25 Burst results for "Visiting Fellow"

The lasting influence of the Tofurky

Climate Connections

01:11 min | 6 months ago

The lasting influence of the Tofurky

"Twenty five years ago a food called tofurkey made its debut on grocery store shelves since then the tofu bass rose has become a beloved part of many vegetarians. Holiday feasts tofurkey. Thanksgiving are forever intimately tied in my heart. Yon duke of inches of visiting fellow at harvard law. School's animal law and policy program. He says tofurkey with different from most vegetarian fare. Because it could actually stand in for a turkey roast that allows me to be at thanksgiving meal having a sort of centerpiece of my own and not just eating stuffing and nibbling on veggies and today there are many more meat alternatives on the market some brands such as impossible foods and beyond meat work hard to appeal not only vegetarians but meat lovers to the strategy has been to offer product. That's as close as possible in taste texture and price to the product that meat consumers are already eating producing plant based proteins much less carbon pollution than animal agriculture. So duke of it says making plant based foods that appeal even a mediators can help reduce global warming on thanksgiving or any day of the year

Harvard Law YON
"visiting fellow" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

07:23 min | 7 months ago

"visiting fellow" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"He is president to the Copenhagen Consensus. A visiting fellow a Hoover institution at Stanford and His new book is False Alarm. How climate change panic cost US trillions hurts the poor. Fails to fix the planet. His latest writings are about Joe Biden's massive $2 trillion Climate change plan. Let's bring Bjorn back on. He's going to talk about a couple of positive things about it. We were just talking about electric cars. Is one sentence that Is worth repeating. In his latest writings on We've talked about it before. But he writes, even if the entire rich world cut all their CEO to emissions tomorrow and remain shut down for the rest of the century. The standard U. N climate model shows it would reduce temperatures by 2100 by just 21000.8 degrees Fahrenheit, which eyes Remarkably nothing you are and how could there possibly be such sustained hysteria? And also all these wild multi trillion dollar plans. When it would take the whole civilized earth shutting down for the next 80 years. The lower the temperature by less than a degree. I don't understand where this comes from. Andi, I think if you look back in time, we have many of these similar kinds of things. You're remember back to the eighties. We worried about acid rain, and there is a sense that you know, certainly Germany. Friends were really resonated. Most people literally believed that Germany would be without force in the year 2000. Call back in the 19 seventies, We thought we were going to run out of everything. Oil, gas, whatever. Ah aluminum gold, the whole shebang. We have believed a lot of things. It's not the thing that they're not problems as Wayne was. The problem there weren't issues about of treating resource is well. And the same thing with climate change. Climate change is a problem, but the way it's being sold at the end of the world. The kind of thing that means people are willing to spend whatever is necessary, and of course, it means that we will end up really, really Catholic. And that's why it's important to say with Joe Biden plan he talked about spending $2 Trillion. A lot of it is going to go to things that will be very little help climate. Some of it is going to go to stuff that will have very little to do with, you know, climate like five people are banned and modernizing credit school. But there is one great thing. Actually talked about and this is what gets back to how do you actually fix climate change through technology if we could make green energy cheaper than fossil fuels? Everyone would switch. You won't have to force everybody to do it. They simply switch because it was cheaper. He wants to invest a lot of resources into research and development into green energy, and that is very likely the best way to fix climate change. Hi. It seems that storage is a huge problem with green energy taking solar and wind power. And then storing the electricity long term. In. I guess gigantic batteries will be diary is that possible? In our lifetimes to do that. Hard to talk about a lifetime's right. It's certainly not possible right now, just to give you one sort of. Ah, not of information right now. The U. S has enough battery capacity. If you took all of batteries to store the equivalent ofthe 14 seconds of average, US electricity constructor 13 seconds. For 14 13 14 on amazing 14 14 seconds of energy. What this would take a lot more than what we're talking about right now. And yes, that is a huge challenge. But again, it is not something that we haven't done before. If you think back over the last 100 years, we've solved many problems. The biggest one was, if you think back in the 19 sixties seventies, we worried about large swathes of the world would not be able to get enough people will start to death. A lot of people were just giving up on India and many other countries. What solved the problem was not to tell everyone in the U. S. I'm sorry. You've got to eat last, then shipped down to Africa or India. Really solution was innovation. We got the green revolution that basically made it possible for these pork On every acre. That's why India did you say that again. Can you say that again? Because your phone blipped out you rather than have a scent, Half our food to Africa and India. What was this revolution? Say it again. There was the Green Revolution. It was the fact that we actually made this innovation that made it possible for everyone to grow much more food on every acre. That's why they can now grow enough food to not only feed themselves, but India is actually the world's leading producer of rice exports more rights than any other country, While that's an amazing achievement, and that's because Of the Green Revolution. Innovation is what solves problems for the world. It's great talking with you. We could talk to you all day night. Seriously, you're you're one of our favorite guests. You really are very logical and again. Bjorn does believe in climate change. Just wants to take a logical approach to making a difference in it. Thanks for coming on. Oh, and he's got a book, False alarm. How climate change panic cost us trillions hurts. The poor fails to fix the planet. Next time he comes on what I want to ask him about because this just came off the top of my head and I I remember years ago when I was much younger, it was the ozone layer. Remember? Yes, And that seemed to have everybody. But that's why we switched from the spray deodorant to the Rolands or whatever. Right. It was the ozone. It's going to burn a hole and there will be but too much sun or of just eight destroyers. Yeah, well, this deed that the sun rays would give us all cancer, I think It's something I like to be a less of a concern. Now we've got more coming up. Johnny Ken Ko Phi and any king is this California's top election officials warned the state Republican Party he's watching for any mishandling of ballot. Dropbox is Secretary of State. Alex Video says the parties made several concessions in how it operates the drop boxes clear. The California Republican Party can't conduct valid collection activities, but they have to play by the rules and follow state law, and that's what they are going. Action speaks to and shirt, Padilla says. The drop boxes have to be secured and staffed, says the party also needs to follow guidelines to offer up a clear chain of custody and the delivery of the ballots to state officials. News brought to you by Benjamin Moore. The final measure on this year's ballot, has targeted the bail industry. Back in 2018, then governor Brown signed a law the next cash bail and replaced it with an algorithmic system that would assess the likelihood of someone's giving out before their trial. Almost immediately. Signatures were gathered for a referendum, which is why it's on the ballot now. American.

India Joe Biden US Bjorn Africa Germany California Republican Party Stanford visiting fellow president Benjamin Moore U. N Andi CEO Wayne Padilla governor Brown
Are Australia's security agencies getting too big?

Between The Lines

03:09 min | 8 months ago

Are Australia's security agencies getting too big?

"Well, you'd have to be living under a rock not to notice that Australia, is radically different security environment than walls just two years ago. The Prime Minister he's locked into the situation to the nineteen thirties, and in the last six months, we've seen a massive increase to the budgets for defense and our intelligence agencies. Now, the external threats are undeniable. You just think of the rising power of China, but are we at risk of undermining our political freedoms by expanding the powers of security agencies too much. Hell big and powerful. Should we let security agencies get? And what kind of oversight exists to ensure that the intelligence is not collected or used for political purposes? What do you think we'll pay the redwoods is the former official historian and the author of several award winning books. He's most recent one is called law politics and intelligence a law of Robert. Hope. Welcome back to the show painter. Thanks very much tom thanks for having me and just into carol she's a visiting fellow and senior research fellow at the national. Security, college it you good to be with you again just enter right to be thanks Tom. Now let's start with the hope commissions in the seventies and eighties Peter. This is your faces take us back to that time. Why are those commissions so important well between the mid seventies in the mid eighties over ten year period three successive Prime Ministers Whitlam Fraser and Hoke commissioned the same man just as good hope to conduct major inquiries into the intelligence agencies What he set up was not just not just any inquiry into a agency in Asia was the declared one and quite controversial that he set up a whole system for the agencies. Sitting out what each what agencies Australia needed, what each one should do, and what should not do how they should interact with each other, how they should interact with departments with individual ministers with the cabinet and cabinet committees and with the international partners Those we now know is five is and he emphasized a number of things. He particularly emphasized the intelligence system should serve the whole of government and not be unduly influenced as it was when he started by one or two very powerful departments, and towards that end, he said that should be a central coordinating agency which would only be invoked with assessment and he allocated collection assessment and dissemination different agencies. this one would be only concerned with assessment on like the American CIA and with its the independence of its. Assessments guaranteed by legislation. To, be independent from ministerial oh departmental. Precious. and. He said a of other things about the relationships between intelligence and lure enforcement agencies. Keeping Intelligence and policy making separate keeping intelligence and law enforcement separate were among the the basic

Australia TOM Prime Minister CIA Visiting Fellow Whitlam Fraser China Senior Research Fellow Official Peter Asia Hoke
Pope sends strong message to US Catholics after Floyd death

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

Pope sends strong message to US Catholics after Floyd death

"The poop issues a strong message to U. S. Catholics following the death of George Floyd cardinals black and white who's spoken out about Floyd's death on the Vatican's communications juggernaut who shifted into overdrive to draw attention to the course he now represents Andrea Butler a presidential visiting fellow at Yale Divinity School responses wants to send a very clear message to these conservative Catholics who are pro trump is along the lines of listen this is just as much of an issue as abortion is Butler who is African American since the Vatican is telling Catholics to pay attention to the racism that is happening on the racism that is in your own church in America I'm Charles the last month

Andrea Butler America Charles George Floyd Visiting Fellow Yale Divinity School
Exporting Authoritarianism

Why It Matters

05:19 min | 1 year ago

Exporting Authoritarianism

"I will relate that interesting story. The president of Kazakhstan actually visited a company called hike. Vision is another one that provides surveillance technology visit their office in China and he saw how with one. Click on a person's face. You could get that person's school history work history financial situation. Wow and wait for it. How did this person spend his or her leisure time? So where did this person go to have fun? Did you go to the movies? Did you stop by the bank to go to the post office where you hang out with friends? Did you participate in a protest and his reaction after seeing all of this was we need this technology. That's not where I thought the story was going. This is probably not the first time you're hearing about China's surveillance technology and that's because it gets a lot of coverage it's like a Black Mirror episode. It gives us visions of a dystopia in future but this technology and the eagerness of some countries to begin implementing. It is only a small part of a much bigger story about China through its belt and road initiative China's in the process of building and funding infrastructure projects across the globe and loaning vast sums of money in the developing world. Some observers argued that as it does this. China is also exporting its authoritarian model of government and eroding democratic norms. That many of us take for granted others say that China is simply taking business opportunities where it sees them and providing countries with an alternative to a global order that has gone unchallenged for decades. The debate comes down to one question. How will we choose to view China as they pour money into hospitals ports and roads around the World I'm Gabrielle? Sierra and this is why it matters today is China exporting authoritarianism. I think the most important thing to understand about China's foreign policy over the past ten years or so is that it really has been transformed. This is Elizabeth Economy. She's a senior fellow and director for Asia. Studies here at the council. She's also a distinguished visiting fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution beginning in about two thousand and eight with global financial crisis China's hosting the Olympics. These are really moments that defined in the minds of many Chinese leaders that China was rising. Chinese have many goals for these Olympics. One of them was to announce to the world. The China is back after two hundred years. China's economy has grown faster than that of any other major country. The Asian giant has now grown into one of the most important export markets for manufacturers from all over. The world is a period of historic change in China. There haven't been many periods in history as fascinating as this so there was a real sense within China for the first time that they had always expected that at some point China was going to surpass the United States but maybe that time was coming sooner than they anticipated. But what really has changed the game on the ground has been Xi Jinping everything for Xi Jinping is under the mantra of the great rejuvenation of the Chinese nation and it is a call for reclaiming a much greater degree of centrality for China on the global stage. Xi Jinping became China's president in two thousand thirteen some observers have called him the most powerful Chinese leader since Mao Zedong. Look I think there are any number of objectives and we can find them all and Xi Jinping's writings and speeches but fundamentally what I think. Xi Jinping attempting to do is simply to make the world safer authoritarianism. Teaching is a dictator but dictators. Still have to answer to domestic constituents. This is Jessica. Chance Weiss associate professor of government at Cornell and a leading expert on Chinese politics. She has a different take on China's expansion. One that sees it as being less offensive and more defensive. China's concerned about a whole lot of different risks. Some of them domestic others ones. That emanate from abroad sparks. That might start the prairie fire and bring down the Chinese government and might take units overriding purpose is to continue to make the world safe for the Chinese Communist Party to strive at home. So this is a world that safe for autocracy to coexist alongside democracy in the international space. So it's not been as ideological I think and it's foreign policy is some admitted. It out to be so. China is trying to find a way to sort of fit in with a world. That might not be comfortable with its model of government tried to make space for its form of government to be regarded as one that can continue to exist that is legitimate than democracy isn't the only form of government so to speak and so this has made it easier for other authoritarian states to survive

China Chinese Government Xi Jinping Visiting Fellow Chinese Communist Party President Trump Kazakhstan Elizabeth Economy Olympics Mao Zedong Asia United States Jessica Stanford University Hoover Institution Weiss Associate Professor Cornell
In Unprecedented Times, Governors Have Unprecedented Power

Lutheran Hour

03:16 min | 1 year ago

In Unprecedented Times, Governors Have Unprecedented Power

"Now let's move on to the power governors in the states have explained their responsibilities during a public health crisis so we're gonna do this what is your view of the constitution of the limited document the tenth amendment to the constitution stresses that they're in the powers not delegated to the federal government to research this thanks so I understand our constitutional law we understand that the states have what's called quote unquote the police power and it's not the power just to have a police force that power to regulate everything within the borders of the state all people and conduct except when it's taken away specifically given to the federal government so that's why it the governors of the states who are exercising that power under their own constitutions or because the state legislatures given that power they're the ones who decide whether businesses can stay open out whether we're allowed to travel outdoors what can be bought and sold because the states have the general reservoir power over everything within their territory finally local governments mayors county commissions do they have any unique powers or they beholden to what state government decides on last a governor specifically gives them the leeway to make their own decisions like an acting curfews or ordering residents to wear face masks in public question and that's really up to each state so some something could give if they wanted to their cities and counties that power that's the case in California for example but again that's just they launched a constitution each they could be different I'm joined by former Deputy Assistant Attorney General and visiting fellow at the Hoover Institution John you let's talk about re opening the economy and your piece explaining how the president can't force states to do it explain who as what authority there it's interesting so based on the police power states hi I have the primary thirty over in the opening closing of businesses for example restaurant in your hometown A. L. a public health standards that's under state law that under the police power the greatest use of the state police power in the system record is one where is their power to protect the public health and safety of the residents of that state hi imposing these lockdown orders that's all under state law now the federal government has a lot of tools at its disposal to try to get the economy reopened and going again what they're saying you can't do is actually reverse those lockdowns so the federal government can boost spending ranking give out more checks to more people her unemployment benefits it can actually directly assessed since it can reopen travel can encourage people to travel want to control whether businesses and establishments the open or not whether people go outside or not thanks still to this day in

Federal Government California Deputy Assistant Attorney Gene President Trump Visiting Fellow Hoover Institution
Yal Eisenstat on Facebook and Political Ads

Good Code

07:30 min | 1 year ago

Yal Eisenstat on Facebook and Political Ads

"Last October facebook announced that it would not fact check political ads and their decision quickly. Isolated the social media giant on the Texan twitter on the contrary decided to all political ads and Google restricted them and while that decision angered a lot of people to outside but also inside the company. The critics worry that the twenty twenty presidential elections in the US would be flooded and misinformation and that facebook's decision would make it worse woke up to good code a weekly podcast on ethics in our digital lives may name is gene lobby. And I'm your host to talk about this thorny issue we sit down with your license stats now a visiting fellow at Cornell texts digital life initiative she also teaches a class on tech media and democracy and she has had a fascinating career a public servant for most of her professional life. She served as a sea officer working on eastern Africa in the US then. She was a diplomat overseas before working as a national security adviser to Vice President. Joe Biden in the White House but one day she decided to take her services outside of government and eventually joined facebook where she was hired as their head of global elections integrity operations and the focus of her work was specifically political ads but things did not go as planned and six months she left. I sat down with yellow eyes instead of two weeks ago the day after the Iowa Caucus. I began by asking her. What brought her to facebook. How did she decide that going to? These giant was the next logical step for her civil servants by training who had spent all of her career working on protecting democracy. I left government in two thousand thirteen and my goal at the time was to see what the private sector brings to bear on a lot of the same challenges. I had been working on in government particularly overseas. I was really focused. Middle East and Africa at the time so actually my first role when I left government. It's kind of funny actually. I was looking for one of the biggest I called it. The biggest baddest companies in the world that was having a profound impact on people's lives and wanted to help them figure out how to work better with local communities and in two thousand thirteen. That wasn't actually facebook yet. It was Exxon Mobil so I actually went to head the corporate social responsibility strategy for two years at Exxon and then moved back to New York and started really freaking out to be honest about this breakdown in civil discourse that was happening in the US about. I mean. We've always been polarized. None of that is new but it felt like something really different was happening which is full level of poisonous. Polarization started to dig into. What's what's making that happen. And by the end of two thousand fifteen early two thousand sixteen. I actually really started to think that this breakdown of civil discourse was becoming our biggest threat to our democracy which I know sounds like a big statement for someone who used to head counter extremism work overseas and was like a senior national security person but it really felt really dangerous so I started writing and speaking about it and when facebook called. It's interesting. We're actually recruiting me for slightly different role but still one that was very relevant and we all. We both decided it wasn't the right role for me. And then one minute after Zuckerberg Senate hearing ended. They called me back. They gave me this big shiny title. You said it's a mouthful global head of elections integrity operations For business integrity and for someone like me who fundamentally started to believe that this platform was severely damaging democracy being offered the opportunity to come help them. Really think through this and see if there is a way to steer the ship in a different direction was something I absolutely could not say no to. You realize polarization is a great threat. social media partly responsible of it facebook being the biggest one. You go to facebook your offer that very shiny really kind of cool sounding job you accept it. So can you please bring us back to that scene today? We all have in mind face fixed position on political ads in two thousand and twenty but that was back in two thousand eighteen. That was already in the conversation that the position I guess was very different. What was the political discourse at facebook at the time? And what did you think you were brought to do? And what did you think you could achieve? It really. Wasn't that long if you think about it. After the whole Cambridge analytica scandal became public. So in facebook's defense which is not the way I start many statements but in facebook's defense they were really trying to beef up their teams to really make sure. This didn't happen again to be very frank. It didn't fully understand from recruiters the divisions and the silos within the company yet. So when I came in I realized that what I was really going to be doing I was supposed to be building. A brand new team. Hiring is meant they said as many people as I need on this sort of operational side of how they're going to handle political advertising. How they're going to verify who the advertiser is. What are the lines? They're going to draw between who can advertise. Who needs to be verified ensuring that foreign interference is not happening in the elections. All of those issues but not just for the United States around the world heard of what I really struggled with there is. You're bringing someone like me in whose entire world is about understanding the nuances and the differences between different cultures. Different policies different political realities. And you're asking me to work at a company that Kinda just wants this one scalable solution for the whole planet and people. There knew that was challenging. I'm not criticizing that per se but anyway so the fact checking conversation. We're having right now about political. Ads wasn't actually part of the process. Yet when I first came in what we were talking about when I first came in was it gets in the nitty gritty. What do you even classify a political ad? If somebody WHO's not a political candidate wants to run an ad about climate change is out of political ad and for people who don't understand why it is. It's because in part one of the Russians strategies when they were buying ads on facebook and not just ads. Also the organic contents. Actually a bigger issue was to purposely. Choose the most divisive issues in our political discourse and to fan those flames. This is white. The question is okay. So is that now a political issue? And do we need to verify who the advertiser is if they're advertising something about race relations so it's very sticky very complicated. But that's sort of where we were at. When I first came in those were the issues. We are really exploring. Sounds like you had a lot of Of Room to discuss debate bringing people to maybe steer the boat unfortunately didn't work out that way for me. That was absolutely why I believed. I was going into this role to be frank on my very second day. They're the person that I reported to said. I'm changing your title. She completely disempowers me. They tell me I am not going to be hiring a team. Tell it doesn't let me come to a lot of these meetings. It was very I still to this day. Don't understand why they hired me but I certainly understand. I was never empowered to do the role that I was brought. In

Facebook United States Joe Biden Google Cornell Exxon Mobil Vice President Iowa Caucus Visiting Fellow Middle East White House Africa Officer Global Head Exxon Senate Frank
"visiting fellow" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

05:33 min | 1 year ago

"visiting fellow" Discussed on WJR 760

"J. R. when our friends at the macro center have always got a lot of interesting yes that come in to town to make presentations and there's no exception today when a visiting fellow in life sciences of the pioneer institute in Boston doctor William Smith comes in to to speak to to those gathered and we're happy to have him here on the Frank back when show to talk about his public presentation in Lansing and what he's talking about is a a limitation of treatment of for those people who have rare diseases now why this wasn't supposed to happen when obamacare originally passed but apparently it has doctor Smith good morning nice to have you with us good morning my pleasure it is really true isn't when when we when we switched to the foldable care act everybody was supposed to get treatment everybody was going to be taken care of and it has always turned out that way well there are people that don't don't want everybody to get every treatment that's that's what that's one of the challenges what what's happening is that a lot of bio pharmaceutical companies because of the increase in knowledge particularly about the human genome are producing more and more therapies for rare diseases in fact last year the FDA approved more drugs for rare diseases and for common disease this that's out that's the direction the science is going and those those therapies and medicines tend to be more expensive if you only have two thousand patients that you can sell to its customers and you don't two hundred million dollars worth of are indeed to develop the medicines medicines tend to be more expensive and so there are people out there calling for its restrictions on these rare disease trucks and that's that's what I want to talk about today no telling what what sort of malady so we we are we talking about here we we're we're do we see this happening at which cases well with your the the diseases that that could be cured in the pipeline are some of the most common but dangerous and and terrible diseases out there are we talking about multiple sclerosis cystic fibrosis sickle cell disease hemophilia these therapies are all in the pipeline and there might people might be restrictions on them but some of the medicines that have come out already where they're recommending that babies these drugs are cost effective are for diseases for example there's a disease called Spiner my spinal muscular atrophy only five hundred babies a year are born and most of them died by the H. two and as a new medicine that was just approved for these for this terrible disease and the FDA's called a miracle drug but the cost is high it's two million dollars a year it's two two million dollars for a course of therapy so some people are calling for restrictions on on on access to this drug which I find astonishing given that most of these babies will be dead by age two and less they get this medicine yeah that's got me scratching my head the restrictions on access to the drugs are you kidding me this is America I know I know it's quite astonishing but this is this is Frank this is the way the European systems work and they're trying to import some of the ideas that some of the socialized medicine systems in your work it is used particularly Great Britain a which uses a standard where they put it on an economic number on the value of human life and the medicine exceeds that number they say you can't have that's the way it is that's very common in Europe and it has not been common in the United States this is it it's in and a difficult crossroads we face here isn't where it's almost as if we're deciding which which diseases are are worth trying to fight in which people are are worth trying to save right and and and but I don't think in my view that that decision should be made by a bureaucrat with a calculator somewhere that's a that's a decision that that families and doctors and even health plans but but people close to the situation need to make not it should be made on hi by an economist that that's my concern how do we how do we change it well it there's there's some very robust set of patient advocates who who are fighting are fighting this hard and and supporting them would be important and and elected leaders need to educate themselves on what's coming out of the pipe lines of these these biotechnology companies and how important these therapies are and then support public policies that are going to support those that innovation that that's really the most important thing well folks can check out the pioneer institute in Boston and C. A. C. your advocacy for some of these as some of these viewers and the learn a little more about it and that perhaps help up so we help yes I hope our our website is trying your institute dot org and I've written some papers on this subject that if people are interested in there on our website I'm sure they will be doctor William Smith thank you so much for joining us as to talk with you my pleasure thank you.

J. R. visiting fellow pioneer institute Boston
Iraq And Lebanon Protests Against Iranian Backed Politicians

PRI's The World

04:55 min | 1 year ago

Iraq And Lebanon Protests Against Iranian Backed Politicians

"Iran Lebanon have been rocked by huge protests in recent weeks demonstrators in both countries have a lot in common they're railing against corruption and inequality and many of the politicians they dislike are backed by Iran Tom Hanan Haldar has been connecting the dots in an article in Foreign Policy Harare is a visiting fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy Honey your article is headlined Iran is losing the Middle East what's the essence of your argument Carol what I'm trying to say is that Iran although they are studying control of the political and state institutions Iran have lost everything else that came back its political power and Lebanon Iraq so it and trying to say as that Iran has been very good at winning military battles and to have also been great at winning nations and infiltrating state institutions however they never thought of what's going to happen next they it turned out that Iran is really bad at governing controlling they have been backing corrupt politicians in order to infiltrate state institutions and people in the street have noticed that and today it is not a coincidence that the protests in Lebanon Iraq started as a protest against corruption and eventually turned into protest against Iran proxies in both Lebanon Iraq. This is not a coincidence and I just want to remind our listeners that both Lebanon and Iraq have large populations of Shiite must Salem's and that's where Iran gets influence in these countries Lebanon and Iraq are different Lebanon has thirty percent shop and then the Lebanese population Iraq has majority Shia and what's fascinating about these two protests as the Shia are at the core of these protests Iran is not only losing its corrupt allies in these two countries it's also losing its Shiite support base so I guess a shorthand for your argument is that Iran proxies in places like Lebanon and Iraq know how to win wars and they know how a gain political power but they can't seem to deliver on the economy is it sort of is a kind of you know the old saying it's the economy stupid yes kind of but Hezbollah has done a lot more than just be involved in politics I mean they've had lots of social programs and medical care and all sorts of that would seem to address the concerns of Lebanese and that went back in the one thousand nine hundred and nine hundred ninety s but you're arguing that Iran through its proxies Hezbollah have failed to deliver social economic vision of course of course because two things here one is that this was longtime ago and the only catered for the Shia they did not really cater for the Lebanese people they cater for the shop operation because this is how they wanted to get the Shia political court base the second important thing is that these services are no longer catering for the Shia they do not have the same funds that they used to have twenty or thirty years ago today they are only catering for their members and the families of their members which is not the Shia community so that's why they failed wrote the US has almost strangled Iran's oil exports as a result arounds revenues have fallen catastrophically how has that impacted cash flows to Iran's proxies in Iraq and Syria the very people we've been talking about yes definitely this has definitely contributed to Hezbollah's crisis there the crisis they have stopped serving the majority of the population they couldn't employ people anymore they're started firing employees and they have started to you think reconsider every step they make in terms of a war with Israel or more military adventures region because they cannot afford to have the as wars so this has affected them tied their hands in terms of military adventures and also started to to create this content within the shaft community who are no longer benefiting from Hezbollah services and blow employment so could we be seeing a gradual shift in Iran's influence in places Nick Iraq and Lebanon given these protests given the fact that the traditional ways of propping up proxies isn't working we already seeing this shift Hezbollah today in Lebanon in the very very difficult position the Iranian back militias in Iraq are also very difficult position they have lost their people and this is very important pillar in their political power and public support Anina Dr With The Washington Institute for Near East Policy Okay thanks a lot you're welcome thank

Iran Lebanon Iraq Iran Tom Hanan Haldar Lebanon Iraq Middle East Washington Institute Visiting Fellow Carol Thirty Percent Thirty Years
"visiting fellow" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"visiting fellow" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"What is it that is happening along supply chain that is adding costs that isn't buying additional units of health and and how do we take that out. How do we disrupt that and so just the same way walmart came in a couple of decades ago and disrupted retail and cut out out the middlemen and figured out a way to price products lower and make them more accessible for people. That's kind of the same thing we have to do now with this healthcare and of course we already see the haven enterprise now as it's now been named with amazon berkshire hathaway and j. p. morgan trying to do do that for their employees and that's great but we need basically the entire business community to be focused on doing that at the local level so wading into this and trying to understand exactly how this industry has organized itself and bring the tools to that industry to really make much more efficient and cost effective supply chain. It's a great call to action. Susan and definitely would say folks dive in don't be scared if we have to get involved in our own healthcare especially as employers so love that called action in the background there susan what would you you say is one of your proudest moments in in the work. You've done boy. That's hard to say because i just think of so many different things that i've had the privilege actually actually of doing that. <hes> that were meaningful to me. I mean all the way from covering the rollout of pet far as has been known the president's emergency plan for aids relief leash that were launched under george w bush that brought h._i._v. aids care to tens of millions of people in poor countries around the world and i traveled a lot in africa to cover that that was extremely had a lot of impact on maine's very moving and emotional experience to see the u._s. u._s. Really taking the lead on getting these what you know. It was really the u._s. Tackling with everybody said was impossible. You will never get all these poor people around the world on these very expensive h._i._v. Aids drugs where we did. We did and saved a lot of lives in the process so that was quite meaningful. I think at the other extreme now of the book that i was the lead author and editor of healthcare without walls. It's really is also articulating a vision of a of a very different u._s. Healthcare system but not one that would be impossible to achieve the goal that we set for ourselves when we were writing that report court was let's take everything that exists in the healthcare space day and just and fully deploy it and say if we fully deployed everything everything that we already have. We don't have to incent anything new. What could we have in the year twenty twenty-five in healthcare in america so take telehealth health and telemedicine and max out our usage of it in all the ways that we already think are appropriate. Take our ability to i use all the healthcare men mobile apps that have been developed and that have been proven out in many instances obviously not all but many <hes> put those into into the system make electronic health records interoperable by basically giving back ownership of those records fully to individuals having being <hes> open application program interfaces so that records can be easily shared at the direction of individuals with providers all over america. No we know we can do all of these things. We don't have to invent anything new to do them but we just have to do them and so we that we said if we did all of these these things what could healthcare look like the answer is we would get care that was much closer to people in their homes and communities really creates the avenues just for what i talked about earlier which is ongoing engagement between healthcare providers and individuals before they're sick to try to influence influence the very positive health status on an ongoing basis. We know we could do that. We just have to get it done and i think the fact that we pulled it all together into a book clearly articulated the obstacles stand in the way and there are many of them and things that are really obsolete eight that we need to hold up for scrutiny now in this day and age..

america walmart berkshire hathaway amazon Susan j. p. morgan george w bush africa editor president maine
"visiting fellow" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"visiting fellow" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"We have strange pricing patterns patterns. We underpay our primary care providers in the u._s. Relative to our specialists other countries will pay primary care higher than we pay and they pay the specialist less well. Primary care has an important role in that first responsibility describe which is keeping keeping people as healthy as possible. Why are we doing it this way so we have to rethink a lot and again. I think a lot of it is just down. It's what is it that we're paying for is part of the issue but also what are we paying for and in particular. What are we bang in our big package of health care. That really doesn't buy one single. I owed of health but does add a lot to the cost and thinking of ways to streamline that whether it is taking more advantage of technologies more distributed care pushing more care out of institutions you should where possible bring it closer to people in their homes and communities. I think all of that is going to be a major source of disruption in healthcare over the next few years and it's going to be a moment too soon l. susan i really appreciate the perspective definitely multifactoral in you know the thing is you did such a great job of answering entering that it's not an easy question is very loaded question and the perspective that you added here i think is is inciteful for a lot of the listeners and and and you know just from a from an employer perspective. What are your thoughts there. You know the folks listening are definitely. Many of them are sitting in the employer seat. What are your thoughts there well. It's interesting because <hes> you know not not to quote myself but i read a piece years ago. When i was at u._s. news on world report that was basically urging the employers of america to wade very very deeply into healthcare because the field saying goes war is too important to be left to the generals and healthcare is too important to be left to healthcare providers alone not that a lot of them aren't very good people. They many of them are of course but it's just it's a very very complex enterprise. It's as complex if not more complex rex then running a major aerospace company or a new nuclear energy company. I mean this is complicated. Implicated stuff and a lot of the people in healthcare went into it with clinical training which is obviously very very important but now with a lot of operations training and healthcare as we know has been very very slow to move into operation science to take advantage of health of <hes> information technology. I mean health care is twenty or thirty years behind a lot of other key sectors of the economy. That's why we had to have <hes>. The high tech law passed to instill the the acquisition of a what kind of health records into the system. They no other industry the u._s. Government it didn't go to the banking sector in the nineteen seventies and say you people have to do you people have to acquire information technology. They just did it. I say sometimes. I'm certain they did it. Because it banking sector the financial sector that was about things that really matter money instead of just life human life here waited another thirty years and then it had to kind of be forced feted and of course that happened at a time where we had a what in retrospect like we will view as a pretty primitive that of tools of trying to health records that move you know we're going to move thankfully rapidly beyond this but it just tells you the quandary that we got into in healthcare partly because healthcare was focused more on clinical care and not on operation so what i think think is the really important issue for employers. Now and goodness knows not every employer is gonna do this but we have to start bringing the same business skills that other industries have profited from and bring them into healthcare so basically it's understanding fully the supply i chain in healthcare..

america thirty years
"visiting fellow" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"visiting fellow" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"The microphone for susan to fill in the gaps of any <hes> anything that i may have missed the intro and let us all give her a warm welcome. I welcome susan. Thanks so much all to be with you. It's a pleasure to have you on the phone. Casts isn't so what is it that got you into the healthcare sphere fear well to tell you the truth. That was just a stroke of fortune. I was <hes> a writer at newsweek magazine. I had <hes> back in the nineteen eighties. I had just come off a stint as the wall street correspondent for newsweek and i was writing about general business and economics x and my editor said to me one day you know there are some big for profit hospital companies that are based in the south and they're trying to to buy some entities in the northeast in particular <hes> one was attempting to buy one of the harvard affiliated hospitals and causing a great stir because at the time as is the case now there were laws prohibiting the corporate ownership of healthcare institutions in the northeast so it was causing quite hubbub and my editor said why don't you do a story on this and these large for profit investor owned hospital companies so i did and of course at the time the leading one is now h yes in the different <hes> different context than than it is now also humana manna at the time people forget humana was a hospital company before it decided to become an insurance company and there were a couple of others as well and they had established a beachhead in <music> south and to the to certain degree the west california among other places but they really hadn't crept into the north and the northeast so this was a big deal and <hes> and h._d._a. was attempting to buy mclean hospital a psychiatric hospital in the boston area so i went into the story on that and i i thought wow this is interesting stuff this healthcare business. It's hard to believe now but frankly the business of healthcare wasn't covered that much by journalists back in those days there were medical writers who covered medicine healthcare really hadn't become a business per se and so i he said <hes> you know this is interesting. There aren't that many people writing about it and then the other interesting timing issue was that this was just about as the government was bringing me out <hes> perspective payment for hospitals in the medicare system on the basis of what of course as we now know d._r. Cheese but this was all new and it was going going to happen for the first time hospitals had been paid by medicare on a cost plus basis. Now we're shifting to perspective payment and a lot of people thought the sky was is gonna fall in that hospitals weren't going to be able to cope with us that many many hospitals would go out of business at cetera et cetera et cetera so there was the sense of doom and gloom <hes> in the hospital sector and again. It's hard to believe because it's major event was happening but it was getting almost no coverage and i thought you know this is. This is really a a lot of interesting stuff here and again not that many people were covering it and so just bit by bit. I did one story and that led to another story and that led to another story. I'm pretty sure i was just completely hooked and decided i was going to cover health care i as a business and then eventually i moved into covering health policy so fascinating tasting what a what an interesting story is an amazing how things unfold to just kinda <unk> today and now you know you fast forward to all the experience. You've i've had in the sector. I'm really curious from your perspective. What do you think is a hot topic that needs to be unhealth leaders agenda today and how are you thinking about it lately. Well i think the hot topic <hes> remains cost cost cost and twinned with that affordability affordability ability affordability. It is pretty clear that for all of the wonderful things that we have accomplished and healthcare in the united states and i don't <hes> we should not at all <hes> understate that the sector is pricing itself out of the availability the reach of the american public and we we have got to figure out ways to deliver health care at a lower rate of cost <hes> make it much more affordable for individuals for businesses..

newsweek magazine susan h._d._a. mclean hospital editor united states writer harvard boston west california one day
Heritage Foundation, Steve Moore And Visiting Fellow discussed on Lars Larson

Lars Larson

08:53 min | 1 year ago

Heritage Foundation, Steve Moore And Visiting Fellow discussed on Lars Larson

"Tonight and Steve Moore joins us now distinguished visiting fellow at the project for economic growth at the heritage foundation the author most recently of trouble now makes inside the America first plan to revive our economy Steve before we get into talking about dixieland can I ask you what you make of the federal reserve's move I I know is anticipated ahead of time that this quarter point drop in interest rates and what your take is on the well as you know I've been a strong supporter for the last year of of lower rates and that's one of the reasons that Donald Trump had done nominated me to be on a summer resort because I I do want to say the fad you know but restore strong solid money in this country and is the fed's tightening actions of late last year it will not likely slow the economy and because of massive reduction in the stock market and so I think is the right move unfortunately that that chairman and see if that John Paul made a statement when he was making this nonsense that you know with this this may not may only be one you know rate cut and that was a mistake because the market wants more rate cuts and and their need to be at least one maybe two more and so the felt a market stall it was a big selloff day on the stock market today and I think that's because strong Powell signaled that he may not be continuing to cut rates and we need another one or two were great productions can I ask you this Steve does anybody measure what the market rate value of money would be not the artificial rate set by this you know sort of government agency the fed but I do believe it would be like saying well you know the actual because because the government sets the cost is acts five dollars but but if it was actually the free market it would be three dollars I mean does anybody measure that and and I I almost so you be worthwhile start pointing out the difference the actual market value of the money you know it it did this represented by the federal raid would be you know two and a half percent but the fed is set at three and and and then measure the differential it's a great question what this there's a there's so many mythologies about the fact that this is one of the reasons that I think a lot of people that mom and some reports that was exposing a lot less cells is one of them is that the United States federal reserve sets the interest rates it does not that's just the price in interest rates that's the price that that you know are calibrate states you know supply and demand of credit in that shot we are mostly by the private sector two people one of our people willing to lend the money install the fat you know the reason the sad needed to load lower interest rates not to lower the interest rates you know that thanks our church and so on but the issue is more money into the economy my line is that we create a really strong economy which record low unemployment you know a great sure you know stock welcome in the everybody wanting invest night stage the study has not accommodated that floats with an additional infusion of money so I I believe that the role of that should be the simply keep the dollar stable which is why you've got a great your question so white you know what the reason we have a currency is so the dollars today will be worth what they will be two years from now or five years or ten years from now travels around with Venezuela officials say is right because you all the blood of the initial Basil may not be worth anything so we want to keep the dollar strong as good as gold and I think one way of doing that right now is to lower rates getting more you'll get more growth with more money in the economy without inflation without inflation let's take a moment to talk about the south though the southern part of the United States because you you're an interesting take on this that that the south has been one of the hotter locations but but for some reason now is it falling behind no actually you know so I was responding to a piece in the Wall Street journal the news pages about a month ago it which was saying of the south is not you know that the heart region of the country anymore and now simulate a minute look at nine on the fourth side you know hot stage right now in the south you got Texas you got Florida got Tennessee you got shorter in North Carolina and those are five of the ten fastest growing states in the country right now next fall last you've got somebody's pretty fast growing states yes well states like Utah Idaho Washington Oregon but you know the shelters that is not coming to a screeching halt in fact it is growing and it's because it's taking a lot of jobs a lot of people out of the northern states especially in the northeast and allow those northern midwestern states and they continue to slide into the south because of low taxes right to work laws and they kind of pro business atmosphere and so we don't I mean my goodness Texas from two thousand seven to two thousand fourteen create more jobs and then the other forty nine states combined you know so Texas burn rate in Florida is now the new taxes and affordable myself now this is a mythology that somehow those houses slowing down and the northeast by the way those black I've called them the four states of the apocalypse and I think you know which a lot of you know my home state of Illinois New Jersey Connecticut New York the four states without papers with the highest taxes in the country have the biggest financial problems and a losing their people and I I'll tell you what they're gone they're going to Nashville they're going to Miami they're going to places like Austin Texas and so now the the rumors of the slow down in the south are greatly exaggerated so who's pushing that kind of mythology I mean in and walk out unions are and you know it's like this is very embarrassing to levels and I was listening to some of that debate you start up this conversation to talk about that the disgrace of what's happening on the democratic side of the island and its entry by the way to see you know what about what about nature to courage in this country is it you know the what terraced housing it Adam by you hours of eight well just to remind you no he kills you because I hear them saying last night things that a couple years ago I was telling my audience this is what's happening they said no no no the Democrats are not calling for the end of fossil fuels for the end of automobiles they're not calling for you know they're and they're saying and we're gonna make sure electric cars are made in union run plants and that the workers get part of the well the workers can have a piece of the action right now buy some stock in GM buy some stock in forward but by some stock in Toyota they've got the Toyotas understand makes more cars in America than it does in Japan so but but to have the government do yeah there are stylish thing eight no I I I think it's amazing and now there's a little bit off the top of your question but it's it's a heavy on my mind right now I've watched all three of these debates you know for that that each one last about an hour and a half right I'm not the whole thanks but I've watched most of them hello I can't think of one good idea that has come out of those debates not one maybe maybe have I missed one but it's all income redistribution raise taxes on the rich care down people are successful you know the the the the bowl of Americans to make all people which not to read make rich people poor and this idea that people are are villains because they've been Gretchen the drug companies are villains and the energy companies are villains are gonna tear them down high in and also so pessimistic and so this gets your question about why do people do you know why are people celebrating the south because the self does use this formula for taxes less regulation pro business and and none of those are the policies and Democrats are running nationally or in states like you know New York and Connecticut in California and in New Jersey and and you can see let's not make America look more like New Jersey let's make America look more like structures I couldn't agree with him I'm in fact I get curious about real estate around the country and I visited you know Louisiana and Mississippi I look at houses down there you can buy a house in in nice towns in Louisiana Mississippi I'm not talking right New Orleans but but in smaller towns of for what you could buy a parking spot New York City for which you can buy a nice house near the water down there I mean like a hundred a hundred thousand a hundred a quarter I mean we're the mortgages five hundred dollars a month or seven hundred dollars a month and you think well you could you could actually you know even if you are an average person making the minimum wage you know in in a family with two adults working you could easily afford that and and that what else flowers what are such a special here is that the right about that and I've talked to you know I know rich people in on another round needs of people are successful and you know millionaires and some of the universe and they moved out of California they've moved out of the level I did out of Michigan and northern New York and they've moved to Texas and Florida Tennessee and they tell me they can I I I Viewtiful host in Nashville or Miami or chairman Tony you know and and they can they can buy the house which is the money they save on the Traxxas reading and actually New York Connecticut rolling unbelievable his book is called trouble Namik she is Steve Moore from the

Heritage Foundation Steve Moore Visiting Fellow America Seven Hundred Dollars Five Hundred Dollars Three Dollars Five Dollars Five Years Ten Years Two Years
"visiting fellow" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

03:36 min | 3 years ago

"visiting fellow" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Be a part of the program by the way, our friend Danish the Sousa stops by the bottom of, this hour but final thoughts as we get from Alfreido Ortiz president CEO of the job. Creators network, and our friend Steve Moore is a fellow. Distinguished visiting fellow for, the project for economic growth at heritage final thoughts afraid of Sean bottom line is in November we have a very very important election because it's going to be the, difference between the type of, prosperity that we, are seeing today that we're experience today when we saw that four point one percent number Donald Trump and. This administration and this congress understands what it takes to move things. Forward and to create positive growth in our economy, if we lose control of, the house that will all go away so we urge folks to understand what's going on get out. There and vote and, we gotta make sure that we vote for the free. Enterprise system? Which we are seeing working now. Steve last. Word these. Numbers just make you. Proud to be an American don't they Sean I mean we got Trump said today. Any borrowed, this line from the Wall Street Journal the. American economy today is, the envy of the world and it hasn't been that since the Reagan years and what it really proves on is that ideas have consequences you know you you put, in place pro business pro, growth policies and, they make a big difference for Americans incidentally this is the first businessman president we've had in a long. Long time and it really shows all right thank you both Stephen. Moore thank you Alfred Ortiz thank you eight hundred, nine four one Sean Sousa, or Florida Georgia line Friday concert series put your party light on it's almost time it's almost Friday. Although, we do have, a great Hannity tonight at nine I'll tell you about. That next This is NewsRadio twelve hundred w away I San. Antonio and I heart radio station It's. Four thirty am carrying lucky in here. Are some of the stories we're following President, Trump's ecstatic about the latest economic. Numbers the GDP grew by an estimated four point one percent in the second, quarter it's the biggest jump, since two thousand fourteen in a statement. On the south lawn of the White House. The president called it an amazing rate he also predicted continued brisk economic. Growth President Trump's reportedly opened, holding a, summit with. Russian President Vladimir Putin in Moscow if given a formal invitation White House press secretary Sarah Sanders issued a. Formal statement today saying the president's, also looking forward to summit with Putin in Washington after the, first of the year although Putin is not formally accepted the, invite Putin suggest today followup summit in Moscow all speaking with reporters in South Africa he also said he'd be open to coming to DC if the conditions were right stocks, closed lower to end the week on Wall Street or earnings from Intel and Twitter offset a. Strong reading on the economy and. Tech stocks logged their second day of. Steep losses the Dow Jones industrial average fell Seventy six points to close at twenty. Four fifty one the NASDAQ fell, one hundred fourteen points to seventy seven thirty seven and the, s&p five hundred was down eighteen points to finish at twenty, eight eighteen breaking news on the hour at the half and anytime at w. o. a. i. dot com brought to you by comfort air engineering more Sean Hannity coming up, next on News Radio twelve hundred w. o. a. i. but first traffic and weather together from. The wwl way I traffic center Clinton's. Delays due to congestion. This afternoon I ten westbound between Campbell is Ruben that has. Been a stretch problematic most of the week fifteen to twenty minute. Delays right now..

Donald Trump president Steve Moore Vladimir Putin Sean Sousa Sean Hannity White House president CEO Wall Street Journal Sean Alfreido Ortiz visiting fellow congress Stephen Reagan Clinton Moscow South Africa Antonio
"visiting fellow" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

MSNBC Morning Joe

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"visiting fellow" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

"Joining us now former treasury official and morning joe economic analyst steve ratner and joe he had a skiing accident he's he's on crutches yes just trip to the er this weekend he too was at a ski slope and and then and the eur book and i just tell you very briefly my funny story so i get to the bottom of this deal with mile badly guy independence clinic at jackson hole wyoming and the doctor comes in looks him he says i know you from somewhere oh boy and i i should said like are are bad bad he said yeah i know you from somewhere and i said well only if you watch a lot of cable news and then he looks he says she was a child man you're the cia there are chart watches in jackson hole wyoming thank god and i'm sure they gave you special care charges are amazing also with as white house correspondent for pbs newshour image else indoor and commentary editor for the washington examiner and a visiting fellow in american enterprise institute tim carney good to have you all on board joe it's one of those morning is where there's too many dogs to connect and it's best we don't just put the dots out there no this is very interesting though donald trump tweeted out what he tweeted out yesterday bit crying chucky new lost actually if you look at nbc news survey monkey poll while we're looking at donald trump's false tweet fifty eight percent of americans believe that either donald trump or the republican congress were responsible for the shutdown at thirty nine percent believe the democrats were you add up congressional republicans and president trump the republicans on that list for outnumber the democrats but you know let let's go to let's let's go to our ski our our our our ski.

president nbc chucky american enterprise institute washington white house correspondent jackson hole wyoming steve ratner treasury official republican congress donald trump tim carney visiting fellow editor pbs cia analyst fifty eight percent thirty nine percent
"visiting fellow" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"visiting fellow" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Either visit fellow at the i've ever done and i once made abbott giovanni bill it is the stephanie militia protecting hamilton malcolm man's live in studio this now this is a par entity separately am i right okay hey let's listen to our blood is for a minute as he what did you calm punchdrunk he's punchdrunk just picture him saying this would muller holding his forehead and to swinging wildly why not in putting this bill to gather may gave make it so that you could say everybody in the middle class will get a tax cuts dominant cut to blow this pardon me sleep wait a minute that almost sounds like it was about the tax cuts almost and not regarding treason okay no he hour let's let's go to charlie albuquerque our unstuck the malcolm hella jolly hey good morning cheap i was on tripoli in uh seventy one to seventy four i root tripoli in combat in uh in the gulf war full co to nbn i would say in uh we were we were uh did a lot out rescue out in the tonkin and uh uh we wish nn sweep blams on seventy two stuff like that i was curious did you know she uh a longshot because it's been a long time but you know a chief gardener now i wouldn't you're from a completely different era thank you for calling navy talk the following is i wrote the tripoli when we hit a mine please don't call malcolm and asked if he knows random guys from the navy it's a she'd navy chief are called the largest mafia in the world and we i'm one degrees separation from all lada gaps and i go wait a minute wait yeah i do know that can allow all right so i stand corrected budget i'm actually sitting correct at goes from a ship that i that i wrote in the first hour period in the first gulf war till i hit a mine and we had the leave and go to a battleship uss missouri it's me your point is you once were on a ship with men men men men men again areas fears here's blow this well i feel badly for badly very strong life and i feel very badly john i.

tripoli gulf war tonkin malcolm abbott giovanni muller navy missouri john i one degrees
"visiting fellow" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"visiting fellow" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Live on a different part of new york than the city eleven long island and i it's a pretty long commute but i do it every day because i just prefer i just prefer a little green grass on high tides forever the cold the old outlaws song that's really dated but it's a great workouts on we played a lot when i'm doing my ninja anyway so let's back to the tech maxuta attacksple for just a second here and so you have questions and i am going to bring in steve moore later in the program as a matter of fact of the top of the next hour he's a distinguish visiting fellow for the project of economic growth that the heritage foundation we had a caller doesn't know how this bill is going to impact their specific tax bracket and where they stand they and and i kinda doubt what she was suggesting ends up being trouin i will lot of small business owners and there's still a battle an ongoing ano ron johnson of wisconsin still pushing very very hard to lower the tax rate for small business owners that would be an improvement in my view i liked the fact that corporate tax cut is going to have a major impact on the economy the president went through all the numbers yesterday at look at the the dow jones again is up today in a few hundred points it's an amazing response to the president's tax cut economic claim but it's been that way since the president said he's going to end burdensome regulation now now we have a seventeen year highend consumer confidence we.

new york visiting fellow ron johnson wisconsin president seventeen year
"visiting fellow" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"visiting fellow" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"Live on a different part of new york than the city eleven long island tonight it's a pretty long commute but i do it every day because i just prefers i just prefer a little you know green grass on high tides forever the cold the old outlaws song that's really dated but it's a great workouts on we played a lot when i'm doing my ninja anyway so let's back to the tac vaccine attacksple for just a second here and so you have questions and i am going to bring in steve moore later in the program as a matter of fact at the top of the next hour he's a distinguished visiting fellow for the project of economic growth that the heritage foundation we had a caller doesn't know how this bill is going to impact their specific tax bracket and where they stand they and and i kinda doubt what she was suggesting ends up being true and i will lot of small business owners and there's still a battle an ongoing ano ron johnson of wisconsin still pushing very very hard to lower the tax rate for small business owners that would be an improvement in my view on i liked the fact that corporate tax cut is going to have a major impact on the economy the president went through all the numbers yesterday outlook at the the dow jones again is up today in a few hundred points it's an amazing response to the president's tax cut economic clam but it's been that way since the president said he's gonna end burdensome regulation now we have a seventeen year highend consumer confidence we had but nearly three hundred thousand jobs created.

new york visiting fellow ron johnson wisconsin president seventeen year
"visiting fellow" Discussed on All About Android

All About Android

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"visiting fellow" Discussed on All About Android

"And the main difference between the raspberry pie and the android things uh thing is really that and great things runs android um uh that means that you can basically uh do everything you one uh you've been doing with androids a plus you get the option to uh get info from outside into your uh little program uh and also uh get it out so activate sprinklers rule that kind of thing and i've seen lots of cool little demos but ovalles' hope tokyo series developers who using these kinds of bhuj uh for home farming showed that developing this whole home farming the foam into bulk school it uh and they get temperature readings moisture readings and what note uh jews that uh an analyzed that in that normal android program uh and yet based on that day sprinkled will they journal the lights or whatever and the two to interrupt real quick these are developers that also have a passion for home farming right because like like visiting fellow pathetic which are not making fun of it at all but but i mean just just illustrate like this isn't the kind of thing where you get this kid and you don't know anything about programming you're like i'm going to get this kid and put together this thing that helps me be a home for farming at home you still need that how to develop remind and knowledge in order to develop for andhra but also agriculture and farmers of i'd that is like there's a huge amount of iot growth in that case i really as you know in terms of like your irrigation regulation and temperature control and all that sort of stuff oh make sense you know that that there's a lot more kinda d i wife.

android tokyo visiting fellow andhra
"visiting fellow" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"visiting fellow" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I would think but you know i with and i think also there may be cooperation between say the us in israel if if you're looking to recruit a somebody of importance in said the iranian nuclear programme who may be a visiting fellow at american university so uh and in my book i have some examples also of where kind of the us and and taiwan kind of stepping on each other's toes may be recruits and people about china but i don't i doubt that it extends much be on the level of those special few people that everybody has an interest in recruiting i have to ask you as we sort of wind down the interview we started by talking about the the rave review you've got unexpectedly from john lewis le carre said your book was timely and shocking whoo hoo to his mind why do you think he thinks it's timely and shocking this is the man whose you know written tons of books his imagination is broad and wild and yet he focuses on what you've written which is rich in information in data why do you think he thinks it's timely and shocking well on the timely part i would say certainly it's time lien number ways i mean russian in russia's spying on the us is obviously dominating the news and i have a anecdotes and discussions of russian espionage on american campuses the same goes for chinese theft of intellectual property another a major topic which i point out is going on on american campuses i also think you know the big sort of faultline in the world now is sort of globalization versus nationalism right if the big issue in in brexit in the trump campaign in the french elections and uh that's really at the heart of what i'm writing about because you've got these universities of your classic global jetsetting type institution and you have these nationalist organization seeking their own country's interests exploiting that globalization so i think he probably found a timely for all those reasons in terms of shocking i mean you know the vast majority the of this book is composed of new episodes that have never been told in public before and i.

us israel visiting fellow american university china russia theft brexit taiwan john lewis le carre
"visiting fellow" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"visiting fellow" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"Chelsea manning was set to join harvard as in ville visiting fellow eu as well but there is a firestorm over hers because of course she faced a thirty five years in prison because she was convicted for violating the espionage act and releasing thousands of national security documents to wikileaks and then it started hit the fan yesterday mike pompeo said he was going to speak their mike burrell stepped down as a senior fellow congresswoman liz cheney's called on the government to withhold federal funds and at midnight sean a harvard put out the word that apparently they had changed their mind they had made a mistake and chelsea manning would not get the invitation to be a visiting fellow that's correct and i think they made the right decision lucky i i'm i'm no stranger to mistakes i've asked for forgiveness and people now granted to me and i appreciate the fact that harvard has recognised say it wasn't a stake they made the ray ultimate decision that there is a need in this country have a civil discourse and have the free expression of ideas that's what makes our country so amazing but it is quite another to take gave someone who has been a traitor to this country has been convicted of treason and and invite them and i too to be part of the process i think we can have an open and honest discussion about the ideas and and policies of this country by the end of the day we are a nation of laws and i appreciate the ultimate decision that harvard made it's the right one and i am honored to be part of the the visiting fellow team here says on i will gladly i mean has lifosa white house was ing making all of this is the first time we've really seeing you on a news programme since you let outings guy there there are much more relaxed the it was an honour to serve as press secretary to this president and speak on behalf of the united states as an honor that very few had and i i will cherish it for the rest of my life there you go and that's sean spicer i wanna get him on air and he was on jim kimmel obviously he can take fine then poke fun and receive the.

Chelsea manning harvard ville wikileaks mike burrell liz cheney visiting fellow press secretary president united states sean spicer jim kimmel mike pompeo senior fellow thirty five years
"visiting fellow" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"visiting fellow" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"At six thirty five i'm jane matenaer news radio 620 wtmj the deliberately kept record laid have wikus outbreaking loose story update of what we just talked about harvard apparently has rescinded the visiting fellow ship offered to chelsea manning in the face of criticism mom avi let's see the dean of the harvard kennedy school of government came out with statement at that long ago i now think the designating chelsea manning as he visiting fellow was aim mistake for which i accept responsibility harm yet think so he says he decided to withdraw the invitation after realizing that many people view a visit fellow title as an honorific and though the school hadn't intended to honor manning in any way or endorse her words or deeds of misuse i apologize i recognize the many concerned people from whom i've heard today for me not recognising upfront the full implications of our original invitation g let's see you have somebody who is a traitor who is a fell one and you decide here who should be in prison were it not for barack obama and you decide here we're we're going to have them come onto the campus now apparently she still allowed to come on the campus she's the second of the title chelsea manning responds by saying this is what a military police intel state looks like the cia determines what is that his not taught at harvard now bottom line is you should still be in prison in.

harvard barack obama cia jane matenaer visiting fellow chelsea manning harvard kennedy school of gove
"visiting fellow" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"visiting fellow" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"And national guard troops practising how to rescue victims in the event of car bombings and other disasters and a boys and girls clubs staffer in dudley as been fired after a young girl says as a staff pulled her by the hair and threatened her with violence wall street the dow is up thirty seven points twenty two thousand to forty nasdaq up 23 it sixty four fifty two and the sp 500 up one and a half 24 ninety seven in other news harboured gives an harvard takes away the university has rescinded an invitation to the former army soldier who seat ridley gave cal lasts of classified information to wikileaks lots of controversy after harvard hired convicted cia leaker chelsea manning as a visiting fellow i'm very sorry after announced that the cia director will not be speaking jfk school of government dean doug elmendorf after mike pompeo cancelled an appearance former deputy cia director mike morale quit his fellowship manning's post is now rescinded oh she is still invited to speak to students for one day in a tweet manning says she's honored to be the first dis invited trans woman visiting harvard fell out deborah rodriguez cbs news america's lost to season tickets to the detroit lions games all because of a racist online poached the uploaded video and social media of two black detroit lions burien sitting during the national anthem in the pontiac michigan business owner added a racist caption including the edward the lion say the fane have sir rendered his season tickets had growth jim caldwell and i think what our question that are um organization followed up fateh individual was a woman in the pictures as she began sitting for the.

army pontiac michigan business burien detroit social media detroit lions deborah rodriguez dean doug elmendorf school of government cia cal dudley jim caldwell america manning mike morale mike pompeo director visiting fellow ridley harvard one day
"visiting fellow" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"visiting fellow" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"The london subway station that of course is something that it happens way way way too often in how to get a handle on that so this was interesting to harvard apparently is withdrawing convicted leaker chelsea manning she she was supposed to be a visiting fellow now is that politically correct to call her a fellow it or key a visiting a general genderneutral a fellow i don't know liquid we are liquid i got it they history they get a big chelsea daddy there were gonna maker a fellow at harvard you know so the see yet cia director look mike pompeo he dropped a speaking engagement the school thursday because he felt it would betray the trust of those working at the agency good for him and also former acting cia director michael morell also resigned from his position at the school for similar reasons because many was convicted in 2013 if you remember of giving hundreds of thousands of documents to wikileaks she it was he then was sentenced to thirty five years in prison and then that sentence was commuted by president obama after she was released from prison in may you can't make this you cannot make this they'll she is a fellow i think that we should attack harvard for using politically correct eight that is the fence of the chelsea manning she is not a fellow she's gender neutral apparently halloween oh achieved i don't even know what we are you bore of so good he a fellow to develop anyway they were droid the withdrawing subject lowered is and i could make a joke about that but we were gonna go there good morning it's a great to have you with us at brand owens is the easa of the tourists firm he personally on the ground and benghazi six months before the raid and was in charge of gearing up to take over guard duty in benghazi you don't wanna miss would bread owns has to say about all this information regarding that benghazi attack gary goldberg gonna be on the show gary on am 970 the answer sundays at noon with money matters jeffey lyons a break gunnell the films where he mike gallagher my buddy my money boy you made me laugh it off off mike i'm going to see if.

visiting fellow harvard mike pompeo michael morell obama owens benghazi gary goldberg london chelsea cia director president halloween mike gallagher thirty five years six months
"visiting fellow" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:37 min | 3 years ago

"visiting fellow" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Was it it but it was on i t i thought they would at least tire him to be a visiting fellow in espionage what's the best way to spy we got this tote spine in the new age hosted by emoji emoji bradley manning so and i mean you you he leaked 700000 classified documents and was convicted on six separate espionage charges so harvard hires a trader he's a visiting fellow and so of course harvard hires that's just this is where we are in this country but oh my gosh if you talk about fact checking the media people this ever levy minds it's crazy it's just absolutely crazy in looking at this daca thing transition in from bradley manning this daca all the controversy over dhaka and the eight hundred thousand or so quote unquote dreamers one of the things that chuck schumer wants to do is increase the aged from sixteen to eighteen so he would be essentially giving in adults amnesty and this deferred action for childhood arrivals it it stipulated that those who are going to be covered two for eligibility you couldn't have been convicted of a felony offense is significant misdemeanor multiple misdemeanor or pose a threat to national security or public safety and when the the significant misdemeanor had a had a definition but apparently that's something i don't know if that's what democrats are looking at it seems as though they're messing with a lot of things from that dream act because for instance the week in washington examiner that was taking a look at this new updated dream act from 2017 and how it's a little bit different from dhaka originally because it first it applied to people who were brought over to the united states under the age of sixteen although there were so much fraud who's to know whether or not someone was actually under the age of sixty who has sixteen rendre but now it's eighteen or it's eighteen aj team and then the previous stipulation was that they had to have been living continuously into the united in the united states for five years now in a new one it's only four years it was previously required that the recipients dako be present in the united states on the date of this of that memorandum which was june 15th 2012 when dako was announced the dream act had zero requirement and.

visiting fellow harvard dhaka united states fraud dako bradley manning chuck schumer washington five years four years