35 Burst results for "Voice"

What is happening the final weekend before the election?

AP 24 Hour News

01:00 min | 4 hrs ago

What is happening the final weekend before the election?

"Election Day Tuesday, tens of millions of people have already voted nine million alone in Texas more than all of the votes cast in that state in 2016. I'm Tim Maguire. Pandemic campaigning. I'm Tim a guy with an AP news Minute earlier this week, Minnesota Governor Tim Walz another state officials warn President Trump's campaign the Corona virus restrictions limit large crowds 250 people. Despite that restriction, the campaign continue with plans to host a rally and a hanger of the Rochester airport. Trump says thousands were kept from attending. Tonight. You're Democrat governor tried to shut down our rally. Silence the people of Minnesota and take away your freedom and your rights. Former Vice President Joe Biden also campaign in Minnesota today, holding a car driving rally in ST Paul, You want your voice to be heard. Drop off your ballots. I'll put in a nail or boat safely person any day up through Election Day. But you've got to get it done. This is the final weekend before Election Day Tuesday, tens of millions of people have

President Trump Minnesota Governor Tim Walz Tim Maguire Vice President Joe Biden Rochester Texas St Paul
Vice President Mike Pence visits Flagstaff, Tucson

Dave Ramsey

00:48 sec | 9 hrs ago

Vice President Mike Pence visits Flagstaff, Tucson

"To be in Arizona. Today. It's crunch time and the road to the White House continues through Arizona Vice President Mike Pence is here just landed, and he also joined the MIC Broom Head show this morning. Sally Ventnor joins us live with his plans in the state today. Mike Broom head show spoke exclusively to Vice President Mike Pence ahead of his day full of campaigning in our state. Today, he explained why he's back in Arizona just days away from Election Day, making sure that the people of Arizona know that the confidence they placed in Donald Trump in 2016 is all promises Made and promises kept. Governor Doug Ducey joins him during his events across the state today as well. I'm in Arizona today, Flagstaff and then Tucson to encourage everyone in the sound of my voice, Everyone in this great freedom loving state to get Out and vote to re elect President Donald Trump you can

Arizona Mike Pence President Donald Trump Vice President Mike Broom Sally Ventnor Doug Ducey White House Flagstaff Tucson
Interview with Voice of Princess Leia, Ann Sachs

Audio Theatre Central | Exploring Family Friendly Audio Drama

04:47 min | 19 hrs ago

Interview with Voice of Princess Leia, Ann Sachs

"As I mentioned a moment ago and sacks is the voice of a Princess Leia and she is a talented actress for many many years on on stage in both on and off Broadway Productions. And she is the former president and CEO of the renowned theater design firm sacks Morgan studio and you can find out more about her and the fact that she's working on these days at theatrical intelligence.com while and thank you so much for joining us today. It is a pleasure to talk with you and I'm been looking forward to this ever since way just connected. You know that there's just so much we could talk about because of this a project that is such a huge part of American. Well, I guess you could say even Global culture. I mean this thing is reach around the world. And so the original radio adaptation was first broadcast in 1981 and back. In those days you were doing stage acting at the time. Is that correct? That's correct. Yes. I played the leading role on Broadway in Dracula APA Frank langella and did that for over a year and I loved working in the you know, our country's resident Theatres because they're so varied in their approaches to producing plays and then also the theaters themselves very, you know, the little key we do lunch and then they're huge ones and I loved the surprising aspect of of working in different places. Yeah, like your locally we have the Orpheum Theater downtown Phoenix and that is just an absolutely beautiful beautiful theater. Yeah. Yeah. I've been in there. Yes, beautiful never worked there, but yep. Lovely. Yeah. Well, so how did you first hear about the Star Wars project? Well, it was one of those things where I just got a call from my agent and he said that if I was free I was being asked to do a radio adaptation of storm. I said what that is very strange and I guess I had met John Madden once brilliant brilliant director and said he must have been you know on a tight line or something like that, but it just sort of suddenly happened and a couple of days after getting the call. We we started it and it was just a just horrific great son Mark Hamill from the original film was in it then Terry King did dead. How long is solo and Carrie was terrific in that? So it was this something out of the norm for you to get asked to audition for a radio project or or what was that audition process? Like well, there was no addition. I just got called by my agent and they asked me to do it. I guess they must have been kind of dealing with a last-minute schedule or something. But I was asked I could do it and I did it was wonderful. It was a real Joy. Wow. Yeah, just call up and say hey we've got this roll for you. Come do it. Yes, exactly. That's all too rare in the theater and film business. So have you done any other radio projects before this month? Do you know what I I don't think I have I've done radio things but mostly it has to do with interviews and commercials for I was doing but it was a complete surprise and and of wonderful one, huh? That's that's amazing. So the so the film was released in 77 and the radio drama 81. Did you ever think that Star Wars would be such a huge cultural phenomenon as it is today, you know on one level I was I was completely surprised. It's just really the the global phenomenon is something that rarely happens in the world and on another level. It makes perfect sense. It just wage has that you know, the magic. Yeah that that just draws people in and what did you like to work on home? Sure,

Morgan Studio Orpheum Theater Frank Langella President And Ceo Sacks John Madden Broadway Productions Mark Hamill Phoenix Terry King Carrie Director
Standing Rock With Cody Two Bears

Superman's Not Coming with Erin Brockovich

03:59 min | 20 hrs ago

Standing Rock With Cody Two Bears

"So I'm really looking forward to today's guest cody to bears. For as long as anyone can remember, America has been trying to come to terms with questions of race and equality. Much of our focus has been on the African American community and for good reason. However far too often overlooked and forgotten are the people whose ancestors inhabited this majestic land for generations before the first white man set foot on the continent. Today I am talking with my friend, cody to bears and the Standing Rock Sioux. Cody has been at the center of his people's battle against the Dakota pipeline which served their sacred land. So here today, and then there's my pleasure to have cody to bear and to talk his people and share his story. To Cody. Welcome. Thank you so much for being here. Thank you Erin it's it's a pleasure to be a part of your show. Very excited about this discussion and also thinking me also like to thank you for a lot of the work that you have done in year history in your past of protecting water rates in this country in the world it just to bring up a the voice of the voiceless for them to stand up for what's right is very, very important than it falls right in line with their native American heritage and traditions and customs that we still follow today. Well it's it's been my privilege and to have an understanding of. which so much of a cause possibly forgotten about or moved away from or for many reasons thought it was being in fact, protected our land, our water and it hasn't. And so can you give the listeners background please and tell us about your people and and everything that has been happening with you up at standing rock. Yeah. So just to let you know I'm still very young man I'm still thirty five years old of course but. Yeah I've I've learned a lot along the way at the same time I got the privilege and honor to be able to. Serve my people from. Twenty down twenty thirteen to twenty seven in the Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Council So as one of the youngest elected leaders are standing rock, Sioux travel history at that time. So I got to serve four years from community in the crazy part of that whole situation is that. In two, thousand, thirteen, my first year in office we got. President Barack Obama to come standing rock in my community to in cannonball, which were encampments the protests all went down at the northern border of our reservation boundaries. That's the community that I represented for years for my tribe and now what a coincidence off fast forward two years later. Brock Obama had to make a tough decision to try to protect. Our water in our rights and Bustan for indigenous issues while he came previously two years ago to our lands and promised us that he would do what he can to help our people. So what a coincidence that now four years that we definitely hadn't standing rock during that time Since then I've been out of politics outside of twenty seventeen I told myself you know. Like to protest about it, talk about it the environment but you know it's time to start to be about it, and so that's why I started my own initiative on my own nonprofit called indigenised energy, which currently now we have the largest solar farm on standing rock three miles away from the pipeline crossing in north. Dakota which is the largest solar farm in North Dakota to date. So we'd we did remarkable things two years after the pipeline and now the protests. So we're doing what we can try to live by that and. Keep pushing to go hundred percent renewable within reservation boundaries

Cody Barack Obama Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Cou Standing Rock Sioux North Dakota America Erin Bustan President Trump
Trump and the GOP Campaign Against Reality

Late Night with Seth Meyers Podcast

05:03 min | 21 hrs ago

Trump and the GOP Campaign Against Reality

"The president and his allies decided on closing message for the final days of the campaign wine about social media pretend the pandemic is over for more on this. It's time for a closer look. There's a lot you can say about Donald Trump's inner circle and the leadership of the Modern Republican Party. But when you boil it down, it's basically just a collection of shy can't take Weirdos. Then people who collect ceramic pigs in sit by their windows writing down license plate numbers for no reason take for example House Minority Leader Kevin, McCarthy. You showed up to one of trump's rallies yesterday claimed republicans are going to take back the House McCarthy then belched up this I think English sentence about House Speaker Nancy, Pelosi a watch you watch Nancy Pelosi hand. And I promise you this. I won't thank her with it but I'll banged the into the socialism and yes to America. What No. I'll bang end to the socialism and yes to America, that sounds like a poorly translated leaflet dropped on Moscow during the Cold War why all these guys talk like rip off dollar store. Action. Figures made in. Eastern Europe. Your grandma will get you for Christmas. Oh Wow. It's a fuzz goodyear. Let me pull the string. The leaders of the hundred gop beer. Basically just a bunch of goofy old buds. I said it pods. Take a guy is still working at your hometown bowling alley thirty years after high school because he gets free disco fries blessed all the shoe sporadic and huff and that is a lot. For example Republicans held a hearing on big tech companies yesterday just to complain about supposed social media. Bias against conservatives which it's not thing. Now, there are progressives like Elizabeth Warren Tonight's guest, Bernie Sanders you really do want to break up big tech monopolies that have consolidated too much power but Republicans just WanNa. whine about mean tweets they don't like the best example of that came from Wisconsin Senator Ron Johnson when he complained about an obviously satirical tweet this Dorsey. You talked about your house toward misinformation and then you will you will block misinformation if it's about against civic integrity election interference or voter suppression give you a tweet. There was put up on twitter says Senator Ron. Johnson is my neighbor in strangle our dog buttons right in front of my four year old son and three year old daughter the Keith refused to investigate. This is a complete line, but important to retreat and note that there are more my lies to come. How could that not be a violation voice oppression? Obviously, if people think I'm strangling my neighbors. They may not show the polls that would be worse oppression and another thing Mr Dorsey last night by doorbell rang late at night. So went to answer when I opened the door there was a flame in bag APU on the front step. So I tried to stamp out the fire but I got poo all over my shoes this clearly enact the voter suppression by the Neighborhood Teens because if I pooh-poohed on my shoes, I'll be too embarrassed to go vote. The bigger problem here is Ron Johnson thinks his constituents might actually believe that he strangled his neighbor's dog and Yeah. Okay and kind of see it. With said. Jack Dorsey looks like a dog serial killer. Like straight up a guy who together multiple dogs. in Ron Johnson's corn chowder brain joke tweet about a senators voter suppression. But invalidating mail in ballots and making people wait hours to vote isn't he's like a guy parks is BMW in a fire lane then loses when his targets tone Boris Suppression How am I supposed to get to the polling place now and then there was Tennessee Senator Marsha Blackburn who asked the CEO of Google if the company was still employing someone who criticized her is a blight Lemoyne one of your engineers still working with you. Senator familiar with his name is a name as an employee I'm not sure these employees. well, he has had very unconscious things to say about me and I was just wondering if you all still. Kept him working they are man Fox News is right. Canceled Culture is out of control. She sounds like she's asking to speak to the manager about a sales assistant at Costco is Madison still working here. She had very unkind things to say about me when I tried to sample the pizza rolls in the frozen I'll very hurtful things about how I'm not supposed to open the box. This is a fundamental reality of the modern GOP they're all donald trump. He complains about social media they complain about social media even though most of them don't have the tech savvy to handle the laundry room bulletin board coffee, table for sale what the hell does Obioma this is unfair.

Senator Ron Johnson Donald Trump Jack Dorsey GOP Nancy Pelosi America Senator Ron Senator Marsha Blackburn Modern Republican Party Senator President Trump Mccarthy Lemoyne Eastern Europe Twitter Fox News
Suspect Arrested In Fatal South Los Angeles Hit-And-Run That Killed Father

KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

01:11 min | 1 d ago

Suspect Arrested In Fatal South Los Angeles Hit-And-Run That Killed Father

"Southland residents are not only seeing a big spike in murders. They're also dealing with an endless number of severe or fatal hit and run cases, Authorities say. One of them though, just got solved. Police say the suspect was driving a stolen vehicle when he slammed into a dad riding bikes with his two young Children. On July 8th. The dad was fatally injured. The kids were hurt, and the suspect took off on foot through various investigative leads. We were able to identify 26 year old voice of Los Angeles. He was already in jail for something else when they caught up to him, But now he's being held on $2 million bail for hitting and killing. Jorge Guerra, Sarah's daughter says the grieving family is grateful, but they want to see the end of all the carnage from hit and run cases. What happened to my father was just one of the many casualties caused here in South Los Angeles. Traffic violence, the officer notes. The drivers must stop after hitting somebody, or else the consequences are much more severe. It actually compounds the matter into further, more serious charge is, in fact, a suspect in this case is facing a murder account. In addition to a list of other charges in south L, A. John Baird, Kay and X 10 70 NewsRadio,

South Los Angeles Los Angeles Jorge Guerra Southland John Baird Murder Officer KAY Sarah
Deliberative Mini-publics: Involving Citizens in the Democratic Process

Science Magazine Podcast

06:50 min | 1 d ago

Deliberative Mini-publics: Involving Citizens in the Democratic Process

"We have news intern Kathleen O'Grady. She's here to talk about many publics a strategy for democracies to figure out tough policy problems. Hi, Kathleen High. These are sometimes called mini public citizen juries, deliberative democracy. What exactly are we talking about here? We are about buddies made up a randomly selected citizens. Deliberate, very controlled conditions answering often very constrained questions and who at the end of the process produce a set of recommendations there different kinds of buddies. They're really big ones that take a long time. There are these small ones that just meet for a weekend but the crucial ingredient really is that the citizens of randomly selected rather than self selected what need are these deliberative bodies filling the point that a lot of. People indicate as a real sea change recently was in Ireland after the financial crisis when there was a catastrophic collapse trusting government and one of the responses to this was a promise to institute as citizens. Body, that would deliberate on various crucial questions in Ireland at the time and produce recommendations, and they've been a couple in Ireland now and they've been incredible success quite a few people point to the success in Ireland. As. An indication that these bodies are very useful in the political moment that we find ourselves and where there's incredible polarization, there's lots of trusting government. So. That's really the need that they're trying to deal with when I hear about small groups deliberating big policy questions I, want to know a few important. Thanks how're the members chosen who picks basically the curriculum that they're subjected to and what happens with the results? Can you walk us through some examples? Sure. So use the UK, Climate Assembly because that's the example that I know best thirty, thousand letters were sent out to randomly chosen postcards and people were invited to rsvp saying whether they could make Birmingham for the weekends that had been selected for the assembly about seventeen hundred people responded saying that they could make it. We start out with random selection and then there is an unavoidable layer of self selection, right? Yeah. Strong people into being in a room. They don't want to be in and then random selection comes in a gain where there's an algorithm that takes these people who've responded positively, and it strips that down to the core group of just one hundred and ten people who are stratified to reflect the UK wide population on a number of different. Characteristics. So now that you have your body, how do you choose what to have them talk about listen to in this case, there were so many different bodies involved you parliament commissioned the assembly, and then they put the question of WHO's going to run the assembly out to competitive tender a charity won the contract to run it, and then the charity instituted a panel of experts, coup selected speakers but then there selection was put tear another panel. It was the first round of deliberation really on who should be providing evidence. Now, you have your people and your curriculum. The first thing that happened here was that they listen to academics explaining the very basics. What is the greenhouse effect? What are the consequences of climate change after they've kind of got the basics in place they hear on specific topics from experts and interest groups whose opinions are clearly labeled as opinions. The assembly was divided into three different tracks. So one track was looking at transport, for instance, in another track with looking at eating in home energy. And within those tracks, they split into small groups where they would deliberate on questions that they wanted to US policies that they wanted to introduce. There was some kind of template policies that they were given to vote on, but they also request changes to use the policies that were suggested to them, and then at the end of that, they had a blind voting process. One of the big concerns that we have right now with politics is how polarized people are, how do they keep that out of this and make it like a com- space for making decisions one of the best descriptions of it that I've heard is it's like couples counseling for Democracy. What happens is that within these small group settings, there are very strict rules for civility only one person speaking at a time being polite and calm at all times giving other people space to other abuse even if they disagree with them, backing up your opinions with reasons and facts. And there's a great deal of space made for instance, in asking questions at the experts where people who are not comfortable standing up and asking their question in front of a room of one hundred people can write down the question and have it asked for them. Each table has its own facilitator guiding participants through the civility rules and at the end of it, you have these. Comments from the participants about how much they felt that their voices were heard how much they felt that they were respected. It's really kind of difficult to imagine when you're spending time in the political climate that rules spending time in, but it does seem to work. Yeah. Reading some of the descriptions of the way people felt about participating in about all getting on board and kind of this magic of cheering facts and forming logical conclusions from them and being satisfied with how things went. Basically, it's like summer camp less data and politics and it's somehow uplifting. That's a great description I. think that works really well, the other comparison that kept coming to mind for me was the great British baking show. So they go every weekend it's the verse population that's rarely is representative of the country and they go into the situation where the norms dictate kindness camaraderie helpfulness. And they produce something beautiful, and in this case, it's climate policy rather than take what happened with the results will happen with the policy decisions recommendations that they made. Some of them were quite creative. One that I particularly loved that an assembly members suggested was the idea that the government should be producing information on our success, a climate policy the way they're producing information on our stats, a website that you can go to see what our emissions look like and how that compares to Nineteen Ninety and what's happening to bring them down. There were also suggestions to have carbon footprint labelling on food an a very high level of support for bringing public transit back into public ownership in the UK where it's largely privatized and where this has been kind of political football for a while. So in many cases, the policies themselves are not necessarily that astonishing, but it's a gauge of the trade offs that members of the public prepared to make what people are prepared to do to achieve those policies and what level of support there is among a very informed subset of the public. That's really particularly interesting

Ireland UK Kathleen O'grady Climate Assembly Kathleen High Intern Nineteen Ninety Birmingham United States Football Representative
Fauci voices support for national mask mandate

Lewis and Logan

00:38 sec | 1 d ago

Fauci voices support for national mask mandate

"A national mask mandate help. Dr Anthony Fauci thinks so nation's top infectious disease expert was asked on CNBC. If the U. S needs a national mass mandate. Yes, if that works, let's do it. I don't think it's gonna happen Nationally. He says He hopes governors and local leaders will implement mandates if it's not done at the national level, because the rate of infections is going to get worse if they continue. On the course we're on is going to be a whole lot of pain in this country with regard to additional cases and hospitalizations and deaths. We are on a very difficult trajectory. We're going in the wrong direction.

Dr Anthony Fauci Cnbc
Interview with Kenny Harper & Manny Torres of Rock My Image

The DigitalMarketer Podcast

05:38 min | 1 d ago

Interview with Kenny Harper & Manny Torres of Rock My Image

"Manny and Kenny Hello Welcome to the digital marketer podcast. So excited to have you both here. Glad to be here. Excited this is going to be awesome in epic. Awesome Ethic I love it. Can we it do names and voices just people are listening know exactly who's speaking when so introduce yourselves and people now? My name is Kenny Harper and this is my voice. So if you hear me talking, this is Kenny. Harper. Very literal I loved it. Says many tourists and this is my voice and I'm Jenna. This is my voice but y'all know me it won't change. So Amplify Your Business Rock my image. I WanNa talk out where Y'all started your entrepreneurial journey, how you learn about all this marketing stuff and just what led you to this point today. So where were you born? Just kidding I'll give you the fun story. I was born in Virginia, Beach But raised in Louisville Kentucky. In found my first passionate about fourteen years old I went to a metallica concert. I was in the snake pit and I was blown away by the huge performance, the flashing lights, the booming Bass and I knew I'd found my calling in. So I started to play in bands start to learn how to record them. We're doing shows wherever all this fun but you know what I had a passion, but it didn't have the knowledge about running a successful. Business and there's a lot of starving artists out there for a reason right and they have passion they know they love to do and they're good at it. But if they don't know the business side of things, then they're going to run into some challenges. Luckily, I was able to find a way to use my creativity in a different light in marketing. So went to school graduated and then became a student of the craft of business growth and development. In profit growth in particular along the way. I became a freelance web designer. Met My business partner Mr Manny. Torres, we formed a an agency and really started to do a lot of small business marketing. What we started to see is that some of the clients that we are marketing were growing, they're amplifying, they were scaling they're opening new locations. We're just seeing all sorts of success in a few and some of the clients that we're marketing. or saying, Hey, it's marketing isn't working and. We looking at and saying, Hey, we're doing the same thing we're giving you leads. These aren't good leads really. Is it the leads in what we really found out is that? Unless. You have a holistic approach and you have the other components of your business. synergistically, working marking may not be the answer. You really need to have a good sales process a good team, good operations you need to have all that in place, and so that's where the concept of growth amplifiers all came about, which is our podcast growth amplifiers, and that's where we're at today we were with business owners and entrepreneurs who are looking to increase their profitability. Through Proven Systems Ineffective Strategies with guidance and accountability. So that's all the way from Kentucky. To present day in being able to step in really understanding the concept behind taking that rock concept that everyone plays their own instrument. Everyone has their own unique gifts but when you can really tune in and produce that amplify it, that's how things can really be a magical. So that's back story that I have in. Make you for letting me share it. Yeah of course well. I definitely wanted to talk about some of the the interesting tidbits of like your time in rock and music and producing music and stuff like that and how it airs together. So well with marketing but I also WanNa hear I many a little bit of your story and like where you came in where you add metallica concert and may be missed each other that first time. Radically. Even though my family has a ton of musical talent in its history, I've never played any instruments but my unique talent has always been drawing and being creative and on high school I came across the fact that you can actually be a graphic designer as like, wow, I didn't know I could actually do a job with this talent assault went. To, school design in at NC state north, Carolina State, and that's where I started my graphic design career and one things I noticed at being a designer that made me different from other designers is that I didn't just create something that was visually appealing but always thought about what's the bigger picture was the strategy behind it and so when had moved Jacksonville? Design Printing Company. And I was looking for someone to partner with I was introduced to Kenny and that's one of the things that really brought a lot of synergy together was that we both thought about the big picture what's the strategy behind what we're doing what's our ultimate goal, and then how can we really leverage? What makes the client the rock star in the talent a so? that. There was a lot of synergy there when we both went to do more things because we both are all about personal development and growth we said, how can we take our business to another level and Kinney at the time had a cool thing that was rocked my facebook and I really love that branding and when we were talking about what the name of the business should be. He said, what do you think about rock by image Bam? That's awesome.

Kenny Harper Mr Manny Metallica Partner Kentucky Virginia Web Designer Facebook Louisville Design Printing Company Torres Kinney Assault NC Jacksonville Carolina State
Ellen Pompeo Hints at Grey's Anatomy End, Khloe Defends Kim's 40th B-Day Trip Amid Backlash

Daily Pop

06:00 min | 1 d ago

Ellen Pompeo Hints at Grey's Anatomy End, Khloe Defends Kim's 40th B-Day Trip Amid Backlash

"It's time for some daily. Pop Morgan. Is out today suggested I joined once again by actress kitchen night polio. Thank you for joining us from Georgia. Loving for having me. Thank you. says. They do even. Just in case. Well, thank you very awesome. I want some. Okay. One of your favorite TV shows may be ending grey's anatomy has been on for fifteen years and Ellen pompeo just made a very shocking confession about what is next she tells variety. We don't know when the show is really ending it, but the truth is this year could be at this is also the last year of Ellen's contract. Okay. So Justin. Do you think they should end the show now while they're on top because people are still loving the show. Grey's anatomy is Kinda Sorta like young and the restless in the sense that like it can go forever and could miss a whole year. I'm back watched two episodes and then be caught up again you know what I mean. Yeah and the answer minds right and almost reminds me of the time. Do you remember when the hills was I going off Air Lauren Conrad was going to walk out the church and it was going to finish and she thought the curtains were going. To close and all of a sudden kristen cavalieri walks in and they revamp did I think Ellen pump? POMPEO is gray but the show can survive without her but can't survive without Shonda see. So Shonda, of course, just send them big NETFLIX's deal and it's to my understanding from what I was reading that she is literally parting ways with ABC completely, which may mean she's not GonNa have our hands on this show as much as she has in the past maybe not at all. And without shining once you've created show. Yeah. But once you've created a show, it's your show and I mean who's changed things happen we don't know how her contract is structured it could just be humming net flicks. One hundred percent but do I mean I think ABC has Shonda rhimes was so early in her career I don't think any see would have given Shonda. rhimes so much ownership over that show where she could move it to ABC but I think that Shonda rhimes, this voice, her blood, her sweat is so in this show that yes if shot arrives went to Netflix she will still get her coins from this show and she will let Iran. We'll be run by somebody else. That's does her voice. Okay. So listen I know somebody who used to write for how to get away with murder and he told me that his job was literally pointless because he says we were instructed to come in with ideas and we always did we came in and we said here's this. Here's that here's this but it always went with whatever Shauna had envisioned. Thank you for your ideas. Those are good and all but. We're going to do this. Appreciates the help but what did you say? No I said well, clearly, she has something you know I know it can be frustrating for someone to shoot down your ideas but the longevity of her career and all the shows that she is there's a reason why they've been successful and I know the Debbie Allen has been doing a lot with race mad at me. You know. You never know she still no matter she goes to net she still you know that's still her show. They can't take that away even if she starts creating another network. One hundred percent you know what? I am all about being petty and I heard about the drama shameless ABC for not giving Shonda that extra fast pass at Disneyland Shame on you. But if I'm Shonda RHIMES, I don't give y'all keep the show going on still get the cash I'm not gonNA. You know bitch and fuss about it. I have two kids got college should be four and I love living fancy like Oprah. We'll see what happens but I know there's some diehard grey's anatomy fans that are just not ready to say goodbye yet. So we will have to wait and see okay Khloe Kardashian has a message for the people who are hitting on Kim's birthday trip. She told Ellen Degeneres. She knows this year has been very frustrating for everyone but there Was a good thing. I did hear that people were upset that we all went out of town but also its her fortieth, and this is something that she really wanted to do for us. It was such a nice thing and being there with all the precautions and everything that we took and being there and how grateful everybody was for the tourism aspect of it and how. So many people said that we were their first party or guests that they've had in months and what it's done like for them to be able to pay their bills or to do. So for their family I mean just hearing those. Yeah. Messages when we were there, it was really a we felt really good and we felt so safe. So safe Wow. You know I knew the minute that first photo went. Oh, here we go. It's GonNa be a firestorm and For me I went to Cynthia Bailey's wedding in Atlanta and a lot of people were giving flack about that I thought about it for ten seconds and when it's a milestone, a wedding or fortieth birthday or something. Of that magnitude, it's hard. Skip it. It's hard to say or I'll just wait until next year. So I completely understand why there was so much backlash but I also understand why you wanted to continue in go on with it because you know sometimes. Life Yeah Kisha. And and the truth is that you know they did everything I think unfortunately, the Kardashian. Sometimes are just a position where you're kind of damned if you do damned if you don't. I'm not mad at him. I'm like, go ahead live your best life you share money you should be able to spend it how you WANNA spend it and they did everything they could to keep people safe in terms of quarantine in terms of getting Kobe task I mean, what more can you ask for it? Some people are upset because they don't have the option to do it, but you know sometimes you you can't just live perilously through the and plan your trip that newest you.

Shonda Rhimes Ellen Pompeo ABC Grey Khloe Kardashian Netflix Ellen Degeneres Ellen Pop Morgan Georgia Lauren Conrad Ellen Pump Debbie Allen Kristen Cavalieri Justin Murder Shauna Kobe Shonda. Rhimes
Survey: LeBron James, Taylor Swift, Tom Hanks among the Most Influential People In The Election

Mojo In The Morning

01:02 min | 1 d ago

Survey: LeBron James, Taylor Swift, Tom Hanks among the Most Influential People In The Election

"Speaking of the election Tom Hanks Dwayne the Rock Johnson Oprah and Lebron James have the most trusted opinions on political and social issues according to a new survey of American voters. We're all twelve percent of voters reported that a celebrity or athlete absolutely influence their decision regarding the election down the party line. Democratic voters are more likely to be influenced by CELEBS or athletes rather than Republican voters. Voters thirty six percent said that Lebron had done the most to motivate people regarding voting Taylor swift came in second than the rock followed by. B. Beyond say also making that list asked to name the person who's opinion trusted the most regarding political or social issues in America Tom Hanks won by a landslide forty, nine percent kid rock who was obviously a very vocal supporter of president trump ranked as the most influential voice for. Republican. Voters

Tom Hanks Lebron James Taylor Swift Oprah President Trump
interview With TripleLift Founder And CSO Ari Lewine

AdExchanger Talks

05:28 min | 1 d ago

interview With TripleLift Founder And CSO Ari Lewine

"Our Hawaiian is chief strategy officer and CO founder triple lift. An eight year old programmatic advertising technology company triple lift has developed at products that have a closer match to the look feel and voice. But. Wide Range of media types and environments sounds like native. That's what they do They also support video in ot advertising and have other initiatives as well. Excited to have Arianna talk about some of that I reached out to our because I think he has a unique. Perspective on. Programmatic advertising at the current state of digital advertising overall that sometimes runs against the the larger narrative which is, which can be a negative narrative at times. So I'm looking forward to chatting him with him about that as well. Ari Welcome. Thank you so much act I'm delighted and honored to be here. Great to have you here Let's have a minute on you I. You got into start up stuff like right out of college. Is that right? Yeah. Even actually in college I. Ran My first startup analysis seventeen years old where I was really fortunate to be at a school that took entrepreneurship really seriously in fact, I I majored in entrepreneurship which is hard to believe as even a thing. And there were local businesses on my campus. I was able to as able to buy one into one of them. That did local shipping and storage, and so I got sort of taste in above that is still with me to this day building businesses from the ground up and just trying to make customer super happy. And we're your parents entrepreneurs have how did you get this bug? Yeah. So my parents are also entrepreneurs preneurs They started something on the order a dozen different companies. Many of them, not successful. And so I got to sort of see that growing up what I think is really important. It's like being around that failure from a young age and not having any stigma towards it was really impactful for me because. It shows that it's okay. As long as You keep trying my parents certainly keep trying in in some of them. Worked out okay and so I was fortunate to be in the sort of like environment where starting businesses was normal and expected in my parents very much supported me even at very young age when I tell them, this is what I want to do with my life I want to be an entrepreneur. And did they. Actively, encourage you was a kind of A. Son You're going to be startup founder. Yeah. It wasn't like you know. Jewish boy, and so the first inclination was to be neurosurgeon button when I got a D. on my first bio exam I think entrepreneurship became the clear path and it's funny because I was just going through things of my childhood from home and apparently when I was four years old, we went to FAO Schwarz he'll toy store and they printed. Out A car said Arlo an entrepreneur and so I think clearly there was there was maybe some program going on from a young age that that this was a path that they would like to see me go down and I've been very fortunate to be able to do it. I think it's like one of the most wonderful things that's happened because Entrepreneurship for many isn't considered a path at all like when you go to college or when you're young that isn't a thing that you think about you often think about professions that have a very clear path. And Entrepreneurship is not a clear path. So I would I try and do now in my clinical free time is I'm help other spying entrepreneurs. With their path towards entrepreneurship because I think, it's one of the most wonderful fans. That's Kinda funny. Hey honey sign's kind of a poor student. Push them towards the Internet. Yeah. That's where he belongs. No, that's great and Tacos through these couple of jobs you had before founding triple, you were head of business, development, oyster dot, com what was that all about? So Dot Com was a hotel review site that was subsequently acquired by trip advisor and a really beautiful idea which is people spend a lot of money on vacations and the worst thing that can happen is you get there and the hotel is not what you expected or paid for. And so the idea was to send a undercover reporters to full real expose on what the hotel is actually like with real unadulterated unedited photos and Iran monetization there. So this was a really crazy experience where they were publisher and I was twenty years old. They brought me on to make money from ads and I didn't know anything about online advertising. I just graduated college. And it was still the middle of the recession. and. So what I what I did is basically called up at that time it was ad networks. And I asked to speak with the product folks and I would just pepper them with hours of questions about how their technology worked, how the relationships of publishers and advertisers work. Essentially, I was able to learn from them how the industry worked at that time. There wasn't the wealth of knowledge of the sort of add exchanger dot com, a publications that we have today, and so one of the only way to learn about it was from other people and I was able to learn basically from the partnerships in vendors use are the publisher side and so. I started on the publisher cited from there I went to APP nexus. which became clear because when I was at one of the things I was doing all the time was you know in my lunch breaks I would log into DSP and start changing the line nine of prioritization across the different campaigns and ad networks I was working with. So I, was looking at who is paying me the that day and I would tweak the waterfall

Publisher Advertising Technology Dot Com Arianna Chief Strategy Officer Co Founder Fao Schwarz Founder Arlo Iran Advisor
Debra Messing; AJCs Groundbreaking State of Antisemitism in America Report

People of the Pod

12:01 min | 1 d ago

Debra Messing; AJCs Groundbreaking State of Antisemitism in America Report

"Messing is probably best known for her role as Grace Adler on the long running Sitcom will and grace. She has starred in movies and even been the voice behind cartoons. But for the past several months, she has been one of the voices behind a podcast called the dissenters since May Deborah and her co host Donna Damiani have interviewed men and women who have made their. Mark Challenging the status quo but the penultimate episode that aired this month was particularly powerful Deborah and her co host invited Dr Edith Eba eager a ninety three year old Holocaust survivor to share her memories of the past and thoughts on present day politics and the future Deborah is here now to talk about that episode and her own experiences with anti-semitism Deborah. Welcome. Thank you so much. So tell us about this podcast, the dissenters what you're trying to accomplish with each episode and how your conversation with Dr Eager Fit that theme. The dissenters created as a response to the suffering that we saw around our country over the last few years, and also in response to the activists that have stepped forward and taken it upon themselves to try and make things better. My friend Montana Diani, she is the CO host. She was a religious refugee came to the country at six years old she and I have both been very active in activism reading these pieces about these extraordinary people from around the world doing extraordinary things, and we would send them to each other in order to sort of buoy each other when we. Would start to feel overwhelmed and it always sort of kept us moving forward and one day we just realized that as much as was uplifting us it would most likely uplift other people to hear about the works of these what we call accidental activists we wanted to ultimately inspire and empower people to recognize that you don't have to have a certain education. You don't have to have a certain following and social media in order to be an activist all you have to do is just recognize something feels wrong and take one step towards doing something touted doctor eager fit into this lineup. She is a ninety three year old Holocaust survivor. Who came face to face with Dr Mangala when she was a teenager at the camps, she lost her mom and dad and went through horrible torture and trauma, and came to America and created a family and. Got A PhD and has used her experience and trauma in order to help people coming home from war to heal from their trauma. She has written two books and she decided to become a healer. And we just felt like she did not have any idea what her life would be. Once she got out of the concentration camp. Yeah and she was able to look towards the future to have hope and ultimately choose to do something that would help others. How did you first discover Dr Eager Montana and I are just really really curious people. So we are constantly reading. We are watching Ted talks. It was a Ted talk of her that we saw and ultimately we felt given the fact that there is this surge of anti-semitism and racial strife in our country that it felt particularly timely and important to highlight her and her journey because in our research, we discovered that three quarters of millennials who are people who are in their mid thirties do not know what Auschwitz is such a stunning statistic and kind of unimaginable that we felt like, okay. This it's incumbent on us to have someone who was there and lived it to assert that it really did happen and to celebrate her as well. You mentioned the lack of knowledge about concentration camps AJC. Of course, just released its first report on the state of anti-semitism in. America. And found that more than half of Americans don't know the meaning of the word anti-semitism. Some haven't even heard the word before. With Charlottesville and. Is seemingly explosion of white nationalism and Antisemitism Nazis everywhere in juxtaposition to the second wave of civil rights protesting it's very interesting that people don't protest against anti-semitism people flood the streets, for racism. And when you look at Charlottesville, the Nazis were screaming about two groups about black people and Jews. And we really are the most natural allies in the world and it really was just something that I just sat with for a while about like why is it that people don't protest four us? You're Jewish grew up in a predominantly non Jewish environment. Did you experience anti-semitism growing up I? Did? Can you speak to that a little bit? Sure. I remember I was in second grade and we were lining up. To go to Jim and I got in line and a little boy me and said, get to the back of the line Kaik And I didn't know what the word meant the teacher overheard and immediately grabbed the boy and sent him down to the principal's office I. Remember everyone looking at me like I had done something wrong. And as much as I didn't understand what was happening I understood that it would have been better if I just stayed silent and I just wanted the board to come back and everybody to just be normal and stop looking at me and a couple of years later it was Halloween and my grandfather was visiting and we woke up and a swastika was painted on his car. In our driveway. And I recall my mother just standing at the front door looking at it and I felt her fear I felt endanger and I, remember no one said a word. Just, you know my mom said get in the house. And somehow the car disappeared. And we didn't talk about it. and. So it became very clear to me from a very young age that I was an other. That I was different from everybody the community and that difference wasn't good. And Somehow I had taken on a sense of shame about the fact that I was Jewish and I actually recall in highschool. My father was president of the Temple President of the Jewish Federation. My mother was Vice President of the Jewish Federation very, very, very active in the community. And we would stay home obviously for the High Holidays and I remember coming back in after the High Holidays and someone saying, why were you out and I said, oh, it was yom. Kippur and. He got really mad they were like. How come you get that off and you get Christmas off? Why don't we get off and after that encounter anytime I would stay home because of a Jewish holiday I would lie and say that I had been sick. Wow. I WANNA, go back to your conversation with Dr Eager and I'd like for you to share what your biggest takeaways were. It's so powerful because she speaks about will lasting that her mother said to her in the cattle car. That essentially reality is whatever you have in your mind and in your heart. And bad things pass trauma passes and her first night there. Joseph Mangla went into the barracks and made her dance and she loved opera and she said that she got through it because she imagined that she was on a stage and they were playing Makovsky Romeo and Juliet. And she said and I danced beautifully and I loved it. That's how I survived. For me what was really remarkable was hearing everything that she went through and the fact that she landed. was that she was grateful for all of the terror and trauma and pain that she had experienced. She felt that she literally calls them a gift. That is something that is so amped medical to the way at least. I think about someone who has survived the Holocaust it really was a full paradigm shift for me to hear how she got there and ultimately how she healed herself. Yeah. Well, certainly, the testimonies of the survivors are a gift to all of us in terms of preserving the memory and the lessons that we can take from their experiences. So thank you for giving Dr, eager another platform to share that story with another audience that needs to learn and learn the lessons of her experience. I will tell you one of the most moving parts for me was the separation from her mother when they got to Auschwitz and how the experience of children being separated from their parents at the border was a trigger for her honestly I can't do it justice. Let's listen to a clip. Van. Is Show children being separated that their border? I had terrible night mash. Remember him and my mother was. Towed to go this way, I followed my mother. And this guy told me that I'm GONNA see my mother very soon. She just GonNa take a shower and promptly I was on the other side which meant life. So you see mandating trigger today for the me The time and everything was taken from me. Why was it important to include that in the podcast? I. Think when we witnessed that kind of wrongdoing that is really a crime against humanity, it reminds us how fragile we are. That we don't learn from the past potentially and we have to be vigilant every day in making sure that what we are putting out into the world is modeling compassionate. Inclusion.

Deborah Dr Eager Montana America Jewish Federation Charlottesville Dr Eager TED Dr Edith Eba Montana Diani Grace Adler Dr Mangala Donna Damiani Mark Vice President Kippur
How To Evaluate SEO Campaign Success With Cassie Dell

Voices of Search by Searchmetrics

05:24 min | 1 d ago

How To Evaluate SEO Campaign Success With Cassie Dell

"So far this week casting I've talked about the workflows for conducting your Seo Research, sitting your Seo Strategy yesterday we talked about implementing your seo projects and the process for making sure that you're doing that successfully and today we're GonNa talk about how to evaluate your Seo efforts. All right. Here's the fourth installment of Seo workflow week with Cassie del Client success manager at search metrics. cassie welcome back to SEO workflow week on the voices of search podcast old. On Thursday happy Thursday we're getting close to the finish line here were already talking about how to evaluate our SEO projects. We've gone through the process of understanding research, understanding our organization, our goals who our customers are, and then figuring out what we need to do from an Seo perspective to reach them Ramos said our strategies and yesterday you and I talked about how to implement your projects by take away from that conversation was that you need to first off. Get a baseline second, do the development and work within three pretty strategic about how you're going to roll out your project to understand whether you're going to rule everything at once or whether it's going to be a rolling launch and that gets into the project evaluation phase. Assuming that we have, you know a reasonable baseline to evaluate. Are you just doing an AB test for every SEO project? You're doing what was the before and after what's your process for thinking? About evaluate in your campaigns. Yep I always tell clients avoid looking at just one part of the data some people can just get stuck reporting one important project that they feel the most personally tied to, and then they're missing half the picture or they're only looking at desktop and not focusing on mobile. So definitely, just making sure to take a look at every single thing that we've implemented towards this project that make sure that we can track or looking today. It's interesting philosophy that you have to look at the data in aggregate, but you also have to look at it from a very segmented segmented point of view where I've run. Seo Projects where mostly if they're on the technical side. You've seen not great results, but then you split everything up by desktop versus mobile and all the sudden you're seeing that we saw a significant decrease in one and a significant increase in the other. And they blended together make it look like nothing happened well, that doesn't really tell the whole picture. So. When you go through evaluation, there's a couple of different components that could weigh in. You know what's the timeframe you're looking at how you slicing and dicing your data? What are some of the other things that you're looking at to evaluate your projects and making sure that you're getting the whole picture yup definitely timeline is one of the most important things. So let's say spend three months. We don't see a lot of movement however like you said on that Bogle sexually tend to see a lot of movement. Some things could be really successful in one category not accessible in the other. So, really keeping an eye on that, and then obviously the we we kind of tag and segregate things especially keywords according to our business. It's helpful to kind of look at that as well because different segments or maybe different as ECON Zeitler say product category. Let's say we sell candles and pillows and pillows is doing really well, it's picking up all of these things maybe that system easier industry to get into whereas something like channels can be a little bit more trickier it could take us longer. There's a lot more competition. So things like that. That's kind of why we granular segregate all. That data because in some areas, it could work quicker versus lower could work better versus worse. So it's helpful for us to audit all that and see that data and make changes accordingly to things that pop into my mind listening to what you're talking about a one. As you mentioned the time line, you know I think that this is something that a lot of non Seo's that are evaluating the effectiveness of Seo's get frustrated with how long does it take for us to see if this campaign works there is no way for us to say, Hey, we're going to roll out this. You know new list of key words or there's new content and we're going to understand the impact of it in one week or two weeks. Right? You just don't have a great sense of how and when and why Google is to adjust your rankings based on your content and there is some predictability. Once you start seeing the ball moving. But when Gould decides to start reprioritising your content is coming up in the air. How do you think about not only setting the time line in terms of when you're running your evaluation for your campaigns but also how to communicate realistic expectations. Cheer leadership. Are Sure I'd always tell folks to keep a pulse on whatever Google's doing. A much better job at indicating some upcoming important banking's are upcoming ranking factors. So as you're working on content, let's say you had a strategy going for awhile knowing that that authoritative content to be there, it needs to have some type of backing to it adjust that strategy accordingly, and then obviously Okita be in better shape to note performance, it's going to follow not only something that's good for your company but also what's good and Google favoring that kind of content as well.

SEO Google Ramos Econ Zeitler Okita Gould Bogle
San Francisco War Memorial & Performing Arts Center

Voices of the Community

04:41 min | 1 d ago

San Francisco War Memorial & Performing Arts Center

"To voices of the community which explores critical issues facing Northern California communities. We introduce you to the voices of community thought leaders and change-makers who are working on solutions that face our fellow individual community members neighborhoods cities and our region. This is George Custer your host. This episode is part of our series exploring covid-19 s impact on nonprofits and small businesses in San Francisco. We started the series back in April of 2020 during the whole page of the first phase of the covid-19 pandemic and the shelter-in-place requirements over these past nine months the covid-19 pandemic and economic meltdown has wiped out millions of jobs in both the nonprofit and small business sectors as well as shuddered tens of thousands of small business operations. The goal of the series does shine a spotlight on the nonprofit's small businesses wage under staff who are struggling to deal with the impact of the covid-19 pandemic on their operations services and sustainability the series of interviews. We conducted features voices from across section of organizations that make up the fabric of our community. Each of them brings a unique perspective on how they and we are dealing with the issues facing our community during the global pandemic and economic depression. But at the outset of this and ongoing it's been people who are used to Bringing people together who have been forced to keep people apart Hospitality workers entertainers. We're the ones who have really had to click on other and keep people safe by keeping them apart and this episode. Our featured voice is John called in the managing director of the San Francisco war memorial and Performing Arts Center the San Francisco Memorial and Performing Arts Center opened in 1932 with a production of Tosca by the San Francisco Opera the war memorial name commemorates the people who served in the first world war zone. It is one of the largest Performing Arts centers in the United States covering 7.5 acres in San Francisco's Civic Center historic district and totals 7,500 seats. Mom gets multiple performance venues. I'm join remotely be assumed by Sean called in managing director of the San Francisco war memorial Performing Arts Center. Thanks for being here John. I would like to begin. And by having you share with us a little bit about the war memorial and Performing Arts Center. I think for most San Francisco people. They walked by it there a McAllister and Venice across from City Hall and they're like, oh it's a month old building. So it would be great if you could get a share or Memorial and how the memorial and Performing Arts Center work with Arts and Cultural organizations to say, we're just go. Oh absolutely. Thanks for having us on George excited to be here today. The San Francisco war memorial and Performing Arts Center is in the heart of San Francisco, right across Van Ness Avenue San from San Francisco City Hall. We have a number of performer venues here including Davies Symphony Hall the War Memorial Opera House and then inside the Veterans building. We have the Herbst theater. There was a center for Opera which hosts both the Toby Atrium theater and the Brian Crain station studio. And we also have a really fabulous event space called The Green Room all in all we can host over 7,000 patrons any given evening and pre covid-19 do that with juice. The ballet performing alongside the symphony San Francisco performances being in Herbst theater all that could happen in one night. So we're both a home for culture and art in San Francisco as well as a huge economic driver for the region. We've been here since nineteen thirty-two. Our resident company is the San Francisco Ballet the San Francisco Opera the San Francisco Symphony and then San Francisco performances, of course is off the primary users of the Herbst theater, and we've had a long partnership with them as well. So I think that we're one of the cornerstones of cultural activity in San Francisco and really proud to be a department of the city county of San Francisco and then fun fact a historical the charger for the was actually signed their trips theater. That's correct. All of the plenary sessions took place in the Opera House. The UN Charter was signed off stage of what was then the veterans Auditorium, which is now known as the Herbst theater and the Japanese peace Accord was also negotiated in the opera house. So we're really big site for history. A lot of folks don't understand wage. Why UN Plaza is called UN Plaza, but it's called UN Plaza because indeed the charter was signed here and for a brief period they actually almost put the headquarters of the United Nations here in San Francisco before they decided to place them in New York. Yeah, we host a lot of history here and still continue to provide a meeting space to Veterans groups and a number of other non-profits working on behalf of veterans causes here in San Francisco. So

San Francisco Memorial And Per San Francisco Performing Arts Center San Francisco City Hall San Francisco Ballet War Memorial Opera House Herbst Theater Largest Performing Arts George Custer Un Plaza Managing Director Northern California John Davies Symphony Hall UN Toby Atrium Theater Civic Center
A Biopic About Arguably The Most Influential Comedian Of All Time Is On The Way

Direct from Hollywood

00:38 sec | 1 d ago

A Biopic About Arguably The Most Influential Comedian Of All Time Is On The Way

"Regrettable life in times of quite possibly the most influential stand up comic of all time Richard Pryor is finally coming to the screen and blackish creator Kenya. Barris has jumped on board to make his feature film director debut. Kenya's honored for the privilege of telling Richard Remarkable story saying in a statement the way Richard did what he did with truth was. Self aware and self deprecating and said with unmatched vulnerability that was the power and impact of his work prior had a voice that was distinctly his and in many ways comedies since has been derivative of what he created. It's a film about that voice and the journey that shaped. There's no word on who will play. The iconic comedian will definitely be a role many actors will look for.

Richard Kenya Richard Pryor Richard Remarkable Barris Director
Making Gay History: Les-Lee in Paris

Making Gay History

05:27 min | 1 d ago

Making Gay History: Les-Lee in Paris

"Let's join studs, terkel, and Leslie, in a room full of raucous patrons as less the proud host begins by sharing a bit of his club's ghoulish history. Actually the place was called the czar before because it was the stable of Duke Giza. And Which? Actually this beam. This right above your head is where he was hung. History then. History. Exactly. That's why they the we know that they couldn't fill the building down even if they wanted to because it's point of history and all points of history in Paris or not allowed to be changed you yourself. I'm not French. No, I'm not I'm Montreal boy from. Canada. And I've been in Paris for seven years now. What led you to. Paris. Actually, my my business. I. I'M A female impersonator I worked to New York and. Walking in Finocchio in San Francisco at the time. And a manager of one of the big shows here in Paris Saami working and asked me to come to Paris. You abused me so. I. I haven't been back since. Scrapped this art or skill female impersonation remembers a small boy I saw someone named Julian Elton. Actually. Was the first. In America whoever became a big star? He did silent movies with Gloria Swanson. Does the the technique, the theme female impersonation itself. has changed a great deal especially in Europe because the female impressed is in Europe they. They are not like the female impersonators in America nor the tax of Jillian Nelson's of being. As. A boy in the daytime and a female impersonator impersonating at night. The female impersonator in Europe have gone to the extent of taking female hormone injection over them growing their own hair and living as women which I don't approve of I don't think they're neither one the other at that point. He realizes that there is this difference. Oh, they do the American theme at leaves Split Life, it's not a life. It's it's like any any entertainer actually I mean. A clown, the clown. In the circus and personality of his own. I'm the Daytona. Maria life. Now Your Tech. Now, what is your your interpretation you believe in the American tation? Do I think that's the whole lot of being female impersonator. I mean there is people who know me and have seen me as a female impersonator. Who I've passed on the street the day after not knowing me at all here then is the scale they are. Yeah. We think we'd be on personnel of many who we personate celebrated figures actresses or Social feed you. Know I do not I have my own personality which I pushed forward and jokes and I sing in my own natural voice I don't try to. Make anything artificial about the the art of my work is just. Looking something different than what I have the art of allusion as. You. Say you singing your natural voice and yet you're female. So this then. Because of illusion would come through as a contralto perhaps noah tenor, a male tenor voice mail tenor voice but the illusion of seeing me as a girls, it becomes more feminine. Is. Doing. Tricks. The matter of Luge Network. So it's a question of being an art and a skill with the rather than the way of life. Exactly. The Place of south of whichever host. The White Food, the menu looks most Tyson. Need you have a certain way? Well, we chose we we have tried to keep the food. Somewhat French home cooking because the French cuisine in Paris is very very hoti seasons and lots of wine and very fancy very heavy. Actually it's the best of cuisine in the world they say L. O. Myself, I prefer a hamburger coca-cola. that. We tried to keep it very simple and the old homemade bread and something we've tried to kept to go with. The atmosphere of the room because it's all in an old wood and Just ordinary flat walls back to you again less UAE. Your theme impersonator. Why did you come to wipe Paris? While they're more female impersonators here there would be another cities in the world no no I don't think so but I think the Art of female impersonating. Much more highly looked at. Only in America regardless freakish as we'll be. In America Tall. Set you feel more perhaps more accepted I mean you're accepted to to a point if you're an entertainer or an artist, they will look at you and respect you I have very very. High respect here in Paris because everyone knows me as being a female impersonator. Like back home of people know me of being a female impersonator. They have shunned their noses in point. which doesn't make any difference to me because they don't pay my bills and if my life long as I don't hurt anyone and I have my family who respect me most important thing

Paris America Europe Paris Saami Duke Giza Julian Elton Noah Tenor Terkel Montreal Gloria Swanson Canada Split Life Daytona UAE Luge Network Leslie New York Jillian Nelson Finocchio
Decluttering Paralysis and Moving

A Slob Comes Clean

04:18 min | 3 d ago

Decluttering Paralysis and Moving

"I am here with Laura how're you Laura? I'm great. How are you? I'm I'm excited that we're talking today that we're having this opportunity. Let me get my notes pulled up I have a new question that I'm asking and that is. How did you get introduced to a Slob, comes clean. Well. I believe. That he popped up on Amazon as a suggestion on so i. bought. Your book in Kindle Format Aaron and I. And then the audible version and then I would hear website. I actually don't know how long ago that was but it was Years ago it's unless hollower years. Yeah. It's. because. First Book came out on Election Day presidential election day of into sixteen. So we know that it's about to hit the four year mark has to have another. The next day so Yeah. Okay. Well, and what? Are The podcast. You're number one thing that you do or read the blogger or what is it that help you the most I read the blog I listened to that podcast but. I, put the rules up on my refrigerator. I just enter try to hear your voice. I read your emails and I try to do a for some reason just reading your your host works for me. I think I think that they the helpful thing about the newsletter is just it kind of comes to you on a regular basis at least that's what I hope and that's what I hear from people is it's like you may just be going throughout your day and then all of a sudden appears in your email box makes you oh yeah, focus. So that's my hope at least. Okay. So tell me what is the number one strategy? That's had the biggest positive impact on your home well. What's a starting point was rela dishwasher every now. Was a concept to me that was or in a because. Now, it has to be full. A dishwasher has to be before even not just all like overly fall doing the dishes every night. I get permission for me to do that. Is So. Can you tell a big difference in how it helps your kitchen to function? It does it just I it's so much easier to unload. It keeps the dishes getting into the covered. It gets off. The counter is so much faster and it's a good turnover if there is no. Oh this. Doesn't fit right now some leave it on the counter as the is almost all the way all. Runners remember on anti. As stuff there's that. and. So most everything always in. I generally at mytalk. Of. Sales going to do that. What's your? What's your unique like life situation as far as are you married? Do you have kids how you know where are you in life? I am married I am married to my first and my second husband. If you. Should. Explain. That's. Because we were married on got divorced, and then after seven years we got remarried. That's very I love it. So is it just the two of you? Yes. We're. I guess empty Masters we have a daughter who's giving US ranch already had our second eldest in-progress grandchild is. In The excited or we're excited to be grandparents.

Laura United States Kindle Amazon Mark Mytalk Aaron
"voice" Discussed on Inside VOICE

Inside VOICE

04:22 min | 7 months ago

"voice" Discussed on Inside VOICE

"This is your host to carry Roberts and today my guest is David Colleen the CEO at sapient acts. Welcome David. Thank you for being here. I carry thank you so much for having me. It's an honor to be on your show. Thank you so we were just talking right before this interview that both you and I came from pretty diverse backgrounds getting into this space and I know you started your career journey in architecture and then you got into a in about two thousand and three and now you're into voice. Can you tell us a little bit about that? Career journey and how you went from designing buildings to designing voice experiences of not sure Add or just naturally curious. But I have gone through a lot of things I I I studied architecture and got out of school and started designing high-rise buildings in San Francisco but one of my professors turns out. He was one of the founding fathers of computer graphics and infected me with the notion that you can use computers to design buildings so I started doing that. And then sold friends. So I was backpacking with them. And they said we're GONNA leave our day jobs and started a company to three on the Internet. How would you like to put the first three D online and that sounded pretty cool? So we did that. And that was the beginning of a Mile Dublin at nine Studios Team. We built our first talking characters using those three d technologies and one thing led to another and in two thousand and three. We were building computer games for the intelligence community to create synthetic human. That could look for bad guys and that was early. Start DOING AI. Talking characters it was very primitive back then but it put a the notion in our minds that we could effectively communicate with our technology by voice a few years later in two thousand seven we were building navigation systems for the hand held and automotive markets. And that's when we brought all friend of a programmer Bruce Wilcox onto our team and he built what possibly was the first digital assistant for a car. It worked beautifully. It was exciting all except for one thing speech recognition. Ten years ago was in a terrible state. It only understood may be one word out of ten that we would say so. As much as we love the concept of talking to our technology we knew we would have to shelve it and wait until that technology matured then. Siri came out and I pulled a little bit of hair out. If you look at me I know you can't see my picture. I don't have any here left house but I've got a little bit out at that point because Siri beat us to the punch then An old friend of mine divulge that he had been working on Alexa and they brought a lex out to great acclaim and I pulled some more hair out at that point. But you know what looking back at it. I see now. That Syrian Alexa didn't important things. They established that technology was used way to communicate with your technology and they built a large consumer appetite for voice products. And we all benefited from that. So today we are running saving tax. We began at four years ago and were busy. Building Voice Systems that understand conversationally using some dramatically different technology from what everybody else is doing in the marketplace and were building new systems for people make cars and robots and motorcycles and consumer electronics of all sorts. So that's where we are today and thank you for having me here. Yeah very exciting to kind of hear that journey and I know there was an article. Done your company back in two thousand eighteen. That wrote that. The current voice products force users to learn commands blocking the natural conversation that we desire. They can't handle complexity of speech multitasking. And they consume mountains of sensitive user. Data that is stored for marketing and development of user profiles or that gets used for targeted advertising. And you say that your company sapient acts is two times better fixing this than your competitors. Can you speak to this and talk about how and if these are still issues in your eyes today and you're a invoice? Technology is fixing. This won't so. Let me begin unpacking that by describing the presentation. I saw in a voice conference yesterday. They voice technologies in five levels. The first level were. Ivr systems phones. That could understand you when you said yes or no or three or five or very very simple sorts.

David Colleen sapient Siri Voice Systems Bruce Wilcox CEO Syrian Alexa San Francisco Alexa Roberts Studios Team Dublin programmer
"voice" Discussed on Inside VOICE

Inside VOICE

06:38 min | 8 months ago

"voice" Discussed on Inside VOICE

"Really helpful when people say. Why do you need that when you and I talked about this project voice that you know if you get using that everyone else has you know? It's hard to differentiate you but they start to hear your sound over and over again. They're going to start to associate that. Hugh in your brand or your company who it is kind of a long process just as like you said just like your logo. It's your audio logo. Yes exactly. It couldn't agree more. Let's go. I forgot I didn't forget I knew that but I you know clutch. Yeah she did an incredible job and I remember sitting in the audience at that opening day voice summit and having the band playing the music and and people singing along and it just felt right. And that's what Sonogram does. Yeah it does and I know for Pete Sound for Voice Summit you know. He really was about. He wanted that communal feeling. And so those woes really fits with what they're about so it's amazing how we can do so much with music and for people that that's their thing it's really great to hire people like that because they understand how to pull a motion through sound. It's a really special place you know you're doing so much with technology and boys podcasting things of that nature. I'm curious how you use voice in your every day and at work like how do you use Alexa? Google assistant or big fee in your office you know in the medical field or even at home with your family. It's a good question so it's tricky to be perfectly honest. Although I've got all this stuff about voice I health that side of my bread. It's very hard to implement that stuff at this stage in an actual office practice because we haven't actually solved challenges with security and privacy. We haven't solved the problems with security and privacy there and so it's very hard to implement those in an actual office practice because that's all those are very valid challenges and concerns that we need to deal with what I am very interested in is using Alexa and these other devices as educational tools because a lot of what we're doing as physicians as healthcare providers right now is providing education. There's so many times when a patient that I see has a very typical problem and I'm answering a lot of the same questions. Saying a lot of the same thing so I think even now without having to worry about necessarily privacy security there are many roles for the smart assistance to be able to answer those. Faq's were educated patient or patient to tap into for example. Eight flash briefing about diabetes at home. Those are the examples of the low hanging fruit right now for medical applications. Obviously it's GonNa get a lot more interesting beyond that as we sort out some of these challenges at whole what am I doing? I'm using Alexa for routines for giving me my when I wake up in the morning. What FLASH BRIEFINGS? Whether traffic all that kind of stuff. I use it for home automation in the home. Like kids playing with Games. Those sorts of things. I do like to play around with it using some of the other tools out there just to kind of experiment and see what kind of skills that I can create. That are that are interesting. Some of them are not out there publicly. You know what really excites me is the potential power we're going to use voice assistance in the home and how homes are going to become little. Almost like satellite medical clinics as technology gets a little better and we will start to talk to our devices in the home and that is going to be our entrance to the healthcare system. Which is I think something. That's coming down in the not too distant future. Yeah there's definitely companies working on that and I think that will you know be able to save time. Save money. You're not going in for every little thing and I think it will be super helpful for patients and doctors as a whole I would imagine. Actually I can see the day. Where is already you know? Amazon's put these kids already that they're getting into the healthcare space but I can see the day where you wake up and say you're not feeling well you talked to your Alexa device. And through the analyzer. Your voice or with some of his vocal biomarkers. It can detect that. You're not feeling well so it already has an idea what's going on. Then ask you some questions like a doctor would and it may come to the conclusion that there is a certain probability a higher probability that you might have. Let's say strep throat and then it asks you. Would you like me to order a structure? Where you it gets delivered to you by drone use. The STREP Test Alexa. Talks you through how to do it. And of course it's catch the It's an Iot device. It analyzes the results. And then it says you know what you need some antibiotics just through history with you. I know what you're allergic to orgies anti-biotics and they get delivered to your home through one of Amazon's pharmacies and you have your home and you've got your treatments. That's where I think we're ultimately going which is really really interesting. Yeah I mean that's funny. 'cause you're like oh it's a little weird soul scary is they're not used to it but I think it's very exciting and I think you're right in the future will become very common overall. I think so and I think for people that don't necessarily have access to healthcare system or too expensive or they live in a remote geographic location. These devices are so inexpensive. Now we know what the market penetration of them that. This is a way that actually people I think are going to be able to access healthcare system when the otherwise weren't able to and I think that's another real benefit I mean. I know in candidates different than the US that that could definitely change our healthcare system from insurance as a whole chain which I think a lot of Americans would be very excited about. You're right I mean there are differences for sure between what's going on in the US resorts on Canada but overall the healthcare system is so ripe for change and I wonder voice. Technology is the thing that is going to be the real thing that causes that change once for all. Well thank you so much for being here. Where can people learn more about you if they WANNA connect mentality? WanNa connect I if they want to learn more about the Canadian side of things then Alexa in Canada dot CA is by blogging. Podcast is up to say name. My flash briefing is a voice in Canada from the medical perspective. I have a N podcast voice. I health dot com and I have a voice I health suite a flash briefings that we're building out similar to what it was talking about where people can tap into certain for certain diseases or illnesses and interested in sort of the marketing side of things. I have this free course. Flash BRIEFINGS FORMULA DOT COM. And of course I'm on twitter instagram. The whole bit under unusually everywhere as Dr Terry Fisher D. R. T. E. R. I S. H. E. R. Perfect will thank you so much for being here sharing your insights not only into what you do but a little bit into your life. I greatly appreciate it. Thank you so much Gary. It's really fun to chat with you and as we spoke about at projects. I love the energy that you bring so. Thank you for everything that you're doing. Thank you for.

Alexa Canada Voice Summit Amazon Hugh US Google twitter Pete Sound Dr Terry Fisher D. R. T. E. R. Gary
"voice" Discussed on Voice First Health

Voice First Health

12:45 min | 9 months ago

"voice" Discussed on Voice First Health

"I health so glad to have you along today for the podcast. Today is a little bit of a different podcast. Because I don't have a guest. I have a recording of a presentation that I gave recently the project voice. If you weren't there this happened in January of twenty twenty. It was a fantastic event. It was a lot of fun and I had the the opportunity to participate in a number of different talks. One of them was a workshop that I gave my colleagues. Harry Pappas David box and Atlanta mayor. And I I started off by setting up a little bit of the ideas that I have around. What is the opportunity right now for voice technology specifically in healthcare and then in my colleagues bill for that and we had some really fun interactive sessions to talk about how you designed for voice in healthcare specifically specifically and it was a lot of fun so today I want to bring you the recording of my portion of this workshop? It is about twenty minutes longer so and afterwards words. I WanNa tell you about a very very special project. We have coming up at all has to do with the first book. The book is about Voice Technology in healthcare and it is being released March twenty twenty so stay tuned for that will have all the details at the end of the podcast for now. I enjoy this talk and I hope you'll get a lot out of it and have a little bit more of an understanding of what some of the opportunities are for voice technology in healthcare. So yes as Harry said. Thanks for coming. We are going to delve into a a little bit about the basics of voice for healthcare. And how to get started with this so as you heard. My name is Terry Fisher. I'm a physician practicing clinician. I work fulltime. I'm in Vancouver Canada at the University of British Columbia mclinville assistant professor there And that's really my day job and by night I am a big voice ace tech enthusiasts and I've been in this space now for a number of years Number PODCASTS Lexin Canada more specifically for this audience create the podcast voice. I health where I speak about. And speak to people that are on the forefront of what's going on with health and and voice technology so I'm really excited to be able to give you a little bit of an overview overview now of what is going on with health and with voice and why this is such an incredible opportunity right now so I just want.

Voice Technology Harry Pappas David twenty twenty Terry Fisher University of British Columbia Canada assistant professor Atlanta Vancouver
"voice" Discussed on Inside VOICE

Inside VOICE

06:22 min | 9 months ago

"voice" Discussed on Inside VOICE

"We came to an age where we are starting to connect with computers in the way these more comfortable for us which is voice? It's the most basic thing for us for communication. I think this is when you think about it like this. You understand that in the next five ten years re going to look back and say worldwide Legesse Data completely GonNa Change enough. Not only on what we're doing yours. Every rich finance house air told a motive. It's G we we can talk about it for a few hours in will never end you know just growing going. Yeah I cannot agree more. You know and that's what I get so excited about. I mean it's just it's so oh creative. It's expansive the more I talked to people. There is just so many avenues. You can take with voice as a whole do you think that For Your company I was utilizing in your stuff on your website. That right now you have a lot of you know where it's kind of voice coming from like a computer sounding voice. Do you think that you will eventually eventually US real human voices or voiceovers or what kind of your thought or that going in the future. Great question and I contemplate about a lot I I think no first of all I think. No Ano- explain why when I started this journey about two and a half years ago the quality of text to speech solution and was nowhere near where we are today any just getting approved on a quarterly basis new releases new features. It is based on a I in no so we as we say union office we feed the machine with Roy Moore dead. I need getting improving. Will it be like human voice. Well no probably not but I think it's already good enough. It's only GonNa get better and I think that's another thing that is growing as well. The parallel channel Uman are interacting with machine on a daily basis more and more so the human years starting to be more tolerant from Canada. Voices so I flew the fast. I wouldn't say to Mitt Buddy to get definitely get close enough that the majority of the people will have tolerance. I gotta get used to end. They don't think about all that mechanical for me that would be fine and that stuck again about the benefits that they have communicating any kind the content. You want who you will have a using not there's advantages to both sides like you said there's the I is getting smarter. It's faster but then you've got the other side for maybe a specific skill. You want a real human being because it's going to give a different brand voice. I think there's benefits both if people WANNA learn more about what we talked about today or trinity audio or connect with you personally. Where can they do that online? Suppressive is you said. My Name is zero awards ski in a trying to look doc for the NFL player. This is not me but spells the same so first of all the logo In linked gene or a just visit Message the Joke Darren and now I'm available. Just write me an email at a trendy audio not I I think the most fun thing about it you know conversation action repeater about voice about audio is that you know we can talk or in under half an hour an hour and we can think about an full five different startups it's week. It's thought indies these landscape in an additional thing about what you said he said about giving your grand in a voice I would say so. I think that definitely gently here. Always using simple take notes Bresso Deg George Clooney George Clooney in a recording studio for whatever. It's long day on it. Couple of weeks in advertiser full voice in any direction press so as we bear clients is George Voice and I think does also the kind of things that we're GONNA see in the coming year. Two brands are starting to use talents. Voice Voice to create the voicing direction we dare unique grin. I don't think maybe they were using those narratives fees because then okay guy part of your to prepare the answers at least in my stand for this is not as good as serving in a serving. Espresso yeah I think that's a good example. You're right that's I'm saying I think there's a benefit to both in different use cases of voice. Now now the last question we like to ask on this show to help promote voice as a whole is is there a current flash briefing or voice killer experienced that you using really enjoying right now first of all unfortunately in Tel Aviv excise written. I would say I never eat. W connection to have excess says I must say weapon definitely recommend I can recommend the love podcasting voice landscape it irrelevant in there. Actually repeat shooting in in those also being commanded on our blog. I talked about Jerry Fisher. Great Fan as well. A Is is also doing their job to spy. y'All congressional yourself. So I think all the influencers are amazing in if you WANNA learn more about Voice Bernard mobile audio you should listen to more Voiced through answers. Like yourself during these insult me my experience. Maybe Alexa will come into job. Then we'll have nation. Well thank you for that compliment. I appreciate it and yes the other. Two you mentioned are amazing as well for us over here voice summit. It's really the big for us to make sure we bring in the community voices a whole and really pushed the education in the innovation of it. So thank you so much for being here Ron and for sharing with with us what you're doing over at Trinity Audio and I look forward to hearing more soon an amazing and hopefully we can connect soon because this industry is developing. Thank you for listening to the inside voice podcast. We greatly appreciate you being a part of our community. And if you enjoyed this episode or you like the Podcast we would love it if you would subscribe a follow like share. Leave a review of the show. If you have any questions comments feedback people. You want to see on the show things you WANNA learn it. Feel free to send us an email at Carey at motive dot com that's K. E. R. At M. O. D. E. V. DOT COM and be sure to check us out online. Ed Voice Summit Dot. Ai Thank you and we look forward to chatting with you next week.

George Voice Voice Bernard George Clooney George Clooney Tel Aviv Jerry Fisher Canada Roy Moore Alexa NFL US Darren Carey K. E. R. At M. O. D. E. Ron
"voice" Discussed on Inside VOICE

Inside VOICE

08:36 min | 10 months ago

"voice" Discussed on Inside VOICE

"Maybe I can convince you otherwise that I can move on to my regular part of my story but the other part. That's that's interesting but also makes it. A little complex is that there are certain questions. I can ask you where I can retain that information to use it later in this case the fact that you're a a dog lover are that you're not a dog lover is important so I might want to use that information later in the story so I can store it and use it later. Sammy it's ooh. It's really a simple set of tools because I'm really only asking you binary questions but I can respond in a different way and then I can remember what you said Ed and that might influence other things that I ask you but it's not going to change the outcome of the story so again. We're still experimenting with it. We've we've had some success Jason. Some of the prototypes. That we've done But you know we want to continue on that so that we can work with authors to create a compelling compelling conversational story experience that people are going to want to engage with. I mean it's very similar to when you're having a conversation General I mean your conversation with me. Oh you did another podcast. You might have the same topic in mind where you're going to tell it slightly differently based on the questions that are asked based on the interaction you have with that person. That's very true. Yeah yeah that's a good way of saying it right. Who is like your target audience for this as anyone is focused on kids adults? It's focused on adults and I think our target audience audience is really people that enjoy engaging with a A very entertaining story. That's compelling you know it's got rising rising action they WANNA. I hear what happens next. I think people that read a book you know people that enjoy books. Hopefully they'll also enjoy this experience. It's a different experience but hopefully they would enjoy. There are people that don't really like books but they enjoy engaging story so they might like this experience You know might make for an author. Let's say it might open up new audience because they might not be able to reach as many as many people with their book as they could pinch essentially reach through this voice experience where they're engaging with a virtual character that's telling the story and I mean you're getting so much data so let's say you're like I want to write a book about dogs. I think that's what everyone and then artery when engaging is saying no because maybe like cats or birds or something else more might change how you write your sequel or for something else right. That's that's a good point. I hadn't really thought about that. But as an author I suppose you know if you if you know what people's what your listeners preferences are that might influence what you're right in the future. So where did this idea come from for you retire early and instead of being like I'm just going to hang out you're like I'm going to start a new business this and it's going to be in this kind of voice face and interactive storytelling like. Where did this idea come from like I said I guess I've had this idea for a long time but the technology has not been there and in some ways? I wish I could just hang out at the beach and but I have to have something to do and this is so exciting waiting for me. Like coming to this. Conference is is at least as exciting. If not more than just you know going on a vacation because I get to engage with all these people everything is changing. It's evolving for me. It's like trying to figure out what's going to work in solving a puzzle. It's challenging because you have. You don't know where things are moving. So you WANNA WANNA thank out into the future and tried to position yourself in a way that you're gonNa have something that's compelling. It's going to work in the way. Technology works later like I. You know smart speakers. Is that the way people are going to be engaging with virtual personalities three four five years from now or is it going to be more from their. TV'S ARE WE GONNA have augmented reality characters. Then our homes that we want to engage with and if we do we're GonNa want them to tell stories so you know I don't know my my my view is that we will personify these things more and more and if we personify them then we will expect them to tell a more linear story story as opposed to a choose your own adventure. Like if I'm having a conversation with you and I'm telling you a story I'm not GonNa ask you to pick a path. It's just not how a storyteller retailer engages with the person they're telling a story saying so trying to invent something that works within that. Do you see like adding where the person interacting are acting also becomes like a character within the story at all or no. I'm not really going that route either Because once you make them the protagonist in the story it it opens up this this whole branching thing you give them agency and then they have to like pick which way they're going. Yeah I really want to stick with this simple concept of I'm a virtual storyteller. You're my audience. I'm telling you a story but I'm in tailoring it to you and making it very personal and also asking you questions that will help you. Thank about the story. Maybe even change your mind about some things. I'm trying to convince you of something potentially potentially in the story that I'm telling you know but it's hard because you know one of the things we've had people say some of our early prototypes as I don't really want to be interrupted. Did when you're telling me the story so we have to figure out a way that the con- The conversational elements are they add the enhanced the experience as opposed to making it seem like it's interrupt in brain. I mean I know you're doing from a more. It sounds like from a more fun consumer side but as a branding person myself I see This great potential for businesses to use like okay if I'm trying to reach my audience and a content marketing space. Who is listening? How am I gonNA adjust that? That story said that it's an interesting constantly in my presentation. We also talked about this idea of stories a service. I mean what what chattels battles you know. My new company called Chattels What we what the value proposition we offers that? We're we're working with writers to perfect. It's this new. This new craft new style of conversation storytelling so we will be building this repository of stories will what if there were was a brand that had already engaged their customer and a voice experiences. I you know recipes or travel or whatever they wanted to increase the engagement or link than the amount of time that their their customer was in their experience they could go to our story service and pull out a story that worked within that context and then share with our storyteller storyteller can engage engage their customer within that experience. I mean I like the idea of you know stories or storyteller service is going to happen anytime soon and I think it probably will. It's point But that's exciting. So you said you liked reading do you see yourself doing any of the writing and you have the storytelling yourself you know. I really like like doing some example stuff and try because it's hard for people to search for authors to understand exactly what I'm describing because there aren't really precedence for it so I have a fun time trying to come up with stuff as an example and then when it worked actually did one recently where a couple of people were they listen to them. They're like Oh wow when you are you. When's the next one coming out? They wanted more and so now I gotta like come up with the story. But I'd rather just handed off like more experience authors and let them do it but it's it's fun playing around with to see if I can perfect. The you know the technique. Yeah I love it you know and I think what I'm say this over over and over again I love on the voice community is it's people from all different backgrounds sewing all different things. Yeah it's it's amazing All different ages all different industries. And I've never really seen that before and I think it's great that it's like bringing up different things and I think you know you having worked for NASA is right because that's so so innovative in and of itself that now you're like okay. I'm going to do something another innovation but completely different And that's exciting. You know that you're you know we can. We can do so many different things. Voice allows us to experiment and a lot of different ways. It's great where can people learn more about you and your your business. The they go to our new website which is charitable dot com. They can actually download a storytelling for Alexa writing guy. That explains this concept of the conversational stories told life from a storyteller perspective so if someone's interested in learning more about that yet go there. They can follow me on twitter at talks to us. Perfect thank.

Ed Jason Alexa twitter NASA
"voice" Discussed on Inside VOICE

Inside VOICE

06:53 min | 10 months ago

"voice" Discussed on Inside VOICE

"You're sharing food information it just you know you can tell I get excited about this stuff. It's it's it's really a way of enhancing people's lives And and doing it in a way where the technology doesn't get in the way. Yes I agree. I am somebody who doesn't love to cook. But this would make me want to cook because it is interactive. I can ask questions I can see a Lotta Times. You're reading one thing online or you're looking at a picture and you're looking at your stuff and it doesn't look look the same and then you get frustrated so this is just a great way because it is interactive. It's more fun. It's more engaging which I think is what we need and what you touched on something. I love about voices does that. It's not about technology replacing things. But how can we use so that we can interact with other people other things be healthier live healthier lives. I think that's really important right. And and we have a pretty ambitious roadmap for twenty twenty some of which I can't talk about but there are a couple of things that we've announced we're looking to add online culinary help for subscribers and this is going to be culinary help from live to experts so if you have a cooking question you can go to food network kitchen and you can be in touch with somebody. WHO's an expert in cooking and get your questions answered now? The potential for that for voice I devices is a pretty exciting Being able to have something on your kitchen counter where you can ask somebody directly Cooking question while you're in the process of making food. That's exciting that you know we talked about the to do. Live interactions via voice and also kind out of enhancing the connections between some of our content. So we have a ton of how to videos for simple thing tasks like how to Mend Scarlett how to clean a grill grill how to chop an onion properly and ability to answer those questions in the moment so that your Alexa the platform and your echo devices really kind of your how to central for all of your cooking question. Yes and I was told briefly at the the number one question people ask is always as a how to when it comes to voice so this is a perfect fit for that. And we're we're working with Amazon to to to get to make those paths Z.. As possible so you don't have to try to figure out a way to ask the question properly in order to get the answer you want. Just you know. Speak naturally ask you. How do I minced garlic? How how do how do I clarify butter and just immediately get that answer and be able to keep going on whatever task you're doing? Yes now. I want to switch gears a little and talk about you personally. I met you last night and you talked about. You studied photography. And then you got into technology and you're doing this. Can you tell us a little bit about that path. In that journey it's been a long path I've been I've been in technology about twenty five years before that Yup I graduated from Rhode Island School Design Way back in the Jurassic Era But my but my family was actually very computer literate. My father was a computer programmer. He start programming in nineteen sixty three. Wow so this was back in the punch cards and vacuum tube days of computing and so we always had computers around the house and we had some of the first person. Uh I b. m. p. c.'s. When they came out in the early eighties and we do in programming is kind of a hobby growing up so fast forward? After I gotta a school I was working for an architectural photographer and doing some P- repressed which turned into digital pre press and that was about the time that you the.

Scarlett P Alexa Rhode Island School Design Amazon m. p. c.
"voice" Discussed on Inside VOICE

Inside VOICE

07:40 min | 10 months ago

"voice" Discussed on Inside VOICE

"Others this year so we're excited about people that did it last year. Have you found that they continued it since they kind of started and felt pretty comfortable with it. Yes so that's always a risk about these types of events right is like and you guys know because you're in that business to like what's a real. Roi for the people not just from a networking standpoint because there's value in a networking standpoint. But then when you look at like did they just take notes and then kind of go back into their daily grind or did they actually apply their knowledge. So I'm really really happy to say that the many people who attended the conference reached out some me personally after. I'll give you ones I'll give you two specific examples. One being a client a Web web client at the time who attended our voice conference really knowing not that much about voice challenging us to build a skill on Alexa that has a the video component of visual component. So thanks to her. I learned a pl right so I learned so yeah like double benefit of the conference right right and then another one another small business owner that wanted to build a quiz you know To help his ECOMMERCE clients find the right product for them based on their lifestyle choices so then I had to learn you know the logic and the capture and all of that so yeah very very cool on both sides. That's that's good to hear. And I liked that workshops out at you're taking king because like you said most people go they take notes very passive is going to be able to build something that you understand how to do and then continue. Obviously they have to be consistent. But that's extremely mainly helpful. Yeah well thank you. That's that's our style right like we like getting ask questions by our clients and then we turn that into content. That can help everybody so. That's our content strategy and then our business development strategy has been just have like ten to fifteen person workshops and in helping them do stuff like facebook business manager Google analytics Google ads stuff in wordpress and so the voice one superfund though because nobody nobody nobody really knows what to do. So we're learning and they're learning and yeah the workshop styles just us and that's why we can pull it off. I think if we tried to do something much bigger or you have a bunch of keynotes and stuff. I just don't think we'd be as good at it right well and I think it's good to stick to what you do. Well we're doing you know. So how is Nashville Asheville in Chattanooga here for project voice had a Nashville and Chattanooga differ. How are they saying when it comes to technology as a whole invoice technology our people a lot of companies as within both Nashville is very in my opinion established especially in the healthcare space and the business services space? There's some brilliant companies in Nashville that are like You know diamonds in the rough basically because they're so established. I don't WanNa say say. They're stuck in their ways but there are very strategic about like what new types of things that they want implement and there they really need to be proven why they need to go. Oh into a specific space. So that's actually why we're data driven design. I won't get into the long story but like just having to prove so hardcore that they need to do something and so as I understand. But that's good about Nashville right like that's very positive because then when somebody makes an investment into that like you know that they're invested so oh voice in Nashville was not surprisingly hard. It was a hard sell to get people to pay attention to it. And now that there's some momentum it's GonNa still still always be a hard sell to like get them to try it but it's happening Chattanooga the home of project voice seems to be more open minded initially about like embracing new technology and they both that they have the fastest Internet country. Nashville I can. I am from Tom Springhill and Thomson Station. Which is like twenty minutes south of Nashville very very slow Internet so two differences? I think Chattanooga's may be a little bit more willing to to try different things. Faster Internet then Nashville right interesting. Yeah no that definitely helps. What have you learned from being here at project voices? They're kind of a common theme that you're seeing within voice whether it's from the development side design side or what there's way more than I ever thought existed in Boyce way more like I've been sort of heads down on building voice APPS and so my mind has been on getting clients on Alexa and Google and and then being here I'm like holy crap like there's way more than that these these assistance like the custom assistance. That brands are building. Aren't even they don't have anything to do with Alexa. Google but then they that brand will have an Alexa skill or Google action that will basically be like the top of the funnel. Maybe you you know. And so. That's super interesting to me. And then if I didn't know anything about Bixby I didn't I don't know anything about bixby. Joe Wallis CTO at data driven designed. He's he's funny. We were in the keynote this morning and he does this thing like sorry for the listeners. You can't see me but he does. This thing really puts both of his hands on his and I know he's like going into like processing mode like he's processing he's really thinking in in like fifty percent of the time he'll verbalize what he's thinking and the other fifty percent he'll go back and do what he was doing and so he does this thing where he's like and then he looks up at me and he goes Paul. I think everything about myself and the way that I've ever done anything thing in the way that I'm going to continue to do anything in my life just completely changed based on that team. That's a shout out to them and talking talking earlier with another guest you know so Amazon Alexa and Google assistant and bixby's still fairly new. And so you know really a push for them to push the marketing You know and Roger. Roger Kibbe at labs working with them is doing a great job of expressing the creativity and the third party development and being places like this to to teach more about it. So it's great to hear that. There's there's an interest. There's an excitement for people on the technology and development side. Yeah I think you bring up a good point. I mean Amazon Google and Samsung mad props to them coming to events like this and even they they all walk the talk like they're they're giving developers the I think the most access that I've ever seen anything and it's really cool for enterprise level of biggest companies in the world to be here at an event like this and giving developers access to their platform and like really caring about the Development Community. It's really cool. Yeah I was telling someone earlier you know last night Google had them speaking and they gave out an email and then it goes to one guy and I was like. That's amazing. You know you really are here with the pioneers and the people starting out and you know in ten years. It'll be amazing to see what happens. Absolutely I love it. It's so good work. The people are more about your connect with you go to data driven dot design. That's our website and the Nashville Voice Conference Dot Com so Nashville Voice Conference Dot com data driven dot design perfect. Thank you so much I appreciate it. Thank you for listening to the inside voice podcast. We greatly appreciate appreciate you being a part of our community. And if you enjoyed this episode or you like the Podcast we would love it if you would subscribe follow like share. Leave a review of the show. Joe If you have any questions comments feedback people. You WanNa see on the show things you WANNA learn. Feel free to send us an email at Carey at motive dot com that's K. E. R. I at M. O. D. E. DOT COM and be sure to check us out online at voice summit dot Ai. Thank you and we look forward to chatting with you next week..

Nashville Google Alexa Chattanooga Bixby Joe Wallis CTO Roger Kibbe Amazon business owner facebook Tom Springhill Thomson Station Carey business manager Boyce Paul K. E. R. Development Community Asheville
"voice" Discussed on Inside VOICE

Inside VOICE

07:59 min | 10 months ago

"voice" Discussed on Inside VOICE

"Brand again. Think of the songs how they made you feel and sound also uses your brain in a different way than visuals do and I. I love that. You're really talking about that. It's people it's not brand is not company this group of people trying to connect with this group of people in a one to one way in an audio experience like we are right now just to human beings talking king and I I love that you're breaking it down in such a simple way because I think sometimes we get so much into that technical business as we forget. These are people trying to connect with people. I can't agree more and like we've said every voice is different and everybody connects with different voices. You know differently. Is it going to be you know. Is the one voice gonNA connect with four million people at once. No probably not but you know the brands and companies at least paying or being aware of it a little bit more and how that can help bring some value you know. I guess if we want to get on the business side of things bring some value to their brand and to reach out to people in a little. Oh bit more personal way if you will. Yeah can you share with us. Any successes that brands you've worked with have seen from working with you or other voice actors in general and when it comes to engaging with voicemails if possible well again it's so new okay. Skills have been around you know with the echoes and all that that's been around for awhile. Voice acting has been around for a while but the meshing of the two seems to be fairly new so like I say I've only worked on one one skill and it was a connection. I made through Lincoln. It's called life venture so I guess you could go on your smart speaker and download life venture an N.. Play the game. I've only done one. I don't know all of the specs on the success of downloads or anything like that so I can attest to those numbers. But I can't say it was a great experience for me. I had a work with a wonderful developer super professional very efficient this particular developer it was written in. Xl unlike the left column had what we needed or what he wanted me to save the. I think it was by sentence what he wanted me to save that as and he he gave me the format that was needed and I sent it on. Its Way I do think this is maybe again. I can only go by my experience. And what I've heard a lot of other voice actors actors. Do it seems to be in. Its infancy for now. So it's a lot of education it's US keeping our acting skills up and connecting with developers and and working with them to show the value in that. It's something different. Not Everything has to sound like Alexa or Syria or Cortana or Bob or Jim you you know what I mean on the can be different because the voice actors are out there. It's a living breathing. You know rather large industry that not a lot of people know about so I've Only done the one to be honest done inside but it was a really really good experience for me so that was awesome. It helps with skill sets and acting all of so it was a win win on both sides and I am working on a couple of other projects right now having kind of to do it's not necessarily or could be part of a skill and other things. I'm not at liberty to say anything right now. Yeah and I think of just using voices in general and voice skill so one that has been done really well. In my opinion Ian was wait. Wait don't tell me which is the show by. NPR familiar with that one. I am they have a way scale and it was actually done by the inner smarts and and when I used that skill I loved it because they had the actual gentlemen who does the show. So it's his voice they are interacting with so not only does it coal from on the show he does. That's recorded but now you kind of feel like you're talking to him and the experience is totally different than when I tried to use a voice scale that uses. This is Alex's Voice Amazon exit hold and then I use maybe a third skill and that also hasn't Amazon Alexa voice and it starts to kind of feel like everything just sounds the same and so for me. That was a skill that I think did using voice over obviously a famous voice. That's attached to something already really made a difference in the experience that I had with that skill versus something else and there you were talking about that. It's kind of the branding. Kind of press. People know his voice so there was a nice emotion. You know oop whatever motion. You're trying to get you know from your skill but you recognize the voice and you. It was like like you said you were. We're talking to him not talking to a piece of plastic and wiring. You were talking to a person or talking with having a conversation with a person not having a conversation with an object and I think that makes a difference and that might be a way and maybe a lot of people who own this mart speakers don't even know about all the different skills also there I sure no I don't Know about all of the different skills that they're out there and this might be a way to differentiate them and you know introduce people to it. Hey it's not like you're talking to a piece of plastic that's in the middle of your counter. It's not a live conversation but at least it's one that is in all the great technology that connects people. Sometimes people are still really disconnected. And you hear of people still being super super lonely so bringing bringing that human touch and that emotion. That's not always perfect all the time. That's okay because that's how people relate to. I think it's important. Yes I cannot agree more I am all about about the human connection. I think you're right. It's a great way to kind of create connection because then you know the next step of voice skill could be to call them on the phone or connected them online and then you chat with a real person and so it kind of keeps that same feeling throughout so if People Wanna learn more about what we talked about today or they want connect with you. Where can they do that? Judy well thank you for indulging me in this Can certainly welcome to check out my website. which is simply judy? Foshan voiceovers voiceovers dot com can listen to demos therein some videos and whatnot Go ahead and email me. I'll be happy to answer any questions you have and my email l. address is judy at Judy. Foshan voice overs. It is plural dot com and go ahead and connect with me on Lincoln. Love to hear from you answer questions. Ashton's how best I can and on their just judy awesome. And if I can answer your question at least I might be able to get you in the right direction to somebody who could help out. Her fact denies you were just mentioning earlier. One of the biggest issues in voice right now is the marketing component is getting people aware of what's out there and so we like to ask the question at the very end of this show if there is a current flash briefing or voice killer experience that you've used in really enjoy at this time you know I can't say that I can and to be honest with you. You're GONNA love this. I don't even own a smart speaker so say we are here as one another are so those that are listening. Our job is not done here to continue aid on boys and I'll help one another. Thank you so much for being here. Really breaking down these these steps in showcasing the importance of having a human voice as art of your brand and as part of those greeting voice skills as well you are welcome Kerry. Thanks for asking me. I greatly appreciate. This has been great fun. Thank you for listening to the inside voice podcast. We greatly appreciate you being part of our community. And if you enjoyed this episode or you like the Podcast we would love it if you would subscribe a follow like share. Leave a review of the show. If you have any questions comments feedback people you. You want to see on the show things you WANNA learn. Feel free to send us an email at Carey at motive dot com that's K. E. R. I at M. O. D. E. DOT COM and be sure to check us out online at Voice Summit Dot. Ai Thank you and we look forward to chatting with you next week..

Judy Voice Summit Dot Lincoln Foshan developer Alexa US Amazon Alexa NPR Ian Alex Carey Ashton Kerry K. E. R. Cortana Bob Jim
"voice" Discussed on Inside VOICE

Inside VOICE

08:08 min | 10 months ago

"voice" Discussed on Inside VOICE

spotify skype writer
"voice" Discussed on Inside VOICE

Inside VOICE

10:26 min | 10 months ago

"voice" Discussed on Inside VOICE

"The future that we imagine where people are engaging with their brands much more over voice assistance but today is there really a core. Need that someone's GonNa get from a smart speaker home maybe in some cases but in a lot of cases that might not be the right answer but then suddenly when you could be providing value whether someone's John's on the road driving or walking the aisles store just opens up a lot more options and there has become now a lot of voice agencies in the last few years what do you think makes banners smart unique within the space. I come back to onto the various started. This where it's we are born out of a broader not just advertising agency Z.. But a broader marketing company. And we're here to solve some of this fundamental business and marketing problems and so I think a lot of our colleagues around the voice space other agencies do really nice design were some of them put out some really cool experiences. I'd like to thank and I think we've been investment to say that are designed development capabilities are right up there on bar with the very best spent Since I've been here for years now investing heavily in that making it a core focus but in addition to building and designing really good experiences. We also have this broader agency and company around us that can be really powerful both and driving discovery which I think we all here as a a big want in the voice base that you can build very thing ever but unless you make people aware of that in the right moment it's tricky to drive engagement and then so we have a built in solution on that end and then more broadly thinking about that role that voice experience glazed within a broader product or marketing system. I mean I think again any company can take that more strategic coming in the differences. We're we're actually practitioners along that broader marketing ecosystem as well so whether that's being able to tap in some of my colleagues Bainer on the media side of house and when we haven't experienced coming up understand what are some of the most efficient ways to actually drive at discovery and with the right audiences or if it's about topping into the broader UNCREATIVE and strategy teams might understand a really old consumer journey for one of our clients and be able to help pinpoint the moments where we could address a real need with with a voice experience. It's just thinking of this not in isolation but instead as part of an overall brand system which ultimately is how user going to experience it so we look at that has our had a big competitive difference that expertise but also integration with the broader system. And can you share with us any success stories. You've had God with the brands you've worked with that are using voice. Sure of those that we've Big Ben acknowledged publicly in spoken with to come to mind. One Jamie Morgan we can chase. It was pretty big story for those in the AD world a couple of years ago we were named their Voice Agency of record. And that's been a great partnership running for a couple of years now where there have been bits. That have you've been public facing. And we've seen really interesting. Thought leadership experiences on their side where. I'm really proud of the work. We've done with them to take some of their really great educational information really great guidance investors and making that a bit more accessible through public facing skills in science briefings but then beyond that some of the work internally we've done from a strategic standpoint so helping them understand as they progress towards market with an own voice assistant as they look into the roles that across the different businesses interacting for conversations whether it's voice or messing are GonNa play in some cases. This is Upper funnel stuff where it might be after initial awareness. But they WANNA help do a little bit of validation of leads or bring folks along that journey a little bit. Sometimes sometimes an automated conversational experience might actually be a better solution than trying to drive them right into a bank branch or something like that. We've done quite a lot of work on the strategy side. Jake retakes there and then another one. WHO's been a great partner over the years and we're continuing to work closely with the audio and the spirits category so the makers of most talkative spirits and for them they were actually our very first client that we ever developed a skill for that Johnnie Walker Whisky? mentorships guided added Whiskey tastings back in two thousand sixteen saw a lot of success. There evolved from Amazon Google as well continued at a rate on that and then Spread it out to another skill experience about happy hour. That's kind of portfolio wide a little bit more of a recipe experience for cocktails within within the broader happy are context of reasons to cheers and stuff along the way and then increasing now as Amazon and Google of starting to build out more. I party capabilities. Typically in that recipe space. It's a obviously very popular domain voice. So one way or the platforms are investing more in answering questions directly themselves and maybe not always of these less frequently deferring out to third party skills and actions now were kind of pivoting on our strategy and looking into what are are the new ways that farms are GonNa be surfacing this information to users and how can we position Biagio is a folio and then the individual brands in the right moments there to service the right recipe in the right moment for user. Guide them through whether it's instructions on certain types of mixing Aren't all the different stuff you can get around cocktail content. And then for some of their brands there will still be more interactive experience of. It's not to say that it's it's all utility based all the time but across their portfolio really picking up the right solution in the right moment and it's something that they've put as a big priority in have been really Great Orange Emirs. I know you're talking about on the go. which is again what you're really passionate about at this? Time is a brand creative way skill that works on the go. Oh beyond a device at home so maybe what are some tips. You can give to make sure a grand scale can be used on the go. Yeah and I'd start with. We are just figuring this Out Now like those hardware form factors talking about echo buds just shipped. Yes in the last few months anyway. The Pixel Buds are going to ship until next during latest. We've heard is early spring and so we've been playing around with the teams on both sides while as at Bowes they've got hardware market earlier earlier. It's obviously a small user base but really cool seeing even the bose frames and how those are integrating voice commands there. But I think first and foremost it's about really getting into the mindset of user defining. So we talk here in terms of and I've each inspirational design target and part of the definition of that user is GonNa be where they're being where they're using the experience and so in terms of envisioning where they are and then forecasting you need based on that it's really important in the planning stages and then in terms of the actual experience designed as of today we don't have you know an automated way to sense which hardware coming through through across Google and so in context it's about trying to with you know a little bit artfully upfront. We don't want to be totally bash people over the head with with Way Finding in directions but asking them early on an experience a couple of discovery questions to figure out as much about their context weekend and then tailor the rest of the experience from there. So really you might very well have an experience that you've designed one way if you're envisioning somewhat over smart speaker and another way if they're you're on the goats not unlike how we think about multi-modal today where we might have Sunday mentally a very similar experience. But if someone's got a screen device in front of them I can make a lot more assumptions and show them reference information on that screen that if they're audio only can't so the sooner that I can kind of working to the upfront of the conversation. Some discovery question that helps me know which contacts therein the better tailored I can make that experience. Well I think so. You've provided so much information today. If people want to learn more about what we talked about where they want connect with you. Where can they do that online? Sure of the best place for me is going to be on Lincoln on. There's Patrick givens you can look up also always happy to chat over email so In my other boquets givens. JV NS adventure media NFL. And the last question we'd like to ask on this show to help promote voice as a whole is what is a current slash briefing or voicemail or experience that you are really enjoying right now while I'm be totally shameless and go given the status of the NFL and hopefully listeners. Out There I'm a huge Baltimore. Ravens dance dance. I've Been Baltimore Ravens. FLASH BRIEFING JUST ABOUT EVERY MORNING for the past couple of months. We've got a nice round here but I actually think it's a little bit addictive of what actually does work in this space. Where where it's about a passion point right? We're not expecting to for kind of generic discovery from a random. This is very content within that last briefing thing is designed for fans because those who are going to be pretty pretty deeply committed fans one a little bit more broad. Maybe it's been around for a little while but I think still is just such a great example of what I can do. Well as jumpers. I'm sure that's on the audience. Super familiar with autism has been very impressed by what the team did their to find a really relevant day are create good habit and then keep programming useful content against that and all L. aligning with encouraging a good behavior. It's awesome well. Thank you so much Patrick for being care and I look forward to seeing what you and the team at banner smart continued to create. Thanks so much. Thank you for listening to the inside voice podcast. We greatly appreciate you being part of our community and if you enjoyed this episode so you like the podcast we would love it if you would subscribe a follow like share. Leave a review of the show. If you have any questions comments feedback people. You WanNa see on the show things you WANNA learn. Feel free to send us an email at Carey at motive dot com that's K. E. R. I at M. O. D. DOT COM and and be sure to check us out online at Voice Summit Dot. Ai Thank you and we look forward to chatting with you next week..

Google Patrick givens Voice Summit Dot Voice Agency NFL Amazon John Baltimore Ravens Baltimore Bainer AD world Jamie Morgan Ben Jake Biagio Johnnie Walker Whisky partner Bowes Carey
"voice" Discussed on Inside VOICE

Inside VOICE

04:26 min | 11 months ago

"voice" Discussed on Inside VOICE

"Makes it more of a one to one conversation especially with the the voice voice announces voice on top of that makes it. It's amazing so besides being able to add more languages to Carson. What's kind of your long term vision for it? And why do you think boys is so applicable for the car. Yes so make the whole road. Map of Kossi is to try and make it normal for dealerships so as a tool to increase productivity and improve customer experiences and the the aim again is also to build upon what I've done by possibly in a front end interface on website so that day the ships cannot she change in real time the content also for to include a car configuration So this is something that I'm working on now whereby the `Cau- you actually jump into the into the coffee and you actually get guided for different features of the vehicle Bakal and you'll ask to choose different packages like some polls lever which you want for Nascar level. Do you want different types of lever and you cannot say yes or no love and depending on that you're building your own custom car. And then at the end of the conversation that information gets sent to the sales team but you will find the price for that configuration and also many of US special offers that accustomed to what you've chosen so that's the next step to make more pass snore and also just call sites of being you know reaching out into the US to new car franchise dealerships. That's online list of. Nothing's I really really want to push and just to make it something new that caught the ships can actually just out there. Maybe it's just for marketing Pepsi's denied puts into a shopping mall. You a you know come and taught to the vehicle discover the vehicle so is more about that than anything else and for it to be a huge opportunity full day in a ship to augment the real world and that she pushed Kossi as a tool that can be used as something normal. Well I'm excited for it. You know every time we do this show hearing so many different use cases and hearing people like yourself really fine niche markets to make voice work. I think it really brings it to life for people that haven't thought of it in that way before four so I am super excited for this. Where can people learn more about Carson and yourself and connect with you online yes? So I'm frequently contributing to an on raising discussion points Mignon Winton so you can reach out to me there and also if you want more information about costs can be found on the website cau- CYTOTEC site the tech. Let's say and you know I'm matchy starting your blog soon about the actual development process and the ups and downs of of Bolinger employees business. I've written a few blocks on medium. So you can actually find me that as well so we we can have a talk and the last question we like to ask has gotten show to really help. Different voice skills is what is the favorite voice scale experience or flash briefing. You're using right now and really enjoying. I've actually got a four year old son so he's actually loving comfy panda skill on Alexa. And is it you know voted amazing sound effects. It says he's reading joying how it allows interacts exercise daily. So that's a daily skill that we actually used so is this is a bit of the old navy but it's really fun way and it's amazing how develop is actually looking out the use cases on who's actually using these making amazing expansive Well thank you so much ethan for sharing what you're doing and I am just super excited to see a grow. So thank you for being here. Franco Thanks for having me and also thank you for all your efforts growing this community on giving people a voice. Thank you for listening to the inside voice podcast. We greatly appreciate you being part of our community. And if you enjoyed this episode or you like the Podcast we would love it if you would subscribe a follow like like share. Leave a review of the show. If you have any questions comments feedback people you want to see on the show things you WANNA learn. Feel free to send us an email at Kerry ad hat. MOTIVE DOT COM that's K. E. R. I at M. O. D. E. DOT COM and be sure to check us out online at Voice Summit Dot. Ai Thank thank you and we look forward to chatting with you next week..

Voice Summit Dot US Kossi Mignon Winton Carson Nascar Alexa Pepsi Bakal Kerry Bolinger ethan Franco K. E. R.
"voice" Discussed on Inside VOICE

Inside VOICE

09:56 min | 11 months ago

"voice" Discussed on Inside VOICE

"So so they'd have mechanisms to do that but With respect to find the suds off by in generally goes in the shopping fuel rich by the photo was into the Amazon choking with the Benghazi years once the scale. And you're basically talking to this ridiculous king and broad using that relate Blamed from the nearby store. And you say yes or you say looking through nearly firmly at I can pick up your lines then basically helps you in Alaska Alaska for Zip Code and then locate incapable or depleted initiative Goo Goo downs. Yeah that makes sense and I think it's great in your show casing from a bank to a winery. There's a lot of different use cases here and that you're highlighting that you start with one piece you start with one entity see. Hey how that goes and they kind of grow at a make that skill more advanced because I think a lot of people think it has to do everything all at once but you start with something tested Rohit and it's great to see that that's what what you're doing with these two companies. I wondered talkable very very interesting. Use case which we are seeing action across multiple zones actually and an a It's a little surprising to me but it doesn't learning look media great job so especially with respect to mandatory and complaints based trainings in beat it organizations that Israel the utilizes is also really Example to be looking at this way nights claim by exclusive dozen employees scrape across fifteen hundred offices in you know the challenge was to basically retailed laws as employs with a new mandatory cleaning They basically had define handful of council anchors that they declared all the implies to later and they wanted the spinning dispensing across and they had to selling hopefully feed in place. And that's when you got into this organization and we considered him and he phoned that Weiss could be such an amazing bitty fuss and in a wedding aware interesting demanded what we've done is we have actually created in I add conditional interactive deigning employee's which which they can basically access anytime anywhere and can Lillard did bays foods plus So so it is integrated with the system. It is indicated with their own learning management system because they videos and images at all in a stolen they tax system. As in all of this into this Indian voices two and ensures the the employees have a rich and interactivity at a very exciting. Do you have anything else to add to that Sanjiv as well are you doing. Thank you know we had liquor to exploit lot of use cases you know and they inevitably days. We are talking about multiple use case in clinical trials and radio awesome you use cases and did some amount approaches and we're looking at ELMA system integrations and a lot of things you know there is no own lack of what can be bring into the voice base. It's all adoption. Andy gradually doing by separate. You know besides custom invoice APPs your company also has a couple of voice of fat forms. Can you share with us. A few details of these platforms. We have one guy and that black hole was actually listening that be maintained that is a platform which is a podcast it is to have the womb custer skins on an excel Bothering anybody dignity that does Lord behind the scenes. Nature considered Green Vicks for Customs so you just largely black folk relates betty basic Letting create customized certain aspects of that Put in or does the closing feedback from listeners. Do you want to include extension of the episodes Just Macula hottest speed in the Diet thing is taken care after the delay of the scale. Inner Visa issued who crosses none of that is taken by blessed also gives you Geico the listeners on the exit channel that is one of the black films behalf which is under the leg the second blood flow which is in certification at this point of thing is targeted goods chocolate favorites shopping being and he combs platform that on eight or two thousand Mouton's across the globe us for the eagles stores. So what we've done is the Grega to be ability to these Chevy fame legions. Too Lazy fe begging us at Boone certain aspects of the customers fled exam Zombie. If using militants can create their own Alexa skillful stools rich customers can then use to know the status of day artist us to back the shipment status to cancel orders and obviously enhance this particular black from going ahead being relieving Senate food eight Dems place so these are the platforms that be. Have anything else that you want to add as well said you all the exercise the building the podcast platform and shopping by what ability gained all the time. Is You know we can easily build a connected APP for any size based product at this point. That is what we have proven over this time. You wonder how let's say something like salesforce or you know any other SIERRAS application if you want to build an connected. We have the ability to do that. And what we are doing is they're taking one us at a time and see. How do we build it On ferns and come out of customer space and then make it to the next level. Where can people learn more about what we talked about today your website? Where can they connect neck each of you online? There's a shake it is me lady that they can teach. Oh there's some of the scales which are going library sooner they naturalist Melissa Visibility. And just mean we're doing yes so they can dot com and as well as look at both of you guys on linked in. I know you guys are very social and love to interact with people in the space and the last question. We'd like to ask on this show. This is for each of you. Is there a flash flash briefing voice skill or experience that you are using right now and really enjoying and why so sergey will start with you. Don't follow much about that flash briefing. I love the most Useful thing for me. That voice bought that probably a lot of useful insight. But you know what is possible and what is the trend toward voice voice technology next ethics. Yep that is my primary source of information. At least what is happening on the voice technology. Yes and that's Brechin Saleh He. He is a wealth of knowledge and information. So yeah we ever on this show as well yes. IBP Your choice will use for fundable suspicion of the day that that is one of my favorites that use on on a daily basis and I do miss the brands on the stand ready thinking. Hey really really. Do I really think that is so much more that the brand should be doing on this tunnel and I wish I could have meaning to conversations with all the brands that I generally use on this day and getting interesting. It'll be really nice to see how it grows and improve so thank you both. Oh so much for being here and sharing your knowledge today. Just one last communicating that. I wanted to make that Dean months working with these building. These black foams in plays in working with all the smarter nuts claims that we were good. We really feel that We have a lot of reusable components that the beard and we believe that it is a graduate at least start experimenting with this and we held them that stem now order to see that if any bran Dan wants to create their basic prisons on the Alexa channels. We could afford it for free. And that's how we are with musical companies able to turn it on basic Because that get started I mean that gets you started on the voice and then they would understand the streamed discipline Will be able to let things. So that is one point that I wanted to put a close to Marcus into the market. So that you know I think I think it'll be good for the entire industry. That's and that's because I wonder used this Orcas I believe and then thank you some whiskey. I think commissioning that you are creating week. I mean that's Lord of Publishing and very equality continues. Thank you for listening to the inside voice podcast. We greatly appreciate you being a part of our community. And if you enjoyed this episode or you like the Podcast we would love it if you would subscribe follow like share. Leave a review of the show. If you have any questions comments feedback people. You WanNa see on the show things you WANNA learn. Feel free to send us an email at Carey at motive dot com that's K. E. R. At M. O. D. E. V. DOT COM and be sure to check us out online at Voice Summit Dot. Ai Thank you and we look forward to chatting with you next week..

Alexa Alaska Voice Summit Dot Benghazi Rohit Israel Amazon Sanjiv Geico Weiss Brechin Saleh Andy eagles Melissa Visibility Lillard Boone Inner Visa sergey
"voice" Discussed on Inside VOICE

Inside VOICE

07:45 min | 11 months ago

"voice" Discussed on Inside VOICE

"A really cool on where there was a wedding and so initially Axa's boys but then the wedding couple speaks as you ask them a question about. Where do I go for the wedding? What do I need a couple speaks to you and then you can like you said move the blind? I mean there's just so much that can happen and I think your video show a great mix of it. which makes it really exciting for anyone? That's traveling all the things that can be done with. Ease Charlie that wedding specific demo. It's a customized personalized recording from a Koppel and again that's put into the back end of our software and so when a guest that Araj the wedding. Let's say it's at the hotel. They arrived at the wedding. The hotel maybe even a conference or an an event old I have to say is Alexa. I'm for the wedding or maybe make it a bit more specific Alex. I'm here for the smiths wedding or the wedding and it's GonNa then throw out that. Personalized is recording from the wedding. Couple themselves to welcome them and it really adds a level of personalization necessarily example of already. We think thank hotels to really take it to the next level you know. Put in personal recordings from the hotel manager specific welcoming the guests. Maybe it's the first thing they experienced. Come on US Alexa. So again my say and that's a a personalized recording from the manager per se. And you're gonNA feel a connection to that hotel true that brain and again. We think that's going to loyalty. And that's what hotels are after and nothing's really strong very easy to do US migration with flowers office so from back in so we love it. It got my Asian to the empty agree as long as you have the imagination the hotels to do it and we can help. Yes and I your passion for it is just so wonderful. What has been the overall feedback from users or any data that you can share so far extremely positive and was seen even just the analytics in terms of how much guests using the devices ruined or not? You're looking at asked six to seven request specific to that loss you know and then we'd bet that it's the hotel sixty seven digital interactions with that guests. You know so guess to using it especially appropriate opera me in the US. Way Eh. Holden penetration again. Like I said is quite high so they understand how to use a little bit better you know again with over here in in New Zealand in the US again there the education so what we do. We don't see this collateral. We try to help them as much as we can. But it is pretty natural life when you ask a question. Overseas Union over the command is initial trigger. Forgot which I grew once. You've done that with the blouse subway. We've pretty much customizing. Any question in any barechested. How you ask that question so it's GonNa hit every time so even if asking for a cow slip is beginning to get that no matter how they ask that question? So that the daughter and the initial feedback getting of see the reviews that were saying. It's a little hard to get the exact specifics. All the reviews that they're generating revenue and that's a big one for us and big want a hotel it's L. as well as pushing guest to onslaught soon so they make requests Berlet's at cocktail or as the nearest restaurant with the best restaurant. Or what do you recommend with the hotel. We push them to the that restaurant we offer them at ten percent batch and then you know. Hotels are seeing a ten to fifteen percent increase in revenue to through those specific Beta news. That they have on side again six to seven requests. Not so you know and I asked hotel keeping track of your guests. Sixty seven more tongs day visit. Would you take and how much value would that be too. And that's kind of you know one of the big strong pitchers that we say that we think the Dodd is the reflects in revenue. And really right stuff that we can. We can do outside of those things. Yeah I mean. Roi Again always the big question. So where do you guys as long as the next phase of voice going in the hospitality industry specifically. Yeah okay I will you got the rest of the world and by me talking different dialects. Alex looks different accents. Broken English all these things so we are kind of limited to a Google and Amazon dot now into the bay support what languages they support night's eighteen Greek and then what we can integrate with. So it's already a matter of time but like I said Wiki ready quite easy go and when I'm already when hotel impossible to ready who tell and yet women waiting for at six months to a year. Let's do this so you've got the hotel industry which has got no ago. Roughly just too late fees you half a million beds or hop million and then that's just a hotel industry. You've got the whole ebb industry which we're really excited about a little bit of the scale of a little smaller property. But are we still think that you know that is revenue to be made there that you've got the whole cruise ship industry you go all of those on streaming saw about his age brings things vices he do h especially some of private ones with potentially adding impersonal. I'm accounts to H residents communicate with their their loved ones just from a simple voice come on human simple voice commands of automations that we spoke about sort of lower software and hospitality into those key sectors. Those few and again. It's only a matter of harms so much to this voice. Control make sense in terms of empowering certain industries booting revenue for some of them Helping you you know that age K.. You know improve their lot. dister small little things so the line of duty. A lot of Apply Limited by Amazon Bay saying yet. We're ready to go the by again soon as they already will be ready to six months to a year so again Exciting yes. Where can people learn more about? You talked about today on bare react on lengthy and on posting you know he's not everyday videos demonstrations so this driest Kufa on link Dean or our website. His voice systems are dodd. said yet which is going to link to videos Valera specific videos to ones. We're doing so you know you're in any part of the world and from the US the UK draws drolet. You can reach out David Muir same reach out to us. And also we can pretty much customized any solution that you want. Even if it's not an austerity ministry mystery. You know there's a lot you can do so it's exciting times voice. I'm excited to be part of the on. The first. If not in this part of the world does feel like you know anyone explaining the boy's face you know is You know an entrepreneurial trail breezy and it's real excited to be on the wave of the month and the last question we'd like to ask on this show to kind of help promote the voice as a whole is there a flash briefing scale or voice experience that you've been using a lot and really enjoying recently will for me it's actually the NFL. Oh on a pig. NFL supportive just with business. I don't often get a you know. Check it on the daily. So that's kind of one of the first ones that I say just getting updates. Yeah and it school specific. The biggest kind of that it's local weather earn sadly again some are slash three three for New Zealand Limited. Or maybe that somebody we helped with but formerly. NFL May just getting those those excites everyday. Really perfect thank you so much for sharing your energy and excitement for all that you do. Andreas knows absolute pleasure. Thanks for reaching out. Yeah I'm real excited to be on podcast. Thank you for listening to the inside voice podcast. We greatly appreciate you being part of our community and if you enjoyed this episode so you like the podcast we would love it if you would subscribe follow leg share. Leave a review of the show. If you have any questions comments feedback people you want to see on the show things you WANNA learn. Feel free to send us an email at Carey at motive dot com that's K. E. R. I at M. O. D. E. DOT COM and be sure to check us out online at Voice Summit Dot. Ai Thank you and we look forward to chatting with you next week..

US NFL Alexa Alex Voice Summit Dot Axa Koppel Charlie Araj Kufa New Zealand David Muir Dodd Berlet Overseas Union Amazon Bay Andreas Google New Zealand Limited Carey
"voice" Discussed on Inside VOICE

Inside VOICE

08:48 min | 1 year ago

"voice" Discussed on Inside VOICE

"There are a lot of elements to making a voice experience. Great but have you. You ever thought about the sound quality and engineering of the sound. Eugene Kim is New York City based production sound mixer and audio post engineer having worked with clients that include net flicks flakes. PBS National Geographic Division. And more on this episode he talks about. Why the quality of Sambas of Gordon how he goes about getting the sound just rate what equipment you can use? Why sound excites him? So much high inside voice podcast listeners. This is your co host Kerrie Roberts and today my guest is New York City based production sound mixer her an audio post engineer Eugene Cam and his clients have included. TV Land Paramount PBS DreamWorks TV. Comedy Central National Geographic Netflix univision and more so. Welcome Eugene. Thanks for being here. How you do it? Because I haven't been so the reason I wanted to bring you on. Today's talk about an area invoice voice technology that I think has been discussed as much and so once a company or a brand has decided that they want to create a voice experience. They have a voice voice strategy they have the. US design the sonic branding and they're starting to actually bring their skill or experience to life. A lot of people don't think about the sound quality ready and the sound engineering of a voice go experience and many people just tend to use the default boys of the Smart Speaker. Can you talk about some ways. Sound can be engineered for voice skills and experiences. Sure voice skill technology. I agree a lot of people. Default to a will come stock on their phone or the device because it thankfully just a tool tool And I think if you want to make it a little more user friendly or kind of enrich that experience part of it has to do with the sound quality it's recorded so sort of the analogy of if you're doing a conference call and get to listen to an iphone to speak or if you're looking to like James Jones Day you know everyone knows each Joel all day. It sounds better but it's just not a practising for device do so I've always thought that it would be pretty interesting for as sad as I point. Small things like on your birthday. There's a little sonic chronic signature for your birthday or for a meeting going on an airplane. small-time seniors like that. I think it's the the small nuances and textures in bed. Sound can kind of enriched the listening experience so why do you think the quality of sound and the way it's engineered is so important to the user and the Listener Pika Giancarlo it is important to easiest way I think for an user or a listener to kind of be taken out of the moment if picture or the image is is strange or a little off kilter off quality law or forgivable but if there's bad sound where someone's house visit dinner muffled or unintelligible. People are a lot mystery and find find and It's like this first immediate marco quality projects I think is judged it would look but also image but also the sun equality I think this on equality for it is Is the easiest way to kind of be taken out of the ball. Can you describe like as somebody who is doing sound design and engineering what what you are processes for audio standpoint like how somebody could potentially work with someone like yourself. What does that look like well? I'm actually going to tape a live comedy special for A STAND UP COMIC NEW YORK. This will be her second and third album so typical process like this. You know she would tell me about the project. This is where the venue is. And then we'll go down there and we'll scout the location to make sure that the recording environment is problem-free or if there are problems you know how do we mitigate then more around that And once we establish like the location is good. We'll get a good recording. Then we can start working with the house engineers and get discharged. You where to put mics a large part of that is the client so the client will. We've talked about it. She's called me. I want to show to kind of mimic or resemble these other shows initially give me some reference points of other comic acts And based off Battle Watch that and try and get an idea of what sonically the client is looking for so based off of that will arrange equipment amount that opera her like. Hey this is what this case like a stand up comic like these are. This is the way that the audience is GonNa React sorts going to sound like you sound okay. And then we'll do that and if she approves and we kind of go ahead and we start Mike Benue up and then typically once shows done. We'll handoff files. It's off the post production so Alabama handled post. I'll get the piles all the kind of sound notes from there. The event and then start to do a rub pass you know. Get all the pieces in place make kind of a rough past send it to the client for approval and no no come comeback with notes if any will implementers and they will kind of keep repeating the process approval so if somebody wanted to whether they wanted it to hire someone like yourself a solo creator. They wanted to do something. Do you have any recommendations of the type of equipment that they can get from kind of the basic stop. Stop for someone. WHO's doing it on their own to somebody? That's really looking to create this amazing sound experienced religion vice sure. The good news is probably all Muslims knows the cost of inner and set up a pretty decent recording setup at home is really really affordable so essentially what you really need to track. Recorder to microphones and then into mic stands and then kind of figure out. Do I want to record a table. Do I want a Mike hanging off the table or on the table and just kind of figure that out but the basic setup is really affordable if you get a really nice to have around you know thousand bucks or or less and then from there just gets exponentially more expensive than complicated kid at the upper end of the podcast setup or home recording studio if you would have the room that dedicated recording. It's been isolated. True for sound around can have some kind of Mike Cable routing system into a mixing board. And the whole of Mike's in a whole outboard gear to kind kind of colored down in control dynamics of the recording once you at that point the whole buildup and if somebody is looking talking to like work with anyone in the audio space to really work on this setup or understand production how do they go about finding someone in and finding the right person for them. I think the easiest way and the most common way to go through craigslist which I don't think yields results. I think the better way. Or the way that I've I've seen now is is very very specific facebook groups and they're so specific you can say jobs for audio people lifestyle or in productions out or podcast recording is very specific. And usually you can post up What your job would project is? Someone on their will capable likes to refer other people like it specialists these kinds of jobs and I found that that works pretty well. What works for the New York community? We've met before and I know that you originally were a chef in the new transferred certain to this audio engineering which is really interesting in itself. What is it that excites you about sound and audio as a whole I like about it being worse look side? It's a IT'S A. It's an invisible mio. It's not something that you can really directly measure like a camera image or something else. I think it's an an in a family of medium so there's a large part of it just called psycho acoustics inches the way that sound affects your perception and a lot of physical. It's something that I think is intangible but people can't really put their finger on it because they know when it's good and I like work in the medium that has kind of effect on people and if people want to learn more about what we're talking about or connect with you. Where could they do that online listen? WWW dot eight to nine nine. P R D x Dot Com and has won the contract to go and Some links to work interested. Thank you so much Eugene for being here and giving us awesome insight on just the improving sound quality and things that we can do with our voice skill so thank you. Yeah I know the pleasure. Thanks for having me. Thank you for listening to the inside voice podcast. We greatly appreciate you being a part of our community. And if you enjoyed this episode or you like the Podcast we would love. Love it if you would subscribe to follow like share. Leave a review of the show. If you have any questions comments feedback people. You WanNa see on the show things you WANNA learn. Feel free to send us an email at Carey at motive dot com that's K. E. R. At M. O. D. E. V. DOT COM and be sure to check us out online at Voice Summit Dot. Ai Thank you and we look forward to chatting with you next week.

New York City engineer Voice Summit Dot Eugene Kim National Geographic Division Mike Eugene US Netflix Gordon Kerrie Roberts Mike Benue Pika Giancarlo craigslist Eugene Cam facebook YORK Mike Cable Alabama
"voice" Discussed on The Voice Tech Podcast

The Voice Tech Podcast

06:32 min | 1 year ago

"voice" Discussed on The Voice Tech Podcast

"Alexa meet ups all over the country and all over the world and so in Columbus. We have a fairly active group. They're we hold it every month and every second Thursday I believe it is and we get a great eight to needing people come out and we just talk about different topics but but Columbus great place and there's a lot of startups here and it's also easy to get Really to anywhere Very interesting well shout out to everyone in Columbus and the and the area so talking about the product then what the typical problems that your your customers looking to solve through through these surveys. Obviously it's about data capture. They want to gain the opinions of their users. But what are the specific use cases that you've you've had requested so far and on how does voice how those in particular more voice particularly suited to terms of use cases. Sure yeah that's a great question. I think it's so early stages ages Carl with all this voice stuff the most The most that we've been seeing is companies really just wanted to experiment and seeing how voice can Supplement what they're already doing with other kinds of surveys. I think nobody says Oh. A voice is going to you know Disrupt completely the survey industry or everybody's runnings can switch over because there obviously are nuances with voice as far as having to listen to the question and it couldn't go along but there's other things about voice it makes it faster an easier. So what we see mostly as the market research companies in the survey companies and brands wanting to experiment with it and getting that That experience or we call it engagement of voice engagement with their audience or their participants or their users to basically Actually have a conversational interface. So for example we're taking it out to the ECOMMERCE and like subscription box companies and a lot a lot of times these companies will have a little card in there that says you know Texas key code to this number and they do those sorts of things but what they wanna do is really engage their customers so what they're building is a voice survey where you can just say. Open the bully make box and it basically will go ahead and give them a really great interaction and and they can use the real voice. That's one thing all that we've added is allowing you to have a real voice voice act because it really changes the experience so So so you're getting you're getting a lot of experimentation. And the the market research companies are really loving it. Just because it's a whole new way and think about this. Carl Voice we survey is it. Sounds like Oh. It's all brand new brand new but really if you think about it. The Ivy are the interactive voice response doing telephone surveys. After you may be the you know the cable company you have a have a call with them they say. Stay on the line for you. Know a voice survey and that's an IV are so it's interesting about it is. It's not that new new from that standpoint but now that we have Alexa and we have Google assistant and we have phones now. We're actually working on a an at base version of survey line. Where with your phone? You could just take the survey by voice. It's something that I think is prime for that because people are used to taking surveys by voice they. They're not the greatest. But if we can get the real neil voice in there and we can make quick and fast then. I think it's going to really have a good uptick absolutely He was saying that I I was remembering my experience. So try to pull up before before the show and one of the things you said it was about the length of ounces and I found it much easier experience with much less friction than and filling a paper based form the fact that you could give the answer so easily that you could give longer answers and much more much more in depth ounces and it was more engaging as well it was it was it is more fun and it and it kind of reminded me of the people who interview you like in a sharp on the on the street you interview and they will call you but then when you're in a conversation with them you have a much more engaged compensation than you would ever do if they just handed you a form to fill out a thought it was A. I was really impressed by actually like how how easy it was to create and and also how enjoyable it was to to take and I went through this. We'll hear it in a minute by went through the survey that I created a number of times and I didn't get bored of it and now is giving different answers each time. I thought it was really interesting. and talking about the features then. Could you give us a like a rundown of exactly the process that someone has to go through in order to create a survey on survey align sure so the way it works. is you go to surveys by voice dot com and you get logged in using. You know you can log in with Google or Amazon Zahn or however you want to get logged in and then you have your own account very similar to a survey monkey or something like that. And then there's a big button on the top that just says create survey now and when you click ticket it Ha- it asks you to fill out various things and we're working on actually templates pre configured surveys. That are already ready to go. So we'll have that soon but right now you just fill out an introduction and introduction is what the voice assistant will say to the person taking the survey like a welcome to the voice. Tech- survey Blah Blah Blah and and. Then it begins with questions so the questions that you fill out allow you to select from. I think it's five or six different question types. So when we talk about question types hypes think about things like a yes or no or a A scale a rating from one to five or one to ten a multiple choice question a free form question and we have one now that we added called mobile phone. which allows you to get the Get a mobile phone and do texting and so forth so we have these reconfigured question types so you select which type of question is and then you just type in the question like you would on survey monkey and then so you can create as many questions as you want and one thing. We just added About a month or so ago is logic branching so if they say yes you can move down to that question if they say no you go to that question obviously surveys need to have that so we added that fairly quickly another thing. That's really neat. Carl is Called a conditional response so if you say let's say it's a scale of one to five and somebody says one for your satisfaction. Let's say then you can come back and say oh sorry to hear that we'd like to help you out or whatever or if they say five you can say. Oh that's great to hear and you can actually have that Conditional Response and what's neat about the real voice it can be an actual you know voice actor and basically have them say those things so it's starting to sound sound like an actual conversation like you mentioned earlier so anyway to get that kind of fill out your for your survey by adding your questions at the end..

Carl Voice Columbus Alexa Google Texas Amazon
"voice" Discussed on This Week In Voice

This Week In Voice

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"voice" Discussed on This Week In Voice

"This is going to be interesting showed up to watch it i wanna follow up asked me about the echoed show competitors to google ruled out with another question you know in in what shall talk to your clients about in sort of how you advise individuals and businesses with how to approach voice i'm i'm curious just for myself if you've got a company that has a limited amount of money to spend on creating a voice presence are you going to tell them at this point as we head into 2018 that they need to not spend any money until they can be a until they can have a presence both voice only like in the original echo or if it's just voice just audio and uh a multi modal presence like with the echo showed with of these google devices or would you tell them to go one way or the other to focus more on the voice burst application with israel's or don't worry about that for now share with me how you just your thoughts on how you might advisory fly ahead bid has limited budget which way would you have them dough first of jury is now exciting i think them if you have william dimmed to budgets i would go was first in general because in the many device updated on his voice and look no screen at all at the moment it depends on did with only a product if you have a media products that has the you've always already strong presence in the video fuchs than you might consider doing visual ends voice services for your for the devices so just depends on what you're existing assets already it's it's very specific i'm but only on an other and i think that if you look at the market at the moment you have like i don't know what the ratio was by feeding is like it's ninety percent waste on d and ten percent addition or screens of etched.

israel fuchs google william voice services ninety percent ten percent
"voice" Discussed on This Week In Voice

This Week In Voice

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"voice" Discussed on This Week In Voice

"They've got a sitting in these offshore bank accounts and you'll make a couple of key acquisitions of companies doing interesting things in voice technology that can then be unique to the platform of that all will require nieto people to calm an end use siri and continue to be inhabit formation of of using siri syrian so to me that's that's their only road out otherwise there you know dead in the water but that's my opinion blerta king and tactical brita catches on his niagara fantastic allergy i have both in my android found in i signed the voice recognition sell nyj better than on my son in recognizes me so much more often on on harm and a lot of that to me is down tonight from technology than this far failed microphone technology that these home assistance have now is really really good and on your little found the microphones have not been able to to replicate the same performance that's interesting it's definitely believable it's interesting to think about if apple had any other name you know your place apple with renault film some companies here if you replace apple with like lenovo oh or something like that some company with far less cachet neon in brand equity built up i just think people would be far less forgiving a some of the stuff going on with them and it would be disc cast in such a different light a if to use this example against surrey at used at once if lenovo had series we wouldn't even be talking about it i mean okay well nice try.

bank accounts voice recognition apple lenovo nieto siri android nyj renault