19 Burst results for "Vitol"

"vitol" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:31 min | Last month

"vitol" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"And it's 6 30 a.m. here in London I'm Caroline Hepburn devastating images of alleged war crimes in Ukraine spur more calls for sanctions against Russia that is our top story this morning Also just breaking on the Bloomberg terminal from built the German newspaper Germany is to decide on expelling some Russian diplomats the decision expected this week according to that newspaper So that's one topic that we are going in depth on but also on the gender pay gap reporting here in the UK It's innovative but is it really making a difference Bloomberg's Charlie wells has been analyzing those reports first he joins us in just a moment Let's go to the markets though and give you some context then Asian equities at the moment are gaining although China is on holiday today So at the moment you've got the hang seng index up by 1.7% Chinese regulators have removed one of these hurdles for allowing the U.S. full access to audit so that pushes back the idea of Chinese companies being delisted in the U.S. as for the bond market It's really the focus on treasury curves We've got the curve edging marginally steeper ten year yields at the moment trading at I'll get you the figure two 41 so up by three basis points but more concerns around yield curve inversion giving the twos 30s have inverted fed ECB minutes this week oil from vitol oil feels cheaper than most would have predicted currently WTI crude features just under a $100 of our Brent crude at a 104 Those are the markets let's get over to Bloomberg's Hannah George.

Caroline Hepburn Charlie wells Ukraine Russia Bloomberg London Germany U.S. UK China vitol ECB Hannah George
"vitol" Discussed on Adventures in Finance: A Real Vision Podcast

Adventures in Finance: A Real Vision Podcast

03:24 min | 11 months ago

"vitol" Discussed on Adventures in Finance: A Real Vision Podcast

"Ryan wachner revision exacerbate beer. It's great to have you know we were talking a little bit before we started about our journeys into the crypto space. Tell us a little bit about your background well. I went to computer science school in canada and from there i've done a tour at some startups about ten years ago at amazon dot com. In from there. I went to a wonderful fintech. Startup in manhattan. Where i cut my teeth in in finance and while i was there i just my love for crypto which has been in the back burner for some years. Had really a flourished. And i just i had to get involved so i've been full-time in this space now for three years so tell us a little bit more about the details of how you got. Involved in. The crypto currency space. Well when i was in computer science school we were in a computer lab late one night and started playing around with bitcoin software. And because we were in school and in the thick of the theory it was immediately obvious to us that it was novel yet. We didn't buy any. We didn't save our wallets. It wasn't that time you know. Otherwise i probably. I probably have my job as bezos mega yacht behind me instead of instead of where we are today but having been bitten with the crypto bug fairly early on i had the advantage of always knowing. It wasn't a scam and that there was novelty and so over the years. As as bitcoin grew i still wasn't invested in a major way. And we we saw saw that more and more stakeholders were getting involved that these you know there is evidence that these open networks might be the future and then along came fella named vitol budarin and the talk had this idea that great. The novelty of bitcoin is that we can now make public computer network. That is a consistent reliable system even if up to half. The participants are malicious or incompetent in the teluk says. Let's blue app platform to that. Let's make an app platform. Were you can run financial applications different kinds applications. And let's put it on the blockchain and at the time. I was very lucky to to watch his launch webcast. The day of and i had an opportunity Which i did not take to participate in the crowd sale so i let the crowd sale sale. By and for a few years. I watched with great interest as theory and began to take shape and early apps were written in may net was launched and it was just so exciting and Eventually when i was working at a fintech in in manhattan on consumer consumer finance totally traditional nothing to do with crypto there was a catalyst than i realized. I'm an investor. I get into this. This is going to change the world. And i took action and i- heavily invested personally over over the following years. And now i've been I've been an active community member for several years. And it's just been an absolute joy ash to watch this space. Come together and those of us who are close to believe that is going to change..

Ryan wachner vitol budarin manhattan teluk amazon canada
"vitol" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

Deep Background with Noah Feldman

04:03 min | 11 months ago

"vitol" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

"Deep background. The show where we explore the stories behind the stories in the news. I'm noah feldman today. We have a remarkable guest and remarkable conversation to share with you here. On deep background. I was fortunate enough to have a wide ranging conversation with vitol. Bhutan vitelic is the co founder of ethereal which you may have heard of as the other extraordinarily popular crypto currency and a broader blockchain. That is a complex distributed computer network on which is possible to build all sorts of different applications. The tallec has contributed centrally to creating an enormous infrastructure and a tremendous amount of wealth and unsurprisingly. That's made him into a kind of folk hero of the crypto world. Oh and i may have forgotten to mention this. The tallec is all of twenty seven years. Old attack is a kind of public intellectual of the crypto currency and blockchain space. He has a blog where his posts are more like fully crafted. Well thought out essays this blog which you can find out vitales dossier turns out to be one of the most extraordinary resources you can imagine for anyone who like me is trying to make sense of this new and complex set of developments in the world around blockchain. What inspired me to ask vitale to come on. The show was a particular post or essay on his blog about the nature of legitimacy legitimacy is a central concept in government a central concept in constitutions a central concept in property law and i was stunned amazed to see how central tala can self made it to the whole structure of the blockchain and of cryptocurrency. I really wanted to delve deeper into his idea and to how it relates to the entire system of crypto and vitelic graciously agreed to come and talk about exactly that tom. Thank.

noah feldman vitol Bhutan vitale tom
"vitol" Discussed on World News Tonight with David Muir

World News Tonight with David Muir

01:47 min | 11 months ago

"vitol" Discussed on World News Tonight with David Muir

"Afghanistan to nation build and to his critics. The president asking late today. how many thousands. More americans. How many daughters and sons are you willing to risk. The president was pressed on the taliban already taking back. Small parts of that country afghan soldier surrendering. We have reported on the images. Right here. the president was asked what happens if kabul falls to the taliban. Abc's rachel scott at the white house to name president binding. Declaring the military mission in afghanistan will end on august thirty first saying it's not an america's interests to keep fighting the nearly twenty year war status quo was not an option staying met. Us troops taking casualties american men and women back in the middle of a civil war. The president pushing back on those who saying he's moving too fast. How many thousands. More americans daughters and sons. Were you willing to risk. Would you send your own son or daughter. I will not send another generation. Americans to war in afghanistan with no reasonable expectation of achieving different outcome biden says afghans control their own destiny. We did not go to afghanistan to nation bill and it's the right and the responsibility of afghan people alone to decide their future and how they want to run their country but the taliban is gaining ground more than a third of the country's districts now in their control if kabul false vitol about what will the united states about the question is how much of a threat to the united states of america and to allies is whatever results in terms of a government or an agreement. That's not judge will be made biden. Wasn't attic united.

taliban rachel scott afghanistan kabul Afghanistan america Abc white house biden
"vitol" Discussed on Shut Up & Sit Down

Shut Up & Sit Down

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"vitol" Discussed on Shut Up & Sit Down

"Think the role visit. Has this memory aspect where there's enough things that you can do with individual pieces and with some where you can often look at a board state and the important thing is trying to if you forget that. There's a certain card in the deck. The does a certain thing. Because there's a special king cod the whole court. You've got two of them. If you forget and then someone has the opportunity to take it. Can you know skew your whole game a little bit but a member but it's not like quarter vitol. Don't worry just push that from your mind. If you would like to google exactly how wrong. Thomas quarter spelt q. U. t. zero. I think raw visit is tom. Carney massing games zero repeat of feature. We did in twenty of top five new card games. You and i collecting games for that now. Our nami which among even tell people how to spell i spell it myself looking at our flam will look and now we're looking at raw visit. I think the the longlist could be gates foundation. Now i would. Let's not get into her if you punk house ago online with. What are we move on. Let's move onto another game. We played a tennis trail loon deadline. I got the running back has been replacing. Various words inboard game titles with the name delight for example mississippi delights royal delights lastly delights trail so tennis trial as a martin. Wallace game what he might go from brass and which was used the foundation ross birmingham. Maybe one of dan's favorite era games of all time martin wallace also made the best official discworld board game. It's now brinton combi. I'm sorry tennis trial. However is a game from two thousand eight that has been brought back in lush new edition in two thousand nine hundred one by alley cat games and it's good it's good. I think it's interesting. I think it's gonna be for some people listening to this podcast and not just the ones of you who already into a traditional cornish tin mining. So i came in mining. I was very excited big. If anyone's been watching. Paul dot com nicholas hold. The character pulled up in the tv series..

two martin wallace Wallace Paul dot com Thomas twenty thousand nine hundred Carney alley two thousand eight five new card games tom. martin cat games zero tennis tennis trial gates foundation one quarter vitol
"vitol" Discussed on Dots, Lines & Destinations

Dots, Lines & Destinations

03:15 min | 1 year ago

"vitol" Discussed on Dots, Lines & Destinations

"Vision of seconding trained in barstow california going. Now what all like. Harry like half jeff stumble into that mcdonald. What year is it still bar in antwerp liquidation so these are two airline art sauce dove art to airlines in europe are liquidating which has said very area. Antwerp was the second or third iteration of the airlines trying to fly between antwerp in london city. them us last january. I want to say on the europe. flush showed up humidity london but didn't get any further than that. Let's face it. we got fixed. This now post anyways wanted to london who'd onto antwerp on them. A trainer to train where the cool monorail thing was Anyway vitol where we're at all. Yeah so i got to fly a little hawker Hop back and forth and they actually applied for. There's lots of london city again. This coming year this coming winter season and announced on friday that they were out of business last friday afternoon and then similarly art is aer lingus regional so they props Fly some as british airways cityflyer similar I think actually out of city airport and they had some. Klm maybe one point on that trip as we're still active or stone contract but they had a deal in theory for a new investor to show up but that was contingent on financing in that investor. Secure the financing from a different thing. And then you know just all fell very quickly day. Officially closed up shop On a saturday morning. And it's not good because it's stewart was like having 'cause they offered stuff flakes between belfast birmingham airport. Yeah not the national stuff. It was like you know commuter props but all over the british isles sounds like some of the bigger city will be will be operated by mainline airlines so birmingham in berlin manchester. Yes the earliest backfill cornell has sort of a scramble jets but they're trying to figure it out and i think they are. Obviously this does not happen anymore That routes dead. But what happens when you after not basically not fly for eighteen months. sixteen months. Thinks it's weird things. Survive that with escort and the government support on that side of the hong has been less than stellar. I'm going to save our last topic for bonus show. I'm gonna talk a little bit about cutter and saint martin so you're patriot. Subscribers stick around for that if not you can support us. Unpatriotic get access to this bonus. Content jim falls on twitter at deaths. Lines that's dot com lead comment s question rant at us. We may reduce those rance. Ds their answer the best So yeah until next time Happy travels by ticker..

berlin eighteen months sixteen months europe twitter london saturday morning second saint martin last january friday birmingham barstow california last friday afternoon vitol Harry Antwerp cutter two airline belfast
"vitol" Discussed on How I Got Here with Dave Fiore

How I Got Here with Dave Fiore

05:09 min | 1 year ago

"vitol" Discussed on How I Got Here with Dave Fiore

"Was literally a high school senior report okay. How'd that little plastic stuff you get at the dime store walgreens or whatever yeah it was it was i had somebody do the artwork on it like literally handroll it okay anyway to turn into a book and i got my is being number so i was a real author now. Okay so you know. It was all just constantly hype up. What you're doing and promoting and all these ideas of mine from i went on anna show. I was so nervous. Oh my god. I couldn't even breathe. And when she was the oprah tallahassee at the time right she was the oprah of and i got up leaving where we filmed the show and she says just have such great posture. We teach me how to shut down the runway. My posture and i'm like of course. I have already been in new york. Been around eilly ford. And we'll let me but i'm intimidated. Because i'm now marcia dog with a book like really like what are you know about a buck. A write a book anyway. So i taught her and we became best friends since early. Two guess in two thousand and two you created nyc model actor bootcamp that skirt right so That was based on what you were doing earlier for. Eileen or tell me what that was about well. I basically basically emulated what she had done that i had experienced in college and her new. She didn't call a boot camp. But i tweaked to be a lot alike but very different in many ways so we would see all the agencies that my boot camp we would see the agencies but i would have them saying hotel and entertain them around the clock like literally. Run the clock ticks to broadway shows. She used to take us the limos. But then i started going to like danielle blues. And if anybody doesn't know who danielle. He's one of the most famous chefs in the entire world. He's fabulous became really great friends with danielle and i entertain at his restaurant but the camp started out new york city boot camp and i tweeted the first year. Had the idea. Well actually. I moved there when my son was five years old. We have three daughters and son okay. My three older daughters were they just probably twelve nine. Eight and little dane was four five and a lady the modeling convention that my family had to go to because i was competing with my models in this convention. This woman saw little jane my son and said oh my god i have to have him in new york and this woman was surely grant i found out. She passed away last night and she. I was watching the voice last night and nick. Jonas is one of the judges. Shirley founded the jonas brothers and i looked up charlie. Vitol turn about a year and a half. She had been ninety eight years old. I talked to her before the virus. And i found out she passed away last night. I was just devastated but anyway..

Shirley new york charlie Jonas danielle Eileen danielle blues three daughters last night first year two Eight Vitol ninety eight years old about a year and a half nick three older daughters one jane dime store walgreens
"vitol" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

07:42 min | 1 year ago

"vitol" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Our twenty six year coverage of cas. I'm dave grave line. Welcome back into tomorrow into tomorrow's coverage of cas. Virtual edition is brought to you by epa twenty twenty one tech hub for product. I and next gen incites checkout. Ifa dash berlin dot com by vitol. It's your car. keep it that way. By catalyst total protection for your devices like only catalysts can design visit catalyst case dot com. Know that we've got three weeks worth of coverage bringing you some of the latest and greatest announced and introduced at the. Es do stay tune from the all digital cas. Our next guest company manufacturers a robotic companion designed to help seniors overcome social isolation and cognitive decline. He is the business development director of a company called carry. Clever richard marshall richard. Welcome into tomorrow. Thanks for coming on how are you. I'm very well. Thank says it's a great opportunity to speak to you thanks. Well it's a pleasure to have you because what you're doing is of innovative and certainly can help a whole lot of folks tell me for a moment a little bit about Care clever as a company start with the company so Cameras a french company is conceived and the robot was invented in france and in fact it's manufactured their the moment myself in based In massachusetts of vp business development here in the states and it's On thrilled to be able to let you know a little bit more about cuties companion device for seniors who are too often is located. Oh for sure. And we've talked about that on the show a lot and how technology makes a big difference especially for our seniors. But for all of us and i can tell Watching you on video here on the zoom interview that cutie c. u. t. I is the name of the robot by care clever. Now let's get into the robot itself Tell me about cutie. Look i'm what. What am i do is. I'll just share a little video. While i while i talk i all right. Kitty is autonomous marble fully voice controlled companion device specifically a hundred percent made within four seniors. So this is not a generic robotic platform looking for something to do. This is the exact opposite actually dive so it looked it. Looks like richard. I was gonna save richard. It looks like cutie. Actually encouraging An elderly lady to engage with it to do something. I mean i. It looked like she was rubbing a feather around her face. Or something probably instructions from the robot to have her engage in some different activity and smiling and interacting in. Interestingly dave. it's it's a little bit of a wolf in sheep's clothing. Ud because really what we're all about is connecting humans to other humans. So most what you're seeing now people engaging with other people and seniors for reasons as why as broad as covert with a lack of transportation remote family you know they're just not having enough interaction with other of human beings and we wanted to do something about well and it appears that you are doing something about the need for robotic companion. I think for seniors especially more important now than ever before especially because of the pandemic and how many have not been able to see family. And i mean i'm sure the ability to also tell a commute with their doctors is also part of cutie. Yeah so if you can look at it. The pill is based on listen connection so we curate a calendar of live in remote but live imprison activities. So things like taichi exercise in the like. It's grateful family to tell the president and the robot autonomous mobile so the family and the senior can say cutie. Come to the catch. That kitty comes to the senior the heaven engagement afterwards. It would go back like but would to its. Yes go back and recharge or state charge exacting terrific and do you have a price yet in terms of availability here in the us and is there a a cost established yet for folks that are thinking boy. That'd be perfect for mom or dad or both or or their facility. Even yes it's a two prong answer. Really dave There's the cost of the device outrage and we're working on a Senior activity is service for one of a bit of fries on which be a month to month basis. I mean Outright it's around six thousand dollars to sell to to institutional customer and we're looking at Monster monster subscription models as well for the more Consumer level terrific. I mean i can see where this can help a lot of people and certainly from an institution standpoint Where cutie can be used for more than one or two individuals. It makes a whole lot more sense financially so they should look into that. You can visit cutie. C. u. t. I dot ie slash e. n. for english richard marshall. Thanks so much for spending a few minutes with us continued. Good luck. let us know when it's very readily available and we'll certainly share that with our audience off. It's our pleasure more coming up. Next hour is our twenty. Sixth year of cas coverage continues. I'm dave grave line right here on the advanced media network boy. Welcome into tomorrow with dave grave. Line the interactive network program with the latest in high tech products and services and the experts. Who bring them to you. This is into tomorrow. Here's dave grave line once again. This week it's cas. It's our twenty sixth year on the air and our twenty-sixth year covering the big consumer electronic. Show i'm dave grave line delighted to have you with us. We are of course doing three weeks. Worth of cas coverage talking to as many people as we can that are introducing very cool new products and services things available today and into tomorrow. So here's the deal. We've got most every interview on video as well so you can see the products were talking about. You can see the people we're talking to so just visit at your leisure into tomorrow. Dot com and check out all of our three weeks worth of cas coverage again at into tomorrow dot com our coverage of the all digital edition of cas is brought to you. In part by install essentials interfacing the past present and future by epa extended space the virtual extension of epo on demand streaming matchmaking and digital product demonstrations extended dot. Ifa dash berlin dot com and by. I'll call communications for small business phones. Just tell them. I'll call visit. Is l. e. call dot com our next virtual. Cas guest is an innovator of digital health solutions for detection and management of cardiovascular disease and they're doing some really unique things the founder and ceo of a company called hd. Medical is arvin. Tia garon tia garage. I hope i did that right to your garage..

france twenty-sixth year vitol This week richard marshall twenty sixth year richard Sixth year today tomorrow twenty both Dot com Kitty twenty six year more than one hundred percent two prong four seniors one
"vitol" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady

Red, Blue, and Brady

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"vitol" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady

"So first responders law enforcement and some of those populations over lapped quite a bit right and it isn't necessarily their identity with those groups that bestow the risks so much as just the access to comfort with with the most lethal method for suicide. Now that's the fire officers. I picture right. So you can expand beyond that and talk about increased risk amongst veterinarians who are gonna use vitol in their suicide attempts right. That's not as relevant to this conversation with the ideas that the folks most likely to die by suicide in america are the folks who have ready access to comfort with methods with actually a highly saudi rate. They're actually likely to cause death. Folks don't realize it's only two three percent of intentional overdoses resulting in death whereas eighty five to ninety five percent of firearm suicide. Him stephen and a much. Higher percentage of phenobarbitol overdoses rights veterinarians. Have this high suicide death rate instead of just attempt rate and so it's it's really about who is equipped to act on their misery. Not who's most miserable. But who has the ability to do something about these thoughts that aren't necessarily more pervasive or pernicious than other folks suicidal thoughts. They just happened to be paired with this access in this comfort. And so i think when most folks close your eyes on thinking about that method that access component. They're just thinking about the misery they think. Well who's the people who are most likely to be miserable. Niklas rising think of that. And those folks deserve attention again trying to deflect away from that and just highlighting that we so often miss a large swath of the folks who actually likely to die by suicide in fact our entire suits prevention of healthcare system is designed to wait for someone to raise their hand and say i need help and then we hopefully direct them. The evidence based care When the reality is we mentioned earlier. Is that a lot of these folks. Don't wanna see care. And they don't wanna tell you their thoughts and that's why we all say we never saw coming. We just think about it the wrong way and with firearms being as lethal as they are as a means. It's not a case. Where sally if someone just something they shouldn't have. There's time generally call nine one and two to manage that way. Whereas i believe firearms are there. Overwhelmingly lethal yeah. It's eighty five to ninety five percent of firearm suicides attempts result in death again compared to that two to three percent figure for for overdose. So it's it's it's really a huge contrast and what's really tragic about that is seventy percent of folks who saw five in attempt temple never attempt again right and so second chances obviously matter but folksy. He's a highly recommend that. Don't get a second chance almost ever and you can see that in fact that i've tried to recruit samples research studies of folks who survived firearm suicide attempts. And the fact is it's almost impossible because there are so few it's it's it's even difficult to study on that front. And so just a uniquely sort of rare group of folks and hard region it highlights the fact that the method really made such a difference in the outcome. I wanna make sure that we give people a call to action. You know something that. At least they can do if they're listening to this and they're starting to get concerned or if they had concerns and that's why they're listening to this in the first place so i'm wondering you know. What would you recommend in terms of just general policies especially for folks who have firearms in their home. Yeah and so. This point is not exclusive firearms. It's the it's the primary focus in the us. You can look across the globe at crossley at this and the ideas when you are able to either reduce the league of america d- or reduce the access to the method if it's a highly lethal and highly economies method geographic area. You're going to lower the rate and so you can see that. In the fact that when they detoxify domestic gas in the uk in the mid twentieth century the suicide rate went down forty percent when they banned the most lethal brands of pesticides in sri lanka last couple decades their nationals. Who are down by fifty percent right and so it's not the same story in every single location. It's the story that maps onto that location in the us stories firearms because it's more than half the suicide deaths right. It's a top fifteen cause of death in its own right in the us as firearm suicide. And so there's not one single way to do it but it's a you can't really make a firearm less lethal it is what it is and so it's about limiting access in this case and that doesn't mean a gun grabbed. That doesn't mean you know. Abolish the second amendment. But i mean such a couple of things people when when we're doing lethal needs counseling and we talk about generally storing firearms more safety from suicide prevention standpoints. I mean story. Them unloaded separate from ammo in a secure location like unsafe or lock box and quite frankly ideally ellsworth By on it so trigger. Lock lock right but not everybody's gonna be opened it that whole some cascade of interventions and we quickly don't have data showing which one which combo is the most effective but the other thing

america stephen
"vitol" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"vitol" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"You are here to discuss the peabody essex. Museum latest exhibition the women who revolutionized fashion two hundred and fifty years of design as the title suggests. This is not by any means a small topic. Can you tell us about the exhibit and a little bit about the inspiration behind its creation. Sure absolutely <hes>. So this exhibition actually is a partnership that we did our we're doing i should say <hes>. With the consortium and then hand in the netherlands and it is an extension of a show. They put on called them. Vitol's strong women and fashion and their show then travelled to belgium and we are essentially kind of the third venue. But it's. It's an interesting collaboration because it's not an identical repaying of their show so they're installation on which was was beautiful and spanned multiple rooms in multiple galleries and our show is going to be designed a little bit differently <hes>. And part of reason that we were very excited to partner with consortium is that they're so accommodating on really great partners they allowed us to borrow sixty objects from their election which was huge for us because of course the european collection <unk>. Phenomenal works that represent into the big european designers for which <unk> doesn't have that much representation and but of course being in the united states. We really wanted to draw out of some additional stories that pertain to designers the twentieth century. But also american designers <hes>. For whom there wasn't as much representation in their show the we've been able to augment <hes>. With twenty five works from our own collection some of which are recent acquisitions and <hes>. We borrowed a few pieces from the mfa in boston. We brought to pieces from the chicago history museum and then we're working with <hes>. To private collectors. So there are a hundred eight mannequins in the show. It's a really big show and it does run the gamut. We say two hundred and fifty years. It's not of course the comprehensive look but it does span that timeframe and so why an exhibition dedicated to i mean. This probably goes without saying what inspired you to do. An exhibition dedicated just to women designers. Well that's a great question <hes>. It actually takes me back to a time in chicago. Because i was working at the post. Your museum as the custom curators there and of course as a social history museum we were definitely thinking about a twenty twenty s. A hallmark year for the anniversary of the ratification of the nineteenth amendment. And so even then this back in two thousand seventeen <hes>. By partner just kapoor. And i were already beginning to catacomb the collection and look to see what we might do in honor of women. Because of museum itself was looking to do a year of women based programming and exhibitions. My life changed. Because i. I moved tuesday when massachusetts became the vashon. Tech's curator the peabody essex museum. Is i kind of put that idea dressed. Rest until i was scrolling through instagram. One evening saw me ho. Hey who's curator at the museum post image of stack of books and i noticed all the names on the books. And they were all women designers. She said something pithy like coming soon. And you know a strong women fashion. And so i sent her a direct message and i said hey. Tell me more what is going on. What are you doing when he planning <hes>. And she told me about the show. And i said oh. That's really interesting and said you'll have you ever worked with the us institution before she said. No we haven't <hes>. What would you be interested. And she said yes so. I went and saw the expedition. And i came back and i spoke with our colleagues here in just so happened that we had a are scheduled for twenty twenty and <hes>. We really been thinking at that point about doing anything dedicated to him in and so it all fell into place <hes>. We were slated to open in may but of course because of covid that did not happen. <hes>. but again because we have great partners they were very flexible. And now we're opening number twenty first.

peabody essex museum chicago history museum kunst museum cassidy zachary elizabeth keck salem massachussetts Quant essex pem Lucille gordon bonnie cashin Vitol boston belgium partner Phenomenal united states madeleine
The Women Who Revolutionized Fashion with Petra Slinkard

Dressed: The History of Fashion

04:28 min | 1 year ago

The Women Who Revolutionized Fashion with Petra Slinkard

"You are here to discuss the peabody essex. Museum latest exhibition the women who revolutionized fashion two hundred and fifty years of design as the title suggests. This is not by any means a small topic. Can you tell us about the exhibit and a little bit about the inspiration behind its creation. Sure absolutely So this exhibition actually is a partnership that we did our we're doing i should say With the consortium and then hand in the netherlands and it is an extension of a show. They put on called them. Vitol's strong women and fashion and their show then travelled to belgium and we are essentially kind of the third venue. But it's. It's an interesting collaboration because it's not an identical repaying of their show so they're installation on which was was beautiful and spanned multiple rooms in multiple galleries and our show is going to be designed a little bit differently And part of reason that we were very excited to partner with consortium is that they're so accommodating on really great partners they allowed us to borrow sixty objects from their election which was huge for us because of course the european collection Phenomenal works that represent into the big european designers for which doesn't have that much representation and but of course being in the united states. We really wanted to draw out of some additional stories that pertain to designers the twentieth century. But also american designers For whom there wasn't as much representation in their show the we've been able to augment With twenty five works from our own collection some of which are recent acquisitions and We borrowed a few pieces from the mfa in boston. We brought to pieces from the chicago history museum and then we're working with To private collectors. So there are a hundred eight mannequins in the show. It's a really big show and it does run the gamut. We say two hundred and fifty years. It's not of course the comprehensive look but it does span that timeframe and so why an exhibition dedicated to i mean. This probably goes without saying what inspired you to do. An exhibition dedicated just to women designers. Well that's a great question It actually takes me back to a time in chicago. Because i was working at the post. Your museum as the custom curators there and of course as a social history museum we were definitely thinking about a twenty twenty s. A hallmark year for the anniversary of the ratification of the nineteenth amendment. And so even then this back in two thousand seventeen By partner just kapoor. And i were already beginning to catacomb the collection and look to see what we might do in honor of women. Because of museum itself was looking to do a year of women based programming and exhibitions. My life changed. Because i. I moved tuesday when massachusetts became the vashon. Tech's curator the peabody essex museum. Is i kind of put that idea dressed. Rest until i was scrolling through instagram. One evening saw me ho. Hey who's curator at the museum post image of stack of books and i noticed all the names on the books. And they were all women designers. She said something pithy like coming soon. And you know a strong women fashion. And so i sent her a direct message and i said hey. Tell me more what is going on. What are you doing when he planning And she told me about the show. And i said oh. That's really interesting and said you'll have you ever worked with the us institution before she said. No we haven't What would you be interested. And she said yes so. I went and saw the expedition. And i came back and i spoke with our colleagues here in just so happened that we had a are scheduled for twenty twenty and We really been thinking at that point about doing anything dedicated to him in and so it all fell into place We were slated to open in may but of course because of covid that did not happen. but again because we have great partners they were very flexible. And now we're opening number twenty first.

Vitol Chicago History Museum The Netherlands Belgium MFA Boston Peabody Essex Museum Kapoor United States Chicago Massachusetts Tech
The Women Who Revolutionized Fashion with Petra Slinkard

Dressed: The History of Fashion

05:30 min | 1 year ago

The Women Who Revolutionized Fashion with Petra Slinkard

"Seven billion people in the world. We all have one thing in common every day. We all get dressed. Welcome to trust the history of fashion. Podcasts are we explore the who what of why we wear. We are fashion historian and your host april kellyanne and cassidy zachary will hello dressed listeners. Today we are very excited to feature an exhibition. That does something that you know. We love to do on dressed. And that is celebrating the work of bad ass ladies from their history and today. And that's right because today we are welcoming the peabody essex museum fashion and textile curator pitcher sling card to the show to discuss. The exhibition. Made it the women who've revolutionized fashion and as the museum's website says through more than one hundred works made it celebrates the stories of women who revolutionized many aspects of the fashion industry and traces how these efforts parallel history of women's global struggle for equity and opportunity exhibition is actually collaboration between pem and the kunst museum didn't hog in the netherlands and it features clothing from both of these museums collections. As well as from private and public collections and so from every designer from elizabeth keck lead to lady. Lucille gordon to madeleine to bonnie cashin and low mary. Quant and then all the way to more contemporary designers like rei kawakubo Irishman herpin gina. Kuma you do not want to miss this exhibition. It actually just opened in its on view until march twenty twenty one yes and alas we will not be able to make it to salem massachussetts in person this year especially right now so what better way to celebrate this exhibition them by being joined by his co. curator patriot. Welcome to the show. He had show welcome to dress. It's such a pleasure to have you here today thank you. I'm excited to be with you. So you are here to discuss the peabody essex. Museum latest exhibition the women who revolutionized fashion two hundred and fifty years of design as the title suggests. This is not by any means a small topic. Can you tell us about the exhibit and a little bit about the inspiration behind its creation. Sure absolutely So this exhibition actually is a partnership that we did our we're doing i should say With the consortium and then hand in the netherlands and it is an extension of a show. They put on called them. Vitol's strong women and fashion and their show then travelled to belgium and we are essentially kind of the third venue. But it's. It's an interesting collaboration because it's not an identical repaying of their show so they're installation on which was was beautiful and spanned multiple rooms in multiple galleries and our show is going to be designed a little bit differently And part of reason that we were very excited to partner with consortium is that they're so accommodating on really great partners they allowed us to borrow sixty objects from their election which was huge for us because of course the european collection Phenomenal works that represent into the big european designers for which doesn't have that much representation and but of course being in the united states. We really wanted to draw out of some additional stories that pertain to designers the twentieth century. But also american designers For whom there wasn't as much representation in their show the we've been able to augment With twenty five works from our own collection some of which are recent acquisitions and We borrowed a few pieces from the mfa in boston. We brought to pieces from the chicago history museum and then we're working with To private collectors. So there are a hundred eight mannequins in the show. It's a really big show and it does run the gamut. We say two hundred and fifty years. It's not of course the comprehensive look but it does span that timeframe and so why an exhibition dedicated to i mean. This probably goes without saying what inspired you to do. An exhibition dedicated just to women designers. Well that's a great question It actually takes me back to a time in chicago. Because i was working at the post. Your museum as the custom curators there and of course as a social history museum we were definitely thinking about a twenty twenty s. A hallmark year for the anniversary of the ratification of the nineteenth amendment. And so even then this back in two thousand seventeen By partner just kapoor. And i were already beginning to catacomb the collection and look to see what we might do in honor of women. Because of museum itself was looking to do a year of women based programming and exhibitions. My life changed. Because i. I moved tuesday when massachusetts became the vashon. Tech's curator the peabody essex museum. Is i kind of put that idea dressed. Rest until i was scrolling through instagram. One evening saw me ho. Hey who's curator at the museum post image of stack of books and i noticed all the names on the books. And they were all women designers. She said something pithy like coming soon. And you know a strong women fashion.

April Kellyanne Cassidy Zachary Essex Museum Kunst Museum Elizabeth Keck Lucille Gordon Bonnie Cashin Low Mary The Netherlands Vitol Madeleine Gina Salem Chicago History Museum Belgium MFA United States Boston Kapoor
"vitol" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"vitol" Discussed on KGO 810

"Com Greg Dru G P A. L S T Greg Pal last dot last. It's been great talking with you, Greg. And I'll be watching for you this afternoon. Thanks so much for being with us. You're welcome. Bye bye. That's Greg Palestine Path. At the White House press secretary Kayleigh Mcenany says President Trump wants all schools to open on time in school when he says open he means open and full kids being able to attend each and every day at their school science do not stand in the way of this. But in Chicago, the union representing teachers in the nation's third largest school district want to begin the semester with online classes. And correspondent Clayton Nevel reports. Some Texas educators have their own ideas about an opening timeline. The Texas Education Agency could allow local health officials to delay the start of in person classes, which have been approved to start next month. Dallas County Medical Director Phil Wang says the recent uptick in hospitalizations and Dev's can't be ignored. Wall Street drifted to a lower close after mixed reports on the economy, including one showing that Layoffs continue at a steady pace down, lost 135 points. The S and P Slade 11. I'm Evan Hey, Nick News update Soon it's 1 31 I'm Paul Rodgers. This report, sponsored by Rocket Mortgage Sunnyvale schoolteacher is leading a campaign urging the county health officer to keep the school's shut down until the pandemic is under control. Chandru Vitol, a speech language pathologist at Vargas Elementary, says.

Greg Dru G Greg Palestine Path Greg Pal Greg President Trump Rocket Mortgage Sunnyvale Chandru Vitol Texas Education Agency Texas Paul Rodgers Clayton Nevel Vargas Elementary Chicago Kayleigh Mcenany Dallas County Medical Phil Wang press secretary White House officer
"vitol" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"vitol" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Reading how. Oh wonderful girl Jimmy. Why if I would ten years younger? That's the way I feel a little something. I've been meaning to take up with you know if I were your doctor. I'd I'd advise you to slow down a little. Take it easy ridiculous ridiculous. I never felt barrel. Come now sooner or later. Everyone reaches an age when he has to retire. Oh no no I mean retire from participating in some the more strenuous activities that a younger person might not since. Maybe I've heard you give the same advice. Many elderly patients anyway anyway. Let's leave it for the present. We can talk about it this evening at the Special Board meaning board meeting Still planning to have it Dan. What's your aw why not Vitol Jimmy No reading at All? Why shouldn't they have? That's the way they feel. Uh I know exactly yeah you feel Glaspie and I'm very sorry for you but after all what can I do about it you're just as ungrateful as that Border Regions Your. I've nearly killed myself all week. Long trying to show him. I'm fitna something besides retirement. But they can no no they. They don't care still going to hold their confounded meeting tonight. Sit there and gloat while I'm drummed off the style. Oh yes assets also dramatic just just like Khan founded. If I were flat on a back dying you huge Stan. Then said was just like the. What's the matter? No if they thought I was dying maybe they might call thing I of course they why did they wouldn't have the heart to retire. Retire man it was only one step from. Hello Dr Kildare Doctor Leslie. I was one of Ood to the matter with you. terrific pains Jimmy over anywhere. Longs Oh liver. Wow we better get you to check you over. Came on suddenly Jimmy Serious Awesome afraid who sorry about the border regions tonight as well. I'd better let Karuna. Oh we'll get to work on. You see what you can do for. You know what I can do for you Phony Kildare Dr Karoo doctor. Gillespie is just been taken. Neil get something for you Dr. Gillespie allows Lou. I don't know how serious it.

Jimmy Dr Kildare Doctor Leslie Glaspie Dr. Gillespie Dr Karoo Special Board Khan Neil Lou
"vitol" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"vitol" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"Could be a little bit more of a question Mark over market direction by the fourth quarter. Shia. Buzzer. Vitol Vitale groups it exclusively to guy Johnson in London. Ed, bow is with me senior commodities analysts at Amherst NBD listening to Russell hardy. Welcome to the show listening to Russell. He's obviously concerned about the those issues that onset which is by Venezuela, which is about OPEC which concerns you the most OPEC supply cuts or the Venezuela situation within the OPEC supply cuts are very well. Telegraphs message for the markets the American to interstate and to accept them, and then it has to sort of price accordingly based on how well those cuts are being adhered to. So Sadie Arabia's been cutting quite heavily, right? And so that's affecting their flows out to refineries our customers an Asian markets. The Venezuela issue is in in in unknown for the market. I think most of seventeen two thousand eighteen ruin is watching Venezuela. And we certainly were as a major supply risk. As production was just deteriorating. Thanks to years of neglect and investment in the oil sector the US sanctions. Although they had been talked about in two thousand eighteen they did come as a bit of a shock because this market tightening more than perhaps had been anticipated on top of those supply cuts from OPEC countries that Saudi has done the heavy lifting the compliance rate. I think within OPEC was around the mid eighties. Consi- in ju on its comply, and it's over compliance. It does look like based on past performance continue to do that. So it continue to cut at a higher rate than they're expected to this time. We've also seen the also cutting more sort of over delivering on the terms of the deal. And really what they have to do is is keep those heavy cuts in place. Just because other members of OPEC aren't really coming up to scratch in terms of their compliance rates. You look at for instance, Iraq or Algieria they're really not hitting their targets anywhere close. Okay. There's probably reticence looking at the market of were seven straight week in a row where we've seen the hedge funds go long into this market. And how does he not kind of pace since two thousand seventeen so market. Really is stocked up in anticipation of the China USD? Listen dip, bats with baked in this market. Yes. Certainly looking at the oil market bills. When you stretch it out across all commodities industrial commodities as well. They're all. Basically, I think counting on some form of a supply deal or a trade deal between China and the US coming to the fore over.

OPEC Venezuela Russell hardy Vitol Vitale US guy Johnson Sadie Arabia Mark Ed London Iraq China Consi USD
"vitol" Discussed on Russia Rising

Russia Rising

04:46 min | 3 years ago

"vitol" Discussed on Russia Rising

"Nondescript apartment buildings and offices, and there's one building year that's four stories tall that has a large for rent sign hanging in the window. And if not for the Russian translator who is accompanying me here, I would never guess that. This was the home of the internet research agency, the official name for the now notorious Russian troll factor. The Kremlin troll is a known thing in Russia. The American and Canadian it's weren't prepared for it. I'm Jeff simple. The Europe bureau chief for global news. And this is Russia rising as a Canadian correspondent based in Europe. I do a lot of reporting on Russia. It's a world superpower, of course, hugely important country. And it's one that's not afraid to throw its weight around on the world stage and Russia is constantly being accused of behaving badly of meddling hacking doping invading neighboring countries, even assassinating former spies, but despite all of that coverage and constant attention. I think Russia is also deeply misunderstood by many people in the western world including Canada. So on this podcast. We'll try to piece together the puzzle separate fact from fiction and unravel the mystery that is Russia with help from those who know her best and on this episode. We're going hunting for trolls not. The kind that live under bridges and carry large clubs. I'm talking about Russian internet trolls credited, these using the internet to manipulate political opinion can Russia, according to one full the Russian internet troll, the United States to like the kind accused of interfering in the 2016 US presidential campaign. Facebook told congress Russian trolls hosted eighty thousand items from January two thousand fifteen this August two thousand seventeen rushing reaching more than twenty million in the United States. In fact, this evening new report about Russia's efforts to stir up racial conflict right now inside the United States. But how do those trolls actually work and come on? Is it really possible for a group of people on the internet to affect an election result in a different country and besides the United States, which we've heard a lot about. I also wanted to know if. Other countries specifically Canada are targeted to. So I came to Saint Petersburg to ask a guy who knows firsthand what these trolls are up to you. See Vitale best ball of used to be one of them. Vitol, Ian, I meet at a park in Saint Petersburg. And we find a bench where we can sit down and chat. He did not want to meet near his house because he said he was worried that we might inadvertently identify the location where he lives and that he could then be targeted for speaking to us about his experience at the troll factory. And it's hard to blame the guy for being worried. We tried reaching out to a few other former professional trolls who used to work at the trophy factory and have since quit and spoken publicly about their experiences, but most of them don't want to talk anymore. They say they've been threatened with criminal charges. Accused of being an American spy, for example, another one we spoke to had a family member fired from their job after he did an interview and batali himself has actually done. Some media interviews before and paid the price. He says he's been threatened with espionage charges and had his reputation smeared by. Stories produced by the Kremlin controlled TV channels in Russia. They accused him of being a drug addict, for example. But despite all of that, he bravely agreed to meet with us and speak to us about his experience. Gave it a lot of fun. But I believe it's important for me to tell my story. No. The TV channels like yours report on exit. Now, I've got to admit batali doesn't exactly look like a Russian troll. I mean, he's a skinny young guy wearing his hat backwards. He's got a stuttered bracelet on his wrist and more than a few tattoos running up. His arm of words written in Russian seraphic when I asked him about the tattoos. He rolls up his sleeve and shows me that he's actually got the face of a Russian opposition leader drawn on his shoulder. So not exactly the pro Kremlin. Propagandist..

Russia United States Saint Petersburg batali Canada Europe Facebook official Ian bureau chief Vitale Vitol
"vitol" Discussed on X96

X96

03:55 min | 3 years ago

"vitol" Discussed on X96

"Have I have a disc in my bag waiting. It's opening next week standing all just gonna ask that opens it up next Friday at the tower Broadway, I believe, okay? Just wanted to know what are you know, about Sundance some previews? I've I've seen a few documentaries. I I can't talk too much about them yet because of reviews or embargoed until their first screening at Park City as usual as usual, though, the documentary frequently the strongest part of the of the program. Yeah. And and I can and I will be recommending a couple of them the program looks very tight. The biggest the biggest controversy at the moment is the last thing they added to the to the program is this four hour docu series about Michael Jackson. Oh, yeah. A couple of a couple of people who accuse him of abusing abusing them when they when they were kids now, it's docu series that will be like on a net. Flicks. HBO HBO HBO later this spring, but they're gonna show all four hours of it at the festival. I talked to somebody at Sundance who said that they're they're getting all manner of hate mail for this. She said, she's learned swear words and more languages than she could imagine. Because there is a large contingent of Michael Jackson fans who who do not want to believe he could have done anything, Ben. And the fact that one one time when he was put on trial. He got acquitted because they couldn't make the case is evidence of. Oh, yeah. He never did anything ever bad just that. Oh, yeah. Yeah. So and and and there is a hashtag boycott Sundance festival. The whole festival the whole thing. It's just. Yeah. Utah locals today is the day noon to eight individual tickets, go on sale Utahns get first crack before everybody else buys individual tickets, get online. See what's still see what's still available after the pass holders? And so on who've gotten there. But you get first crack before everybody else gets individual tickets today from noon, eight show on Sundance website, are they showing movies? I know they're showing movies a Park City and Salt Lake are they showing any in Ogden again not this year. They they they they discontinued the Ogden screenings last year two years ago. All right. Yeah. Okay. Let's well all we have is glass. So it's two and a half two stars with a with an asterisk stars in an asterisk. Yeah. They all look like stars away. I've written them those the problem next week besides STAN and Ollie. What are we? We have the kid who would be king a British kids movie with artery and stuff. With Trump Tower and Patrick Stewart, and the end any circuses son is the star. Yeah. Yeah. So the biggie destroyer is possibly opening. This is this is a Nicole Kidman detective drama and serenity which is a new are thriller with Anne Hathaway Vitol, and Matthew mcconaughey has schmo. Thank you very much. Sean means. Crash eastbound US forty this is in summit county just north of SR to forty eight crash. Northbound fifty six hundred west at new Bingham highway in west Jordan, the right shoulder affected, their crash northbound US eighty nine this is by deer creek in Wasatch county crash northbound I fifteen main street in Lehi right shoulder affected there. And looking at our message stream nothing new there. But if you see something new and want to share it three three nine eight six Boehner's round two coming up here. Your candidates motor candidate number one. I've had severe back pain. Why didn't I think of this cure Boehner candidate number two? They didn't want me working there anymore and Boehner candidate number three gun nuts and cannabis. All right Boehner's for round two.

Sundance Michael Jackson Boehner HBO Ogden US Trump Tower Park City Salt Lake Nicole Kidman Utah Patrick Stewart Wasatch county cannabis Anne Hathaway Vitol STAN Sean Matthew mcconaughey summit county four hours
"vitol" Discussed on The Final Furlong Podcast

The Final Furlong Podcast

03:54 min | 3 years ago

"vitol" Discussed on The Final Furlong Podcast

"The handicap rousing him on one hundred forty nine I think that's a fair reflection of his form and for a novice to be rated that highly when he jumps his weapon. His he does. Those are the kind of the good race. Is you want to be covered? He is one hundred percent the ROY favors. I assume he's going to roll because he was in the big race on. He was on the big races. Well at Laurie the classic and they took him out of that. So I seriously don't to run a he's definitely the one to be. There's a couple in there. I'd like to take on if they do run. Okay. Carla. I'm not sure if he would run on on the potential ground, but he is a track. Now, I think this horse it. Hey Hayes because he looks clumsy. And so to me he is got loads of ability, boss. I could just see him haven the track if he runs steely addition won't on heavy ground chips on the last day is now we're gonna call them around on a much quicker track on good ground. He's when I take on his well. So I don't know. I think the the one I'm probably most interested in at the corn prices there. Would be in Williams's king of realms who who impress me when he wanted ask on November. And then he was sent off seven to four behind Rockies treasure the last day at Doncaster, boss. I think that race at Ascott left. Its Mark find being honest because he he was beating after a fencer to Irini walls. When when this lot wanted ask on his chasing debut. He really impressed with how we Jones he traveled through the race. There was a look like there was a big injection of pays Coleman. From swindling boughten up to up to the top of that before they turn into the straight. And he bet off the horse in third and then laid on E fended off spiders, vice spiders, vice maybe is a horse who doesn't want to win Bosh either way. I'm still impressed at the to those Cam ten lengths clear the rest, he'd be the value Vitol no-one what's gonna run here, which is a bit of a pain in the ass. Bosh? I definitely be against OK corral. He ran and steely addition, I. Think you know, this is just going to be a bit of a different tests. Remind always worn on decent brand before not not at this kind of level. So yeah, look, we'll see LeBron is a horse of. I think I have a good handle on. I think one four eight is a bit too high for him. Good ground will be good for him. But he just looks like a horse to me. Here's a bit triplets. He keeps running over two and a half and staying on. And then he can rolls over three. And he's he's kind of just doesn't get home. So he's it horse to jumps really, well, but I think he's going to be better suited when he goes right handed. So it's a good race. And it'll be interesting to see what stacked up, you know, white moon result. Another horse day of Collins, his that deserves a good mention he run in the in the decent novice chase at the Cheltenham, November meeting Mary bell worn, but he NFL at the last, but he was really unlucky in that. He got squeezed out. And he just went down. I thought he was Cullman to win his race. Then he was behind defeat. A soy. I think the. The slow pace on soft ground turned into a bit of a sprint didn't suit them. And then you win the the next day at Exeter. But at four to six look this. This is a good race now. But it's hard to be very very concrete on because we don't know what's going to run. King of Rams is is definitely overpriced at sixteen to one. But maybe that's too good to be true. Maybe that's a sign that he's not going to roll nor. It's may a assigned at Tokyo's are definitely overcompensate and has run last time. But he he's definitely a horse to keep onsite visa these non of I like the thinking here, particularly I like it when you say sixteen to one that just makes me wanna pilot straightaway. White moon was the worst that was drawn to first of all Kevin with a view to Cheltenham..

Cullman LeBron Bosh Laurie ROY Williams Hayes Ascott Coleman Carla Rams Tokyo Kevin Collins Jones Doncaster Mary bell NFL one hundred percent
"vitol" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

03:50 min | 3 years ago

"vitol" Discussed on Good Life Project

"And I had asked him to ask Benedetta Vitol this chef who had come and done a couple of that shape who I had met and really respected if she would take me on as an apprentice in her kitchen, and so I came to visit Sarah Lawrence, and it was amazing and very intimidating. And I felt like everyone was so worldly, and the all these big city people who knew how to take a train. I didn't know how to do any of that. And I was like how am I going to do this gonna pay this ninety thousand dollars and moved to New York and figure this out? And Chris emailed me. And he said Bennett at the said, she would take you you can come. So I ended up deferring the master's degree and going to Italy. Instead, I saved up like for six months to have enough money to go to Italy. And then I never ended up like, you know, going back to the poetries in because and then you were in Italy for three years, I was in Italy for about two years, but for six months, and then I was applying for Fulbright grant because I was. Operating from this very student driven like intellectual academic driven place, which was the only way that I could understand mastery in the world, you know, or like getting any degree of outside respect, which also still honestly, like even my aunts and uncles store. Like, what are you going to go? You're. TV show. Okay. And so so I was applying for this full bright. And I wanted to study traditional food making techniques in Italy were disappearing because the European economic commission in the EU had changed all these laws in the late nineties to try and standardize food production techniques across the EU, which meant that food traditions. That were like up to three thousand years old in Italy were now illegal things like storing there's a kind of cured meat Collado Dacosta, which is cured in mar these marble boxes and Colo not does close to Carreira where Carreira marble comes from. And so there are these beautiful marble boxes that are stored essentially in these very cold rooms, and this meat is cured in in salt, and the marble turns out is antiseptic and for three thousand years this. This thing has been made this way and people are not dead. But all of a sudden this became illegal because it wasn't in a stand. Steel kitchen with refrigeration, but the flavor comes from the air in the mountains, and this whole process, you know, and so actually the people of color or not though like protested and ended up winning. So I thought this kind of stuff was really interesting people sort of coming up to protect their traditions and talion, of course, are so protective of their food traditions. And I wanted to work on that. So I researched and I wrote an application for that. And I like miraculously got became a finalist, but in order to not disqualify myself. I had to leave Italy. And so I came back to the states for a little while return to shape knees. And then I found I didn't get it. And I was heartbroken. But Bennett at the said combeback, you can help me write a book, which was the best possible was thinking. So I went back and we worked on a book in the end. She never published that. But again, I got to live there for another year and a half. So which was really formative and really really difficult in a lot of ways and really amazing. And also, I became fluent in Italian by the end, and you know, this really colored how I understood how to be a good cook. For sure. So when fab lettuce came to us and said, hey, we want sponsor Goliath project. I asked my team, you know, have led ex. And there was this immediate read a love their stuff to leggings quality priced really well cucumbers. Yes, of course, we know headlights was what came back to me. And then they said why I said because they're looking at sponsoring good life project. And it turns out fabrics makes great really affordable. And according to my wife, Stephanie, and I will validate this super cute active where for anything from yoga to running.

Italy Sarah Lawrence Benedetta Vitol Bennett Chris EU New York Carreira combeback Goliath Stephanie Fulbright three thousand years six months ninety thousand dollars three years two years