videos on YouTube about eco-friendly living about sustainability? And you did this video about the things that you stopped buying. So we're gonna answer some folks questions today before we get into that key talk to me about maybe three things that you've stopped buying since. You've started living more sustainably, more minimally. Yeah. Definitely. Well, I call it EKO minimalism. Right. So they're all different reasons, you could be a minimal remind is because it reduces the demand for products, and also, obviously reduces your carbon footprint, your water footprint, all the above. So tons of things I've stopped buying. I have several videos about it. But, you know, anything from like paper towels plastic water bottles to new clothes. I haven't bought new clothes in years, all kinds of stuff. Those definitely hardest thing for you. Stop buying do. Do you have one of those? I mean, just everything that it takes awhile to shift right because we're doing life one certain way because it's convenient so changing any of those things make your life a lot less. Convenient overall. So that's a really unfair question. Because people always ask me, they're like, so what's the hardest thing you had to, you know, get rid of in. It's like there's so many things. But yet it's kind of a a growing in Volusia and each step is it can be a little bit difficult for sure Ryan averse and things that you stopped buying before. We jump into our first question here. So man, I've wrote on six things here because we talked about this. I stopped buying orios celebratory as men like I was a sucker. I'd go into the grocery store, and like they always got me with lake special Oreo edition twenty flavors. Yeah. Exactly. So I have not bought any more Orioles. But I've replaced it with a hundred percent chocolate. And I think when we talk about what we stopped buying some of these things on every single one of them. But some of these things we do have to replace it with some better habits because if we don't do that, then, you know, at least for me like I just end up buying all the crap that if I if I haven't, you know, replace it with something something else replace it with a bad habit. Stop by Orioles by. Started buying hostess cuts. Wait a minute. Wasn't the ideal tradeoff there. Gimme gimme two more things. So men are I got I'm just gonna read his dress shoes suits stops up south. They're not going to the other ones for patriot later. Okay. So dress shoes dress shoes and suits. Yeah. So dress shoes haven't really replace those with anything because I don't have any suits anymore. But I mean now I just have a uniform that I will wear I mean pretty much this. I got a pair of jeans that I'll wear to for weddings or funerals. Funny. How my my office the same for a wedding or a funeral? Pretty much the same thing. I have a list of a lot of things with my top three on this list. I stopped buying coupon items. So like, I that are on I stopped when we go to CBS CVS right by my house and the other day, I walked out of the I bought I literally bought a pack of gum, and they give you like a manuscript the receipt. I was dragging on the floor literally on the ground before I could drag it out to the trash I felt so bad. Because like look how much paper that. I think we would save. We would we would solve the environmental crisis. If we could just get CVS to stop printing receipts. It was obscene. I didn't. I never looked at it. But they every time they print out. Who was who wrote the road? Not McCarthy, I'm sorry on the road. Yeah. Jack heroic. Thank you podcast, Sean. And apparently he originally wrote on the road with on. What is that? Yeah. What is it? Butcher paper. Yes. It was like giant receipt, essentially, and that's what I feel like every time I go to CVS. I don't use coupons anymore. There's a reason why I found it coupons were forced to go to look to that CVS rec- started just oh, yeah. This save a dollar on something. I don't need. I might as well by now because fires in seven days sometimes those receipts like it'll be like, hey, here's five CVS dollars. And I know I'm going to go and buy shampoo at some point. So like, marina, we got a little envelope. But it is difficult to stave off that impulse where it's like, oh, it's I get five dollars off this bag of chips or this bar of chocolate. Maybe I'll try it out because it's on sale. Like, yeah. It certainly can lead you down to. Yeah. Also, buying path boundary is and it will force me to be more. Impulsive than not a second thing. Discounted items? So that's another thing that really gets me. It's on sale. It's fifty percent off. I'd be dumb not to buy. What's one hundred percent off if I don't buy it? And so I don't say it doesn't it doesn't mean that I won't take advantage. I'm going to I really need to do pair of shoes. They happened to be on sale. You're not going to be like, oh, wait till they go off. I'm not burning money. I just no longer. Make that the primary decision maker forget if the sale price triggers the impulsive by like that's where you've got to stop yourself and be like, wait a minute. What I buy this thing if it wasn't on sale. Yeah. And last, but not least I have stopped buying into being busy. Paid for that. Yeah. I paid a lot for it. Unfortunately. And that was the problem. I was in fact, I was talking to the gals that we work. How's your day going real busy? I'm like really sorry to hear that. Instead. Sometimes my days were full. I today is a full day. But I try to stave off being busy for the sake of being busy allowing other people to sort of dictate the direction of my to do list of a bunch more things. We'll cover those in a bit. But our first question today is from Nathan in college station, Texas school here. He's from Canada. I wrote down on my notes, he's the he's the Canadian Texan. Previous podcast, you both talked about getting rid of certain things, but enjoying enjoying them when they're owned by others, for example of Christmas decorations, you might not have Christmas decorations, but you might go around and enjoy others is that a feasible thing. If you know in some idea future, everybody is acting as they say minimalist, there's this like Dana bowl ways to act as a minimalist because you know, if everybody is getting rid of those things things than you know, than what will there'd be pretty to joy. Maybe that fick Texas accent. So what if hypothetical questions didn't exist? Why does everyone's mind go to the extreme versions of everything? So quickly. It's human nature. I mean, we've gotta like test are boundaries. Right. And you know, that's easy to do with these mental exercises. I think it's a good question. I mean, if everyone stopped purchasing things, let's just go to that. Because that's just the next step. What he's talking about the economy would crash, right? It's not a good question though, that it's what if everyone did something is always a back question unless is breathe. The only thing that we can all agree on as you can water. No, no, no, not drinking water, plenty of plenty of videos on YouTube all find one put in the shows where people talk about waters, dehydrating you. We can't even agree on water being hydrating. Okay. And so what if everyone stopped drinking water? Then I don't know. We would all have a water crisis. We'd have for crisis. So she'll be as soon you get questions about this. Because you live sustainably yourself and inspires other people to live sustainably through your videos on YouTube, which by the way, we'll put a link to several of your videos, including the one I mentioned at the top of the show on our show notes. But you have you have people who as well. What if everyone stopped blank, how do you talk about that? I mean, I feel the same way that you guys just mentioned that people go to the extreme so quickly. So I do get that question all the time. How would you buy second hand if everybody started buying secondhand? And then those no new clothes to buy second hand, my answer to that is that we would switch over to a sustainable economy where people are producing clothing sustainably. I feel like it's a similar situation with Christmas decorations. I also don't own any. But like, I told you it's because of the ego minimal situation. I mean, but if we stopped making Christmas decorations, and they wouldn't be there. I feel like my life wouldn't be that heavily impacted. I mean to me, it's it's like if we started doing if everyone started taking the approach that that Nathan said here like we would have more of sharing community in leg, the more access to stuff opposed to having own everything. Right. Exactly. But like, you know, Josh. And I we still buy stuff like you still buy stuff. It's just we're more deliberate with those purchasing dollars. And you know, it's not just our dollars. That were delivered with. I mean, it's all of our resources. So with Nathan question. It's like, yes. Go ahead and have a substitute for things that you wanna buy if there's something that is a better option more sustainable or a for for whatever reason. Yes. Do that until it's not a good decision. It's sustainable until it no longer is exactly. And when I think about when I think about the things that I buy right now, it's different from the things I bought a decade ago, and it'll be different decade from now we're gonna talk about some of those things minimalism isn't about not buying anymore. It's about being more deliberate. With will Ryan said the resources we have part of that money. And that's certainly ties into the economy. And I'm gonna talk about how you can stimulate the economy like a minimalist in a moment. But it also has to do with your time your attention your energy and in. No, I don't think everyone is going to become a minimalist. I don't think you could force everyone. We. He can't force everyone to do anything at this point. And so you're not going to force anyone to do, by the way. I don't want to force people to become minimalist. What that's a really bad plan. I want inspire people to live more deliberately whether or not you call that sustainability or friendly or you call that minimalism or simplicity or intention -ality. I don't care what you call it. What is them? You put on it. What I'm more concerned about is. Maybe I can inspire few people to live more deliberately to live. A more meaningful life with less, but not force them into that situation for some people living with Christmas decorations. It is worth having right? 'cause we all have different things that you would think is important, and I wouldn't my sister is obsessed with Christmas, and I'm never going to try to take that away from her. So I think we would never see the extinction of Christmas decorations because there are some people out there who do value that enough for that to be something that they continue to one of my ex-girlfriend's her mom had. I've counted one time owes like over three hundred. Santa's that were in her house lake. It was just statue. Some of them were. No, no, it was. It was interesting though. Because I started to notice this. It was when I counted them. It was like the first year that we sort of the minimalist Stockholm. Like, let's interesting she has all these sane is. But the thing is like hurt house is beautiful during Christmas time. Like, she. Absolutely. Does a good job of displaying these in a way that it really makes you feel that warm fuzzy holiday feeling and you're right. Like, I would never wanna take that away from anyone. That's the key. The key. Takeaway here is we can appreciate things whether it's a Picasso painting. Yeah. I don't think I'll ever have enough money to own a Picasso painting, by the way, if I did I can I don't think I would buy one, right? There's something else. I could do with that money. However, it doesn't mean I can't appreciate to lack Ma they have a whole Picasso display. And I can appreciate that without needing to hoard the thing to own the thing to have the thing for my self. In fact, it's actually better that it's a museum because I'm not the only one who can appreciate that. Now. And the same is true with the Santa imagine if your former girlfriend's mother, just like hoarded them in a special room just for herself. It wouldn't have had the same impact the other people that were like, wow, this is really cool. I can appreciate this. And I think that's that's that's what we were. We need to start where it comes to. It's not about not owning anything. It's about having access to the things. We don't want to own. It's really nice whether it's shared ride services or a community pool or you can go to house a kid in the eighties in Dayton, Ohio. We went to a basketball I didn't own a basketball court because again that's something else. I'll probably never be able to afford having my own backyard basketball court, but who cares? As long as I have access to one. That's that's what's important. Yeah. I think if we ask ourselves with any items that, you know, insert whatever their besides Christmas decorations like asking ourselves like our life better. Or is it worse without it? And if it's worse, if you're depriving yourself like that is not what any of us really are trying to propagate here. It's not about deprivation, it's not about making yourself miserable. It's about doing things deliberately so we can stay off those impulses that we all have one thing. We can all agree on is we live in a very consumerist dick impulsive buying society that it's not sustainable, and I mean, what's the statistic of everyone? Consumed a lake an American. It would take. Yes. Something crazy like eight to six. Yeah. It's it's it's just not sustainable. Well, you know what? Nathan I'm gonna send your copy of our book. Essential. It's an essay collection with twelve different chapters about twelve different areas of intentional living. But one of showers about. Finances, and there's an essay in there called stimulate the economy, like a minimalist, I'm going to read an excerpt from that really quick for you. But if you like our podcast the audiobook version of that book, it's our longest idea book. I think it's over six hours, or if you want the book or the book podcast, Sean will be happy to send you those as well, if everyone immediately stop spending their money our economy would crash this goes without saying consequently, one of the biggest supposed- arguments, many people have against minimalism is that if everyone became a minimalist than we'd all be doomed the financial system as it stands today would collapse and no longer we have the wealth necessary to purchase cheap plastic crap from WalMart. There are several problems with this point of view, some obvious some bit more abstruse. I know informed person would argue that we should stop spending money or that we must stop consuming consumption is not the problem consumerism is the problem consumerism is is compulsory vapid, pernicious, impulsive unfocused and misguided. Worst of all it is Saddam active consumerism, shiny facade promises more than it can possibly deliver. Because love happiness contentment, and satisfaction are all internal feelings that cannot be commodified and the truth is that once our basic needs are met the acquisition of trinkets does little for our lifelong wellbeing using consumerism to stimulate the economy is like fixing cracked MIR with a hammer it only worsens the problem. Yes. Trade is an important part of any society. Circumventing consumerism, however, doesn't imply that minimalists sidestep commerce rather minimalism is predicated on attention -ality which. Means we spend our money more deliberately minimalist. Invest in experiences over possessions travel. Indie concerts, vacations, community, theater, etc. We can all spend money without acquiring new material things, I guess an important point here lay. You're still stimulating the economy is doing so differently. Right. You still spending money as someone who's interested? In sustainability is you're not saying I'm never going to use money again. The goal and you're not allergic to money either. No last time I checked. Minimalist by new possessions carefully. We do so to do. So we must ask better questions. Like will this thing at value to my life in a moment? We'll talk about six questions we ask before purchasing. That's one of them minimal support local businesses Lok windy shops tend to be less motivated by profit. Sure, they need to make money to keep the lights on. And there's nothing wrong with that. But earning a buck usually isn't the primary concern of a local bookstore restaurants or or bike shop there. I'm business because they're passionate about their product or service, and they want to share that passion with their patrons. Passion, begets, greater quality and better service, which makes the money they earn. Well deserved. Ultimately, minimus aren't alternately minimal aren't concerned or interested. In stimulating. The economy stimulation is a federal we rather improve. Our economy's long-term health by making better individual decisions about consumption getting involved in our community and support. Supporting local businesses who care if more people do this will build a stronger economy one that's predicated on personal responsibility and community interaction. Not a false sense of urgency and the mindless stockpiling of junk, we never needed in the first place. Ryan with time is Thomas, it is time for our lightning round where we answer questions from social media and deed, we do at the minimalist on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. We have Shelby here. She's at shell busily, which will put a link to that in the show. You can't spell there. Several ease at the end there. And openly all her social media in the show notes as well. What's our first question? Ryan a first question is from Nicole from patriot on she says Amazon makes it too easy to be impulsive, very very true. But it's so convenient since I don't like shopping and person. How can I cut back shall visible? Let's really interesting. A lot of people look at Amazon is a way to get things really fastened impulsivity. But for me shopping online stocks from looking through all the aisles at a store. I don't know if you guys have a similar like viewpoint on it. But I don't have to walk through the aisles at the store and see all the stuff that. I don't need sell for me Amazon. I still use Amazon don't tell me. But for me. Yeah. I don't go browse Amazon. If I need something, I do this thing where I have to put it on a list and wait thirty days. So you've got boundaries set up. Right. I mean, that's that's really would. That's that's what I would tell them coal here. I mean, my my short answer is no boundaries equals. No impulse control. So he set boundaries up lake that you give yourself a thirty day waiting period, or you go to Amazon, and you just or the one thing that you went there for it is difficult though. Like, you know, sometimes they got a little recommended stuff. I'd never thought about that point about, you know, browsing the aisles, you're right. Like, that's that is that's actually kind of a plus with with online shopping. Just the way I grew up because my mom I used to be the same. But my mom is shop mahalick. So we would just like that was entertainment for us going to the stores and walking through the aisles and just finding things. So I that is a huge part of like being a minimalist for me is not going to the mall not going to target. So it makes me think of like when I used to buy Christmas gifts. I would just, you know, had no idea what I was gonna get friends or family. So I just go to the mall, right? And like look for inspiration. Like, oh, maybe maybe we'll find some inspiration walking around. But like buying gifts that way to me is like one of the most unintentional ways. It's there's not a lot of thought in that. It's. It just shopping like that in general rain searching for consumer Ristic inspiration is not something. I'm inspired by tweet that podcast, Sean, by the way, we put all these minimal maxims and the show notes. So you can copy and share pithy answers on social media. If you like shawna's tweezers out things that sound profound and put them in the show notes force. My short answer today is today's convenience is often tomorrow's headache. And that's one thing. If we don't have the boundaries set up a thirty day boundary or Ryan, I have something called the thirty thirty rule if it costs more than thirty dollars, thirty hours. So basically a day to to buy this thing because on Amazon they've removed all the friction to the point where you might slip into consumerism because there's no friction all it's like this ice kid that you don't realize like, oh, no what? Well, actually, you do realize it when when when the boxes show up at the house, what did I do in my apartment building? Actually, they check in the box for every time that like I order something. I get an Email notification about it. And there was one day. I had a bunch of supplements coming for the stuff and been going through with my stomach, and I didn't realize why they were coming all his I didn't know they're coming different boxes. So one that had like five different boxes show up. And I'm like, I'm such a fraud. Not a real minimalist one. And then I realized oh, the this was something I intentionally purchased. They showed up and five box. Right. But we do need we do need those boundaries. Because as Ryan said without those boundaries the impulses will run wild. Absolutely our next questions from how how do I stop myself from buying food? I don't need man. He's asking ho subs. Oreos? Stop buying Oreos Ryan replaced it with better things. It was what's interesting those when when you're giving up a food habit that first week or two or even month. It is you go through this withdrawal of lake whether it's fried food or sugar. So there's a lot of discomfort that you're going to have to accept that. You're going to go through. But like now. All right. So here's here's like confession time. So yesterday, I was walking home. And I was like I have not been roscoe's chicken yet. Like, the everyone talks about roscoe's chicken in LA. And I'm like I keep talking about how I've been here for almost two years. And they keep talking about going to try it. I was starving. It's like it's just a block or two from our house so Kalt Mariah. I'm like, hey, Honey, do you wanna get a rest, rescuers chicken? She's like, yes. Been meaning to try that. So like, we go down there, and we get chicken waffles. Well, we get one order chicken waffles to share. And then I got like like side, a potato salad greens or something. I mean, all in all it wasn't like the most horrible meal in the world. But my. My point is is because I don't eat that stuff on a regular basis because mariah's need that stuff on a regular basis when we had it would just like all right? 'cause it's like, we're not we're not now if we were constantly eating, you know, fried chicken and waffles and syrup, and like which believe me is tempting to go back to that kind of. But, but if we were doing that, I'm sure like this would have been one of the best chicken waffles we've ever had. But since we have kind of cut those things out of our life like now, even when we do have it. It's not as a treat. Exactly what about you any grocery shopping tips. I'm really bad with groceries because I feel like I don't buy anything else. So food is where I kinda like let it loose a little bit. But I also don't buy anything in plastic packaging. So that restricts me a lot with I could buy Orioles anyway. Yeah. Right. So it helps you to like not by like processed foods. Yeah. Yeah. I my short answer is just a silly one is from Glenn Greg on Ross put that coffee down. Coffee's for closers sa-. Don't don't tweet that Sean. That's not my quote. But what I really do. I really need. I mean, put that food down that you're considering buying if you know, it's not good for you in the one thing that I do to stave off impulse the rule that I have in places when I go to the grocery store it had backs and I have shared list on our phones. And so we we updated together. But if it's not on that list at the store, no matter if intended to put it on the list, blueberries, they're not on the list that I'm not going to buy forced myself to go home put it back on the list. If that really wanted that bad. Yes, I'm creating an inconvenience for myself. But really what I'm doing credit enough friction to force myself to not buy those things. I don't really need time. When you don't buy something that you thought you needed you end up not missing out on it. Anyway, le- realize you didn't really care, and it didn't make a difference that you don't have. Well, my pithy answer is this. If you take away a bad habit and don't replace it with something good. It won't be long before a bad habit is back in your life. So you know, how the way you could stop buying so much food is. Yes. Create that friction create some boundaries. But find a way to still go out and get something that's enjoyable like the Oreos versus the one hundred percent. Is it Montezuma? Is that what is code over? Trader joe's. I think that's what it is. Yeah. But yeah, dark chocolate. Yeah. Which is really difficult lake. It's not a treat for the first. You're like, oh my God. Like this flavourless chocolate. Does not like it because she's had child's chocolate. Right. Yeah. But if you if you stick with it, though, your body does start to adapt your taste buds adapt. But yeah, Al you do still have to replace what you wanna stop buying? You've got to replace it with with something. Good or the bad habit. Will be right back in your life. All right looks like we have several more surprise questions this week. This is some interesting ones. I maintain good credit without bind things with credit cards. How do I stab wish financial freedom when I still must pay for essential services? How do I purchased fewer close fewer books less perfume, fewer candles and less makeup? This is why we brought you in show business. Talk to my wife about this too. So I I don't really have an opinion other than like an adjacent opinion of that. We'll talk about that in a moment. Also about other things that Ryan and also show be gotten rid of what what are we stopped buying? Why did we stop buying those things we'll dive deep on that also things? This is fascinating one things. We started buying after becoming minimalists. Is there anything that? We started buying after becoming a minimum. I got a list of a few things that might surprise. You also things we wish we could stop buying. This is real confession time. Ryan you wish you could stop by. We're gonna talk about that also six questions that ask yourself before buying something new and twelve ways to stop wasting money and take control of your stuff. And you want to hear all that? You can listen to this week's maximal episode available exclusively on patriot. That's right. You're currently listen to our weekly minimal episode. But each week Ryan, and I record in entirely different long-form maximal episode on the minimalist private podcast, which gives us the private space. We need to talk about. We don't always discuss in public. Plus patriot is the best way for us to fund this podcast and keep one hundred percent advertisement free. You subscribe to the minimalist private podcast on patriots receive a personal link. So that are minimal or I'm sorry that are maximal episodes play and your favorite podcast app. You also get access to our entire back catalogue of more than one hundred private podcast episodes. Find all the details and all the good stuff, including additional private podcast episode every week over the minimalist dot com slash support. Ryan what else you got for us this week, you know, being informed as more important than ever especially today. We just live in immune culture. And it's very easy to read him and be like Nuff said don't need to look at anything else. But man, we really got to dig into stuff. So as always just want to encourage people to read more in get informed. And now, here's some voicemail comments and tips from our listeners. Hi, FILA minimalists. I just wanted to leave this tip because it has been a recent shift in my way of thinking on the podcast, I used to hear people or even Josh Ryan discussing like consuming consciously in thinking about the companies where they purchase things I felt like that was too much work to do the research behind companies and recently, I've kind of realized that my power in a way comes from the things that I'm spending my money on in our current society. And so it actually seems like a very small price to pay to do the research and purchase products from places that care about the environment, and that treat their employees. Well, because I suppose the alternative is spending money on goods and places that may. We don't care about their employees in don't treat the environment will and then if I am purchasing from them than in a way, I am supporting those behaviors which don't align with my values. Hi, Josh, Ryan. This is Gina calling from Hershey. Pennsylvania have a listener tip for finding free reading material for avid readers on budget. There's the local library, which were usually the most familiar with. But there might be other larger libraries available to you within your state, for example, as a Pennsylvania resident you can access the materials at the Philadelphia free library absolutely for free, which was a much larger collection than my local library. I use an app called overdrive and log in with my local state library information to different collections to search from ever stepping foot into this library. I've downloaded countless audio in books. It works just like a regular library. If something isn't available you can place a hold in. You'll be notified when it's ready. I'd recommend doing some research for your state. To see if there are other libraries, you might not have known that you have access to. Our Joe thanks again to Shelby for joining us today. Thank you for being here today. We're really grateful. I wanna courage folks to check out your YouTube channel put a link to it in the show notes shakeout her videos about eco friendly living and real quick for right here. Right now, here's one thing. That's going on in the life of the minimalists. We have a side project. It's called a minimalism dot life. We partnered up with the folks. Well, Carl from minimally CMO and out Berta from five style to bring you the best in minimalist while being there's so much with minimalism. It's like we good at essays and talking about minimalism the well-being side of things. Right. Right. But you know, I'm not I don't have the best style. That's really why I have only one outfit is because like I really don't know how to dress myself. But but yeah, I mean, we've got Caro with basically with minimalist design, and then we've got a traveling. You know, some travelling aspects of minimum lease of minimalism dot life to Albert oh from minimally similar right from five staff and five. All right. If you wanna check that out its minimalism dot life. You also follow minimalism life on social media. It's at minimalism on Twitter at minimum life on Instagram some beautiful photos over there being check it out. There's a weekly journal this free wallpapers that will declutter your phone quite a bit make it beautiful. And also we've done a recent website revamp over there. So it looks beautiful minimum. Life. If you have a question comment or minimalism tip for a podcast leaves voicemail for zero six to one nine seven eight three nine or sin voice memo to podcast at the minimalist dot com. You can come in on this episode at YouTube dot com slash the minimalist. If you wanna show notes in your inbox sign up for Email list at the minimalist dot com. You also receive are simple Sunday emails each week. But never spam. Because stuff's gross for added value this week, this just happened recipes to nipsy hustle you hear about this. LA rapper thirty three years old and was he was gunned down in front of his his clothing store and was that about this. He was really pillar of community like the ideal story of someone growing up in poverty and not just leaving poverty behind. But empowering his neighborhood. He he owned several businesses in south central including the clothing store that he was killed in front of. And it's it can happen to anyone, and it's really unfortunate. But we're gonna leave you today with what he is Grammy nominated album called victory lap. It was his most recent album came out last year. And here is my favorite song from that album. It's called double up by nipsy hustle featuring belly and Dom Kennedy. If you leave here today with just one we hope this love people and use things because the opposite never works. Listen, y'all. We'll see you next time. Three jobs. I that's enough of a letter. I was. That's. I just up. Mutterings? Who knew?

Ryan Nicodemus Josh Ryan YouTube Sean Amazon Nathan Orioles Twitter Santa Volusia Lynn house LA joe Kalt Mariah Nobis Shelby
Apple Sues Virtualizer Correlium for Replicating iOS - DTH

Daily Tech Headlines

05:10 min | 1 year ago

Apple Sues Virtualizer Correlium for Replicating iOS - DTH

"These are the daily tech headlines for friday august sixteenth twenty nineteen. I'm sarah lane the bluetooth s. I i g which oversees the bluetooth standards issued a security notice about a vulnerability that wireless devices exposed to key negotiation of bluetooth or a knob attack it interferes with the bluetooth pairing procedure and can alter connections encryption key to be shorter than what it's supposed to be which allows easier brute force techniques to spy bye on data transfer between devices. The vulnerability affects devices that use bluetooth be r._d._r. Also known as bluetooth classic connections and only works if both devices establishing dabbling connection have the vulnerability apple and microsoft have already ruled out patches to fix the flaw and the bluetooth core specification has been changed to require a minimum encryption not linked on september seventeenth and eighteenth european union's general court will hear arguments in the challenges by apple and ireland in a three year old thirteen billion euro or fourteen point four billion dollar tax bill battle back in august of twenty sixteen. The european commission ordered ireland to recoup that record sum plus interest saying that apple had been given given an unfair advantage last year the u._s. Lost a bid to intervene in support of apple in the case the irish government said an email it profoundly disagrees with the decision and in other apple lawsuit news the company filed one against mobile device virtualization company corallium which describes itself as the first and only platform that offers i._o._s. Us android and lennox virtualization on arm and the southern district of florida where the lawsuit was filed apple accused corallium of copyright infringement for illegally replicating i._o._s. i._o._s. As well as iphone and ipad apps apple argues that karoly imposes its virtualization product as a research tool to help discover security vulnerabilities but that career lamb liam has simply copied everything the code the graphical user interface the icons all of it and exacting detail alibaba quarterly earnings beat expectations as e commerce and cloud computing business growth helped bring in one hundred fourteen point nine two billion one. That's about sixteen point three billion dollars in the first quarter ending june thirtieth. That's a forty two percent increase from the same period last year which raised u._s. Listed shares three percent to one hundred sixty six dollars and seventy two cents analysts expected revenue to be around one hundred eleven point seven three billion one youtube announced that copyright owners will no longer be able to monetize creator videos that include very short or unintentional uses of copyrighted headed music and youtube manual claiming tool though now be able to choose either to try to prevent the other party from monetize video or try to block the content youtube said in a blog posts that aggressive manual claiming short music clips quote can feel particularly unfair as they transfer all revenue from the creator to the claimants regardless of the amount of music music claimed however the majority of clams are currently created through youtube content i._d. Match system not the manual claiming tool u._p._s. announced. It's taking a minority stake in a thomas trucking startup too simple too simple had a previous partnership with the u._s. Postal service carrying mail between its phoenix and dallas distribution centers to simples navistar trucks trucks used nine cameras and a pair of light are sensors. The company says it's been helping u._p._s. Achieve level for autonomy which refers to full autonomy. That's locked to a designated geographic location research firm canelas latest quarterly report says that the wearables market now includes to clear sweet spots those from two hundred to two hundred ninety nine dollars and those from three hundred to three hundred ninety nine dollars which now represent eighty percent of all shipments panelists noted that in the second quarter of nineteen over sixty percent of apple's four point seven seven million global apple watch shipments were shipped in north america which is a thirty two percent bump over the twenty eighteen quarter fitbit was in second place down from the previous year with one point point nine million shipments samson garmon and fossil made up the rest of the top five all short of the others category which came in at one point three million units sega's genesis mini is launching on september nineteenth for seventy nine dollars ninety nine cents. It's fifty five percent smaller than the original genesis. It connects to your t._v. with an included h._d._m._i. Yeah my cable has two three button usb controllers to mimic original genesis game pads and features forty-two built in games sonic the hedgehog ecco the dolphin are included clued as well as third party titles like volusia and castle vania and multiplayer games like streets of rage to the price is about the same as the s._n._e._s. classic and cheaper than the ninety nine on dollars ninety nine cents playstation classic and finally researcher jane mansion one discovered that instagram is testing a slew of new features that may end up on the platform including new options for boomerang such as pause or wiggle at the end of a loop slow extra speed instagram's also testing new layout features within stories and the ability not to share comments on instagram stories and videos for more discussion of the news of the day subscribed to daily tech news show dot com remember to rate and review daily tech headlines wherever you get your podcasts. I'm sarah lane have a wonderful weekend touchy next time.

apple youtube ireland instagram sarah lane corallium volusia european union alibaba european commission navistar dallas north america u._p._s.
The future of sex: bots, bonking, biology and beyond

Science Friction

41:29 min | 2 years ago

The future of sex: bots, bonking, biology and beyond

"This is an ABC podcast. Milken science fiction live on the future of six at Melva museum. Contemplating the future of six future where six pleasure pregnancy will probably get a little bit Weeda and a little bit wild. Thank you to new technologies and our brains guests philosopher, professor rob Sparrow from Monash University who does into the future where robots become carers and also our sexual partners bioethicist to av KENDALL from Deakin university. Well, she us for a future where the use of artificial wounds. So having babies outside our bodies could help achieve equality between the sexes. And we also have professor Bob warm with us tonight a behavioral and Volusia biologist. He's lab at Monash Uni investigates, the six lives of other animals and. How are infecting dramatically changed by what we do place? Give them a big welcome. Six pleasure reproduction as it every listener biologist, they're all kind of on the same spectrum really out. There's one in point exactly it's all about posse on your genes. So I guess the bodies basically lock support system for reproduction. It's a very very anti lighting y describing. Try and do better. Because you know, biology is kind of what he's about. But it's about so much more than there. Without pleasure. Six would be boring. The pleasure sought of things is actually really crucial in terms of facilitating that drive for reproduction. Right pleasure is just about alternately procreating. Back to the boring. Animal's type pleasure in six think. So I think human sex lives quite vanilla compared to a lot of the other animals that we actually study in the animal world, we have species that actually engage in sexual cannibalism where the female actually eat the mile during sex and the mouse completely complicit in all of this. Because by being eaten alive, he's actually contributing nutrients to he's future progeny, but then also by being eaten alive, he's prolonging the actual act of sex. And so he's able to transfer more sperm to females aches say he signs up for these great perfectly. Happy to be eaten alive during set just perfectly. Happy asked them. Usually eaten headfirst he can't really see the smile on their face. From all of you, given this is a conversation about the future of six the interesting front. He's live H of you from your perspective. Rob as philosopher who's thought a lot about our relationship to take -nology don't think six is mostly about reproduction most of the time that people are having six they're trying desperately not to reproduce. So as you say, it's at least more than that. You know, the fact that we have a biology doesn't mean we should reduce everything to biology. Yes, there is an evolutionary history. But that's not why people are doing they're doing it because they board. They're doing it drunk or they're doing because there's nothing else to set. I not. I mean, there's all sorts of actually they want someone who produce the list of two hundred reasons why people had six and having a baby is nowhere near the top of that list is an awful lot of boring sakes that happens in people's bedrooms. But what do you think what happens in people's band? Brooms will look like in the future. I mean, I think people going to still be having sex the old fashioned way for a long time. Because despite all I slightly deflationary remarks people do tend to enjoy it. Philosophies. That one really skillfully. Why else would you have a philosophy degree? I guess the thing that is of most interest to me at the moment is remote six so six where people are interacting via telly deal, Don IX or internet enabled six toys, for instance. So there's already six toys marketed to people for long distance relationships where they transmit the motions of the genitals to each other's devices. Just a sensation it's a movement. Yes, you can certainly control the vibrations on your partners vibrate from your mobile phone or indeed your desktop anywhere in the world. So so they're abs- for this now. Oh, yes. And this sort of remote six is interesting because there's lots of circumstances where you won't really know who you're having sex with even think, you know. Essentially, you've got a something that looks like a vibe writer and something that looks like a mile mess to Bida and they both bluetooth enabled bluetooth into your computer, and you logged onto a website and they're talking to each other. And hopefully, you're transmitting some sensation to each other nowadays people are also getting there either on Skype together in the future, they'll be involved in virtual reality. And so they'll be having something I suspect this is really mutual simultaneous masturbation rather than six, you know, you could think of this as being like a very long conned on. Ten thousand kilometers. Yes. Yes. So you very Sipe six potentially to gets hacked. So that's. That's kind of what I think thinking about. So you think you're having sex with your partner? And in fact, someone has intercepted the signals between those devices, and in fact, you're having sex with someone else, and I think that would actually be right? And then those cases where you might hook up with someone in a chat room. And they say look, you know in my name's fan. I'm six foot three. You know, I'm I'm a corporate lawyer and infect a Harry, too, and you know, a corporate lawyer. There's some questions here around what it is that you sign up for what sorts of things are important to consensual six when people lie to each other. Whether that can main that consent is invalid for instance. I think there's a future in which has more long distance six more sexual encounters in inside the spice Modu, there's a fair amount of masturbation joing anyway. Well, end notoriously win, the British security services were intercepting, everybody's Skype conversations they discovered that they were having real problems because they I was spending a lot of time watching people mess debating, and they Rimma has it they actually developed a software solution would automatically detect when you you'd intercepted a Skype. Call let involvements debate basin and block it out. So the agents weren't stopped having fun. Yeah. Or joy isn't. Never expected that the British security office would have come up in this conversation tonight. So thank you for going. Aby, we've managed to make babies as Bob was explaining is the primary function of sex with Minnesota might babies without six get quite successfully. In fact. Two point that the primary goal of six is reproduction because that's actually limiting what sixes. Only certain types of six actually lead to procreation there's a whole spectrum sexual activities, but also, you know, sexualities in which having sex does not lead to procreation, or at least at present it doesn't. And that's where a lot of the emerging technologies in reproductive medicine might be really interesting so something like an artificial womb could be used for a game male couple that want to have a child they could have an egg all we could use skin cells, and we can actually produce situation give me two sites in that way. So we can actually come up with the material that we need, or at least we think we can we're not really loud to do it. But. Just remind. We want exam spoon to be created from another type of cell eggs. We wouldn't need spoon. We wouldn't need main or women particularly could just be a skin cell of anyone get convinced them to an egg cell or spin. So pop them in an artificial women. Hey, presto, you've got a baby absolutely right. Which I reiterate we are not allowed to do. It is important that we remember that we allowed to do you became obsessed with this possibility as a scholar what drew you in as a bioethicist into contemplating a future where we might the to heaven artificial women. In fact, went when not not close. There are uterus. Transplants that have been successful Abe, enable women who didn't have a women to have children. So what drew you in? Well, I found that offficial wombs actually sold at number of problems that nothing else was going to solve. So we counteract. Some forms of infertility using things like issue or out of fishing semination. But there's still a subset of individuals who can't get pregnant or don't want to get pregnant full which not official room can actually help. And there's a lot of reasons why a woman may not want to be pregnant it might not be safe. She made us not want. It totally valid wanting to be a parent is not the same as wanting to be pregnant. And then of course, you've got the people who are born without a worm whether they be male or female, if they're born without a worrying they cannot be pregnant at present. So this is that would solve a number of problems that we don't currently solve so technologically an enormous challenge. And last year, we saw a preemie lamb immature lamb taken from a womb of its mother shape mother and put in essentially a bag of bio bag, and it was carried through to term and born and it lived. So it was a lamb. Bag just hated in a bag and it worked. Yes. It did. So we are inching closer way, but it's a huge technological challenge. What sort of conditions? Do we have to create? Well, yes, there's three major things that we need. We need a physical structure, which is actually pretty easy. We can either bio scaffold. We can three D print using in Dmitrios cells. We could have transplanted tissue that we keep outside of body that parts not too hard. We need amniotic fluid for pressure and to support the developing Fatus, or at least we think we do that one's actually quite easy. We already have some functional amniotic fluid that we can use. But then we need a really good method of oxygenating the developing Fatus and providing nutrients, and that's the really tricky one. So an artificial placenta is what we really need. So they are some studies going on particularly in Italy. They do have some functional products that they using for premature infants and I think an official worm is essentially going to be created. By accident. I think we're just going to push the boundaries of how young a feta's bone prematurely will be put in something like a humidity. Crib. Because at the moment, it's twenty three weeks. He's the cop, isn't it? And that's because of that oxygenation problem. So it's the undefined lungs, it'd be issue. So if we can find a way to actually provide nutrition provide oxygen that we could do it at the moment, we only have air-based incubation machines. We would like to have a fluid based one to solve that problem. And that's what we currently missing. So that is the step, and of course, with the lamb in ziplock lamb, if you want to Google it. Give yourself nightmares. Really last. You was a really viscerally may just Google it who's looking at on. They phone right now. Yeah. Yep. It's a bit horrific. And it's not first time we've had several other animal studies that have done similar things Blong as biologist isn't Volusia biologist when you hear about these sort of intervention in the reproductive process in the sexual lives of animals, what comes to mind, but I think there is an evolutionary challenge. So I study sexual selection as distinct from six election sexual selection as the concept that Charles Darwin came up with to explain the Lucien of really bizarre traits like the title of the peacock or the Antlers of stags, and he recognized that animals evolved. These traits driven by the the struggle to reproduce as individuals compete for the opportunities to reproduce. And we know that things like female mate choice plays a really important role in determining for example, matings. Compatible mates. So when you have interventions like, this, you are bypassing some really important ever Lucien processes as well, and we actually really seeing that with assisted reproductive technologies when you're taking away millions of years of evolution, and creating I guess babies artificially, creating sometimes issues health problems that manifest later on when the babies are born, so we I think we're bypassing these really important issues. We've all heard about stories of those experiments have been done where people wear t shirts, and they take the t shirts off, and they give it to women to smell and women. Right. The attractiveness of those t shirts, and we know that linked in with the genetic compatibility we see that in humans. We also see this in animals, so there are genetic compatibility. So in the case of the t shirts, it's linked with M H C genes, which linked to immunity, so we choose mates. The ideas. We choose mates to maximize immunity for the offspring that we subsequently produce. So we try and find partners that very dissimilar to us in terms of their, gene. So that hopefully, our children will have a broader. I guess said of resistance to the challenges they might encounter you'll sign. This is all knows led by faira moans and smelly tation cermony things. Come into play smell is important. We know in humans. We know. There are lots of visual cues are important. I've been involved in research the show that women do actually prefer men with big penises. Unfortunately. Unfortunately. So strength voice pitch. There's a hole through of different things that we know emportant in human may choice, and they play really fundamental role in terms of picking partners that can deliver good genes or they can deliver. Yes. Good genes, compatible jeans or trading partners that can deliver good resources. So when we do this work on mice or human. We did some work on human the pain of the FIS work. Yes. It was published in a journal call Pena's penis with that was inside. A scientist joke that we thought it'd be appropriate to publish research on penises. You love that. So you do you think that we should be attached to these evolutionary ways of kind of evolutionary story around six and its function. And why would you be concerned that we might be kind of bypassing all those may choice, dynamics and tangos that go on using technology that you shoe is at least in the medical room. The canary angle hasn't really been given much attention recently, the with fine to realize that derive issues, for example with a sister reproductive technologies not just for humans. But also when we're trying to conserve endangered species that the drive there is to is to try, and I guess create as many corroborate frogs as possible and finding ways that we can do that, obviously. But then we are bypassing fundamental process of might choice. Can we feel that these two way? Sparrow, and then I'll come back to you look to seems extraordinary to say that the medical profession hasn't been concerned with things that they describe as Evelyn, fitness. I mean, there's an enormously long and shameful history of the medical profession deciding who can in can't have children on the basis of rice, est, and sexist and Heim Afo beacon closest all of every poll motivation. You can attribute to people, you know, doctors with lots of lettuce after their nines have said, you know, isn't terrible full the species that Paul people having babies, so this was the basis of the jenex movement, which was much more widely supported internationally, and within the medical profession, then people realize it was a big hub in Melbourne here. Yes. People have sort of rewritten at history to think it was all about fascism, but actually, this is absolutely stock standard medical teaching was that we have got to try to have the best buy. These possible. And that means that we should be sterilizing people. So I mean it really driven by volition airy biology, though. So what I'm saying is that we using the signs of evolutionary biology to hopefully provide some insights into things like hot official wombs or assisted reproductive technologies. So I think there's a there's a difference there. But some of those people were claiming to be able to sugary biologists. So actually sort of eugenic concerns go right to the heart of the sort of studies of volition, plus kiss about the Spacey's when it comes down to any any of this stuff, really one ks. Evolutions goals? L goals? We have I mean, either everything we do is natural in which case this stuff will all come out in the wash. Okay. There's no purpose to any of it. Some people will have kids and win win. They have kids will say, oh, what a successful. We're going to them. All all your point out that all Gassim as the case. No, no. I mean, but also at another level the moment, we started wearing shoes and people stopped dying that made it easy for the easier for the skinny people with less body hair to survive. So technology intervenes with Evelyn at a really basic level that concerns you somewhat Bob here. So I can think of some modern societal issues where I think more of an evolutionary perspective might actually help to anticipate or void problems. The my come down the track. So two men spem sells a cheap to produce them. We produce millions. Of them for females the AIG is relatively larger expensive more expensive in the case of internally foot allies species like humans, we spend a lot of time being pregnant and that is quite costly as well. So what we see in some societies nowadays is they're actually millions of women that are missing from the population demographic and some countries because of things like six elected abortions or infanticide. And as a result is actually now a skew in sex ratios in some countries like China and India, and we know from ever Lucien theory that when you skew sex ratios, you actually increase competition, and there's going to be a lot of men out there. They're going to be missing out on the opportunity to secure a mate, and we already know from crime statistics that unmarried men are actually more likely to commit a crime and ready in some of these countries has been an increase in shoes like sex trafficking. So I think an illusion. Perspective on some some of these issues can hopefully enrich and enliven the debate to interrogate every single one of the connections. You may because ever Latian revile Ogies fascinating that way about in terms of what stories it tells us air condition, and what what we take from what we push away, I guess, but I want to come back to av because both just referred to the expensive nature of pregnancy for women very expensive. It's a great burden and it ends up being financially expensive and women's careers. Get was often and I find it hard to get back on track. Now, all these things kind of build into the argument that you make in a book that you wrote on echo Genesis idea of using artificial wombs to breed that it might be rather a good thing. Liberating thing for women in particular. Yes, I think it's really important to know. It's liberating thing to have the option. So if we have for example, and I'm going to go. To the most tragic case here so bit of a trigger warning for you. If we have a woman who is morally opposed to termination of pregnancy for whatever reason, and she has been the victim of forced sex, and has found herself pregnant there is no acceptable option for what to do next. Now. Obviously the solution to that problem is to not have rape in the universe. I recognize that that is what we wanted. That is our goal. However, given where we are now at the moment, this is a reality fa-, some women, and we have absolutely nothing to offer them, that's even vaguely acceptable to that individual that would elect to heaven, above course, image and some women would choose to have that child, and they would either choose to give it up for adoption or to raise it, everyone is different. But the ease that subsection for which we don't have an alternative that we desperately need. And of course, we also have people who for example may have lost the uterus to cancer. They always wanted to have their child. They wanted to be pregnant having a Sarget. That experience full them is not acceptable to them. So for some of them, they would rather have an artificial room, then have a Sarget and for some people that I would rather that than adult. Now. Of course, everyone is different. There are plenty of people who perfectly happy adopting a child in Nate. And that he's absolutely fantastic. But we often have to defend if pro Genesis the idea that we're going to replace biologist station, of course, as I said, we're really not most people s still going to use the traditional method. This is not about forcing one particular view of sex reproduction or anything on anyone because you do know that the anti-abortion community of APL safeties as a possible solution. They do that you could make women give birth to a baby, but they do it outside of their body. Some arguments have been put forward that way. It's actually quite interesting that even women who are personally against him nation of pregnancy. In many cases, if you offer an artificial way miserable. Tentative. They actually don't want that either. So there's a lot going on there, and it's actually quite complicated. But as you're saying the investment for women ease so much greater, and we know that a lot of stereotypes about women as k give as potentially pregnant people it does impact their social and financial wellbeing. So that is very well recognized. And it you something that an artificial. He's not gonna fix that problem, obviously. But it eased gonna make people stop and think so that all of a sudden it weren't bay that women on necessarily a bad investment for promotion because they might get pregnant because they male counterparts. Also, get pregnant doesn't give this isn't just adding an option that this will make it very difficult, for instance, for a woman who wants to be successful in Korea and also to enjoy pregnancy. I mean, one solution is to try to change the economics of Korea's to speak. Nations. But if you say to Rio Tinto, look, he's this technology that will allow you or executives to keep on working twenty four hours a day and can have kids in genetically modified goat. I don't see that as adding options. I actually think that's taking away and option you could imagine women being forced to be good solid little workers. Sauce that outsource being forced to add source. They pregnancy to obey well again until you said the offficial goat. I was going to tell you we already do that. But that we don't do essentially things like companies that are offering free egg freezing for the female, see, ios, etc. I mean, that's it's an extension of that women are already being demonized choosing to be pregnant because it's economically inconvenient for their employer. And of course, very well recognized official Williams could exacerbate that problem, but it doesn't create the problem women being told they can't follow whatever reproductive future they want because of their job. That's a problem that already exists, and we already very much need to deal with we can actually put in place, the ethical and political sort of structure that we want to release his technology on because. Yes, these problems do exist. They already exist. We could exacerbate them actually at a point where we can prevent some of that from happening. Okay. So we've talked about bonking we've. Talked about beats we've talked about we'll come to both Stena teak, but I'm gonna come to Beatles. Sexy because you'll you'll work. Bob long is is focused on understanding how the six laws of other animals and indeed our own potentially by the same triggers being screwed literally what we do. So we are really messing up the Slavs of all sorts of Spacey, we're really screwing up the sex laws of species. So the baby question, it's a good example. It's an Australian example, so Don gara- it situated in Western Australia, and in the nineteen nineties to into Malla GIS were wondering around the Bush nearby town, and they came across rather intriguing thought so male jewel beetles had developed a sexual predilection for discarded be about -als that had been left behind strewn across the Bush. So the reason for this was because the bagels. Bunking the b-battle the Beatles with bunking the bottles. And I think that the name of the title of the pipe was something like Beatles on the bottle. Who says biologists done have a sense of humor? So what's funny, but said these funny and also quite sad. Because what was actually happening was the the Brown. Shawny surfaces of the MTV bottles actually bear a striking resemblance to the Brown. Shawny surfaces of the full wings of real females except for one notable difference. Right. The be bottles actually 'Lajja, then a real female so actually coming across being much six. Yeah. Then a real female was so the acting as a super normal stimulus for the males. So apart from missing out on reproductive opportunities. The researchers found that these poor males also being eaten alive by meet Hans. Was no hope it was very sad. That could be the end of the Spacey's. Yes. So I mean, be bottles. The one thing an object environment with polluting environments in all sorts of ways, we peace out into the waterways antidepressants the peel. We make a lot of noise. So this noise pollution, these visual pollution, all these you. You are measuring directly affecting the six. Affecting animals kinds of peculiar in some cases on expected ways. So birds sing to attract females females can get a lot of information from the songs from from the miles. And what researchers have found around the world is that because of the noise having to elevate the pitch of this song. So that they can simply be be heard a noisy environment. And we don't quite know how these adjustments might actually affect the ability of females to gauge the quality of the miles of potential suitors. What many people don't appreciate is that the medicines that we take whether we give to animals can find their way into rivers and into lakes and even into drinking water. So he's looked at growth whole minds used in the kettle industry. For example, having a dramatic impact on guppies. Yes. On the sex lives of fish. It's been banned while the European Union since the nineteen nineties, but still widely used them any parts of the world, including Australia, North, America and parts of Asia. And. They're a powerful steroid synthetic steroids. That are present in these homeowner growth promoters that we've been studying these chemicals that have fifteen to fifty times the potency of testosterone. And in fact, bodybuilders abuse of one of the chemicals. We actually look at trenbolone. We're talking about levels at extremely learn anagrams Pelita will pots petroleum changing be sexual behaviors of fish female piece that are exposed to trend balloon less responsive sexually this choosy. When it comes to potential nights, males, also changing, the reproductive behaviors. And got piece males can either court females and gets matings consensually or they can engage in coercive or sneak matings guppies are unusual in that they're internally fertilized so miles of got this modified fin coil Ghana perdiem which uses to inseminate the females and what we found was the exposure to trenbolone actually caused miles to increase their coercive, mating strategies. Which actually possible sick? Invent female mating decisions are the same chemicals in Leitch ING out into waterways Famas cynical 's growth whole minds for the Catalin distri affecting our sexual behavior. Sexual. Sexual hormones is definitely concerned. So the will Health Organization is very very concerned about pharmaceuticals contamination of drinking water pharmaceuticals and already that they're a group of chemicals known as endocrine disruptors and this so cold because they have the ability to mess up with the normal hormone functioning of animals, and humans and debate about them. There's been a lot of debate. Controversial. But what we know in humans sperm count has been decreasing over the decades. There's been an increase in male genital deformities in countries such as Australia, and it's believed that exposure to some of these so-called endocrine disrupters might actually be responsible. So so definitely there is the risk that the chemicals that we're pumping out into the environment. Could be having a devastating impact not just on wildlife, but on humans as well. Roby wanted to pick up. Oh, look if you worried about the impact of chemistry on might choice. Can I remind you that the Bob will be open until I. This is this a serious point there if you were looking at society, and you wanna say what's came ical that was affecting who has kids and win. They have kids look no further than your local. So I mean, again, we always came ical environment is the defendant will look wacky, girth hormone stuff, but it's pretty clear that drugs affect decisions that people might about when they have six and who they had six with. Yes. And in this case, though, we might be actually ending the ending hall Spacey's differences that drinking beer or wine is not gonna make his son grow small, the penis, which is the very real risk of what's happening. So I always think about those cigarette packaging where they show you. What could happen? If you smoke a lot. I think it'd be really effective if we actually have pictures of what's your child's penis. Look like if you're exposed to certain chemicals because it's raw rob horrific. Getting the the alcohol industry is support that one because I can tell you now it's been very hot just saving getting these warnings on on beverages. His quota hated debate in the strategy to be campaign around that we. Haven't even got to bought yet but sex spots. Hia rub not here. Could be. But they exist they're expensive, and they very plastic really wouldn't wanna spoon one invaded, but they exist and what what does that throw up for you in terms of where we're heading. So I think it says something sort of depressing about both human beings, and engineering profession that this is such such kind of hot topic at the moment, and that sort of human ingenuity is being directed towards making these devices importantly rickety racing. What if six pots gave people a lot of pleasure. And a lot of joy, why is that depressing? I mean, these technologies always in offering options do reach although options, so one thing to worry about here is is the circumstance with someone might actually makes a real human being. But in fact, this dying at home with this x-ray, but that's going to actually be quite bad for the quality of life. One thing we know is that people die of loneliness. I mean social relations, I really important to human health, and these things are not providing human relationships it is important to recognize. When people think about sex, they not walking around, you know, they really Dole's life-sized light Dole's with the sort of speech recognition that you've already got in your mobile phone and a little bit of animation around the mouth and the genital area. The other reason why I think it said is because if you look at the cons of social messages that design of sex robots is sending its very old messages. The most important thing about a woman is her body the best the best woman has got an almost breasts women are only good for one thing. I means a whole series of real question of do the do we design the six boats with an eye that allows them to give consent. Yes. So in some of my research, I've been interested in what it would cya 'bout someone if they were having sex that look. Just like nonconsensual sex with a robot, and it's important to distinguish here between the idea that you really need to ask the right about permission because these are essentially ides domestication, that's not a person. It's not something you need to ask for its psych for permission. But there's something strange about the sort of repeatedly and physically enacting what seems to be for instance, a fantasy of ripe. But one thing we do know about six fry robots is that this idea that it might be sixty if they didn't wanna have six, and you could still have six ripe out, and it's an agent of you. Holy. But actually to be Frank. I think a significant portion of the market for sex robots will be robot fetishists, they really will be people who wanna have sex with robots because that's the kind of thing. But they're also very clear that these represent with. One of the kind of things that I wish I didn't know about six Dole's is that you can buy replaceable hymens full them. So that you can say that now that I know it. All that. So that you know, any kind of the genie in a robot makes no sense at all. So whatever is going on that is about the fantasy of well that's happening in women to they have to get their and stitched up because it's culturally appropriate for them to have its teached up. So again, it's an extension already happening hard not to think of that as slightly depressing. Aby, your argument for the artificial womb was a feminist iky meant that it could liberate women to an extent from the biological and social bids of pregnancy while still in idling them to have children lots to debate there, of course. But as you're listening to this, what do you think that six bouts mutt? Main for the relationship between the sexes. But I think is really interesting that the examples they all six boats that looked like girls they would basics to look like guys I've got some ladies in the room that inaudible here. Yeah. And I mean, of course, there there are plenty of six that are exclusively for women what we need to be consumed about if there is a patent in which women being degraded, and of course, there is real risk of that with sex pots, and if we have people who are engaging rape, fantasies. What does that actually mean? Does it mean they netting those fantasies on real women? Does that women's Saif? Is it Sipho or doesn't mean they just going to escalate because they fading into this as opposed actually dealing with that problem and avoiding that violent predilection. Yeah. We do have pretty good daughter on sex Dole's, for instance. So there is this mole Maka in mile six holes actually that market. Is it self largely rented towards men as well? So there mile extols sex attracted man, there's very very few heterosexual women buying mile stole. So that's because it's predominantly men that making them awesome baked and if women design them and marketed them. You never know. People just might be more interesting. I think you'd have to restructure the sort of a whole series of Gendun messages around around desire and human relationships for that to be realistic again vibrators great six twenty four women. As far as I know. But the idea that it also has to have picks for instance that same. I'm just not sure that that's that important for for women, anyway, lots of fashions estimates might go for kind of skinny sort of six. Spinney weighty six robot? He has a big brain. Which is a euphemism full that other thing talking about the recent robotic connection to that you'll doing on the six lots of other animals colleagues and myself, we sometimes use things like robots to study in the sex of animals, so giving the Spacey's six boats. Yeah. Pretty much so leaks North America. For example, have designed fem bots birds, basically used that the skin of a real female bird. And then obviously put a robot inside to try and understand male courtship behaviors or colleague that works on fiddler crabs in northern Australia and has designed a robot fiddler crab able to manipulate the right of the wave of the democrat. So we know they crows the way they close to attract females for mating. And we know from that kind of research that females prefer males that have highway rights by using using robots can actually. Study things that you might not be able to study with real animals, and then from a conservation perspective, those kinds of technologies can actually serve a really important conservation purposes. Well, in terms of getting very rare dangerous species to help them to reproduce as a side the six idea. It didn't realize the conversation was going to go in this direction that let's think rub. Sparrow, AB KENDALL bomb. You've been listening to an ABC podcast. Discover more great ABC podcasts. Live radio and exclusives. On the ABC. Listen up.

official rob Sparrow Spacey Bob ABC Australia Dole partner Volusia rape Beatles Evelyn professor Google Monash Uni Korea Skype Weeda
Messages From Her Heart: Regrets, Forgiveness, Stillness, + New Beginnings

Your Own Magic

35:40 min | 1 year ago

Messages From Her Heart: Regrets, Forgiveness, Stillness, + New Beginnings

"You. Low soul tribes. So this was intended to be a mini sewed has happened. It would just be fifteen to twenty minutes, but it's slightly longer. But the beautiful thing is is that there are no guidelines. So from now on though, I do intend I have set the intention to do other mini subs with words that I write and perhaps Minnesota that are much shorter than this with some of my writings, and sometimes elaborations, but I also want to say happy birthday to my mom. My mom had just turned sixty years. Young today. I love you. Thank you. For listening to every episode. This episode is dedicated to a seven short message from sponsor with an offer. That includes the word F R E to all of my curious friends interested in personal development and self expansion or just would like to dip your toe in. To creating one or more things for yourself to enhance your life. Well, skill share has an even better offer for you them before they are now, offering the soul tribe, two months four free. When you go to skill share dot com slash your own magic. They have over twenty five thousand online courses from creative courses like writing or poetry or even for Taga fy and drying video editing, and culinary and even practical tips for businesses for your social media marketing, or your management and so much more. And also they have tech causes lifestyle. Classes and health, wellness, classes and language classes, just an abundance of courses for free for you for an entire two months. So begin developing your self enhancement when you go to skill share dot com for its lash your own magic that skill share dot com slash your own magic. And now on with the show. Let's take one deep breath. Just to ground us. Bring us to this present moment. Take a deep breath thin. Next Hal release. Thank you for listening to the same being hair. I may sound a little congested. I am adapting to the cold weather. And so my nose was in the mood to be a little stuffy. 'cause it was like why did you take me out of the warm weather? But it's okay, I felt the spark of inspiration to record this. I've been wanting to it's been in the back of my mind for a while to do these little mini episodes. And right now, I am. Here. I am present. I am in spirit ever somewhere. Its to remind myself of the truth that sometimes I can easily get in my head about and be frustrated over Saad over though, it's not explicit as to what it is. I it's just the core. Emotions of what my hardest feeling in what my soul needed to here. So here are the words. Stillness? It go. Less than. See? NB? Stillness laco. Lesson. I see. And be. Doing these simple things you are giving yourself permission to love. What is to love where it is to love the world and love yourself for a moment. Until allow for new beginning as change and evolution is only promise is only guaranteed. But to sit in the space where you recognize your pain. You're you're heartbroken. You're feeling a little less than you're feeling. A little more challenged. It is in the seat of stillness that you not only show up for the grace of the universe to have a moment of peace within all the chaos to show up for yourself. For your heart. Has it and like? Please honor these moments of stillness to give recognition to whatever it is that you are going through because. In sitting with it. He released seeing this energy now instead of in another way and in another four. If it's true that all energy cannot be created or destroyed that means whatever negative thoughts are negative stories or difficult pass events or thought created future events spin in your mind in times time travel, our mind tends to spend a something that may sabotage our power for a moment. And sometimes we may act on this sabotage because it's an energy that had been exchanged that is sitting inside of us. And if we don't release it in the stillness in bringing our awareness to it, then this energy will find another way to lash out. Sometimes through anger. Sometimes, sir tears. Sometimes their judgment, others or have yourself. Sometimes walking through the pantry. Sometimes finding and instead release in a hit. A set. By or a nice. So in this done is we recognize this energy give love and compassion for having this experience with the Senate G as part of our humanly contract. And then when we're ready. Before we like of ourselves. And when our minds are free when our pain is floating away transcending into something beauty. We become a little more beautiful within. And so we shall listen. Stillness? Let go. Less. Receive? And be. Stillness leka. Lesson receive envy. It's amazing that we don't know that we know, you know. And that knowing comes through from the stillness from the release from the listening, perhaps it's a little whisper a little nudge. That reminds us of our sparkle that gifts us with an idea an inspired idea from her soul, reminding us to now act from a place of love in guiding us to now influence from a place of a wisdom and painting a picture of what a future may bring. But magic the future may lead. While we list said, and why we receive so our hearts open a little wider as the corners of our lips lift a little slider. Allowing these messages to come through to us, perhaps we see vivid image standing in laughing with those. We love standing in the shoes of which we've dreamed of. Way received these messages from the grace of the universe. Coloring variety future shifting that once gray color into more of a rainbow. Because we turn to grace when we were drowning in the rain. Stillness? Let go lesson. Recei? And be. And now that we've received clarity remembered are light release. Whatever had once been arrested are cloudy mind for a moment. Just a moment. We tapped into the depths of our inner knowing our inner wisdom, our soul. To let it be. Tell ourselves be and to simply just be. Stillness? Let go. Listen. Recei and be. And be. Hello sole try. So I wrote this moments ago knowing that I had planned for a surprise many sewed this Thursday for you. And I'm a little congested. But that's okay. Because I really don't care to post perfection. I just want to create. It's just the process of creation, and it's beautiful. We're all different seasons. And so yeah, I'm a little congested right now. It's okay. But what's amazing? I realized that I had this rhythm with the podcast. Now, you know, no matter where I'm planted on earth. I could be in London ho why Spain wherever and I feel so called to continue to expand it as I have this rhythm in momentum. But expand it in a way where I'm just delivering more delivering more messages messages from. My heart in more of my writings, don't get me wrong, interviewing others and hearing is from their experiences in our soul is what brings me the most joy in the world. You know, I I love connection, and I love hearing how others create something of great miss to share with the world. So I can learn how to you know, reflect their greatness MIR their greatness for myself. But also, so we can learn how to for ourselves and for others and just there are so many benefits from whatever it is. They have to share. But I realized I ride a lot. And we all have a story. We all do we all have an engaging story. We all have many stories, in fact, many different stories to share that will make hopefully at least one person one human feel less alone in an area. Like just think about that one life just like you you can impact just with your one story. One person's life one person's life. That is huge. I know that just one small negative wisdom from anyone on this podcast can do that with one person even the one and a half hour to two hour episodes. They might really just resonate with that one message or how that person made them feel that can change a person's life in every way, and we all have these stories to share. So we should I'm excited to share more my stories hear more my writings here of my heart's interpretation through my writing in. So I can understand him better understand it. I hope that may be just one thing might resonate with you in some way. So I'm feeling really called to you know, do more of these little mini sodas from the soul. But this idea didn't even come to mind, I knew as do many. So like I said like I knew I was going to record something today to post for Thursday. What you're listening to this? And. I couldn't think of anything that. I wanted. That was like everything's been talked about in the I just don't know what to talk about. So in full transparency, I was driving to this place with the intention of recording. This with no idea what I was gonna record. So I was seeking externally for inspiration. I was listening to Rene Brown Oprah to car, and the, of course, their messages were powerful. It's not something I felt like speaking about and then I was driving. And I think one of them maybe it was Brenes said something that reminded me of breed. My dear friend in co retreat leader moments later after I got a little left tap from Bree. Love taps, by the way, or what I call text messages, and that synchronous city that little love tap made me think. Perhaps Bree holds this message. I'm supposed to deliver. Of course, more external inspiration, right seeking. I don't know why. So I've always been mode her and she memo back. I'm a voice memo were by the way, I pretty much with everyone. So anyway, she simply said something along the lines of why don't you just share the core of whatever you're going through which is likely going to resonate with others. As everyone else is kind of going through the same thing just in their own way. But just the core of it. Oh, truth, the geese, bumps we're high. Yeah. Well, you why why are you seeking anything external usually just do it from the hardest from the heart. So here I am here. I am all I needed to do is go within. So when I got to this space to record. I just I said down I intended on meditating for at least fifteen minutes, and I think it was about only fifteen seconds or so when those words were poking at me to get out on paper. So I just wrote what I recited to you five minutes ago. And then my second glance of it was honestly speaking. I can't believe I did it for a month. I gave up coffee for good for a month because I did drink coffee every single morning sometimes throughout the day forever decade. So I had to give it up for a minute. But thank God is for four Sigmatic because I could just use their mushroom elixirs instill get that. Great pleasure. Humanly pleasure that coffee gifts us with the energy as well. But forcing Matic their coffees. They're much as their mocha's. They're hot cows. They are some of humans greatest pleasures woman at least because every morning I rise. I'm really looking forward to this hot Cup of forcing Matic lately, actually the past few weeks. It's been the mocha mixes, which are just ho delicious in have the superhuman superhero Chagas, mushrooms inside providing us more benefits more energy in with just half the. Caffeine, and I drink the on my drive to my hot yoga and sometimes on top of it. I like to sprinkle little court like, sir for, you know, another pre workout energy biz can recently, I just ran out of their adapted Jin coffee mix with tolsey initial Gonda and cinnamon, which is another favorite. Oh, it's so good. So I'm actually going to have to go on their site in order more because. Yeah, you get a couple of bucks when they sponsor you. But I need more than just a couple of bucks is. So I gotta go order. More forcing Matic dot com slash soul tribe for fifteen percent off using the discount code soul tribe. My favorite of the actual mushrooms, though is lives main because you know, the the mushroom drink that Buddhist monks would drink to enhance their focus. So again, forcing Matic is continuing to gift the tribe. Fifteen percent off just go to the link in the show notes or go to force Matic dot com for its lash soul tribe. One word no spaces that. F O U R S I G M A T. I C dot com for slash soul tribe and enter the discount code soul tribe. One word no spaces for fifteen percent of your magical coffee in mushroom. Elixir? Order seoul. My lens. A perception when I read and recite inherit is completely different than your interpretation. And that's what I love about writing from the heart is that we're all going through the same core emotions yet just completely different experiences and have completely different interpretations. Stillness kept coming up during that. Right. And I know for someone who is pro stillness for whatever reason for whatever energetic reason, I have been resisting it, so no wonder that came through when I wrote it down that's key right now because I've been moving moving moving literally moving to a different state and just seeing all these people and trying to navigate my new life here. And so when I came in writing, my soul is like still. Miss still miss you need to just calm be still for a bit. Because I noticed that that when I don't have those moments stillness to slow my mind, the noise inside my mind, only speeds up I swear your thoughts, your stories your own narratives of things in life never ever slowdown unless you make it slowdown. And then from that slow point instill nece it has to slowly build to race again. And so it's nice to just reset it every single day every single day, otherwise just keeps going and going and going faster and faster and faster till we purposely. Give permission to slow aside from sleep man, if humans have sleep we would just be nut jobs all over the place because I notice for me personally, the negative thoughts really release when I allow myself to sit with it. Otherwise, I will. Be spending that energy in another way, some sort of some sort of sabotage. I'm not really an angry person, by the way. So it rarely releases in inflicting the pain onto someone else since studying it manifested another form such as negative self talk or ice lady myself or getting into the sad state. Also opening up the fridge or pantry for comfort, and I'll do that with complete unawareness as to why as my mind is creating this excuse that I'm hungry. Let's fill hunger pain, but really deep down. I may be feeling just severely lonely in the moment, or I'm deeply missing this person in this moment, but I feel powerless to say anything about it or or I'm annoyed over some physical issues that have been making me feel sick, whatever the case may be. It's just it's just the ego. When really my soul who I can hear more clearly in the stillness reminds me all is. Well, all is. Well, always no matter. What picture the mind is painting? My reality to be in this moment. No matter what lie. I am telling myself. No matter what story I'm telling or I'm regretting as I play back pass it to rations thinking if I only did this differently. No matter what the heartening scenario may be all is well always and without the stillness with the intention of releasing this specific pain, the story that had been created may just stay inside simmer inside until it reaches its boiling point. Because it cannot be destroyed it will just manifest into creating even more pain in hardy. Aac for ourselves and for others. And sometimes we may create these future stories that are not true, or we may think of ourselves in a certain way that are not true, and it may actually just manifest into our reality. Because we believe this ally long enough in strong enough, for example, flu I've had even throughout my travels of studying meditation, and since I started my health journey four years ago or five years ago or so. I when I started losing weight from being overweight, I developed body Dismore via and there was a point where I did feel really good in my body. And then in the past recent years, it got louder I would look in the mirror, and I would think I was I was I was big. That's what I would see almost in. The men would field though, I was tiny. And I believed this lie long enough in strong enough that it it's just one of those things that we really really need to listen to others in do our own reality checks, real reality checks. Remind our souls that it doesn't matter where worth it right now. Otherwise, we will drive ourselves crazy and believe the lies that manifest, and then we live with regret because it can affect relationships. It can affect your. Guidance. It can affect your love for yourself. And no matter how much we practice. No matter. How many people tell you your beautiful the ego can find it's tricky deceitful ways to get around that. That's when stillness really comes in. So we can listen to our stolen in those moments. That's when I feel like me. Like me not the shell. Not this human Rick, hell, but me. So the way it is right now is simply just part of the experience, you know, perhaps we feel as though where strolling along aimlessly down different different path that we now regret end. You know, what that's okay because when we sit in the stillness in let go of the negatives. And when we listen within we will always in one form or another. We will receive a new map that will lead us down an even brighter path. And it's there that we can simply recognize that we're human sober going to make mistakes. And we're giving these lessons for a reason. Whatever the reason whatever the souls mission was souls desired human experience is and it's all beautiful. And so we're going to continue to have regret some are going to continue to fail. That's okay. I know I'm supposed to experience the beauty of regret of grief of learning how to forgive even those who cause the most pain, and I'm going to have peaks and valleys enduring those values I also know that can be excited for a new beginning. Because that is always promise as change in Volusia is always promise. So there's something new something free four you free four two whole months when he go to skill shared dot com for its last year own magic a new U R L to get two months for free with skill share. I'm so thankful for the sponsor and that they are continuing to gift us an even better deal like what? Because millions of students have been using skill share to expand their human self in many different skills. They have an array of skills to help us along our journey for more. Abundant two dozen nineteen skill share has over twenty five thousand online courses now from creative courses like writing or poetry for tiger Fyvie drying animated illustration, all kinds of illustrations video, Ed. Getting other kinds of editing, probably podcast editing, culinary even oop tips for your business from social media marketing and freelance guidance management in so much more. Oh, I can't forget I can't forget to mention also tech classes like gaming development or app development and lifestyle. Classes like health and wellness and language. Just an abundance of courses for free for two entire months. Join me in their self publishing class. That's the new and I'm taking but I've taken there. A couple of their creative writing courses in an entrepreneur course and productivity one who knows a mouse kind of curious about singing, I might try the singing course, just to since the universe knows that that is net my forte at all it might not be gift, but I can learn a new skill anyways. Goto skill share dot com. Ford slash your own magic for your free two whole months that skill. Share dot com forward slash your own magic. So now that I have more by regrets. And I'm finally letting them go in my Sita's stillness. I was not only able to forgive those who my mind wants blamed for abandoning me. But to know that one it wasn't personal against me. So I've been able to forgive myself. Forgive myself for not being this perfect spiritual being knowing that I'm perfectly imperfect human being and to have compassion for myself for being human knowing just truly knowing that I'm doing my best. And that I'm listening to my intuition, and my soul and following my guidance, and that's enough. That's enough. I'm enough. You're enough. And I feel it so much when I finally remind myself to sit in the seat of stillness that my guides reminding me to do when I was reading that. Because in those moments, not only do we listen to ourselves, but we also get to receive inspired ideas of something to create some magic to create into be surrounded by beauty and people that aligned with that higher vibration of where we're at and to just welcome new beginnings because what a way to forgive others. What a way to let go of regrets is to begin to create something from an inspired idea. So much easier to let go of whatever is going on. And now this past week. I've been starting a new chapter who knows actually this may even be a new book. I'm going to continue the podcast. I can see myself doing this for life. And I genuinely believe with everything I've been through in life that this was designed to come into my life to feed my soul's mission in some way, and I received this inspired idea and stillness and it allowed me to also get over other stuff. I was going through. And it does seem to be a cycle. You know, I go through something. I regret something. I have to face something. Even if I'm very slow at recognizing that I need to face it, and I'll sabotage myself in some way, and since I was probably about fifteen it's food whether I e over or under eat or something else, and then I'll set in that stillness, but I really learned in those moments like really forgive myself in those moments, and I really get inspired in those moments. And that is what? Else me move forward. Now with all that being said, the only things every Greta in life are failures of courage when I cloak in in fear of hurting someone else or being hurt by someone else. And in those moments those small decisions where we leave our courage in the backseat and someone that is not our higher being begins to take the wheel in our minds. Are just also oh genius. At tricking us, truly they know us. They know what will trick us. Make us feel as though this cloak is the smartest and safest thing to wear in the scenario or will put on a mask, and we think that this mask is the smartest and safest thing to wear in the scenario unless you're a fully enlightened human than perhaps you'll never learn. If there's not something to have pain you in some way into move from. If there's not some valleys, how are you going? To know you are at a peak if you haven't experienced some of the valleys, that's actually the beauty of life. So yes, like I said I'm gonna continue to experience the beauty of regret enough grief and learning how to forgive and mourn something from the past but be excited for something in the future. And be scared be nervous and sometimes getting Zion for moment in breathe in that moment in calm, myself down be empowered by the fact that I was able to alleviate my anxiety on my own. That's magic that's magic. And it all happens after we get still because we slowed our mind. For a moment or two or sixty. It is in the seat of stillness that you not only show up for the grace of the universe to have a moment of peace within all the chaos, but to show up for yourself for your heart as it men's. And like. Stillness Laco less. C and B. Stillness lecco. Lesson receive and. Dear yummy. Thank you so much. So so much for lending your ear. I I hope something in this spoke to your soul, and will you please. Please say Hello in the air on magic. Facebook crew to all of this whole tribe errors. And if you if you like this podcast, I would so love to read your review, and of course, all gift to a free guided meditation from your own magic dot life. Which by the way, has many meditations meditative imaginings journal questions magic monthly challenges and just other spiritual tools for your soul. More on your own magic dot life. When you join the sole tribe exclusive site for four dollars and forty four cents per month. I'm just thankful for us spiritualists to gather together and have a safe space to help us tap into our own magic. Anyways. I love you all. Seoul much. Thank you for listening and how a magical day.

Matic seoul Recei Bree Taga fy Minnesota Senate Spain Facebook Saad tricking Volusia Caffeine Laco Brenes Rene Brown
Podcast: Apstra leads the way for intent-based networking (IBN)

Telecom Reseller

24:14 min | 3 months ago

Podcast: Apstra leads the way for intent-based networking (IBN)

"This is green and the publisher of Telecom reseller. To deal with monster corrupt, who's the founder and President of abstract? Thank you for joining me today. Thank you. I'm delighted to be here. This is going to be a very interesting podcast. We're GONNA. BE TALKING ABOUT CISCO. We're going to be talking about their announcement to improve its intent based networking IBM portfolio and we're gonNA. Be Talking about abstract story within that story but I mean what is what does that stress? So, it was founded in two thousand fourteen and you. You're mentioning ten business working Astra Pioneer incentives networking. We came out the felt into thousands of extend and delivered the first in ten based networking products on the market. So, right there. Maybe we should talk about a difference because what I'm hearing. Is You pioneered the idea? So? Were you actually in front of CISCO AND THAT ONE? Oh Yeah. We worship think it's well documented I. think that's a Cisco you know. Calling their products under the umbrella in ten days networking in two thousand seventeen. I think they up on stage and They talked about in ten days networking redefining. That's working for the next thirty years, but it was bullying two thousand seventeen in fact astro. Again of product was launched or a Os one. Though which is the first intended networking product on the market? hit. The markets in July of two thousand sixteen. So you'RE A. Curve. Well Yeah. At the ends you know we found it after. Deliver on intended networking and you're asking about the difference as. Well intended networking As with, be that abstract. Think of it as a tool that's both architects and others us so I think the number one say differentiator. Is that what we want is to unify architects and operators under one umbrella. Usually problems in the Parisians happened decree because the architects would have a vision of how the network needs to be. They build a beautiful network, and then they toss it to the operators right, and then you know the operators got go off on their own, and then you know it. In the sense the nets were deviates from the original intent. With Astra I think of it as this very powerful nation software that Bush architects and operates is us to essentially also made the entire life cycle of. Designing Building Deploy and then operating your network, including moves adds deletes. Changes including you know ultimately Changing your security policies or adapting your security policies or compliance policies, etc.. It keynotes in based networking. Is that you can closing loop read? So, what does that mean closing the loop? If you, think automation you know typically You're You're automating writing configurations to thousands of devices through scripts right and to like you press about them, and then you know these Chris Ron, and then essentially configurations are pushed on tons of devices, but then that's it. You know you're hoping. Hoping that everything works out as expected closing the boots. The Duluth is this notion that is. We're also collecting telemetry in time continuously gathering a whole repository, if database of the state in your network and we are performing tests against all of the state, insead time continuously to ensure that your network is as the moments delivering on your intense and so this notion of closing the loop. Is a combined with pushing configurations right so pushing corporations, but then verifying that indeed network is. It's critical to incent business working all. That's possible. The same tools not as enough thoughts. Now you did this and came up with this idea and twenty sixteen. What what existed before witnesses replace or take the place? Yeah so before in ten days networking what you have is what you call basic donation right, which is essentially. What was talking about right this this you know you. You know that you WANNA. Push configuration to switch right, and then you say well, you know the difference between the completion of this which and this other switches. Maybe some of the variables Ip address the. The. The the the the specific V., land etcetera, and so you're right up. Scripts writes You know that will help you. Stay time right, and so instead of pushing competitions manually by typing I think people were you're essentially writing Chris could be an answerable or or curling, no or some other tools in that's helped. You essentially pushed competitions faster to too many many devices. The problem there is because you're not. closing the loop, right? You're not verifying that as of the same tool that indeed you know your network. If delivering on what you want, many times, we have tuitions, and that well documents that where you know by making one mistake, right? You're not pushing the wrong configuration up to thousands of device devices. are very familiar with the feeling. It's almost like if you know. PTSD. You. Know you're on a on a you know you have your pinky on the answer, but then you're just praying. But before you press that indeed, you're going to get the results you want, and if you don't you're you're you're really? Out of commission, you're you don't west of starts is all you know if you cancer network anymore, and that's engineer has gone through that nightmare, nightmarish scenario, and so this is the type of tools that existed before in networking. So you, introduce this twenty sixteen. Ended companies start to adopted. Yeah. We quickly the in production and what we're seeing is that since then it's advocating It's been it's been asked erasing at a very fast rate, and it's really exciting to see I think that's when we launched initially were still this kind of resistance in the sense, you know especially network engineers. Who you know because of the last thirty years how they've done things right? If they you know through their CIS, etc were they're very close to the Cli, Cli is the command line interface, which is essentially how you manually configure a typical fiscal switch right, and so you know it's like you need it. We need to move them from a place of you know thinking about specific configuration commands who replaced? Carrying about outcomes right so it's not about you know what what specific configurations you put your network. It's more about you know. What outcomes do you expect your effort to deliver on your building and Network for a business reason? What are these business outcomes that you you needs to care about but over time I think because networks are so critical reading the. The continue becoming so critical and and because of the fact that you know at the end of the day. That's works. Engineers are being asked to do a lot more with less recipes. Nets seems not growing. Yes, the importance and the scalable networks are growing. They started embracing automation to help them especially those tools that them deliver better predictable outcomes. And so and so I'd say, and now she's be Cisco and what they've done in pushing the whole intent, based networking approach and every. The other vendor out there leaving with software and automation right, this is a no longer the exception is now the norm, but and so we've seen Volusia, and over the last year been exciting to watch. No. Let's dive a little bit deeper into some of the things you've been discussing. A lot of our readers deal with maintenance. You've been talking about how they stricly have done it now how they can do with IBM one. You need to know about abstract mate with Cisco. Well with. first of all think of it as a turnkey solution rights so you you deploy the software and essentially with Astro, if you are in the process of building and you pods right in your networking father in networking infrastructure, essentially with Astra, you're able to get the whole network designs built deployed, and you start operating. Get within half a day right so it's it's simple. It's really about the simplicity of operating your network and so a lot of times in the. Software bet the best type of software hides complexity right? What's makes in that poll? iphone attractive right then especially when it came out, I was this whole interface that made. It Complex Operation Super Simple right and that's what abstract Oh that's. We are simplifying the operational model and doing it in the way that delivers reliable experience, and so that's that's the first thing you need to know about APPs. in terms of you know Azran, how relief and that's looking specifically Cisco What after those two? That abstracts outs the specifics of the hardware? So after as multi vendor solution, it doesn't only work for one type of hardware or one type of vendor if works across. Various vendors, essentially all they sadly spenders CISCO, but also every stuff, juniper, Dal, and the open alternatives right cumulus, which now. Has Been acquired by not with itself has been acquired by and video. You know becoming another of. choice that customers can deploy. A and with Dell Sonic the know how much you know or knows about sonic, sonic. If fascinating developments in the last year, where essentially it's an open source switch writing system that delivers on all of the enterprise features that enterprise care about and so it's a viable kind of option. white label essentially option that's not is to your options from established vendors in. If you'd like, we can talk more about the importance of multi vendor. If that's something that you think is the you know, it's interesting to your audience. Well I. Think it is I think most of our readers contend deal, manage a multi vendor network, and indeed many other readers who are the other side of the desk serve customers who are managing networks like that, and of course let's talk about the the the diversity that network in the context of Migration So how does this fit? Yeah absolutely right so Your career. You I'm glad to hear that. In fact, that matches our experience in that in that you know we're seeing. interprises become increasingly more multi vendor in fact in days where? You can source your empire networking infrastructure from one vendor. Over right and the reason is it compliments stuff? Things one you know. Let's take the example of how when Cumulus acquired by men and all the sense. In the context of the larger and company. And video is focused on machine, learning educations you know a especially these high performance clusters and these high performance clusters have very stringent requirements on the networking side very specific requirements on the networking site. That's what you need is networking. That is optimized. For for education, right. Namely you need to have. A also need to have some low Nathan. Etc So i. think especially like stack will be critical to get the most performance of your. It'd be cluster, and so this is where you're going to bring in some video. That's getting into. You're into your network, right? And then you may have some more generic you know. type of education's whereby you can use more cost effective, as which is not especially low latency. Just you know W- switches work well Do the job respite. They're more cost effective offense for that. You'RE GONNA. Use another nets. Networking Vendor maybe open networking options such as Dell and then maybe as at the fabric layer to put it to kind of bring it altogether, US established under such as fiscal or every so so that's one aspect. The? Other aspect is clouds right. Now with the last year's organizations move workloads to the cloud. and now they want to bring these These workloads back on premise the easiest way to do. This is to use those on premise solutions that cloud providers have delivered to the markets you know with with aws were talking about w outposts, or with as your as. Iraq! That's your now deploying in your in your network, which also have their own specific networking. and so you can imagine. With The compliments wants of all of these trends. How you're going to end up with a multi that's works and so having a multi vendor network management tools becomes critical in fact, you know. Bringing in management stuff, and that's what management software from a single hardware vendor is it past with dense? You'RE GONNA get stuck with this vendor whereas your business requires you to bring in all these other vendors into the mix. Now how does the security sector into this? Great Question. So. Security so so if you think of networking intense, right what outcomes you're looking for from your network. One is ability right. You know you only have the ability for specific. Workloads to you know a server or a virtual machine in some other rats, and then that's where. Is Delivering on that intense, and it could be at the three. The other intense is security. The also have compliance. You have product of experience, but security is really key right then you know with security. What you want is to ensure that your policies in terms of. How particular machinery particular application reaches another virtual machine or server or application? You know if the are being enforced in your network and you WanNa. Know for a fact that they're being enforced recipe visibility into your into The compliance of your network to your security policy is key right and. You know I say this and. It sounds obvious, but you'd be shocked. How many times an organizations have no idea? What Acuity Hustler. They have in their network infrastructures, and that's because they don't have that visibility, but they don't have the tools to essentially confirm for them that India. It's their policies are being applied and that the network is behaving, asked for the policy, so with Astra what do is collecting the state, and then we're doing continuous validation. We have this single source of truth. You know for a fact that your security policies are indeed being implemented in your network, and you know that if there's an deviation there, the tool will alert you, and in fact, you can also have the tool. He'll the situation very quickly, and so that's. Why you need to have the foundation in terms of the state and the visibility in real time, and all of this continues validation for us to be able to on top of foundation. Apply your security. Policies so intense as networking is foundational. To to securities it kind of the basic hygiene, you need in the network in order for you to have the ability to enforce and confirm your security policies. Now you know we should also talk about it. In the in the context of the Cova crisis is going on right now. no for many of our readers some cases they've had to move entire contact centers, large flocks of workers, who they did not intend to make mobile or remote. To remote. And so they're contending with that work situations that are very different or very new. does does this impact is? The impact then. I absolutely Kobe as you say, erect It's you know. What it is, it's really accelerated this whole trend around digital transformation. Right everything we're GONNA be doing now is through our screen. Right I mean. The? And it's went beyond anything before right now. Physical whether it's even stunning or events writes conferences. You know and of course we must work. And ultimately If you think about this networking is at the core of it all right. In fact, you know Garner sad, that's. Your Ti- times more likely to fail as your digital transformation. This is if you don't transform your network I. And I mean that's the August in the sense that you know. How can you you know deliver on digital transformation? If you're nets, work is being managed manually. It just becomes a pity on scalable right and with go ahead. You don't to be sending people everywhere right in terms of you know. Sending people could remorse vice to consider the networks you have the ability to remote control your network right, and how can remote control your network? The way through powerful Automation Software Association software that essentially enforces the policies whereby declare your policies, the desired outcomes of your network, and then you have. The software essentially worked with all the right systems in order to. Implement this follow policies enforce them, and then through the continues citation, Luke ensure that those policies are being implemented right and when released to remote work, you can think of the you know. This trend been going on which is companies have headquarters where you know. The majority of their employees were at the headquarter and we had you know it's past. Their best insured that policies within the network of that's headquarters facility essentially mess intense met the needs of their users, and then we spent. It's you know seeing We work type colocation facilities, right and that model. Has to change it right where now you need tremendous policies in every we work or remorse, replica location facility, and now you know what what we're seeing is. Every employee is working in their own home. Right now you went from having one or two headquarters to you know dozens of sites and now two thousands of different homes where you need to be implementing policies, automation software networking automation software in base of the Mason software is essentially the only way you can manage this. So you know we've been talking about this so far. This is really interesting stuff for readers. Can you give us some use cases or examples? Of of this process in motion of intent base networking being applied. Yes sure. Maybe the first example is Bloomberg Bloomberg built. A great headquarters. In London and They have there and there's MEKA network. Network essentially. is where all the accident happens, and you know whereby they ultimately serve four hundred fifty seven million households worldwide. You can imagine the that's worth these to be. Super reliable I have the right level of. Performance. And also a multi vendor networks, and you know essentially Bloomberg after trying, but quite a few different approaches ultimately implements as strengthen based. In the media and that's where you know back in London. Socio that's. One you know exciting example. I can say and then just more recently We've announced. The, elastic right this. Is. The company's plant in. Differs, Switzerland's first infrastructure is a service and bare metal providers, and what they wanted to do is allow their customers. Provisions their own service does and They needed the best of breed solution because on one hand. They want high-performance they want. To give high-performance to that. high-performance expedience to their to that customers and number two. He needs to be super simple. Essentially this customers nipple have it very simple operational model to proficient their own services, and so especially for the hardware they used you know offensively openness working with a minute ox, which is now part of Nvidia which is. What in in in in their estimation, what the best of breed solution for the is and you know that provide this simple model? They used abstract and based a networking. So. Are Your services available directly to end users or do you do? Do you operate through partners? Yeah so we sell. Become the rats but in most cases we actually sell through a network of partners We have a Partner Program called after partner advantage with different tiers It's actually every. Program and we do have a a network of resellers and distributors across the globe. And so, if you are a reseller out there, that's interesting, interesting Asra certainly reach out to us. would love to hear from you. So where can we learn more about abstract? Asks rather come. Once thank you very much for joining us today and I know we're GONNA be talking about this topic and the related topic very soon, but for now thanks very much. Thank you.

CISCO Nets Astra IBM Chris Ron founder and President Dell London PTSD Volusia publisher engineer Telecom Nvidia Switzerland
How to heal and NOT harm with medicinal plants.

The Plant Path

16:55 min | 1 year ago

How to heal and NOT harm with medicinal plants.

"Hey there everybody sage Popham here founder of the school of evolutionary herbalism. And in this week's episode of the blog, I wanna talk about our number one fear as herbalists, right? But before we talk about our number one fear only talk about our number one goal, right? And it's pretty obvious, right? Our number one goal is herbalist is to provide healing for people. Right. But that then translates into for most of us are number one fear, which is hurting someone with herbs, right? That obviously we want to help we want to heal. We wanna provide plants for people that's going to rejuvenate their body and alleviate their suffering and for the evolutionary herbalists out there. We want to also help clarify and inspire the mind and uplift and strengthened the heart and facilitate in the soles growth and development rate. And the very last thing that we want to do is. Give someone in herb that's going to do harm to their body. Right. And that really is you know, one the foundation of, you know, traditional western medicine, which is the number one axiom. I do no harm. And so this is a totally valid fear. Right. That we have because I think it shows that were coming from a good place. Right. That we gen- genuinely want to do good. But here's the deal with most. Herbal medicines that were giving right that if you're working with the majority of medicinal plants used especially in our western Materia Medica and you're giving them in moderate doses. Like, you're not giving them, you know, heat. John Norma's five milliliters five times a day dosages for months, and months, and months and months, the likelihood of you actually inflicting harm on someone is incredibly low. Like insanely low. Right. And so this is something that's really important because that's one thing that stops a lot of people from helping another person with herbs, right? As that. They're like, well, I don't know enough or I don't really understand how much to give. And I just I really don't wanna I don't wanna hurt them. Right. And that's good to think that way. But I just I always like to encourage my students that the the likelihood of you actually doing that is pretty low now one of the things there's a kind of a couple of different orientational to take when we look at. How an herbal medicine is actually working in the body. Right. So on the one hand, we have the herbs very distinct physiological or biochemical effects rate where you know, the the plants have certain medicinal constituents that are. Traveling through the body and working through our own internal, biochemistry and adjusting the physiological processes in the body. The other side of how an herb works is through their energetics right through kind of how the herb adjust. The the ecosystem of the body and looking at those primary factors of energetics of people in plants being like temperature hot and cold moisture moistening or drying and then their action on the tone of tissues, whether they're tightening or whether they're relaxing, and when we're looking at that energetic side of things this is really kind of the main area where we might get the wrong remedy, right? Where maybe someone is too hot. And we give them a formula. That's got, you know, time in oregano and turmeric and Cayenne, and it's like, whoa. That formula was a little too warming for their constitution for their tissue state. And it might be slightly aggravating to that. Right. Now, a constitutional or tissue state aggravation. Is important to look at right? This is an important factor for being a holistic herbalist, right? We've got a look at those things. But it's not like it's not like going to kill them. Right. I mean, it's not going to like inflict serious harm in the short term. Right. It might shift their body a little bit in one direction or another. But if you're doing follow ups with people, you know, you're following up with them, you know, maybe a couple of days later or a week later. And you're saying, okay, how how are these herbs doing? How are they feeling? What's going on? And they're like, yeah. I just feel like, you know, the burning pain in my ulcer got a little bit worse. And it's like, okay. Like, yeah. That sucks to hear feedback like that as an herbalist. But remember it's a teaching right? It's it's helping to clarify what is going on with that person right in last week. Blog episode. I was talking about that story about me being at a workshop with Michael Thira. Right. And how he was mentioning that the remedy that. You give is part of your assessment and evaluation like when you give a remedy how the person reacts to it gives. You more information to further clarify and refine your understanding of what's going on with them and to clarify. What remedies are going to be appropriate and potentially inappropriate, right? And it's going to happen, right? I mean, I don't know a single herbalist or practitioner that has given a rep given the right remedy on. The I go every time with every client like, it's it's it's gonna happen. Right. You're gonna get it wrong. So I think as herbalist it's important for us to recognize that to accept that. And to take it in as a teaching, right? And to not beat ourselves up and get hard on ourselves. And think we're worthless. And we don't know what we're doing. We should just you know, go back to our day job. If you're doing this as a career, right? It's like, you're not gonna get it. Right. Every time. And so this is why doing follow ups relatively quickly. I think is really good because you can get that immediate feedback in that immediate information about how they responded to the remedy or the formula, and you can adjust it as needed, but really a constitutional aggravation isn't going to turn into like a major path Allah g or disease INA short term window of time. And they can usually be corrected relatively quickly. Right. Just by adjusting your formula. So it's like, okay. You know, I gave this remedy, and it may be aggravated their temperature or their moisture. Okay. Well, we're just gonna change it out. Right. We're going to rearrange this formula. Maybe we'll add in some more. Cooling herbs or take out. Some of the warming herbs or make sure we add a demo- sin yin tonic. Herb to moisten the formula up because you know, maybe their sinuses and mouth, and is and skins getting dried out all the sudden from all the drying herbs that we're giving them. So you can pretty quickly. Correct. Those constitutional dynamics in your formula. And I think that's one of the most important ways to make sure that we're giving the right remedy right now, the other big one here in terms of kind of this fear of harming someone is the potential for herb drug interactions. Right. This is a huge subject. This is an important subject for the practicing herbalist because let's face it. A lot of people out there are on prescription medications. And so we have to be aware of those remedies that might potentially interact with those Medicare. -cations? Now the thing about this. And when I was studying at bass steer university. We did a whole semester focused on herb drug interactions. Right. So this is something that I've studied a lot. I had a great teacher in the subject, Dr Eric yarnell, who's an amazing Natura path. Really, great herbalists and clinician, and you know, one of the things that he said is like look like, yes, some herbs definitely have adverse reactions with medications. But for the most part most herbs don't write. But there's a certain handful of remedies that do and you just need to be aware of that. You know, the big example here is Saint John's wart, right? Saint John's wart in does interact with a number of prescription medications, and that's primarily because it's a liver. Remedy right? We tend to think of Saint John's where it's like, oh, it's an herb for depression. But really? It's a liver. Remedy right? It's actually detoxifying. It's the liver through what they call the site of chrome P four fifty detoxification pathway, and what happens with Saint John's wart is that it's actually helping the body to metabolize that drug more quickly. So that it's going to be less effective. So, you know, another example is how Hawthorne and things like mother were and things like that can can help to lower blood pressure. Right. But if someone's on blood pressure medication because the herbs doing the same thing as the drug it might drop their blood pressure too low, and we don't want to do that. Right. But if we really take it from, you know, from my perspective, it's like, oh, if the herb is doing the same thing that the drug is doing then we can drop the dosage of the drug, right? And hopefully, potentially be able to wean someone off of there. Description medications, right? And especially if the client wants to do that, then that's great. Right. But of course, that's that. Now, we're starting to get in tricky territory. Right. So just for clarity sake. I never tell clients to stop taking their prescription meds. I never tell them to reduce their dosage, I don't touch people's drugs. Right. I don't I like, and I encourage you to never do that as well. That's you're getting into risky territory there what I do in tell my clients to do is talk to their doctor about it. And I say, hey, you know, go talk to your doctor tell them you want to start working with herbs tell them. You don't wanna be taking these drugs anymore. You want to wean off? And if your doctor laughs at you or scoffs at you, then you need to go. Find a new doctor, right? It's like remember your hiring them. Like, you're the boss, you're in charge. And if you're seeing a doctor that isn't able. To work in kind of your paradigm of how you want to do things than I always encourage my clients, you know, in a kind gentle compassionate way to try to find a physician that is a little more open minded to natural medicine, and is more open to helping them to wean off of their drugs. And actually, I know there's some doctors that that's their specialty right that their specialty is to get people reduce their medications, and you know, just on that note of prescriptions, you know, one thing that I've been doing in my clinical practice is when someone comes to me with their primary complaints. And if they're on certain prescription medications what I'll do is I'll go look up those drugs in reference books or online, there's some great materials online. And what I'll do is. I'll write down all the side effects of those medications. Is right all the known side effects of all the medications, and then I compile them into a list, and then I put it right next to their primary complaint. And it's actually amazing to see how often like I would say probably ninety percent of the time people's primary complaints are drug side effects. Right. And so again, I'm not telling them what to do. I just provide information. And I say, look, you know, I don't know if you're aware of all the side effects of your medication, but I- I compiled a list and provide references for people to double check me just if they want that. And just say, you know, it's looking like a lot of your main complaints are actually side effects of the medications that you're taking and you might consider talking to your doctor about this. So I know this is kind of like a little side note on how to. Not do harm with the herbs that we give. But you know, this conversation of you know, people's prescription medications is a big part of that. But again for the most part, you know, if you're working with gentle, mild, kind of the standard herbal remedies that we use as herbalist most of them actually don't interact in adverse ways with prescription medications now on this note of herb drug interactions. It's not like you have to memorize all the drugs and all the herbs every drug interacts with right? I mean, this is a constantly changing environment. There's always new drugs coming out. There's always new research being done. So one thing that I always encourage my students to do is just get good reference materials on this subject. There's a book I think it's just called herb drug interactions by believe Francis Brinker. And that was one of our main textbooks that best year for this subject that book is constantly being updated. So you can find that on Amazon for cheap. Make sure you get the most recent edition, and if someone's on a drug you just look it up in the book and see what it interacts with. And if it interacts with any of the herbs that you wanna give them don't give them that. Herb, right. And you can usually find a way around it. Right. That's the beauty of herbal medicine is that there's a lot of plants that have a lot of properties and some of them have crossover. So, you know, if we want to detoxify someone's liver, and we wanted to give them Saint John's wart in a formula, but Saint John's were interacts with one of their meds. Give them a different remedy to detoxify their liver. Right. We've got tons of liver detoxifying remedies that that you can. Still use to help them but won't interact with their medications. So I just wanted to share this because it's a really big topic these days, and you know, like, I said as herbalists we wanna help we want to heal. The last thing we want to do is potentially hurt someone, but I'm just here to tell you that the likelihood of that happening is actually really low. If you're using safe gentle mild to moderate strength herbs, and you are just diligent about getting all the information about what people are putting in their body every day over the counter or prescription. And you've got some good reference materials on how to look up. What herbs are going to be potentially contra indicated in the use of that drug. So hopefully that provides a little bit of clarity. Hopefully that provides a little bit of relief for those of you that might have a little bit of fear in terms of. Of working with people on prescriptions or just the fear of hurting someone with the remedies that you give. So if you're watching this anywhere, but our blog be sure to head on over to Evan herbalism dot com. We've got tons of free videos, tons of free training and content over there. If you're not subscribe to our YouTube channel, be sure to click the subscribe button. We also got our podcast at the plant path on itunes and Stitcher. So that's how to be tuned into all the work and free offerings that we do here. At the school of Volusia, Mary herbalism, gutter Facebook page and Instagram page two for daily updates and inspiration on on this plant path. So thanks so much for tuning in to this new episode and until next time take care and be well.

Saint John Herb sage Popham founder John Norma Volusia YouTube Materia Medica bass steer university Michael Thira Dr Eric yarnell Evan Facebook Hawthorne Francis Brinker Amazon
144. Tales from the Insurance Industry

The Working Experience

47:11 min | 1 year ago

144. Tales from the Insurance Industry

"Greetings, dear dear listeners, and welcome to another episode of the working experience, a very warm open arm audio embrace and a squeeze this episode is brought to you by my company. One circle. Media one circle media is a hybrid digital agency in media content creator, we create and design apps websites, videos, social media, content and physical products. We are artists directors designers. Producers coders editors thinkers makers and creators who embrace story and creativity from design web and app development animation. Docs, features TV shows digital and social media content to physical products for our clients. We create content that builds networks audiences across multiple platforms. Check out our work at one circle digital dot com and one circle brand dot com. If you work for. Network studio brand startup or corporation and are looking for a partner to create media that will build engage in entertain reach out to me at John at one circle media dot com. I'd love to hear from you. This episode is also brought to you by an app that I created called still believe still believed transforms a picture in your home into video proof of your child's favorite magical characters with the app parents can catch the magic of the tooth fairy leading money under their children's pillow or Santa delivering presents on Christmas Eve in their home. You download the app take picture in the week Crete the magic we utilize feature film visual effects artists to transform your picture into video just tell your kids that you have a special app that can detect and capture the tooth fairy. Then present them with the video proof in the morning. The look on their faces is priceless. You're still believe video is created in minutes. And you can then save it to your phone and share it on social media. The app is available for the iphone and Android. And it's free to download our aim is to bring joy in wondered to the hearts of children around the world. Check it out at still believe dot CO. Thanks, everyone. And I hope you enjoyed this episode of the working experience. Everybody this Medicare with the workings firms podcasts this week, I sat down with my friend. Matt Matt works Lee insurance industry, and as many fascinating tales about how it all works on the inside. And also his kind of off the wall workers enjoy listening. Thanks for working experience. Water ninety three north is almost at a standstill yet. So rough one out there the scorings win sleep there. It's known service on clear of the closing doors bleed community minutes, ma'am, traffic, make sure done either report ASAP. Presentation shore wants to see that. Team meeting at ten fifty think ball and work the dream work moving at after the meeting, we'll have a breakout session, where am I microwave if discussed was that now? O'neil? Hey, everybody Matty Kay. And I am here with my friend. Matt. Little background. I've known Matt for pro. We don't see each other that much, but I've known you for probably going on twenty five years now something like that. It was it. All right. Yeah. So full disclosure. I graduated from college with Matt's older, brother. Tony who made a very early appearance. One of our first ten episodes. I think and had some pretty good stories. Yeah. Some of the bathroom related bit scatalogical. I'd like to say we've upped our game since then, but we really haven't. So we know where we swim, we know our audience, so, you know, Matt, so you you work for a an insurance company. Yes. Basically my entire career. I've worked for a handful of difference Durance companies on based on the kind of Connecticut area. So that's that's one of the biggest games in town. So to speak, you know, Hartford at one point on still is or not was the insurance capital of the world is not a of the capital of really much day. That's deadly some opportunities there. So that's yeah. Now twenty years into my career in change. That's yeah. That's where I spent my time. So. We're going to insurance company. You you go into the office. Now, you work from home primarily now. Correct. I do now it's got a Volusia over the years in different. Yes. Obviously worked insurance had a heavy finance angle within that to most of my career, some different jobs. You know in terms of outside mate were dry. They were getting that one too. But then over the progression. So, you know, graduating college in nineteen ninety eight joined out, you know, sort of the the advent of more activity in internet type excessive -bility is a lot more flexibility kind of going from full-time in the office. All the time coming in blur snowstorms because it was early in the year for financial reporting purposes in working to be done to now being fulltime work at home occasionally going in the office as needed a spend kind of. Yeah. Progression over two decades. So, you know, going back to your office days like you would go into the office. What's like a typical day nine? A m whatever it is like hot of things get rolling over there will so so then, you know, Bakken always scripts financial reporting role. So think of like a annual report, you know, the press release type of information for plants perspective go in the workload of air. By the time of year based on win. You know, final statements for available to be distributed publicly but the workday, you know, we consist of in a cubicle surrounded by of goals. You know, more senior people might have a higher wall cubicle offices things like that. But then just, you know, sit in front of a computer all day, crunching numbers or writing disclosures. And then for that to those alluding to was you'd be desktop in front of your computer. But a lot of the reporting for, you know, financial reporting perspective is done in the early part of the year follows which is you know, Connecticut can have some some unpleasant winters in we networking. Saturday's general rule in the months of January and February just because working to be done. So you know, there could be a blizzard on a Saturday morning. You. You'd there'd be known else on the road would be miserable because there'd be a foot of snow coming down. But there was no other option a narrow window time in which the work had to be done before. You know, it had to be distributed. That was that. So it was a it was a different mix. So. How long did you spend working like when you had to go into the office on a regular basis? I would say they're very by time of year, you know, sometimes in the summer because I was acquired time it'd be kind of a straight forty hours. Nothing. Terrible. You know, later quarterly cycles year end cycles like that. Yeah. I know again, by tech standards. Nothing terrible. But you'd be there. Oh, probably sixty maybe seventy hours a week for for a couple months out of the year. But then, you know, try to sort of find some balance in quieter times into being in the summer or something. So how many years did you do that for sided that for five years that kind of corporate clients type function then I switched to another insurer. So I kinda bounced around that was property casualty insurance automobile homeowners jumps similar type of stuff that I went to a health insurer where I did for a time and of internal management reporting is around. Mary's metrics that were maybe not that interesting either depending on the audience where it was, you know, claim claim processing call metrics things like that which I felt was pretty dry stuff too. I was I put it in a couple more years there again, actually from that point in again some flexibility that particular employer can allowed some some dabbling in work from home arrangements as needed, but it was still something that was very foreign to me. They went actually I remember denouncing ridiculous where I accommodated district. My back could barely walk and move. I felt compelled to did I couldn't even dress myself beside from like breakaway trash cans felt compelled thousand come in and get a monthly report out to the boss that show, you know, whatever people were on hold for ten seconds on average or something breakaway pants nuts. Nuts an interesting image. Yeah. That's a very special look people. I've seen things horribly wrong. I actually never barely be on my leg. Pine up to step over a speed bump in the parking lot. 'cause my back with structurally in such poor shape. But I felt like, you know, the world needed to know. So I've made it basically came in did the work, and then did some Larry Bird type stretches lying on lower than made my way home again. But the time they work from home range was not something. I was. Yeah. I mean, I know one other guy who works for a large telecommunications company, and he has switched over. I think primarily to working from home. And you know, he he talks about the kind of ups and downs of it like it. You know, it's it's good in a way that obviously you don't have to leave your home in the commute tonight's and all that. But he also said it is kinda strange not like seeing anybody like they used to go out for drinks and stuff like that. And now it's like, no nobody really does that anymore. Yes. A different mix. It's funny. 'cause there's there's a whole range of like interpersonal relationships in the office in quirky things that go on it again office where he especially when you're working long hours and yet he has some whacked situations. They are contained time that then you still have some. But then more settled now the other spectrum, I probably get more work done because I have your interactions. There is definitely a different experience. I'm home the majority of time a day week on average maybe shade last night a bit on nearby office in my current role. So there's still some interaction, but respectively, no commute there. I must not allow calls where all work with someone for, you know, months at a time instill, I even though they look like because I ended up in one of a handful of officers, and they don't happen to be there. So I won't even know they look like until I introduce himself or I hear their voice in the platoon to together that actually is which is kind of odd existence. Yeah. Well, we were I mean, the podcast Netflix, swims in that area of quirky things were or sometimes go well beyond quirky into the psychopathic things, my friend, John up here had this great story about a guy he worked with who was very very tall. He was like six foot seven something like that really talk in older guy. Really into lunar eclipses, and he would talk at that nation hobby. I've is that what I've expecting. Yeah. To the point where he would take vacation days to go to like Japan, China wherever one was happening. He got up and he would talk at length like if he if he were allowed to get into that lane. You're in for a while being spoken to but that wasn't even the the best thing. The best thing was he would go into the break room area, which John describes very very small like a sink a refrigerator, and he would take off his shoes and socks and he would place his barefoot on the edge of the sink in cut his toenails, Omar war into the sink. And I said that that is a clear act of aggression like that that's crossing many a lot. Although I not not that I've done now. But I mean, I I remember some mishaps like not to get too far afield on this. But at one point I remember having being separate yet. Like, I like major player must've been Myrlie twenties. And I got I forget how I ended up with like, my my girlfriend a time had gone to a Tupperware party got some Tupperware set. And then you had like I didn't have much time for where. So then it one point, you know, like one of the more usable sizes when missing. And then I happened to come across it in the fridge at work. And I was like son of a bitch. This is someone still might uproar. So I I ended up changing that and then just like tasting the food because I think I'm gonna take him. See what it is most like asked not that good inside. So that. The ozone autocratic. Taking my container home. And so that puts a note in me up completely fallen this story. I'll is Yeltsin find out. So then I take stuff home. They aren't taking tater. All right. Great got much Dana back to wait. Wait, you you took the you took the container with the existing food in about taking container back in this person's quilts stolen. I might these taste their food series, which I didn't care for. It was like pasta through enough at yellow some sauce and like through the food to my took. What I thought was my container. Hell, but I guess it was fairly common. Tupperware sil- set is I discovered later that I realized oh, my girlfriend the time. It apparently actually liked put something as leftovers in that equivalent sized container from our house and give it to a friend who we saw a month Jewish. Here's your. Hit son of this will go to but in the interim. There was not on the fridge that some of it stolen the container in the food. And that this is the jobs I had gotten back yet, so stolen the container. That was a pretty bold move. Like, you're accusing you're now bad the continuous stolen when you stolen in the first place. How dare you while and so then they want it back. But really what they wise was pretty good the food because it was their wife's homemade sauce on my side. God it's preceded right on the note, the food wasn't that good. Did not making. I obviously have the moral high ground on this. This is a stolen container is returned to its rightful owner guys got a lot nerve. And I subsequently realized. Yeah. The guy just the I I still is container throughout his life scoop. And and basically shit on the idea of being tasty. So those so not only did you feel the man's Tupperware and throw his wife's food away. You then insulted the food on the note rent because I felt like about this this this is this is where I came from while this person's got a lot of imagine in hindsight because I felt like this person's got a lot nurse stealing container. Joing you they want the food. They can't believe some circuit after that guy was thinking while they realize it was like I was on a fan of embargo. So I still sleep well at night. I'm doing that is perspective this guy, he really is it asphalt. He's taking the food in the container. Ben saying the food suck after I've already essentially, you know, hiked up. It's my wife's special recipe. This. Than this. About please all all fronts where where did he evacuated, but I also never brought in any more of my food any corresponding Tupperware container without his blue lead. With a little yellow circle. You could pop up to allow steam to come out because I knew he would know it was the same staff. So when did he put the note on the refrigerator? Yep. Yep. And you wrote on your wife's food was good. Exactly why after stealing the man's food. So that when when when my return that container at home, I was just like. Okay. There's nothing you can do things point. I just couldn't bring him to work. No. And you can't like go like explain to the guy or anything. It was just now explaining if it were someone actually like had in higher regard. Maybe I wouldn't like I played sorry, which is still a tough sell. But here just like that like this. Yeah. I actually one school where I was teaching. I brought him into one of the rooms where you know. It's like a break room sort of. I brought in like two boxes of triscuits specifically did separate shopping to leave food at school. So I go into get might triscuits and boxes are gone. So I am annot while now here's what happened. I went to open the cabinet where they were in the cabinet was locked, and I was really mad. I was trying like there was some little keys lying around that. I tried. I could how locked this. So then I came in the next day with a screwdriver, and I managed to halfway get the cabinet open and bent the lock. So now, it's jammed in now, I, you know, it's it's all a mess, and I scratched up the door and everything it was just a disaster. And so I'm still mad. Unlike two boxes of triscuits in there. So then I just it very. Yeah. Yeah place, and I thought all right. Well, maybe I can reach around the other cabinet may be consorting get through and they were not even in the locked cabinet. They were in the open cabinet that was next to it that all why would I bother looking in there? I don't know why not go, right? So then a memo goes around about this like destruction of property. One of the, you know break rooms, and there was a note laughed. And you know, I don't know why anybody would do this dot. I mean, all that was in. There was like plastic plates and nothing to really merit. Yeah. So there was that. And then I was looking save security cameras around. And I thought all right. I'm going to be on security camera. They're going to be watching this like a month later. It's gonna come up. I was kind of on eggshells for a while thinking that you know. But what I mean? Yeah. The Tupperware thing is classic. And it is amazing. How like I did research one time on the notes that people leave in the refrigerators at work in. It's like you took two of my hot pockets. I enjoy these hot pockets and was demanding repayment of like four dollars and thirty two cents and slide it under the door of my office. Like first of all who who eats hot? When you talk about. Yeah. People get amazingly very petty very territorial examine what place someone like leftover cheesecake in the fridge in someone act. They had like a I guess they were planning to have some more of it later than I went over to guys desk, and he had for work was four slices of cheesecake which comprise like more than a quarter of a size, cheesecake half a cheese day. It was eating that is like a lunch. Like, you think it was the old week who on earth, and that's that in the law. That is very is a rich meal. Right. He's eating four slices of cheesecake like now that guy over there is the only person to have touched it in he consumed everything you've seen it's gone since he forces of cheesecake. Yeah, they weren't like they're like cheesecake factory size like like a one serving is like fifteen hundred. It was like six thousand calories cheesecake, I don't understand. I. Yeah. Like one time a an Email went out. This was like, I don't know a couple of months ago. I was on there after school doing some more. And you know, it's like leftover pizza down in the in the break room. Anybody wants it? Sounds like smelly three o'clock and not that many people left around. So go down. And there's this guy. He's a teaching assistant. He's packing up the last three slices. Am I he sees me come in? And he's like. Like oh yard grab some for the road might come on, man. Last three. I mean, obviously someone's going to get the last one but three there's a bolt move. Yeah. Yeah. And he's the same guy who's like trying to sell some table. He has like a picture of the break room up. Yeah. He's trying to sell some table for like one hundred dollars. Like, what are you a gypsy or something like with us? Yeah. Yeah. Working in that, you know. Supporting role, and then that was the big Turkey on a Saturday morning at the Boston bringing bagels and donuts. But then as the date crapped on now just to pending on where you are in the cycle. So you were in the accounting portion of it or doing the right apps like data would become available. So as as the weeks from say, mid January through February went on in March, you know, different people different subsets of the team would have more work. But they felt like it was good for morale for everyone in the whole department to be there throughout the whole process. So go there really not have much to do like one part of the department in the January would have little work their stuff wasn't actually like fully baked to work on. And then if you were in the department working heavily, then by the time, it was w airy you'd pass that, you know, your contributions over the other area, but you were supposed to come in. So I remember distinctly being there. And you know, they bring bagels don's you'd have breakfast. Maybe thinking I don't have that much to do. Do here. Meet a cut out around lunch time, they'll get to be like one two o'clock. Are you talking other bagel? Maybe another Donut let's terminate how many meals are you gonna subsist on because he was hoping to even have a real meal, but you go don't be like leaving getting food and coming back because any more committed to stay. So just be up by three pm you on like you make donuts bagels. He pad is only than you had all day it just a miserable existence. Yeah. Yeah. It sounds like such a good idea in o'clock in the morning by the time like you going around one or two o'clock. It's now it's not good. And so from that role a year. So this other company that was more flexible, but I still wasn't ready serving brace that flexibly like city when I was hurt. And then I basically left that company after a few years, and I went to another insurer, which kinda focused more on someone from property casualty insurer still in finance to house insurer though in finance too. To a life insurer still in finance where they had a little flexibility by nadh as much and then after tour they're talking multiple years at each came back to the same health insurer in that point was pretty accustomed to the flexibility was in a finance role for some time before switching to more of a business strategy type of role where the occasional work on flexibility. Was look you're lying to other geographic regions in the country. We're not concerned with you being in the home office, the U Muslim just be aligned to literally your home and come in the office for meetings, and whatever else they are notable leadership meetings things like that. And it's been a yes, totally down spectrum. But again you. You know, our per hour basis not to it. I pretty much enable this kind of work various hours, you know, that an issue. I always see laptop said a desktop, but it's been a mixed even when I went it's like when I was occasionally working from home, I wouldn't really planet, particularly well, I would just of scavenge to my kitchen cereal for lunch. It's my went fulltime work at home that was too. I was eating cereal and peanut butter. Jelly sandwiches, leftovers, finally, bracelets that I need to establish some sort of structures. Not just young you have to kinda map things out a little better because that was ROY committed which was an adjustment itself. Now. I mean, are you supposed to be like online or whenever a certain time? I mean generally deal amid at a level where. You know, especially since a lot of what I learned to folks in New York City northern jersey later, I can kinda shop anytime in log in. But I mean, probably eight nine Shabangu can still be later in that if I wanted to that's when things start happening. I may drop off a little earlier some folks that are physically office been logging all it again after dinner Rafter, my kids are bad or something like that. Or something else that I get done with? So even though I'm home enough interrupted as much on interpersonal level, you still get a lot of instant messages emails things like that meeting. So just two hours a day. So sometimes, you know, all along vacuum later, just a hammer out some work. I just didn't accomplish today it self, but it's easy because it's just a different room in your house. So when you say things start happening like you, log on eight nine o'clock like what what exactly is going on L overnight exactly carrying cancer, others meetings and people have questions the emails come in or different topics. Regressing? About you know, inserting healthier. You'll be a mix of of the strategy. What we're trying to doing with a sales to plan sponsor, those employers that have insurance coverage for their employees through through my mind players, and she said, it's health insurance. So then their interactions with brokers that sell that business members that have issues like, you know, maybe health alligator insurance claim of for a medical procedure could be interacting with hostile network negotiations. Speaking with the actuaries tracking down trying to supplement some things for sale on kind of across central role in my current role where I support a lot of trouble shoot. Almost a sort of a fixer without ABC, actually, physically berry any bonds. So people are e mailing you instant messaging use. I am like luck. This is come up. That's come up in your your. Trouble-shooting? There's some standing meetings of different topics come up that we have ongoing basis, but a yell out of is just some of it is structured reporting that occurs every month or some of his just flown team together say busy, she will rose address it in it's one person from the legal department want Trump, the compliance department of one person actual, you know. You want from sales something like that to identify solution or or you dress in issue, but there's a lot of standing kind of working in different things to germs of just recognizing employees. And like, I said, I I wear a lot hats, it'll be something like we have some recognition programs employees. They do a good job or making sure people are utilizing that, you know, it's it's a whole range of thanks. And that's the part of I like about my current job is a lot of variety there's some structured but enough to keep you busy we need to. But there's not enough. Ryan, Jim, thanks come up in different challenges. So when you say you have a meeting like how does that what does that look like if you're at home like how does that is everybody logging onto some sort of? I know there's all kinds of like meeting, you know, platforms now online and all that. And so there's a lot like this the WebEx Skype different setups. Where the times given the area is for grasp what he has a heavy focus on New England, New York, New jersey to broads better where people are so especially like in a sales culture for say sales folks out trying to get new accounts they're travelling bit or you know, say times, I only off going Manhattan. Not more than say half the team actually less than that will be physically there because their jersey or they're just outside the office. So people will kind of joint some of these calls from various locations, but there may be screen sharing. That shows. Here's a presentation on cycle. Powerpoint presentation with different slides drive. A discussion may just be a call in where different people call him. But then whatever the agenda is the topic in people going to chime in and have a discussion, but a lot of those folks or geographically spread out. So even though I used to kind of align, though, the home office in Hartford, Connecticut, I go there of actually physically there today in see people in person, you're still on the phone even when you're there than elsewhere. So it's it's a mix of who's in the room. But once a month of minimum we have a meeting for the leadership team. It's come across monk show meeting to the senior folks from the various areas represented in the tragic, no come in for two hour meeting in a particular office typically. In Manhattan or northern New Jersey? And at least one day a month everyone's in the same place. So there's more interaction. Do you actually is sort of the joke? You know, I guess in corporate culture and whatnot is people love to have meetings. And I mean, do you find that these meetings are productive they of valuable way to spend time or I mean, I've heard kind of the gamut. I mean, people I've heard people say, it's just, you know, people like to hear themselves talk and not a whole lot gets -ccomplish. Don't know what the flavors vary pretty widely. I'd say there are some people that are twenty precise. -ccomplish get done move on. It's now or longing. But takes minutes. Good. You know? You know, limiters Enceladus kind of half assing, I'll give you back forty eight minutes. And just kind of like there's a law about our ministry give giving people back as they close at a meeting early. But other folks yet, it'll just be a recurring meeting weekly biweekly inches too much. It goes on unity, the measurable progresses, slim to none. And it it's just kind of eventually some of those meetings, depending on some of those Mason by the the largest number of people that go on in kind of in perpetuity being that same being held every two weeks in eventually people to stop showing out. I mean, even indicate Dave accepted the meeting. They're gonna come in in the meeting windows says it's just a time sut- real. Yeah. I a friend of mine and phonies and Yunan Tom guy from Maine. He was talking about we're used to work, and he said, they would have a meaning. And there would be like, you know, talking about one guy in particular on. It'd be like, you know, it's this agenda. Da da this and that and then they come back for the meeting in two weeks and nothing had been accomplished. It was just like it was sort of not idea that once we leave this meeting actually supposed to go carry out the items on the suggestion. It was just like, well, it all sounds good on paper and everything. And then nothing ever moved forward yet. That was at definitely the case law types, you know, I can get anyone wrapping up a meeting whatever we are. Now, saying okay who yells the various items identified will takeaways who's doing this who's in that went to expect update is otherwise the next meeting of the same topic. It's like groundhog that you just have the same conversation while some people that are clearly not at driving alum. They try to get by vice we haven't same thing. And then some people call out say what we've already all know that that's not that we we cover that place of vast month. Whereas whereas demonstrable progress see I I'm one of the rehash IRS. I. John. And I the other guy does this podcast. We're gonna have like a master class and mine is looking active in meetings. One one of my classes, I'll teach looking active in meetings when you don't actually have any idea. What's going on? It's side. Yeah. Yeah. It's real skill. It's a real skill. Is kind of a leading question or you know, you know, it is one of the is. Yeah, if you will just keep talking. It is what it is. That's what I'm thrown out there. But it's enough to just like, okay. Yep. Your present. And you spoke in. Yup. Someone else's keeps telling Nimmer now while I think, it's it's, you know, first of all I always show with a legal pad and a pen that looks like you're into it. You know, like, you're actively taking notes eagerly just make some noting. Yes. And then you wait until it's a little bit of a game little bit of a gamble. But you you kind of waited out you wait for like Lisa and Tyler to throw. And then you you piggyback on that. And then you, you know, there's an art to it. I mean, people think this is all natural. It's not I've worked on it for many years. You know, actively listening nodding unlike what Tyler said about blah, blah, blah. And then you know, you can really role of it. Was interesting mix because you know, insulin beings. I'm in physically there. People have their laptops in front of him that he wanted to be engaged in the meeting. But then he you could sort of tighten almost be taking notes, but then it becomes readily apparent when you are just like sending emails to somebody else in your zero engagement, so that sweet spot of participating the meeting sort of nodding talking. But then maybe can see we taking those and also you're not as head down. Clearly, just doing other work happen to be sitting in a room people. You're not talking about or in my case, you're watching those videos of like the zookeeper wrestling with a baby elephant 'cause I love those. I have to keep from chuckling. But yeah, I do sometimes I am one of those guys who takes notes whatever. Then I shut the notebook. Honestly, I couldn't really tell you. What happened? I don't really know. I don't follow up on anything. So you know, that would be one where folks that worked for me back the life adjourn somebody, and he was real nice guy. Well, tension hardworking guy. But so, you know, we're in a meeting with my boss. So it was like his boss's boss. I guess his takeaway of all change your name from sicker catering colored. So we come out of the beating he's got anything legal pad notes. He's written in all caps. In enemy talked about a few different things. You try to make sure that he did what he was supposed to do in. Then he leaves no pans desk. You know, an I happen to walk by few minutes later in all it says is f you Janet on there? So I said all changed his name said, Mike. Wait. What what once was that all about like what since denser, the meeting? Unlike Yuejin Kenny goes, he I don't know if you're paying attention also is the follow up with her about that later. Not at all what I see at the UK is. That's my reminder follow up junior later on top of talked about you should probably tear that it just start with a fresh age on your note that because that's just sitting on the corner who's desk in like hundred point five if you heard it pretty off. Probably these. Oh, I like to see how that might. Yes. We might take that different Mike. I'm pretty sure ninety plus percent populations. Will take his is that our bosses boss mislead writing assignments? There is no other way to take up. No rush. If I didn't know him his these innocent like positive guy like really you're like do not you're not selling. Use the same guy to that. Boston be had we get key. He said to me one because she was not could work for not the sharpest tool shed it one day you came out of being with him in with her. And so I was frustrated because it was just like. Against the wall for this is brutal. I cannot our meals, you know, no, let I thought to myself. She's hard to work with the maybe she's got maybe she's got like a legitimate issue. That the limits are Billy to decide. This is the best she can do and we should be proud of her. Like anyone else? I'd ever known in my life Bali, honestly, said that like, wow. That is as brutal. But for for him. It was a positive spin on her complete aptitude ills, maybe this is the best she can do in. We should be proud of her. He was heavily functioning adult. It was really bad job. There was no other. There is no actual gentleman issue was just she was just not bright. And she was your superior yell. Yeah. Yeah. Which was Becton that's L. But I mean, I I got transferred over there when that company was in danger in town situation, they been it was was kind of corporate mix of saying we're going to be leading a lot of people go because we have to scale back, and we want you to take over the seem over here because we're letting your peer go when also stuff so that point I was kind of survival thing. It wasn't interesting work, but I was least behind the curtain. Oh, okay. I know the teacher will days will break years people get like, oh because obviously if I'm taking on the other team, then did I guess? Survive. But I saw you kind of. Tough it out for for lack of a better option for time with that moved on when when there were more opportunities. But yes, oh, it was horrible that work in that setting. If he was hard working guy really well meeting that I used to he he fell douses his way of looking at it. And he meant that in all earnestness, a really too because I thought of having said that it would be, you know, like my brothers and says just withering criticism of someone, you know, he's been now like you. So let's let's go what's Bucker up? She's she's doing what you can you. I mean, you might say that about like not to be able about it. But the person who's like emptying the waste baskets or something like this case his bosses, right? Yeah. It's amazing though, you know, my brother works for the federal government. And so does my sister-in-law for many years now. And they just said over the years. It's amazing the people who get into positions of authority who are utterly incompetent, right, right? Oh, yeah. I think she'd put up time than whenever. And then one of the guys that was also a team had been there. Longtime was kind of just you know, writings out 'til retirement. He hit apparently hired her company. I don't know fifteen years prior. Whenever we suggest around we ring DeLorean, eight miles an hour eagle back and fix all the mistakes. He made in his life. The ought on hire her create this user, we'd be an alternate world. She was not lost one point Tony one gigawatt hundred. And he goes, well, I never thought what Howard her I would alternately work for her. He goes, I never Fallon. There would play out that way, they shuttled more and more people around. I think her deficiencies were pretty glaring 'cause gotten areas. Okay. I'll figure this out. We'll get it up. Your running a manages team kinda out on my own terms. But then she was not really effective or adept at managing doing much of anything. So was the more. They kind of were shuffling teams round out of necessity. He cannot say what she contribute or we know. She's not a good manager. She does not going to you'll contributor, but she would have in Boston down ago. Okay. I'm not sure what the values. So that kind of came on after a while then went for a long time swing the guy who hired her. She ended up becoming his superior yell remain many years that he? Take a split off the gas at all we're talking in the hierarchy of things, you know, she was like a director. So she in their long different pairs of in that kind of corporate setting directors assistant director below that may be like a manager assistant manager, you know, senior consultant consoled going down the second to the the earlier career options. But then he advanced whatever level he was in say, he was an assistant director and industries kinda hang back saying I need to work three more years till retirement and somewhere along the way. Yes, she hit sort of a Senate to director, then he had gotten slotted under her when they kept shuffling these apartments than it was a. Young. It was it was a real kind of mixture. He didn't begrudge it because he was just trying to coast retirement, get his pension. But it was just a weedy. I was shocked when I became aware of her like how how she even position at all. Again, she was in charge of vast swath of the company, but it was still just kind of perplexing yen like corporate culture, at least the perception from the outside is supposed to weed out. I mean, it's supposed to be like Darwinism at its finest flooded. But I don't know I guess that there's a never before or since and he seemed fine. But I was like what I stumbled across that little bit that he had actually hired her company years prior that come to be. Well, I guess if she someone like her hits that kind of perfect storm this skies Lieven, he doesn't care other people are very new, and they don't really know. And but you can only play that shell game for so long gas. I mean, I don't know. Maybe I don't know some people play it indefinitely. I suppose they just know how to work the system, I they have a certain kind of intelligence ride there. They must have something. Well enough to get by guess. Yeah. Yeah. It's interesting though, because well, there was this book that came out. It just sorta reminded me you talking about her called bullshit jobs, and it was about how in all these companies you have so many jobs in like a range of maybe sixty to one hundred thousand dollars a year that are kinda very redundant Shinsei kind of they are redundant. And they they don't really. Produce anything probably at these sort of management. Vice president issue kind of layer. It's almost like a thermodynamic layer that exists, and they don't really do much of anything you can sort of hide in the air and Email whatever phone calls, but it just sort of exists. You know, and I guess that's my theory is people need someplace to go, otherwise, it'd be wandering around on the streets. So that's that also wear yet. Yeah. And they got like Judy members of society. But they're they're. Yeah. They're there somewhere doing something. I guess. Yeah. And they pay taxes, and they go out to restaurants and things like that. So Holly by cars, and as I said for that. Yeah. They yeah. They like things and do something presumably now, it's sort of like, an ether they exist in this ether that, you know. Yeah. The guy office space like, you know, he brings the file from one department to the other because they don't get along. So we we do that. They don't get along. Yeah. Yeah. Absolutely. And you know, like, I kinda there's a guy who comes sometimes to fix the copier machine. And I see him, and I'm like he's very specific job. He fix fixes the copier machine. That's it. That's what he does yet. Right binary exist. This is what I do. Yeah. If it doesn't break it to be fixed. Maybe I fixed the toner. But as I can that it's yeah. Yeah. And he has all these tools out that are different the book catch twenty two a long time ago. Yes. Yeah. There was a scene where this guy works on these little little machines. And he drives the protagonist crazy. And this guy. He must have a hundred tools laid out and they're all tiny these tiny little instruments city gets in there. And he's fixing it and everything he fascinates me. Like, wow. What a what a job? That's I just felt he doesn't have to deal with anybody. And none of that just does that by leaves leads that get guess, and he's the man because of the copy machines broken were. Admired ads in his involvement. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. And everybody loves him when he on the copiers fixed. Oh my God. Like, this guy's iota. Like, he just, you know. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. You get your skillset is highly valued in in that realm not outside of that meals. Yeah. It's with the rest of that light consistent. I don't know. I don't need to know. I don't want. Now the park that that intersection of life. All right. Well, we've hit forty five minutes here just about this is great shot on. I I'd like to do it again. I feel like there's a lot here. I haven't quite delved into yet. So we'll certainly delve into it. But yeah, thanks for talking to us. Matt. Absolutely. They showed me. Thank you. Everyone for listening to this episode of the working experience. We'd like to think our sponsors one circle media and the still believe app the only app that delivers video proof of the tooth fairy. And Santa by simply taking a picture. Download the app at still believe dot CO today in a major kids, and if you work for a studio network startup or corporation and are looking for a partner to create media that will build engage in entertain your audience reach out to me at John at one circle media dot com. I would love to hear from you. And that's it the end to sweet end until our next audio encounter.

Matt Matt John Connecticut Tupperware Hartford dot CO Santa Tony partner Boston Matty Kay Volusia Larry Bird Manhattan