20 Burst results for "Virginia Town"

"virginia town" Discussed on Open Loops: Conversations That Bend

Open Loops: Conversations That Bend

05:47 min | 4 months ago

"virginia town" Discussed on Open Loops: Conversations That Bend

"As she read she. She reads palms. And i'm telling you she was right on with everything just a little bit of it with everything and but then what real was really startling was she also identified me as a warrior. So now i got these to read it to readings from two different people on different sides of the country. Want california one in west virginia town. And then i get this this thing from adana and it just together. It's they're saying the same thing you know which i still to this day. Totally fascinated by it so and one or two You should do a past life. Regressions what happens. I have what what happened there. Well i'll get. I'll briefly. tell you what. I experienced it here. Just just saw ladies. That lives here in mobile and she is absolutely wonderful. Really really super person really in tune with the spiritual and that's what her goal is to help many people as many people as you possibly can. She's had her own set of experiences and bay. I had about four sessions with her and saw about.

adana west virginia california
"virginia town" Discussed on The Bobby Bones Show

The Bobby Bones Show

05:15 min | 5 months ago

"virginia town" Discussed on The Bobby Bones Show

"Was great and we're going to get the cat soon and then they emailed us and they're like oh the cat passed away. We're like win there like two weeks ago. Well what took two weeks and they go because it's so sad. It's the best bits of the week with morgan number two. So the whole bay eddie. Walking from west. Virginia to tennessee with spawns. Because eddie made a comment about george strait song lyric in it that he was laying. It doesn't seem like what you want to emphasize what that lyric was. Yes it was carrying your love with me from west. Virginia down to tennessee in my mind. I'm thinking like that's just not that far so like and this is the songwriting world. Hey you can say whatever like you're writing a song you can just say from singapore down at tennessee like and that'd be wow you were going to carry my love that far like wow you really love me but this dude saying like west virginia down tennessee like one st and for somebody who doesn't take a lot of things very literally eddy took those lear literally. I did and that's already to walk the whole thing. Best bond from this but while you guys were on the walk you admitted you realize that's not what the song actually means when you you're walking across the whole steak or three states you're thinking a lot and your mind starts kind of like gone and i was singing like care. Union with me. West virginia town tennessee. And i'm like wow tennessee and then going to bristol tennessee. The birthplace country music and then nashville tennessee. And i started thinking like wait a second. What if hey. This song may not be about a guy. Like walking all the way from west virginia down to tennessee to prove his love. Like i thought it was. Maybe it's like george strait sane. I'm a musician. I live in west virginia. But i'm going go. Follow my dream. Go to nashville and may become a country star. All the way down in tennessee. But love you. I want to be thinking about the hallway. And i'll be back. Don't worry to come get you. Because i'm going to be carrying your love with me from west virginia down tennessee and the middle of that. I'm like which means this whole walk. That i'm doing is pointless which is why did i open my mouth. Meant days to think about it. I think it was like day to you. Yeah the revelation like. Let's just cancel this whole thing even makes no sense day. Two of when this happened he was. I think i know what this is. All about. And i was completely wrong about it. Which people who. Just listen to the show no on the show eddie. Like behind the scenes is really like not a literal person. Like you just don't literally believe certain things like what you like. You just you mess around like somebody tells you something near layout whatever you're just not very literal does the best way i can explain it. That's just not your personality. Normally you're very go with the flow. Yeah yeah yeah. Yeah i am. It is what it is is kind of my thing. Yes so for you to take something so dramatically literally not your personality but you gotta understand like i was listening to george strait was one night and i just to trae over and over and i i was. I've been listening to us for years. But i don't listen when i listen to music..

nashville tennessee west virginia Virginia george strait sane two weeks two weeks ago george strait singapore eddie bristol tennessee West virginia town three states one night Two nashville tennessee one Union with west years
"virginia town" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

06:59 min | 10 months ago

"virginia town" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Arlington, Virginia. Her name's Kristen Alan again apparent in Arlington and a member of the Arlington parent Coalition with constant battles to fight against the school district there, Kristen. Good Morning. Great to have you back with us. Didn't want invents Mary, Thanks so much for making space on the program to focus on this. It's really important. Yeah. Without AH lot to talk about first talk about that. Would you with the status of Arlington schools? And when it comes to, uh, getting the kids back to school, and what kind of fights you're having there? Uh, Arlington is still over. Tool. Um, and we're having the same fights of of God. Mr Fox, you know, there's a lot of dissent of power is starting to shift a little bit back towards the parents. They're demanding. But the kids get back into school. But we go a long way to grow up to go. And, um the fear narrative is still driving most of this. And, um the kids are deeply suffering. You know, we have a mental health crisis. Isabella's The fact that they're stricken blind in their education, but I've even heard from Ah lot of people. That was kind of an epidemic of kids feeling if I think they're just hitting a wall, you know they they are losing hope, and the adults can't seem to get it together and make it work for them. Yeah, and and that That is a huge problem because these kids are spending time online. But they're not spending necessarily time online with their studies. I was speaking to someone as a child in the Virginia school system, and their son normally was. It was a really good student, and they have one son who could handle this and his ex Elling with the with the online learning in the remote learning their other son is falling behind and they're taking him out. Now they're putting him in private school, and they had actually had a hard time finding a private school that didn't have a waiting list that they could put their son and And I think what's gonna happen when this all shakes out is the school systems. They're going to find out that a lot of kids aren't coming back to them because the parents who can afford to take their kids out and can find a place to send their kids are doing so. So. How does that change the dynamic, though of also taking kids back to school, because the school is going to be very different. It isn't any different. I think that you're seeing parents losing faith and the government schools because there's a real breach of trust. You know, there's an inability to Figure out how to get them educated in the current environment, and you know the initial confusion last spring on over the summer movement, understandable, but but the time that's been wasted this year, um and people problematic. The other big issue that we're seeing is that there's a real, um the public schools are really now serving the interest of special interest groups. And, um, and what I specifically want to talk to you guys about today is what's happening with the Virginia Department education model policies with transgender students. And this is, um The deadline is tonight for comment on this and what we're seeing is the statewide rollout in Virginia, um, based on policies that were actually developed and incubated here in Northern Virginia. Um, let me give him quick background is that in 2018, the chair of an advocacy group for transgenders Blessing, told The Washington Post that Virginia and California Burgundy laboratories in which they tested Fairly radical policies. They were very successful in implementing this stuff in Arlington, Fairfax, Loudon, and now they're rolling out to the rest of Virginia. Um, now that it's a one party state. Um, it's causing great confusion among Children already and it is not helping heal the kids with gender dysphoria and let me just take a quick second here. It's important to be clear on this Children who are suffering from issues such as gender dysphoria. Need respect, support protection. The families are suffering. Home. But the goal of these policies is really not about helping the parents and and, uh and Children. It's about something much darker. That's going on. I want parents and I know that there are folks looking into you that have their kids and faith based schools and their home schooling and they're saying to themselves. Thank God I don't have to build us and they You need to deal with it. They need to be aware of what's going on because it's coming to every community, including the faith based and the home schooling, and I'll tell you why in a minute Promises policies into Mary is that their attack on families and its attack on the identity of our Children in their most vulnerable Pages. The policy. Uh, if you go when you look at it, you can look at it. The Virginia Town hall. Another great resource is the Family Foundation of Virginia to take a look their website. They really recap what the policy's sake. I'll give you the language of it and kind of break down what the issues are, but Just quickly. The policy redefines gender as being entirely separate and unconnected to biological sex. So we're telling our kids from kindergarten non that you cannot necessarily trust. Body. You were born into and if that's what we're telling our kids, then every level of reality is up for grabs. The schools are undermining Parental authority because part of their policy is saying that they can advise and help students make decisions about their gender without any parental involvement, And this includes Authority happening again here in Arlington. It's happening, Interfax happening allowed him. This includes going against parents wishes about which bathroom the child should use that they have gender dysphoria. What name? They're called What pronouns they wanted. They prefer to be used. The school record. This is amazing regarding this can be kept from parents. Uh um. If a parent is being to be unsupportive of their transgender child behavior choices the parent can be reported to Child protective services. Again. We're not talking here about physical emotional. Beatrice is never acceptable under any circumstances, but simply a lack of support can be reported as abuse. Disappearance are concerned the threat. So this is an attack on family its attack on Children's identity. It eliminates safe private spaces for girls because biological males can now use girls, bathrooms and locker lives. Can you imagine the humiliation of the young men and young women?.

Arlington Virginia Arlington parent Coalition Virginia school Mary Kristen Alan Virginia Town hall Virginia Department Northern Virginia Family Foundation of Virginia Mr Fox Isabella Elling Beatrice California Burgundy Fairfax Loudon The Washington Post
"virginia town" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"virginia town" Discussed on KCRW

"Like when a segregated school in a small Virginia town burned down in nineteen thirty eight how much ash has came a court case that predated brown versus the board of education the law declaring segregation unconstitutional as Robbie Harris of member station WVTF reports most people in town never knew about the role it played in the fight for racial equality until now after the fire a new school was built for black students in jail aszki Virginia Dorothy Venable taught at the county training school for decades she says black teachers were never invited to meetings that white teachers attended but this one time she wasn't having it and when she walked through the door the supervisor was none too pleased to see here the room is full of face to face okay she said she couldn't embarrass me and at that meeting she was able to get the same school supplies that the white teachers received Gary Harris was her student in the early sixties I believe that the teachers understood the challenges that were in front of us we're getting these kids ready for this life that they're facing a life of closed doors and unequal opportunities in Pulaski formal education for African Americans ended at junior high it was deliberate that black students will only go to the ninth grade Mickey Hickman is a healthy school alumnus so that would attract them to lower wage jobs and that's why a young man named Chauncey Harmon left town to get his college degree he studied at the Tuskegee institute in Alabama under George Washington carver and later he became the principal a caliphate in nineteen thirty nine while he waited for the school to be rebuilt Harmon did something unheard of he started a petition for equal school facilities and teacher pay in Pulaski he had African Americans as well as whites Dr Marilyn Harmon is the lake Chauncey Harmon's daughter and for many of them it was as long as they're not coming to us let them have what they want that petition became the basis for a lawsuit seeking racial equalization Harmon and a prominent Pulaski physician named Percy Corbin why on their case in nineteen forty nine five years before brown versus the board Mr Harmon was involved with one of the earliest efforts and civil rights that's when trip he wrote his dissertation on Harmon's little known fight for equality in Pulaski and its connection to brown what would become the landmark case aimed at ending racial segregation filed by Thurgood Marshall who later became a Supreme Court justice it was actually when I got started in this about and while this led to more dig into it and the more clearly it was there can you connect Thurgood Marshall to Mr Harmon's working scalping yes you definitely can I've been here for Singh be sixty one years and a year and a half ago I heard for the first time in my life the story of Chauncey Harmon in the lawsuit Dave Clark is mayor of Pulaski happened right here in my town and that tells you how far we've come and how far we have to go after the legal victory principal Harmon was not offered a contract to return to caliphate now P. Laskey is fundraising to turn the empty school building into a community center with a museum commemorating Harmon Corbin and the town's role in the fight for racial equality healthy teacher Dorothy Venable says that's fitting black people white people anybody who needs the services of what's going on in this bill was going to go on in this bill will be able to use it the museum won't shy away from pointing out desegregation did not come to Pulaski County schools until the late sixties more than a decade after.

Virginia
"virginia town" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"virginia town" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"The rage in Virginia towns and counties the past few months today it become big comes before the at love it's filled town council in Loudon county the owner of the local gun store in town once a show of support posting a you tube video thirty forty fifty people say or else Bryce arm and I made the full regalia Warner workmen owns minute man arms in love it's Phil where the town council will vote on the proclamation a quote supports measures that would advance firearm safety without infringing upon the right to bear and keep arms love until as a municipality that does not have authority to disregard county or state law the vote has reportedly divided some members of the community Barbara WMAL and WMAL dot com Arlington board member Christian Dorsey is likely to lose his position as a member of the Metra board of directors after he failed to repay a ten thousand dollar campaign donation for metros largest union that is a violation of metro's epics policy Dorsey's been open with the fact that he's undergoing personal bankruptcy any told The Washington Post he is deeply embarrassed and disappointed he also says he's working to transfer the money back to the union the metro board executive committee meets today it could decide to punish Dorsey or seek his removal from the board twenty twenty has gotten off to a strong start for most of Maryland's casinos with revenue up six percent over last year the top generating casino MGM national harbor which brought in almost fifty nine million dollars followed closely by Maryland live it roughly fifty two million the only casino to take a loss for sure when Baltimore down four percent compared to the same month in twenty nineteen more than forty five.

Loudon county Phil Barbara WMAL Christian Dorsey metro The Washington Post executive committee Maryland Baltimore Virginia Bryce Warner twenty twenty MGM
The Feast of the Seven Fishes: Italian-American Christmas Cuisine

The Feast

09:45 min | 2 years ago

The Feast of the Seven Fishes: Italian-American Christmas Cuisine

"We may not understand stand while we make many of our holiday food traditions. What counts of course is that the food brings together family and friends to celebrate which which may be the exact reason that every Christmas in a small town in West Virginia and indeed in many Italian American family homes around the country tree families prepare for an epoch culinary marathon just before Christmas making seven different seafood dishes has to eat on Christmas Eve? Tradition appropriately enough called the feast of the seven fishes. Now what exactly exactly is this tradition. You might ask well. Let's let the experts explain what was talking about seven the seven fishes the fishes and something we Christmas Eve. I mean all the Italians around here. What seven kinds of fish we were supposed to we? Honestly it makes so many different kinds of dishes. I'm not sure when some sort of violation and not some families only do three or five. Some do more. I think the only thing is just has to be an odd number. Somebody told me that maybe it has something something to do with representing the seven sacraments. But it's not like a big religious thing for us though you know I mean we cook fish and we party and yes that's pretty much mindset the whole families. Their friends last Christmas Eve at my house is the most of the year. I mean. We don't do anything on houses allowed US which is scary. Actually yeah now that I think about it. The thing is the piece. That's one of those about the journey. Things you know like getting their being the fundamental everyone spent so how much time on the preparation dinner itself. It's almost the letdown. It takes that long. I think a lot. It's a real pain in the ASS. Clark allows is a confidence. That's been heavily salted to preserve it so it comes to visit board and you have to soak in water for three days. Always changing the water grandfather. I great uncles thing. They're obsessed with it so most isn't that we make in tomato sauce and the rest we're willing to deep fry pointing tonight's plain white fish we finding the cast iron skillet with garlic and olive oil and salt and pepper is really small. Fish called smelt. Melt I love him when we were cancelled beginning contest. We didn't always have shrimp. It was too expensive by Dunkel. Frankie started bringing it in one year and he fixes a deep fried oysters. Iraq's up a couple we're throwing the soup there's he'll brad and deep fry novel and then marinade and some kind of type thing my grandfather makes it lasts but surly least Calamar. Kalomo is Italian for squid and that takes a whole bunch of different ways. Stop Them Big Fried. I like boiling marinated in vinegar and garlic and served cold. That's our seven the what you just heard as a clip from the new movie called appropriately enough the Feast of the seven fishes written and directed by Robert Tannehill. The story focuses on that small West Virginia town that I was telling you about earlier and how one Italian American family celebrates the holidays with a massive seafood meal set in the nineteen eighties. It's essentially a food movie with a little romantic comedy thrown in on the side and although the movie itself is fictional the town the characters and of course the feast itself all come directly from. I'm Robert nells experienced growing up in West Virginia and of course his own family celebrations of the Feast of the seven fishes on Christmas Eve. And before you think that his family was the only one celebrating the feast the annual holiday. Tradition has become such a big deal in his hometown of Fairmont West. Virginia that town own has actually begun to hold an annual festival in honor of it featuring music holiday lights and of course more seafood dishes than you can shake a stick stick at Robert has been advocate of the feast of the seven fishes for years. I publishing a graphic novel about the tradition in the early two thousands followed by a cookbook cookbook featuring traditional dishes from the feast and now with the international release of his fill in two thousand nineteen. It's easy to say that Robert Canal Knell is the biggest champion of the Feast of the seven fishes around late November. We had the opportunity to sit down with Robert and chat with him about his new the film his experiences growing up in West Virginia and of course all the things that go into this fabulous culinary tradition Charleston on the writer director of the seven fishes. Well you know the the interesting thing about it is in. Nobody's quite sure you know how it got started. Or when I mean you'll hear people argue about when was it. I called the the seven fishes or they don't hear you know people say they don't do this. Nearly which and my response is those. Two million tying immigration on painlessly came to America without any form of mass communication between them and decided all start doing fish. I don't think so. It was called love as you vigil for the Christ child in some form was celebrated in southern Italy. I didn't even know why we get it. I you know. I wish they when you're a kid you're busy. You know being a kid. I didn't think to ask anybody. It was delicious and we had it on Christmas Eve and I think my mom in the late eighties. I finally said you know. Why do we do this seven fish and it was the first time I'd ever heard the phrase we didn't say it? You know we were just too busy busy doing it. My grandmother who I hosted for us I mean it was like I I used to think she was like supernatural. She could multiply through her yard with legendary very in in in the neighborhood because she could just it was like you know it was like a story because you know what's amazing you want it out of the store. She made her own Pasta. She made her own wine no she you make their own bread. She grew tomatoes basil. She grew everything and their food. Just I just never tasted like that anywhere and Christmas Eve especially you know she would. She would make this giant meal on Wood Burning Stove in her inner base. But which was you know. I'm being kind of I'm calling it a basement uh-huh and we would all crowd in down there and just have the mazing Lee exotic food meal you know. There's a bit of a description in the film about it's it's called the feast of the seven fishes by. It's not necessarily always seven now was at seven in in your family tradition or was it nine or was it thirteen. There seems to be an odd number element going in there you know. I don't remember ever being hung up on it if I look back as a kid be There would be. I would say there were seven as I'm remembering but over the years as she got older you know she kinda dropped feels she. She kinda stopped fooling with time. She's ninety she's like I'm not going to deal with his buckle up but in my house now I don't know what it is like seventeen fishes. We go crazy. I mean he's become way more. I think even I think probably always it was. It's more of a cultural family thing. You know it was trying to check some sort of back. Was it always the same recipes for for each of the each of the dishes. Shall we say like were was the the call Mari Recipe. Always the same or were there little variations are that was the one call Amari recipe. And that's that's what you you he had to make. If you'RE GONNA make call Mary in in our family that there were two There was the stuffed with red sauce and without without with just kind of like drenched in olive oil. She was just wonderful too. But you know the thing is if you you go downtown you have from house to house. Everybody's got their stand. Spend on stuff like I dropped the way. We used to do a lot in favor of my my friends that I grew up with. They were when I was collecting recipes and we did the book. they deep fry balls. And after I had those ones and I was like man. This is what we're having magic coming back to the same thing you know. It's it's that act of creating this meal together and sharing together and actually you know generating an authentic memory inexperienced instead of being on some treadmill running around trying signed by stuff and you know trying to somehow our direct the perfect Christmas instead of actually living it that was important to me is is in engaging in the process. Does that make sense. Oh absolutely and I mean I think you show that very well in the film and that's where I was going to ask about as well of it's clearly you know whether it seven or seventeen dishes this has to be in some way a kind of a family affair of of making the dishes that this is something that one person cannot achieve on on their own So it almost the the cooking process ends up being more of the the kind of family gathering together almost more than the eating of it. I'm not sure if that's going too far. I'd love to know if if you see the same thing I usually do. I mean all of this is just. It's so delicious. And we my wife and she's always bringing in new ideas she wants to try different things but you know last shit last year. I think we had. I think it was only down to twenty six dinner. You press a lot of people can just you know when you're doing that and my father-in-law where He's you know he's outside we try. We started putting some of the cooking outside so we definitely press people in the service So you can get it all done. Even though we start we start in the morning inevitably might try to capture that show that last forty five minutes to an hour is just insanity elite trying to have everything come on close to the same time.

West Virginia United States Virginia Robert Tannehill Robert Robert Canal Fairmont West Robert Nells Clark Kalomo Frankie Iraq America Wood Burning Stove Mari Recipe Mazing Lee Italy Mary
"virginia town" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"virginia town" Discussed on AP News

"Will be set in the fifties just like in the film and it will include new and familiar characters the musical also be a mix of fifty songs and some new original tunes while HBO MAX debuts as a streaming service next spring the premiere date for Greece why dell hi has not been announced drones have started delivering online orders in a test being run in a Virginia town the company running the test is cold wing which is owned by Google parent alphabet it was the first drum company to receive approval from the FAA to make deliveries in the U. S. wing partnered with Walgreens fat acts and local gift shop sugar magnolia to perform the tests in Christiansburg Virginia Walgreens customers in the town will be able to order from a list of more than one hundred items and get them delivered to their doors by the drones drones will start with the flying radius of about four miles from wings distribution facility in Christiansburg the drones are capable of flying a twelve mile round trip and wing expects to widen its radius eventually though it did not give a timeline for expansion Disney's Maleficent mistress of evil has knocked joker out of the number one spot at the box office but just barely studios on Sunday estimate that the film grossed a thirty six million dollars in North America and one hundred seventeen million dollars internationally in its first weekend in theaters Warner brothers that joker landed in second place in its third weekend with twenty nine point two million dollars third place went to another sequel zombie land a double tap of the R. rated comedy comes ten years after the original and in limited release Tyco white tee tees **** satire Jo Jo rabbit opened in five theatres with a strong three hundred fifty thousand dollars October eighteenth two McGuire former Ohio.

Google Affiliate Rolls Out Drone Deliveries

America's Dining and Travel Guide

00:31 sec | 2 years ago

Google Affiliate Rolls Out Drone Deliveries

"A Google affiliate started using drones to officially deliver customers Walgreens and fed ex purchases in a test being run by a Virginia town wing which is owned by Google parent alphabet receive federal approval earlier this year to make commercial deliveries by drone it was the first drone company to receive the approval in the US earlier this month you PS got approval from the Federal Aviation Administration to fly delivery drones they've been running delivery test with WakeMed hospital campus in Raleigh North Carolina this is USA radio news

Walgreens Google United States Federal Aviation Administratio Virginia Wakemed Hospital Raleigh North Carolina
"virginia town" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"virginia town" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"This is a Bloomberg market minute drugstore delivery in the twenty first century is about to take off in October Walgreens fed ex and winning the drone offshoot of alphabets Google will start making some drone deliveries of small packages in a southwestern Virginia town near Virginia Tech University is relatively low density of population and so the relatively low risk teal groups director of corporate Alice's Philip Finnigan emphasizes though this doesn't mean you can expect to order a prescription and find it on your porch anytime soon I think that's still quite a ways away and it isn't just an issue of risk although that is part of the calculation. economics is less clear so he believes drone deliveries in the US will initially involved deliveries to hospitals but Finnigan says the companies involved here fed ex and Walgreens are making a smart choice to be in it take off all these companies want could prove they're working at the cutting edge of technology Jill Duggar Bloomberg radio. Hey this is Joe Gallagher well the weekends here but the kids are enjoying their homework on over the weekend for most of the teachers assign homework including essay questions yet be it be. my parents are you say you're doing your homework. any minute now and respond that way my dad really save you clean your room that was another weekend thing. my mom was one. realizing a figure. anyway joy homework and the essay questions okay always cleaning your room. we know that.

Philip Finnigan Walgreens Bloomberg Virginia Tech University Virginia Joe Gallagher Google Jill Duggar US director Alice
"virginia town" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"virginia town" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Different worlds and that I was trying to juggle simultaneously and then one night in a break from writing Russell watched a movie you should never seen before one from the fifties about another set of siblings who were also in the middle of a nightmare the night hunter it's a movie made in nineteen fifty five Charles line directed his only found when it came out it was a critical and commercial disaster it's about a preacher who comes into this West Virginia town lord you show Arnold what she was doing can you put me in this very cell at this very time Robert Mitchum plays the Reverend Harry Powell a man with ten thousand dollars his time we know him at this point to be a con man and the wind and the make lose it in prison and discovered that there is fortune to be had the children also know about and seduces a widow mind your manners take that look off your face so the winters plays this with it didn't she has his two young children do you boy who seem to be the only ones alert to the kind of evil that's that's role than for brother Ben's only about these young uns what do you tell you I tell me what finally land you and your sister both was is that all why noble he told me lots and lots of things nice things more but there's a scene that was such a complete surprise that opened up in the middle of the film everything I've been really resonate and then suddenly just structurally there's this enormous surprise zero show room Shelley winters is no longer with us she has been murdered the children still haven't given up the money you and me is one not if we stay here Danny county Kansas no suggested no and they are being pursued by Robert.

Russell Arnold Robert Mitchum Harry Powell Ben Shelley winters Charles West Virginia Danny county Kansas ten thousand dollars
"virginia town" Discussed on AM 570 The Mission

AM 570 The Mission

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"virginia town" Discussed on AM 570 The Mission

"Workers for Exxon Mobil, have begun evacuating from an oil field in Bosnia, the US already ordered all non-essential diplomatic staff out of Iraq Jackie Quinn, Washington a tornado touchdown on Saturday packing. A powerful punch with winds as high as one hundred thirty miles per hour in the mid west national weather service says the F to twister traveled for about a half a mile. Mile in Geronimo Oklahoma, the town is located about eighty miles southwest of the capital. Oklahoma City officials say the twister damage to homes and hospitalized one injured person as a precaution that is correspondent, Andrew Stewart reporting officials say a roadside bomb has hit a tourist bus near the Giza pyramids. They say Sunday's blast as wounded at least seventeen people, including tourists the size of World War, Two invasion, known as day, took a Riddick toll on the small Virginia town of Bedford which only had a population of about four thousand at a time if d day losses were among the steepest proportionally of any community in America in nineteen Ninety-six congress designating a plot of land next to Bedford at the site of national d day memorial more on these stories at townhall dot com. This is Dr Howard founder and formulator of balance of nature. We're changing America one life at a time. Why I've different vitamins, I had to take because of my post cancer post, cardiac situation, but the bows nature of I mean that being so condensed on natural. And you know it's amazing stuff. I haven't felt this good then seven or eight years, I would not be able to.

Exxon Mobil Bedford Geronimo Oklahoma America Jackie Quinn Oklahoma City Bosnia Iraq Andrew Stewart Washington Dr Howard US Virginia founder cancer eight years
"virginia town" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"virginia town" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Fear the use of violence and the use of lice fake use. And those are used in combination to the people in check and the silence though position. Okay. The voice of the opposition in the election in the Philippines, which NPR's Julie McCarthy is covering from illegitimate. Thanks so much. Thank you. Some of the twenty one democratic presidential candidates are looking beyond the earliest states to vote. The voting starts, of course, in Iowa New Hampshire, South Carolina, NPR's Daniel, Kurt Slaven reports on where else you may find Elizabeth Warren, a West Virginia town of fewer than four hundred people isn't an obvious place for a democrat to campaign for president. But nevertheless, even with Trump supporters protesting just outside. There was Elizabeth Warren rallying her supporters in the town of Kermit. There comes a time when the fight comes to your door. And for me that time is now I believe in an America that works Kermit has been hit hard by the opioid crisis. And Warren spent a lot of her Friday speech talking about her new plan for combating that pedantic time to talk about personal responsibility. And that means the people who helped create this problem, and I got a plan for that his latest campaigns wing. Started in rural West Virginia, but moved into larger cities in Ohio another state badly hurt by the pedantic. Having plans is Warren's brand and warns library of policy proposals is drawing voters like Rebecca Hooker who came out to hear about college affordability big.

Elizabeth Warren West Virginia Kermit NPR Julie McCarthy Rebecca Hooker Trump Philippines Kurt Slaven Ohio president South Carolina New Hampshire Iowa America Daniel
"virginia town" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"virginia town" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It was he a Newark that I realized that I was needed that my work could be crucial in somebody's life. This by these Portuguese resources in Newark. It may not be enough for asylum-seekers like Adriana just in the US. She's being wearing an ankle monitor since she was released at the border and still looking for an immigration attorney to represent her in court says that photon signals on the fighting back Adriana says if she and her family are deported should doesn't know what they're going to do because they spent all their money to come to the US experts say, smugglers and Brazil lie to immigrants and tell them. The courts here will favor them but to succeed in their asylum. Claim immigrants like Adrian that will have to show they suffered more than the conomic hardship to be able to stay here. Bala Moda WNYC news, some of the twenty one democratic presidential candidates are looking beyond the earliest states to vote. The voting starts, of course, in Iowa New Hampshire, South Carolina, NPR's, Daniel, Kurtz, Slaven reports on where else you may find Elizabeth Warren, a West Virginia town of fewer than four hundred people isn't an obvious place for a democrat to campaign for president. But nevertheless, even with Trump supporters protesting just outside. There was Elizabeth Warren rallying her supporters in the town of Kermit. There comes a time when the fight comes to your door. And for me that time is now I believe in an America that works Kermit has been hit hard by the opioid crisis. And Warren spent a lot of her Friday speech talking about her new. Plan for combating that pedantic time to talk about personal responsibility. And that means the people who helped create this problem, and I got a plan for that this latest campaign swing started in rural West Virginia, but moved into larger cities in Ohio another state badly hurt by the pedantic. Having plans is Warren's brand and warns library of policy proposals is drawing voters like Rebecca Hooker who came out to hear about college affordability. The big one.

Elizabeth Warren Newark Adriana West Virginia US Kermit Rebecca Hooker Trump Adrian Brazil Ohio NPR attorney Slaven South Carolina America president Iowa New Hampshire Daniel
"virginia town" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:02 min | 3 years ago

"virginia town" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And by the listeners of K Q E D. This is weakened edition from NPR news. I'm Scott, Simon Measham Marins novel sugar run open. His Jodi McCarty is getting turned out of prison on parole after serving eighteen years for manslaughter. She shut her girlfriend when she was seventeen Jodi has lived most of her life in prison and must make a new life in the real world outside. She doesn't really know soon. She'll meet someone and they'll try to make a life together in a small West Virginia town where they're outsiders in every way sugar run is the first novel for Measham Erin who short stories initiation appeared in the Oxford American cheese, a visiting writer at university of North Carolina and a writing fellow at the Beckley federal Correctional Institution in West Virginia joins us from West Virginia public radio. Thanks so much for being with us. Thank you so much for having. You kinda grew up going to prison. Didn't you? I did. Yes. My dad worked for a nonprofit in part of the work that he did is he volunteered to visit women in the federal prison camp in Alderson, West Virginia women who hadn't received a visit from family or friends in more than a year. And I would often go along with my dad, so as a very young child, I think it was exciting to me because I got to eat candy out of the vending machines. But those experiences stuck with me. Well, and they come up here they do. So I think when I started writing sugar Ryan on and started realizing that my character Jodie had spent a significant amount of her life in prison, those impressions that I formed when I was young came back to me. I specifically remember overhearing my dad speaking with women at the medicine prison who were soon to be released and later as an adult I realized just how strong their joy was to be released. But also their fear of what it meant. To make a life on the outside. Did I hear you say once I realized my character Jodie had spent all these years in prison. Yeah. I mean, Jodi came to me very strongly before I even realized that I was writing a book, I was hanging out with Jodie, and she kind of took up residence in in my mind, and I became a little infatuated with hair started thinking about her all the time, and then the plot and the rest of the story sort of fell into place. I really actually kind of felt like I was getting to know her. And so it was a process of realizing what she had been through. Well, Jody without giving too much weight gets out of prison. She meets an interesting woman. Miranda. Who has three children to failing marriage to a has been country singer and an addiction. What draws them to each other? She's just gotten out of prison, and she knows in many ways that taking up with Miranda is a bad decision. I mean, she she kind of looks at her the first night that they're hanging out and tells yourself, you don't do this. But at the same time, she's drawn to Herman she's physically attracted to her. But she's also I think attracted to a fact that Miranda is bound and determined to enjoy life despite everything that's going wrong. So it's this sort of love of life and determination to make something joyful out of life. Certainly one of the things that compelled us to pick up the book is that we don't hear a lot in literature about West Virginia. What did we misunderstand sometimes about West Virginia? So I get asked a lot like why why not just leave West Virginia, you know, or or why would a character like Jodi go back to West Virginia. And I think that for for those of us who love places that are sometimes difficult to love. We love them with this extra fierceness this fierce tenderness for this place that isn't always easy to love. But there there's so much. That's so interesting and beautiful both in the people, and the landscape, you do take on the fact that that fracking is is in all ways, truly changing the landscape. One of the things that's difficult about West Virginia is that it is a place where a lot is extracted from here. Right. Coal lumber. Now fracking for natural gas, and it's devastating on. On the land here. But I also think that that's part of where we get the conversation of of why don't you just leave is that people kind of envisioned West Virginia as a place to take things out of? Yeah. Ed addictions. You do have to make that a part of your telly storytelling too. Don't you? Absolutely. So, you know, the characters in my book, they use a lot of different substances. And of course, the happens anywhere that is not specific to us Virginia. But I do think that you know, in some some rural areas it can be easy to fall into a trap of using substances. As a crutch to make it through a life. That's difficult for Jody. She's trying to find a job after prison and living in a rural area doesn't make that any easier for her. And I think that sometimes she goes to substances to alleviate that. We noted that you're writing fellow at the Beckley federal Correctional Institution. Is there a great story and every prisoner? I think there's a great story in every human being and that so that the same is true. I there's a great story in every prisoner. But the thing that I loved about teaching there is just how obviously how much it means. The guys who are in my class. Being able to to sit down once a week for two hours and focus on their writing. And they've told me just to be quiet room to where you know, I'll give them a writing assignment. And then and then we're quiet. They've told me that that in many ways is one of the things that is most valuable to them. Without giving away the end of the novel. Jody go on with you in your life. Now, she does to a degree. I mean, I think when I found the end of the book I was able to to let her go in some ways. I I definitely still think about her when you found the end of the book. Now, people don't write for a living. All think, what do you mean you found that you created? True. But the thing is I think at least for me the way that I write is. I have this sort of foggy idea of the ending. I need to have something that I'm working towards right? But I don't want it to be too sharp, actually in my mind because then I might right towards it at all costs, and I might miss something along the way and actually this book ended slightly before I had planned. So I had this kind of idea. And then when I reached the place where the book does end now, I, you know, I think that's the act Measham Erin her debut novel sugar run. Thanks so much for being with us. Thank you so much. An airline food cookbook. Sounds just above promising is an album of great moments from public radio fundraisers, but United publishing cookbook of recipes against fired by.

West Virginia Jodi McCarty Jody Miranda Measham Erin Beckley federal Correctional I Virginia NPR Jodie Alderson Oxford American Simon Measham Marins university of North Carolina Scott writer Ryan Herman United publishing
"virginia town" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:57 min | 3 years ago

"virginia town" Discussed on KCRW

"Premieres Tuesday at ten nine central on history. This is weakened addition from NPR news. I'm Scott Simon. Marins novel sugar run open. Just Jodi McCurdy is getting turned out of prison on parole after serving eighteen years for manslaughter. She shot her girlfriend when she was seventeen Jodi has lived most of her life in prison and must now make a new life in the real world outside. She doesn't really know soon. She'll meet someone and they'll try to make a life together in a small West Virginia town where they're outsiders in every way sugar run is the first novel for Measham Erin who short stories initiation appeared in the Oxford American cheese, a visiting writer at university of North Carolina and a writing fellow at the Beckley federal Correctional Institution in West Virginia. She joins us from West Virginia public radio. Thanks so much for being with us. Thank you so much for having you kind of grew up going to prison. Didn't you? I did. Yes. My dad worked for a nonprofit in part of the work that he did is he volunteered to visit women in the federal prison camp in Alderson, West Virginia women who hadn't received a visit from family or friends in more than a year. And I would often go along with my dad, and so as a very young child, I think it was exciting to me because I got to eat candy out of the vending machines. But those experiences stuck with me. Well, and they come up here they do. So I think you know, when I started writing sugar Ryan and started realizing that my character Jodie had spent a significant amount of her life in prison, those impressions that I formed when I was young came back to me. I specifically remember overhearing my dad speaking with women at the Alderson prison who were soon to be released and later as an adult I realized just how strong their joy was. You know to be released. But also their fear of what it meant to make a life on the outside. Did I hear you say one, sir realized my character Jodie had spent all these years in prison? Yeah. I mean, Jodi came to me very strongly before I even realized that I was writing a book I was hanging out with Jodie, and she kind of took up residence in in my mind, and I became a little infatuated with her. I started thinking about her all the time, and then the plot and the rest of the story sort of fell into place. I really actually kind of felt like I was getting to know her. And so it was a process of realizing what she had been through. Well, Jody without giving too much weight gets out of prison. She meets an interesting woman. Miranda. Who has three children to failing marriage to has been country singer and an addiction. What draws them to each other? She's just gotten out of prison, and she knows in many ways that taking up with Miranda is a bad decision. I mean, she she kind of looks at our the first night that they're hanging out and tells yourself, you don't do this. But at the same time, she's drawn to Herman she's physically attracted to she's also I think attracted to fact that Miranda is bound and determined to enjoy life despite everything that's going wrong. So it's this sort of love of life and determination to make something joyful out of life. Certainly one of the things that compelled us to pick up the book is that we don't hear a lot in literature about West Virginia. What did we misunderstand sometimes about West Virginia? So I get asked a lot like, you know, why why not just leave West Virginia, you know, or or why would a character like Jodi go back to West Virginia. And I think that for for those of us who love places that are sometimes difficult to love. We love them with this extra fierceness this fierce tenderness for this place that isn't always easy to love. But there there's so much. That's so interesting and beautiful both in the people, and the landscape, you do take on the fact that that fracking is is in all ways, truly changing the landscape. One of the things that's difficult about West Virginia is that it is a place where a lot is extracted from here. Right. Coal lumber. Now fracking for natural gas, and it's devastating on. On the land here. But I also think that that's part of where we get the conversation of of why don't you just leave is that people kind of envision West Virginia as a place to take things out off. Yeah. At addictions. You do have to make that a part of your teller storytelling too. Don't you? Absolutely. So, you know, the characters in my book, they use a lot of different substances. And of course, that happens anywhere that is not specific to us Virginia. But I do think that you know, in some some rural areas can be easy to fall into a trap of using substances. As a crutch to make it through a life. That's difficult for Jody, you know, she's trying to find a job after prison and living in a rural area doesn't make that any easier for her. And I think that you know, sometimes she goes to substances to alleviate that. We noted that you're writing fellow at the Beckley federal Correctional Institution. Is there a great story and every prisoner? I think there's a great story in every human being and that so that the same is true. I there's a great story in every prisoner. But the thing that I loved about teaching there is just how obviously how much it means. The guys who are in my class. Being able to to sit down once a week for two hours and focus on their writing. And they've told me just to be in a quiet room to wear, you know, I'll give them a writing assignment. And then and then we're quiet. They've told me that that in many ways is one of the things that is most valuable to them. Without giving away the end of the novel does Jodi go on with you and your life. Now, she does so less of a degree. I mean, I think when I found the end of the book I was able to to let her go in some ways. I I definitely still think about her when you found the end of the book now people don't write for a living think what do you mean you found it you created? True. But the thing is I think that at least for me the way that I write is. I have this sort of foggy idea of the ending. I need to have something that I'm working towards right? But I don't want it to be to sharp, actually, in my mind because then I might right towards it at all costs, and I might miss something along the way and actually this book ended slightly before I had planned. So I had this kind of idea. And then when I reached the place where the book does end now, I you know, I think that's the end Measham Erin her debut novel sugar run. Thanks so much for being with us. Thank you so much. Erland food cookbook sounds just Bob's promising is an album.

West Virginia Jodi McCurdy Jodie Miranda Measham Erin Beckley federal Correctional I Jody Virginia Scott Simon Alderson NPR Marins Oxford American university of North Carolina writer Ryan Bob
"virginia town" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:58 min | 3 years ago

"virginia town" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is weekend edition from NPR news. I'm Scott Simon Mishra Marins novel sugar run opens his Jodi McCarty is getting turned out of prison on parole after serving eighteen years for manslaughter. She shot her girlfriend when she was seventeen. So Jodie has lived most of her life in prison and must now make a new life in the real world outside. She doesn't really know soon. She'll meet someone and they'll try to make a life together in a small West Virginia town where they're outsiders in every way sugar run is the first novel for Measham, Erin who short stories essays appeared in the Oxford American cheese, a visiting writer at university of North Carolina and a writing fellow at the Beckley federal Correctional Institution in West Virginia. She joins us from West Virginia public radio. Thanks so much for being with us. Thank you so much for having me, you kind of grew up going to prison. Didn't you? I did. Yes. My dad worked for a nonprofit in part of the work that he did is he volunteered to visit women in the federal prison camp in Alderson, West Virginia women who hadn't received a visit from family or friends in more than a year. And I would often go along with my dad, and so as a very young child, I think it was exciting to me because I got to eat candy out of the vending machines. But those experiences stuck with me. Well, and they come up here they do. So I think when I started writing sugar Ryan and started realizing that my character Jodie had spent a significant amount of her life in prison, those impressions that I formed when I was young came back to me. I specifically remember overhearing my dad speaking with women at the Alderson prison who were soon to be released and later as an adult I realized just how strong their joy was to be released. But also their fear of what it meant. To make a life on the outside. Did I hear you say once I realized my character Jodie had spent all these years in prison. Yeah. I mean, Jodi came to me very strongly before I even realized that I was writing a book I was hanging out with Jodie, and she kind of took up residence in in my mind, and I became a little infatuated with her started thinking about her all the time, and then the plot and the rest of the story sort of fell into place. I really actually kind of felt like I was getting to know her. And so it was a process of realizing what she had been through. Well, Jody without giving too much weight gets out of prison. She meets an interesting woman. Miranda. Who has three children to failing marriage to has been country singer and an addiction. What draws them to each other? She's just gotten out of prison, and she knows many ways that taking up with Miranda is a bad decision. I mean, she she kind of looks at her the first night that they're hanging out and tells yourself, you don't do this. But at the same time, she's drawn to Herman she's physically attracted to her. But she's also I think attracted to fact that Miranda is bound and determined to enjoy life despite everything that's going wrong. So it's this sort of love of life and determination to make something joyful out of life. Certainly one of the things that compelled us to pick up the book is that we don't hear a lot in literature about West Virginia. What are we misunderstand sometimes about West Virginia? So I get asked a lot like, you know, why why not just leave West Virginia, you know, or would a character like Jodi go back to West Virginia. And I think that for for those of us who love places that are sometimes difficult to love. We love them with this extra fierceness this fierce tenderness for this place that isn't always easy to love. But there there's so much. That's so interesting and beautiful both in the people, and the landscape, you do take on the fact that that fracking is is in all ways, truly changing the landscape. One of the things that's difficult about West Virginia is that it is a place where a lot is extracted from here. Right. Coal lumber. Now fracking for natural gas, and it's devastating on. On the land here. But I also think that that's part of where we get the conversation of of why don't you just leave is that people kind of envisioned West Virginia as a place to take things out of? Yeah. And addictions. You do have to make that a part of your telly storytelling too. Don't you? Absolutely. So, you know, the characters in my book, they use a lot of different substances. And of course, the happens anywhere that is not specific to us Virginia. But I do think that you know, in some some rural areas it can be easy to fall into a trap of using substances. As a crutch to make it through a life. That's difficult for Jody. She's trying to find a job after prison and living in a rural area doesn't make that any easier for her. And I think that sometimes she goes to substances to alleviate that. We noted that you're writing fellow at the Beckley federal Correctional Institution. Is there a great story and every prisoner? I think there's a great story in every human being and that so that the same is true. I there's a great story in every prisoner. But the thing that I love about teaching there is just how obviously how much it means. The guys who are in my class. Being able to to sit down once a week for two hours and focus on their writing. And they've told me just to be in a quiet room to where you know, I'll give him a writing assignment. And then and then we're quiet. They've told me that that in many ways is one of the things that is most valuable to them. Without giving away the end of the novel does Jodi go on with you and your life. Now, she does who less of a degree. I mean, I think when I found the end of the book I was able to to let her go in some ways. I I definitely still think about her when you found the end of the book now people don't write for a living. What do you mean you found it you created? True. But the thing is I think that at least for me the way that I write is. I have this sort of foggy idea of the ending. I I need to have something that I'm working towards right? But I don't want it to be too sharp, actually in my mind because then I might right towards it at all costs, and I might miss something along the way and actually this book ended slightly before I had planned. So I had this kind of idea. And then when I reached the place where the book does end. Now, I, you know, I think that's Measham Erin her debut novel sugar run. Thanks so much for being with us. Thank you so much. An airline food cookbook. Sounds just about is promising is an album of great moments from public radio fundraisers, but United publishing a cookbook of recipes inspired.

West Virginia Jodi McCarty Jodie Miranda Measham Erin Beckley federal Correctional I NPR Jody Virginia Alderson Scott Simon Mishra Oxford American university of North Carolina writer Ryan Herman eighteen years
"virginia town" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:56 min | 3 years ago

"virginia town" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is weekend edition from NPR news. I'm Scott Simon Marins novel sugar run opened his Jodi McCurdy is getting turned out of prison on parole after serving eighteen years for manslaughter. She shut her girlfriend when she was seventeen so Jodie who lived most of her life in prison and was now make a new life in the real world outside. She doesn't really know soon. She'll meet someone and they'll try to make a life together in a small West Virginia town where they're outsiders in every way sugar run is the first novel for Measham Erin who short stories initiation appeared in the Oxford American cheese, a visiting writer at university of North Carolina and a writing fellow at the Beckley federal Correctional Institution in West Virginia. She joins us from West Virginia public radio. Thanks so much for being with us. Thank you so much for having me you kind of grew up going into prisons. Didn't you? I did. Yes. My dad worked for a nonprofit in part of the work that he did is he fallen tiered to visit women in the federal prison camp in Alderson, West Virginia women who hadn't received a visit from family or friends in more than a year. And I would often go along with my dad, and so as a very young child, I think it was exciting to me because I got to eat candy out of the vending machines. But those experiences stuck with me. Well, and they come up here they do. So I think you know, when I started writing sugar Ryan and started realizing that my character Jodie had spent a significant amount of her life in prison, those impressions that I formed when I was young came back to me. I specifically remember overhearing my dad speaking with women at the Alderson prison who were soon to be released and later as an adult I realized just how strong their joy was. You know to be released. But also their fear of what it meant to make a life on the outside. Did I hear you say once I realized my character. Judy had spent all these years in prison. Yeah. I mean, Jodi came to me very strongly before I even realized that I was writing a book I was hanging out with Jodie, and she kind of took up residence in in my mind, and I became a little infatuated with her started thinking about her all the time, and then the plot and the rest of the story sort of fell into place. I really actually kind of felt like I was getting to know her. And so it was a process of realizing what she had been through. Well, Jody without giving too much weight gets out of prison. She reach an interesting woman Miranda. Who has three children failing marriage to has been country singer and an addiction. What draws them to each other? She's just gotten out of prison, and she knows in many ways that taking up with Miranda is a bad decision. I mean, she she kind of looks at her the first night that they're hanging out and tells yourself don't do this. But at the same time, she's drawn to Herman she's physically attracted to her. But she's also I think attracted to the fact that Miranda is bound and determined to enjoy life despite everything that's going wrong. So it's this sort of love of life and determination to make something joyful out of life. Certainly one of the things that compelled us to pick up the book is that we don't hear a lot in literature about West Virginia. What are we misunderstand sometimes about West Virginia? So I get asked a lot like, you know, why why not just leave West Virginia, you know, or or why would a character like Jodi go back to West Virginia. And I think that for for those of us who love places that are sometimes difficult to love. We love them with this extra fierceness this fierce tenderness for this place that isn't always easy to love. But there there's so much. That's so interesting and beautiful both in the people, and the landscape, you do take on the fact that that fracking is is in all ways, truly changing the landscape. One of the things that's difficult about West Virginia is that it is a place where a lot is extracted from here. Right. Coal lumber. Now fracking for natural gas, and it's devastating on. On the land here. But I also think that that's part of where we get the conversation of why don't you just leave is that people kind of envisioned West Virginia as a place to take things out of? Yeah. Ed addictions. You do have to make that a part of your teller storytelling too. Don't you? Absolutely. So, you know, the characters in my book as they use a lot of different substances. And of course, that happens anywhere that is not specific to us Virginia. But I do think that you know, in some some rural areas it can be easy to fall into a trap of using substances. As a crutch to make it through a life. That's difficult for Jody, you know, she's trying to find a job after prison and living in a rural area doesn't make that any easier for her. And I think that you know, sometimes she goes to substances to alleviate that. We noted that you're writing fellow at the Beckley federal Correctional Institution. Is there a great story and every prisoner? I think there's a great story in every human being and that so that the same is true. I there's a great story in every prisoner. But the thing that I love about teaching there is just how obviously how much it means. The guys who are in my class. Being able to to sit down once a week for two hours and focus on their writing. And they've told me just to be in a quiet room to where you know, I'll give them a writing assignment. And then and then we're quiet. They've told me that that in many ways is one of the things that is most valuable to them. Without giving where the end of the novel does Jodi go on with you in your life. Now, she does to less of a degree. I mean, I think when I found the end of the book I was able to to let her go in some ways, I definitely still think about her when you found the end of the book. Now, people don't write for a living will think what do you mean you found it you created? True. But the thing is I think that at least for me the way that I write is. I have this sort of foggy idea of the ending. I need to have something that I'm working towards right? But I don't want it to be too sharp, actually in my mind because then I might right towards it at all costs, and I might miss something along the way and actually this book ended slightly before I had planned. So I had this kind of idea. And then when I reached the place where the book does. And now, I, you know, I think that's the Measham Erin her debut novel sugar run. Thanks so much for being with us. Thank you so much. An airline food cookbook. Sounds just above is promising is an album of great moments from public radio fundraisers, but United publishing cookbook of.

West Virginia Jodi McCurdy Jodie Miranda Beckley federal Correctional I Jody Virginia Alderson NPR Scott Simon Marins university of North Carolina Oxford American Measham Erin writer Judy Ryan Herman
"virginia town" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:03 min | 3 years ago

"virginia town" Discussed on KQED Radio

"At ten nine central on history. This is weekend edition from NPR news. I'm Scott, Simon Mischer Marins novel sugar run open. Just Jodi McCarty is getting turned out of prison on parole after serving eighteen years for manslaughter. She shot her girlfriend when she was seventeen Jodi has lived most of her life in prison and must now make a new life in the real world outside. She doesn't really know Hsun she'll meet someone and they'll try to make a life together in a small West Virginia town where they're outsiders in every way sugar run is the first novel for Measham, Erin who short stories and essays have appeared in the Oxford American cheese, a visiting writer at university of North Carolina and a writing fellow at the Beckley federal Correctional Institution in West Virginia. She joins us from West Virginia public radio. Thanks so much for being with us. Thank you so much for having you kind of grew up going to prison. Didn't you? I did. Yes. My dad worked for a nonprofit in part of the work that he did is he volunteered to visit women in the federal prison camp in Alderson, West Virginia women who hadn't received a visit from family or friends in more than a year. And I would often go along with my dad until as a very young child. I think it was exciting to me because I got to eat candy out of the vending machines. But those experiences stuck with me. Well, and they come up here they do. So I think when I started writing sugar Ryan on and started realizing that my character Jodie had spent a significant amount of her life in prison, those impressions that I formed when I was young came back to me. I specifically remember overhearing my dad speaking with women at the Orson prison who were soon to be released and later as an adult, I realized just how strong their joy was you know, to be released, but also their fear of what it meant. To make a life on the outside. Did I hear you say once I realized my character Jodie had spent all these years in prison. Yeah. I mean, Jodi came to me very strongly before I even realized that I was writing a book I was hanging out with Jodie, and she kind of took up residence in in my mind, and I became a little infatuated with her started thinking about her all the time, and then the plot and the rest of the story sort of fell into place. I really actually kind of felt like I was getting to know her. And so it was a process of realizing what she had been through. Well, Jody without giving too much weight gets out of prison. She meets an interesting woman. Miranda. Who has three children to failing marriage to a has been country singer and an addiction. What draws them to each other? She's just gotten out of prison, and she knows in many ways that taking up with Miranda is a bad decision. I mean, she she kind of looks at her the first night that they're hanging out and tells yourself don't do this. But at the same time, she's drawn to Herman she's physically attracted to her. But she's also I think attracted to a fact that Miranda is bound and determined to enjoy life despite everything that's going wrong. So it's sort of love of life and determination to make something joyful out of life. Certainly one of the things that compelled us to pick up the book is that we don't hear a lot in literature about West Virginia. What are we misunderstand sometimes about West Virginia? So I get asked a lot like, you know, why why not just leave West Virginia, you know, or or would a character like Jodi go back to West Virginia. And I think that for for those of us who love places that are sometimes difficult to love. We love them with this extra fierceness this fierce tenderness for this place that isn't always easy to love. But there there's so much. That's so interesting and beautiful both in the people, and the landscape, you do take on the fact that that fracking is is in all ways, truly changing the landscape. One of the things that's difficult about West Virginia is that it is a place where a lot is extracted from here. Right. Coal lumber. Now fracking for natural gas, and it's devastating on. On the land here. But I also think that that's part of where we get the conversation of of why don't you just leave is that people kind of envision West Virginia as a place to take things out of. Yeah. Ed addictions. You do have to make that a part of your telly storytelling too. Don't you? Absolutely. So, you know, the characters in my book, they use a lot of different substances. And of course, the happens anywhere that is not specific to us Virginia. But I do think that you know, in some some rural areas it can be easy to fall into a trap of using substances. As a crutch to make it through a life. That's difficult for Jody. She's trying to find a job after prison and living in a rural area doesn't make that any easier for her. I think sometimes she goes to substances to alleviate that. We noted that you're writing fellow at the Beckley federal Correctional Institution. Is there a great story and every prisoner? I think there's a great story in every human being and that so that the same is true. I there's a great story in every prisoner. But the thing that I loved about teaching there is just how obviously how much it means. The guys who are in my class. Being able to to sit down once a week for two hours and focus on their writing. And they've told me just to be in a quiet room to where you know, I'll give him a writing assignment. And then and then we're quiet. They've told me that that in many ways is one of the things that is most valuable to them. Without giving away the end of the novel does Jodi go on with you and your life. Now, she does less of a degree. I mean, I think when I found the end of the book I was able to to let her go in some ways. I I definitely still think about her when you found the end of the book. Now people who don't write for living think what do you mean you found it you created? True. But the thing is I think that at least for me the way that I write is. I have this sort of foggy idea of the ending. I I need to have something that I'm working towards right? But I don't want it to be too sharp, actually in my mind because then I might right towards it at all costs, and I might miss something along the way and actually this book ended slightly before I had planned. So I had this kind of idea. And then when I reached the place where the book does. And now, I, you know, I think that's the act Measham Erin her debut novel sugar run. Thanks so much for being with us. Thank you so much. An airline food cookbook. Sounds just above is promising is an album of great moments from public radio fundraisers, but United publishing a cookbook of recipes against.

West Virginia Jodi McCarty Miranda Measham Erin Beckley federal Correctional I NPR Jody Virginia Jodie Alderson Oxford American university of North Carolina Hsun Simon Mischer Marins Scott writer Orson Ryan
"virginia town" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

10:41 min | 3 years ago

"virginia town" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"David balducci. This interview initially took place live in may, Mr. Balducci is the author of forty novels, including absolute power wish you well. And most recently the fallen we remind you this is a recorded program. No calls, please. Gotcha. You have been on tour for the last several weeks talking about your thirty six adult novel the fallen and it features number four in line for character by the name of Amos decker. If I were to meet Amos decker on the street. What would I see? You would see a very large guy ambling down the street, oblivious relates everything that's going on. And if you stopped him and asked him a question, he would probably just sort of blow you off and keep drilling. He's he lives in his own world. And I think people take his aloofness or rudeness, which is not that at all. He used to be a very gregarious outgoing guy. And then he had a brain injury and changes in personality. So he is living body. That's the same body just not the same person. So I think it's a book. Evolve. And you see the fall that my wife is funny. She read this book because you Finally I finally like him. You finally reached his humanity level at the core. And but it took me four books to get there. But I like complicated guys, and he's complicated. Thanks for being with us for our in-depth program and this special series. We sit with authors for three hours talking about their life and their work and David is going to be spending that time with us today. And we hope very much for both of us because we enjoy your interaction that you'll be part of the conversation as we continue along here. We'll put the phone numbers on the screen and our Facebook and Twitter handle, so you can join in the conversation, and we very much like to hear your questions about his writing the character cities developed and why you're intrigued about them, which is the key to his success over the years. So what makes Amos decker of good Hera a hero what especially for a thriller series? Yeah. What I I started thinking about a series with him. I was like what would be good to get this guy. Who's irascible? He's aloof. He doesn't get along with people. He doesn't get jokes. He doesn't pick up social cues. He walks out of the room while you're talking to. Yeah. He'll be very popular. But he just kind of spoke to me, and I've always been fascinated by the mind, and this is a guy who's mind changed, and he had no control over that at all. So we sort of had to rebuild his life. And when you're developing series, you have to have enough material justify more than one book is almost like developing a television series where the is going to evolve and grow, and you got an arc that people can relate to enjoy and watch and see a change if the character is unchanged. There's no point to write another book to it. So with him he had an enormous amount of material that I could grow on this whole backstory about his brain injury by the family being murdered about this perfect memory when I first went on tour with with the first book memory man, everybody in the audience. I said raise your hand if you think it's really cool. Have a perfect memory. Can't forget anything a lot of people raise their hands. I'd be great raise your hand. If you have something your life you'd read it for that. Everybody. And that's his dilemma, you know, he does he has lots of things he'd rather forget. So for me, what's cool about him. Every time. I get him on the page. I have no idea what he's going to do. But when you start and you think about series because all of your books now pretty much our series. And he said you don't want to do the one offs anymore too, much work. Really that do you have a sense of what how many you can play out with him. Or is it just evolved as you? Right. Yeah. I'm not really good at predicting stuff like that. And so I never had a set. I'm not like Jackie rolling said they're going to be seven books in the Harry Potter series. And that's it. For me I've written series of f to I've had written series at five series are going to have more than that. It's it really for me is how much gas in the tank is a character half. And do I wanna keep discovering things about am? I excited about writing him on the page on the page. If the answers are yes that I keep going regardless of what the book count as the answer is. No, then I go off into something else. How did you develop Amos decorated was a model in the real world that you? No. I mean, I really kind of it was like Frankenstein. I built them for parts all over the place and. I I knew I wanted to large guy. I wanted to have this enormous presents intimidating presence. Even though he's not really an intimidating guy. And I knew he was going to be a football player, and that was sort of a source of the brain injury, which all too prevalent these days in professional, sports and football because I've been thinking about that too. A lot of the players that I loved growing up watching there either passed away wheelchairs, they have dementia. It's six sixty years old. You know, they're totally gonna bring the garden. So I wanted to write a story where care because grappling with those issues as well. And have this large presence? And then build them into a detective with this unique feature of being able to forget anything. But all the other baggage that went along with it. You know, he's sort of you know, he doesn't pick up on social cues anymore. It's hard for them to relate to people in is a detective that can be difficult so on hand. Yeah. The superpower this perfect memory on the other hand, it's difficult for you to relate to people, which is a downside for detectives. So it's always a struggle with him. But I love stroke because struggle just sort in neatly dramatizes things in sort of raises the stakes and makes people understand this person. What makes him tick? And if you can get a reader to say, what makes this guy tick keep reading the Panthers settings for the fallen is barren Ville which is fictional. But its problems are real. When you tell our audience about them. Rust belt town much like thousands across this country and thousands across other countries in western Pennsylvania, coal mining steel territory. And this is a place where it only exists because got him John Maron figured out a way to make money. So there's coal there. There's a river I can textiles. So here. We have baron Bill, and I needed people to work on it. So they came and he paid them. You know, whatever you paid them and they put down roots? Bill homes had lives had kids. Nicole went away textiles went away and everything went away, except the people who live there, they still have to somehow. So they have a lot of challenges in this novel. And sometimes those challenges take you down a dark path so embarrassing Ville, we come upon the small town that has a lot of secrets under underneath the skin and when decker starts poking around. Bad things happen. One of those the opioids, and we're all seeing so much. They travesty of the opioid, crisis and states. What story did you want readers to learn about what the country is struggling with in this book? I first and foremost, I wanted them to understand this is a manmade problem. And this problem that this is not a problem that started with drug dealers on the street starter with prescription medication by your doctor pharmacist filled in West Virginia town that has nine hundred people and thirteen million Opio prescriptions are written for that town. That's a problem in the nineties. Big farmer decided we're not selling enough these painkillers, and we want to sell a lot more. Do they made pain sort of the fifth element of a diagnosis? Instead, it's really good for anything that ails you. Ironically enough a lot of the opioids were prescribed for back. Pain is almost has no effect on back pain. And all that's irony. Have it all, but it's is not addictive don't worry about it. You ever get addicted was all addictive. So I wanna people understand. This was a main may. And now, it is decimating communities. It's called the drug or despair. A lot of these rustbelt towns where people have no hope spiraling to this. So I wanted them take away the fact that this is the problem. We have is not getting any better. It needs to be addressed. It's not being addressed an advertising campaign that says just say, no, it's not going to work when you're talking about which you can be addicted to one us just saying, no really doesn't work. There's a whole host of factor needs to be addressed to get the country through it. But we have to next year. If the trends continue next one hundred thousand people have an overdose on opioids. That's that's the population of a small city. So I want people to take away the fact that even though this novels fictional. All this stuff is non-fiction in one scene. You get into the NAR candidates. What do you think about that? I think now a lot of places are giving out the first responders a lot of places they're saying, you know, what we're gonna give out to everybody. So even if you're there and you're doing drugs as well. In your your person. In your with overdoses, take out the Narcan and save his life. Because it really is a lifesaver people say, well that will encourage people I said note, it will save lives until we can figure out how to solve the problem. So you don't want to say don't do it and let them die. And we'll figure out the problem later. Let's do both at the same time seminar. Cam needs to be out there. Everybody needs to have a particularly these towns give it the family members give it to the addiction treatment centers give it a first responders give it to everybody where there might be an issue in restaurants and bars because a lot of times people don't realize this people will go in overdose in public place because they know that can be resuscitate so put in a bar put it in a restaurant put it in public places. And it's almost like having a defibrillator these days, you know, somebody goes into cardiac arrest break the class pull it out hit him with the same thing with arcane break the glass, pull it out pop it in their nose and bring them back to life. They. Do you see a lot of this when you travel? See these towns. Absolutely. I my my mother's family came from rust town coal mining country and south West Virginia very much like this place that was once where there are a lot of good paying jobs where you can make seventy eighty thousand dollars a year without a college education. They're all gone all gone, and but the town still or there, and when you drive through these places draft through the midwest. Unlike the Washington DC areas as possible to be a lot of people have never finished high school. They don't have college educations, the work. There is service oriented menial, low paying no benefits people have very few properties don't have home. Sometimes they're an old cars even have a car lot. A lot of that is what America is. And so it for me. I'm not surprised that people are turning to opioids to try to break out of this. Because they don't feel like they have any hope that's the bad thing about it. We're the greatest country on earth richest country on earth. Every citizen should have hope that life could get better. And we just need to get that back. Well, what is the lesson of capitalism? Then. The lesson capitalism is that and look I'm a capitalist. I have my own small business, and there has to be balanced as well. I was thinking about this..

Amos decker David balducci West Virginia baron Bill Ville football Pain Facebook John Maron Panthers Washington America painkillers Jackie rolling Twitter Nicole Pennsylvania Harry Potter NAR
Town threatens teen trick-or-treaters with jail time

Tim Conway Jr.

00:48 sec | 3 years ago

Town threatens teen trick-or-treaters with jail time

"Halloween. Trick or treaters over the age twelve could face a fine or jail time in one Virginia town, what the hell they do. This is something else that folks are talking about in my home state of Virginia, actually, no doubt, some young fans will be dressed up as Sixers for Halloween. But if the trick or treating in Virginia will they better not the older than twelve years old. They could get in big trouble. The town of Chesapeake has a law that states if anyone thirteen or older is caught trick or treating they could face up to six months in jail. What what kind of town is this what what thirteen or older if you're thirteen or older and your trigger trading can spend six months in jail that states if anyone thirteen or older as caught trick or treating they could face up to six months in jail that what a what a great

Sixers Virginia Chesapeake Six Months Twelve Years