14 Burst results for "Viropharma"

"viropharma" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

Monocle 24: Midori House

05:35 min | Last month

"viropharma" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

"Greece's prime minister discusses the value of his country. Soft power with monocle own tyler. a andrew. Talk it's joe. Biden's first full day in office as president of the united states following yesterday's inauguration ceremony in washington. Dc and now that. Donald trump is firmly ensconced in the confines of his monologue. I mentioned we'll discuss how the language of the us presidency will change following his departure monaco's editors and correspondents ahead discuss those stories today. Here on the late edition all monocle. Twenty four hello and welcome to the late edition. It is thursday the twenty first of january. My name's tom edwards. At midori house in london joining me today to discuss some of the day's big stories from around the world are similarly international bunch monocle twenty four car lottery bello and augustin much. Laurie and thomas lewis. We've tracked him down. He's on the line as well. Good evening to you one and all we begin today's program leafing through the pages of monaco magazine's february issue which is out today on all good news stands for the lead story in the affair. Section monaco's editorial director and editor chief. Angie tuck traveled to athens just at the end of last year to meet the prime minister of greece. Mitsotakis the three of them disgusted range of subjects from greece's newfound sense of national confidence to regional geopolitics and greek relations with the eu and the rest of the world in this excerpt of that conversation with him. The prime minister explains why greek soft power is in his view. A key and flushing asset. Looking at irish. The rise of greece's a soft power influence When we think of people around the world looking degrees was some of the things parts of that brian. They're important as we explain the soft power of greece. We had set the bar very high when we first came into office. And i've haven't been shy about my ambitions. I do want to transform a country into a country that is open competitive please. A leading role in the region and most of all our country that embraces change and rises up to the challenges of a rapidly transforming work. And i think we have punched below our wait for quite some time. It's time to change that punch above our weight and covert with all its dramatic. Consequences has offered us an additional tool which we did not have a disposal. And i'm talking about money talking about thirty. Two billion euros that constitute the allocation for greece from the recovery and resilience fund. We've always said that we want the growth and investment driven. Who are not sure we could mobilize enough money from the private and public sector and we have an additional pocket of money. That is very very significant. That can help us drive through really transformative projects on the green side on the on the digital side on the investment side. We want to focus on on high end manufacturer in greece. This is not just a country that can offer exceptional services and covert gives us this additional firepower. I think kobe. there's also is also has to be imagined the post covid world and we try to make sure that we will be in the winner's calling because i think it will be winners. Losers post covert. I think one of the bandits in greece has to offer in the post. Covid world is the fact that this is a beautiful country and go the Can work from anywhere. And you've also seen that doing lockdown. A lot of people actually moved to greece. They consider greece to be safe. So this is a country that is safe while connected very well positioned for our slides from london but also four hours flight from extreme position geographically. So why not consider greece country out of which you can actually work not to spend your holidays but permanently moved to briefs we've offered very i think attractive tax incentives for people who actually want to move their tax residents to greece. I mean there will be paying only fifty percent income tax for the next five years so we don't just want to ask for back when people like do back like you're not say back but back as residents to purchase property in greece. So the people who read your your magazine who by nature are very international. Should really consider that. This is country. That has profoundly changed. The perception is different than up. Was i was so thrilled. When i saw survey and your knowledge that this transformation is really very very rapidly and for us. This is a huge opportunity. For example we were one of the first countries to auction off our five t spectrum. We also set aside twenty five percent of the proceeds and put them in a fund that will support startups that are active in the five g ecosystem. So on top of everything. That's happening in greece. You also have a booming starter. Biko system tech companies suddenly becoming a tech hub. We have microsoft announcing a huge investment in data centers. A lot of people noticed because when microsoft decides to invest in a country. They've done their due diligence. I think greece has huge potential to become a center for healthcare but also for next generation viropharma. If you just look at the landscape of the people who are active in the us biotek and big pharma industry who find so many greeks the ceo. Pfizer is greek. Regeneron is essentially a greek run company. So set together in a group where we brought all the leading brains. Greek or greek related of the global biotech industry. And ask them what it is we can do to start build. Having you know manufacturing capacity in greece more clinical trials in greece and then of course also offer high quality healthcare's services at an affordable price for the entire region..

Laurie Donald trump thomas lewis washington microsoft thursday yesterday Two billion euros fifty percent tyler Pfizer february tom edwards Biden four hours today london twenty five percent first Angie
"viropharma" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"viropharma" Discussed on Love Your Work

"So that for example, when he when he painted the potato eaters, which was you know, before the fort lack for last year of his wife, it was in the fifth year before he died painted in Holland in those very dark colors, you know, eat painted it in the hopes that it would bring attention to him, and he spent enormous amount of time describing to kind of frame he wanted on that painting, and what he will have any people. He wanted to show a theater show it to and when the oh, and and a good friend, the only friend he had his life of a man named Anton ViroPharma hold and since. That they didn't think the painting was any good. He was not just a upset but horrified and angry so mixed in with all of the self doubt that really essentially defined is entire life where moments of piercing. Desire for recognition. Right. And did it also make him maybe critical of other artists, you know, as sort of a defense there. There was a considerable amount of that he would make he he's actually made of of some of the sort of easier artists. But, but really what was more typical of him was a kind of acceptance, and I don't know whether this came from some sort of subterranean of feeling of solidarity with artists who had not been recognized or whether it was I think more likely and Greg bought more likely a kind of generosity of spirit and generosity of of of. I that he really tried to see the best in other art, and the the range of things that he admired was was pretty astonishing there at because he was manic as. Well, there are letters to feel in which he will list a couple of dozen artists who's working had seen recently artists. Most of whom are not known to us today that he wanted to go look out because he thought there was something wonderfully admirable in their work. So you know, he tried for the most part the see the best in in in other art almost regardless style. And as I was talking about that it seemed to be he was very professional about his pursuit of art of as a career. I was very surprised when I read about how much work he put into say to potato eaters that you know, I'm thinking that he just sits in this people in these people's living room and does a painting of them. But it's not like that. No, he doesn't dozens of preliminary drawing. The also did a series of of of heads. He called it. Not so much portrait's butt heads of. Presents some of which are really just spectacular is. Notably of the hasn't that he was sleeping with a woman named Gordon to grow as a spectacular painting. For example, the Norton Simon museum in Pasadena from this series. So he did all those preliminary drawings all the preliminary painting, and then he worked for months on that pain. That was not physical the great masterpieces that we know we're done a pretty a fairly quickly. Some of the paintings at the very end we're done in a day. But so the potato eaters is is is is not symptomatic of the working style at the end of his career. But it also shows as you just suggested the the focus and the attention to creating a fully realized work of art early on. In fact, he was so he simply couldn't leave it alone. At one point this is on. Shing after having essentially repainted for five times. He got to the point where he thought he more or less had really wanted. And he took it to a nearby city and left it with somebody knew so that he wouldn't be tempted to work on it anymore. And then he got you have to take train to take it there and the next morning he got back on the chain. And in and retrieved it so he can work on it some more..

Greg Anton ViroPharma Gordon Holland Norton Simon museum Shing Pasadena
"viropharma" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

14:53 min | 2 years ago

"viropharma" Discussed on WRVA

"A. Go round have each of you tell me and our listeners your name. And where you're from where you work. What's do? Okay, sir. Sure. My name is Mark Jones, and my businesses Sharon del mushroom farm. We're just east of Charlottesville. Wow. Thank you for coming in so far. And ma'am, I'm IRA Wallace with southern exposure seed exchange. I'm also in the board of the Virginia says for biological farming. And you know, I'm in both of those because I care about seeds at southern extensively. We offer over seven hundred types of heirloom seeds, which you can get to see when you come to the conference, right. Yeah. It'll be the eleven's for the thirteenth at the Omni here in Richmond is gonna be fabulous. I love it. And ma'am. I am racy Connell. And I recently moved my farm to the Richmond area and started a farm based high school and some of our students will be going to the biological conference. So now, what is the high school called local sta- you high school? I love that. How's it going? It's going. Well, actually, it's it's going really well. And then make you guys feel good to know that there's somebody out there teaching the young ones had to carry on. Oh, we need those young farmers. Now, we talk about you know, for tenure, but let's talk about the biological partway. What is that about? Oh, three of us are on the board of the Virginia association for biological farming. Ben a group for about forty years and this is our twentieth. Conference coming up we are advocates for small and mid sized diversified, organic and biological farmers. Wow. Mazing? And so you specialize in the mushrooms. Yes, now, we're all your mushrooms go where do they go? Well, we sell a lot in Charlottesville market. And in the Richmond market, you'll find us at Elwood Thompsons at whole foods and Wegmans in this area. And a couple of finer restaurants. I love that. And what makes us better than anybody our certified organic, and we do a really excellent job with bringing diversity to the market with our our mushrooms, we grow about twenty different species throughout the year. Wow. See I had no idea that many. I love mushrooms, I know a couple of different ones had no idea there were that many people should eat more mushrooms. I love. And my dear you are from what I understand as such a treasure to this group didn't realize that. Well, you know, heirloom seeds, and I the resurgence of them kinda grew up together. And we work at bringing back varieties that have been held maybe just by one family. We introduce Cherokee purple to the larger market back in the eighties and early nineties, and we offer so many unusual things. One of the things that's kind of fun. Now is we have all these unusual collard greens has we're coming to New Year's we might want to have some with our. New Year's dinner. And I'm telling you, we're talking about purple ones anyone's Greenland's curly ones. One's you've never seen. But they're gonna come to market near you. When the farmers get them growing enough. But when you talk about heirloom sees growing up together. So these are seeds that maybe people had way back and now they're starting to share them. And like how does that work? Do you find out how long does seeds last well seeds need storage who plant them over and over again? I mean, some types of seeds like colleges something might last for ten twenty years in a cool dry place. But if you really want to preserve them, you need to have storage who are growing them getting new seeds replenishing them in what we do. It hasn't exposure is reach out to families that perhaps only that family has been preserving this. Maybe people in a certain community, and we grow some. And then we get a farmer to grow a lot more. And then we can offer them in the catalog, and you can grow them in your own backyard. I love this AMI before we started. You know, tugging. You're talking to me about how you like to get your seeds and Canada lovelorn. I'm a little bad are pass it about this. Well, guy news love getting those catalogs in the mail in December and the order early. So they can look at them and think about because there is no Guidon like the one in your imagination. And then you have the one you get to eat too. So now right now people ordering seeds. Yes, they are. They just started this week. We noticed the number of orders per day has doubled from last week in probably will do that again. Right after the new year because people want to make sure they can get the seeds that they want for the varieties. You know? It's like we have one hundred tomatoes and some of those real ones. Not so many packets of seeds available. So if you want him to get him, I love this. How do we find out about you? Well, southern exposure dot com. We have a website that not only selling siege. The growing seed saving your own seeds and things like the conference, and we're going to be at the Virginia association for biological priming conference was seeds and interesting garlic's and perennial onions and fundings for all the gardeners and eaters now when you are doing the conferences that can be open to the public. There is a there is a cost to participate in the conference's pretty nominal compared to what other farm groups offer. We're going to have a great lineup of people teaching about farming and the business of farming and how how to do it. So we also have the taste of Virginia on Saturday night, which people anybody can attend. It's it's. Is that open to the public racy? I believe so. Yes. Yup. And that'll have Virginia, beer and wine insiders and excellent food from around the state come on down to the Omni on Saturday night the the twelfth, and you guys are all going to be there. We're going to have some famous people to. Oh, Joel Salatin. Our local lunatic farmer. Is going to be one of our keynote speakers really talking about farms and food independence, and if you've ever had any of his policies beef. Oh my goodness. And Leah Pearlman who penman who is someone special coming to us because she's from Seoul, ViroPharma African American farm where people are taking back rather, the African American farmer tradition and feeling like they don't have to run from slavery. But they can embrace the land and make food good food for all our communities. I laugh that okay? Let's get to the skull. Now, what is your part in all of this? My dear. Oh, my part, I happily serve on the Virginia biological farming board as well on the secretary. I love being part of this organization. It's amazing. We started our goat and sheep farm. Actually, my daughter started. I'll blame her. I think back in two thousand eleven and we have moved to doing everything in a sustainable, and and natural and friendly environment way. And and then as we progress there, there are a lot of things that came together, and we decided to use the farm as a base for the high school. Seven down here to Richmond. And we're serving the Richmond area so to come to this skull. It's like a private school, right? Yes. You come to new learning. How to to to grow foods and everything else? Right. Yes. You are. I think that's amazing. What's been the biggest thing that a surprise to over this past year with the kids sit there like going like, wow. Well, it's funny because even kids that week that come in there like so not interested in farming. You know, because technology is the thing not farming. And they don't realize how much technology and math and science is involved in this. So we actually have a pretty heavy science program, and it's all stem, you know, it's all it's all heavy science and math and technology, and that they really get excited about it. Well, why is it so important to to be a part of all this you guys to biological part is is to say we don't run out of food right said that we have good. We have excellent food. Yeah. Yeah. And then we have nutritious food, and we don't rely on large corporate agribusiness that we rely on our local local farmers for excellent food and resilience in our ecosystem from excellent farming practices. The thing is to me. You can't get something that tastes like grown on the farm unless you get it Grun on the farm. I mean. Difference between a tomato, and let's say Hanover tomato. When you go out and field, and there's no comparison to me, you know, I'm like, I grew up in West Virginia. We always had a farm. I know the difference on what led us to taste like, you know. And I don't know if other people realize that do you think that that folks that have grown up with test, whatever, you know, they're getting their their produce wherever know the difference between the taste. Well, that's why we have things like the taste of Virginia. Okay. In the summer. We also do another event at Monticello. The heritage harvest only have a big tasting tent? We have over one hundred tomatoes and people who haven't really had that experience. Come back several times during the day to try different tomatoes to realize they are flavors. They never even knew existed. Wow. Wow. Well, tell me about the taste of for dinner. Now, I've heard so much. About that. There's going to be food and things their right to try. Absolutely. We're going to have a lot of the value added products that Virginia farmers make you know, the sauces and cheeses and all kinds of beverages both alcoholic and not. You know in Strub, and these non alcoholic delicious things that are somewhere between the T and a soda fun. And yeah, so and you get to talk to the farmers who make them. Now with your conference. Do you guys discussed during this time ways to make things better to get your your foods are your seeds out there? I mean what happens during all focused on that year round? Okay. At the conference. You get a concentrated dose. You can take full half day workshops on Friday. You know and learn about technical things like how to be governor. Gap, certified or you can learn about how to grow poultry. Yeah. Our mushroom guy is gonna teach you how to grow edible and additional mushrooms. It's going to be so great. I'm going to teach you a little bit about garlic, and perennial onions resumes. Going to teach you about those stimuli things that she mentioned. I'm actually teaching a workshop session to help. Farmers. Get their websites on online. And really. Yep. Said they they have that access to get out there. Well, that's wonderful. Now, you guys are amazing that to come in here and talk about this. I just feel like you have so much knowledge each of you on how to to keep this going in these seeds. I had no idea I'm blown away by the amount of tomatoes. Cucumbers, I q coming. Well. We only have maybe fifty. Oh my gosh. Have you gotta have your pick lers your white ones. You're green ones your long ones. You know, your Armenian ones that are a little bit different families. So they don't get the same insect pests. You know, we have a young farmer who does a lot of work with cucumbers and squash rate in Louisa county where we live and he's looking for disease resistance. So they can not only tastes good enough all over from various insects and other best Edmund will be teaching session there too about seed saving warning. Yeah. Absolutely. Yeah. He's Edmund frost with Commonwealth seed, right? We're going to have. Yeah. So many hands on topics that are good for farmers and also good for gardeners who wanna do better in their own backyard. We'll also have some sessions about the business of farming. Not a we build a website. Water some of the legal aspects of farming. And then I think there's something else isn't there? The business of farming. I'm sure there is. Yeah. Sessions because you have to know how to do that. I wouldn't know. I mean, had you marketing is important if you wanna make make money as a farmer, you have the market you have to market you have to find places to distributor what you're grown. Right. Absolutely, correct hard. How hard was it to get started up for you all was it hard to get that going get the word out? Well, we started out we had to support our business rather than it supporting us, right? And that was something we weren't as aware of you know, that in in order to build it up you have to throw lots back in. And if you don't have backers it means having another job in my case that was running crafts business. But sometimes. That craftsy artistic thing has become a part of our signature is crazy drawings and interesting illustrations in our catalog, so yeah, yes..

Virginia Richmond Virginia association Charlottesville Omni IRA Wallace Mark Jones Connell West Virginia Joel Salatin Edmund frost Elwood Thompsons Greenland ViroPharma Canada Seoul Leah Pearlman secretary Hanover
"viropharma" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

14:24 min | 2 years ago

"viropharma" Discussed on WRVA

"Go round have each of you tell me and our listeners your name. And where you're from where you work which do. Okay, sure. My name is Mark Jones, and my businesses Sharon del mushroom farm. We're just east of Charlottesville. Wow. Thank you for coming in so far. And ma'am, I'm IRA Wallace with southern exposure seed exchange, and I'm also in the board Virginia association for biological farming. And you know, I'm in both of those because I care about seeds at southern especially offer over seven hundred types of heirloom seeds. Let you can get to see when you come to the conference now. It'll be the eleventh through the thirteenth at the Omni here in Richmond is going to be fabulous. I love it. And ma'am. I am racy Connell. And I recently moved my farm to the Richmond area and started a farm based high school and some of our students will be going to the biological conference. So now, what is the high school called locals? Do you high school? I love that. How's it going? It's going. Well, actually, it's going really well, then to make you guys feel good to know that there's somebody out there teaching the young ones had to carry on. Oh, yeah. We need those young farmers. Now, we talk about, you know, teased Virginia. But let's talk about the biological part. What what is that about? Oh, three of us are on the board of the Virginia association for biological farming. Been a group for about forty years and this is our twentieth. Conference coming up we are advocates for small and mid sized diversified, organic and biological farmers. Wow. That's amazing. And so you specialize in the mushrooms. Yes. Now, we're all deer mushrooms go. Well, we sell a lot in Charlottesville market. And in the Richmond market, you'll find us at Elwood Thompsons at foods and Wegmans in this area. And a couple of finer restaurants. I love that. And what makes us better than anybody our certified organic, and we do a really excellent job with bringing diversity to the market with our our mushrooms, we grow about twenty different species throughout the year. Wow. I had no idea the way that many. I love mushrooms, I know a couple of different ones had no idea there were that many people should eat more mushrooms. I love my and my dear you are from what I understand as such a treasure to this group. Did you didn't realize that? Well, you know, heirloom seeds, and I the resurgence of kinda grew up together. And we work at bringing back varieties that have been held maybe just by one family. We introduce Cherokee purple to the larger market back in the eighties and early nineties, and we offer so many unusual things. One of the things that's kind of fun. Now is we have all these unusual collard greens as we're coming to New Year's we might want to have some. Yeah. New Year's dinner. And I'm telling you, we're talking about purple ones, shiny ones. Greenland's curly ones. One. You've never seen. But they're gonna come to market near you. When the farmers get them growing enough. But when you talk about heirloom sees growing up together. So these are seeds that maybe people had way back and now they're starting to share them. And like how does that work? Do you find out how long does seeds last well seeds needs storage who plant them over and over again? I mean some types of seeds like holidays, you something might last for ten or twenty years in a cool dry place. But if you really want to preserve them, you need to have storage who are growing them getting new seeds replenishing them in what we do. It has an exposure is retail to families that perhaps only that family has been preserved. This are maybe people in a certain community, and we grow some. And then we get a farmer to grow a lot more. And then we can offer them in the catalog, and you can grow them in your own backyard. I love this AMI before we started talking you. You're talking to me about how you like to get your seeds and kind of lovelorn I'm a little bit. You are passionate about this. Well, hardcore guide news love getting those catalogs in the mail in December and they order early. So they can look at them and think about because there is no guidance like the one in your imagination. And then you have the one you get to eat too. So now right now people ordering their seeds. Yes. They are. They just started this week. We noticed the number of orders per day has doubled from last week in probably will do that again. Right after the new year because people want to make sure they can get the seeds that they want for the varieties. You know? It's like we have one hundred tomatoes and some of those real ones not so many packets of seeds available. So if you want him to get him, I love this outta we find out about you. Well, southern exposure dot com. We have a website that not only talks about selling siege. Growing seed saving your own seeds and things like the conference, and we're going to be at the Virginia association for biological priming conference with seeds and interesting garlic's and perennial onions and fundings for all the gardeners. And eaters now when you are doing the conferences that can be open to the public. There is a there's a cost to participate in the conference's pretty nominal compared to what other farm groups offer. We're going to have a great lineup of people teaching about farming and the business of farming and how how to do it. So and we also have the taste of Jinyu on Saturday night, which people anybody can attend. It's it's is that open to the public racy. I believe so. Yes, so yeah. And that'll have Virginia, beer and wine insiders and excellent food from around the state come on down to the Omni on Saturday night the the twelfth, and you guys are all going to be there. We're going to have some famous people to. Oh, Joel Salatin. Our local lunatic farmer. Is going to be one of our keynote speakers really talking about farms and food independence, and if you've ever had any of his policies beef. Oh my goodness. And Leah Pearlman who penman who is someone special coming to us because she's from Seoul, ViroPharma an African American farm where people are taking back rather, the African American farmer tradition and feeling like they don't have to run from slavery. But they can embrace the land and make food good food for all our communities. I love that. Okay. Let's get to the skull. Now, what is your part in? All this. My dear. Oh, my part I-, I happily serve on the Virginia biological farming board as well on the secretary. I love being part of this organization. It's amazing. We started our goat and sheep farm. Actually, my daughter started. I'll blame her. I think back in two thousand eleven and we have moved to doing everything in a sustainable, and and natural and and friendly environmental way. And and then as we progress there, there are a lot of things that came together, and we decided to use the farm as a base for the high school. Seven down here to Richmond. And we're serving the Richmond area so to come to the skull. It's like a private school, right? Yes. You come in. But then you learning hell to to to grow foods and everything else. Right. Yes. You are. I think that's amazing. What's been the biggest thing that is surprised to ever this past year with the kids sit there like going like, wow. Well, it's funny because even kids that week that come in there like, oh, so not interested in farming. You know, because technology is the thing not farming. And they don't realize how much technology and math and science is involved in this. So we actually have a pretty heavy science program, and it's all stem, you know, it's all it's all heavy science and math and technology, and they really get excited about it. Well, why is it so important to to be a part of all this you guys the biological part? Is this is to say we don't run out of food right said that we have good. We have excellent food. Yeah. Yeah. And then we have nutritious food, and we don't rely on large corporate agribusiness that we rely on our local local farmers for excellent food and resilience in our ecosystem from excellent farming practices. The thing is to me. You can't get something that tastes like grown on the farm unless you get it grown on the farm. I mean. The difference between a tomato, and let's say Hanover tomato. When you go out and filled and pulling up there's no comparison to me. You know, I'm like I grew up in West Virginia. We always had a farm. I know the difference on. I know what led us to taste like, you know. And I don't know if other people realize that do you think that that folks that have grown up with just whatever, you know, they're getting their their produce wherever know the difference between the taste. Well, that's why we have things like the taste of Virginia. Okay. In the summer. We also do another event at Monticello the heritage harvest sessile. We have a big tasting tent. We have over one hundred tomatoes and people who haven't really had that flavor experience. Come back several times during the day to try different tomatoes to realize they are flavors. They never even knew existed. Wow. Wow. Well, tell me about the taste of for Dana. Now, I've heard so much. Much about that. There's going to be food and things their right to try. Absolutely. We're going to have a lot of the value added products that Virginia farmers make you know, the sauces, and there's going to be cheeses and all kinds of beverages both alcoholic and not you know, and Strub and these non alcoholic delicious things that are somewhere between the tea and a soda early fun. And yeah, so and you get to talk to the farmers who make them. Now with your conference. Do you guys discussed during this time ways to make things better to get your your foods or your seeds out there? I mean what happens during all focused on a year round. Okay. At the conference. You get a concentrated dose. Didn't take full half day workshops on Friday. You know and learn about technical things like how to be governed gap certified or you can learn about how to grow poultry. Our mushrooms. Yeah. Are mushroom guy is going to teach you how to grow both edible and medicinal mushrooms is going to be so great. I'm gonna teach you a little bit about garlic, and perennial onions resumes. Gonna teach you about those stimuli things that she mentioned. I'm actually teaching a workshop session to help. Farmers get their websites on you know, online. And really. Yep. So they they have that access to get out there. Yeah. Well, that's wonderful. Now, you guys are amazing that to come in here and talk about this. I just feel like you have so much knowledge each of you on how to to keep this going in these seeds. I had no idea I'm blown away by the amount of tomatoes cucumbers. I q company we've got well. We only have maybe fifty. Oh my gosh. Only fifty cucumber. You gotta have you. Gotta have your pick lers your white ones. You're green ones your long ones. You know, your Armenian ones that are a little bit different families. So they don't get the same insect pests. And you know, we have a young farmer who does a lot of work with cucumbers and squash rate in Louisa county where we live, and he he's looking for disease resistance. So they can not only tastes good, but not follow over from various insects and other best Edmund will be teaching session there too about seed saving warning. Yeah. Absolutely. Yeah. He's Edmund FOSS with Commonwealth seed, right? We're gonna have. Yeah. So many hands on topics that are good for farmers and also good for gardeners who want to do better in their own backyard. Also have some sessions about the business of farming. We build a website. Some of the legal aspects of farming. And then I think there's something else, isn't it? The business of farming. I'm sure there is. Yeah. Sessions because you have to know how to do that. I wouldn't know. I mean had you marketing this is important. If you wanna make make money as a farmer, you have the market you have to market, you have to find places to distributor what you're grown. Right. Absolutely, correct hard. How hard was it to get started up? For you all was it hard to get that going get the word out. Well, we we started out we had to support our business other than it supporting us, right?.

Virginia Richmond Virginia association Charlottesville Omni Connell Mark Jones IRA Wallace West Virginia Joel Salatin Edmund FOSS Greenland Elwood Thompsons ViroPharma Seoul Leah Pearlman secretary Hanover Dana
"viropharma" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

10:29 min | 2 years ago

"viropharma" Discussed on WRVA

"Force. Reserve. Good morning everyone. It's cat Simon last weekend at twenty eighteen and do I have some great guests for you. Go round have each of you tell me and our listeners your name, and where you're from where you work, which do okay, sir. Sure. My name is Mark Jones, and my businesses Sharon del mushroom farm. We're just east of Charlottesville. Wow. Thank you for coming in. So far. Man, I'm IRA Wallace with southern exposure seed exchange, and I'm also on the board of the Virginia association for biological farming. And you know, I'm in both of those because I care about seeds at southern especially offer over seven hundred types of heirloom seeds lets you can get to see when you come to the conference now. Yeah. It'll be the eleventh through the thirteenth at the Omni. Here enrichment is gonna be fabulous. I love it. And ma'am. Hi, I racy Connell. And I recently moved my to the Richmond area and started a farm-based high school and some of our students will be going to the biological conference. So now, what is the high school? Con locals. Do you high school? I love that. How's it going? It's going. Well, actually, it's it's going really well tend to make you guys for good to know that there's somebody out there teaching the young ones had to carry on. Oh, we need those young farmers. Now, we talk about you know, teased differ. But let's talk about the biological part. Wait, what is that about? Oh, three of us are on the board of the Virginia association for biological farming. Been a group for about forty years and this is our twentieth. Conference coming up we are advocates for small and mid sized diversified, organic and biological farmers. Wow. That's amazing. And so you specialize in the mushrooms. Yes. Now, we're all mushrooms go. Well, we saw a lot in Charlottesville market. And in the Richmond market, you'll find us at Elwood, Thompsons foods and Wegmans in this area. And a couple of finer restaurants, I love and what makes us better than anybody. We're certified organic, and we do a really excellent job with bringing diversity to the market with our our mushrooms, we grow about twenty different species throughout the year. Wow. See I had no idea were that many. I love mushrooms, I know a couple of different ones had no idea there were that many people should eat more mushrooms. I love mushrooms, and my dear you are from what I understand as such a treasure to this group didn't realize that. Well, you know, heirloom seeds, and I the resurgence of them grew up together, and we work at bringing back varieties that have been held maybe just by one family. We introduce Cherokee purple to the larger market back in the eighties and early nineties, and we offer so many unusual things. One of the things that's kind of fun. Now is we have all these unusual collard greens as we're coming to New Year's we might want to have some with our New Year's dinner. And I'm telling you, we're talking about purple ones, shiny ones. Greenland's curly ones. One's you've never seen. But they're gonna come to market near you. When the farmers get them growing enough. But when you talk about heirloom sees a growing up together. So these are seeds that maybe people had way back. Back and now, they're starting to share them. And like how does that work? Do you find out how long does seeds last well seeds need storage who plant them over and over again? I mean, some types of seeds like college or something might last for ten or twenty years in a cool dry place. But if you really want to preserve them you need to have storage who are growing them getting new seeds replenishing them. And what we do. It has an exposure is reach out to families that perhaps only that family has been preserving this are maybe people in the certain community, and we grow some. And then we get a farmer to grow a lot more. And then we can offer him in the catalog, and you can grow them in your own backyard. I love this AMI before we started talking. You're talking to me about how you like to get your seeds and kind of lovelorn I'm a little bit. You are it about this. Well, a hardcore gardeners love getting those catalogs in the mail in December and the order early. So they can look at them and think about because there is no garden like the one in your imagination. Oh, and then you have the one you get to eat to now right now people ordering their seeds. Yes. They are. They just started this week Lee noticed the number of orders per day has doubled from last week in probably will do that again. Right after the new year because people want to make sure they can get the seeds that they want for the varieties. You know? It's like we have one hundred tomatoes and some of those real ones not so many packets of seeds available. So if you want him to get him, I love this. How do we find out about you? Well, southern exposure dot com. We have a website that not only talks about selling siege. Growing seed saving your own seeds and things like the conference, and we're going to be at the Virginia association for biological farming conference with seeds and interesting garlic's and perennial onions and fundings for all the gardeners. And eaters now when you are doing the conferences that can be open to the public. There is a there's a cost to participate in the conference's pretty nominal compared to what other farm groups offer. I'm going to have a great lineup of people teaching about farming in the business of farming and how how to do it. So and we also have the taste of Jinyu on Saturday night, which people anybody can attend. It's it's is that open to the public racy. I believe so. Yes. Yup. And that'll have Virginia, beer and wine insiders and excellent food from around the state come on down to the Omni on Saturday night the the twelfth, and you guys are all be there. Oh, yeah. And you know, we're going to have some famous people to oh, Joel Salatin. Our local lunatic farmer. Is going to be one of our keynote speakers really talking about farms and food independence, and if you've ever had any of his policies beef. Oh my goodness. And Leah Pearlman who penman who is someone special coming to us because she's from Seoul, ViroPharma an African American farm where people are taking back rather, the African American farmer tradition and feeling like they don't have to run from slavery. But they can embrace the land and make food good food for all our communities. I laugh at okay, let's get to the skull. Now, what is your part in? All this. My dear. Oh, my part, I happily serve on the Virginia biological farming board as well on the secretary. I love being part of this organization. It's amazing. We started our goat and sheep farm. Actually, my daughter started. I'll blame her I think back in two thousand eleven and we have moved to doing everything in a sustainable, and and natural and and friendly environment way. And and then as we progress there, there are a lot of things that came together, and we decided to use the farm as a base for the high school. Seven years down here to Richmond. And we're serving the Richmond area so to come to this skull. It's like a private school, right? Yes. You come in. But then you learning how to to to grow foods and everything else. Right. Yes. You are. I think that's amazing. What's been the biggest thing that a surprise to over this past year with the kids sit there like going like, wow. Well, it's funny because even kids that week that come in there like so not interested in farming. You know, because technology is the thing not farming. And they don't realize how much technology and math and science is involved in this. So we actually have a pretty heavy science program, and it's all stem, you know, it's all it's all heavy science and math and technology, and they really get excited about it. Well, why is it so important to to be a part of all this you guys the biological part is this too. So we don't run out of food right said that we have to we have excellent food. Yeah. Yeah. And then we have nutritious food, and we don't rely on large corporate agribusiness that we rely on our local local farmers for excellent food and resilience in our ecosystem from excellent farming practices. The thing is to me. You can't get something that tastes like grown on the farm unless you get it grown on the farm. I mean, the difference between a tomato, and let's say Hanover tomato. When you go out and filled and pulling up, there's no comparison to me, you know, I'm like, I grew up in West Virginia. We always had a farm. I know the difference on I know, what led us should taste like, you know. And I don't know if other people realize that do you think that that folks that have grown up with just whatever, you know, they're getting their their produce wherever know the difference between the taste. Well, that's why we have things like the taste of Virginia. Okay. In the summer. We also do another event at Monticello the heritage harvest sessile. We have a big tasting tent..

Richmond Virginia association Virginia Charlottesville Omni West Virginia IRA Wallace Mark Jones Simon Joel Salatin Greenland Thompsons foods Hanover Lee ViroPharma Seoul Leah Pearlman twenty years secretary
"viropharma" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"viropharma" Discussed on PRI's The World

"So he's taking really hard line stance. But major league baseball really kind of understands a future. They know that the Caribbean is the place where you get the best baseball players. You know, I'm from Puerto Rico. So I'm very biased. And if you look at kind of just the surface details of the agreement. Well, it looks like MLB is trying to get Cuban players to the United States easier. But really the top line. From the statement from major league baseball Commissioner rob Manfred says for years MLB has been seeking to end the trafficking of baseball players from Cuba by criminal organizations. So take us back a couple of steps. Here before this agreement. How would Cuban players in the past end up in the majors. You know? There's this fantastic story by ESPN the magazine that literally chronicles what? Yes. Yelp bleak at to do to leave Cuba to get king coon's, and then have two hundred fifty thousand dollars paid for him to get smuggled from Cuba to Cancun and get into the United States is typical story. Yeah. It is a typical story lately because his is the most dramatic because there's all this unsavory individuals that are involved in this. The big question is now is it going to be easier for these Cuban ballplayers to get visas? The Trump policy essentially has made it harder for Cubans to get into this country. And I just wonder if MLB wasn't making money off of this. I don't think we'd be having this conversation. So I mean back to that statement from the Commissioner, do do you think it's about trying to end trafficking or? Is it about trying to? I think it's what they say. But let's be real. I think it's about making money, and I hate to be cynical. But I think about this. Let me give you this. One example, the Miami Marlins van is ninety miles away from Miami. I can see the franchise like that which is struggling bring four or five legit Cuban ball players. And then all of a sudden, you might change how baseball is viewed in Miami. And then all of a sudden you have a moneymaking franchise again. So this is about money. This is about baseball becoming more global more Latino or Latin American more Caribbean. And again, if these players in Cuba weren't so mazing we wouldn't be having this conversation Julio Ricardo gorilla with the in the thick podcasts. I guess we're going to have to wait and see if this deal between major league baseball in the Cuban baseball federation, hopefully water, but thanks so much for your tongue to speak, man. It's always a pleasure to talk to you. My friends one of the big stories or Twenty-eight teen has been the rise of the far. Right. And it was also a global trend in two thousand seventeen and in two thousand. Sixteen and two thousand fifteen and you spot a pattern here far right movements and political parties have been growing now an effort to unite the left. The time has come to form our own common front in the fight global peace and prosperity. This movement would bring people together across the globe to think about the world. We want to live and how make it through the attitude a promotional video there that part of the effort being led by Yanni's ViroPharma. He's the former finance minister of Greece buzzfeed's, j Lester fater has been writing about this movement bringing together people across global left who exactly is verify FOX trying to unite. So progressive international is the name that verify has given to this initiative that is being organized in partnership with the institute that bears Bernie Sanders name. So that gives you some idea of the kinds of people that he's trying to connect with. Is an institute in Vermont. Yes Sanders institute that's actually is run by his by Sander's, wife and stepson. But the idea is to try to unite progressives around the world, and at this point that effort is just is very much in the planning stages. He's got a more mature effort at this point in Europe, where he's building a new political party called European spring that aims to compete a across the EU in elections for the parliament next spring, and to his idea is to actually do the opposite of what the right wing parties wanna do to make the EU stronger to give the central government, more control and power and responsibility for the economy. Now, the European parliament is the one of the weakest branches in the EU, the other branches are appointed leaders and much more powerful..

baseball Cuba MLB Cuban baseball federation Caribbean king coon Miami Commissioner United States EU finance minister Bernie Sanders Miami Marlins Puerto Rico Lester fater European parliament Vermont Sanders institute Europe ESPN the magazine
"viropharma" Discussed on Channel 955

Channel 955

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"viropharma" Discussed on Channel 955

"Fifth film and the drastic park series taking place three years after the previous film the theme park is closed the when a volcano starts erupting on the island and claire try to rescue the remaining dinosaurs chris pratt bryce dallas howard james cromwell beatty wong geraldine chaplin and jeff goldblum star scifi adventure out in limited release is boundaries starring viropharma gap she plays a single mother who takes a road trip with her estranged father when he's kicked out of his retirement home chooses to live with his other daughter down the coast there's family comedy drama also stars christopher plummer kristen schaal christopher lloyd and peter fonda also out in limited release is the biographical spy film the catcher was a spy based on the nineteen ninety four book ball rud stars as the title character a major league baseball player who covertly joined the office of security services to try stop the germans from building an atomic bomb during world war two march strong cnn miller jeff daniels and guy pearce also star still in theaters are the incredible to oceans eight tag solo star wars story and deadpool two and that's your weekend box office preview on iheartradio of cash cars and conscious up with a giant bag a cash of the into summer wanna win seven fifty monday morning on channel nine five five.

geraldine chaplin christopher plummer christopher lloyd jeff daniels guy pearce jeff goldblum viropharma peter fonda baseball three years
"viropharma" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"viropharma" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Eight three three wrecks home that's eight three three r e x home with rex you pay two percent all in no hidden fees no fine print rex provides full service agents and charges fifty percent less than those other guys rex uses big data and machine learning resulting in faster sales a better customer experience and more money in your pocket take the wrecks challenge pick up the phone and let rex prove they offer the lowest fee in the industry call eight three three wrecks home that's eight three three r e x home license number one zero three one one zero seven one five eight if you're thinking or doing it there's an iheartradio playlists or it and you can try it for free right now iheartradio is created a playlist perfect for any mood activity or moment in your life suddenly you're the emergency dj at your friend's house we got you there are thousands of my her radio playlists excuse me human oh hello these days all networks are great yet some humans choose to pay so much more with verizon when they could be saving sprint can you tell me why i didn't know that humans also unaware that sprints offers fifty percent off the samsung galaxy s nine lease i need to get to sprint helping humans is my mission switch to sprint and get fifty percent of a samsung galaxy s nine was bricks lease visit sprint dot com slash gs nine or call one eight hundred sprint one to learn more galaxy s sixteen fifty per month after sixty monthly credit applied within two bills for eighteen months if you cancel remaining balance do with approved credit new restrictions apply did release is boundaries starring viropharma gaffe she plays a single mother who takes.

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"viropharma" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"viropharma" Discussed on KOMO

"President doesn't talk to bob more from director general michael hayden speaking with jake tapper for what it's worth i'm cheri preston at the jp morgan healthcare conference in san francisco this week there are more male ceos name michael than female ceos at all on a women leaders however i'm concentrating on that there is trying to get the job dump one of them may may who is working out a vaccine to prevent and treat alzheimer's our mission neuroscience is really to democratize brain health and make it accessible to all she and her team are hoping some sort of immunisation we'll be able to prevent degenerative diseases in the future our goals to reduce the incidence of alzheimer's in the world by half by 2050 united neuroscience is one of several companies at the event described by some as the super bowl of biotech the goal is to lure investors into putting more of their funds into biology drug production and research another ceo attendee guilty and buckle and with abc says says people are in the mood to invest markets are strong in the fda is cut back on regulations so he gets a really good combination for the viropharma area for what it's worth cheri preston abc news your money at twenty and fifty past the hour on komo news editor colo propel insurance money up the from abc news wall street now stocks moved lower on worries about interest rates the dow fell seventeen points the nasdaq dropped ten in the s p closed down three toyota and mazda are building a jointventure auto plant in alabama the facility which will be located near huntsville will employee of two four thousand people and build up to three hundred thousand vehicles a year berkshire hathaway promoting two candidates to eventually replace iaea warren buffett to its board greg able and ajit jane eighty seven year old oracle of omaha is leaving though he and ninety four year old vicechair charlie munger will remain on the board which is expanding from twelve to fourteen members daria albinger abc see news a gaza we alarm our houses and we alarm our cars but when it comes to your personal information.

alabama ajit jane warren buffett news editor komo viropharma ceo jp morgan healthcare director general bob omaha greg huntsville President mazda toyota nasdaq interest rates insurance money abc super bowl alzheimer san francisco cheri preston jake tapper michael hayden eighty seven year ninety four year
"viropharma" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER - Full Episode

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER - Full Episode

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"viropharma" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER - Full Episode

"Did owned thirty mostly treatment to enact use of treatment than we are we have shown that we are continuing to shoe we pruning guus velocity the pieces continue to grow faster than although he can do bless you patients the number one cause of you and dwarfism in the world so you have substantial part of of your action on dis literally manufacturer youth you're unbelievable manufacturer of yeah we have a large manufacturing footprints we have now for manufacturing facilities basically in the world including the new gene therapy facility we just we just completed in in california so i see we believe we have the largest aegean therapy manufacturing facility in the world today that's operation are we still the leader in biotech in the world see we you say bomber in these b bar inventive are we worry about trump healthcare you don't worry about these things change and a us is definitely steely leader in the in the world by take business no question hopefully will stay that way and if we pool round with the healthcare system too much conduct go away it could go away but i think you despite all the rhetorical issues a direct pricing i think most of the people in power today congress and in in washington i think they believe they believe in in competition as best we to direct pricing and not governor and regret just no fired a family member kid entity since bob may be moanco all right you jjb animator ceo viropharma civil i need you to read the presentation because it takes a tenure perspective not a ten minute for stacked up like a lot of the hedge funds have been monies back into.

california healthcare system congress washington bob viropharma hedge funds jjb ceo ten minute
"viropharma" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"viropharma" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Welcome back america it's hugh hewitt i'm joined now by the chairman of the house ways and means committee he is congressman kevin brady of texas his last time he was here is beloved congressional district was underwater howery a cabin in how is your district doing a good morning you thanks raskin lift our outreach in still struggling in a in a major way as this gordon and then as we all know puerto rico uh as well and so look we got tens of thousands people who just don't have a home in in not sure where they're going to go we got a lot of business an art reopening in so that's why i think you know the two actions congress already swiftly to provide health of the president just send up another uh recovery package uh this week for us to consider so which will help people in in uh erma her viropharma um maria and harvey so it's really important for us to help those communities rebuild they can do alive but i think we can help them as well now in terms of your district congressman just before we get to the tax bill which everyone wants to know about it was truly underwater so what what is needed down there what's the most important thing for the eight yeah so uh look imagine a years worth of rain occurring in three days and just the devastation that an unprecedent that brings about that's what we faced in so again we gotta get uh homes rebuilt you gotta get businesses back up in running and we need to think about how to prevent this in the future whether it's on the coast with their hurricanes through the inland flooding that caused so much damage in our region in so we're spending an awful lot of money making repairs repeatedly in these hurricane zone so it makes sense for the state in the community to partner to gather with us at the federal level each of us putting in uh share in trying to solve the problem for the longterm all right now let's turn.

hugh hewitt chairman gordon president congressman partner the house texas raskin puerto rico harvey three days
"viropharma" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"viropharma" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"Welcome back america it's hugh hewitt i'm joined now by the chairman of the house ways and means committee he is congressman kevin brady of texas his last time he was here as beloved congressional district was underwater houria cabin in how is your district doing a good morning you thanks raskin look our our region still struggling in a in a major way as this gordon in as we all know or rico uh as well so look we got tens of thousands people who just don't have a home in in not sure where they're going to go we got a lot of business the two art reopening in so that's why i think you know the two actions congress already swiftly took provide health the president just send up another uh recovery package uh this week for us to consider so which will help people in in uh erma her viropharma um maria and harvey so it's really important for us to help those communities rebuild they can do a but i think we can help them as well now in terms of your district congressman just before we get to the tax bill which everyone wants to know about it was truly underwater so what what is needed aidid down there what's the most important thing for the eight yes so uh look imagine a years worth of rain occurring in three days and just the devastation that in unprecedent that brings about that's what we faced in so again we've got to get uh homes rebuilt you gotta get businesses back in running and we need to think about how to prevent this in the future whether it's on the coast with the hurricane through the inland flooding that caused so much damage in our region in so we're spending an awful lot of money making with peers repeatedly in these hurricane zone so it makes sense for the state in the community to partner too gather with us at the federal level each of us putting in i share in trying to solve the problem for the longterm all right now let's turn.

hugh hewitt chairman gordon president congressman partner the house texas raskin harvey unprecedent three days
"viropharma" Discussed on BiggerPockets

BiggerPockets

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"viropharma" Discussed on BiggerPockets

"It's time time for its time the random five argh as this is a new segment not that new anymore that we do it is called the random six we asked you six random questions and we'd love to learn a little bit more about you so the first question is what would you do if he won the lottery this rule dave retire from the viropharma and live on beach wa you'd retire from the fire department yes i would no kidding endured for 17 years old i'm ready for new adventure it put in your time my get it identity all right scott next question was the title of your future memoir wow future memoir i know what that means mother smart i'm not that smart on a north that means that's a great title it's really nice and the grid greatest idlib every conceptual hush i would remind i would probably have heard from the civil hearts who came out of his head on its rolls jets deal it uh i really like the tide step so be inappropriate things run your my head i can't keep this pg let's go family first oh i love it i love listen that is one of our our core values here bigger pockets family above all else so i i love it our next question if you could master any instrument on earth what would it be bagpipes nice nice a dig at we would you rocked the kill to go with it or just you know a big killed gabrielle dominates begged by that she's the onto in air there was give off shrill as soon as.

viropharma gabrielle dave scott 17 years
"viropharma" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"viropharma" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"There's a huge difference between a star starter is a name starter is a name and there's a big difference salary wise and what they command so the players association will always fight for starters and for elite and four march key because marquee gets paid but the bottom line is a fat amorin starts are michael pineda's starts i dunno who do i have a better chance to win ifc's about these starts instead of adam warn if addison read started over gazelle men are lugo were the anybody really would i have a worse chance i dunno i don't know and i think for most teams they don't know butch row in new jersey next on the fan i vote area owned brotherhood up at the holiday weekend in every day the armed great guy yankee adequately why don't you get even but you hang from a couple of course i viropharma every day but what i what i heard it sanchez hidden behind on judge you invest your judges hitting it says judge right now all right i thought i reviewed warplane and data you can quit he wasn't doing thank you buy joe jiang that's why you will be on the protection book about a guy with greenery here's one thing i know i know you guys going killing harder i mean you hear the current commodity why not you know recovery met familiar petty night why would argue whose reason why not rome not oh not bear would routine of five while and purity could go because he can it he can't hit look carter let's not kid ourselves about carter okay carter was the leader in the national league and home runs last year he also got a threemilliondollar deal which is nothing and if he could have gotten better he would have taken it so there are a lot of doubters about carter allott otherwise you don't leave the national almonds and then only give three million dollars and i use only and quotes but you baseball fans and sports fans and.

michael pineda ifc adam addison lugo joe jiang sanchez carter baseball three million dollars threemilliondollar