20 Episode results for "Virginia State University"

Lonely Brains Have Cravings Too

The Ten News

11:30 min | 3 weeks ago

Lonely Brains Have Cravings Too

"And nine seven six four three from hungary brains to hidden figures in the next ten minutes. We'll get the lowdown on what's up in the world. I'm bethany van and this is the ten news this week. The cdc is expected to release new guidelines and how to safely reopen schools as the covid. Nineteen pandemic continues. There's been some debate between teachers organizations and scientists on whether or not teachers need to be and should be vaccinated before returning classrooms. But everyone seems to agree that getting kids and teachers back together for in person instruction and doing it as safely as possible is really important. President biden has said that he wants schools to reopen and stay open and that the guidelines for doing so we'll be based on science and not politics excellent we'll be keeping a close eye on what the new guidelines say and of course we'll keep you posted next up. It's a look inside our brains lane. Farber from nature podcast. We all get hungry but you know that we can get hungry for people. Don't panic y'all this is not as ambi- story that's an october exclusive. This is a much more. Wholesome craving you. A new study proved that lonely people crave human interaction the same way i crave cake after binging the great british baking show for like eight hours straight. Yeah you heard that correctly. I watch way too much of the great british baking show and lonely brains are hungry for human connection now before we learn how the study was conducted. We have to understand the basics of hunger hunger. Is that familiar sensation of your body. Telling you that it's time to hunger cues can be both physical and mental because all of our systems require nutrients to function properly. Sometimes it's a rumble of the tummy and inability to focus help or even sudden irritability aka the hangary's alone when we're hungry. We see food as a reward. Scientists know this to be true from past studies the neuroscience team at mit was not surprised when their participants brains responded positively to pictures of pizza and cake after fasting for ten hours. What did surprise them or the brain. Scans of people starved of human interaction. Participants were socially isolated for ten hours. No phone no social media no outside communication whatsoever. No way to the ten hours. They had their brains scanned while being shown pictures of people hanging out and participating in groups sports and guess what their brains lit up just like when being shown pictures of food that means that are crave company. Just like we crave food. The longer we go without food the more we crave it and this study proves that the same thing is true about genuine human connection the lonelier we are the more our brains crave company. So why is this study important right now. Well it's easy to feel isolated during times of quarantine. This study proves that forcing humans to self isolate makes us crave social interactions. even more. so you're feeling answer blue because you miss your friends and family. Don't fret there's a scientific reason behind it. Many of us are stuck indoors working from home or doing virtual schooling. But just because we can't be together in person doesn't mean we're alone challenge yourself to find ways to spend time with your friends and family in two thousand twenty one. Dr writing letters playing games online with friends or even throwing zoom party get creative. How fun and remember the. Take care of yourself hi. I'm libya h ten from troop three to one line. And i'm here to hear some good news cookies. Did you know that girl scouts sullivan. Two hundred million packages cookie each year. It's a whole lot offense but since the pandemic make selling door to door. I know go this year. The girl scouts Gone digital selling online through social media and even through the food delivery app. Grandpa awesome one spread kindness through cookies. You can donate cookies to the uso oriented support. Troops made up of girls. Living in new york city's homeless shelter system isn't the ten news dot com to find out more and seriously though you want these cookies. Lucky you screen time report. It's time to play the music. It's time to write the light. It's time to get started. The muppets are coming kermit. The frog miss piggy and the whole fuzzy gang will be on disney plus when all five seasons of the muppet show joined the streaming platform nice. This will be the first time seasons. Four and five have ever been available to stream. Oh my gosh. Binge watch the muppet show a variety show that featured the muppets. Different sketches and musical numbers often accompanied by celebrity guest stars originally aired on tv in the late nineteen seventies and early eighties. It was created by the legendary puppeteer. Jim henson whose work you may know from. Oh i don't know sesame street and introduced characters like five z. Bear you went. I went to the world's funniest joke guns. I shall demonstrate my amazing powers of hypnosis. The swedish chef horns orrin dude. An animal show is hosted by kermit or crazy and offer just as much in the way of cookie backstage antics as it did an actual performances. It was filmed in england. Were jim henson. Production after his pitch for the show was rejected by major american networks. Though did air in the us on cbs. I bet those network exects were a little bit sad about that decision. Because following the success of their television run the muppets went on to make thirteen feature films and become pop culture icons yes so now's your chance to see where the muppets got their start and to check out our show. Your grownups might have watched when they were kids. The muppet show will be available to stream on disney plus on february nineteen and now what. What's the big trivia on the ten. What modern technology was made possible by the work of a mathematician in the nineteen sixties. Was it a the internet be. Gps or c cell phones. Did you guess it. The answer is b. Dr gladys west is one of the reasons. We're now able to get directions to anywhere right on our phones. Dr west was born in one thousand nine thirty in rural virginia where she grew up on her family's farm from a young age. She knew that education was the key to living the life ship. Magin for herself. She worked hard and got a scholarship to virginia state university where she majored in mathematics and nineteen fifty-six gladys west had a job as a mathematician moving ground indulge in virginia. She was one of only four. African americans working there at the time throughout the nineteen sixties. Dr west worked on projects that help more accurately measure the shape of the earth using satellites and mathematical modeling. This modeling is critical to the technology that let satellites determine the position of a receiver so the gps we use every day wouldn't be possible without the contributions of hidden. Figure that to gladys west. Thank you very much. Hey grownups this is tracey. Leads kaplan creator and executive producer of the ten news. I'm gonna take a minute to thank our show sponsor today indeed dot com. I've used indeed a bunch of times. When i've looked jobs and now as a hiring manager i'm really enjoying the service if you're using anything other than indeed for your hiring you are wasting your time. You can hire great people faster with indeed and only pay for the results and get back time in your schedule. Indeed dot com hiring site. That helps you find quality candidates with indeed instant match indeed searches to the millions of resumes in their database to help. Show you great candidates instantly so you can get to the part that you really need faster. Which is meeting in hiring great people and unlike some hiring sites indeed gives you full control and payment flexibility with indeed there no long term contracts. You can pause your account at any time and you only pay for what you need. With instant match you will see. A great list of candidates was zero weight and indeed delivers four times. More hires than all other job sites combined according to talent nest. So do you want your quality shortlists fast. You need indeed right now our listeners. Get free seventy five dollars. Credit to upgrade job post at indeed dot com slash tent. That's t. e. this is indeed best offer available anywhere. Get a free seventy five dollars credit at indeed dot com slash ten indeed dot com slash ten offer valid through march thirty first terms and conditions. Apply time's up. That's the end of the time for today. But you can catch new episodes on tuesdays and thursdays. The ten news is co-production of small but mighty media in collaboration with next chapter podcast and distributed by iheartradio. The ten news writing team is led by editorial director. Tracy crooks with contributions from stephen tompkins and lane. Farber the creative producer is jenner pascua. Social media and web support by stephen tompkins editing and sound design by pete musco under the production direction of jeremiah tiddle executive producer donald albright and show creator. Tracy leads kaplan round out the team. If you have questions about the show a story idea or a fun fact you wanna share email us at hello at ten news dot com. And you know that you don't forget to subscribe rating review the ten days on apple. Podcast iheartradio spotify. Or wherever you listen to podcasts. Bethany van delft and thanks for listening to the ten news by.

bethany van President biden Dr west Jim henson kermit Farber orrin dude cdc hungary Dr gladys west mit disney Magin libya Leads kaplan sullivan virginia virginia state university new york city
Just Make The Thing with Scotty White

Cheers To Business

21:03 min | 4 months ago

Just Make The Thing with Scotty White

"Before we start the show. I'm excited to announce that we have a new sponsor for this podcast and it's stuck or dr. Rex is a family-oriented company dedicated to Taylor operational solutions for patient health and complain programs that increases the quality and efficiency of patient-centered care and always with the mission of the patient's health first with over ten years of experience helping doctors in their patients with diagnostic testing patient monitoring medical supplies compliance wholesale Pharmacy physician dispensing billing and much more. Dr. Riggs is your patient and health compliance solution both under a one way to find out how dark RX can help you your Hospital Pharmacy or Physician's office. See all their services are darker x.com. That's d o c rx.com now onto today's thought. Let me ask you this what some advice you would give the people out there that love their hobby. They have a passion, but they have a day job. You know, how do they get started to make that hobby become a a job or something? Well, I have a full-time job. You know, I have a career and this is my side hustle and I love my side hustle. And so the important thing to do is that first step just make the thing. Don't worry about it make the same thing and understand and be okay with that. The first thing you make is not going to be great, but that's okay because the next thing is going to be better and the one after that is going to be even better. And after that it's going to be wonderful. This is a process. This is a place that everyone goes through from the the great filmmakers the great novelists. There's very few one-hit-wonder. So you go out there and just make the thing that's important. We're in the age of the internet. There's room for everything. So if you want to be golfing pasta show make a copy pasta show. I think I'm in love with you. Hey everybody, welcome to the show. Today. We're going to start a couple of shows talking about taking that Hobby and making a business out of it. And you know, it was all really a business. Anyway, Willie today with Scotty white Scotty. Why does comic books podcast game shows creating his own Channel on Roku going to find out what that is? Cuz I didn't know he's using technology to create and monetize his passion and his creativity. Hey, I'm Karen. I'm a former c p a entrepreneur business consultant with Big Ideas. Welcome to cheers to business. Scotty white thank you so much for being on the show today thanks for having me I know you work at Wind Creek but what do you do I am an animation and video specialist so I make web shows for Wind Creek Hospitality the casinos and I also do digital signage so you all the animated cool signs and Marquis you see I help make those we have actually have five casinos six casinos now in the United States oh that's interesting I didn't realize y'all off of them yes we have three in Alabama too in the Caribbean and most recently this year right before coded we open 1 in Pennsylvania Willie yes ma'am hey all right but it started here in Alabama right yes ma'am reason you interest me so much is because I've met so many creative people that don't realize that they're operating businesses at the same time that they're just following their passion right when did you realize that you've had some viable possible businesses coming from their creativity I think it was early on probably in my mid-twenties when it kind of dawned on me and it took a little while to get their name Was ever since I was a twenty-five twenty-six. My driving passion has been following my hobbies into turning into a business to say, I love that. I think everything's a business. I think everything we do is typically a business. If you are fulfilling a need for extra very much and to me entertainment is a need. I think this whole Kobe thing has proved that more than anything absolutely with so much, you know, everyone's been stuck at home. So they've been doing streaming and listening to podcasts and it's it's so much to see all the Creative Energy out there that people are consuming. Whereas you tell your story a little bit. I know you do comic books podcast game shows something called the mock cast network and off. I don't even know what a Roku channel is. So write me and tell your story real quick. I've always been creative. I've been I was a creative kid. I was overactive imagination, you know at the court took me into a writer. That's what I and so, you know, I was always writing stories or little novels and stuff. But as I got older I was drawn in the comics and movies and things and they're very similar, you know animals everything scripture. Adding and so I started writing scripts and wanting to make movies and then realistically movies are expensive to make on your own. I tried to do it a few times. It didn't quite work as well as I'd like and so I moved changed mediums. I went from from movies to Comics which a little bit more manageable and then I went into podcasting as well. The Mont cast network is my podcast Network. So we have our own branded name for it. I have a character in my comic she's a mask out of my company. Her name is Mom and she kind of looks like the Wendy's girl but I'm a big follower of Walt Disney and Walt Disney was big on brand name and branding your name. So I you know took ownership of my name. So everything now I have is under the Scottie white company instead of all these little separate things that used to have and I have Mop as my mask behind it. So I took all that Creative Energy and so now I'm not doing comics and podcasts and you know, just whatever my heart is content so till about your comic books. I mean, I mean are they in full publication or you know, we're stage. Are they? Well, I have to book off. Now that are already published. We're working on two more. That's hope we're going to publish in 2021 next year, but my main kaam book is called Chronicles of limbo. It's a science fiction fantasy story for a promotion all ages about a 300 year-old half-vampire and her cosmically powered toddler. That is so cool. My cousin who unfortunately passed at the end of 2018 actually was off the animation. He was following his career as an actor, but he was an artist creative much like you and his name was Nathan Smith. Oh it was it was a very dear friend of mine. He was actually my very first really, well he his mom and my mom are sisters. Okay? Okay. Nathan was a wonderful Talent. He worked a lot with my friends Kevin LaPorte and down Hills who own inverse press man and a lot of, after this I will send you I did an interview with Nathan I think 2014/2015 we did an hour on podcast with him. I'll sell Do his mom would just love that but you remind me a lot about him, you know, he was I was looking back through some of your I spoke to you a little bit. Sorry on Facebook and man you met a lot of famous people and he was into the what do you call the con thing? We have the conference's. Yeah, so we have you know, there's a whole subculture out there for conventions start out, blinking off now they've become too morphed into like these pop-culture convinces. Actually. We just did one locally. Let's pass Saturday and mobile and they are absolutely a blast and that's how I meet a lot of my celebrities. You know, that's for me. That's a way to sell so long, you know, usually, you know, you can purchase a table at these events which I do and you know, I can set up, you know the comics I have or stickers or posters whatever we make and that's how we, you know, introduced herself to a new audience and we sell we sell looks that way glad you brought that up because the shows I've done in the past about, you know, people taking a hobby and then eventually quitting their day job because it turns into something but you know, whether you make stuff or bake stuffing Whatever, you know by getting these tables to get yourself out there at the markets. I'm doing a market. I'm doing the market, you know, especially now that we all need to be outside or you know, not confined. And so how long how you take the initiative and say you encourage people to go get those tables. Absolutely absolutely great. Especially if you're you in in these kind of creative arts, like I Like Comics or podcasting that's one of the best ways to get out and meet draughts and build your audience too. I mean, that's that mean it has been nothing but a wonderful thing for us a good growth mayor. So what history do you have in the business part of it? I mean to be creative people it's easier for them to Market than business type people marketing putting yourself out there. But how do you handle or do you think you also have the talent to handle the business side of things, you know, this guy company, you know, unfortunately, you know can only afford one one employee and that's me. So I'm kind of been forced to do everything myself. It's like that. So sometimes like every you know, I guess like everybody else and sometimes I'm not the best out of it, but I do Thursday. Try very very hard at it. I've kind of learned over the years how to balance a lot of that. The big thing is you're keeping up with your taxes are so much you can save and so much you can do just by by Saving receipts. It's amazing. How often so do you use a CPA or Consultants? Or you know, who do you reach out to to help you? Cuz I think people are looking a lot of times they don't realize they have a business or if they do realize they have a business office to take it to the next step that they're not sure who to go to for help. Well, I do have a CPA and she she helped me out. She's a friend and luckily. I had a friend, you know, who was a CBS a kind of fell in fact that you know, the the best thing is everyone has a circle of friends and family and it's always good to ask you who knows who I mean, you know advice is always out there. And so, you know, that's what I do. If I don't need something find it find I was actually a CPA for twenty-five years and sold my practice in May 2019, but you know, I never advertised just referrals right, you know or what hey It podcast do you listen to how many times have you heard that so tell me an experience, you know getting the podcast off the ground and what kind of following do you have? The podcast was an accidental thing, I guess. So I was in college. I'm studying Communications at West Virginia State University and and Institute West Virginia and it's a small historically black college and they had a radio like they had like a lot of colleges have a radio station Unfortunately. They didn't need a license to broadcast that was just basically used for student projects. So it's empty all the time and I have to say my broadcast Professor Kim Cobb who allowed me use that for practicing. I had just started listening to podcasts. I was like when this seems like it could be easy. I like to talk and so and I think I'm an interesting guy. So I started a whole pop-culture network cuz we took a different ideas for shows and so it was so economical for us to try this. I mean, the only thing we were paying for was for like hosting for the websites, so we had recording space for free and so we just thought On T shows and so under that we just I would create a network and we just see what stuck into the wall some shows work some shows getting and so we've multiple I'll follow him got a three to five thousand listeners off and flew over the years especially as competitions come in but we're still growing now. That's cool. I think we've got over a hundred shows now and would I don't know if you would have ever listen to our show, but we get free business advice off and started out with me and my daughter and then she got busy in in life. And so I've kind of taken it and run with it and I don't know what I would do without Johnny. So, you know, it's nice down that way and slowly let me ask you this what some advice you would give the people out there that they love their hobby. They have a passion, but they have a day job. They want to go to Comics or movies are how to fish a golf or whatever. You know, how do they get started to make that hobby become a a job or side hustle? Well, I have them a full-time job. You know, I have a career and this is my side hustle and I log Of my side hustle. And so the important thing to do is that first step just make the thing. Don't worry about it make the thing and understand and be okay with that. The first thing you make is not going to be great, but that's okay because the next thing is going to be better and the one after that is going to be even better. And after that's going to be wonderful. This is a process. This is a process that everyone goes through from the the great filmmakers the great novelist. There's very few months hit wonder so you go out there and just make the thing that's the important and we're in the age of the internet there's room for everything. So if you want to do a golfing pasta show make a copy pasta show off. I think I'm in love with you. So, you know people want from me a lot of times they want clear steps and instructions one, two, three, four, five six. Well, sometimes I'll leave a note 3 and 5, but it's sometimes I do it on purpose because I can't tell you after to what's going to happen. It's going to change so, you know, let's do this part first just do it. So I thought That I think everybody should take encouragement from that and just do something one of the mentors I listened to was said just make the thing make this thing and that's what I did. I made the thing and I keep making things. I thought that's what I love. I enjoy making it putting out there and you know, some things work some things don't work, but that's okay. At least I put it out there and doesn't live in my head. I call it being a Roomba, you know, you hit the wall don't keep trying to go to me that while you're not going to just you know, turn to the left or right and go a different direction because you'll find your way exactly so what do you think has been your biggest struggles in trying to take this passion hobby page a business? Well, I think for us and mainly because we're such a we're entertainment and so trying to get it in front of audiences. It's been difficult, especially in Covent time off the podcast and stuff one of our our in the comics that one of our biggest sellers are the conventions. Well covid-19 away conventions this year. I mean I lost we had ten bucks. I did two dead. And so that's a that's a you know shot to the pocketbook and plus shot to the the audience. That's who don't see us. I did do one show and we finally got to do one at August 1st of August, but we didn't do a panel off a show win that and when they don't know you they don't come by your stuff they'll look but they don't buy they don't they don't have that engagement and it's kind of hard to engage with us with Co it however we're turning the curve off doing it a lot more advertising a lot more marketing on that. Yeah. We try to find different ways to do than the last few shows have been called get back up, you know, just give backups quick how you put your name down on that's been a hard thing for people not so I think it's different for a lot of people there's a podcast called Bumble but podcast and it's some guys in Wisconsin. I think that's where they are. They have an accent. But and if you bad language bothers, you don't listen to him, but it's about weird crimes and serial killers and stuff. So it's really way outside my normal, but they're so damn funny. Thank you. Jean heard. There's another one. I found that I liked really liked as far as that platform, but they do patriam. All right, so Patriot and go from me. You know, what do you do? What do you which some your advice for other people? We are working on a patreon for next year. I'm gathering. The thing about patreon is you have to have money don't have to but it's good to have like exclusive offers and you know what it is. I'm not sure. I know what it is is it's an artist site for people to fund artist projects. So yeah, so, you know, I guess if you know people like you have enough listeners you and you want to offer, you know, extra podcast or extra advice or personal sessions with people you can do that and they they pay a monthly fee and to support you and it can be anywhere from a dog or whatever for that that you know that you just weren't what you do plus, you know, it's nice to give them something back. And so right now we're working on the content for the patreon to launch Tech. Is it a tip jar? It's kind of like a tip-off. You know and so so a recurring tip jar, that's pretty cool. Oh, yeah, it's very it's very cool and it's been around for a few years. I've been watching this year some other friends who have that New Jersey looking at their models and so we're looking at doing that. I don't have any chance would go fund fund me but I have had two successful kickstarter's and so I've had experience with Kickstarter and you want to do uh, your books or or something like that. I really highly suggest kick charged a wonderful platform to find your your project. Oh you on patreon now not yet. We will. I mean I am when we don't have anything up yet. So I'm I'm trying to launch party by I'm looking at January latest February, but are you on Kickstarter right now? I am we are not currently don't have a project on Kickstarter going but we're okay. Cool. What what about GoFundMe election? I don't have much experience. I'm with a go fund. I've paid into it but Kickstarter seems to be more friendly to create a Endeavors and go fund me as I think people like with Kickstarter. It's like wage. You know, if you know, if you don't fund it it doesn't if it doesn't hit your goal is not funded and go fund fund me whatever you make you keep but I think backers like the fact that you have to work for it. Yeah. So for me, I'm I feel like a door-to-door salesmen when I'm running a picture. I'm not going on Virtual doors and saying hey this Kickstarter, right? And this is what's really cool about it and check out this video or you know, let me tell you about it being a likely to give if they're getting something or if they know that person has got skin in the game not just turned out it's not a handout any and for us, you know, when I do when I do Comics the comic is done. I'm I'm just raising money for printing and so you know, so it's almost like a pre-order, you know you get and there's we have exclusives a neat things to go along with that. Yeah. We were lucky enough to get a sponsorship. That's B. Correct server know your medical clinics Across the Nation. Anyway, that's not a little spot for our sponsor who we fortunate enough to recently get so it's it's very helpful to do something. Being and to put it out there that you think has value, you know, you want others to see value whether it's entertainment or informative exactly. Yeah. So what's your next step? My next life? I'm working on a video project that we're going to bring to my video platform and we're going to you know to the website and hopefully to a Roku Channel. What is Roku Roku is the streaming device that you can put all your streaming channels together like Amazon or HBO GO or Showtime or whatever and not going to have my HBO channel you can you give us not very expensive. It's not very expensive. It's just the bulb is about the content. You got a great keep creating content monitoring. Well, we would throw website. Okay, so there's no regulations or anything like that. No regulations only as far back over the year not came. Okay. Well, that's because you know, the the airwaves are public so they're they're all of ours and so they're regulated by the FCC. That's interesting. That's why people cut Saint Louis. Would you can't on ABC right? All right. So how do you get like if I were we're searching you on my little smart TV that my twelve year old granddaughter operates much more effectively than I do. How do you find you? How do you find all these channels? You're like Roku has a a search feature. So whatever Channel you want to look for you is type it in HBO, whatever you need to find there's an app for they'll have an hour or so on my Roku Roku is a device. You'd have to buy the Roku too attached to your TV Bo you buy Roku, you know, it's like a Dish box or something a cable box office. It's kind of like a Dish box except it's you know, instead of hooking up to a satellite it hooks to the internet and it uses they Johnnie's still inside for me cuz he's sending me messages saying it's on the county. It's in the menu do a silver truck. So what do you hope to achieve with that? Just exposure? We just want to I want to Chrome. And I love creating and I just want to know for us is just getting it out there, you know, we'll put it out there and if it gets picked up by somebody bigger, that's great. If not, we'll make some other stuff. I mean, we we want to make entertainment entertain people you want to make people you enjoy what you know, what we love it. I absolutely loved it. But I keep wanting to come back to the business side of it. And you know, I know there's creative people that found a thing and whether they sell it on Etsy or they may markets or you know, whatever they've been able to quit their day job. Do you think you would do that? Ultimately, you know, I love Wind Creek wonderful wonderful place to work, you know, they they're you know, great wage employees have great benefits When what I do out ways that I'll make the switch right now. I'm happy where I'm at. So we're you know, we're chugging along but talking on the door and and you thought you sounded me big check. Well why to make some decisions will remember the little people back right? So on the show we give it to yours cuz we're going to have to, you know wind it up a little bit and I want to thank you so much. So much for coming on the show cheers to you and your endeavors and thank you for keeping everyone entertained. So cheers to creativity go out and make something love it. Love it. Love it. All right, how do people find your information how they get your comic books? And where are you? I'm super easy. Go to www.ebay.com. Everything's there. All right. Thank you so much for being on the show. Thank you, bye-bye. Please be sure to subscribe to cheers to business podcast on iTunes or anywhere else that you get your podcast visit our Facebook and be sure to give us a like and if you have any questions or topics, you'd like us to discuss shoot us an email from the website. Cheers to business. Com.

Roku Facebook Creative Energy Wind Creek Nathan Smith Alabama Walt Disney HBO patient monitoring Willie Dr. Riggs Physician dr. Rex Hospital Pharmacy Taylor Caribbean United States West Virginia State University consultant
STEMinists: Gladys West

Encyclopedia Womannica

06:50 min | 3 months ago

STEMinists: Gladys West

"My name is samantha. Montenegro and i'm an implementation specialists based in austin texas. I travel the us and canada servicing medical equipment as well as trained dentists on how to use computer aided design and manufacturing software to make crowns in their own offices. as a woman in stem. i frequently faced the challenge of being underestimated. Just of the way i look. I'm always happy to prove them wrong. But it still stings a little. Every time my aptitude is assumed to be lesser because of my gender and appearance gladys west inspires me because despite facing discrimination for her gender and appearance she strove for excellence and ended up creating a system that i could not live without the global positioning system. I was not given the gift of a sense of direction and and without her contributions. I would quite literally be lost. Hello from wonder media network. I'm jenny kaplan and this is encyclopedia. Were manteca today's stem. Nist is pioneering air force mathematician whose work was instrumental in developing the mathematical and computational modeling that drives modern. gps technology. Though for many years she went unrecognized for the incredible contribution. She made modern life. She's finally receiving the credit. She so deserves. Let's talk about an extraordinary living legend. Lattice west. i never thought that. I could sit in a car and you know turn left. Turn right gladys mae. Brown was born in nineteen thirty in the rural community of dinwiddie county virginia. Her parents were small time farmers as were most of their neighbors from a young age gladys knew that a life of farming was not for her. She figured most likely way off the farm was through education so she threw herself into her studies. Receiving top marks an all of her classes at the time. The top two students at her high school were guaranteed scholarships to virginia state university. And she needed to be one of them. Gladys graduated as valedictorian in nineteen forty eight scholarship in hand at virginia state gladys initially struggled to decide what she wanted to study. Before choosing to major in mathematics she also joined the alpha kappa alpha sorority where she thrived socially after graduating with her bachelor's degree in mathematics gladys took a job teaching at a school in waverly virginia. She lasted two years there before heading back virginia state to earn a master's degree in math which she received in one thousand nine hundred eighty five a year later gladys was hired as a mathematician to analyze. Satellite data was then called the naval proving ground and dog virginia. She was just one of four african americans working at the large facility at the time gladys started out as a human computer somebody who in the days before smartphones and fancy calculators. Actually did the math by hand. But it wasn't long before. She shifted to work on programming computer machines. Instead for most of the early nineteen sixties gladys worked on a study of the orbital resonance between neptune and pluto orbital resistance is the relationship between orbiting bodies that exert record periodic gravitational influence on each other following. The success of this study gladys became the project manager of the cease sat raider altimetry project. Those cease at radar. Altimetry hardly sounds sexy. It really was an extraordinary project before. C. sat it was almost impossible to precisely measure distances service of the earth or between earth and a secondary object like a satellite or airplane. The issue came down to the fact that the earth isn't a perfect sphere but a joys and it's complicated further by the starring role that ocean's tides play in determining the irregularities if the earth's shape the issue came down to the fact that the earth isn't a perfect sphere but at and it's complicated further by the starring role oceans and tides play in determining the irregularities in the earth's shape in order to accurately model the sheep of the planet to get precise distance measurements. A real understanding of variable sea levels was needed. C. sat was the first technology that used radar to remotely sense oceans by measuring the distance between the satellite and the surface of the ocean. Honor over the course of many years gladys used the data she received from c. Sat and later. Satellites terrified an increasingly precise and detailed mathematical model of the earth's shape. This modeling would eventually become vital. To one of today's favourite technological advancements. Gps now features a navigation system in its eight l. s. s. model the system uses gps global positioning system satellites linked to onboard database just modern gps or global positioning system relies on gladys's mathematical model to determine our receivers position without the accuracy the gladys's model provides gps would be essentially useless in nineteen ninety eight after working at the dog. Run facility for forty. Two years gladys decided to retire five months later. She suffered a stroke but persevered through a hard recovery with one goal in mind to finish. Phd in public administration. She'd started at virginia tech. Despite the fact that gladys was instrumental in the development of technology as prominent and important as gps parole remained mostly unknown to the general public. That all changed. When she submitted a short personal biography for honoring her college sorority when one of her sorority sisters read that gladys had been on the team that developed. Gps she became determined to share gladys the story with the world in two thousand eighteen. The associated press published a story about gladys and her many accomplishments almost immediately after the united states military issued a press release officially recognizing gladys for the pioneer. She is on december sixth. Two thousand eighteen loudest was inducted into the air force. Space and missile pioneers hall of pain in a long overdue pentagon ceremony. All month. we're talking about stimulus for more on why we're doing what we're doing check out our newsletter manica weekly follow us on facebook and instagram at encyclopedia will manteca special. Thanks to liz. Caplan my favorite sister and co-creator talk to you tomorrow.

gladys virginia gladys west jenny kaplan gladys mae dinwiddie county alpha kappa alpha sorority Montenegro virginia state university Nist samantha austin Gladys waverly texas canada eight l Brown united states two years
ENZ 285  How he made $9,000 using the Text method strategy with Cory Vickers

Escaping The Real Estate Investing Newbie Zone - Make Money In Real Estate Wholesaling Properties For Quick Cash

20:09 min | 1 year ago

ENZ 285 How he made $9,000 using the Text method strategy with Cory Vickers

"The episode two hundred eighty five. You're listening to escaping the r._e._i. Newbies own podcast where you'll learn the underground closely carter secrets that will revolutionize your real estate business. This podcast is all about helping you exit the real estate newbies zone and etter financial financial freedom building up your real estate thrown. This is escaping the r._e._i. Newbies own podcast and now your host real estate investor ester entrepreneur world traveler and nationwide mentor chris bruce. They are welcome back to another episode of escaping r._e._i. Newbies zone host bruce. I want to say thank you for tuning in to today. A show <hes> man very very special guest. He is a college students. He has been crushing it really in the real estate business guy in the virginia market and <hes> he's actually one of my students and <hes> he has a phenomenal story of any of you that are in higher education right now <hes> interview that <hes> or aspire to be rotated us. There's you're going thanks to definitely get some aspiration motivation from this young man here he literally i remember coming to me and and having you know a done a couple of deals but the deals were very slim. More joint venture type deals <hes> but he's followed everything. <hes> you know implement everything that i've you know share with him and he has a a super super ambition ambition away he looks at life is just amazing and so i salute him and i can't wait to bring the interview to you guys <hes> for you to motivate you guys to aspire you you guys and especially the ideal definitely reach out to him all right so <hes> leeway no further introduce my guest corey glory vickers are welcome everybody to another episode of escaping r._e._i. Newbies zone. I'm your host chris. Bruce and today is a very a special day because we got my guy cory who has been crushing it crushing it on his real estate business. I'm so excited for his brother while while having <hes> big school full time also working and internships and he has been literally crushing his real estate business so <hes> <hes> leeway no further introduced my guy cory core big bro groups <hes> chris. I'm doing great man. It's a great day out feeling good knows gene country to the only in is looking forward in back lives and just tell my story absolutely so corey <hes> pre real estate you know you. When did you even out because you're in college. Will your call him. I'm going into my fourth year. Averaging see universities to small historically black college thirty minutes south of richmond virginia gosh okay so fresh. Mira college where you thinking about real estate was on your mind no so my freshman year actually originally from new york. I'm chesapeake virginia being myself. More year in football quarterback had legs but i won't so i actually had got offered a scholarship becoming in play football the quarterback of reducing university atma freshman year my first missiles like reno different. I think i'm tired of just think in my steals may not fit the n._f._l. Let me look and search for something that can that. Can you give me a a normal life that i live in when i graduated from college and i was snack gotcha. Why are you know you play football mattis. That's that's news to me so <hes> that's as good because you know. I think a lot of athletes sometimes don't even think about that. You know what i'm saying. They don't even think like would if you know what if i don't make a no good i know i have the skills but what if vitam not good enough to get to that next level that that <hes> the liberal professions you know what i'm saying that obscene n._f._l. Were being the n._b._a. Or whatever the case it'd be so so as manager had my set of light. Okay what can i do. You know next work in that look like so. What are you this question. What are you going to school for. What is your marketing meizhou hornsey auto market. Okay perfect okay so then what led you to to real estate. Because of of course we have plenty of different things that you could choose what was like all right. Rosedale is going to be cool so actually my for about a year amino my freshman year i got into network marketing after about a year <hes> it was brick spirit of i don't think for me but i learned the fundamentals of reading everyday fifteen twenty minutes podcast every day. I'm writing down daily goals affirmation. I did take a lot from that will really got me. Focusing nosy was <music>. I'm actually in the fraternity here. Virginia state university and we were doing community service. I saw that the town was very under developed underserved these kids who are all using the same bathroom at elementary useful and i spent the summer out he actually pleaded for one hundred internships. Now's looking around like many swimming beacon home that couldn't imagine living like this against hundreds of hundreds of acres in his area <unk>. What can i do to fix this community series. I was looking around like it is so bad out here. What can i do that started doing research emma internship it kind of boosting investing strategies connection little to no money and as our came into a wholesome okay okay so you guys <hes> <hes> hostal <hes> so did you just like big of a book whilst videos and just hit the ground running with <unk> kinda. What what did you get started so what i did was. I just watch videos for about a month or two and like i say the town has a lot of homes house deal that i had credits. I was no i saw big home actually went to the appointment and the the guy who's selling it was actually wholesaler too young for one number and up sales his wholesale the which we all is that the people who went back and did it over. I'll i feel that i did down here. In petersburg was three thousand dollar deal or on the go. Go girls rush guts oga so <hes> that i deal for sure he was like man this. Is you know three thousand dollars through money for you to need really do much so now. I really didn't up a meadow. We taught that i know of anything about or pairs or anything about a house addle. I just knew hailom. Try shot to bring his number down as much as i can. Also i got for that that i just went on feast with a form was buzzing off the off the ringling every ten minutes rat. I gotta sold old that day. Gods and that's what i want people to understand the power j._v. deals is that some of you guys are going out there and you hustling that you try to do the whole transaction from aid z. Which is fine but you know college. Did you take your first deal. <hes> it took me about about two months moan about it to sending to execute as excellent because most people here eight months nine months a year or two years because you're trying to do connecticut international aid and see a faster way to start property right now is j._v. Getting somebody has inventory cylinder inventory for the and the splitting the profit that way says excellent okay so then <hes>. When did you say all right. I'm doing deals. I made some money lead use okay. Let me go through phishing them all before when i mean for me i think actually got good at gene would i i mentioned for him. As every dealer had achieved you got to me and i can somewhat deal for me and i would get it done and i said you know what i don't like this week. Someone else to bring you wanna word. Won't the juice obsessed jaffer dollars. More soda machine serve apps like that. When i was at a point in my business i was tired of doing every little thing and i knew that into shoes news he too fat for that time knowledge also then i went out and i really just wanted to mentor. I wanted someone. There had a system or lifestyle than i am you i wanted to do. I don't really wanna be visit to every single thing where i'm going to have the process. I came across europe podcast. I listen to everyday when i was in that or soon. Three months. I listened to every single day aside got into god's you and you know the fast forward now. At were you close it consistent deals now <hes> what was like that was that shift like far as and maybe even in your mindset or just different as that you've been doing that has gotcha from doing a j._v. deals like you said to actually right now going out and marketing and doing asta also i will say the mind shift as we spoke you know yours there from throughout the mentorship programme any questions sino that first remorse i was still in school now. <hes> didn't have much money to put into borghetti could do worst g beaten army to head to reform our most had nothing school so mentally i was holding myself because i didn't have the financed laxatives even to get a forty two hundred internship. This summer and i took that money is no it. It's tom hardest time to implement these things that chris teaching me every on and agile really shifted everything. I said you know what i'm gonna. Go hard to do to get these deals on. I commend <unk> literally step by step what she told me to do but that's what i always say that that's the thing about your life was that you didn't look at what's your situation and say or will man out. You know i can't do this now. You didn't let those things hold you back times. That holds us back. You know llamas that we you say we look at our situation and we like okay well. What are we going to do but you got resourceful. You know what i'm saying. You thought okay. What can i do like you said the internship pop. That was a paid internship. Luckily so that when you take that money to invest and that's what i want people to give from this. Is that listen you know some. I say but some tom you guys are older and you are a chicken shit. You afraid you accord as a school trying to figure this stuff out and he goes out gets paid. Internship defies toss up to be resourceful when by as finds a way to use his skills things that he knows to make more more money to take that money and invest in his business and bam stuff start happening for out so i like some you guys listen to it. I need you to know that rose state investing requires investing so if you don't want to invest in yourself if you wanna invest money to marketing good fucking luck. If you're going to make this happen you know because this is probably not like this is a real so let's talk about some of the results that you've got. I mean <hes> would pass frigging. Wha ma calls what three years yeah yeah three deals so the spurs deal that had beginning summer was working fulltime job. A summit was to lead to some people that aren't school any more assaults working nine five nine five thirty. I deals with swollen. I use the berdahl shetty romeo deal. He actually went now. They've got contracts on everything we marketings. Twenty four hundred dollars deal the next do that king you know use your strategy of cornelisz from proctoring that was ulysses who sent over over we had modules system text flats that lists all ended up talking to the seller on negotiating over foam sight unseen <hes> actually again a chance to meet them because it was only about four minutes from my own for internships meet them that key and then from there i mean three phone calls soda for nine thousand dollars in three now i probably could have gotten more and we talked about as example do an ushered in no numbers union. It'll just get excited because you know what we're going to. That was a great deal to happen at less than two weeks and then third you was it ill that i had used this word of mouth whereby was going out in the field. I saw somebody appointment social and that made with like needed some help aim it has a vacant home five hundred dollars for that and many a gentleman and he was able to give me in contact with his boyfriends is moths boyfriend and we close deal with him five grade. I gave a five hundred dollars yesterday with that on my instagram so just another burden strategy tonight units. We'll do title three deals out in the cold and the last one wow wow okay so that the saga bow <hes> the first nine thousand dollars okay so because we were. I'm going to ask you what i what did you use. The list of practicing was vacant list. <hes> i believe it was i know that you sent it over three minutes on the wish the one that you had up racer had been vacant louis freeh show the vegas <hes> big apps ownerless that okay so <hes> how how did you get in touch with the the homeowner <hes> so we used the text application over on that we got in contact with her as she was texting back my gotten forward there and she said someone else by the same name as me altered to lok and she was upset about estimate on cory joseph vickers the situation but i understood help and just having a mindset mold sales. I'm just eat help if it works for you works for me wherever we're going to do love the extra wholesale also say that the project worked for me. I'm gonna give it to one of our parts of group. Esters flip came ozone. It just worked with her and the reform goals three buys area until market that was a hot market was a lot easier to sell to make sure that ed right right now's. How's your first virtual. Does that correct nice nice night is okay so man <hes> sh- esco crazy mad because i remember when you i started a program like you say used avian. Deals and deals was a little slimmer. I'm like man coryell michelle how to get more profit because that's the biggest thing is you want the profit margin to be more because they reinvest you know the fifteen twenty percent twenty five percent whatever back into the mark of marketing and keep the rest to pay a bills in the corsino to fund your lifestyle things like that so yeah ma'am. I'm just proud of you. Man has been taken out of action. You know <hes> and and doing so so for people <hes> because i'm pretty sure there's been some challenges right. Of course we talked about. You know having to money for marketing <hes>. Would you say there's any myself challenge that you might have went through initially with an initially uncle my mind sa- challenge i know allowed outta. Listening is just having that confidence would you. Don't you know if you haven't got a deal done. You haven't got a significant deal. People can tell you certain things that i might knock you off a little bit but all messy just being shown no. Hey i know him at close. I mean more money than you ever meet a month at work or at an odd mental attitude and then also i use for me is writing down affirmations and goal and like speaking into this is like i've already spoken this august i think i watched their own uh-huh at like i had a roommate or and i was listening to the vikings evidently christie mistakes his religious so i'd definitely setting goals <hes> what we affirmation speeding into existence every day every morning eighteen minutes as being held <hes> mm-hmm another challenge you said was trying to give biggest fred's which i think that change once i got into a better market and local in the area absolute absolute slow perfect perfect okay so <hes> anyone has listening to this <hes> that is struggling or on you know i'm thinking about now. Maybe even getting into the mentorship program or whatnot. Would you recommend for anyone <hes> yeah. I would definitely recommend it. <hes> i mean the nike deal when having even if it wasn't for you from the list from using texting application and just happened at mindset through the trainings that i would do sellers in how to sell my deal <hes> and also swooping systems in place because to be honest. I'm not too good with skipping x._l. College students should be good at some of that so just having that being teach me coaching in your adam managed are virtual cisco could be a great partnership for me and my assistant <hes> i would definitely recommend. It's anyone's looking in the business anyone he may be tired of just doing in every single step a-to-z understanding the seasonal prostate you put in place so that we can come in the business and we had to do to tree successful so okay. Sam definitely are also corey. <hes> anybody has washington desk new. You know you're going to be able to relate to a lot of people that <hes> <hes> maybe a little bit younger and older two people as is in college. You know <hes> especially you know is challenging running a business while being fool down house while working <unk> things like that <hes>. What advice would you give them. A mini advice on gives people that are in college i would you say look around. You see where you really wanna be at five usenet like do you really wanna have over job or do really want to be free. Run your own millicent s. a. company amid all about where you wanna be at five years from now and kind of those things that aren't important and just stay focused in you know having fun of course but saint bankbook summation at udorn alia to be that you need to do with in your business and then anyone incorporate 'cause no had a corporate who different but it was exciting. Allergies say <hes> no our corporate america to have a bigger vision and just knowing you own unknown at this may be temporary doing now due to the best year abilities these which is on the back of your mind. Hey build something as well that can create casual created money for me along working this job absolute low of it all right so great advice from corey vigors out here of guys. We're going to be are probably <hes> we'll drop. This guys will be watching this live so anyways <hes> if you have any questions before if you want a j._v. with them on if you've got any deals you know especially in richmond petersburg. You know no that that d._m._v. area on well mainly for gene area. I should say because that's not too much d._n._v. but petersburg <hes> definitely <hes> appreciate convince me go to virginia beach as a richmond <hes>. Do you have anything corey. Aachen it getting content which estimate when you can get in contact with me on instagram grant every day all day as c. zero zero c._v. I c k zero zero. I'm definitely started totally more about investing. It is my opinion. I know what it takes to successful businesses. I'll shoot our guys. I'll make sure include the link to his s. Two grams so that what you can i'm lacking with the follow him and follow his journey all right so guys. You know my quote. Don't live the dream. Live your dream and i'll see you on the next week. Thanks for listening to escaping the r._e._i. Newbies own podcast at w._w._w. Dot escaped the newbies own dot com uh-huh.

corey vigors cory joseph vickers virginia chris bruce football Virginia state university richmond petersburg europe petersburg new york instagram Allergies richmond petersburg Rosedale virginia beach louis freeh
Dr. Gladys West: The Mathematician Who Reshaped Our World

Command Line Heroes

32:09 min | 4 months ago

Dr. Gladys West: The Mathematician Who Reshaped Our World

"The. Third Century BC E. In the Great Library of Alexandria the chief fly Barron Era tostes is about to have his breakthrough. Eratosthenes isn't Strana Mer a historian, a poet, and right now he's a Cortana prefer to. Using, just the shadows cast by sticks in the sand and a few geographical records he discovered in his library, he has managed to calculate the circumference of the planet. Even. Though the ancient Greeks were unaware of whole continents era toss knees calculations were off by less than two percent the world the whole world had suddenly snapped into focus. The dream of building an accurate model of our planet, a complete picture of the whole world may have begun more than two thousand years ago, but it's still a bream were pursuing today. In the ancient world, a good map meant more effective trade routes and better prospects for military campaigns. Today our ability to measure every nook and cranny of the Earth surface can lead to so much more. I'm surrounded Barak and this command line heroes an original podcast from red hat. All season were tracking inventions and breakthroughs that were made possible by people who never quite got there do. Brilliant minds whose contributions were overlooked. This time we're zooming in on the mathematician who helped bring definition two, hundred, ninety, seven, million square miles that we call home. Gladys. West was a pioneer in the field of geodesy. That's where scientists and mathematicians walk to build more and more accurate models of the planet. That model is crucial to our daily lives because in helping to build that model. Gladys West didn't your show us with the mountains and oceans of planet Earth listen. She gave us way to find ourselves. Her work was crucial to the creation of GPS. It all begins with a young black woman who's determined to find a place for herself in a world that wasn't necessarily looking for her. Doctor Gladys West who's now ninety years old spoke with me from her home in. King. George. County. Virginia. So what is your parents do for a living? Well we were. We were poor family. The kids work the FLOM during the summer and in eight minutes it was busy. So we had. Good food because everything was so fresh everything from from the garden. Money, crop was tobacco. Did you WANNA do farming when you grew up no not really I I had been on that farm long enough to know that. That wasn't A favorite kind of life for me I want something different I wanted to leave the farm I wanted to be educated. I just. I need to go somewhere I could use my talents and I enjoy my life better working on a bomb. So you mentioned that your family didn't have much money, but you did attend. Virginia State. Would it take for you to get in there and to pay for it my parents would always say that they making this feel over here just gladys to go to college, and then they supposed to save that money from. Income of that crop, but always turn out to be that there was some other needs they came up and always used. So we didn't have. A lot of students of waiting for me to go to college. And then one day I heard that. The State of Virginia was GONNA GIVE TO SCHOLARSHIPS To graduating seniors from high school. and. They had to be first and second in class and I heard that and right off the spelt that. Could earn one of those I stopped working right now and Burkhard. So when I graduated I did. Come first in my class. Then that was the you know life was just great after that. I knew I was going. Dr West wasn't just going to college either after graduating in nineteen, fifty two, she got a job teaching math at a segregated school. She saved her income. So she can return for a master's degree in mathematics at Virginia State University an historically black institution. Then destiny came knockin in one, thousand, nine, hundred, fifty, six she was invited to come work as a mathematician at the naval proving ground at Dahlgren an institution that adjust been desegregated before I had been. Mostly black environment, everybody was sort of compatible. In that sense, it wasn't blatant. We didn't have blatant discrimination, but there are things like maybe people stop stopping. Talking being quite win the blacks walk in. Maybe. You didn't know too much about. What was required for promotion maybe that kind of detail where are told you. And we didn't we didn't have a like a mental. have got you and throwing allegiance. For the Best I put. There was always talk in the corridors of we will leave people fail. ARE THEY GONNA make it? That's Martin. Jackson he's the CO author of Gladys West Memoir it began with a dream but the thing about it. They were so strong. Like she said, when she first went there, you know people would look at her. she went to the ladies room or something like they saw a ghost. And you know her was. Far from being a ghost. But she said that. After a while they got used to you know and. It was just like anything in life everybody got used to each other and she said that. They gained a lot of good friends at Dr. West was the fourth black person they ever hired. And the team being assembled, there was about to tackle some of the twentieth century's largest problems. Gladys West was suddenly a long way from the tobacco fields of her youth. The world entered the space age a multi-stage rocket took off from a launching site in Russia. Launched the world's first artificial satellite called the sputnik one. For Fourth Nineteen Fifty Seven Soon after Gladys West arrived dog Rin the Russian satellite sputnik begin orbiting the Earth at an altitude of three hundred and fifty nine miles. The United States determined to keep up launched its own satellite, explore the following year, and as the colonization of outer space progressed an entirely new field opened up for those mathematicians at Dahlgren. So into have been waiting for a space-based doppler signal. That's Gavin truck a surveyor and also on editor at Geospatial World magazine when Sputnik went up in one thousand, nine, hundred, fifty, seven within its first couple of orbits John Hopkins University researchers. We're getting the doppler effect. You know the shift as the signal is coming towards you. It's sort of one pitch in one. It's going away from you. It's another. And that difference they're able to determine a position on the earth to the satellite, the position of the satellite relative to the. Earth. Scientists had realized that if you track to satellite carefully from the surface of the earth and you applied the dubliner effect to your receiver, you could actually locate where you were on earth by tracking satellites you could find yourself suddenly our ability to find our place in the world grew infinitely finer. Soon. The Department of Defense heading number of satellite-based patient systems. The navy has something called taxation. The Air Force had program six, twenty, one be. The. Army had C- core. But was missing was a single coordinated system that one could use. After many political wranglings within the military a man named Bradford Parkinson assembled some of the country's top minds at the Pentagon for a weekend meeting in nineteen seventy-three. Now, they're the master plan for a new global positioning system GPS was brought together including key concepts like a passive one way four dimensional user position. That meant an infinite number of users could conceivably access the system when it was finished. The work was going to be way more intense and involves the what air tossed. These could do with sticks in the sand Gladys West, and her team would be asked to deliver next level precision. Schroeck explains the ancient ancient eras. The math was actually pretty simple just working out working out some angles some trigonometry where things really took off was. In the eighteenth century, there was a geodesic mission to the equator. The French Spanish one. In seventeen, thirty six. And it was they were determined to measure true length of two degrees of. Longitude. Very precise navigation was not going to be possible until they figured this out too many discrepancies navigation at the time you know with a sextant and the clock was good but. That mission proved a lot of things. For the first time, we had a rough shape of the earth. And they had a pretty good idea of hell. Lizzo could be computed one of those egg-shaped models to fit over the earth. This is starting to get towards the kind of math, the doctor Westwood. But it was. I don't know maybe five percent is complex is the stuff that Dr West would have had to do. To make a GPS system work properly, you need two perfect that model of earth you have to build a kind of imaginary shell that fits over the infinitely rough reality of the planet. To build that model though an enormous amount of calculations had to be managed I. The Earth is it's a bumpy potato. Everybody knows that that's fine. But how to correlate something like an elevation or sea level on that is quite a bit more complicated because elevation is a function more of the gravity, the mass of that bumpy earth and how that affects. The water flows. So. You can have a spot that sea level in one part of the earth in it's actually many hundreds of meters above or below sea level in another part of the earth. West. Calculations at Dahlgren had to accommodate such complications and in doing. So she helped build that final geodesy that fighter model of the Earth. G.. Odyssey was fundamental gps in ways that people don't really realize. And it was a lot of hard work. To, be able to get GPS to be able to. Measure. Initially, they just wanted plus or minus ten meters was the charter for the US Air Force if he wanted to measure to a meter or nowadays because geodesy is so well refined, you can measure to the centimeter. An even over a time series, say structural monitoring down two millimeters. Oldest off, you had to refine the geodesy. You needed this very perfected model of not only the shape of the Earth Yours gravity in the correlation between the two. Truck describes a positive feedback loop where GPS tech grew more and more sophisticated things to the refinement of that model Gladys West was working on, they were taking satellite-based observations. Turning into a refined model of the earth that would in turn. Improve, the satellite based systems GPS would have been pretty useless without it. It was great that they were all of these wonderful people who kept getting all these awards for building the GPS system, but it was going to be any good. It was like building the record player without the vinyl to run on it you couldn't have agreed GPS system without the geodetic foundation. That's why you know folks that are sort of into the esoteric of of TPS. See. Dr West is a real hero. But making the model itself proved so incredibly complicated that even someone like West would need a little help and help had arrived at exactly the right moment in the form of the world's first supercomputers. I'm Paul Ceruzzi I'm a retired curator at they. Sonian institution's National Air and Space Museum. We contacted Ceruzzi who literally wrote the book on GPS to find out about the test gladys west was able to work with at Dahlgren. She was in charge of computing activity that took that data from tracking satellites in space and track the anomalies their. Orbits, which she then was able to translate into an understanding of what was causing those variations namely, the variations of the Earth's gravity. So her accomplishment was really the translation of this data into a knowledge of the Earth's shape which of course, is very important not just for GPS but for lots of other things she worked using these sophisticated IBM computers and also. In the nineteen fifties and sixties Dahlgren was one of the world's SPA. Computing centers believe it or not some of the top computers in the world where we're located there. Increasingly, precise models of the earth could be made because the mathematicians at Dahlgren have access to IBM supercomputers and in Nineteen Sixty to the seventy thirty had arrived nickname stretch. It was also used at Los Alamos in the race toward atomic development stretch with capable of computing at an unprecedented scale because it was IBM's first transistor is supercomputer older versions had used vacuum tubes. Stretch could handle half a million instructions per second and sixty components cost about seventy million in today's dollars. Wow. Yet, by our standards stretch wasn't that Super Gavin Schroeck gives us a sense of how arduous that work really was here. He describes their work determining the orbits of Pluto and Neptune on another early supercomputer, the Norfolk, naval ordinance research calculator nor in entailed five billion calculations and about one hundred. Hours of processing time. This could be done on your phone in a few seconds, but it can only be done. Because the process is that go into it all of the computations and the nuances between them to prove each other out have been proven over decades. The early pioneers were the ones that went. Okay. We can teach this computer to do a simple calculation a very straightforward calculation. But what about when putting it, all these other variables? So they had to do everything by hand. To make sure that it would work as they put it into the computer. Gladys West and others at Dahlgren were in fact, often using slide rules to manually do their calculations and these were then incorporated into decks of punched cards they handed over to punch operators who had access to the supercomputers. Paul Ceruzzi for security reasons only very few people who are allowed in their room because it's a multimillion dollar installation, you didn't want somebody pressing the wrong button or something like that. So. That's the way it was he you would submit your program you. You'd wait it would be run and then would come. Sometimes hours or a day later, print out a big giant piece of Fan folded paper. Upper case only a giant printer. It made it horrid horrendous racket. But was actually a good sound. When you heard that racket, you knew that the computer was working and giving you an answer. punch-card by punch-card Gladys. West and the rest of the Dogwood Mathematicians were using the stretch supercomputer to painstakingly home their models of dealing. You didn't have a second computer or a second set of people coming up with alternate algorithms to prove it out. So it had to get right the first time. She says, her primary job was not thinking about all of these future and uses it was getting it right. So at the time, it was doing it by hand on one hand with a pen and paper. And running it through the computer and seeing how it worked out. By the early nineteen eighties, the GPS project was finally taking shape. This will be a universal and truly Global Positioning System that would redefine the way we orient ourselves to the planet. But even then skeptics complaining about its expense. Y build something new when separate disjointed systems already existed. But those arguments went up in smoke in the fall of nineteen eighty-three I found Americans I'm coming for you tonight about the Korean airline massacre. With crime against humanity must never be forgotten a Korean airliner was shot down by the Soviet Union who mistook it for an American spy plane The Korean airliner had strayed off course it was using another navigation system. So called inertial navigation, there was some issue about a misreading of the the data it was one of the. Lowest. Points most dangerous points of the Cold War between the US and the Soviet Union. And in the midst of that disaster, came a new push for GPS. The President Reagan made an announcement that said that the GPS system which was then under development would be made available worldwide. For navigation purposes. That took the the planners gps a little bit by surprise because it wasn't quite ready yet but it also. Put the consciousness of this system in the public's eye everybody. Now realized that there was the system if and when it got finished, it would be very useful. It would save lives it was worth the money. So all those debates over the funding which were raging in the Pentagon and Congress those debates went away. Finally there was full support for GPS. By the early nineteen, ninety s this enormous project which would redefine our planet and our position on that planet was finished at last. And it has worked exactly as planned or better really better than plan. At the time gladys, West may not have guessed how great of an impact her work at with eventually have but then again, nobody could have imagined how GPS was going to influence guide and shape our lives. I am Todd Humphries and associate professor of aerospace engineering at the University of Texas at Austin. We went to Todd Humphries for a look at all the ways. West work is still evolving. It's become so entrenched that life as we know, it would be impossible without it. Economists around the world have gamed out what it would look like to go a week without gps or even a day. What they showed was that a prolonged duration would have trillions of dollars of damage to the economy. So going without this wonderful resource that rains down from medium earth orbit would really cripple our economy and it shows how dependent and how grateful we are for this resource because we really do benefit from it in a significant way. As we've grown more dependent we've also fine tuned the earlier work from Dahlgren and building that more and more perfect model of the planet allows, for finer applications. If you were able to take a look at a graph of the errors that GPS has in in its solution at the surface of the earth since the time it became fully operational around nineteen ninety-five to today in two, thousand and twenty you'd be very pleased to see how it's improved every year many of those improvements have to do with. Better orbital modeling so Johnny. AIDS in the improved orbital modeling that is contributing to every year better accurate, more accurate GPS. I think we've. Basically flattened out, we really can't will the gravitational field of the earth or the earth shape to any higher resolution that would provide better accuracy for GPS. Today GPS enables the entire rideshare industry? It's super charges are personal way finding. Its however, Amazon delivery is tracked around the world. It's estimated. The US alone gains more than sixty, six, billion dollars annually in raw economic improvements. Thanks to GPS. That is an amazing benefit to each person living today, and we owe that to the pioneers like gladys. West's and other people who contributed to GPS in. All of their. Multifaceted ways. And you know we are just basking in. In, the blessings of having, this is a great resource. My name is Gwen James. Dr West and I belong to the same royds the Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority incorporated. gwen James was that a sorority meeting honoring older members when Gladys West brief bio was read aloud after the meeting I went to her. And I said that the West I had no idea that you know you work on the GPS I'll mazing is you know as no segment of our society that doesn't use the GPS and I said to her some well, would you mind if I tried to get your story told? And her response to me was well, you think it's worth telling. Among like Yes. I certainly do think it's worth tally. James took the story to a newspaper journalist who wrote an article that got picked up nationally by the Associated Press? For James this was long overdue credit, but she's not very surprised that it took so long. Keep in mind it was the time when black people and white people couldn't even go to the bathroom together they couldn't use the same water fountain. So you know for other people to take credit for white people to take credit for that work. That was just the way it was I mean that was just the way the country was at that time. James believes that the more we dig into the history of black inventors, Black Mathematicians and scientists. The more will discover that heroes like gladys West aren't so rare after all they were always there ready to be seen. Dr West. And folks like Kathryn Johnson and some of the other hidden figures. They're really not anomalies, these men and women. Rebecca days of segregation days of Jim Crow. They've you know they've always had the intelligence they always had the wherewithal. They just never received credit for their work because of racism. So. Had not the someone. Just. Like I did we'll stop the WES someone found out about Katherine Johnson than the other hidden figures and thought their story was amazing and couldn't believe that no one knew there are a lot of people around men and women of Color. That never got credit for the work that they did. In engineering and mathematics in the sciences. So they're not anomalies. At all and West accomplishments speak to the potential in any number of little girls before the civil rights movement fighting their way onto the stage. Author Marvin Jackson I call her mother term is recently recognized because she basic math was always there. The now she's being recognized for all the hard work she did. I just think that it's important that we recognize people like gladys and the contributions they made a mean. And they did it at an even more difficult time than now. And so that should give. Young. Girls a reason to be more positive about doing these types of things because it'll be a lot easier for them now to do these things then when it works for Gladys. Later, Westwood build on early GPS breakthroughs by contributing to the geosat satellite mission in the nineteen eighty s where she helped determine the height of oceans down to the inch. An even won her forty, two year career had ended. She remained a fanatic for precision and for excellence at levels that most of us never even contemplate. After retiring in one, thousand, nine, hundred eight West went on to get her doctor of philosophy degree in public administration at the age of seventy she was the only black woman in her program. And just this last summer she published her memoir entitled it began with a dream. Here's a bit more of our conversation. In two, thousand, eighteen, the airforce base command may do the first black woman inducted into the. Hall of fame. What did that honor mean to you? That that was that was fantastic. It was. Unbelievable. You walking around for a few days one who you are. Do you feel it should have come sooner. I think. This is about right Sam I can't. Think of a better time. At the end and You don't want to wait too late so you can enjoy. The Nan, I can get to sorta enjoy what has happened to me. So based on what you've seen over the past eighty nine years do you believe the culture in technology in science has evolved its attitude towards black innovators? I've been thinking about the. Time that has passed over and looking back at the real times you know taking folks, inventions and ideas and all. Sort of done with that much Shingai, I, guess you just. Do Your thing and take credit for. What advice or words of encouragement you give to other black technologists and scientists in the field? I had to I had to work hard and I have to not be discouraged and treat others as you want to be treated. You set your goals and work work with dollars with somebody else doing and in Nebula and always be best. And I guess just. Be Yourself. Wise words. Lorcy since three shots out Chung. The mission to map the world and find our place in it didn't end with Gladys West, of course. Even, as we put the finishing touches on this episode, the Chinese Government Finish launching its own constellation of satellites powering their by do system an alternative to GPS. Russia Russia meanwhile has its own system to bonus. And Space X has been launching satellites of their own creating new Starlink constellation to provide a further GPS alternative. With. Started a moonshot program that stretched the limits of modern mass has become a necessity of modern life. Because just like Gladys West herself now that we found ourselves on this big bumpy potato over world, we don't plan on ever going missing again. We discovered lots more fascinating material on gladys, west, and the emergence of GPS. You can check it all out over at red hat dot com slash command line heroes. Command, line heroes is an original podcast for. Next time we introduce you to mark deep. The inventor who made the computer personal. I'm strong. EDVARD. Coupon. Code.

Doctor Gladys West Gladys West Dahlgren Gladys West Virginia United States Gladys West Memoir National Air and Space Museum Paul Ceruzzi Great Library of Alexandria Eratosthenes Gavin Schroeck Gavin truck Marvin Jackson Virginia State University IBM Dahlgren
EP103: Weed Entrepreneurs + Amber Guyger - Botham Jean Murder Case

#GetSome with Gary Owen

51:34 min | 1 year ago

EP103: Weed Entrepreneurs + Amber Guyger - Botham Jean Murder Case

"Listen to this on itunes or go to Go to YouTube go to YouTube dot com back last Garryowen com or is it forty you're listening to the podcast tag a what's up everybody this is Gary with get some podcasts as always you can brown I know he's from making Gusta wikipedia shoes born in Barnwell South Carolina just a that's unbelievable so that's where I'll be home of James Brown guest Georgia in a couple of weeks so this this October twenty fifth at the Bell Auditory when October Twenty Six I'm in Mobile Alabama at the Mobile Civic Center arena and that takes let not this week this La- last week I finally got to go on fighter in the kid podcast with Brennan Shaab and the Georgia at the Bell Auditorium that James Brown's from I think he's from making from making our Gusta I'll look it up Augusta Georgia the music box jail and he had a hell of a life James about a hell of a life later they moved to Augusta I was right Stober so gonNA lift it up James Brown is he let me just see were. Jane's Browns from James in his family first settled at one of his aunts brothels they later moved into a house shared with another aunt Brown's mother eventually left the family after a contentious and Abusive Marriage Uh Virginia State University multipurpose center and then October nineteenth. I'm in Oklahoma City Oklahoma at the Cox Convention Center October Twenty Fifth I'm in a gust Bryan callen don't know like about six months ago somehow my name came up on their podcast and Brian Kelly sisters get married on Saturday my sister Kayla she's an identical twin sister eminent sister Kayla on my Dad's side excise spoken and said you guys volatile yeah guys kind of hard to work with on the road and I was like what and I'm sitting here laughing about it and then and debris Richard Pryor's life where the Brown family in extreme poverty in Elko South Carolina which was an impoverished town at the time they later moved Augusta Georgia when James was four or five so yeah Augusta Georgia Home James Brown moved there when he was four or five. That's you know this is before the Internet they don't even know God or you talk by yourself like I'm doing a pause that might be like a two second pause it feels like ten minutes so my Dad's side were good on my dad's side Mrs Kay is getting married so I'm off this weekend so but next weekend I'm back on the road October Eighteenth Petersburg Virginia at the and your brain like Oh my God I gotta say something else I don't WanNa lose listeners so you fill it with or you but where did he grow up he grew up he was yet elko south in New York Brown's spent long stretches of time on his own hey on the streets and Hudson goodbye he may have stayed in school until the sixth grade that is crazy I think that's just a way of filling dead space so you don't feel like nobody's saying anything 'cause when you it's crazy when you do a podcast armas much but when you're by yourself yeah I I didn't realize how much I did it until not allowed a few people make comments on my page and I'm like maybe I d say that see I just pause right there pause again didn't say for all the editing I didn't I didn't know if I saw editing but it's a pretty impressive it's it's an impressive like people that are at don't speak public often I catch it when I see that type of person speaking in front of a large or small are there podcasts in La it's actually Santa Monica its own building and they do nothing in there but like podcast socially infrastructure that they have there are they can just be in house and create content that millions of people can see all outside yeah so I didn't find in the kid and I was struck me it's one thing to do somebody's podcast I'm always curious as like how it's run media type things now Brennan does do his his show a food truck diaries he does that out of there that's where they do I think I'll abandoned building society normal corporate building and you would never know that Theo von does podcast inside of their well we're Brian and brandon recall lewd less okay listen James Run their life another movie on it but just the read on Wikipedia it reminds you the hells at it I know one of them's got to a theater named after him pretty sure they are Gospel Brown singer on their podcasts of how when we first started me and Brian it was you know you're at the mercy of network executives and movie a lot some people do it because they're nervous I see public speakers doing quite a bit she's in public speakers no but like on dead air so I think that's why I say because I'm just bein times in the next sentence if you talk with somebody a conversation you don't say are sure Brandon and now Brian's by gas it's open the doors up to people that maybe weren't that familiar with me side of the the machine let's call it the Hollywood machine they create in their own space their own way in their own careers and we we talked about at length the people so I think sometimes I do it just because I'm by myself and I feel Oh my God I cannot take a breath I gotta keep you tell the same stories a few times but you're on different people shows you want your ex expose yourself to different audiences and not everybody watches like length about my mom and Stepdad. I don't really I'm not in touch with either them anymore but me and my dad are good so that when people get confused like telling me your family might not ability to eat shit as far as like bombing and still coming back and not that I was bombing because jokes wasn't funny but early in my career I do read people's comments and I heard people say an awful lot so I'm GonNa work on that this podcast but when you're talking by yourself I think it happens a lot 'cause you just so like when I did feel vons podcast he had this you would drive by this frigging delicious the sake a almost can share that hopefully people become fans of mine so that's why when they asked me about my story how I became this white guy that you to black audiences I mean the Brendan and and and and Brian Great Guys The podcast is one of the top podcast in the country and What I would tell okay had some rough sets wanted a gay bar in West Hollywood plays call the rage one guy did again I live Joe Rogan's the guy whereas Tom joyner's the guy for black people men and women over forty five I say Tom Joyner's the guy I didn't see that story didn't podcasts so you do tell some of the same stories when you're getting your name out there and I feel like me doing like feel von Berg Christ doc so I have noticed I did notice that the people told me it's freezing in this house it's like a new like all my Eddie's Tom's great now radio show host but Tom used to do this thing called the sky shows and he would he basically do one of his morning shows on my stand up or haven't paid attention to my stand up might not might know my name but I haven't really resonated with a large society so this is another side that live in different cities he do it once a month and one year he didn't Richmond and you hire me to be the man on the street in Richmond so Saddam again Tom Joyner he's Marshall host and they weren't that familiar and I said he is I said he is basically the job rob and now he's got three shows all out of this building in Santa Monica he's got fighter in the kid which is a podcast and he has kings Brendan and Brian was asking a lot of same questions that feel bird so they didn't even see the podcast so they didn't know the story so stories lots of stories are similar the same because I'm telling the same stories I can't change how I came up in the comic business if they don't know that and that's what amaze me they were promote a food truck they free exposure basically and I told him a story of it was funny I said if you guys heard of or whatever that food truck is and they comment on how good the food is so we go to? Tom Hires me and I'll run around Richmond I'm showing the city Rogan to over forty maybe even fifth year old Black Joe Rogan is the guy for white males from about eighteen to forty five thing which is him and Theo von another podcast and he's got food truck doctors which is a show on showtime where he gets UFC fighters and they go to a food truck credit he apologized immediately. It's like I don't know why said that we got to get you on the podcast I'm sorry so I finally got to do the podcast and I had a great time both both getting back to the billions they have I mean brandon was a UFC fighter Brennan Shaab Schwab Shaab Mispronouncing his name I'm not sure but it it he made into a TV show eventually this guy show so he'd bring in like Jill Scott and then he bringing a comedian and then he do the sky shows they cut it down to an hour but it was a four hour recording so the singer whoever's the let's say we're in Philly he would bring in Jill Scott it is famous for their fish boats these fried fish boats right so we all we or the fish boats so let's say there was me another producer they order some food and they just talk about the business of you'll see what fighting are coming up experience in the past but it's all over food and they get the so the singer would come and do two different sets they do like a couple of songs and they come back to a couple of songs because it was a four hour show now when it aired on TV x and and comedy exempts certain networks now the nearness completely changed and Brian said something I didn't realize he said you have an incredible and for the people like four orders of fish boats basically and then the wages come to give me a bill at the end I went and then you have a comedian go up every sky show so this one was a Richmond Virginia and I'll never forget and I'll show you how this this correlates into brandon if you look at a lot he's almost twice as you tell story and it gets like two hundred thousand views there are still millions upon millions upon millions upon millions of people could girl and she would do like two different sets she'd come out about seven am do a couple of songs and she come back ninety and do a couple of more songs and exposure to this black owned fish spot that was pretty good but I was so amazed I was like God saves accomplished I got heckled by the comedians and got banned because I- smart off to him I I probably started before because I do you guys comments it but I'm GonNa talk about him tomorrow so I remember on the live show the next morning because this guy shields were six to ten am it was basically a morning show and and Businesses he was really big into black entrepreneurs black owned restaurants so he wanted to give at this camera crew Whitney then we go to this place called Croakers Fish Pot and Richmond Virginia and we go in and we sit down we got the cameras we order the food truck batteries so we should yeah we did the food truck diaries basically the you know they get the order some food and they're not charging them for the food because it's free exposure everyone back to Kroger's after that I just can't support a business like that I just can't and every time I go to Richmond Oh oh so you you want to be on the TV show you want to charge four tiny fish boats do you realize what you're doing right now do realize show you're getting all this exposure it's forty dollars which really if the radio show but then it would air on one of the networks I'm not sure which one was TV Juan de T. centric at your pocket the Flu Markup it's probably twenty dollars worth of food that really paid for and that I was just I wo- I grown I can't believe you I don't know they invited us or what but it was tom here's the thing to Tom always went to like black excuse me now we're rolling we're on camera and I go excuse me as I said Oh no no Tom Joyner show we're filming or recording here she lisa I know every time I go to always recommended croakers and even on my pockets is probably the most exposure croakers got in a while but I can never go back because I ver I never went to Tom about it I mean listen there's you tom ago it's forty bucks I'm talk about it on stage the next day I go it's like four. Am because you get a free concert everybody gets free gifts but I went in on croker so bad on the live show and I can't remember what they aired they got to edit it down when it aired but I just never forget the wages I shall know about that they didn't tell me to sit with free which the bill was like forty dollars they're like ten bucks a pop these fish boats and it was I argue with is I said not I'm just GonNa pay could we speak to the manager Mexican I it goes yeah no nobody told us that this was free we had to pay I end up paying out of my pocket and I never can't support a business like that after they did that I was Oh amazed I say wow wow you're ought to TV show you're getting exposure I said again we got construction workers in the backyard in our backyard dome right now so my dog goes crazy when anybody there was like we smoke everywhere one of the producers came and go yeah we got a Matt Barnes and Stephen Jackson and somebody else in the back I'm Kinda talk show sports talk with him Stephen which I think is brilliant because Stephen Jackson and Matt Barnes and if they get other MBA players with all the candidates I'll matter to me here's your bill and then the manager comes out and it was like it wasn't clear that this was free is always amazing to me that people will be out there five amland around the blocks we do it in a big theater wherever the big theater was in the cities where this big theater in Richmond and people were just lining up twenty bucks I'm food so yeah I was busy keeping now kim joy dog the wages are the best though on about that for that Dan receipt on the table and I say we and I'm all polite you know is but we haven't had a lot of deep conversations but I go behind him and I said wow of black smoke weed who came up with that Braille Yukon like the food's better and I don't know like you can get Chili's Friday's you can get that everywhere I like to eat your stuff I can't get unless in that city whether it's good or bad producers that were in the front of the room when I got there and I saw Brendan O'Brien this Yeah Matin Steve's in the back film this this Promo piece her film they were filming something Matt and Steve I know Matt's got his we'd line and he's got he's got his own podcast Matt Barnes but I think they're putting together another show that from the cloth I should say guys you didn't WanNa Cross but you wanted him on your team they they were back there filming something so I go back there why we were filming why were film in fighting the kid right when I got there I walk in this building and it's a it's a whole it's a whole conglomerate I mean there's all these little not so much lately but for a long time ago but it was good spot the 'cause I always like to find local spots whether it's a coffee shop or restaurant I like to find mom and POPs own stuff because except and you see like there was like there was fifteen guys in the room it was like seven white dude's eight bucks so the blood need or is talk show podcast he sitting there and then he's doing this shit you know so I'm standing behind Stephen Jackson and I've met Stephen Matt Barnes especially talk about utilizing your money and your connections from being the NBA. Stephen Jackson's got his phone up right and he's filming Matt presents the rampage and you can go Stephen Jackson Bay you can see the video where I'm behind him but so sitting here got the cameras around of got this music playing and Matt Scott Sweetie spoken and he's you know whatever he was it was a promo for something either we ah bars is very much becoming a an entrepreneur on something that he could have did fifteen twenty years ago he came at the right time thoroughly and do stuff he likes and he's passionate about like like just weedon general the benefits of it for professional athletes why should be made legal that that he made an MBA and just milk in that and transfer an ad into a whole second career because he's right when there's this shift and how people look at people that smoke weed and athletes in general and now these all these athletes are coming out Percy a day after games and practices because just ease the pain their joints wasn't a sore and everything because it would have just been Percy Harbin saying that he's very knowledgeable with that kind of stuff but talk about using his resources his his money and everything else that he came with the NBA citizen Calvin Johnson was like a grant hill when it comes the basketball so for him to come out Sammy smoked weed all the time it just runs with all these different podcasts call below the belt there's fighter in the kid then they got a green screen this room in the back and it says I walk the bill all this weed nobody would have taken serious 'cause Percy was always known as kind of a head case wildcard got suspended numerous times for various reasons but calvin was a model to to to your post MBA career I don't think there's too many people like that barns that have l. and it's funny how people's perception can be depending on who the Messenger is because of that messengers personally Harbin there's a lot of people acid- J. Zoo he flips the camera around all back there then Matt comes out it was just funny because you could see some of the even the walk through the backyard so if you hear barking that's what it's for because she sees the contracts guys back there worded it was it was impressive man and then it what was funny was uses aren't that familiar with me and I'll say some off the wall shit especially to a black entertainment black athlete and like what the fuck and then when they see the laughs and they're like lead and athletes it just would I don't know that level of commitment to your body abuse your body can take so I don't really Tom's got so much shit going on not about the pull him aside and be like hey man I need that four dollars but here's my receipt or anything I just just whatever he had he had three or four good years left in them maybe not top of the game but enough that he could we've just about every day just to get through the pain and that's a so much about We I am not an expert I don't either way but I will say this I am one of these guys that can emit you know twenty years ago of Oughta heard of an athlete happy those who came out at the same time because now they can band together they're both play the same position Both got out of the League me is like me being stand up and I fly a lot so I get stretched and then the manager came out and Cosi like yeah yeah you got to pay the interest so now like I go to once a week I go and I just have somebody stretched me out they just it's not working out it should everything I my perception is completely changed I get it now I understand completely it's like like he's he just make excuse he wants to smoke weed but when Calvin Johnson says it then allow maybe there is some validity to this some so they probably still have tread on the tires but just basically had enough was I I'm good the end because when Calvin Johnston retired he there's still been on any NFL roster as a number one receiver But I think by him saying I had a smoke weed every game arvin and Calvin Johnson and I love the fact that Calvin Johnson wide receiver for the Detroit Lions and Percy Harbin receiver both said they smoked weed Dan or then we'll go back there say hi surprise them whatever and it was funny because you even saw coming producers that falls in there was like what the fuck sky doing and you could see it's funny when you see guys Doc Delta almost another million on united hundreds of thousands on American and they're south west and jet sweet I've fly a couple times a week so I'm sitting slash I I don't know I give people every week coming in and tell me what it should be let me get right into my schedule this week I'm off actually mouth that I've become more educated on it and know a lot of athletes of talking to them privately about weed and how they feel about it now once a week I have to get stretched it's just part of the deal is part of a I got to spend money on somebody stressed me out then I can't do on my own qualified to judge somebody because of and I think we're now we're getting no point where more and more people are accepting the fact straight up and that stuff can sorry about that stuff catches up with you when you're in your forties like I am so stretching me and I need it because my hand gets tight my hips throughout align got lower back pain and I know it all stems from flying you know when I got three million so for these guys the ISD Naismith always talking about you can't stay off the we'd just these guys go through you're not I can wait I would have been a guy going man what how to fuck what a loser you're fucking up everything your money your career over Sweden and shit but yet these guys need this we'd to to function to deal with pain and abuse they put their bodies through so I'm one of these guys that have come around going on they become familiar with me but when I got behind Stephen and I said wow brilliant concept of black smoke in we'd where'd you guys come up with that ah you could see him is that the white guys like what the Fuck Stephen just are dying laughing but Mexico I'm telling you man all kind of laughed they know it was me the whitest looked like what the fall she knows David Jackie Gibson issue so steve kind of look back like what the fuck and then he gets the other thing I wanted to talk about was the and this is this is a week old but I really wanted to I wanted to let it sit we the first job it in the past like fucking up man not anymore I'm like I get it I completely get it would've been stiffer anybody with common sense knows how the justice system works and knows how we perceive people in Dallas that walked into what she thought was her apartment and she walked into the wrong floor she walked into this off initial reactions I'll give the without knowing the whole store without hearing on speak I think without question that sense would have been a lot stuff that's the tried to portray the the gentleman as a criminal like there was marijuana and system and there's marijuana department then when I started thinking about it I was like I don't know if I can be forgiving like that there's a couple of things I took away from body saw his brother both of Jesus brother hug her forgive walked in and said she feared for her life and she shot the guy was eating ice cream Washington Thursday night football black man's apartment I I'm going to say that because race in I think race and gender had a big part of this case radio and I mean the guys of his entire life how you're supposed to live kinda people religious ever had a police record never got in trouble with the law anything couple problems with this case is how when it first broke there were some media uh is the Amber Geiger case the the police officer sure it would have been way longer than ten years but when his brother went up there and forgave her and said I don't want her to go to and once you get found guilty so then a lot of people were celebrating that the next day ten years in prison that's all his life was worthless a a white person I said well let's slowdown let's let's go even further what if it was a black female cop that shot a white male her and it's I see I see both sides some people like I ain't got that kind of this heart and other this just a comfortable good family and then there's this amber this cop goes in their shoots them ten years and I think looking at it I think they said what was the other way around was a buffer shooter that's shot both gene from saying his name right and I feel like an asshole if I if I butcher this but I know ever you do and then he said can I hug her and then they went for this long embrace and I've never seen unlike and never seen a basic convicted murderer in this case and it's the I know everybody knows the case talking about don't have to get into details about it but this is the female police officer in because this is the white much back new with essentially the same I think you could say whatever you want but we know this the depor like oh it was beautiful to see stuff what I always took away from I when I first saw it I got a little like whoa that was that was cool that he did that be allowed to hug somebody make a family member making basically impact statement and then I'll put them the judge who's L. and I I forgive her I love her as a sister I have to because I've given myself to Christ Nashville and he asked her to give herself to Christ that's what he wanted somebody was in court and somebody fix their hair I'm sure there I think that was a big deal about nothing the hair combing I think somebody took the picture chemo hug there and then there was a picture of the cop combing her hair now I don't know if there's been other instances where an an people in ran with it because whether it's the worst convicted murderer of all time if he comes in and there's most guys get clean shaven so when I saw the the cop combing her hair I just didn't think that was a that was a huge deal now while the judge hug owner I don't know what the story was on that I never heard why the judge Hugger but the brother the statement he gave the nearby as either really four or really feels like like It was too much kate brant gene was was both genes brothers name so when Brandt was up there talking and he asked for a hug at first I was like wow that I got like that that was nice to see but then and you really forgive like you're supposed to this is his way of living his life the way he's given how we feel this is GonNa it was his brother that got killed and it was this is his way of dealing with if he's a really religious person I thought the sentence was a little lenient myself do I think amber is a for them it's for you it's to give you so you can keep living your life be productive and be a good person now that was like Whoa is a there's a lot of layers of this there's a lot to unfold and I think the bottom line is it's not about disappeared I think if I'M GONNA call it twenty years so now I would bet money this this amber geiger that killed her daughter and then she got off and everybody thought she was guilty and she got off and then she just went cases like these I think not only not only is there jail time but I think when they get out to really show you she's going to be a threat to us I think she when she gets out in ten years or six years whatever it ends up being she could very much has life to Christ that's people do you forgive so he forgave her and when you forgive somebody it's not threat to society from here going forward I don't I don't think she should be a cop I don't think she should be allowed to carry a gun but I also don't think she's thanks show end up being like a Casey Anthony where she just disappears almost the end of the Casey Anthony case the the lady in Orlando that hair in front of the heritage place Michael behind him and fix it whether it's his lawyer or just somebody to the death you know you that's why you wear a suit that's why you she just basically disappeared moved out of Florida her she was in Ohio for a while every now and then she'll pop up on something at one point I think she's trying to capitalize on her fame a little bit I'm like he does we don't know he said his brother's wishes would have been to forgive her and move on with our lives a lot of times in it's not really it's not for us to say that that's his way of dealing with things it's not it wasn't our brother died we don't know him I bet you it's the same thing she just whenever she gets out of jail she's just kind of disappear and live a low life gonna lay low you know changed everything I think you should it should be mandatory that you speak to other people about I don't know what it was four I've heard numerous different stories on a book or some kind of video not sure but for the most part she's like outside shot a instead of just you know own up to it holy Shit I fucked up I wasn't paying attention I was sexton whether you want to admit it or not so I don't think I could forgive her like she did that's that's another level forgiveness this so yeah it's wrong it's fucked up but at the same time nine hundred people will do the same thing if they off-duty sexton not just not in control I'm sorry about the the Ding something we like they're going to jail for the rest of their lives they're gonNA do whatever they gotta do to keep their asses out of jail what I think happened was this was a terrible one bad decision irresponsible not being attention and you freak out you just freak out and then you and it just sucks threat to society in a way and that to me was the most that was the worst part of this case was that especially when you come the whole terrible accident she went in there to kill him on purpose I think she loves her what on these being attention she was out of it she freaked out which is males typically stronger so the whole fear for your life that Kinda that Kinda helps her being a female in that case she what you've done and and the repercussions had had on you and how one bad decision can change your whole life could do I think amber as a threat to society no it was just a just a terrible circumstances how one decision can just fuck up your whole life dollar weaker everything else that goes when you think of male versus female but I said if this wasn't a black female cop email white female had a lot to do with a lot to do with it just because you're also looking at a male versus a female versus a male lie and everything else but anybody would do that everybody does you know you're facing life in jail you will do anything family what do you think you and they tried to paint this guy like he was not a good human being like he was I hope she apologized I hope at some point she comes the realize and apologizes four. It's I can't even chain fathom can't even fathom what what family's going through just she should never be able to going to be out there while in and hurt people but a lot of people said she's not really sorry because you know she she was trying to cover asks Oh shit what was going on so to be that was that was the worst part of this whole thing and that's what that right now is a car accident everything your legacy is all you got once you're gone it's how people remember you and what is what is the public's perception you of your friends at the at the expense of Both Gina Guy she killed we're going to have to pay him as a criminal we're GonNa do this and do this keep from that happen so in her mind she probably got a police force behind her she's got a lot of guys that are telling her this what you gotta do that's is worse than anything else because once you're gone once you're once you're dead ever we die whether it's natural causes Lyon to cover your own ass I get it but also to try to assassinate disguise character Once the dust settles and she she can start doing that because somebody I was doing this and this the EU Amelie going to fuck everybody else I gotta save myself that's how people think find out he was he was exactly what you want in a neighbor and a friend Annaborough was that was this guy that was worse so I can't I can't even imagine the circumstance that that that moment foresee pulled the trigger what was going through buys hits her head and his head own another gun though and there's GonNa be a police force When she gets out and yet ten years a lot and I think her being said you go nice people going to self preservation I have to say own ass even if that means assassinating another person's character listen to my podcast and think I'm defending her not what I'm saying is when you are faced with life in prison that's a meat would be that's worse that's the worst thing about that so you we know how somebody is and you they I mean the fact that route the batsman this year my twin sister que get married to another great Guy Matt so it was funny last year that's what she did that's basically she didn't and she didn't come up with an on our own there were people that told her to do that and people then put that them wheels in motion to make that happen you need to do now is rebuild that man's character and tell everybody would go person he was and what a good family comes from and we had this hall and it was good when he was smooth it was fun

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Session 197: ADHD Diagnosis Later In Life

Therapy for Black Girls

1:11:52 hr | 1 d ago

Session 197: ADHD Diagnosis Later In Life

"Welcome to the therapy of girls. Podcast a weekly conversation about mental health personal development and all the small decisions we can make to become the best possible versions of ourselves. I'm your host dr joy. Hardin bradford a licensed psychologist in atlanta georgia for more information or to find a therapist in your area. Visit our website at therapy for liquor. Girls dot com. While i hope you love listening to and learning from the podcast. It is not meant to be a substitute for relationship with a licensed mental health professional. Thanks so much for joining me for session. One ninety seven of the therapy for black girls. Podcast we'll get into the episode right after a word from sponsors hulu presents its new original film. The united states versus billie holiday directed by academy award nominee lee daniels. This film unapologetically presents the icons incredible and tragic life. Her powerful music led her to become godmother of the civil rights movement. Watch as the government tries to silence her voice for shedding light on racial injustice storing. Grammy nominated andrew. Day and more the united states versus billie holiday is now streaming only on hulu visit halloo dot com for more. Do you like fresh out of the oven. Chocolate chip cookies. You love wholesome hetero normative lifestyle do like pretending that mental cycles just don't exist then you'll hate. Tampons rock tampon. Rock is a scripted comedy. Podcast friends except gay and with black people so actually really not. But it is about friends and musical sorta. But that's all the time we have so been all the episodes now on iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to podcasts. According to an article from very well mind. Adhd symptoms in girls are often explained as character traits rather than adhd. Girls might be thought of as spicy as daydream. Irs forgetful or chatty and later in life a woman might reach out for help or adhd only to be diagnosed with depression or anxiety instead to help us explore what it might look like to have a diagnosis of adhd. Later in life. I'm joined today by two very special guests anger shea. Cozy and rene brooks english shea is an adhd coach and psychotherapist specializing in making a difference for black women executives and entrepreneurs supporting women through clarity empowerment and resilience. She has successfully run her. Practice alchemy coaching and counseling as a therapist and licensed clinical social worker for fifteen years in spite of being undiagnosed until her fifties offers the benefits of professional expertise with a lifetime of experience. Rene is the founder of black girl lost keys a blog that empowers black women with hiv and shows them how to live well with the disorder. In addition to black girl lost keys. She has also written for health line and as a patient contributor to teva pharmaceuticals life affects project during our conversations. We chatted about the impact of being diagnosed with adhd later in life. Why black women are commonly misdiagnosed. Howa later in life diagnosis impacts things like self esteem and identity and some helpful tools and resources for anyone who might need them if there is something that resonates with you while enjoying our conversations please share with us on social media using the hashtag t be g in session. He is our conversation. Thank you so much for joining us. Today anger shea. Thank you so much for having me. I'm happy to have you as a follow up. So in session. Sixty six of the podcast retired psychiatrist. Dr dawn brown about some of the fundamentals of adhd. But i love for us to give a recap more refresher for anybody who maybe didn't catch that episode just about the different types of adhd. Well there are a few types of adhd they're in the hyperactive type which is used to normally when they talk about adhd a lot of times. That is what is connected to young boy falling out of their chairs and bouncing around. And that's what people usually think about. Adhd there is the inattentive type which is or a daydreamer type where sometimes people seem safety. People see like just not really paying attention and sometimes they feel like they're introverted or quiet and then there's the combined type where you have different parts of each of the adhd so you can have hyperactivity but as an adult that legal inward in manifested anxiety. And then you also have the inattentive part of the combined type where you aren't able to focus on things that might might need to focus on that are not interest you got it and i love to hear more about your background egerszegi. So you have background as a therapist but you shifted more towards adhd coaching. I love to hear more about how you made that shift. Was there something in particular in your practice. That leads you to kind of shift to that specialty. I didn't realize i had. Adhd i was not diagnosed with in my fifties. I was always the kid that with hud so much potential so much potential but always felt like they were behind. It took me actually eight years. Get through undergrad. Shoutout to virginia state university and my parents is kept sending me back. I figure out how to get. My assignments turned in on time coach class. You know without structure. But when i finished school right you know able to manage the jobs that sometimes we're great for me and sometimes were and i decided to have my own practice. I went back to grad school. When i was in my forties and i got that time and i managed to finish grad school with a bb pregnant with a baby on time. So we get hyper focused at that. Could help you. But i always just thinking that i wasn't quite ready to be. I had my practice and it was successful. Fine it was kind of like I called the duck analogy where everything went great on the surface that with heroin my heart out under the and it wasn't until my son was diagnosed with adhd. I realized that. I have adhd. And that's what's going on. I was not able to get treatment or like another year or two. Because i was so the dealing with all the different parts of adhd from my son. But when i got diagnosed i got treatments and i got some coaching. I realized how powerful it was. Be able to take care of that because that is so much more successful in all aspects of my life. And that's why turned in my practice and now age coaching so interesting that you mentioned that industry about not knowing that you had adhd until. Your son was diagnosed. I feel like that's a common theme. Like i've heard that story several times right. So what do you think. It's about more exposure to like the different kinds of symptoms or is there something else there. What usually happened said a lot of people don't even really know what. Adhd is or what the symptoms are. A lot of times people dismiss. What's happening and they just go on about their business. You know especially in the community a lot of times. We don't even wanna know that. Adhd exists usually. It's your son that knows and that's when you go that could be me. Is it picked up more amboise. And when you fill the counters and the different rating scales like. Oh yeah that that applies to me and that is by a lot of women are undiagnosed you know especially in the black community as they just are not aware or being able to have to deal with back that so much when things going on So in addition to you know the not wanting to necessarily know the full truth about this symptoms. Do you think that there are other challenges for black women who are seeking diagnosis and then treatment. Absolutely i think it's not necessarily even just don't wanna know what's going people don't know about. Adhd most of the research on young white boys to the fact fat. That's where the research is. There is research that correlates with us. So i know that. I in my fifties so i didn't know that. Adhd existed hanson back. Then you just haven't figured out like you know getting your work around together now more than ever but still people are walking around undiagnosed and just wondering why. They aren't quite able to reach the potential that they have. I've tried to be out there. Advocating that people do know aviation exists exists for women exists for adults is. There's also that perception that incongruity h here's a small percentage of the population that does but most people do not and the fact that that is a misperception also is another reason. Why people aren't able to get digests when the clinicians aren't really well-versed in adhd they'll look at some of the symptoms and they'll look at black women have bias out bipolar or it's just depression or just anxiety and when you treat the adhd about it then you can treat. You can treat the depression when she treat those symptoms. It helps resolve the other commodities. And can you talk a little bit about some of those symptoms that are often missed or often diagnosed as something else. Yes so many times because when you feel like you failing you know because the knife find that you are working twice as hard and some other people that you work with or look around some of your friends and it seems like they are doing these flawlessly and easily and you have to work twice as hard because you may have inattention too many things that are important to you. We've interest faith attention system. You may also notice that winning mother's like we're not getting dinner on the table on time and when. Shane comes into play that leads to depression. When shane comes into play. It can lead to anxiety as you're trying to keep up with everyone else than when you go into psychiatrist's office or your therapist often say i'm depressed now. I feel like i'm inadequate. It always look at adhd so they will look at other symptoms that they know well and it could check those boxes but when they aren't as well versed in how aid the people they will miss that that are a condition. You so what do you think they go. So extreme as bipolar. I mean i do feel like in some ways by fullerton v. Like a catch all right when people don't quite know exactly what's happening but do you think there's something else there for why the extreme of bipolar disorder. Some of. It may have to do with biased. Ran you know women of color him report different things with their emotional regulation. Sometimes you just always feeling like someone is not understanding. How other yelling at their people are just humming act on rsd rejection sensitivity That quinn by doctoral dotson nine at the and what. They don't look out in that the emotional piece of adhd is really one of the biggest triggers. What's coming off. Because as our emotions go that a tower able to regulate all things that are motivation organization and getting the procrastination. And what will happen is you may. And we're imposter syndrome. Stain gram look like or this regulated. Because you are not living into the potential that you have and again shane. Shame immersion are the hallmark of adhd symptoms. That already devastating twin. They're encouraged can look at as having bipolar especially when the clinician isn't well-versed. Adhd and. i think the by the lack when we're told a lot on we're just too much. We're just you're just too much calm down over there and when you have that type of bias conscious or unconscious when you're looking at the waist diagnosed that seems to have more often got it so you mentioned english as a turning point for you was receiving. Adhd coaching to help with your own symptoms. Can you talk a little bit about the difference between adhd coaching and therapy. And how might someone know whether they need one or the other bomb paints because actually made though coaching and therapy or different coaching is. We're going to look forward at your goals and different ways that you can look at the age in and shrimp strength is renowned when we delve into our strength. That's the reason why we're able to move forward. Sometimes we not not what we are actually doing to what is going on in our lives. That each there's that enact that goes on with that so when you have coaching rail to look at the aden hd being more productive with it how you can use your strengths to be able to help you moving forward where you're in therapy. You're going to actually have the diagnosis conditions at half. To be addressed in a third coaches are not air. This and you have coached. It's trying to be a therapist runaway because we hear a lot of training to become therapists. I think it's very important to have that distinction between the two. Actually i convey Actually have to separate physicists. Able to do both because it was just so important to make sure that there's a designation between the two right. And is that something that some therapists i would imagine that some therapists do more of that hands on kind of future facing like okay. These are the ways we can help you to organize. So is there some crossover there. Sometimes they're absolutely kavita. Some crossover there sometimes depending therapist. And you know what they are doing when you're doing coaching. It's not just going to tell you how to wake up ten minutes earlier so that you can get out of the door on time or an italian use of planner in order to be able to organize your life where you do coaching. We'll look at your big wives in the why you doing things what you're interested in how you're able to then i ever together. The different parts of your life should be able to successful. What i find happens. A lot is that people will collapse everything together. People with adhd are changes thing goes. We can collect everything together. Like if i'm late. When that must mean that i don't care that weren't must be. I am not good enough care about getting to work on time. Even though i might be getting fired late one more time could collapse all this together instead of being able to parceling out saying. Hey you my attention span interest as allowing me to go to sleep earlier our circadian rhythm there can be a little different that can prevent us from getting up on time or having the uae of oh. I know that this particular job is really interesting. I can get to work on time and work on things like that with coaching where it sometimes in therapy work on the parts. That are more of the shane. Teeth there or a different ways in affects your your bryant and a lot of psycho education got it. Thank you so much for that. So can you talk about the idea of masking as it relates to ad and how that develops or people who are trying to manage those symptoms. Yes what happens with masking. Is that again Here like we are able to keep up. We're not able to do something. Like our co workers do and what we will do is attention to be just like are the co workers as a safety mechanism to be able to function in the workplace. So we on time or ask call to sometimes cover up for some of our mistakes and we will not be exactly where we are. That's a lot of burden that takes up a lot of energy and we wish each our bandwidth and sometimes the a little lesser. So that then leads to. It can be like a vicious cycle. Where using all your band was trying to pretend that you're something you're not and instead of doing the things that you know you can do that. You're really strong. Are doing bad about yourself again Yeah and i would imagine. And i would love to hear your input about this that the masking then lisa. All these other difficulties rate. So we've already talked about how often in this has been your experience of being diagnosed later in life. So can you talk about. Maybe some of the challenges you've experienced as well as any of your clients around like identity and self esteem when it comes to being diagnosed later in life yes. I was diagnosed later in life and i. I had no idea and it's really interesting being therapist i know when i went on. We didn't get much on. Adhd baby out of your two and a condition. That was more for children. It didn't occur to me that i had and many of my clients come in they. They may have something. They know that they are really running behind. They feel like are at their wit's end they can't keep up and they wanted me that they can do to finally be successful for myself. I had instead of having successful practice. I child relationship. But i was like on a hamster wheel. Bat was kelly liam's around doing everything for everyone feeling a lot of the way responsibly. From my clients my family and it was killing me quite frankly that strong breath woman thing that i was carrying and that was part of my niche was killing me months. I was able to know that. I had adhd. I was able to figure out that. I didn't even know that i would collapse things like that that if i did things for people than maybe i would not ill so behind once i was able to figure out how to get off a hamster wheel and be with who i am and have little self compassion for myself and then trump the things that i need to be able to shore up to show up on time and you are able to organize and i was able to do that and not have any shame around. It was able to blossom and really dealing delve into my strength. Actually my practice has grown. Eventually i have coaching practice. Do you feel like you're lay diagnose anchor. Shay has given you additional perspective into that. You're been able to pass off to your coaching clients. Yes absolutely because adding have work arounds all of my life it allowed me to be able to have a kind of rich and shrink that has allowed me to pass on to my clients. I also hope space for them letting them know that i can see the strength. they have. They can't see what you need to do when you're looking at your itchy is to get educated so you know what your how it affects you because consistently inconsistent ext different. Kerr everybody a little different for each person. We can figure out how you're adhd a cheer is when you can then use a strength heart of your adhd to be affected. And i've been able to learn that the years adding this late stage diagnosis. A also let you know that they can be successful with. Adhd it is not a death sentence as a lot of people feel when they have the diagnosis that they're not gonna be able to be successful. It's one of the most manageable mental health condition. There are out there. You're able to have a really wonderful successful life. Give us a little bit of an example of what is life for us to work with clients. Or let's say you have a new coaching client. Who has been recently diagnosed with. Adhd what are maybe some of the first things that you do with them. One of the things. I do with them. I normalize condition. I just say it is okay here here. We're going to help you to be successful or many people. Just feel like they are alone it and it's actually when they come into if the awkward so like normalized condition in education and then we begin to work on what would be a way that they could be successful or in the things that they have interesting in one of the things that light them up the ways that they are creative ways. They've already hud work around that work for that many times. Adhd we're able to look back in the way that we're able to bring you can look back and reflect on that and then bring that to the future. That's always very helpful because many times with the way that are Interesting pensions fans are. We don't look at how successful and hauer able to use that in other realms to be successful when we can tether those two things together really. It's really helpful usually. It's the most wonderful thing. When the client he gets to be able to tell her those things together and realize that they can be successful in life because they can see the different ways they'd be successful and say i will. I can take this over to here. I can take this over there. They can be who they actually. Our community is also really important. Because when you're feeling like it's just you you're in a room in a space with other people that have. Adhd that sometimes talk over each other or sometimes scott the organized or on the table at ten thirty. You feel like you're not the only person out there that has these things and that's where the healing begins. And i that that is what's most and i'm curious. How are people finding you. Are you kinda getting referrals. From lake the psychiatrists or the other practitioners who are doing the evaluations. Like how people most likely find you some finally through directories of doing speaking lately. I've spoke at the international conference last year and a lot of word of mouth a lot of word of now e surprised. Many people don't know they have adhd but when they find out they will be. Oh here is a black woman. Said doing coaching as we're not define sometimes we are working in silence. Were trying to come together. More actually started a national association for black. Adhd coaches so that we can be together. We can fellowship together. We can have a directory that have a way that people can find us in one space instead of having to handle all over. The place for us dotted. I'm glad that you started it. Sounds like you say going to be super helpful. People deaths were very excited. Very excited about getting. It started because i know that even as a coach myself trying to find a code for my son has not been easy. Not an easy to find like blackmail coach. And that's part of what spurred sawn. Also when i i've been to the adhd allison's not seeing a lot of black coaches and. I know that we're out here. So this way we to be together and hopefully provide like needs something like five on trainings. And things like that So i would imagine leg most things. The pandemic has shifted your work in what the world looks like for your clients. I'm how have you had to kind of adapt in your work with clients in. How are you working with them to create new strategies new routines kinda in light of everything that's going on. The pandemic has affected all of us. All in different ways Many times having adhd in already difficult some people have really enjoyed that necessarily having to go out and be amongst people they get a chance to kind of sit down and deal with some of the things that are happening in each and it's slowed down a bit and that's actually been great for them. But i also have clients that have been had to figure out shifting with children at home and being able to do their work not having a structures that they may have had being able to not have that work environment of people together because that were environment having people together also helps the spur getting work done. So we didn't. We've had two different things like provide like co working spaces over zoom provided for people to come together and have that kind of communal space to work. I've also been able to discuss the fact that it is a fantastic and all things have been different. You're gonna have to figure out just different strategies it'd be able to be as productive and bringing your sometimes even bring your children in and explaining to your bosses that this is what's actually happening here. This is what's happening here for us on the ways that we're gonna have to have work arounds around it. Yes speaking of children. I wonder if you can give some suggestions for people who may be similar to you right who find themselves as a parent with adhd also parenting a chow with adhd. Are there some things that she would share with them. Yes absolutely first off where it was a difficult thing and i understand i feel you because when you yourself a parent you are trying to do all the things you can for your child and you also see all the things that you know my concern new about yourself and your child too and that can lead to sometimes little bit of confrontation but there are different ways. You have to parent child then. Maybe we are. Apparently that other people might see and they might not understand to really be able to drill into the different ways of parenting. Chad is an association. That does a lot of parent training. I'm on the board of philadelphia. Chad of the fanny committee. Where they give you different strategies. Actually they have a free training right now that they are putting out for parents is there are many different ways that you should be able to give your children like rewards some but also giving the consequences children of adhd they get like twelve thousand more negative responses than others. I think under h hen so the be able to learn how to use the different reward systems than you know you would normally have the way to actually normalized even for your child that is not a payroll condition that this is a brain condition and i think that that's really important because many people will see a child has impulsivity as a child at a call. Bad where it's really. Their brain is a brain-based dishing and now allowing that to play out and to be able to deal with your child on that level versus many schools. He's disciplined which is not really acting for children with adhd right because it's not a discipline issue no not at all. Yeah yeah what are some of your other favorite resources english eight things that you think that have been helpful for your clients as well as things that you kinda find yourself. Republicans who over and over again i. Actually i do a lot of different podcast. Translating is one of my favorites. One of my friends. Renamed brooks chisholm blog of black roloff. Keys that's very helpful. I have a face. I provide community for black women with adhd executives and entrepreneurs and in there we have a fellowship and we work on goals and we'll have co workers in there. I'm looking at putting out a book. Miracle worker will for black women. There were just trying to look different resources to be able to meet and have candy and games coaching to people who might not be able to afford coaching. so that's also part of having the nationalize of black. Adhd coaches want to be able to have a portion where. We're able to make sure that everyone can get any of the help that they need a. We are also finding that sometimes coaching him. Be your entry point than thirty for people. Coaching aims partnership model. Where sometimes just explained that you have everything inside really successful and then we can partner in a way that really works for the client. You know some people just are so advert therapy that you can start with coaching. And if you find that therapeutic intervention than we can refer so we're just very excited just have different entry points in different ways for people get any of the help that they need typically like how long someone working with a coach for adhd penned. It does vary wildly. Some people workers are coaches for years. I working my cutrier's I started out with a three month. Engagement changed a little bit of time. But i do have clients that i've had for a few years. I have some clients that i've had for six or eight months so it really does depend on. You know what your goal is and whether you would like to achieve and when you feel that you are ready to move on and like successful life obviously people that comedy do check in a lot of people will come in to check in a couple of times a year just really depends on our inner goal. Got it and please tell us where we can find you english. What is your website as well as any social media channels that you'd like to share our website inger shade dot com on at anger shea on and at ignorant shea on instagram. I have the facebook group lack woman with adhd entrepreneurs. That's a private group and my wife page on. Facebook is black north. Adhd we will be sure to include all of that in the show notes. Thank you so much for sharing your expertise with us today. Thank you so much for having me after the break. We'll hear from rene about her experiences being diagnosed with. Adhd later in life. 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The united states versus billie holiday directed by academy award nominee lee daniels. This film unapologetically presents. The icons incredible and tragic life beginning in the nineteen forties in new york city the federal government targeted holiday in a growing effort to escalate and racialized. The war on drugs ultimately aiming to stop her from singing her controversial and heart wrenching ballads. Strange fruit her powerful music led her to become the godmother of the civil rights movement and an icon too many watch as the government tries to silence her voice for shedding light on racial injustice starring. Grammy nominated andrew day tramonte roads. Natasha leone evan. Ross and more. The united states versus billie holiday is now streaming only on hulu visit hulu dot com for more. Thank you so much for joining us today. Rene thank you for having me dr joy. This is a real treat for me. I've been looking forward to getting a chance to sit down and talk to you. I love the show thank you. I'm very excited to have you hit a share more about your experiences. So i know there's something that is common is that black women are often diagnosed with. Adhd much later in life. And i know that of course is part of your experience. I'd love to hear us talk a little bit about how you started. Black girl lost keys. In what made you want to start it. Absolutely so when. I was seven or eight years old. They suggested to my mother had adhd for the first time actually tested me without her permission and she was not down for that told them they absolutely burnt gonna have a chance to drug up and dropped the subject and then they did it again. When i was eleven so by the time. I got to twenty five. I had no idea all of this was going on. And i was on medical leave from work for really nasty depression that was in and i just so happened to mention in passing to my therapist and she sent me to get evaluated found out i had adhd. And then i started looking to see what the black experience was and there was nothing so that was frustrating. Took a couple of years to kinda learn more about the condition and get down what it was the i would mean in what could help me and as i kind of got the feel for it i went back and stepped. Well let me try again. Maybe in a few years. Maybe there's something and there was still nothing for years after my diagnosis in twenty ten. And so i said well. If i'm hunting for this hard. Even after all this time somebody needs to create the resource of always been writer so that somebody seemed like it might as well be me here. We are right isn't it. How a lot of meaningful as happened right like we are looking for something else is very similar to by origin. Store for therapy for black girls. Right like oh. This thing doesn't exist. I guess it has to be me the kinda started. That's it like. We become the resource that we wish we had. And you know. I think the biggest part of the journey for me was the isolation because you're fighting against the community and their their mistrust of the adhd diagnosis in the first place. You can't really talk to them about the adhd. And then you get into a lot of these narrow divergence spaces and they're not trying to hear anything about black nisa like. Oh well we all have the same issue and raises an issue in. It's always funny. How people who don't have any racial issues wanna tell you whether racism issue. We're not right. So i wanted to make sure that. Nobody felt his lonely as i felt. Because it's already enough just to take in the fact that it almost feels like your whole life. You thought that you were one wang and you find out that you were really another and so you have to relearn your identity and then you've got these other identities within your identity so's this whole journey and it's not really a journey. That's fun to take by yourself Unless he used say more about that rene like the distrust in the lack of black experiences in the neuro. Diverse space is so narrow. Diverse spaces are very male and very white usually a lot of the research that was performed to discover more about these conditions vary white male centered as it is for so many other things and then you combine that with the fact that the frontline treatment for adhd is stimulant medication. And you take that to our community you find that little black boys are more often diagnosed with adhd and it starts to look like why are they trying to jam these stimulants into our kids and unfortunately as you know. I don't have to tell you. Trauma and st catharine very similar in. Sometimes people don't know to look for the difference is child traumatize does the child have adhd or is it both because it can be right so there's this lack of understanding what the condition is. There's this lack of communication about what they're not medication is appropriate. There's all these issues that are usually issues for the community anyway. And then you dump this diagnosis that nobody understands on it. And it's just fuel to hire. So rene i would love to hear about that time between the ages of seven. And how old did you say twenty five when you were diagnosed me five. Yeah so what's happening dan like. How were you managing and how was. Adhd showing up in your life adhd was all over my life leg. When i look back i can say. Oh that's the reason. The car was always getting so. That's why i was always overdrawing. My checking account like best dr joy. One time i actually over drew my count so badly that it took my whole paycheck as a grown woman. It was so embarrassing. So i really struggled as students with organization with social aspect. I had some trouble making friends. That kinda lesson. As i went through puberty but a lot of children have difficulty making friends and then there was the mess. My locker might desk. I never knew where anything was. I was always running into the project at the very last minute. And then i got into college and it got even worse because you are totally in control of your time. When you're in higher education so it just progressively got worse until i can stay in school like i had to go to my mother until her distress. It's gonna kill me. I don't think this is for me. I need to leave this alone. So that was the end of school for me so. Adhd took took a lot of things from me in that respect. I got them all back though. Yeah that's the light at the end of the tunnel right that you able to kind of figure out was happening and then be able to do something out it exactly. I'm so sorry. The ago kate. The air be dog is back really. He has something to say today. So something that comes up quite often in the adhd litter. Is this idea of masking. Are you familiar with that. Absolutely yeah the masking is about like all of the different ways that you try to reform as is adhd is not like putting your life in shambles right. You develop all of these strategies to kind of present as if nothing is going on. I love to hear like some of the things that you learned about yourself that were actually masking eight years. One of the things that i still do it. It's a bad habit that i'm trying to break like especially now when we're doing all these zoom calls I keep mirror so i can watch my facial expressions because i feel like my facial expressions. Go all over the place sometimes and then to boot. i'd never have been able to control them in the sense of like if i got an attitude you're know you're gonna see it on my face so i try to keep an eye on those when i was a kid. You know you find somebody who can imitate and then you do that like let me raise or lower my voice based on what i'm seeing. Maybe from the person on tv or from this person who i think is popular so you're you're really kind of parroting an as you learn more about yourself in the context of neuro diversity you kind of after unlearn that. Like eight okay. I don't have to hide the fact that my house is a bit of a mess. If you're coming over here you know that i have. Adhd i have organization issues. And so you're gonna have to just work with me here or not come over. Because that's the option to So now that you have been diagnosed besides like the mirror. Embedding people kind of know. Are you know the people who already know you know this. Are there other things that you've been able to do that. You feel like has been able to kind of help. You manage some of the symptoms. Definitely like i've gotten this isn't masking at this point. This is just good housekeeping you. In for a lot of years. I really fought the idea of keeping a calendar because it just didn't appeal to me. It seemed almost like corey means to me for some reason. I don't know why my brain does whatever it wants. But i really felt like i just don't wanna do that. That feels very restricting in controlling. I don't wanna do it. So i had to get into using a calendar because i really genuinely thought that i would be able to remember dates and it occurred to me years later like neuro. Typical people don't even do that. They write stuff down Why did you think you needed to try to remember that or. Why did you think you needed that that you were ever going to be able to. When you've clearly got this track record with time. And i learned a lot about the value of time in general because funny enough. My mother has adhd we found out a year and a half ago so being raised by person with adhd two. She showed if it wasn't for school or work. She showed up whenever she wanted to. And i thought that was the way that everybody was. Because that's how i was. So i would do it and people will get frustrated with me and i realized oh this is not how everybody does it. I need to learn how to do time. Somebody life is alarmed. Because i have they call it time blindness so i have difficulty with estimating how much time something will take estimating. How much time has elapsed estimating how long it'll take to get somewhere which was really a problem when you're trying to get to work in the morning and you try to explain that to a boss. Even after i had my diagnosis you can try to explain to your boss. The your disability causes you to to not be able to get places on time. They don't understand in. They're not necessarily trying to hear that. Even though it is something that should be accommodated right right more from rene. After the break was top. African king of comedy michael blassie here to share some exclusive information about my must. Listen new podcast. No michael posted by me and we cannot forget my host. This chinese best friend. Thanks mike this right. Chinese best friend along with me is going to be up to change. Don't can find no filter michael blackson. I heart radio app on apple. Podcast a wit. Emma podcasts do rats lake to be tickled how can paint solve climate change and when it comes to creativity are the arts and sciences or different. Hi i'm mindy. Thomas here from npr's wow in the world podcast recently named iheart best podcast for kids and families and an hour. Show guy rosin i you. The latest scientific discoveries all wrapped up in an audio cartoon for your mind is is up screens down. Jaws dropped with into wow in the world on the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts. So i think that that's really interesting. Release your mom also found out about her. Adhd diagnosis later in life right. So if you feel comfortable sharing like would that conversation was like both given that she was so opposed to you. Having this testing in any kind of treatment is house like when you were much younger and then know that she also struggled with isn't a great because everybody always goes. Oh my gosh you convinced your mom darker too. I did not. I'm sure that is not what the conversation was like. I could be black girl laws keys all day log it. I could inspire a whole bunch of other people but my mom is still my mom. She's not listening me when i talk about stuff like this. She's just like okay alright. I have adhd year shore. Rene so she actually got started listening to another podcast the adhd and she fell in love with the podcast and then started to recognize symptoms in herself and the person who runs the podcast. Dr ari tuchman actually practices in our state. So i was like oh if you wanna go get tested ma. Why don't we just call him up and she was like. Oh my god. I can do that and i was still practicing. And she's like oh my god. I'm such a huge fan. And i'm like okay so it was him She she took your advice at least go and do the testing at least enough to go through the testing and then she made me come along to the test with her and then like so many people do she gets into the room with the professional and start telling him all kinds of stuff like. Do you have an issue with being on time. no. I don't have issue with being on time. A mother is three hours late places. Sometimes she is all like. You're you're not giving you're not giving him the accurate story and if you don't give him the accurate story he can't help you is sometimes. I feel like we feel like if we get in front of professionals and we give them the full scope of what's going on. It's like they don't call the people in to cart you off to facility unless like that's absolutely necessary. You wouldn't be lucid okay. Are you a danger to yourself. Then then you're fine. Just be honest. Yeah but i mean. I think that s shows up in a lotta ways right like just with evaluation but i think even just in the mental health treatment spaces and even like your primary care doctor right like there's something about the authority piece that i think brings out a lot of stuff for people that they don't even necessarily recognize. It's the truth. It's like if i give them this information. How are they going to use it against me. I need to be very careful. About how i all this information out until i know that this is someone who's trustworthy. I think it would behoove the the community to be aware that sometimes when we do that we're cutting ourselves off from the very help that we need and it would help if the medical community understood that the mistrust isn't because we don't want help or that we're trying to offend them you know. Sometimes they take it very personally in. It's like we've been experimented on the. We've had our children taken away by authority figures. We've had our homes invaded. We have to be careful. it's not unfounded. Fear absolutely yeah. I mean and i think that's where the relationship building talked about comes in right. You know so until mom was able to trust this person then they can maybe become more on. But you know you're a complete stranger. And i'm now expected to tell you some things that i've not publicly shared with anybody before right so it some very weird kind of set up. It is not. It's embarrassing for some of us. Like it was embarrassing to me. That i was always balancing my checking account or that. I couldn't show up places on time or that. I was always a message. Made me feel like very much. Like i was in development like i just get over to the adult side of things like i was just stuck in this like i'm too old to be a teenager but i'm not quite able to get into these behaviors that i see as adult behaviors. And that's a. That's a really strange place to be in you. You don't exactly trust yourself because you're making these mistakes that are causing major life issues for you. Yes you know rene. That is such a salient point. I thank you know so of course in my background as a college student mental health professional apart of what idea to set the university of georgia was adhd evaluations. And so i often saw students come in around your age maybe a little younger when you were diagnosed and they would be the first time being diagnosed with adhd and so one of the resources that i would frequently recommend that students often loved was a book called. You mean. i'm not lazy student right right. And so i would love to hear from you because i think what happened there and i'm guessing some of this happen for you to is that now you are able to look back on your life and think about like. Oh my gosh like this is why this thing was happening. And so a lotta times later. Diagnosis of adhd comes with a lot of identity and self esteem issues. I love you talk about any of that. That may became up for you. I think as i started to learn and get my. Adhd under control. It really does feel like you're peeling off these layers revealing his person you didn't know existed like i always thought that i was really bad with money and i found out. You'd like a lotta people with adhd i was under employed. I was trying to do things that i couldn't necessarily do so there. I am trying to save money. You don't make enough money to say you're constantly underwater or how i felt like i couldn't get control of the way that i looked as far as styling. And it was just a matter of getting organized in grouping it differently like so much of what. I saw myself as in a negative aspect. We're just symptoms. The lateness the disorganization extreme emotions. That can come sometimes the anger or the frustration. Or the someone says something to hurt your feelings and it's not just you know. Hey you hurt my feelings. It's a huge you know meltdown crying fit almost so there was a lot of that where i was able to go. Oh now that. I've got some perspective. How do you feel about yourself now. It's almost like when you see them in the movies when they do make overs may cut your hair. And you see that person in the mirror. And you're squinting to see if that you that's how it feels it just takes place over several years I can imagine i can imagine. Yeah so i want to shift a little bit renascent More work as an advocate in an educator and community building like we've already talked about and to really kinda talk about how your work maybe has changed during the pandemic great So i would love to know if there are ways that you have seen. Adhd show differently for you now in the pandemic and has a things. Have you had to kind of adapt during this time. Ooh okay so for me. It's funny at the beginning of the pandemic. i was like okay. I'm going to have this extra time. So let me make sure i've got things to do. And then it finally occurred to me. I run a business that's online. I don't go anywhere anyway. There's there's no major life change for you you in the house man you in the now but what has changed is that there are so many more people in need and so many more people who are discovering this for the first time like it makes me wonder if this pandemic has been the first time that people have really been able to sit with themselves in their emotions in look at their life like. It's easy to stay out of the house if the house is to messianic frustrates. You but not when you can't leave so then you're sitting there in you're trying to pull it together and you find that you can't why Take care of this mess. Why am i still late to work. Even though i'm on zoom call. Now and i don't have to leave the house so there are a lot of these things that regular life would allow us to mass scorer. Excuse away that aren't there anymore. And can you say more about like a need for resources. Or what have you seen change. More people like reading your blog polls so how have you been able to recognize the increase more people reading blog posts. More people reaching out questions more people signing up for coaching services or looking for a coach way more questions especially people have a lot of questions about learning questions for their children now. I work with adults but you know. Of course you still want wanna funnel people to the resources so that they can get the help they need and adhd parents need support to because you're trying to support and most likely if you have adhd your child does your as likely to inherit adhd as you are to inherit. I color so you got. Maybe a mom. Who's finding out child has. Adhd david starts to sound familiar. You've got a lot of newly diagnosed people because they're finally realizing like this is not me having to be outside. This is not anything. But something that i don't understand. Let me go find out. So there's a lot of newly diagnosed people. Women is necessarily. Yeah yeah. I mean we know you know in session. Sixty six when dr brown was here talking about. Adhd renault that it often looks very different in women and girls right. it is often miss. Which is why people don't often get diagnosed until later in life absolutely and a two for a lot of us because we are outside. The box thinkers were able to fly under the radar. Because like for me yet. I didn't necessarily always have my homework done. But i could go into class. Barely pay attention in still aced the test so you can fly through a lot of things like that and now we're finding with this pandemic. You can't do it the way that you used to do it. You're having to learn a new way. You're having to attend work in a new way and you know you're trying to set up your work space. It's halfway setup. it's not comfortable. The clutter is everywhere. You need solutions. I love to hear a how the black experience with adhd has changed since you started black girl law skis. Like what kinds of things have you noticed that have improved or been worse since you started the site year now. I think we're still at the beginning of the work to a certain. Like i feel like my work has moved the needle. There's other people who are moving the needle as well. There's still so much room for the experience to be shared and they're still so much cynicism when it comes to the diagnosis that i think there's more than enough work to be done still. We're not at the very beginning of the work but we still need to raise awareness. We still need to get the truth out about what the condition is like. It's not a plot to medicate children. It's actually a tool to help and get where they need to go if they have this condition and you know i think that like mistress bed. We have related to like. Oh there's just trying to punk. His medication is one. That really has stuck around. Seems a lot might make. Some of that is changing with different kinds of approaches. And we know that there are non stimulant medications to now that they allow kids to try. But i'm curious to your thoughts about what other things might help to reduce some of that cynicism relates age in the community. I think we mean education. And i think we need to know like when we're talking about the symptoms that can result him for children a lot of times people see it as a discipline problem so it's like spanked the child like as we know we're learning that spanking children is not the thing to do to begin with but even so if you're disciplined in your spanking a child and it's not producing the result like the assumption is often that the child is just obstinate. What child wants to be in trouble. You know what. I mean right. So there's i think we need to shift the way that we think about children. I think we could stand to remember that. Children are not. You know. Little soldiers that we command there. People with thoughts and feelings express them in different ways in sometimes feel like as a community. We don't we don't let our children be people third children you know Yeah i think something else like you mentioned earlier you know so much of this research has been done just on you know white men and boys i think that there are lots of black scholars and other scholars of color who are doing more research in this area and i think that will go a long way to in us helping recognize like how. Adhd does look different communities. It does it does and you know. sometimes. I don't know i just feel like i think there is something to be said that little black boys are sometimes diagnosed with. Adhd when they don't have it you know It's difficult when you do have evidence that this is happening but it's not happening the way it's like we're getting pieces of the story. Were not getting the whole story. And then when you're talking about. Adhd when's the last time you heard them talking about little black girls adhd. We don't even enter the conversation. Yeah i mean a often. The attention is about how often black boys are over diagnosed right but girls are completely out of the conversation. It's like we don't even exist because this we're not getting the help that we need it all but we are getting plenty of criticism. That's another thing culturally when we're late when we're messy. We're reinforcing the stereotype. So you're being seen as someone who's intentionally being lane snobbish and playing into these things as a community. We're going to work harder to curtail that in you and then you can't. How do you not feel like you've failed you know a lot of adhd symptoms. Really kind of fly in the face of witted is supposed to mean to be a young black girl in a black woman in the world. Yes like the organized. We're supposed to manage the household. We're supposed to be able to do all these things as a divorce. Now but as a wave it was like look. I'm not take over at do everything while all you do is go to working come home and then not only did not want to turn out. That was never going to be fit for me to have a relationship where that was expected and because black women sometimes victim of how dynamic we are like everything we do so much and because we do so much. People don't often give us the space to not able to do certain things. it's like. i can't do that. it's like yes you can just try harder you do. Everything is likely this particular thing i can't do for you. Yeah so i would love to know renee if this has come up in your work one of the things you've already talked about like how like keeping a house organized in cleaned can be really difficult for someone with adhd and. I know that it's likely that's something that people will rely on is like bringing in help rate so somewhere else. Clean the house. Come with someone to help organize. But i know from my own experience and working with black women. That is something that we will sometimes lead as a last resort. Ray bake it. You know your mom's and grandmoms you know it felt like they can do it all and so there's often some shame around like requiring additional help. Has that conversation with your community. Oh my god yes in like especially this week because my grandmother has been in the hospital. And i've been thinking about and talking about you know. I grew up as her shadow. So when i got into adulthood i was like okay. I need to run everything like my grandmother. Did she ran a successful business. She worked fulltime job. She babysat my brother. And i did. All the supply work took care of the family almost killed myself from exhaustion. Trying to be that woman. And i think so. Many of us we live lives. They're very different from the lives. That our mothers and grandmothers live and so we need tools that they didn't have and probably they needed access to some of those tools to so when we're talking about how you know my grandmother did it. She did all but i think she was frustrated. Like she didn't do it out of joy she did it because nobody else was going to do it. And there's frustration. I really try hard not to emulate that but of course guilt. Still there you know. I told my mom once. I was looking for a housekeeper and she was like. I can help you with that and i'm like no i don't want you to help me with it. I want survey come over and do it. I'm not doing it and you're not doing it. We're taking labor away from us not creating shared labor project here. We're taking it away of expressed to her. Like if i were to have a child. I wanna have a nanny or a helper that comes in to help me with the overnights because sleep is too important to me if i don't get sleep. I'm done and she laughed. And i'm like you laugh but you probably should have had any to his leg. Okay yeah you did it without one. I think you deserve the hell. You deserve the help. So that's usually the response that i'd given them. They look a little taken aback leg up. Maybe i did deserve the help winging it would ashamed and nobody gave it to right right so i love that. You're edgy. pages. Like a wealth of resources a one polls that i loved was you had a post that said if i had a life remote control that you could use you would make use of the rewind and apply the knowledge to your younger self and i would love to hear what message would give to your younger so go to the doctor. You gotta stay but really like all of these things. The frustration that i would feel with myself when i will be trying as hard as i could like you know. Academics of course like so many of that's a priority in our household. You better get those books. If you knew those books like you knew that song you would do so much better. So i felt like i was and i wasn't even a bad student but i just felt like the amount of effort that i was putting in wasn't giving me the result that i wanted and working hard is important but there's such a thing as too hard. I wish i didn't own that. I was working too hard and that it wasn't that i needed to try harder. It was that i needed to try differently What a powerful message. That would have been as a young person right. Yeah i think he would have helped me to realize that. I wasn't bad because that's how i felt. I felt like the teachers were frustrated with me. My parents were frustrated with me. It just felt like. I didn't shape in anywhere that i couldn't get it right like other people were able to get it right and i couldn't so that must mean whatever negative conclusion you wanna come to. And that's the part that people are missing when their children are being diagnosed and we're going now. I don't believe that we were trying to avoid label. You're still going to get one just like the book said you mean. I'm not lazy crazier stupid. That's label your child's gonna get lazy crazier stupid right and it may be an internal label. It may not even be from someone else. That's it yet right there. In the label of adhd gives them access to help and support those other labels. Don't do anything but shame them and cut them off from support. Make them feel like they're not even worthy of support So what have been some of your favorite resources your neighb- as your blog. Of course what are some other resources that you find yourself. Recommending frequently are really enjoying. Ooh okay so there's healthy. Adhd that's a blog. better friend of mine runs. She's very very thorough. She does a lot of stuff with. Adhd moms it's fantastic. Cameron god is an adhd coach. He does a podcast. Call translating age the phenomenal resource. She's going to be on this show. Today inger shake who is also a friend of mine fantastic. Adhd coach tiller. All the time you helped me took my brain back in when it starts to come loose so there's a lot of good resources out there the adhd good life. It's a podcast. Run by by my buddy. Sandra and she does a fantastic job to those are the places i go when i need to to learn something new perfect so tell us where we can find you. What your website as well as where we can connect with you on social media it's black girl. Lost keys dot com. You can find me on any social media under black girl lost keys if you're trying to find me on twitter they won't let me have on my characters so it's l. k lost keys that As the handle. And if you google black or loss keys it'll bring up anything that's related to me. Perfect thank you so much for sharing with us. Today rene appreciated. Thank you so much for your time. I appreciate it. This was really an honor. Thank you very much. Dr joy thank you. I'm so glad. English and rene were able to join us for today's conversation to learn more about their work or the resources that they shared. Visit the show notes at therapy for black girls dot com slash session. One ninety seven and please text two sisters right now until them to check out the episode. Don't forget that if you're looking for therapists in your area you can check out our therapist. Directory at therapy for black girls dot com slash directory. And if you want to continue digging into this topic or just be in community with other sisters. Come on over. Join us in the sister circle. It's our cosy corner of the internet designed just for black women. You can join us at community that therapy for black girls. Dot com thank. Y'all so much for joining me again. This week i look forward to continuing this conversation with you. All real soon take care. What's up african king of comedy. Michael blassie here to exclusive information about my must listen new podcast lou michael blackson hosted by me and we cannot forget. My co host is chinese. Best friend thanks mike. This right chinese best friend along with me is going to be up to change. Don't want can find no filter. Michael blackson iheartradio app on apple. Podcast a whip pockets. Sometimes you need a good cry and we know just the podcast for that crying in public. A weekly podcast hosted by four twentysomething college women living in new york city follow along while they discuss growing up in a time where there is no distinction between what's public and private when you're hooking up with a guy what are your takes on keeping your socks. It's funny it's enlightening. It's the crying in public podcast. Listen on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you got your podcasts.

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168  The Only Subject that Counts (with Eric Siy)

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

1:18:35 hr | 5 months ago

168 The Only Subject that Counts (with Eric Siy)

"Hello and welcome to misinformation a Trivia podcast for ladies and gents love cool. Trivia and sticking it to annoying teens. At pop quiz, where are your host I'm Lauren and I'm Julia Hey jaw. We. Got A got a nice call back in the intro here I did do a fun little Callback d do You WanNa know why I did that found little. In, late and everybody. Because we have a reoccurring guest, a returning guest today that we are very excited about Eric See. Eric. Welcome. Thank you. Welcome back so happy to see you so nice to see the both of you and I'm thinking now that. You know probably there are some places still do pub trivia and they're mostly crazy teens that are yeah. Yeah. I mean, that's probably the case. So it just it continues to be. The, the intro continues to evolve but also be a kernel of truth. You know what I'm saying. So I really want everybody to think right off the bat start. Yeah. But of introspection get into the right mindset you know. So I was on our team Iquique Bowl in Chicago where it was so much on America's last public gathering. Was it was so much fun. Amazing time. And you were probably you were one of the less people that we hugged before. Yes you were the last people that are hugged as well and shared a meal in a restaurant with. Some we want per Taylor. Chocolate milk shake. Shake. As learned love and you described it the drink you to. It wasn't shrink that you chew. We really had a wonderful multi sensory experience in Chicago with you Eric and I'm so glad that that is one of our last memories of the before times. Good Times Oh. My goodness. Well, we are very excited to have you talk to us about something Eric. Please tell us what you're going to talk to us about today we're going to do more math. Top. Do. Best category on Learning League I will tell you Eric that my parents. Usually are very critical. PODCAST. They will say to me like I'll be like Oh did you did you listen to this podcast? They'll go. We want we listened to a little bit of it was. Wasn't your best you swirling much I, swore too much. They get that. But your episode was like Stars Stars Ten stars across the board. They loved Eric's episode. Loved Hello. Dave Tag Dave. Yes. Yup You got it. Right? Don't worry David Nancy Yeah they loved your episode. Solo. But yeah. Math everybody needs it. There's always a question about it. So yes, of course we're excited. Yeah. Yeah. Before I started did one Bailey who also did a math episode which is Primo episode as well and continuing the math legacy, and then you also had tangential math apps like the moon. There was a lot of math in the moon episode a lot of math cards episode. Yeah. Yeah. So much math so much math. Are you proud everywhere I am so proud I was proud of you before. Thank you eric kind. So, just to frame today. BOOT back when I was on last year of twenty. Nine. Hundred Twenty nineteen now. So the American curriculum has five strands of mathematics number and operations, geometry measurement Algebra David Analysis and probability, and so we did numbers where we talked about the history of some numbers and a Greek cult. Geometry did some calculus and talked about you know the Calculus wars, linemates. So now for today I wanted to talk about the other strands. So we're going to do Algebra measurement and probability, and then we're going to end it with America's favorite segment a mathematician you should know. Yes Right, up our alley before I start I had a question for the both of you Did you have a favorite math teacher and why were they your favorite math teacher? Goodness. I can say there was that. I had to favorite math teachers and their names escape me at the moment. Because once I left high school I kicked a lot of information out of my head, but I had one that taught us about Probability and I enjoyed like I liked that part. And I had another teacher who smells like cinnamon And he was very warm and lovely and he taught us calculus. Which I was not good at but. He was a very kind person until he got busted for throwing a math book at a student the year after I graduated and he got fired. So. That's my story. Julia do you have a favorite? Not I mean I don't think I could top that but I also had a good probability and statistics teacher in high school to like that was like I took a math elective my senior year of high school because I wanted to take like another art class and they were like Nah that won't fit on your schedule. Here's have some more math I was like. Yeah that's not fair but I did it. Well, at least you had one and I'm happy for that Matt Teachers, not usually you know the ones you out. So we're GONNA start today with Algebra and I'm GONNA throw another question to you. How would you define Algebra? Math with letters. Okay. Very good. I would agree yes. So we think there's you know it's when we stop using numbers and we start adding letters and so one of the definitions we use that that sort of promotes wineries letters use these letters to understand Patterson relations to represent ideas and think about the numbers in a problem. So you know it's like you have your watermelons and oranges and w watt among you know. That's one way but we will talk about what house means in the higher mathematical context towards the end of this little part. But I did want to start is where we got the concept of Algebra and knowing the origin of the name Algebra gives us some ideas at for this, we have to go to the Middle East and a dude name Outpour is me and by the way I will most likely butchered names so. I, it's fine. It's. Okay. So as me, we don't know a lot about his life. We don't we know one thing. So my metaphor for this as he was like. Dating, myself, he has a live journal account but no entries. Yes, exactly. We know you existed. We know he had friends, but we don't know a lot about him. So now who was this a scholar and? to understand what was happening at the time There was a Calif who was the ruler of this. He died he had two sons once and killed the other and this dude became the new Caliph. I'm he wanted to continue his father's legacy which was to revitalize the knowledge base that they were building. So the something's ID to he's setup observatories where Muslim astronomers could build on knowledge acquired by earlier people's he built a library manuscripts which was the first major library after the Great Library of Alexandria how most important Yep Importantly, he started something called the House of wisdom where grief and philosophical scientific works were translated and Al Four is me was a scholar in the house of Wisdom. and. He wrote a book. Now I'm gonNA use Google, translate to say the name of the book because I don't want to butcher it. So here we go. This is it. Thank you must settle Call Valentine. That's the name of the book. Okay. So. Yeah. I was not going to try to. Separate outside the. Characters. Yeah. Good of you to just just go straight to Google translate and be like you know what she can do this Google translate robot can do this better than I can exactly So if you're a student which I mean, I don't speak Arabic I would not have caught this but at some point. In the name of the book was the word Algebra okay. So we're going to talk about I what what this book is. So notably, there were no symbols used in the tech. So new letters like we know, Algebra. Today. And this was a big deal for historians because they thought that resume. Euclid. Geometry fame because when he wrote elements heeds at an have symbols as well. So there were like, oh, maybe he just copied stuff from Euclid and so what they noticed though is there were subtle differences in the style of writing that they was like, Oh, it's this is Euclidean. It's unique to him. This is Alpha Rays Mehan. That's unique to him. You know like Bob Ross like. Lauren. This is your area. I assume like painters like certain styles than you. So like Oh, there's a lot of fail. Oh, blue in this Bob Ross. Exactly. That's it's called Kinda sore ship an art historical term. So yeah, absolutely. We're. Very noting that for. Sorry so Pop, open my pbr hard coffee of okay where. Are. Not An ad. Guess Tober is not sponsored by PBR coffee, but should be because Julia is drinking her metric weight in it's. Hard copy for people who drink alcohol, but also stay awake. I mean. I have water and cheese Kurds which I got from the farmers market today. We've done enough to us this year so. Whatever? Yeah it's what are you gonNA do. It's dairy wall was Okay. So why was this hailed as the beginning of Algebra? So there are things called quadraphonic. Lot of word problems yielded quadra equations question for the both of you. What is the equation? Julia looked especially angry so I think she knows. What be quadrajet? Is Okay. I can hit I do I could recognize it I can't. Just regular season, there's like a square root symbol and equal. Not squared. square-rigged. Squared over. Something else, ripe. I don't mean to deny your thoughts. No. No no math is one of those things where there's definitely like a real answer. So please tell us what You've described it very well there is a faction there is a square root, but there is a particular feature aquatic equation, which is that squared the power of too. Because it's called Quadra attic because you know it's like square meters and we do this in terms of. A square meter as square. New Things. So that's quadrajet even though it's a two and is logic. Okay. So as you can probably mentioned infinitely many wages, we did some of that in high school don't remember a lot of them but. For the most part. Yeah. So, what did Al do? So Alvarez, me was able to describe six equations with it. You can think of them as templates. So whatever quadrant equation you had, you do this stuff to it, and then it will fit one of these six templates and then he tells me what to do with these templates like how to answer them and it's not. So the way you get it from any revision into six templates is called completion and balancing which is part of inks are the name of the book in English is the compendious book on calculation by completion and balancing, and so you remember the stuff that used to carry this three to the other side of the positive big divide boats at that Murmur. So all of these a procedures was described in this book Algebra okay. Yeah. What's interesting is the purpose of this book. So the purpose of this particular book was quote such as men constantly require in cases of inheritance legacies, partition lawsuit trade, and to alder dealings with one another or where the measurements of lands, the digging of canals, geometrical computations, and other objects of various sorts and kinds are concert. So what this means is it's rooted in a lot of stuff we'd they did out in the real world. Sure. Yeah, which is different. What we do in school, but we don't have to talk about. Application exactly practical applications. The reason why this book was really important is the math in this book was to help people divide money especially under Islamic law. All. The rules follow a Islamic rules of inheritance which requires a lot of alternate. So if you think about it everything out the Algebra, you did in high school was based on practices of this world. That's About, they don't tell you that. No, they don't know they tell you about the white man. Yeah exactly. Yeah exactly. That's one hundred percent I feel like I would made I have been I would've paid more attention I think if I knew like its rich historical background. Oh. Yeah. And I yeah. Just thinking about like this is part of Islamic practices and we don't think of it. That way is unfortunate Ya exactly. Do you remember doing anything else Algebra class? Crying Hey. Yeah. Jew, the mostly just like. I feel like formulas like just working on formulas. Yeah from what I remember, and sometimes we use the formulas to graph stuff your number graphing. The plan. Yeah. We had that ti eighty, three calculator. Yes A TON OF MONEY ON YEAH We made programs in it to like do do our work for us. Oh Yeah. See I didn't have that you and Steve were both like Oh. Yeah. We used to program a program caffeinated. Do things for me I was like I went to Roy Heart Central School in. Middle Port New York like no one knew how to program nothing. So I feel like I really missed out. Also did you have snake on your calculator because? You're bowling Aitken Mafia and Yes, really kids. Having. All these rich with their rich ask calculators Oh my God. Yeah. I can barely like upload a store to instagram with. No. Right he's Border Nineteen Eighty six. So back in baby's episode you talked about the namesake of that the the graph Rene Descartes. Guy do you know anything else about Rene Descartes outside of Math? Philosopher. And he's he's he has a particular quote that it's tagged with him and. Therefore he is. He is cookie to Ergo Soup Yeah. So I'M GONNA. Tell you a little more about cart and then I'm going to say that phrase again and if it will change how you think about that race now. Can I can't wait are picture it sixty thirty, five francine descartes was bored to Rene. An. Occasional alannah Yon Vodka strum Helena was not his wife. Francine was born out of wedlock thus rene calder, his niece. Okay like as like a secret thing Yup for sure by cart wanted Francine to get educated in France so they they were on a boat they moved to France unfortunately, francine developed scarlet fever and passed away notably Descartes's were philosophical works occurred after her death especially, the philosophical ones so things are starting to but. So whereabouts. A yeah. with US wit Mathematica mathematical acuity, and he was really good with machines mechanical prowess. He made a mechanical replica of his daughter. WHOA. We are getting, into some dark. Shit my friend. This is like this. Like Oscar cautious sex doll. Yes. This is like Oscar Kokoschka sex doll. This is like horror movie level stuff. Yeah, and for more other automatic, you can listen to episode one fifteen on my bride of the winter also a great episode by the way. Oh it's very good. Were you uploaded the picture of whatever it was like why? All right I know nightmares. Come through sesame street. Exactly exact-. So Rene, descartes had a robot Francine, and you would sleep with him in a sort of casket next to his bed. I know. Whereas our. PBR. Julius. The seventeenth. Century. Yes Damn. In, sixteen forty, six, Christina of Sweden Sunday Cartoon Castle and send a ship for him to do some some work I don't know not one hundred percent sure some task rabid thing. So as ever the casket went with him and at night, he would take her out of the casket and talk and wind her up and talk to her Oh my God. This is a both heartbreaking and. Terrifying. On the ship back from Sweden they encountered weather. Oh No. And the crew was getting spooked because they would hear descartes speak by himself in his cabin, and so the I mean like you can produce the scene you know it Yak that's not even the Little Mermaid right before you know. So they were suspecting some form of witchcraft which share ising this bad weather. So when descartes was asleep, they broke into his cabin opened the casket to their horror found a robot girl, the grabs her ran off the debts master to pieces and threw it into the seat. Oh. My God. One. Someone to do it to. Like, talk about insult to injury for this poor man. Right, and so faced with unbearable grief of losing her a second time to cart succumb Terry death shortly after here's the quote again I think therefore, I am. Oh. My God. Oh My god God, that's. That's a lot. That's a lot to take Eric. It's okay. You could on asleep. That's amazing. You could end this episode right here would be like thanks for listening everybody and I think honestly. Like How how is this a movie? Right Where's where's our bio-pics about famous mathematicians Ta. Yeah. Yeah we don't have. Steve at a beautiful mind. That's it. That's it. That's instead he said he didn't hallucinate so some. Artistic. Liberty readable. Yeah exactly. Exactly. Yeah. We should write a screenplay guys. Let's do it. Let's, do it I'm into I'm into it. What are doing? I'll be Roebuck. Francine. I. Love It. Okay right up I mean how hard is it to play a robot Exactly. All right. So back to Algebra so So for Higher Algebra. The idea of algebra shifts a little bit. So think of numbers and think of the things we do numbers like of -tracting. Stuff when we think of Higher Algebra. away the numbers but keep the rules. Okay little. To think about. So for instance There's a lot of music theory that goes into this and I'll give you an example. So you know when we're singing happy birthday to someone and there's usually this one person when happy birthday to look at the end, we'll do our harmony pretty quick. You know there's always those people. Yup. What they're doing is they're transforming the notes from like the melody and they're increasing the steps by a certain number to get the the harmony. So these are people that can usually like if you see something Oh, I can do the harmony because what they're doing is they're keeping the rules such as adding, but they're not doing it to numbers they're doing it to notes. Does that make sense? Yeah. That's wild. Yes that's cool You can hear it a lot in musicals. particularly a cloud Schoenberg's work. So Phantom of the Opera Les. Mis. And what he does in the musical is actually pretty interesting because he does a transformation transformation, he lengthened So if it used to be one beat transformed into two beats so such as doubling the number when it is in like music version. Okay what he's doing, he's putting it in a different context every time. So rogue, we're going go to Lima's. So early Ms. We all know this song Well, hopefully here we go. Pretending he? That says that there's that melody we know that. that we know the middle part of the song. which sounds like this. Okay. So what Schoenberg does is actually pretty artistic. What he does is he puts this melody in the background of a lot of the music. So not the beginning you here on my own in the background of Jean Valjean First Song. So what I'm GonNa do is I'm going to play it and then don't listen to Belgian listen to the music behind think of that middle part and I know it's only in my mind so here we go. I feel. And then he goes into the on my own. To. Clean the taste. So, you're introduced to the song on my own pretty early on and it's repeated throughout the musical sense. Amazing. which is sort of a mathematical transformation. He's changing a lot of the stuff but still preserved, he's algebraic transformations to this melody. And so when so this is like really like a, how'd you describe like his lake like? It's a wanting feeling like an optimistic farm. The next time we hear this melody is when Team Dis, oh? Sorry spoiler alert. So which is interesting because you go from this optimistic vibe to this sad vibe of death. So when you get to the on my own. is a marriage of those feelings that longing for for this man, but also I can't have him. Well, it's amazing. What was I have the lyrics? What was it a? Without me, his world will keep on turning longing mess but sadness at the same time. So he's being very artistic. You hear it again at the end of the Music Hall, when Voltron Dis Green is already like conditioned. To reveal feelings and then you end up feeling different things based on the pitch or the speed or yes. At some point So when teams is, it's slow it's sad that's algebraic transformation. So yeah, you're conditioned to hear the song. So that's why when you hear on my own in the second act, you're like this sounds familiar it sounds really good. So it's where like music and mathematics pretty well an you know if you listen to Phantom, he does he does the same thing as well. So, yeah. That was cool. Yeah. So if you listen carefully, it's pretty tight anyways. So that's a that's what we have for Algebra today. We're going to second topic of measurement and I wanted to talk about why in the world is the US one of the only three countries that doesn't use the metric system. Yes. Yeah. Exactly. Question. What are the other two countries that uses the metric system? The don't use a system. Liberia and Singapore. So man. Lauren, helped me out. I somewhere to those and that's why. Somewhere in Southeast Asia for some reason. It isn't southeast and Mar me. In. Modern. Ma Goliath. Me In Mar.. So we're going to look at why America insists on not using the metrics am and I'm going to give you the top line answer right now. American. exceptionalism there's nece Yeah Veritas someone has. So, when they wrote the constitution, they gave Congress the right to regulate weights and measures. So during the first congress of the US and Seventeen, eighty-nine Thomas Thomas Jefferson drew up a plan for measures. He instituted a metric system for money. So which is why we use like the base ten but even checked at the metric system in general because it was quote to French. Yeah that sounds right. They really hated the French. Yeah I mean. He liked their wine no one loved the French as much as. Ben. Franklin. Ben. Franklin. Yeah Yeah. Yeah and he said like the meter is to measure. French things not American things that sounds. Thomas Jefferson's fault. Of them so John Quincy Adams for his part couldn't recommend that the adopt the metric system either because this was a system that nearly vanished after the demise of the French Empire. So it was like Oh they you something and then they did it and it didn't work out. So we're not gonNA use it either. Show. So as you can imagine like, so we're not using the metric system one of the Heller reusing. Yeah. So because of American exceptionalism and states rights, every state had the ability to define their own weights and measures. uh-huh. So I'm going to share with you an image of what this looks like. Harry go on. So this is a table. Of what it means to be a Bushel. Mike. Oh no different in every state. It's different and depending on what you're measuring. Let's take what do we have buckwheat a Bushel of Buckwheat and New York? It's forty eight pounds in Indiana. It's fifty pounds Wisconsin forty two pounds Iowa fifty two pounds Vermont forty, six pounds. Now what would a Bushel is? Yeah exactly and I bet that that came up like a lot of people. It probably died off but like that woman's you know dumber than a New York Bush's. He's flatter than a Kentucky inch. You know what I'm talking about. Kentucky. Right probably was thing at some. Guy. Drag Queen in Kentucky. S. Very, good. That's very good. Okay is lie eight, hundred, sixty, six, the metric act was passed by the Senate, this law was to authorize the use of the metric system of weights and measures and signed by then president Andrew Johnson, it can it provided a table of standardized measurements to convert between the metric and whatever system America was using at that time. Now they were. Still about using the metric system in Latin America they were slowly becoming metric and they were seeing what happens when you convert to metric such as in Brazil. There was the Cabra kilos revolt literally translated as the revolt the kilogram breakers it was a three month long revolt in opposition to transitioning to the metric system. Oh, my God. the, wild well I for my understanding it's because there was a lot of implication for taxes. You know when you measured things in different ways than you might be paying more for something that you didn't use to but I don't know. I mean. Listen again, born nineteen, eighty six I don't know how to budget. So back in the US. The US was still trading internationally and they acknowledged the metric system but refuse to use it within the United States. Come. Coming to the twentieth century people testified to Congress is like we need the metric system, Alexander Graham Bell had speech and it has a lot of math if you want to look for his speech convincing Congress to use the metric system and one of our math read it but I will read you a short quote from it. So. Quote. We simply have to again, this is about the metric system, which is a little funny but also we have to be bold enough to take the step. All difficulties lie in the transition period all the difficulties in the metric system are in transitioning from one system to the other. But the moment you used the metric system alone I do not have any difficulty in the use, and if the government will lead the way that change must enroll come and we will be brought into line with the progress progressive nations of the world instead of lagging behind. Which you Yeah. So he's like, yeah, it'll be a pain at first, but then everything will be a lot easier. Yeah, Yup. And using a centimeter progressive. Listen. But it's funny because you can use that. Paragraph and put it into any political speech now literally agree with you. But after everyone testified Congress still believe that the US should be a leader, not a follower. The Metro Sin Act in nineteen seventy five stated that the conversion would be completely voluntary. But because of this, they instituted the United States metric board, which is a United States government agency that encourage metrification and seven years later Reagan abolished this. Just agency. So relief try like people have tried to make America metric but for some reason out no, because of American exceptionalism nobody. Yeah. For more information, you can visit the US metric association. A national nonprofit organization founded in Nineteen Nine Sixteen for thirty dollars a year. You can become a member and get a copy of metric today, which is released six times a year. What what are they have to talk about six times a year hey, guess what guys still using the metric system still trying to get it through whites doing what you're doing why is it released ten times a year They really. Really Visit Opportunity Very. It's very confusing dollars. Oh. My God you're right. We. We it misinformation encourage you to join A. National Metric Board, I forgot the name already. Metric Association get your newsletter today thirty bucks a year Everybody Support Movement Support Support Progressive Yup. Okay, support progressive, not the company. Okay Before we end. Measurements There is one tidbit that I found very interesting when you much in higher mathematics and I'm going to think Ma Boys Alex Andrew. Jonathan. Who told me about this theorem that I had no idea about a man. Here we go. I want you to think of all the numbers between zero and one all the decimals in the world. There are infinitely many decimals. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Say You were to choose a number at random from all of the numbers between zero and one. What is the probability that you choose point five? Oh. Would it be pretty high? Probability be. Hi. I'm like looking forever Mason. But no no. No. So the probability that you choose a number between zero and and choosing point five the probably of choosing point five is zero. Oh. What right it's countering. Wait how. So this is this is the way that was explained to me. So think of that interval from zero to one. And instead of like a infinitely many numbers in between say the word exactly ten numbers in between this interval. So those one out of ten chance that I could randomly pick a number that's in my head right? That's one out of ten. Now divide that interval again into a twenty. One out of twenty. Okay. uh-huh. Keep dividing a hundred. It's one out of a hundred. If you keep on doing this one over and that denominator keeps on getting bigger one over a bazillion bazillion bazillion and then you keep on going. But because of Calculus, at some point that number is going to be so small, it's zero. Oh, my God. What. I feel like I'm staring into the night sky and realizing how small I am. This is a I'm having an existential breakdown from this what? I appreciate it not a lot of. Wow. Magic, trick read our minds. What number we picked. Numbers Flu. So that's measurement that's measure theory and that was measurement. Feel like we most encounter the the fact that there is a weights and measures agency. When we go to the gas station and you see like yellow sticker on the pump, that's like those. Five by the weights and measures and I feel like I feel like I don't get that confirmation from from anywhere else. I mean America's broken. But also with the metrics. Yeah. All right. The last topic we're going to spend a little time on this. Because you said, you had a great probability teacher. We're going to spend a lot of time. Data Statistics and probability. We're going to talk about the Monty Hall Problem Have you heard of this? Yes. Leo's attacking about this. Okay, we're tell me more. So. Go ahead, Joel. Yeah. So. A couple episodes ago. When the episode Feminist Literature, which was the problem that had no name. I'm quizzes on some problems that do have names. So we picked some some famous mathematical and philosophical problems. And the Monty Hall problem was one of them. Yeah, and the Monty Hall problem is like if you. Choose from an an option of three doors. If you choose one and he opens it up and it's goat and ask you do you WanNa stick with the second one that you chose or do you want to change? That you always change. You should always change even though it feels counterintuitive. Yes yes. So the Monty Hall problem was named after Monty Hall the host of an American TV program called. Let's make a deal which aired from eighty four to eighty six. The problem was originally posed and solved in a letter by Steve Selva into the American satisfaction in one thousand, nine, seventy, five. So the the problem mostly stayed within academic circles. Okay. and you've. Like precisely describes the problem Great. Do you. Do you know why you have to switch? No. No. No We Chance of getting the car and a two and three chance of getting a goat and they show you that one of the things you didn't choose is a goat. So now you have a one in two chance of getting my car or the goat. But your CH- Heus. Is Wrong. But your first choice is always wrong or probably wrong. Okay. So here's a here's one of the I would call it I'm going to call it the qualitative like the feel way the answer this. Okay. Since that of three doors think of a hundred doors talk. Okay. So you pick one, you know door at random and there's a one out of one hundred chance that you picked the door with a car. Okay and then Monte Opens Ninety eight of the other doors and they're all goats. Mysteriously leaves that one door closed. And he goes I do WANNA switch, and so like it just feels like all of the probability just went into that single doors like why did you open that door? The car must be in that one does that make sense? Actually that makes a lot of sense said some reverse psychology stuff. And there's this really. If, you would like to read mathematical theorems. It's there's a really nice way to describe it but this is the the strategy I like to think about because you just feel like, why didn't you open that one door with android? It's very, it has to be there you don't open. I think I did open with a midwestern accent again. It's all right. There the Kurds away their influencing you? Open okay. Okay. So it became famous to the general public as a question from a reader letter quoted in Maryland Voss. Call Column Ask Marilyn in Parade Magazine in one thousand, nine, hundred, ninety have we heard of Maryland Oh? We used to read her allman every parade magazine. Magazine on Sunday Yup me to our family to Oh, where I was at Disney adventure gets. I didn't Read Parade magazine in the in the newspaper. That's. Two year old? Lady. But what I wanted to talk about what happens when she published this? Column. Also entitled by historians as the Great man slain by Historian I. Mean Me. Maryland. Maryland. vaas divide was born in Saint Louis Missouri. Nineteen, forty-six. Age Of ten, she was given to intelligence test to mentor to measure her mental capacity and found that when she was ten, she had the mental capacity of a twenty three year old all my God. Pretty Smart. But again, I, don't want to take any of us I don't know what don't want to. She went on to be listed in the Guinness World Book of Records for having the world's highest Iq and she gained international. But knew that intelligence tests weren't really meant to capture intelligence and she knew that so rejected the she rejected this label. Okay. and as we know today, a lot of our intelligence has are have a lot of racist and sexist undertones in other words may privilege a certain way of living for you to answer these questions? Sure. Yeah. She moved to New York City to become a writer she got hired by Parade magazine and she collected letters about logic puzzles, which is different from a lot of the female columnists at the time her writing about relationships. And she correctly explained the Monty Hall problem in her column and she got a lot of flack from it. So remember that the Monty Hall problem was not a new problem was solved in academic circles way before but you publicize it said a general public for the general public Maryland. Says that she received more than ten thousand letters claiming her incompetence and close to one thousand carrying signatures with PHD's and letterheads of Mathematics and Science Departments Mike What. Yeah and I have some choice letters that were published. Right. This is from A. From the University of Florida. You blew with big since you have since you seem to have difficulty grasping the basic principle at work here. I'll explain after the host reveals the goat. You now have a one in two chance of being correct where changing selection not the odds are the same. There's enough mathematical illiteracy in this country and we don't need the world's highest IQ propagating mark. Shame. Letter number two from a PhD from the US Army Research. Institute you made a mistake but look on the positive side if all those. were, rocked the country would be in very serious trouble. Cheese a gentleman from Sun River Oregon. Maybe woman look at math problems differently than men. I hope she published their names and their home addresses. Exactly what because housing to see how twitter? Oh my? Just, absolutely excoriate her. Yeah, uh-huh. So with outrage she continued to explain her ideas and subsequent columns and even with your wealth stated explanation she was still question as one man wrote even a year after the original column quote. I still think you're wrong there is such a thing as female logic. Oh. My God. Also like, Hey, get a hobby Mike Dude like what you're writing a year after this problem was published like maybe subscribe to some other newspapers and cool off Jeez the US metric publishes six here. That please. Maryland still writes puzzles for Parade magazine today. That's her real last name foster lot. It's not like a pen name. Savant yeah. What a? Jackpot. That's cool. I didn't know that. Yes. So that's it for probability Before we go onto the mathematician, you should know I put this end because I think it's a little timely for what's happening today, and this is This is my area of expertise, which is math education and I to talk about new math. Have you heard of new math? Yes her people complain about new math yeah. Yeah. So the role of math schools has long been debated. So overall, we were duckling between two things. One math should equip us with every day knowledge. How did you taxes what it means to make an investment? How to read a graph all But on the other hand, people are like, no people need higher level mathematics because that's where you learned rigorous. Problem solving all of this other stuff that comes along with higher mathematics. So we still have this to the state. So the Great Depression brought on a math curriculum that was marked by social topics such as balancing an income. And this makes sense because the point of getting an education wasn't to go to college at the time. This was so I go to school and I go out and I can make money and know what to do with it Yeah. Again born in Nineteen eighty-six this means nothing to me And everyone for the most part was fine with this mathematics curriculum But. There were a lot of inequities that made this math curriculum. You know not the best. So this was before Brown v Board of Education. So there are still segregated schools and men and women were largely educated separately and a lot of psychologists at the time wanted love structure as g Stanley Hall and psychologists said during an address of the National Education Association quote men and women differ girls preponderant in high school Latin and English and history from the inner inclination. The first danger to a woman is over brainwork it. Part of her organism, which is sacred to heredity. Brain because you're you'd work anymore. You're utilize shrivel up and die. Too Hard woman float around your body and you'll be making crazy. So, you can imagine. If if men and women were educated separately and white Americans are educated separately for the rest of the population than this everyday math was everyday math for a few people not for one So there was that and then World War Two happened specifically the launch sputnik indicating that the US lost the space race. Thus everyday math curriculum wasn't working they needed scientists, they needed military math and quick. New Math was born and one of the key ideas was from Jerome Bruner another psychologists where he said and I don't I don't agree with us but he said any subject can be effectively in some intellectually honest formed any child at any stage of development. Well where's the? Listen. We're not GONNA Eleanor. Rocket Science makes you may learn later on but at the moment you know, yeah, let's listen colors I. mean. Yeah. Quantum physics a little later on. So, they develop new math curriculum thinking that kids can learn abstract math at any stage of development. So students were engaging in abstract concept structures and reasoning of pure mathematics such as doing arithmetic in different basis like what we talked about las doing arithmetic and base eight. Does it helped. I. Don I don't know where it helps out in the real world bayside. This is important. They learned set theory Union intersection complement very early on in their educational career. and as you said, you didn't work because parents couldn't help and their educated differently ti couldn't help him. They were educated differently. So overall new math was deemed a failure but the the one thing I wanted to underscore is that our math curriculum and schools had to shift based on what was happening in the world today such as today, we have the common core. Common core is not a teaching technique. Tweet me. It is not a teaching techniques as a lot of people say it's a response to the mobility of. In the stanage, we have people moving state. So you want to make sure that if you bring your fourth grader from Rochester New York. So A. Why can't I think of any other place? Wisconsin. You want to make sure that they're studying the same thing. Yeah. So that's what common core was. Now there is a little. Dicey stuff about funding and testing. You don't have to get into that. But common core was a reaction to what was happening in the world and wanted to bring this up today because today our schools are reckoning with with what to teach especially in math in other words did your math instruction help you understand pandemic? Did it help you understand systemic racism and I don't think it is so it'll? Be, interesting, to see how the curriculum reacts and there's this there's this curriculum in the Seattle public schools, which is proposed last year. So you know I said there were strands of mathematics number algebra editor the strands in Seattle public schools are therefore them origins identity and agency power and oppression resistance and liberation reflection and action and think of math class with those are the themes as Matt Wow. Not like history or like sociology like your math class. Yeah. So it'll be really interesting to see what is it GonNa look like in light ten years. Change. Yeah and it certainly sounds like there's going to be more involved with those those kind of. Topics or I guess like sections of math where it's not just going to be like, okay. This is how you add. This is how you attract. You know it's not just like. Numbers in a vacuum, and like this is why we do this because I told you to like that kind of thing. To understand you know where this stuff comes from in a historical sense and how we can apply it in a practical way in our lives and maybe a future you know at a child's future you interests in college or even like a job is interesting. How like math is woven into a lot more places than just like only math class and then you when you leave, you don't have to think about it again kind of thing exactly. Yes. So when we talk, you say like Oh this disproportionately affects what does it mean to diss proportionately effect something that's not. An exponential growth flattened the curve what are we talking about here? What do you mean? Yeah, it'll be interesting. Wow, that's cool. Eleanor get ready. It's GonNa be fun. Oh Man. Okay. So we're going to end today with a mathematician you should know. Her name is Angie Turner. King, and a quick note on the mathematician today, which is a similar note from the last episode that we were talking about a mathematician. So there have been of minorities mathematicians who have led unproblematic lives not to say, they didn't face adversity they went to school the God. Degrees and then their life didn't play out like a movie. I know telling these stories these coming out of squalor stories are dangerous. Early if you essentially someone's experience sometimes they're used to empower people, which is Great. But my goal of telling such stories is four people in power to understand that you because it was unproblematic for you. There other factors at play that you should be tuned to especially for making decisions for something. Aren't. Just, a Kaffa okay, Angie Lena Turner was born in West Virginia in nineteen o five and a coal mining community. She was born to a family of limited means. She was the grandchild of slaves who were given land a steer and a log cabin when they were freed unfortunately, her mother passed away when she was eight. And for a while she lived with her grandmother King described her grandmother as so light skin. She was almost white and because her grandmother was called boys known as as she called her granddaughter pardon my French, the black bitch. I mean Colorado's thing. Wow. Sounds like a great grandma. She's God Apple. Additionally. She recounted into wintertime when it would snow she would wake up with snow in her bed now listen again we talked about this I snow. No no snow on my bed. Burned to the ground no no. Boina Sarah. She said, she had it tough but she it didn't bother her mind and so after that, she lived with her father who couldn't read or write but was supportive and encouraged to attend school. She graduated high school at the age of fourteen. Good for she saved up some money and went to college waiting tables and washing dishes, and she graduated in Nineteen twenty-three from Bluefield Colored Institute now known as Bluefield State College where she trained to become a teacher. She then studied chemistry and mathematics and earned her bachelor of science degree in nineteen. Twenty seven from West Virginia State College. Now West Virginia State University, a starkly Black College and university for more information on ABC US listen to Episode Sixty College. It's very yeah. It's great. I listened on Ruby No. I'm so glad she was awarded a master's degree in Chemistry and mathematics in nineteen thirty one and she gained a teaching position at West Virginia State College where she focused on getting labs in shape. So the sign clubs were not that good she came in because she wanted to quote students would know what a real lab looks like little states administration, but you know support her She also taught in the army specialized training program. This was a military training program by the United States Army during World War Two to meet the demands of trained officers and soldiers would technical skills conducted at two hundred and twenty seven universities West. Virginia State College was one of six BBC to be included in this list. The army stipulated that military students should be taught separately from civilian students. So you know you're in the quad, you're playing spike ball, and then there's like you know like a military march of the students that are like walking by. Our educated separately. some notable graduates of this training program Brooks Bob Dole. Henry Kissinger Ed cod. Gore, Vidal, and Kurt Vonnegut. What a what a lovely crew that is cheese. Go to dinner with all of them at the same time. Yeah King was one of the chemistry teachers in this program and she recounted that I it was difficult to teach the military students because of the formality that was acquired. So imagine you know how to teach a class and All the See. I don't even know what's a militaristic stand up. For a dog you know what? I mean. Yeah. Like a formality of like. Yeah. Yeah Yeah I don't I don't know any of this by you know she got help train a lot of our of our military. Even as one of the black first black female mathematicians to earn a degree in both math and chemistry, you may not know her because she prioritized her mentorship. She only published her dissertation and her thesis and she was inspiring. She's a people percent typical Sagittarius. I. Looked this up. She actually secretary. So it was like I. Don't believe in Serology about you know whatever At the end of Highschool School Oh at the high school where she taught prior to West Virginia, sent out a survey to seventy two students and twenty seven of them. So roughly. Of them said that they your their favorite teacher. So imagine of the high school you went to and you serve everyone and a third of your graduating class. Said we one? Oh, wow that's a lot. That's a lot of that is a lab. So who did she mentor? She mentored a few people that. A A few scientists she mentored Jasper Brown Jeffries who worked as one of the handful of black physicists on the Manhattan project at the Met lab at the University of Chicago. He was one of the seventy scientists at the met lab to sign the sealer petition, which was a document written by Lucy alert petition president avoid dropping the Tomich bombs on Japan. Wow. She mentored Margaret James Strickland Collins, the first black female entomologist, and the third black female zoologist. She studied termites she worked at the Smithsonian's national. Museum of Natural History from the seventy s to the mid nineties. Her work is pivotal in what we know about termites in some parts of the Caribbean and Florida including the biggest termite in Florida Marco Rubio that's Eric's opinion. Does very good. Very good. Thank you. She mentored Katherine Johnson the Fan now mathematician depicted in the movie hidden figures in that survey that I mentioned. John was one of the respondents who said that king was a wonderful teacher, bright caring and very rigorous, and this is interesting to me because when you call a teacher rigorous but also your favorite that's. Yeah. Yeah. Absolutely No throw it. He he smell like, send my y'all super, the book Exactly. And the one of the last people she talked was a fellow in Michigan in an interview king. Did. She referenced one of the students in the eighty s to the army service training program. She said there's a fellow in Michigan that sends me a Christmas card every year and I enjoy knowing he hasn't forgotten about his time here. King would have been around forty when she taught at the ASCAP she gave this interview about that man when she was eighty six along. Oh my gosh, that's lovely and that's a mathematician you should know. Aw. I wish I knew. Yeah. Wow. Lovely. Yeah. Love cursor. Sometimes. Wonderful installment of more. Matt that was lovely. Thank you so much and it was about so much more than math, but it was also all about math at the same time I. Think you framed that beautifully, thank you eric. That's all have. So. I do you have do you have a quiz for us today? Do you have a quiz for you? Oh, my goodness. Please Yup. So the last question I did. I said would be all things not straight white and male but after a really good friend texted me, he said the quiz was still pretty male. Sorry name today's quiz after the texting sent me, which is called Eric always forgets about the lesbians a quiz about Queer Women. Lovin. Ready. Question One we all know of Ellen Degeneres Favorites Sitcom and the scene where she and her character came out as lesbian national television and became the first American Sitcom with a lesbian lead a few years earlier though another queer. But not yet out comedian headliner own Sitcom named us all American girl who joined the poodle persona on the second season of the mass singer. Question to although not overtly gay this movie released in one thousand, nine, hundred six is popular among women for having themes. Identify with named this movie where the following line was uttered. He came to me. Saves. Me Oh and he wanted needs to give you a message your in Deep Shit. He says, you've abused what he's given you and going to have to pay the price. Bonus question named the character or actress who said that line Question Three. Cheryl, swoops decorated. WNBA play who came out in two thousand and five one of the highest profile athletes on the team sports ever do. So Her story career includes three times W NBA MVP, three Olympic gold medals, and the first women's basketball player to have a Nike shoe named after the air swoops, and she's also the I W NBA player to record a triple double. Describe what a triple doubles. Question for. It was the relationship and strength at Ab Windsor and thea spire that pave the way for progress in twenty thirteen the Supreme Court ruled and USB Windsor at the federal denial of same sex marriages under a particular law was a violation of the fifth amendment paving the way for marriage equality by becoming essential ruling in the later case of Burqa be hodges named the full federal law deemed unconstitutional or effectively unenforceable that was signed into law under President Bill Clinton in thousand, nine hundred. Question Five. Progress is coming to Hollywood and Trans actresses are becoming more visible in film and TV named the actress, an activists who was the first openly transgendered person to be nominated for a primetime. Emmy Award in any acting category I tell you what show she's on but I don't want to go to jail. Question six. I miss it when you could gather and large crowds. In fact, we all attended America's last public gathering equal twenty twenty and boy we learned a lot. Answered the Keith Ball Twenty twenty question. And L. Word Bathroom make out session was inspired hot be by discussing what autobiography of Red Author. Question. Seven. I'M NOT GONNA. Lie I never thought I would live in. Wisconsin. But the state has a lot to be proud of such as cheese, ice cream butter and the state beverage milk. But they're also proud of electing the first openly gay person to the US. Senate named US politicians the first openly LGBT. Woman elected the United States. And the first woman to be elected to the United States Congress and Senate from Wisconsin. Question Eight, some of the oldest descriptions of love between two women come from the poetry for ancient. Greece particularly from a Greek poet was born on the Isle of Lesbos from which the turn lesbian comes from. Poet whose name is not the root of the birth stone of those born in September. Question Nine. peppermint is only drag into and compete on repulsed drag race as an openly trans woman. She placed second on nine after losing her lifting battle to Sasha Lor. Name, the song they lip sync to which was released in Nineteen, ninety nine and has the following lyrics. I'm going to censor title which his son. Be. I'M GONNA, make it anyway pack your bags and leave and don't. You dare come running back to me. Be. I'm GonNa make anyway closed the door behind you leave your key I'd rather be alone than unhappy. Question Ten The First Trans woman character in a video game made her debut in nineteen eighty, nine beat em up arcade game final fight. In this game, some female presenting characterists were originally planned to be ciswomen but were changed to quote new hats a Japanese slang term for trans. Women. After the Games release due to the suggestion that hitting woman would be considered route in America. named. This groundbreaking character who gives us something to believe in? We will give you about a minute to think about it, and then we'll be back with your answers. Some of you who have small children may have perhaps been put in the embarrassing position of being unable to do your child's arithmetic homework because of the current revolution in mathematics teaching known as the new math. So, as a public service here tonight I thought I would offer a brief lesson in the new math. Tonight, we're going to cover subtraction, but in the new approach, as you know, the important thing is to understand what you're doing rather than to get the right answer. Here's how they do it. Now, you can't take three from two to is less than three. So you look at the four in the tens place. Now that's really fourteen. So you make it three times regroup change tend to ten. To twelve and you take away three that's nine is that flair? Instead of four in the tens place, you've got three because you added one that is to say tend to the tube, but you can't take from free. So you look in the hundreds place from the three you then us one to make ten ones and you know four minus one plus ten is fourteen minus one because addition is commuted in. Thirteen tents and you take away seven and that leaves five. Well six actually. The idea is the important thing. I am heartbroken that I don't know enough about lesbians. So. Upset. Upset now I gotta read now, I have to read some literature. Engineer. Josh knows a lot of the scenes I know surprisingly engineer Josh knows a lot of these I saw his face. All right. Ready. To work together I think we're able to do it. Yeah. Okay. These are shortened versions of the questions. Question one named the All American girl who dons the poodle persona on the second season of the mask singer I'm GonNa. Let Julia take this one because she is a fan of the masks NFL domestic feel like Josh the only people we know that watch it. This is all American. Girl was the first. Sitcom to star in Asian American cast. This was Margaret. Show. I'm hit his Margaret show, but it met so much backlash because like some of the some of the writing. Kept getting changed like Margaret Margaret actually didn't like everything that was written for the show but you know she went with it and it was a lot of like. Racial like stereotypes and like you know her mom had like a high voice that you know. was very accent. Yeah, and it was just like super stereotypical and like just it wasn't a funny show either. So then there was a whole big gap in television history where there weren't any other Asian sitcoms on TV until fresh off the boat. Yeah Yup Yup great great. Recap. Gerke great historian, I love TV she. She loves TV and she's got a mind like bear traps. Question to name the one, thousand, nine. Oh, by the way I went a queer woman Halloween and they said we are watching. This movie so That, extra hint. Okay named the Nineteen ninety-six movie where the line was uttered he came to me saved me anyone need to give you this message you're in deep shit. I mean I it sounds like vaguely familiar but shoot I don't think I know Julia do you now? I'M GONNA I'M GONNA use my lifeline. Can I can help us. Set the scene it is dark in a house with lightning. ooh. Joshua's no. Is it a scary movie. Yes. Oh. Yeah. Then I don't think. I know. It starts air women. For them and the craft? Yes, IT IS A. Good Job Julia. Bonus question named the character actress who said that line. I'll just guess for the bulk. Gas. It's Sarah played by Robin. Tommy Robin Tunney. The other one you should know from the craft. Beer movie. So it's so it's not but like when I went to like this queer woman holly, we're GonNa Watch the craft, and there we watched like this this one movie from the nineteen sixties where it was about this woman who turned into a Jaguar at night. I'll. Wow why don't you kiss a man? Really funny. I was like okay. I don't understand any subtext. GimMe Pocus. Question Three. Describe what a triple double is basketball basketball. I am not good at basketball. I duNno Julia. Do you have a guess go ahead? Laura, let's talk it out. Triple. Means Three yes. Double means to. Seller. So I'm going to say who there's something called an assist right where he passed the ball to the person who is she's cores the mall, and then scores the ball. So I'm going to say. That's Three. Three. Three pointers and two assists. If she's the only person to ever done this and it's a really it's a really adds to. The first one. I one to do this Yup Guess everybody should look forward to a forthcoming episode of missing on basketball. I would like to tell you. I'm hoping that one. I don't know anything I I went to Trivia one time with. A group of gay friends and it was the NBA final. So it was NBA, themed we did not get a single question on now. One of the questions was if you arrange the roster alphabetically who comes first and last and the list and every time we just answered Vanessa Williams. Don't know 'cause. I don't. Double. So triple double. So there is you out of three of the five statistical categories, points, rebounds. Steals and blocks you get double digits in three of them. I see. Okay Yeah. That's a lie flat up. Yeah. That's a big deal. The loss sports to. Happen. question for name the full federal I deemed unconstitutional effectively unenforceable by US Windsor was signed into law under President Bill Clinton in Nineteen ninety-six. I mean the only the only thing I can remember as don't ask, don't tell but that specifically has to do with the military I. Feel. and. Then the only other one that I remember that was involved in the gay marriage to like thing was proposition eight but I think that was California only. So. Those are my only two things that I wrote down. So do you have anything Julia? What's Engineer Josh up to say, he says the defense of Marriage Act. Offensive Marriage. Good. Job Josh Sherpas. Five named the actress and activist who is the first openly transgender person to be nominated for a Primetime Emmy award in any acting category. That's laverne Cox Yup laverne Cox Indeed Pose on Netflix also headlining very great trans women actresses. That should have been nominated. agreed okay question six Gig bowl twenty twenty question elbert bathroom make out session was inspired by Hoffy discussing what autobiography of Fred Author. Julia de Remember because I remember. In. But I have not I got nothing on the last name I don't remember. I'm pretty sure. We did not get a correct. We didn't get it right? No, we've never heard this person. We did it and then. We looked around. It's like anyone at this table A. Superman and. Now. It's an her last name is Carson and Samer. But you'll remember now autobiography of red we have to we have to have to, okay question seven named the Wisconsin politician who was the first openly lgbt woman elected to the US Congress and the first woman elected to the US Congress and Senate from Wisconsin. I don't know. Do you know Joel. No I don't I'm sorry. Her name is Tammy Baldwin. Heavy old I had Tammy in my head yet wasn't sure with the last name was I live. Two or three blocks from where she used to live when she used to work here in Madison. Oh. How Nice Correction? Nice. It was pretty fun someone like me and my friend were like walking, turn me around Madison and I was like Oh that's lesbian house. What do you mean? Oh cut don't don't you. Good to now. Eight name does poet from Lesbos, who is whose name is not the root of the birth stone of those born in September. that would be Sappho and Sapphire which was the birth stone does not come from the word Sappho it's student. Thanks. Yeah. Okay question nine. Named the song, son by peppermint lip sync by peppermint and Sasha, Velour Song from nineteen ninety nine. Believe I'm going to make it anyway, pack your bags and leave and don't. You dare come running back to me bleep I'm GonNa, make it anyway close the door behind you leave your key I'd rather be alone than unhappy be alone then on have be Hold on I'll think of it because I know what am I had? Let me just sing it just everyone shut up. Let me sing it. Okay. She's like doing runs whether hands ray now everybody is quite the process. Like a spelling Bee Doo do you have a hit? I'm not right but it's okay. And that it's it's not right but it's not right but it's okay. Yes. One of my favorite that album I listened to top to bottom left to right. Out so good. on CD I would assume. Oh. Absolutely. I was playing a quick last with a group of friends and someone asked what a CD Tower was. Like I'm sorry you're too young. Yeah. We we gave Proclaims Hello Sarah question ten named the First Trans woman to be featured in the nineteen eighty-nine arcade game. Final fight who gives us something to believe in? Do, you know Josh I do not know this. Josh wrote something down trash. Poison. Poison also the band who sung the song something to believe in your nice poison. This, Josh just timing is ironic because I just started working on the LGBTQ video game archive collection at the strong National Museum of play here in Rochester New York, Adrian Shaw, academic out of Philadelphia They've been working on this project for the last couple of years, and there's a really great website that people can check out the LGBTQ Game Archive and so they're documenting all of these different characters throughout videogame history that you know people might not necessarily know about and I'm a positive that poison is in there it is one of them and I just haven't just haven't gotten there yet. That's cool. Yeah keep an eye out for that everybody. Eric. Thank you so much. This was a wonderful episode. Oh, much. So much and not just about math but just math related things that now I have even more of an appreciation of. What I'm really away from this is descartes's robot daughter I mean yes. I'M GONNA dream about it tonight. It's GonNa. It's GONNA haunt. My mind is so good. That's up there that that like historical anecdote is definitely not there with Kokoschka weird sector sex doll one, hundred percent and guy with a tiny underpants let's other. Yeah Yeah Yup James Joyce. Yeah. He loved the tiny underpants. Thank you so much Erik. You are always welcome to come on the show whenever you want to just drop in. You know give us a call on skype we'll be around. Yeah one of us is, what are we doing? And thanks everyone for listening. Thank you again Eric thanks. Thanks, Julia. Thanks Josh I'm just going to thank everybody for just being you. P. Are hard coffee. Yeah. Thank you. Hard copy. You've kept us through this fall. So. Thanks so much for listening guys. We'll catch you next time by.

United States Eric See francine descartes America Lauren Monty Hall Steve Selva Congress King West Virginia State University Chicago Schoenberg Wisconsin rene calder Al Four West Virginia Google John Quincy Adams Bob Ross
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28:43 min | 2 months ago

ENZ 091 Getting Out Of Comfort Zones & Scaling His Business with Mit Smith

"Welcome to episode ninety one. You're listening to escaping the rei own. Podcast where you'll learn the underground closely guarded secrets that will revolutionize your real estate business. This podcast is all about helping you. Exit real estate newbies l. and editor financial freedom building. Up your real estate. Thrown this is escaping the ari i knew zone podcast and now your host real estate investor entrepreneur world traveler and nationwide mentor. Chris bruce absorbed escaping. Rei nobis on. today's special. Because i know. I usually always have a special guest today through. I have a guest. That i'm a personal of friendship with as coming on and He's gonna talker bilateral stuff that's going on in the business and also come into the business as someone that has a job and you're doing this part-time he's gonna talk about will to okay He currently still has a job really work as much of. You really doesn't even need to work because mega so much money But it comes a lot of benefit. So he doesn't. He hasn't quit the job. And that's fine. And that's what i wanted to talk about today that you don't necessarily have to go out in pursue stay full time you can still make full time income without really you know getting rid of your job. And he's not only host selling he actually transition into rehab. Es two houses on the market right now is gonna make large profits. And he's been scaling up his business all right so this is going to be good episode especially for all new are coming into real estate. You look get into wholesaling of an and you still have a job you're gonna love and just talking about what it takes to get to a higher level in general okay getting out of your comfort zone. That's going to be talked about us. Episodes. let's go ahead and weigh no for bring on my friend as special guest. Mit smith everybody. welcome again to episode of escaping. Rei nobis on of gaza have a special guest of which is actually a good friend of mine who talk a lot on these very very a knowledgeable investor. He's been in the game for awhile and is going to be sharing a great content with you guys so let me go ahead and welcome on. Most people no-mess mick. But it's real name is darren. Even anybody call him. It was how you doing good man. I'm good trying to get these. Last couple rehabs got going trying to get them done so as soon as possible. Man definitely man he just came back from From a trip man. Where where'd you get to everybody. We just went to went to dubai for the first time. Man probably was the the best trip ever my life. May i will with my girlfriend. My best friend actually proposed out their girlfriends of antibody. Really good tom. Nice nice nice as great as great so those listening. That maybe not be familiar with you. Can you tell us a little story of got started in. would you doing before the state. yes so I'm i'm from philadelphia. Winter school in a in virginia virginia state university in You know just like everybody else. I just no way to get a good job. you know. Pain forty thousand a year in thinking of everything i ever wanted in life known house karner. Thanks oh i graduated actually got a good job. Will i guess secure jobs with a call for the government making a forty two thousand starting off which was pretty much better than all other friends on got the job got a little cuba jolly no on realize for the two thousand dollars wasn't enough north crazy student loan debt night a car payment credit card that everything man by the time i pay my bills man i had nothing. I couldn't really enjoy my life at all so Probably like two years later me emma. My good friend Michael a lot of people know him. We both wiscon- in the same situation. He's like man got found a way to make some passive incomes to get out of these jobs man in a we try to start a property management company. Call us with an awesome properties. We really know who done. And we just start coming across different people different things than we ran into boy. Didn't run into. We started researching a google youtube and a bunch of guys in a real estate game. We came across. you know. A lot of people don't mark in became across you. We came across the antonio amid tonio on these guys. You know they they come from you know. They come from similar situations as far as you know from urban neighborhoods whereas a lot of poverty in you know y'all got tattoos and stuff like that so he's like is this ram you know we've seen y'all you know making a lot of money talk. Educate everybody else in from their male. We batted size them from their marriages. comedy start. Networking with people will facebook for the most part in we got going from their graduate in non twenty fifteen housed with a six years later. I'm now we have houses a wholesale hotel in progress that host on host on forever For me but i'm fairly new to to rehab. I just started rehabbing. This share in learning the whole latin Now want to talk about Is okay so you got with mike. Gonna start your own company and you went also route which is you know. Bessette basically until everybody. That's the first step real estate. You guys just go. Cold turkey quit jobs. Or did you know so actually So we kept our jobs for minute are actually michael. He in that differ route. He doesn't really do too much estate anymore. he does a lotta orlando moorland market and things of that nature in the actually just quit last year. So mike Last year is his business. Got up and gone tremendously. And i of just i actually found another job in government which basically gave me a lot of leeway on basically a dual whenever they let me do a lot of whatever i wanna do. I mean like even today like a second. Do everybody think might work. But i just. I mean i don't work. I don't how. I don't want any trouble by your work much but but i mean i i just wanted to talk about the you know. Some people think and they had that question like you know. Should i stay in my job or win tonight. Leave or in in. It's hard for me to like. Tell them to do what i do. Because it's really hard. You gotta almost came. Elbow came to a point. Where you know came indispensable. I can't. it's really hard for placing right now. Because i worked somewhere. Where is a bunch of the baby. Boomer they automatically know sixty seventies they. They don't know how to even do lot of excel spreadsheet. They move really slow. And i just came to a point i came to point my boss whereas like i can do all of this stuff from home so i worked a lot from home in the give me. I can do it by the hour in. It'd make take somebody else a full working days. Though you know. If i do work. I work at home. I get it done. And i'm out doing Houses you know. I'm pouts out on appointments and things like that so i will tell you know. The average person has a job. If is stressful. If it's taken up. Tom you think you know you can nuking do better hosts eleanor. Heaven ball means mad given that job because it definitely would kill you Emma i government job and either sit behind. Cuba's swear it was killing me. But i just didn't. Have you know the income. The income was a high enough me to quit at that point. So i was just trying to figure out a way hock do both because i said i graduated with eighty thousand dollars in student loan debt and my credit my credit always says up always just want the key good credit man in bed job helped me keep my good credit in even with door rehabs lenders looking at me in a see i got a really good is actually a really high paying job now so look at that in this is this everything is working out for me with my job but like i said in stressful when it's taken about time by all means go ahead and take that jumping jump into real estate full-time but i'll living proof of that. You can do this business part time and still make six figures you you can't you can but At the beginning definitely was definitely was there was a struggle. I've got written up over ten times. A two three hour breaks looking at properties I used to live in a baltimore area and now in the dc area. So hair is just like. I mean i would probably say. Fifty percent of the workforce here works from hollow. So they makes it. It makes it a lot easier when you actually work from home on any. Don't know we all over my bag accident where you at. What you don't want are not only have the punch in cotton. Anything is kind of like you know. I just show up in found. They don't even notice from near nut. So i just got fortunate position right now. You know. do both good. So let's talk about. Let's say someone is listening right now. They're your position. Eli i work a good job. I don't necessarily wanna get rid of it. But i want to do this state. You know that you know you can really get your finances together and you know give financially free you know the real estate. So what advice would you. Would you give them to start. I would say. I was grounded out for five years. Man can just you know. When i say that i mean like you know decrease expenses as much as possible in. Its you can grab some rental properties. Now i don't have any rental properties right. Now in a best probably. Something should should've been dawn but do cash on in my. You know my job you know. They got the whole four one k. Thing in bailed in every day so they pammy Really do minimal are minimal to nothing. So i would say out. Get to a point where you've got you know virtuous citizens and things to where you making a wholesaler business more passive so if you do wanna quit right now. I can quit if i wanted to be completely fine but i feel as though is so easy and is almost like i got two incomes dumping in every month in. This is no reason for me to quit. But you know that person who's drowning our eight. billy can't be doing both in Your full focus. I was described that out. A couple years Your cash flow start. We start building a cash flow. And you've got some cash reserves to become a lot easier so you know quincy job like i say which a five bank to help you get these rental properties that you need to to help you quit janata five a lot faster. Definitely definitely and like so. I mean there's people out there that you know even i know. Has you know amid six figure business and they still work their job because they love their difference. You know in you love your career. You shouldn't just quit just because you wanna pursue some of that make you more money. I don't love my job. Don't get alligator is fine but There's people out there though that that. Listen to this debt That does love their job though. Some of them are saying well. I don't know if i have enough time. That's the most. That's probably one of the things that i get questions about. This cannot really do this part time because you see. Tv shows that you know they're fixing flow you know fixing up properties don work and stuff manual labor and so they don't think that it's possible for you to really do real estate time in awe mention so you know. I have partners on my rehab. So don't ever be. They'll ever get greedy. Are you know beat. At person's allan dove onself. I wanna share the profits artists. And the third. Like you know i have to rehab. Go right now. Both of them will be going on the market. Probably the next two weeks. And one of the rehabs. I have a season-best their is the host illinois. We found off. Found a deal. When i didn't want to hold sally so but i i didn't have all experience. I wanted to actually rehabbing myself. A lot of work extensive work and i came to this And said you got this. I don't wanna. I don't wanna sell it to you blah blah blah. He agreed to basically do everything. All i had to do is really bring the do. I bought a little a little bit capital but for the most part has been him on his his his their days on his thing. I just go see probably like once a week to make sure everything's on track but you wanna deathly partner with people. Man makes everything easier with a non five or not. It just makes your life easier You don't have to be the one time. China you know beating contractors on by material in in all these all your own money or use in lenders are harmony. Leonard you still requires everyday of acquire some kind of money for the most part and you don't have the us all yours and you have a partner to get done faster in easily takes a lot of stress off you. Everyone two percent. So let's talk about the transition as you may. This was a big move in your real estate career. How's the transition will be nervous yet. While i can tell you so really comfortable wholesaling. 'cause we really risking nothing at all. And you put your hundred dollar deposit now in some people you can put a dollar so to go from that to rehab rehab indefinitely will Will humbly for sure. 'cause you gotta be all point with budgets in in known which of spending money on also starts to. Thanks the personal life you know. Like a girlfriend when hubbard dubber. The has recently august. Now's in the middle of these rehabs. And i usually do something. Really big heartaches aware analysis hit a point where. I didn't have plenty to do that. No more so it humbles you. It just makes you think personally ahead of me into like a a better person rehab. It sounds crazy but it just it makes you also value relationships with contractors in how you speak to people. It's been crazy man on. I actually started. We hadn't because of a lot people. Chris jefferson Czar data Took a trip in march into dominican republic. And he was like. I neri having it. And i just want i mean i i didn't have s. I just was so comfortable in in my comfort zone. A host of post. I just like i was comfortable making you know. Ten twelve thousand a month hosts allen has know so you know they of gave the motivation to go ahead and start been in a in a while. One of my rehab for show will make you least like eight thousand dollars profit in. I never seen the host check. Nowhere near bet. So is definitely a scary. I had to put up. I mean had to put a lot of capital. I go from putting one hundred dollars. Amd on wholesale hosa. They'll tell you know fifty thousand mile money pretty pretty scary man. You know anything happen in in tom. House can house Can't sell or something like that. Enormous jacked up man. Yeah but allied. What you said about the day has a movie. We need to pay attention to that. Hang around. certain people was able to get you of that conference on. Say you know what i need to stretch. Stretch myself business aid. That's exactly that's exactly what it was man on like this year. I've been know meeting a lot of people. I've been friends with on facebook throughout the years. I never met him but this job in a lot. And they've been keeping me on my toes man in a you know. I did a podcast. Not long ago in was like what the class of twenty twelve There will be all just it was like a bunch of us. Wall came in at the same time. The which finally learn. And i know a lot of them. Now rehab in listen. I don't wanna be the one in the back still host sal. So they kind light. You know like my parents. Keep me motivated in facebook and san people post checks rehab and stuff so economy. You wanna take take and saying i can do. I don't know what what i'm scared of. I can do it too so definitely keep in keeping your circle with like minded people in dole. What you wanna do is is is definitely key. May i got. Give me my props. You man 'cause you definitely motivated me a lot in a lot of the guys. We've been texted route. Chat through the paseo definitely kept me. Kept me motivated in taking a leap in taking that step and really glad to hear that. Glad to hear that so many less on. Let's talk about. What would you say the best deal that you've done so far. What is kind of like you're most proud moment. Was it the first day ever did or Man that i deal will probably everybody man that i deal. It took me a. We've actually got off our llc. In december of twenty ten but that was to do property management. We didn't know about wholesaler. We learn about hose ellen about middle of twenty eleven in a medicine we probably sixty eight months to get my first deal for like three grand man. I was ready to give up so so many times. Because i had a part like i said michael michael handed a deal. He actually did. I think was actually a a lease option. Delight didn't even do a. They didn't at least option. Do with getting like one hundred and eighty dollars for the next eighteen months common in our tang. I still haven't done the dale. I was just get so frustrated. I just lie. Maybe this is not for me on so i just kept bad. It may not tell you. I got coach Been spent now maxed out about ford credit cards in the china. Learn everything on a bug causing china bob. Postcard yellow letters just to get a deal man in. That's how you did. I mean that over you. All maxed out credit cards. I did i push you know maxed out but it did educate me man so just not given that i do is they got it done so net. That it was being deals started coming man and i started i. Actually i started a virtual selling. And i started doing deals with travel. The man like a dozen people in a facebook. That i said i never met. None of these guys did fill in philadelphia bills in atlanta. Did building delaware detroit. All just bought me just by market in just finding host who knows killing the game net market in basically let them do all the groundwork night. Okay so let's talk about a two hour to give all your secrets was a bit way a for for someone to go and find you over the rice. Would you give them the other people's resources man that said you know even to this day masks way i probably did about me under twenty twenty deals alone like just all me on in the motivated seller anal buyer. Always just use other people's resources men like us so i just basically huda. I mean my strategy was you. Don't get on people's buyers people killing the game by somebody like yourself. I'll just get on. Chris bruce buyers lists i'll see with inventory Properties are located where he where he got these properties that you know he has sent me you know he sends buyers all by the property have available are see zip codes out basically just go ahead and market to those in that you had your properties in in our how grounded out out on it. Once i got a contract out contact. You already know that your market. I know you got buys there because i'm party lewis in go ahead and send you send you the properties that i got on the contract I need a buyer in basically do all the work for me so using other people's by like people want to have thousand buyers all this man to this day not. I don't even have a website for buyer got about probably like seven bars who maybe outsailed to actively market. But i'll have crazy buyers. Let's not use other people's bars for the most part in an i also use other people's markets. I said become part of their buys lists. I take date market united states. They can get mad or whatever they wanna do but pay. They don't mean at the end of the day. A good ho. They don't they. Don't look at competition they look at it as a partner. So that's exactly what i do wanna network in. Just get note defined what people don't just do it off until everybody joint venture is way to go you'll make a lot of money doing it And i love it. I do the same. And if i go to a directional market. That's probably the easiest way to go about it yet. For shown are so. What's your plans for the rest of the year man. Arapahoe plan on rodney's next to we should have them. I mean close got knows privately like another thirty days before he actually kohl's at a pie tickets to know beginning november but probably do about two or three more rehab and then i wanna go ahead and buy a apartment complex. Man i was. I was a the by rentals. That was that was kind of our. You know our things in you know. As i started learning the more i started re a our wanna do the you know the single family homes. Every couple of months is just a. This is not what i wanna do. I just think that's like a more of a nickel down. No a grind and he knows some people but you know after a certain amount in my in my business kevin. We'll go ahead and go ahead and by me. Apartment at twenty plus thirty plus apartment complex That's my plan. That's my goal. Probably of ashby redo that bob middle of next year in a you know that's going to be like my model to three. Thank my money by part. Mcalpine tremendous apartment complex. But you know a couple. I wanna i wanna know least four unisom more serious cash flow coming in. May i ne- i need cash. I gotta stop. Got that plan not too long to handle. Riddles are no passive income on me. I grind. i worked really hard in. This is almost like a are. Never all the just chill. But i want to choose a little bit now. Allows you to to do more dubai truce. Exactly exactly definitely definitely so. How can someone that gets us with you. that's listening. I'm not. I'm not a guy who has a whole off website. I have a website. But i am i paying is really terrible identity years ago when i really don't do much to it but can reach me air nephew Input your email. I do get back to. People are more probably most active facebook instagram. Not facebook is a mid smith in my instagram. This Two one five. Mit two one. Five nine drop a little educational videos every wednesday on instagram at now pm. Just giving little tips on you know different aspects of real estate in value. You could just write me a message and not do offering long. Do coaching probably like every couple months when he opens When tom permits for providence. tv show received. But i'm not. I'm not that that guy was being on. You know coaching and stuff. I i just don't have the systems in place to keep up with all that but again still reach me on facebook or instagram are perfect is not make sure that i include autos links on the blog so wherever you doing if you're listening to his while you're on the road working out or whatever Make sure come. Back to the blog escaped newbies dot com. Go ahead in archives type in mid smith and you will see others podcast. Blog at his websites will be in the show notes. One question. i guess You know towards the end of the call when air from you what you think. Let's say someone's brand new all right. The brand new. They don't know anything about real estate But they want to get their first deal done and escape that newbies Would you or would you give that person to go to their local. Their local ria inches network man. Just offer free. Services offered a put a ban saen four for free offer. Do anything any little tedious thinking. A season invested on. Wanna do in start networking from near your relationships and start to build in a you know next thing you know deals start just appeared out of nowhere all right. Great advice may glass words. Liz other i don't don't give up to not give up around yourself by people has higher network to you or smarter than you in a in. You'll be well off. You ain't got no choice but to be the next person you know to be to be the big guy curve. Perfect all right so appreciated come on the show. You have no problem anytime that is open. Enjoy this episode with a mid year. Whalen of great knowledgeable action steps that you can take a to grow your business to start a business and even to transition from one part of your business to the next level. Alright so hope you enjoyed it also gonna leave you with a nother free resource Like i usually do on every single episode all right so if you are brand new okay looking to get into wholesaling and you wanted to you know get maybe even joint venture profit deal okay doin profiting on dry venture deal worked with someone else colleague mid said he he does all right and he's done before i've done before all right which is great on a great way to start a joint venture with other investors. I'm going to actually give you a video on how you get started all right doing joint ventures. I'm going to give up resources as well with it. How to structure your joint venture all right and how to find joint venture partners so just go to the Text the word. Jv profit to the number three three four four four again. The word is jv prophet to number three three four four four. And i'll get that to you guys. Hope you enjoyed this one. Make sure you subscribe to channels. We haven't already and you guys know by quote all right. Don't live to dream. live your dream. I see guys in the next episode. Thanks for listening. To escaping the rei newbies own podcast at www dot escaped the newbies zone dot com.

Rei nobis Chris bruce Mit smith two thousand dollars Bessette eighty thousand dollars facebook virginia state university mike hubbard dubber tom Chris jefferson Czar eight thousand dollars philadelphia fifty thousand mile dubai mick darren san people post gaza
The Readjusters

Transition Virginia

1:09:31 hr | 5 months ago

The Readjusters

"How are the readjust remember today? They're not I mean they they sort of vanish. On this episode of Transition Virginia, it represents the promise and the tragedy of reconstruction. The Re adjusters with Paul Lebanon their successes thumb ways really invigorated their rival and delegate Schuyler van Valkenburgh. Your democracy is only as the as the people who participate in join us for a deep dive into a forgotten moment in history when blacks and whites formed progressive coalition in the eighteen eighties all that and so much more on this episode of Transition Virginia. All Welcome to Transition Virginia. The podcast they usually examines transition of power from Republican to. Democrat. Although today we're going to do something a little different. We're GONNA get in our time machine and go back to the eighties the eighteen eighties I'm. And I'm Thomas Bowman Today on the pod. We're going to take a break from examining the transition from Republican to Democrat and look at transition from Bourbon to readjusted. Wait Wait Thomas Thomas did you say Bourbon, yeah but calm down at today Oh. All right. All right to help us navigate through the transition from Bourbon Democrat, to the by racial and radically progressive readjusted coalition. We have an amazing panel. Paul eleven good is the former president of the Virginia Historical Society. He's currently president of the George C Marshall Foundation doctor. Levin. Good. Thank you for joining us. Thanks for having me. I'm looking forward to the conversation and we're also joined by delegates. Schuyler van Valkenburgh a Democrat from Henrico as a member of the House of delegates. He witnessed the transition of power from Republican to. Democrat but delegates. Van. Valkenburgh isn't just a garden variety politico. He's also civics teacher at Glen Allen High School and he's about to take us to school delegate Van Valkenburgh. Thank you for joining us. Thank you for having me for having the on and thank you for doing this topic. I think it's it's a really interesting Virginia history. It is a really interesting topic admittedly a bit. Quirky but let's jump right into it. One of the reasons that the struck says worth talking about thinking about is when the Democrats took power recently, there was a lot of talk about as being the most Progressive General Assembly in the history of Virginia to which I responded. Wait a second. What about the eighteen? Eighty s there was this group called the readjust yours that had. Increases. For Public Education that repealed the poll tax that increased taxes on corporations that increase funding for state asylums that had money for higher education that abolished the whipping post I mean, this is a by eighteen eighties standards extremely progressive, even radical Doctor Levin. Good. I wouldn't start by setting the scene here. So when the readjusts are formed and take power in the General Assembly in. Seventy nine give us the setting here. So this is like we're not even talking about reconstruction anymore. Reconstruction is like nine years past give us a window of what was going on in the late eighteen seventies that allowed this to happen. Well, I guess you're right to point out that reconstruction was over ended in Virginia and eighteen seventy when Virginia was readmitted to the. Union. But there was kind of this interim period questions were being determined as to who was going to be allowed to hold power. you it enfranchised the state, African American population. There were African Americans winning local offices. So the political social kind of setting was was really kind of a bit in flux. You know when you had some politicians and figures from the prewar Arrow returning and trying to get back into power and you had new voices being heard. So it was just a lot of tumble at the time and it created I think this unique situation in Virginia history where there was this. Void and the void in some ways was really filled by as you mentioned, the adjuster what comes to be called a readjust her party, and also it is important to point out that one of you know the key debate in this entire period is a financial debate. The the Commonwealth's finances are really hamstrung by the issue of prewar debt which sounds really boring except this is we're talking about more than probably half of the State's budget is being paid in interest payments. For the debt that it incurred. In. The antebellum period mainly building things like roads and railroads and canals, all sorts of internal improvements which. I'm sure. Delegates. Van. Valkenburgh, you know talks to students about sometimes in that in that pre war era that era of improvements the Virginia had invested in these things borrowed money to do it. And then of course, there most of them are destroyed by the civil war, and now they're left trying to figure out how they're going to pay this massive debt this in these interest payments and do everything else they need to do. And this question really lingers and hangs over the head of all this politics. We're going to get to the legacy later on in the podcast but delegate van. Valkenburgh. I'm GonNa sort of hinted that right now at the top of the show, which is how we think about the readjust now in the modern world, like what is their legacy? How do we think about this time period today? Yeah, that's a good question and I think there's there's two things that I think we should address when we talk about it I think. One thing we have to note is that the reason why they were even possible is kind of the structure that allowed them to come into power. In. So when you look back kind of the history of of Virginia politics, you look back at the history of Virginia Governance we we've had many constitutions you had the constitution seventeen, seventy, six constitution of eighteen, thirty, the constitution, eighteen, fifty one, and it's really only with the constitution of eighteen sixty nine which provided African Americans the right to vote which I did not have a poll tax was added. It was done by the readjusting now, but it was only within the context of that of that constitution that this moment could even rise and I think that speaks to how important it is to have a constitution that facilitates. Democratic participation whether that's in the vote or how you draw the lines. You Know Rep Tartar talks about the Great Gerrymander of eighteen thirty, which was basically baking into our constitution, the legislative power for the eastern part of the state, and what that did was give slave owners the power in Virginia all the way through until eighteen, eighteen, sixty, four in the nineteen, sixty, nine with the kind of postwar constitutions I? Think. That's one thing that's really important to know is how the fundamentals help lead to different policies in different politics, and then the second thing is it is an interesting moment is an interesting moment about what matters to people. Coming out of this, the debt was the important thing. There's this huge conversation around school debt. So the Eighteen seventy eight, the general MB passes a school appropriations bill and the Governor Vetos it. When you look back at the language of his veto and why he vetoed it is incredibly inflammatory but it's basically talking about we're GONNA pay off this debt and schools is optional thing. And then that kind of folds in that leads to Mahone the confederate general turned egalitarian who calls a conference and says, you know this conferences for anybody who wants to come in makes kind of explicit call to people from both races and out of that. You could this coalition that exists in almost you know immediately after once they're successful, the rug is kind of pulled out from under them because the debt is no longer the important thing in race kind of respect to the forefront, and so I think it speaks to. The contingency of politics as well and how coalitions will change, and you know how you guys talk about the transition from Republican to Democratic power and how maybe this General Assembly. Assembly was the most progressive in history and maybe it was. But you know what that means in two years is going to be a lot different because some of these issues have now been taken off the table or have been or maybe have been taken off the table on what does that mean for politics in two thousand and twenty, two to twenty four, right So I think. The lesson is both structural but also the kind of day today politics in what issues drive people in eighteen seventy, eight poor white folks poor black folks were incredibly concerned about schools in the debt issue didn't play. five years later. Everybody agreed that the readjusts did the right thing debt or seemingly right. They put it to bed in the issue became about race again. and. So I think those are two kind of interesting lessons. And I think what? Telling you know Michael Getting back to your question. There is how are the readjusts remembered today? We'll. They're not. I mean they they sort of vanish there this little weird interim period between reconstruction and you know the reemergence of the Democratic Party and the the you know essentially the the machine democratic politics that dominate Virginia from then you know the eighteen ninety s until the nineteen. Well apparently to the civil rights movement, and probably you could argue at least until the eighties. So it really is whether it is conscious and deliberate or not the readjust just vanish. No I mean that's that's a really interesting point. In fact, that's one of the reasons I wanted to do this podcast is because everything that we're about to talk about actually challenges the narrative that have in their head about how what happened in the eighteen hundreds you know like. I think in the popular mind it's okay. The civil war happened the confederacy was vanquished but almost immediately white supremacist to power and started you know a government and so they just sort of skip over this brief but radical period of time when black people had power and held political office and were part of a coalition that did incredibly progressive things and got rid of the tax and did criminal justice reform it had mental health reform reactor education. and. I mean there's all this. So it's really it challenges the narrative that people have in their head because it just doesn't make sense with what people think that they know about history. So doctor, Levin? Good. Let's talk about language a little bit. So I think a lot of our listeners are going to say readjusted what the heck is a readjustment and then Bourbon. Made this at the script at the top of the show made this joke about Bourbon like what explained to us the playing field in eighteen seventy nine what is a bourbon and what exactly is a rid or what do they want to readjust While the readjusting are taking their name from their attitude toward Virginia's public debt, and this notion that they thought that the debt that they were saddled with was gonNA cripple the state, make it unable to fulfill its promises about public education and all sorts of other things and so there You know there's sort of reason they're proximate reason for being is to readjust that debt to repudiate part of it to adjust the interest rate downwards. Let me ask a question about that. So the debt is huge. This is pre war debt and war dead and so what was The debate like if you want if you supported paying off the debt who were you and why what was your motivation if you did not want to support paying off the debt? Who what kind of group were you associated with them? What was the motivation they're sort of what's the debate about paying off the debt versus not paying off the debt? Yeah. I. Think over I mean maybe overly simplistically but those who wanted to the funders as they called themselves they wanted to fully fund the debt were more the business class, the affluent the the the wealthy elite. Bargains the verbs which comes from the Libor Bowl, the European royal elite of sort of idea of of what the Bourbon, not not the not the whiskey variety comes from. So that's Kinda that that class of people the readjusting as as Schuyler just mentioned, were you know this kind of coalition of poor and working class whites and blacks You know it's a some others thrown in like William Mahone who will talk about? I'm sure was a strange character in quite quite interesting. and. And so this notion that what they what they wanted to be able to do was fulfilled the promise of. All the things you mentioned, public education You know higher education, all of these things that were to benefit. A wider range of Virginians and if you're pay more than half of your your in your state budget every year paying more than half toward this interest it was you're not going to allow you to do that. So he's going to continue to benefit the the funders. You know. They really had a couple of motivation for people who wanted to pay the debt in full. You know one they kept talking about a matter of honor its honor to pay the debt, we need to fulfil our state honor. which you know it sounds good I think. But let's also face fact they were also worried that if the debt was repudiated, it would make Virginia kind of a pariah among moneyed interests who might invest in Virginia again. So there was worry that if he repudiated the debt, you drive investment away. And I think that that those two things both the honor of paying that debt in some ways and the the business ramifications we're driving, we're driving them. and I would also add in there too that you have to remember that in Virginia and in much of the south. This kind of concept that the everyday person should be able to vote or the everyday person should have access to education. Was not kind of baked into the populace the funders you know when you look back to the eighteen, seventy eight veto message governor holiday he's a, he's basically saying look we have education for the people who need it and they can go and get it. We don't need to fund education for All these folks and so it's not just. funding the debt although it certainly I think is the is the main thing but there is also just an inherent belief that everyday people shouldn't have a say in elections in don't need public education and that that that lineage goes back to the founding fathers in and the kind of folks who were arguing in this kind of classical Republican philosophy that it was the free. Holders and the people who had leisure time who could get an education and in represent the kind of common good whether that's the common good of Virginia or the common good of the United States, and of course, that's butting up against the reality of Jacksonian. America it's butting up against the reality of the reconstruction amendments and it's kind of you've got these two worlds and I. Quote from one of the one of the African. American. Men who came to the convention that Mahone called to create a new party the readjusting. And he says, you know it's this freed slave he he's from new and he says as to the debt, we don't WANNA pay a cent of it. We think we paid our share of it by our long years of servitude. You'd think it kind of that argument and you think that language of and it's it's it's it's true when it's fascinating horrifying though I have a question. How does a biracial political coalition? Actually a whole political party in Virginia, which is spires to break the wealth and power of privilege. Come to be led by a former confederate general. Yeah that's a great. That's a great question Here's where maybe a opportunity to talk about William Mahone. Who you know really becomes the figurehead of the party he he's. He as you mentioned I mean he is a A. Say. Confederate, general. He's actually involved in one of the more horrific events. perpetrated by the confederacy in eighteen, sixty, four at Petersburg if you've ever visited the battlefield and seeing the crater that was created Union Union miners. Dug under the confederate lines and blew up. try to create a gap in the line and what ended up happening was A. as. Union troops poured into that gap. They found that actually putting themselves into rather a gap really into a pit crater where they were sitting ducks and a lot of African American troops were involved in that and were singled out to be massacred by among other officers involved when Mahone. So this is a guy with a really. I mean, Bizarro back story if you were picking the leader of a biracial coalition coalition which I do think lend some credence. To the detractors who say he was really looking at this as a matter of political expediency more than anything else he had been. He'd been a Democrat he came out of the the war A. Member, what they call the Conservative Party conservative faction, which were mainly prewar Democrats and you know I think he found you know he ran for he ran for. Governor and lost and I think he found this was a different a different route to political power I. Think MOANS. Commitment to racial equality needs to be held in a great deal of question Any certainly saw this as an opportunity. Now, I don't maybe not being completely fair to him, but he you certainly have to at least. Afgha- that question and one of the interesting things about Mahone I heard this from someone a few years ago you know. Mahoney. There's never been a great biography of Mahone. and which would also lend us may be some some aid in deciding why did he do this? And the reason Friday the most prosaic reason I've ever heard he has a massive collection of papers that he left to posterity. There are Duke University, his handwriting is so bad. But the people have people have tried to go in the papers. To do a biography of that's fascinating character and they've given up because they can't deter decipher handwriting saw his motivations are lost. In some way just because the man had appalling penmanship but. But let's mind-blowing if you stop and think about it like it. had better penmanship how much more we would know about the eighteen hundreds in Virginia but I didn't mean interrupt you I think it's Fun I would have to You know what I think what's interesting is he comes about in a moment and I think we should be cynical about the reasons why he did what he did but I also think it's interesting right? You'RE A he's he's a confederate general he was in the Conservative Party. And he splits off on this readjustment issue in know there's two ways politicians can go in this moment, and one is to kind of fully embrace the eighteen, sixty nine constitution voting rights for all and to try to create a coalition and the other path. is to try to you know create amendment poll tax, which some folks did and to try to suppress the vote which you know after Mahone other white folks. Do you know they decide not to try to amend the constitution, but you have to famous laws from eighteen, eighty, four and eighteen, ninety four, which essentially disenfranchised the entire African American community by creating these local electoral board's the Democrats could control which kind of become the foundation for the bird machine. And he doesn't do that and I think if we're going to give him credit, we give them credit there, which is a in a moment where he could try to weaponize the constitution of the General Assembly as a form of suppressing the African American vote. Instead when he dies in, you go to those papers you can find a list of black pastors that he frequently corresponded with because he was engaging in interracial alliances, and so I think we should be cynical about his his reasoning. But at the end of the day, he ended up embracing a more FR in franchise any ended up. Communicating and being in touch with in in helping patronage for the black community and I think that's a it's a really interesting story because so many people in the south didn't do that. Yes. So the sky full of contradictions, confederate general who later becomes a railroad president he was president of a railroad and that's actually how he got involved in politics because he was trying to help himself financially and then decides in eighteen seventy nine to found a new political party. This is another really in my mind really bizarre part of this is the timeline how quickly all of this comes together. So Eighteen, seventy, nine, he has this convention that you mentioned. He forms the readjustment party the same year they take control the General, assembly they had fifty six seats in the House fifty, six, hundred seats they had twenty four seats in the Senate is twenty, four out of forty seats. So that's pretty decisive. Win For having formed the party that year. Eighteen seventy, nine, they take control the General, assembly eighteen, eighty, one, they elect a governor and then in eighteen eighty, two, they win six of the ten seats in Congress, House seats in the Congress. So in the course of just three years, the readjustments capture the General Assembly the governor's office both seats in the US Senate and a majority of the House seats Doctor Levin Good How did that happen? Well, yea. You catagor- you're sort of show the the the meteoric rise. Of course, there's unequally meteoric descent I. mean it it it comes and it goes very very quickly But I go back to what I said to begin with which was there was really this. Kind of strange period after Virginia's readmitted where the parties are still figuring themselves out there. There's a foothold of Republican is in especially in the western part of the state you know in the in the mountains and valley part of Virginia, you have these free blacks you have A. You have a really unsettled political situation which I think allows for that rise to come. So quickly because you don't have you know you didn't return to classic. So dual party you know vying for vying for control or single party control the way you did prewar week party went away and prewar Virginia. The Democrats essentially had almost unrivalled electoral success. So you didn't really have the reestablishment of that. There's so a lot of flux which I think is why? You know why this party kind of is able to come about and come together. So quickly and I think clearly, it was also tapping into something that was of great interest to this. Biracial coalition of people who had long been. White and black kept out of the political process that they had not been allowed to vote and they had not had say economically. And socially in. Virginia Direction. In. That would add to that that I think one of the reasons why if you look at the coalition, the coalition is South Central and southeast African Americans the African American population was at its greatest flood of free. Slaves. And it was cities where debt in public schools are a more pressing issue in it was out in the West and if you if you look at the history of Antebellum America, it's the history of the West being disenfranchised is around the eighteen forties where the western part of the state becomes kind of dominant population force but the General Assembly reflects kinda slave owners in the. East power in an the eighteenth thirty in the eighteenth fifty constitutions it's important to note that those those constitutionally Gerrymander the General Assembly to give the power to the eastern part of the state. You know the eighteen thirty constitution broke Virginia into four regions and then gave each region a certain number of delegates senators in a skewed to the east and in eighteen fifty one rewrite. the Senate skewed to the East something like twenty to thirty seats and so you got a lot of folks in the West who prior to eighteen fifty one can't vote because of the freeholder requirements. who can't get anything past even through their representation because of the skew General Assembly, and then all of a sudden eighteen, sixty nine in that constitution kinda opens up all of that right and allows more people to vote. It allows for a little bit more regional less disparity. And it speaking issues that directly relate to this kind of east west divide and WHO's paying taxes in one of those taxes four remember the western part of the state has less slave owners has lessslaves has historically not liked the slave power and I think that creates a perfect storm But of course, right the flip phlebitis, it creates a perfect storm and then as soon as has gone, it just as quickly goes away 'cause right it's gone within three years. Well. Let's take a quick break because when we come back, we want to talk about what the readjust did during their time in power delegates Schuyler Been Valkenburg, Dr Paul Good. Thank you so much. We'll be right back. And we're back on transition. Virginia we're not talking about the transition of power from Republican to Democrat. Instead, we're talking about the transition of power from Bourbon Democrat conservative Democrat to readjust this almost today unknown coalition of Bi Racial Coalition of progressive politicians that did all kinds of things. So let's examine what they actually were able to accomplish when they were in power I, read this list at the top and it's Worth repeating because it's just sort of mind blowing. If you think about this is the eighteen eighties we're talking about the increased funding for public education they repealed the poll tax they increase taxes on corporations they increased funding for state asylums they increase money for higher education. They abolished the whipping post Doctor Levin Gun talk about the whipping post and the significance of abolishing the whipping post in the eighteen eighty S. Well if you think about public spectacle of criminal punishment, especially in times of slavery, the public whipping post is perhaps the most. Striking example of the the the levers of control that white elite bridge held over everyone else, and so you can imagine if you were living in a maybe a courthouse. Town, a county seat. Very. Often there was a public whipping post which could be used. By for crimes committed by slaves brought to the courthouse square and publicly flogged Mathur's who didn't want to do it. Themselves could actually pay local sheriff to do the same thing and it was public spectacle that was meant to reinforce the power structure very very clearly to everyone You know obviously whites could be flawed to, but it was mostly mostly punishment that was meant to keep an African American population in line. So I think for the African American. Ri. adjusters. Both symbolically, and in terms of you know modernizing the processes of criminal. Justice. Abolishing the whipping post was an incredibly powerful symbol and I'm and I think probably. You know they're they're the probably their influence in the party's platform. As. Much as anything else in that kind of a movement. I'm also kind of curious about the politics here of increasing taxes on corporation increasing taxes on railroads, and then spending that money on public education and higher. Delegate van Valkenburgh is this the beginning of? Liberals. No you know what I think this reflects as kind of thinking about this podcast in thinking about what they did I they would have explicitly said this, but it strikes me that This is an embodiment of a very cohesive kind of idea of what I would call the Frederick Douglass wing of the Republican Party at the time, which is the government being used in order to create kind of inequality of opportunity you. You can just see with the emphasis on education in. Wouldn't have called a K. twelve at the time. Right but K. twelve education a higher ran decrease in Virginia State University. It's all founded on a sense of equality is the first mental silence for African, Americans as well in you know once again, you go back to anti-american you look at the taxation in Virginia and one of the big complaints of folks in the western part of the state was that poor people were being taxed in slave owners weren't and I think what you're seeing is you're seeing a foundation of equality of opportunity of using the government to try to uplift all people and I'll go back to the kind of education speeches they gave If people I'm not GonNa read on. But if people go back and look at the eighteen, seventy, eight veto of governor holiday and then they go back and look at Forgetting the governor's name, the the readjusted Governor Han, Cameron Cameron. You go back and read his statement about the value of public education just in the space of like a year the difference in philosophy behind the to the two. Speeches I mean it's stunning and so I. I don't know the beginning of Texas than liberal but I do think it's the beginning of the idea that the government can be used as a force of good to create a kind of a quality of opportunity, which is, of course, a thread that you see in that certain segment of the Republican Party in the civil war and afterwards which you see in FDR, right which you see in Lyndon Johnson, the Great Society in which I think you could argue see in Virginia Democrats today. So you know I don't think it's a perfect comparison, but I do think you can see lineage. No let me I don't want to jump in with thin with a bit of cynicism here but let's also remember that someone like Mahone loses control of his railroad to outside interests I mean his railroad end up being held by receivership of people in Philadelphia and elsewhere, and so taxing outside companies making money in. Virginia. Is a real a popular thing to be able to propose. So you know you're you're. In some ways you're also That's the kind of something you see in modern politics as well. It's you know this this notion of well. Those who are getting those who are making money off of doing in Virginia or doing business wherever should also pay some price for the things we WanNa, do in Virginia. Info. Virginia's people. That's that's true and also note to that. If you actually look at their tax plan, taxes went down for the average Virginia taxpayer. So they decrease taxes on farmers, the decrease taxes on small businesses in increase taxes on the railroads. In in you know. So what happened is they raised substantially more revenue, but they actually brought down the tax bill for the average Virginian in those series of proposals which I think ties back to that senator or not I think probably both one method explicitly that they use to restore. Virginia's economic base was rebuilding infrastructure or at least that's what they campaigned on Doctor Levin. Good. What did they rebuild when they came to power? Their more notable developments readjust are credited with our things like education I don't I. Don't know that in their brief period, you can attribute an enormous amount of. You know infrastructure improvement and really where where things like railroads common make significant progress in Virginia comes because you do have so much out of state and foreign investment in railroads that penetrate the coalfields in South West Virginia, and so on. In in in that kind of late nineteenth early twentieth. Century period. I WanNa talk about the racial part of the story which is complicated and nuanced. So you had African American members of the General Assembly forming a COA who are mainly Republicans forming a coalition with this readjusting African American readjust as well, and so I mean, just UN's face the coalition itself was Biracial, but it's worth pointing out for the modern listener that they were not in favor of desegregating anything right so To, Doctor Levin good talk about this nuanced from our perspective. It's nuance racial element to this where they're a biracial coalition that actually was not for integration. I I. Don't. I. Don't know on the on the African American side, what the what the feeling was along these regards but only for white readjustments, this was you know black public schools in white public schools. blacking I mean Virginia. You mentioned Virginia State is founded. That's very deliberately at a normal school, a school to create black teachers who can teach in black school So this is not a moment of. You know coming together racially it's I. think it is more a recognition that there are shared interests of the poor and working classes of both races that need to be met that need to be satisfied, and now it was not an turning of that of that order of the races and remember you know this is not an enlightened period racially outside of Virginia I mean this is. Sometimes, it's easy easy to forget that the civil war. Did Not Create you know an instant sort of racial utopia anywhere in the United States it it settled the question of slavery, but it did not settle the question of equality even with the reconstruction acts clearly. So that's you know it it probably is not shouldn't surprise us that someone like William Mahone who was a slave owner before this war fight for the confederacy does not then become the figurehead of a party that is looking to overturn the racial order but is reflecting the reality that there is a block of black political power now and pent-up black desire for. Various services to be rendered by the government that needs to be acknowledged needs to be met, and it is a wing of this coalition who has the power in political clout to demand this of their white partners. and. Also one thing to add their to to kind of even nuances even more. If you look at Mahone himself, he campaigned against the only black Republican running for Congress in Virginia during this time period, and so there was kind of and we'll talk about this when we get to the downfall among the white readjusts tres, how far they were willing. To go it is very limited I think you even arguably at the time, but definitely by modern day comparisons and so I think that's important to note as well. Another aspect of this is that it is by many accounts the first political machine in Virginia which I know probably people have various perspectives on whether or not. It was machine Doctor Levin. Good. Mahone lead a political machine perhaps even you could say Virginia's first political machine. Well Certainly Mahone, recognized. the power of patronage and recognize that there's an awful lot of ground to be made as the leader of this party in the political patrons that he can go out of that leader. I mean I I guess I mean I mean. One, man's machine is another man's. System right I I. I don't know whether I would describe the readjustment machine. As the first machine in Virginia politics certainly, political patronage played a part in. Virginia politics going back to the colonial period. I it. It's doling out favours going out positions and sinecures has always gone on I think Mahone might have been a little more blatant about it. In some ways you know Mahone is in some ways he's a classic newsouth figure in that. If you if you study that period, you know he's a guy certainly on the come I mean he's all about. He's all about money. He's all about. Showing his own money and showing his power. He's not he's not doing it. Subtly you nothing there's nothing really subtle about him. So maybe in some ways, it's the first sort of evident machine or the first machine that doesn't try to in any way math what it's doing and as a precursor to the the Democratic Machine of of the twentieth century. So I guess in a way, it's the first machine, but I wouldn't. I wouldn't push that too far because it's kind of a the logical evolution I think of what of what had taken place but I would say that I don't I don't think it is because I think when you talk about political machines, people talk about entrenching their own power and while he did engage in behaviors that we would associate with a machine you know patronage in correspondence and all these other things did they're out of power so quickly, I actually think if you WanNa talk about the first machine, it's actually his railroad rival. John Barbara who who, kind of helps defeat the readjusting and creates the the kind of modern day. Well, the re constance, the Democratic Party and creates the machine that will lead to the bird machine. Barber campaign managers guy named Thomas Staples Martin who created the Martin machine that of course was by any standards. But you know just because they only held power for a brief period of time doesn't mean it wasn't a machine. It just wasn't a very successful machine at having longevity and part of that. Is something that starts leading toward their downfall, which is there central organizing principle? Was this thing about the debt where they're in disagreement with the other party because the party wants to pay off the debt at the expense of public education and so they campaign on readjusting the debt and not paying it off at the expense of public education? Well, guess what the other party says you don't let your right we shouldn't do that doctor. Levin. Good. The other side essentially folds says you're right right And and they do repudiate the debt by about a third. They reduced the interest rate by half. So they really do succeed in this and I think the Democrats. or their their opponents I think once this passes I think then the pretense of well, this is about honor and all this kind of stuff kind of can fade away and they recognize that this is actually freed whoever follows the readjusts free them up to. Do. A number of different things that they wouldn't have been able to do if they've been fully funding that debt, the way they had claimed they wanted to So yeah, I mean th they managed they managed to do it and I, think it's one of those things ca you know be careful what you what you wish for because I think they did create an environment for themselves where their reason for existing started to wane a little bit I mean when you're sort of almost a one issue for one primary issue party and that issue goes away to a degree then you know it is it is. Probably the best thing for your for your future success. If you can't redefine yourself, it's funny. The mention that because I'm thinking about the Brexit Party. So once brexit happens what uses the BREXIT party anymore. Yeah and one thing that's fascinating I did want to make sure that your listeners ended up realizing too is there's a little funny side piece of the debt, which is when all of this debt is incurred Virginia before the war included West Virginia the West Virginia breaks away during the course of the civil war and there's a long and contentious fight between Virginia and West Virginia as to what portion of that debt West Virginia should. Really. Be Responsible for because were railroads and canals West Virginia that were funded by this and so it actually I don't think it's till Nineteen fifteen or something that it's finally established what dollar amount West Virginia owes toward retiring this debt, which is just kind of a little side note that I thought. It just fascinated me at the time to think that you know they had to take it to the Supreme Court to finally figure this all out. So, delegate Van Valkenburgh, can you put all of these reforms in the context of what's happening nationally and the reason I asked that is because now just like then Virginia's politics often parallels national politics and a lot of ways. So what's going on during this time? Well I mean you're seeing the end of reconstruction you see the north, the northern population losing its will to. Its involvement in the south you see. An economic panic in the mid eighteen seventies that causes kind of a change in priorities. So you're seeing the Republican, party, that goes from the Party of Lincoln, kind of into the party of big business, and so the south is slowly getting its autonomy back in you're getting Kinda slow drip drip that will lead to Jim. Crow, and we were talking at the very beginning of this about how people just kind of think it's it's the civil war reconstruction Jeff. KROGH. But there's really this kind of drawn out period that's occurring. Where there are these kind of possibilities that pop up around a moment like the readjusts tres but as as it starts to settle down, you start to move into the. Start to the gilded age where big business the thing in in the south you start to slowly settle into Jim Crow. That's thirty year kind of evolution into Jim Crow if you look at Virginia specifically wants the readjusting our out. You know you start to slowly get the electoral law change stat disenfranchises African Americans, which you know the machine uses for about twenty years until they don't it's enough in the nineteen o two constitution where they kind of explicit goal is disenfranchise African Americans but you're actually disenfranchises almost everybody and so you know, I think Virginia, in many ways, it's Kinda story. We've been telling us this brief moment of hope where maybe something can happen in I. Think in Virginia happens a little bit more than another southern. States but as the realities of national politics, kind of moves away from the south, you know it's not about the southern issues anymore it's about big businesses of global trade. It's about immigration in the northeast in the late eighteen hundreds, the south is really allowed to kind of become its own place and there's a lot of you know you can look through the history you know the solid sow one party south south is different from the rest of the country and it's in this time period around the adjusters in Virginia after the adjusters where we really start to see that on truly happen and if I could add. Nationally. This is really. The between the end of reconstruction and the First Years of the twentieth century. This is really an incredibly. Tumultuous moment you know the the readjustment movement in Virginia is one example of poor people coming together the same happens in the Midwest. The People's Party the populist movement is a you know it's a farmer's movement thing. You know we're we're done being the pawns of big interest. We're going to stand up for the Yeoman farmer and there's actually some of that in the south is well and you've got labor unrest all across the country as working people say you know we're not going to sit there and just be dominated by management by big business. So there's It's in some ways the readjust your movement with his. On you know the poor and working classes. Is. A part of broad or moment that I think finally by the end of the nineteenth early twentieth century Kinda gets quashed down overall and you do move into what scholars mentioning sort of you know the hegemony of big business and the the sort of linkage of big business and government in a sort of a fairly tight way that really does make it difficult for popular movements to rise up like this again. But there is that period of a couple of decades where there seems to be. Maybe, something else that's going to the possible and I'd also eh to that the Virginia trajectory of disenfranchising African Americans disenfranchising poorer voters has a broader is a broader American narrative I'll go back to Frederick Douglass had this speech in the kind of reconstruction and post reconstruction world that he would give frequently called are on our composite nationality. And he was talking about. The words. He would use the things he was talking about sound a lot like what John Lewis was talking about right. You know who's in the news you know and the kind of message he had about a multiracial democracy of equality. And a positive nationality speech is it is kind of one of out of pessimism because what he's seeing as African Americans be disenfranchised in the south, but he's also seeing Asian Americans disenfranchised in the West in the speech talks about that, and if you look at the the late eighteen hundreds, you've got white southerners who are disenfranchising African American and doing it to a degree that's different everywhere else I wanna make sure we make that distinction but then you also have. In the West, you northeasterners who who are making claims magazines like the Atlantic to limit the vote against the immigrant population has they're not suitable to it. You the Mug won't reformers the government reformer who are. Are really restriction area on these issues, and so it's it is there is a broader kind of moment here happening at the end of the eighteen hundreds in some of our I truly restriction airy voting laws calm during this period where you see these kind of arbitrary voter registration laws where you see these arbitrary electoral board's and how they act. You know I'm from New, York originally, and you WanNa talk about a state that had awful laws in the late eighteen hundreds in some ways does still today go to New York where they put in place these absolutely disenfranchising laws to ensure that Catholics and Jews and eastern Europeans couldn't vote. Let's go and take a break. We are talking with Dr Paul Levin Good. The former president of the Virginia Historical Society and current president of the George C Marshall Foundation, and also our friend delegates. Schuyler van Valkenburgh from Henrico. And we're back on Transition Virginia Brunell going to talk about the fall of the readjustment. So this is a group that we talked about earlier had a meteoric rise to power eighteen, seventy nine. The party is founded in the early part of the year. By the election in November, they were able to gain a majority in both house of delegates and the Senate. They had fifty six out of the one hundred seats mouse twenty, four out of the forty seats and the Senate and the next election cycle and eighty one they kept the general assembly and elected their own Governor Governor Cameron, and then the. Next year and the congressional election they had six out of the ten house seats meanwhile, the General Assembly of course, at this time is picking the US senators. So they pick Mahone who went to the Senate and ran the political machine from his US Senate office and they also picked the other US senator. So they had both seeds of the US Senate. They had six out of ten house of representative seats. They had the house ability. They had the state Senate, they had the governor's office when that's all within three years and then it all falls apart doctor Levin. Good. What happens to the readjustments? It's a really good question. Michael I mean I think we've touched on a little bit of this before in that. I think they certainly achieved some of their goals and I don't know that they had. They had great vision for what the what was going to be next but I think they also their successes in some ways. Really invigorated their rivals, you know I think we were talking a little earlier scholar was talking about the. The constitution and looking at what the Constitution's tell us about certainly those who hold the levers of power and if you look at the kid, the next constitution of Virginia, which is one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, one. It is it in some ways almost reaction point by point to the adjusters in their there. And I think what? What really ends up happening is. As? We just talked about a little bit before the break. White Southerners get better at. Figuring out how the new landscape can be controlled to their advantage how the limits of federal intervention in state of matter, such as this, the degree to which local control can be reassumed. You know that that period that we had that we had talked about the kind of whatever you WANNA, call it between reconstruction and the. Solidifying of the of. White control over a place like Virginia you know comes it comes to an end. Not Evenly. But it comes to an end really in that time. As much as anything else because I think white southerners figure out knowing nothing's going to happen to us if we reassert this. Whether it's the the bargain that ends reconstruction whether it's you know the clear weariness of a national Republicans to deal with you know. How how much energy do they have to keep up with the energy of of of certainly what motivated reconstruction, which is to allow for African American voting and other rights, and I think that once they realize but they were not going to be there was not going to be interference long they became increasingly bold and aggressive about reverse course on this and you know in Virginia it it it doesn't Virginia's way is not to be quite as as in your face about it as some other southern states You know you're not just driving blocks away from the polls through you know night night riding and guys in hoods running around, but it takes effect. You know in some of the same in some, the effects are somewhat similar in that it does eventually reassert itself. When you see that you know African Americans working in cities in you know tobacco companies enrichment well suddenly when those tobacco company owners and management can reassert themselves and say you know. We really think this is how things need to be, and we really think if you're going exercise. your franchise. You may not have a place to work here. That's a form of control that begins to take place, and eventually it moves to disenfranchisement within a couple of years. So I think it's just that you know it's it's that moment there was this flash of a great deal of promise and then the. The wielders of power before realize that they can regain power and there's probably not to be consequences for their action and you know we've noted before too. But I mean the issue that brought them together with settled. After that was settled, it allowed the other party to play to racial fears and you know it's it's it's a sad continuing through history that we can see even up to today with some of the ads in the presidential race around urban protests. But you know one of the big moments in that eight hundred eighty-three campaign where the readjusts lose the general. Assembly. Is there an animal? Over a perceived a slight from African Americans to white people that were walking by them in the street, you know some of these kinds of cultural racial. Codes that were informal that white people and black people followed equal and and so that fight led to a huge amount of propaganda that allowed the opposition to win. You know was one of the reasons that the opposition was able to win the election and and you see that playbook and George Wallace you see that play book in Richard Nixon and you see that playbook right now and so when racial issues were able to rise to the four kind of white conservatives were able to re assert power and I would know one thing about that nineteen o two Constitution nineteen, no one of two constitution. Is the members that convention explicitly said, it was about rolling back racial voting rights. They had passed a series of laws in the late eighteen hundreds that allowed them to disenfranchise voters, but they had to do it in a corrupt way. You know they had to rig the ballot box they had to. Throw out legitimate ballots and so when they came to that convention carver glass who becomes a future? Senator. Says Explicitly The convention will inevitably cut from the existing electorate four-fifths of the Negro voters and that was the purpose of the convention. That's a direct quote. And End, they actually cut greater than fifty percent of the white electorate in greater than ninety percent of the black electorate in we became the state with the lowest proportion of adult voters to the early twentieth century to the point where a famous political scientists said that by contrast Mississippi as a hotbed of democracy. Yet I'm glad you mentioned Danville because gamble wed. it's almost it almost created itself as an opportunity for white supremacist to come back and say, this is what happens right the Danville actually, Alexa Majorities Majority City Council is black in eighteen, eighty three, and so this incident, some call it a riot, some just called it a math. Was it was the details are not are not entirely clear, but it was it was custom made to show to white people say look what happens look what happens when African Americans take control of the city this is how white people get treated. And so they they they used it sort of shamelessly in that regard. And this was an era of yellow journalism as well. Right and beard on an environment where you have the Democrats retaking control nationally was that was at grover Cleveland who comes back into power And and so one point that people make who say that Mahone was just a powerbroker in his own right I guess is that he started flipping patronage to Democrats and does that what kind of consequences does that have for? The readjust your party in Virginia. You know I actually I. think There's an interesting point here, which is once grover Cleveland becomes president that Senator Mahone. No longer has the kind of patronage to Dole out the way he used to right so. The change in the national scene actually sort of was one of the things that sort of lead to the demise right and sort of the patronage and the way that they were able to distribute power. And Mahone I mean from the moment you get to the Senate he's very cagey about who's going to caucus with I mean. He's certainly not rigidly adhering to some code of behavior. He's he's looking to see which way the wind blows in a sense, and so it shouldn't be it shouldn't be surprising. Realize Mahone is. In some sense almost a lame duck senator because the readjusted party is falling from power and he's still senator to wet eighteen, eighty, nine, I think So yeah. So the Party is essentially falls apart underneath him and he's he's still serving. So he kinda has to figure out what do I do next I'm not I'm not sure he was overly troubled by in some ways, but he did have to figure out how do i. kind of land this now that my party is basically gone. That's a good point because after he's no longer in the Senate, he runs for governor right in is unsuccessful. So I mean the whole thing kind of falls apart, which leads us to important question, which is what is the legacy of not just home, but the larger readjust her movement. One thing that I think could be significant and worth mentioning is this biracial coalition, which is kind of singular in the United States and the south right Doctor Levin good like what's the significance of this biracial coalition that they put together nineteen eighties? Yeah I mean it's I pointed earlier too. There's a moment when the People's Party, the populists might have done something I mean in. North Carolina and and a little bit in. Georgia. But yeah, you're right in that. It's the only truly successful coalition. Coalition of blacks and whites in the pre civil rights era So I think the legacy of it in that way although it's perhaps not as remembered as it might be it is one of those counterpoint to this notion that somehow. African Americans and whites couldn't work together politically and so I think it does belive that it does be live that myth it obviously has some real lasting legacy in I think the strength of the public. School. movement in Virginia certainly never goes back direction of some of the readjusted enemies would've would have had it had the readjusting not come on the scene so I think that becomes kind of enshrined in Virginia public life and in electoral politics obviously things like State University funding whether it's Virginia State or the expansion of Virginia. Tech. There's some real lasting thing was there. Even. If some of the other things, the poll tax that they remove gets reinstated I mean there are things that don't go away and I think you know in some ways when we look back on it now it's heartening in a way it kind of gives you some psychic income to realize that. There was a point in history where black and white Virginians came together especially those of of certain economic status and said, enough we're GONNA start our power and there's some real. There's some real value in remembering that and it's something that we really ought to. Remember and talk more about and no more about. Yeah and I think it's it represents the promise and the tragedy of reconstruction and how for as far as reconstruction in those amendments win. They didn't go far enough and I think it speaks is speaks to a gun. I'm going to go back to John Lewis kind of what he wrote in his op Ed in the New York Times that was published on the day of his of his funeral, his last words if you will, and he talks about democracy being an action. In democracy being continuous movement, you can't give. And I think they they kind of speak to the sense in which the vote is never enshrines it could he he says can always be taken away in what we see as we see a brief moment where they're able to come together able to get things accomplished some of which I agree the education piece is long lasting some of which isn't, but it speaks to the fact that if you don't continue to cultivate a healthy democracy, you will not get a healthy democracy thirty years after the readjusts their forgotten their buried A convention explicitly meant to a race them and the possibility of them from Virginia. and. And then you know you have the legacy after that of Jim Crow in the bird machine and so I think it speaks to the promise, but it also speaks to the tenuousness of of people being able to participate in continue to participate successfully in democracy. Delegate van Valkenburgh. What lessons learned are there for you as a member of the General Assembly that other members could take from this era of history. Not sure that there's a lot of lessons policy wise from what they do I. I, I think. I think the lesson is ultimately, you can't take anything for granted. You have to continue to shape a coalition. You have to continue to shake things relevance to people's lives. You have to continue to argue for why a multi-racial coalition is necessary. You have to continue to Kinda stand against racial division. Some of their tax policy in some of their school policies are things that I think in Virginia. We can take a lesson from to this day properly funding schools. You know reason I originally ran. I would argue we don't do that and I think that the lessons of how they got to that make a whole lot of sense but I do think the bigger lesson is the equality and democracy peace and I think it's important to recognize that There's never an endpoint it's never over you've never achieved your goal because democracy there's always tomorrow. Now. Recently, in the Capitol building in Richmond, The statue of Robert e Lee was removed from the old house. This is instantly the same house chamber that the readjustment once ruled and delegate Valkenberg tweeted about this about this particular statue and he said many of these statues like that statue of rubber used to be in the old house chamber gifts from other Southern States has recently the nineteen fifties then tweeted let's celebrate the readjust instead. What did you mean by that and how do you think the justice should be celebrated? Yeah, look I mean there's a difference between history and memory right? We want to study history warts and all because we need to know where we were to know where we're going. Never GonNa Change. But what we memorialize and what we hold up to be true I think should be shaped by what we think is important now and you have tour groups that go into that old house building for decades. All they see is a shrine to the loss caused you go in and you look to your left in there's a bust of Alexander Stevens, a Georgian who was the president of confederacy that was gifted to us in nineteen fifty two you look to your right you saw busted Jefferson Davis, and this is sippy man who was the president of the confederacy that was gifted to us from Mississippi state legislature in nineteen fifty three. and. I don't think that that rep you know we need to know that history we need to know that that. That the capital was used for the confederacy and we need to know the that we had a convention at asked us to see from the Union and we did. that. We had former presidents in that convention weeping when we seated tears of joy, we need to know that history, but we need to celebrate the moments where we reached our finest moments right where we lived up to our values lived up to our democracy in Virginia I cannot think of a better moment there's others but I can't think of a better one. Than the readjust there's a kind of what they stood for because they weren't perfect. They don't live up to twenty twenty values Mahone a great example of that. I do think they transcended their moment to live up to a constitutional values in a way that has been very rare in Virginia history and I think that's worth teaching fourth graders. Doctor Levin Good. Any final thoughts about the legacy of this group that's now almost completely forgotten. Yeah I really like what scholars just had to say I'm trying to think how you how you might physically memorial is that I don't know that you want to put up a statue of Mahone Other wouldn't take up much space. He was a very small guys get along lifestyle catch. Yes. Just doesn't aside I love the comment his his wife had when she heard during the civil war that he had received a flesh wounded battle and she said something like well now I know it must be very serious because William doesn't have much flesh to begin with which I thought was a great. Great great comet. He's. He's really a small cadaverous dude. Yeah you know I I i. mean. It's it's hard to say how you How you might spread this legacy a little more widely. you know obviously. In the Sol's is one is one manner that and I'm speaking to an educator here. You know that's one way we kind of. You know we we can say what we value as a as a state is what we decide. We WanNA enshrine in the standards for all their warts and everything. The standards of learning are at least one way to express that as as a society and I think that that's you know that's one way to do it and to continue like this to talk about them and to make sure that you know where when we have opportunities, we bring up this subject and we let people know a little bit more about it and I. Hope this podcast at least take some. Tiny step toward raising. Public awareness about a really interesting and significant. Brief period in the Commonwealth history although I must step in one last thing to say is I. Think when we talk about statues, we typically talk about very important people right. So we're talking about should we have a statue? I'll leave you with this. I think we should do more memorializing everyday people whether it's the Black Union soldiers or it's the average citizen who you know. Let's get that African American guy from new who was at the convention stood up and said you know what I'm more of a readjusted than half the you because I'm I'm all in on this because it's the citizen like that who leads to the readjustment movement. And and it's also when you're citizen in, you go to the citizens capital, you should understand your role. So this is maybe my call that we should. We should recognize the citizenry more than we do because you're democracy is only as healthy as the people who participate in. That is good of a place as any to leave it Dr Paul Levin. Good delegates Schuyler van Valkenburgh. Thank you so much for being on our podcast today and thank you for listening to Transition Virginia find us on spotify apple podcasts. Or. Anywhere. You like to get your podcast. We're on twitter at transition va, and as always you can hear more at Transition Virginia Dot Com.

Virginia William Mahone Doctor Levin General Assembly Public Education Van Valkenburgh Schuyler van Valkenburgh Virginia Historical Society United States president US Senate Conservative Party Democratic Party Bourbon Virginia State University Virginia
Judge Damon Keith with Peter J. Hammer (Ep. 34, 2019)

In Black America

29:43 min | 1 year ago

Judge Damon Keith with Peter J. Hammer (Ep. 34, 2019)

"Streaming K. U.. T. is always great but you can make the experience even better with our brand new mobile APP. You get one click access to news from K. U._T.. Texas Standard and N._P._R.. On Your iphone or Android smartphone plus news alerts and your favorite K. U._T.. podcast download the all new K. U._T.. APP from the apple or Google play stores today and now enjoy the program the following programs the Chibuta Federal Judge Damon J. Key of the U._S. Court of Appeals for the six circuit. Judge Keith died April twenty two thousand nineteen at the age of ninety six it from the University of Texas at Austin K. U._T.. Radio this is in black America in what you're seeing is the importance throughout this period of of these kind of segregated support systems and he starts as a young lawyer <hes> and then he gets what would be viewed as a promotion being able to get a steady paycheck right <hes> at the Friends of the court and I and doing that work inside the judicial system and again uncle Fred the same farm down in in Virginia that kind of of helps them think through what do you really want to do with your life. <hes> and this is why you went to law school and is this what <hes> what motivated motivated you <hes> and he takes very big risk of giving up that sort of very steady job and the friend of the court to really follow his dreams and beyond this path I start <hes> not at that period of time but ultimately to to to found and run one of the most successful black-owned law firms in the country and then as says is career evolves arrest is history Peter J Hammer professor of law and Wayne State University Law School Director of the Damon J Keith Center for Civil Rights and Co the author of Crusader for Justice Federal Judge James J Keith published by Wayne State University Press Nineteen Sixty seven the Alamo Damon j Keith was appointed to the federal bench and and serve the judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the six circuit since one thousand nine hundred seventy seven we has been an eloquent defender of civil and constitutional rights and a vigorous enforcer of civil rights law grandson of slave kief rose from Janjic mark for even considering becoming a lawyer to legal legal giant who have changed some of the very laws and conditions that locked African American men like himself into menial labor yet despite his own rise or perhaps because of it he holds in high esteem the men and women who some time thanked his labor open doors for him and others. I'm Johnny Oh Hanson Junior and welcome to another edition of in Black America on this week's program Crusader for Justice Photo Judge Damon J Keith Co author Peter J Hammer and Black America shortly after being on the bench where he takes on sort of segregation and housing and what he was terming Negro removal and Hamtramck <hes> declaring that to be unlawful taking on school of Segregation and the the very first northern school district in Pontiac Michigan to be declared violated the constitution with intentional discrimination and ordering remedies they're taking on private discrimination and stamps versus Detroit Edison and ordering one of the largest <hes> damage awards of in history and and a very aggressive remedy to make sure that people who had been denied jobs get an opportunity to go and get jobs taking on a affirmative action in the police department and Baker and <hes> a upholding <hes> the constitutionality of affirmative action when there'd been a long history of intentional discrimination and vindicating Coleman Young's efforts to aggressively integrate the Detroit Police Department right <hes> and then if you switch over from MHM civil rights to civil liberties you get practice most famous case which is even called the Keith Case J. Hammer for nearly fifty years federal judge Damon j Keith has persuasively and movingly defended the constitution helping community and enforce their civil rights. He has spoken troop power from the bench prohibiting President Nixon and the federal government from engaging warrantless wiretapping and the Bush administration from conducting post nine eleven deportation hearings and secret just keeps the session has desegregate desegregate public schools broken lines at corporation that require municipalities to repair the damage caused by systematic racism morning Detroit Michigan Nineteen twenty two. He earned a be a degree in one thousand nine hundred forty three from West Virginia the State College his law degree in nineteen forty nine from Howard University law school and a masters of law from Wayne State University Law School. Judge Keith served as a judge on the U._S.. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit Says Nineteen Seventy Seven Evan prior to join the Court of Appeal Judge keeps served on the U._S. District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan. He was appointed to that court in one thousand nine hundred sixty seven by president Lyndon Johnson also he served on the Michigan Civil Rights Commission and as a member the U._S. Army in his book Crusader for Justice co-authored. Peter J Hammer reveals just keep passionate for justice and formed his career. The real honor of Directing Dame Ajay key center for civil rights and one of our missions is really to make sure that people understand the wonderful life and legacy of of Judge Keith so it was very important for the center this biography be undertaken and that his story be shared too wide audience as possible. This is written for general audience. This is not a lot text. This is a story about a human being anybody from high school to to senior citizenship status is GonNa GonNa love the Narrative GonNa love the story. Damon was born on the fourth of July which is odd in itself tells about his early Childhood Yeah and takes pride in that because everybody knows that the promise of the Declaration of Independence that all men were created equal rang Khawla when it was I made <hes> and in many respects <hes> his entire life in career has been built <hes> to making that a meaningful promise but he grew up like many people to parents who came to Detroit through the Great Migration <hes> his father came here older than most migrants at the age of forty <hes> and was working for that mythical five dollar wage in the Ford factories the Ford Foundries <hes> and David grew up in northwest Detroit <hes> went to a partially integrated but only partially integrated <hes> North Western high school <hes> when off to <hes> West Virginia State College and in in <hes> three months in the summer of nineteen forty three <hes> had three amazing tragedies one was the victory of of actually graduating from college and his father was able to see it but within weeks of them coming home his father passed away <hes> who was the most important I in his life <hes> and then the riots of nineteen forty-three interrupted <hes> and then he was off to serve in a segregated army. Why was it important for you all to begin the narrative with him studying for the law exam working? Looking at Detroit News building as a janitor yeah 'cause it just just reinforces the challenges that he faced <hes>. Here's a man who's college graduate serve proudly his country and World War Two <hes> is a graduate graduate of of of Howard law school which is really the the west point of of civil rights of white person coming back with those credentials would not be working as a janitor to study for the Bar <hes> and it just reinforces the tremendous of obstacles obstacles <hes> that we're in his way that he had to overcome <hes> as well as making the story <hes> one. That's accessible that everybody you know whether you're a famous jurist or not everybody has suffered setbacks and starting in that way was also a way to try to connect act with <hes> readers from all sorts of backgrounds <hes> and really understanding what it means to to deal with set back in frustration and <hes> systems that are unjust and unfair until about some of the experiences that he had why he was attending high school yeah. No it was an interesting point in time in Detroit history so it was allegedly an integrated high school so there were black students and white students at northwestern but many of the activities were not integrated right so he could run track Iraq and he was a a tremendous athlete but he couldn't play football right <hes> they could perform some clubs. They couldn't join others right. They couldn't go to the prop so you have all of this sort of a racial segregation built into it and and despite the fact that most people think that doesn't happen in the north that was intrinsic in Detroit and and many many other <hes> northern cities tell us about his other siblings yeah big family his <hes> of of father came up all by himself <hes> worked here to establish himself <hes> sent back <hes> for his wife Anne and for their five children and <hes> Damon was the only one who was born in Detroit right so <hes> and the only one that graduated it from college and that was critical to his father <hes> that he said he doesn't want him to work in the factory like he did wanted him to have a bright future wanted him to go to college <hes> and in a very kind of of touching seen very early on in the book Damon's life <hes> his father was tremendously. Ill and his father says he made a promise to God that if he could let him survive <hes> to see daymond graduate from college that's all he wanted in his life. <hes> and that's what makes those events in nineteen forty three just just even so much more poignant and tragic because he got kept his promise <hes> his father's graduate <hes> but he didn't survive the summer right Judge Kief attended West Virginia State University and that was the first time here never been out of the city of Detroit lucky for him. His aunt was married to the president of the college his cousin I keep making that mistaken and nobody sharper than the judge even today at ninety three years young <hes> <hes> and <hes> we were doing through proofs found two instances where I said onto not cousin so it was so it was his cousin but that shows you and this is something I try to stress with students. Today that are in highschool judge key succeeded because of a segregated power structure and the importance of extended family right and nobody succeed on their own <hes> and sadly. I often say that the kids growing up in Detroit have a hard time the judge Keith did because you don't have those <hes> those same networks works established but you know he wanted to go to college. If other WANNA go to college but they didn't have the money <hes> and so that summer after he graduated from North Western high school <hes> his cousin Ethel is up here and in this asking they more they're gonNA do next year all right you can imagine the kind kind of of shame and and and disappointment and silence that fell with that question but what she said is that <hes> you're going to West Virginia State College and she made the arrangements <hes> but he worked his way college and <hes> and and it's important to know there's nothing demeaning meaning about that opening episode of him being a janitor right right and in fact he worked as a janitor he worked as a chauffeur <hes> West Virginia State College and he was proud to do that. You know nobody works harder <hes> and he had the privilege of driving the president president around <hes> with all sorts of luminaries coming through <hes> so he was able to meet people like Adam Clinton Powell and and other tremendous luminaries at the time in kind of be that fly in the wall the man driving the car and just listening to those amazing conversations going on in in the backseat while tending West Virginia State College. I assumed that helped shape his future with him considering becoming a lawyer well. It's interesting I mean his his the turn towards law came later it certainly opened his eyes <hes> and <hes> <hes> and this is the first time that he saw African Americans in positions of authority. <hes> never had a black teacher and he went to to to go historical college <hes> and then met you know some of the the best in the brightest the our our country had to offer but it was only after coming back from World War Two <hes> and there's another wonderful vignette just <hes> is is is officers asking him to reenlist and there's no way he's going to reenlist in that segregated army <hes> he's GonNa fight for his country area different ways but he was on the fence between being a social worker and being a lawyer <hes> and it was one of his friends. WHO said you know I'm going to law school in Damon usually go to law school and it was his belief that law offered a better opportunity for social change age that led him to Howard law school and not to a career in social work? His cousin was also influential and and getting him in Howard Yeah. No I just say that that you gotTa have <hes> and <hes> the president of westbound when you say college you know young man coming back from the war is not necessarily thinking about <hes> his future within months but if you're gotta meet a deadline sometimes you got to act within weeks hours <hes> and so it was both of the present Davies <hes> that made very clear that if he was going to law school who should go to Howard and then <hes> provided kind of of the assistance and guidance to make sure that <hes> that became a reality while taming how he met the late great Thurgood Marshall but other a lawyer at university. How did I helped shape his ideals yeah? Can you imagine what it's like to be a lawsuit and and to be able to to learn under thurgood Marshall and trolls hamlets in Houston and not legacy and he was able a to go see the mcchord arguments right so one of the famous cases wish L. E. V. Kramer which was challenging <hes> restrictive covenants in in in housing and there was a companion case from Detroit types versus McGee so in a case like that name is able to go there in here the the oral argument Howard Law School and then able to go follow that team of outstanding lawyers and sit in the Supreme Court building and here the actual arguments and <hes> if that doesn't inspire you for social change. I don't know what would I know Oh that's right. If you're just joining us John Johansen Junior and you're listening to in Black America from radio we're speaking with Peter J Hammer Director Damon J. Kief Center for civil rights but first of law at Wayne State University School. Blah Blah and CO author of Crusader for Justice Federal Judge Damon Keith Wants Judge Keith Finish law school he had to study for the bar but he also had to find a job to support himself and I'm going to get to to you know when he finally had dates tomatoes wife but having those two things on his plate at the same time yeah and and and you know coming back to Detroit in the late nineteen forties as an African American your options limited right no and and as a book details that these great lawyers many have to have second jobs to to to pay the bills <hes> and they have to sit around at the recorder's Court and and hope hope that a white judge is gonNA throw a case their way for indigent representations so it was very tough starting out <hes> as a lawyer and judge Keith what many others you did you had to do so to put food on the table. Pay The bills and then diligently prepare prepare the pathway for of professional career now when he eventually met his wife Racial Judge Keith was not a macaroni as we say back in the day and one is part of say. Don't miss this up Yeah No. There's some there's some great levity in the book but but what people should also understand is is despite the fact this story about a civil rights and social change <hes> all throughout the book that it's a real love story <hes> a real meaningful love story <hes> about two very special people and people need to know that that Rachel Boone Keith was an all star in our own right right <hes> that <hes> she was a stellar medical student <hes> just sort of blowing away the standardized tests and and her teachers in her classes <hes> an amazingly accomplished woman <hes> I still around town today and people will tell me about judge <hes> kice wife <hes> and her being their doctor and how special that was but the nature of that relationship is really inspiring for anybody who wants to <hes> to see what real romance through of an entire sort of fifty three year time together can look like now when they went south for the wedding Damon was somewhat perplex when it got to the our our guest the the the state and which uncle a live and say African American could not be living here. They must be workers yeah so again you understand the humor in your in your listeners will too ah I he's not going to get married on a farm. He's a city boy. You'RE GONNA go down to a farm in Virginia to get married has its own kind of of irony and humor <hes> and when he gets here he's you know they're all diligently following the directions trying to find the right place and nobody wants to get lost in in a country wrote in in in the South <hes> and you want to be very careful who you ask for help and they go up and asked us you know African American gentlemen says you know this is a great place here says but but where's this address and he says well you're here right <hes> and goes through that whole sort of revelation that <hes> that Uncle Fred and it really has a finest down there <hes> and that stayed in the family sort of these nice things and he's still tries is best. He can to celebrate his birthday down in that same farm every year. When judge Keith passed the bar he did like every other young lawyer you had to find working went to work a fortunately for an African American law firm yeah and again what you're seeing is the importance throughout this period of <hes> these kind of segregated support systems and he starts as a young lawyer and then he gets what would be viewed as a promotion being able to get a steady paycheck right <hes> at the friends of the court and doing that work inside the judicial system and and again says Uncle Fred <hes> the same farm down in in in Virginia that kind of helps them think through what do you really want to do with your life? <hes> and this is why you went to law school and is this what <hes> what motivated you <hes> and he takes a very big risk of giving up that sort of very steady job and the friend of the court <hes> to really follow his dreams and beyond this path I start <hes> not at that period of time but ultimately to to to found and run one of the most successful black law firms in the country and then as they say is is is revolves. Arrest is history now when he started with the African American law firm at some point he wanted to I guess see if he could cut it yeah and he started his own farm room and then he moved into a new building where there weren't the African Americans in that building and he said well. If I move how people find me yeah now he's pat breaking at every stage and <hes> an ambitious <hes> and successful so <hes> at some point it gets tired of of of working for others <hes> he decides is GonNa Start his own law firm and he not only soza law firm <hes> he breaks tradition of going <hes> across Woodward into the Guardian Building <hes> and the very first <hes> African American law firm to do that <hes> and there is concern right. Are Your Clients GonNa follow you right. They're going to the same building to the same group to the same part of town all the time and you know the short answer is not only followed him <hes> he was able talk to get an amazing group of partners and <hes> in relatively short order was able to establish amazingly successful offer right when the judge <hes> receive his first judgeship <hes> that was until nineteen sixty seven but there was important earlier episode where <hes> in nineteen sixty three sixty four he was named to coach hair <hes> the Michigan Civil Rights Commission Right which the newly enacted adopted in the sixty three constitution Asian and and he's had a life of public service <HES> that that goes back to his life <hes> as a lawyer <hes> helping rebuild the N. Double A._C._p.. Chapter in Detroit and the nineteen fifties <hes> with as good friend Arthur Johnson <hes> you know serving being <hes> in the Detroit Housing <hes> Commission <hes> in the Nineteen Fifties <hes> in that capacity who's part of the team that helped <hes> Rosa parks <hes> when she had to come to Detroit and flee Montgomery to actually find housing so there's no show public service <HES> goes all the way up to his judgeship but <hes> that didn't happen until nineteen sixty seven it was interesting what you are put in a book how instrumental he was that the legacy of Detroit in Double A._C._p.. Freedom Dinner Yeah. No I <hes> just not quite a biography didn't make it in but we do a lot of events here at the key center <hes> and he just as meticulous as an event planner right. He used to drive me crazy. Where's the invitation? What does it look like? What's the pay per gonNA be on <hes> but in the process of the biography when I learned that he was the one that helped create this read and fun dinner which is huge huge massive undertaking that the lightbulb went off you know he's not only in amazing jurists? It's not only amazing human being but he has an event planner par excellence but more than an event that turned the chapter around and that raise the profile and really reinvigorated <hes> the Detroit N._w._e._a.. Chapter and he's just as so many different range of skills. Besides says judicial rendering he was a great humanitarian. You mentioned Rosa Parks and Rosa Parks House got broken into and she was apprehensive in returning to that particular home and judge found another place to live yeah. No I mean there's I just say what what what what's amazing. That relationship goes back to the nineteen. Fifties and housing is essential so mother parks was was getting older and Detroit is changing <hes> and she's being assaulted inside of her own home. You know the judges say you know other parks. You're not going back. They're just not say <hes> and then again as part of this team that puts together an effort to find her a safe place to live for the rest of her life and <hes> <hes> and they they did that. Tell us about some of the historic rendering the judge Keith rendered during his illustrious career thus far yeah you can think about civil rights anything about civil liberties right and it's like this amazing Grand Slam and the in the early nineteen the seventies shortly after being on the bench where he takes on sort of segregation and Housing and he was terming Negro removal and Hamtramck <hes> and declaring that to be unlawful taking on <hes> School of Segregation Irrigation and the very first northern school district in Pontiac Michigan to be declared violated the constitution with intentional discrimination and ordering remedies. They're taking on private discrimination and stamps versus Detroit Edison and in order to one of the largest damage awards of in history and a very aggressive remedy to <hes> make sure that people who had been denied jobs get an opportunity to go and get jobs <hes> taking on a affirmative action in the police department and and Baker and <hes> upholding <hes> the constitutionality of affirmative action <hes> when there'd been a long history of intentional discrimination and vindicating Coleman Young's efforts to <hes> aggressively integrate the the Detroit Police Department right <hes> and then if you switch over from civil rights civil liberties <hes> you get practices most famous case which is even called the Keith case where he declared the President Nixon at the height of his political powers long before Watergate could not illegally wiretap hat people in this country the that even the president was not above the law <hes> the president had to get a judicial warrant <hes> if the Justice Department or the F._B._i.. Wanted to engage in wiretapping and then if you fast forward to George W Bush <hes> at the height of his power our in the wake of nine eleven judge Keith was on the panel that declared the you couldn't have secret deportation hearings <hes> under a blanket national security <hes> and there's a wonderful phrase. It's a emblazoned in the key center here coming out of that opinion saying that democracies ABC's dia behind closed doors and that has caught wildfire and you can find people in Kenya in Indonesia and <hes> all throughout the world that are declaring that the democracies die behind closed door and and the judge opened up those doors now throughout the judge Keith career as a jurist not everybody was in lockstep with him considering that some thought they should have received some of the judge shifts that he received yeah lending doesn't change changes is politics <hes> there's politics and I'll judicial appointments. Although the flavor of the politics really has changed I think that's part of the story that <hes> that Judge Keith was part of that judicial generation that was called upon to interpret the Civil Rights Act the nineteen sixties and <hes> legitimately but very aggressively interpret them to reach their intense which is actually do justice and sadly and the last thirty thirty five years <hes> different kind of politics has come into judicial appointments and sort of litmus tests of conservatism and strict construction so judge keith who rode those cases in the nineteen seventies and really did a landmark changes has had also sit and watch the law sort of recede <hes> and and really become <music> <hes> eviscerated in many respects and go from writing majorities to writing some very important dissents <hes> in civil rights cases now one thing I noticed and was was interesting. Was I call it strange bedfellows bedfellows keeping his relationship with Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas It is strange bedfellows and the stories and they're in and this is a long term relationships about the judge twenty years in county and and long before Justice Thomas Justice Thomas and and and it goes consistent with with with with judge Keith in his sort of tradition of mentoring <hes> in the quality of mentoring and he established a mentoring relationship with with Clarence Thomas back when when he was a part of the E._e._O._C. and that relationship continues to this day even though <hes> in terms of their values and jurisprudence and civil rights believes is the difference between night and day so it's very complicated and and interesting story about their relationship and also found interesting and I'm glad you included in the book that Clarence Thomas irregardless of his judicial rulings was very instrumental again African American judges on the bench yeah not I says there's complications everywhere anywhere and to his credit at some very key points <hes> justice Thomas's is not been been ideological but really has been consistent with this belief that that people should be judged on their marriage and has helped clear the way of to get hearings essential but sometimes very hard to do <hes> for confirmation for of some very important African American judges in Michigan now when Judge Steve was was was was placed on the sixth circuit he didn't mince his words on some of the rulings that his colleagues <hes> set out yet now he has tremendous courage but -cremento tremendous frankness right and and he will tell you what he thinks and he will stand up to people <hes> and and one of the themes in the book <hes> and it's under the judge says and that they doesn't go by when he's not reminded in some way greater small that he's a an African American <hes> and there is serious prejudice in all parts harsh society including those that are wearing black robes and he's been fighting against that is part of his career as well Peter J Hammer professor of law and Wayne State University Law School Director of the Damon J. Kief Center for Civil Rights and Co author of Crusader for Justice Frodo judge Damon Keith. If you have questions comments suggestions as future in black America programs email US Ajay Hanson K. U. T. Dot O._R._G.. Also let us know what radio station you heard his over remember to like is on facebook and follow us on twitter the views and opinions expressed on his program not necessarily though this station or of the University of Texas at Austin. You can have previous programs online at K. U.. T. Dot O._R._G.. Week until we had the opportunity again for check to co producer David Alvarez. I'm John L. Hanson Junior. Thank you for joining us today. Please join us again next week. CD copies of this program are available and maybe purchased by writing being in Black America C._D.'s K. U._t.. Radio Three Hundred West deemed Keaton Boulevard Austin Texas seven eight seven one two. That's pin black America. C._D.'s K. U._T.. Radio Three hundred West.

Detroit Rachel Boone Keith Damon J Keith Co Howard University law school Damon president Black America Peter J Hammer West Virginia State University Justice Thomas Justice Thomas Damon J Keith Center for Civil James J Keith Wayne State University Law Sch Court of Appeals Michigan Civil Rights Commissi Detroit Edison Texas Director
Line Of Fire, Baseline Pt. 4

The Right Time with Bomani Jones

00:00 sec | 2 years ago

Line Of Fire, Baseline Pt. 4

"Ladies and gentlemen. Welcome to the right time. My name is Bomani Jones. Thanks for listening on the ESPN app. At park has podcast. We appreciate it. Right. As review gives five stars. You think it was four stars? I'm inclined to think you are hater coming up on this episode of the right time, the NFL draft has come which means all the nonsensical talk about that cyborg on jeopardy and also lays episode baseline supermax Bobby marks about the supermax contract and some unblocked me Bo forgot about that. But I. That year when we pile on Russell Westbrook. Now, I understand some of you may believe me to be a Russell Westbrook apologised. I kinda hate that term apologies. I feel like I need to look up. Exactly what it means in the dictionary. Because I just feel like people though, apologised around little willy nilly ignoring the fact that somehow. Okay. But gave you the one apologist stood. It says here quoted the Oxford American dictionary. I was actually just looking at myself. I gotta tell a person who offers an argument in defense of something. Controversial Russ is very controversial with any such a bad thing. Right. It's entirely throat arou- as did a pejorative. Nobody ever is. Like, yo you're a real Martin Luther King apologised. That's controversial. You know what I mean? But anyway, I get that thrown around at me. And it's difficult for me when I look out, and I just be like, oh, man Yala trip. Right. So if I feel like y'all trip and and then. Y'all continue to trip I have to fight in opposition of the trip. Ere reality. I'm trying to keep y'all upright. Right, y'all trip and fall down all of your sales here. I am right here. Trying to be like amo you better watch out. Why are you gonna trip on right there? I want you to be tripping. Right. And I want you ought to be tripping. Busy. This is what's happened. We're Russell Westbrook in the last two years. There has been an undeniable fall in his shooting that is made it such that the ways that people would try to pile on him and say this to throw a year out there because as may have been the year he was hurt. But let's say twenty fifteen right. Most of those criticisms at that time. I don't think really applied now who we go to different city issues here. And it's because his shooting has gotten so bad when he was just a guy who took bad shots, but wasn't necessarily a terrible shooter. It was such an issue. Now, you've got a guy who's a bad shooter who also takes bad shots who. But it we have a for real deal problem, and what we have seen in these playoffs with the exception of I guess game. Three is a guy who falls under the description of somebody who has taken bad shots and not doing so. Well when he even takes the good shots. So let me give you some numbers that you may find to be helpful true soon percentage is a bit of a Hodge pas that I don't fully understand. But I think this will help you and twenty sixteen is true shooting percentage of fifty five point four five four. They do it. The Desmond front 2017 the MVP. Year five five four last year. Five to four this year five zero one those are numbers closer to Russell Westbrook in his first year in the NBA. Field goal percentage this year. He was at forty three percent. It's just kind of in line overall with where he's been for most of his career, but he's shooting twenty nine percent from three and that's the worst that he shot in nine years by comparison in the envy PC's and he shot thirty four percent. And again, the shooting twenty nine percent wouldn't necessarily be the worst thing in the world except he's taken five and a half threes per game. Okay. Now, we have a problem. But I still contend still contend the way. The Russell Westbrook is evaluated by the general public is through the lens of what he does not do. Well, and whatever he does do will gets completely washed away. And that's where I wanted to push back against the way. People talk about him. Is that is though there is no like actual real live positive contribution that he is providing he is not simply how well. He does or does not shoot. But that's what he's reduced to in these times. You look at what that whole team is right now in Oklahoma City. And I ask you this. Who should be taking these shots because I think the Westbrook should probably be taking better shots. But who else out there, do you think should be taken these shots because I've seen a lot of people. Make the argument that the thunder four and fourteen since Kevin Durant left in the playoffs playoffs there. Four fourteen since Kevin Durant left gay about looked up at this series. They've been playing they start and Paul George, Stephen Adams Russell Westbrook. Terrence Ferguson, and is Jeremy Jerry and grant, I swear I don't know, which is which Jeremy grant it is year grant. Okay. He the one that went to Syracuse. I'm not sure for he went off look that what went to Syracuse. I think level went to Notre Dame. I think they both Harvey grant sons, and I just don't I can't tell them apart fron nothing. Right. You gotta give kids more distinct names than that help them out. If you thought it was gonna go to the NBA, right horse and Harvey. They sounds that sounds a lot more different in this. And y'all they twins. Jeremy went to Syracuse guiding God. Zones. Anyway. But go look like with the rosters are like the difference between the roster that Oklahoma City has right now versus the Rossa. They had in two thousand sixteen with the almost the warriors. Even with adding ball, George. It's pretty staggering. And that goes beyond when you look at like having Kevin Durant. Go look the other guys word that filled out that roster is a different ballgame. This team was built with the expectation of a healthy, Andre Roberson, whom I call self check. Now don't think you need another guy named self check to be out there on the floor. Russell westbrook. But he is maybe one of the three or four best perimeter defenders in the NBA like you were going to have an elite wing defender and Paul George and an elite wing defender and Roberson they were going to go from there. Now, they don't have him do to bring us. They don't have him anymore game four. They got forty six minutes combined from Terence Ferguson and Raymond Felton who is in his fourteenth year in the NBA still in the league. Still in league. He seems to stay on teams though that we pay attention to. So I never forget that he's in the NBA. It makes sense. Like, I mean like when you own the Knicks. We know that you're in the league, right? You're on the phone. Do we know that you're in the league like I just tend to pop up and be like, oh, Raymond Felton is in a basketball game that I'm watching it ain't when you turn onto magic and you'll hey DJ Augustine on the league. Good for you did know where you were didn't know that there was aware for you to be glad for you. But yeah, no, this is where we are. But this is the thing thunder gotta watch out for man. They gave Russell Westbrook supermax extension because they basically had to you know, like if people were down on the Celtics for not giving is Ahah Thomas thirty million dollar contract after he was physically done for. Then what in the world where they say about Oklahoma City, if they didn't give money to the most loyal man on earth. No, no, they wound up having to give him that deal. But I've said this even when I was higher on Russ than Moton than I than. I am now aim when that guy's game starts to slip. It is going to slip all the way data dude that has a game that's built to age. And if you don't believe me go look at what happened with Alan Iverson. Allen Iverson averaged twenty six points a game in two thousand eight season in the twenty ten season. He was basically begging for a job in the only gig. He could get was coming off the bench for the grizzlies. Right because the type of game that he had was not one that was going to age it was so predicated on athleticism than when the athleticism started to fall. There was nowhere for him to go. The thing with Westbrook is I kind of feel like if he played in the day of Aberson he might have been able to stick around a little bit longer with type of game that he has. But the modern NBA prioritizes shooting a completely different way. And if the slip for Russ is in his shot, this end is going to be very very bad like in spite of all the injuries and surgeries and stuff. Like that. I don't really notice that much of a physical fall off for Russ in. This is Russ what eleven years in the league. The physical fall. I don't really see the fall is in shooting. And by the way, it's not just in shooting from the floor. The most staggering almost inexplicable thing here is there. Russell Westbrook for his whole career up until twenty seventeen head never shot lower than seventy eight percent from the free throw line. He shot seventy four last year. And he shot sixty six this year. That's the one that. I look at it. I'm like, hey, hey, what exactly is going on here? He's also not getting to the line as much as he did in the last couple years. Like, these are the things to point to is not just doom roseby here. Taking bad shots to me. That's the lazy argument and looking at this like dribbed ruined. Notre came out the first round. That's the lazy argument about the totality. Like, it was a lazy argument to me earlier Rush's career when people talk about a lot of the shots that he took. Because if you looked at the offense they were running it wasn't no shos to take these cats weren't open these sets were grinding to a halt. And the next thing. You know, we had Russell Westbrook. Standing at the top of the key was seven left on the shot clock. Kevin Durant over in Kona corner being skinny getting him up. And there's nothing for anybody to do. So he wants to be in the guy that takes the shot. These things have happened. Right. But now we've gotten to a point where this is gone off a so long that basically everybody who went too far with it early gets to be right now. Because a lot of what they're saying. The broken clock has finally come around at twelve thirty seven whatever it was on. Right. This is where they are. But I don't know what they do as a franchise. Also don't know how much to take completely out of this series, Paul George. They were talking about what before early in the series. The do couldn't even raise his arm then get out here to play. He hasn't played. Well, either Paul George, by the way is about to live that Kevin Durant. Life of you know, none of it is actually my fault. Yeah. I remember we was ridiculing Paul George. We said only time he made a game winning shot was in that commercial. Because in that commercial at that time. It was only time he hit a game winning shot. He's in the playoffs. You remember that? No, man. Paul George came over MVP candidate this year. People say Russ won't down has gained back rose down his game. Beg enough to make Paul George a legitimate MVP candidate gave you an MVP candidate out here in this series. No playoff p. No, have you heard any real ridicule to our playoff about this? I have not everything goes to Russ Billy. Donovan what is Billy Donovan demonstrated in terms of being like some great coach having seen it. He gets the skate in large part behind this because everybody gets to stand behind Russ. No matter how down you all Russ. You can't deny that fact like I can acknowledge that he's played poorly in this series. I could acknowledge that his shooting has gotten to a point where it is for real deal problem that that also much make me Bala just as much as looking at what's actually out there. I don't know why so hard for people to look at what the rest of that team is and not be able to acknowledge like, hey, man, this from top to bottom. This ain't what we thought it was going to be right? This isn't it? And so they come out here against blazers and Russ pick the wrong year to tell day literally been busting his keys for years because day, let us take that personally gave he's salty. He's so salty put a hurt on them in this series, Portland. Hey, man, if Portland head nurture is a legitimate reason to believe that they could win west really you'd go that far if they had. I think I think it's easy to look at nurk. It's just some kind of role player, but go look at the numbers that he put up this year. Like he played all NBA caliber basketball this year, if they had him to go with the way, the Damon CJ played I'm not saying that they would win a championship. Right. But I would not put them up against the warriors. Interesting. The wars are gonna walk in five or something like that some things could break, and they could have a legitimate chance to win the west or put it like this. If we had that Portland, Tim, I think most of us think that the rockets even if we don't think they're going to beat the warriors. We think they could. I think that most of us would say Portland with Nurkic could beat Houston. Hell I think a lot of us say Portland without Nurkic could beat Houston. Like, this is not some screw up squad that they're out here playing against there's a reason one of the three in the other one's six. There is a point in time. I want to say three to four years ago where the trailblazers could have been like one of the top top top teams in the west or even in the whole league. Then Wes Matthews blows his achilles in lamarcus Aldridge leaves. And then they they built it around something else. Right. They ran. They were in the process of Bill net around day, which is important while markets all just doesn't play there anymore. But they got they got a decent setup with the guys that they have do we think that Oklahoma City has a more talented Ross Poland us. No. And when you're looking at the two like we ask before, you know, looking at the thunder's future, and how bleak it looks versus how the trailblazers feature looks. I mean, trailblazers featureless good. Also, thunder made one really weird decision to me, which is why do you get dinner shoot? Or if you already have a Russell Westbrook. Because I feel like shooter is just a lesser version of Russell Westbrook. And you still going to pay him to? Yeah. Like, I don't feel like you need to Westbrook's. Although, uu. That's how they got Melo outta of here. Yes. Yeah. It's funny. Somebody trying to tell me with Westbrook. It's always somebody else's fault. Mentally last year was medals. Dow what mellowing in league right now. You know, what I'm saying like like metals that even here at the moment, and I've been a metal defender and a lot of ways to because I think he became an easy target become. He ain't he he is not even in the NBA where he kinda was he was on tour this year. Yeah. I mean, he was at NBA games. He was doing the one last dance tour Pete passes. Yes. He did all the front row that was his to around the league. But I'm gonna give you some numbers though, on Russell Westbrook that should give you some concerns got third. Highs uses rate and flooded, James. Thank you. But it's their high usage rate in postseason history. By the way, case you're curious Ruggles shot but in the clutch in a regular season the MVP season he had two hundred forty seven points that year was a plus eighty five the last two years combined two hundred ninety four with a minus eighty forty five percent of the Clinton than MVP season thirty nine percent in the year since and oh, by the way. Per thirty six minutes including the playoffs. With Paul George on the floor. Russ does dial. It back is at twenty three points per game nineteen and a half excuse me. Thirty six thirty six three points nineteen and a half field goal attempts. What four percent field goal percentage? Thirty three percent usage rate of positive. Plus mines when Paul George is off is averaging twenty eight points per thirty six minutes twenty five field goal attempts. Forty one percent. A thirty nine percent usage rate. But this is the killer part. Minus three in the plus of Mayes. He's better. When Paul George is off the floor. They're better. When Paul George is all which also speaks to Paul Georgia. Kinda gotta bring it. He does he does. Oh, by the way, gave on the stats about Paul George in the clutches this season. He's four for eight for go ahead field goals in last ten seconds before that over fourteen. Because like you said he can stand behind us. He's got it. I mean like they have a rest problem. But I don't think that Russ is the problem does that make sense makes total sense. I got not in a place where I think that what's going on with Russ is totally not correctable because he has changed the way he's played since Paul George guy there. You just got somehow Russell Westbrook has to tell himself just because I make shots in practice on me and I'm gonna make shots right now. But if that happens is what's about to happen to Oklahoma City. Basically teams are just gonna pack in the lane. Like are we asking him just to go into the teeth of the defense every time like he's going to have to it's hard for me to believe that guy is age can just magically do this? But he is going to have to become at the very least a credible jump shooter. Because now he is not a credible. Jump shooter. That being said brick Lopez just became a credible jump shooter. So maybe it can be done. Draft time draft. How you feel about the draft gay? I'm not a huge draft in just even saying the word draft. I'm not a huge fan. We are almost here. What's it on Thursday? Correct. Scott Murray is going to be the first over all pick. There's some movement some kerfuffle if you will see I mean, he's going to be the first overall pick like, I I don't see much way around that. I'm curious to see what they ultimately do Josh Rosen because look man, this is what all this stuff is autumn things I've been reading about the different players and all of that. It's all just to set up a television show, and the television show is the draft. So Josh Rosen is going to be a big character in this draft. I imagined somebody's gonna wind up making a move form because the cardinals are gonna need trade him before the draft because you have more suitors if us before the draft because then teams will take people whatever it is. There's going to be Dwayne Haskins. Who if I was him I would not show up to that draft. Ed Smith bre, my Wanda been there all night. You don't want that? I would not be there. If I was him. I wouldn't be in there. If I was at Daniel Jones cat. It didn't ask and say he's not going. I'm not sure I'd never show up to draft. Ever. Kanki like you want to like how you're supposed to be celebrating some to happen to you. But people all up in your face. That's not what it is gonna take that to the crib. And don't be like that one dude. I got caught with that tater right there next to his leg. While he was celebrating being drafted. I'd never beat a Window World. Joe Tom's are maybe draft. He went fishing. That's the right call because being there ain't going get you draft that no sooner all you give for being there is the privileges. Shaken Roger Goodell's hand, do you wanna share Rogers hand? Like is. That is happy moment. You'll live. Do you wanna spend that? But Raja do. Me personally. No. I mean, I don't know if you're a player if you're going to go in for the lawyer, you're going to go in for the debt. That's the. Yeah. See Raj, practices Depp. Right. He puts a lot of work on a dad. But I imagine I've been Raj hands be wet when he deputy for the draft and wet death is the worst. Wow. Wets? Why's that? Just sweaty hands. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, I imagine he's gotta be real nervous about getting his dab game properly front all those people into people. You gotta get your dad game. Raymond Depp made some you do regularly Betty up just weady and the cats got sweaty palms to 'cause they all nervous about being drafted like what like they make a squishy sound when they get to Dempo Raja deal want to be involved in squishy death. Even if you're partially responsible. Why knees that wouldn't be? There would be at the draft really understand how it is like regular people just be going to the draft. Just hanging out who for what that to me satellite too much money to spend for no women to be in the crowd knows where they give shout of the crowd at the drive. You'll really see. No ladies. You see edge stadium. You wanna so much see him at a draft in like this. Tens of thousands of dudes. Oh, that's the beginning of all kinds of horror movies. No chance I'm doing. Anyway. Who's the character guy? This you gave who's getting killed for the character. Ed oliver. He's the one that's getting. Yeah. He's the one the character is s initiation. So what did they say about it that his leg heart, isn't in it? And that he's a like a cancer to the team. Here's the thing. I find interesting about the idea that he's a cancer to the team. He is the only five star recruit in the history of five star recruits to go to a school. That was not in one of the power conferences, literally the only one, you know, the story on him going there. I don't dull just so he is from Houston and Tom Herman was at U of H. He committed to go there. Tom Herman also hired his high school coach to be on staff when he got him to come to university of Houston. Okay. And Tom harm. It's all things as town Tako. And like he was show a recruits video of the U, and he was telling them that we can build in Houston what they built in Miami. Which by the way, it's not that crazy of an idea. But that's what he was selling to those guys hermit stayed one year. Herman went to Texas hermit took the high school coach with them. He did not take it all of it's. Okay. Do you want to say, maybe just maybe his heart by dot have been ended at U of eight. I can understand. Hey, K D C. How maybe just maybe it Oliver might have thought that he was a little bigger than the program. You know, why? Because he was too good to beat there in the first place. Everybody way it's hard for me to sell me on the argument. The Ed Oliver is all about himself and not. About the team when they had that incredible talent play in nose tackle at two hundred eighty pounds. He's playing out of position in a way. That absolutely did not display what he was capable of talking about. How this dude might actually project to be an inside linebacker in the NFL and they had playing nose tackle. Sounds like someone trying to change a QB to a wide receiver. Not it's crazy. I mean, except he's this is this is this is less about trying to turn a QB into a wide receiver. Then it is like seeing an incredible wide receiver throw the ball. And be like yo have you thought about playing quarterback? Like he's that level in that caliber of talent. But every year these scouts always gotta have somebody. That's just not the right kind of guy for you to have on your team. I don't know about this that and everything else and this doesn't happen anywhere else. Have you heard of any basketball player that they've ever been lying now, we can't we we ain't gonna take him because he's because people don't like him not in my recent memory to and and not for like a legitimate reason. Right because with Oliver it's kind of you know, he hasn't committed a crime here. No. Whereas people who I would say in the past when it comes to the draft have committed crime. It's like they fall past the first round. But they still get picked. I am wondering. Now, if NFL teams are pro or ties and their ability to keep players under control more than ever. Like, you think about this auto Beckham situation and Antonio Brown and stuff like that. You know what I mean? Like, they're real concern. We're having these guys like. It'd be fair to football teams. I do understand this part. Which is the roster has fifty three people and trying to keep everybody on the same program. That is not easy right there all kinds of factions and everything we saw what happened with the Steelers, for example, whereas like offense of line against Levy on bail, all those kinds of things happen. It is difficult to keep team all together in one way. Like, so I don't want to act as though there's nothing to the idea that they're trying to get some lovely conformity on their roster. I'm just saying they go so hard in the leaks and stuff like that about these guys and truly how many guys have really plummeted in the draft. Because somebody thought he was selfish. Like who's the dude that we hear about that? All of a sudden this do it and getting drafted until like the second round because people just thought he was too selfish. They think you might mess around and go to jail or something like that. Okay. We talk about something different vaunt has perfect. For example, is is a guy who because of their quote unquote, character stuff fail completely out of the draft. I contend that the term character needs to be shelled. Because what they're talking about is not character. What they're talking about his judgment. Do you have good or bad judgment? Right. Do you know a good idea from a bad because Montana's perfect leases the football player has no idea the difference between a good idea and a bad one? They ain't even ideas to him. They just stuff to do goes out there and just stuff. Right. So I get that. Dez Bryant Dez Bryant fall in the draft. Because of these things that people were concerned with him about I think it's entirely possible in his case. But we never really know. You know, why we never really know? Because the notion of draft stock is fiction that is why we never really know. Oh, I forgot gate Randy miles, but they was afraid. Randy moss was gonna go to jail. What I wanna know is given that putting this stuff in the newspaper den really have much value. If somebody's going to do it character smear on somebody. You can't let slide anonymously. That's what people love to do. Right. You know, sling mud so to speak and then just hide behind the rock. Yeah. But you gotta put somebody's name on if you're gonna do this kind of stuff. I don't have any real evidence that when people whispering put this stuff out there that it has much of an effect in very many cases on truly excellent players like on the ones that you know about. But as you say gave the other part too, if you might go to jail. Yeah. That's the thing. And they are going to be concerned. But will winds up getting in these stories, just more? I don't like that dude. Exactly. That's what you get antibody way. I totally get why it all of it could have been like that Houston to remember what happened with the jacket. You remember that? Oh, yeah. And the thing about the Jackie was actually saw the argument for him taking the jacket off like I got that point the idea that the jackets for players. Okay. I got that. If you wanted to get the jacket off of them. But when Applewhite went in actually did it himself and then didn't even head occurs determine face that dude. That tells me that the problems that they were having will way bigger than just Oliver. Right. That wouldn't way a grown man puts himself didn't have white fire too. Ever go. Yeah. 'cause they'd hold his job in a modern pack. Anyway, that's what is going to be somebody still gonna take olive first round as entirely possible that scout who put that thing out there. Maybe maybe just totally wanted to get out of address or maybe just maybe based on what you hear. Being being a scout don't necessarily make you the authority that we act like it makes you. You know what I mean? Like scouts be saying crazy stuff as somebody told me that was was like, you can get any crazy coach you quote, you want out of a scout is not that hard to do. But oh, well, we let scout decide he knows dude up and down and until everybody else about it. Even though the scout might have an tear your motive. And what do we call it? Draft journalism. I've been watching jeopardy gave do you watch jeopardy. Do not. Okay. I haven't watched jeopardy allow recently. I was a bit of jeopardy prodigy when I was a youngster. I used to watch jeopardy at up shop. Okay. People would legit. Come and watch me play jeopardy when I was a kid. Wow on right? Got it. Like I used to be watching jeopardy now. And I'm coming up sluggish. Like, I said, I just don't have the skills that I did I used to be like you'll put me on celebrity jeopardy now, I'm not so sure that I will win celebrity jeopardy, and I ain't going on to lose. Got really haven't myself in campaign. I'd have to get myself in marathon shape. You know what? I mean. Like if I was going to do that. I'd have to really really get myself ready because gave you know, damn well as a lot of people that think I would do well and that would be rooting for me. But it would be a whole lot more people in for the people that was rooting for me. They will find a mo- note worthy that I lost. And they will find it that then one they would remember that they would still find that to be no worthy lightweight. People view me. It would not be some huge surprise if I won. I mean, people have written stuff about their perceptions of how smart I am. You know what I mean? So it would just be like, oh, the sport is going sports. You know, I want Saul somebody I was all celebrity jeopardy. The top two were Cheech mayor and Luke Perry recipes. He's saying you never know who come sneak up on you under these circumstances. So I'd need to like if I got myself into into playing shape, I think I might have some for you on jeopardy, but I'm not in playing shape. But I know I'm not in playing shape because Abby on here watching this SAB board, you seem to cyborg or have you heard about the cyborg is names, James? I'll know anything else about him gave the dude I after last night, he hit total. I think he's got eleven wins. Either way now hundred fifty thousand dollars and what he's doing is. He's going to the bottom of the board. I at the top of the board because what his program is he wanna stack as much bread as he can before he hits the daily doubles. And then he's doing crazy risky stuff on the daily doubles. But the thing about him, and the crazy risks that he's playing on with the daily doubles is he has not found some flaw in the game theory that everyone else has been ignoring no, he's just way better than everybody else. And since he's way better than everybody else. He is putting on the. Most ambitious daily double wagers that anybody has ever put up because he no we ain't going get it wrong. And by the way, by the time, he gets most of these daily doubles his pockets of so fat that he can risk thirty five thousand dollars in a daily. Double miss it. And still be about ten grand. That's what you're doing here. Sending shout outs in the final jeopardy screen. You know, you got it. Right. If you're doing that. 'cause you can't be attention. Nobody's name to losing. Amanda, if you gave me a shout out on a date. It's you lost. I don't know you. I was a champion out. No, you when you will lose her after like the ninth day, he sent a shout out to his grandma and Alice your bag was like, she still here, and to do was like, no any like looked up to sky like kissed his hand, and pointed and said, this is grandma man, I got news for you. A grandma saw you on day nine grandma saw you on day one to if you love your grandma so much how to take you nine days a shout out yet thought about that gave. That'd be fended. If I was his grandma got sin shout out to look girls, you'd be hollering that no, no, no. I send a shout out to you granny. I am. But I conclude concluded by the way 'cause I seen as having before. So appetite in the Honda campus all challenges trivia thing and college I'm actually in the Honda campus, all star hall of fame gave I did not know that. Yes. Yes. Yes. I'm like no lot. I am actually in the hall of fame into inaugural hall of fame class. Anyway. But is a competition. Among ABC news, you know, black schools, and so you may not know this game. But West Virginia state university is ABC you, but it is majority white did not know that it is historically black. But it is still in West Virginia West Virginia something like three percent black and white photos in West Virginia must be poor for real because they will undergo the black people school. Anyway, they would always have it was Virginia state like some do some white dude who's cold cold in this competition. But he always they'd always have an achilles heel. Whenever the why do would be the competition killing it. They'd always have an achilles heel black history. That would be that would that would be that would be the whole black history. Right. Ain't been doing that. They hold is. Right. Black issue would always be to do the whole into why do gay now, man. I watched cyborg last night. He was picking African countries off the map without him being identified. He had some other black people question that he got right? And I'm like, oh, man. Just do might be. He might be the perfect contestant. He ready for everything. Like, I'm still not convincing those who Matthew Hinson is. But man, what's an poll? Look up pitcher, Matt you don't what you see that coat in that package rang. He got oh that was Ralph Ellison. The do got the question about the invisible, man. I find that the black history month question of why people typically get teased at in y'all schools, but still I was like, okay, I wasn't positive that. He would be getting the question about Ravaloson the invisible man all right to go. Eight even read the invisible man for you. Big moves, just do my play forever man grew this new like he might never lose on Jeffrey. I don't know who the person is. That is going to beat him on jeopardy. He's like UCLA of jeopardy. I don't know like somebody out here training right now getting a weight up because they gonna take this dude out. He might walk out of here. We ten million dollars. No lie by this day. If you have watched the cyborg play, no one has come any kind of close to him, nobody. Although I we'll say yesterday gave this is how cold the cyborg is right yesterday. Somebody had like two thousand dollars and somebody had four thousand dollars Abbas seen anybody against him. Get that kind of money in a time that he's played. He's out here gave they not even making it out of double jeopardy. He added to a final jeopardy would only one other person you need to get on this. I think you would think you would appreciate this this it. Here's what it looks. Like, it looked like pictures I on high school. Wow. What channels jeopardy on because I don't have cable tell you. Check your local listings. It's a low is on locals, so yeah. But I don't have local listens at got my apple TV. Oh, you ain't got no bunny ears because buddy yours. Can you watch jeopardy online? You should be able to if it's like ABC NBC what channel. Syndicated. Okay. So it all depends on where you are. You're so millennial. I don't have local channels. I got everything I need ya got jeopardy. Low facto it in New York. Jeopardy comes on before wheel of fortune everywhere else. I live with a fortune came on before jeopardy, and I gotta say it's a real drop off going from answering them jeopardy questions the play hangman, this don't even feel right Easby. You got warmed up wheel of fortune into get to jeopardy now now. Yeah, jeopardy you'd be like helps playing with children. We'll be back with the latest installment of our baseline series on the supermax contract with Bobby marks ESPN front office insider, but I the average interest rate on credit card debt is over eighteen percent APO. Have you looked at your interest rate lately? Refinance your high interest credit card balances and save with a credit card consolidation loan from livestream. Get a rate as low as six point one four percent APR with auto pay the rate is fixed. It'll never go up. You can get a loan from five thousand one hundred thousand dollars in there are no fees even get your money as soon as the day you apply when you have good credit. You deserve great service in a low interest fixed rate loan from light street. That's lending uncomplicate want to save. Even more my listeners, get an additional interest rate discount. The only way to get this discounts to go to light stream dot com slash Bomani. L I G H T S T R E A M dot com. Slash Bomani, subject to credit approval rating clues point five zero percent auto pay discount. Terms and conditions apply. Office subject to change without notice. Visit light stream dot com slash Bomani. For more information. Right. We coming up on our final installment of the baseline series. We did this on the supermax contract. Been good learned a lot about this had a lot of good guests, Michelle Roberts, come out and talk about it. Brian win hers, it wills we have. He'll Duffy Bill. Duffy that Hooper agent super right? And that's right. And now to close off we've got former nets executives current ESPN front office insider on the NBA's name is Bobby marks. And here he is now by we've been talking about the supermax extension in the NBA for you working in front office. When they first brought this about what were your thoughts on the rise in salaries that we're going to see here, Bomani. I think when you look at how players are paid in their contracts usually get what three three Craxi apple I say, you get the rookie scale contract. You get the rookie extension. Third contract is usually the big one. And that's where some of these players like John wall and. Steph curry players like that are you know, we're seeing thirty five thirty six million dollars salaries, and how do you build out a team with a player like that on on your roster here in in what the back end of the contract is going to look like I think players like Russell Westbrook will be what thirty one thirty two years old making north of forty million dollars. So I think it's more about the the high cost of what that what that number is is going to be. I understood the concept, but I think there's some collateral damage with that also it was like Steph curry is one thing because you have a team that's always winning and you keep it together. Then a guy like John wall. He's Joe Johnson wolves with contracts with the hawks where okay, you guys aren't that. Good. But you're not good enough that you can afford to lose him. But you're also not good enough. They keeping him is going to take you over the top. And now the panel forty dollars a year one in the wall case too. And I think we can talk about how the system is as far as. What the criterias and for wall the year that ear knoll MBA was the only year, and that's when he met, and that's when he signed that that that that that extension in the summer of two thousand seventeen he was coming off two thousand sixteen seventeen where he all here here and all MBA he was extension eligible because you met that criteria. And that was the only that's the loan year here where maybe a player like Damian Lillard, for example, will learn MBA editor three years and now becomes extension eligible the summer here. So I think if anything you can go back in when eight negotiated the CBA if you can maybe try to tweak the criteria to make it that if it's two years in a row or two out of three years for MVP. It's one out of three years here. I think that's something that that teams would probably take a harder look at here. But I don't think they I don't think they realize the the mitigated concerts. Quences here as far as it's specially if you're a front office, and you have not done a good job of putting your roster together. And I think that's the case in Washington where there's not an insurance policy when a player like John walk gets hurt. And you're stuck with that forty to forty two million dollar cap. It you have not drafted. Well, you have a player like Bradley Beal who was making twenty five thirty million dollars here that. You're basically stuck with that with that contract. You're kind of stuck in in between period. Now could they have afforded to tell John wall? No on that contract. They could've and I think that comes down to having pretty strong principles within that front office. Do you have a belief to let John wall go through the year? And then then go circle back with him the following year. The interesting thing he wouldn't have been he wouldn't have been supermax eligible, you would've left a lot of money on plate and John wall. All of a sudden turnaround and asked to be traded. So I think it's kinda what your relationship with that player is what your relationship with the agent is do you have a belief that you can afford going into a year when he can possibly walk. And basically call his because bluff here so. Yeah, I think I think there's a lot of different ways that they could have gone about doing it. You know, I always call it the blind check route they went they basically wrote him a blank check. And they said pick pick your pick the number pick the years here in John pick the highest amount. And what do they do with Brad? Beal potentially be eligible for the civil. That's the fascinating part is is that does Bradley Beal become collateral damage because or scapegoat because of what the John wall contact is right now in we'll see what happens in the next couple of weeks here when all MBA's announced Bradley Beal, get one of those last spots. And from what I understand before Ernie Grunfeld was let go is that you know, if Beale. Did Arnall NBA that a four year? One hundred ninety million contract was going to be waiting there for him. And so now, you have two players on a supermax making your I think your backward would have been ninety million dollars in the summer of two thousand twenty one and that's hard to sustain here. Unless you have unless you're saying in Tonio, and you've got the young core of players and you draft. Well, and you have that next layer of players kind of coming through the through the system. Well, also, I think the next level with wall and Beal is given their relationship. There's almost like kids you can't give that to wall. And I give it to Bill while you're right. And I think that's that's what the issue that. We're the question that they'll have the summer whoever is in Newt in in in in charge there. If it's Tommy Sheppard is assistant jam where they go the higher on the outside. Is that you Bradley Beal knows what John Warren two years ago. I mean, it's pretty out there and Bradley Beal knows he's been pretty open about it that earning all MBA. Makes him supermax eligible then that that comes with a four year one hundred ninety million dollars. Now, it's just a matter of will Washington offered to them now as somebody who is in the front office. And you talk about trying to build out around that team. How hard is it now to build around team with the supermax contract because I feel like one thing that happened with the warriors them being able to get all those guys in is then forced everybody else to try to keep up without having the tools of the salary cap to do so well, I think you're seeing in Oklahoma City. I mean, the the Westbrook contract where Russell is. And then you add another player, Paul George's. You've got to hit it in draft. You've you've got a draft. Right. You've got to usually when you have a player making thirty eight million dollars in the case of Russ this. You're thirty five million dollars that you're you're in the luxury tax. So you are restricted so the the players that you go out and sign with your tax mid level. The Patrick Patterson's of world. Those guys gotta come in produce the first round draft picks, the Terrance Ferguson's what they do this year in the draft, the call bargain shopping and free agency the minimum players you've got a hit on that. Because if you don't then that leaves you leave you exposed I think Portland will be fascinating situation. Because of you know, we know Dame Lillard will be supermax eligible this summer, and can you know, in that contract them certainly will be there. But it goes back to as far as drafting well signing guys to minimum contracts year. Signing guys to the to the tax mid level. That's the belief of having a good good strong found foundation in front office. Now, how do you think the warriors look at all this right now because they've got Klay Thompson of this year. And then what I think will be the most fascinating decision to make on a player in longtime, which is what they do. Draymond green coming into one year left on his deal. Draymond we'll be fascinating because he is super max eligible errands. All MBA. I don't think he will. Because that forward positions pretty deep here or defensive player of the year. And I don't think he'll get debt, but he's basically walking into a year contract year, an expiring contract, and I think what happens with Durant. What happens with Klay? Certainly the likelihood is that Klay stays will impact with with what happens with Draymond. And usually the one benefit of the supermax is that once a player is eligible or hits the criteria. You have an idea of where you're going here either that player is going to sign that number like we. Saw with John wall. And James harden and Westbrook or they're going to turn down that number quite Leonard, Anthony Davis, and that basically forces the forces the hand of that that team here that's not the case with golden stay with with Draymond because he won't hit that he won't meet debt criteria. And you're basically treating it as a player on an expiring contract as far as is he part of the future or do you kind of look to see what the market's going to be for him? And the overall tricky thing, I think they have also is how many players can you have that the owner likes more than the coach? Why think the one thing that the one benefit they have is that they're going to into a brand new arena, and the cost of that payroll could be I think we're looking probably over three hundred million. If that whole group comes back with tax in salary will be offset as far as basically that rent revenue. But but what I learned was in New Jersey, the one year we had our luxury tax. I think it was the ninth. Two million in luxury tax hundred million payroll, which is still the highest is that although you might have a billionaire owner in guy, it makes a lot of money that it's an uncomfortable feeling the first week of August when you have to wire the MBA ninety million dollars. You have to do as I said, this is not a you're not paying for college. You're not paying on the first and or the fifteenth of the month ear you are paying at once. They give you that wire instructions, and it's not it's not a good feeling there. I don't care how much money they your money, you make those jobs into programs that we got to do this in mind. I would get the notice, and then I would go walk into Billy kings office and Hintze here. Here you go. Here's the date Dubai. The crazy part was to that going back to that years that we had an opportunity to trade for Jordan hill who's playing for the Lakers at that time, and it would cost like another twenty million dollars in for three months. And in our ownership group, like go ahead, go out and get him. If you want gotta money. How many how many more guys do we need here? Like we already had. We already were like fourteen deep, and we couldn't find playing time for Caroline Inca in and Andrei blotch, and that group here, but yeah. And I think that's why you're seeing teams, you know, with Miami recently tried to duck on Houston duck onto that luxury tax because teams don't wanna pay if it's a million dollars or if it's thirty million dollars. Now, switch gears just a little bit what asking about Janas because he's due for the richest contract in NBA history or he could sign that with Milwaukee next summer, and he seems like he really enjoys it in Milwaukee. But how hard would it then be for them to keep a team built around him? Well, the fortunate thing is that they Jaanus is not. He'll be supermax eligible but can't sign it until the summer two thousand twenty five years to fifty one. I think that's kind of where that. That numbers is going to be right around there. They they're key free agents are going to be this summer. So you've got Chris Middleton. You got Malcolm Brogdon, you've got. You've got brook. Lopez players like that you already the Bledsoe extension during the year. So yeah, I mean, they'll be able to stay on the tax year. But that number is that's coming. That's coming for them summer of two thousand twenty one Jaanus is Janice is up. So they do get some breathing room right now going into next year. But it's another team that's got a new building. But it's also one of those market teams. So can you can you pay a guy forty five million dollars and still have a highly competitive roster? And I think that's kind of where we're probably looking at it from a perspective of Milwaukee. They're basically they'll be pretty similar to where maybe Portland is Portland with Lillard with McCullum you still have nurtured players like that as far as building that roster out. How big a deal is the tax for those smaller markets. It's a big deal. It's a big deal because you look at it. You don't get a tax distribution. So you're not. Getting money back teams this year get about three million dollars in tax distribution. It's it's a big deal because there's we see Oklahoma City and that repeater tax right now where it's it's four to five years if you're in there, basically the cost gets doubled. So if if you're paying twenty five million dollars in tax for the funder, maybe fifty million. So there's just a lot of there's a lot of restrictions as far as how you build out build out the roster. I think not receiving that taxes should bution big for some of the smaller marketeer, but on the other hand there also is the revenue sharing. So maybe what you lose. You can get you can get back here. But yeah, we never see teams like Charlotte, and that's another team Charlotte's going to be fascinating summer. You know, what what happens if Kemba Walker all MBA, he supermax eligible can you pay him five years two hundred and twenty one million dollars and basically bring that same roster. Michael Jordan's never paid the luxury tax never had. Ever ever has has never done it in will he do it? And if he if he will you're basically paying it for probably a what a forty win team at at best just because the same pieces come back like how hard do you think it'll be down the line to trade some of these guys that have this contract. I think it's nearly impossible. I think any players tradeable. I think the walk contract is on tradeable because of the achilles injury. But you know, I wrote up Oklahoma City for when they get eliminated here. If it's if it's Portland in game five, and that's one of the questions. I asked about Russell Westbrook. Here's a player that's out for years one hundred seventy million dollars. I understand. He's the face of the franchise. I understand he's never entered free agency since he was drafted in two thousand eight he was the big part of why Paul George committed. He's an all star here. But what happens if the funder all of a sudden say, you know, what we need to overhaul the roster year. Russell is the guy that we're going to look for for. From a trade standpoint. Can you equal value back, and I'm not certain you can know can you get draft picks back you certainly can based on where this where this year's shaking up to be maybe team like Phoenix possibly, but those are big numbers, especially when you have to match salaries and most cases unless you're taking back unless player goes into cap space. So. A guy making forty million dollars in on a roster. I think I think that scares off teams this as an uninvested observer, how excited are you for the start of free agency this summit? I'm one of those guys when I guess when the Commissioner talks about it or when or Kevin Durant talks about it where we kind of thrive on the chaos of uncertainty. I love the chaos of uncertainty. And I think why I'm looking forward to this summer is because there's there's going to be a big drop off. I think in in the summer of two thousand twenty I think we're we're looking at would this year with the impact with the number one who gets number pick starting may fourteenth. If it's New York, the what the value of Zion Williamson is and then Kevin Durant. Klay thompson. Kemba walker? Jimmy, Butler, quiet, Leonard all all both New York. And in LA teams haven't cap space. That is that's that's a great storyline. But then you look at AD and Draymond in a lot of restricted guys. Like, Ben Simmons who can get extensions this summer and guys like the more Rosen. So there is a little bit of a drop off. And I think what teams do this summer. We'll we'll certainly set up for you know, where they are in the future here. I think the point about both LA and New York teams is interesting because this is the first time I feel like in our collective lifetimes that the fact that the nets and the clippers have Spacey mean something different now than it ever has. Well, and and it's funny too. Is that you would probably if you ranked where those four are as far as desirable place right now based on the infrastructure in LA with the clippers the management coaching in Brooklyn. You'd probably rank those those teams ahead of the Lakers in the Knicks. And we probably couldn't say that what you know six or seven years ago in the maybe in the summer of two thousand ten when we saw the big, you know, all those free agents out there out there. Gantt? So yeah, that's the fascinating thing is that the little brother in those two places are now kind of in in the pecking order last thing for you. Do you have Kevin Durant? Guests are you willing to try to guess what? In the world goes through. Kevin Durant mind. I can't read Kevin Durant. Probably as much as I can't read quite Leonard. As far as their. So it's interesting does he get to a point where that winning I call winning fatigue where you basically go through three years of winning winning championships where you said, hey, I've already accomplished enough here is where I wanna go to my next challenge. And I think New York is an the Altima challenge here. This is not Golden State. This is not even LeBron go into the Lakers where you had Kouzmin Ingram in Lonzo ball there and cap space to to add another piece going into a New York team that basically has an expansion roster here in in maybe that changes if there's somebody else coming with him. All right. That is Bobby marks ESPN front office inside of for the NBA. There's so much. I appreciate it. Thank you. Nobody is not shy about blocking onto the right time. Team recognizes we all slip up. So we'll get one lucky following opportunity to make amends its unblocked me. Bo Bo we've got a pretty unique one ear today. We've got to friends or supposed- friends. We're not sure exactly how close they are. But they seem pretty close if they're sticking up for one. Another man Danny Toronto and our men APN Toronto at zero seven to three on Twitter and at snoop VP on Twitter. So the original offense comes from our men VP who said it would be really nice one day to read something by Jason's furry referring to Jason lockenfora that doesn't focus on race. He's talking about a Josh Freeman piece. He's also wildly inconsistent. Throwing the ball over behind receivers and bed footwork. When pressure comes do you? Remember, what your conversation was about? When it came to Josh Freeman. Or what your thoughts on? Josh Freeman were at the time. It depends on what year this goes back to two thousand fourteen. Fourteen 'Sound like when he was getting run out at Tampa Bay. Sounds like it. Yes. Yeah. I mean. Yeah. One of the worst games ever his one game bag. But I mean, I I question about Freeman. But I thought great she was treating them bad. That is my recollection. But helped me help you we got that is correct. And then what happened was you blocked this guy and his friend? Danny proceeds to start a campaign this extends over many years all the way from two thousand fourteen start a campaign to get his men AP on blocked come on Bo on block the man he's a UNC fan to still heartbroken from Monday. And he's nine years fan. He's also thinking, Bruce, Arthur things Bruce would love to know, why Bowe blocked me. I don't even have a dog, Abby. Okay. Bo dude unblock as both. Yo you block me on Twitter straight waste Ammann's time. But then. He's also Wallin out on a couple of other things saying that he SPN was stupid to have hired you. Oh, yes. Because after all he client. He said that you claims that no one cares about the Olympics. It was the Winter Olympics aka the whiter Olympics. Congrats bow you've joined the elite company of at real skip Bayless, hashtag idiot. That's the guy that was sticking go. This is the guy sticking up for the guy. Yes. I guess I couldn't like directly connect whether or not he him through in these haymakers over the years was post blocking or pre blocking because he's still tweeting at you, even though he's been blocked by you. There's like another thing that you that you tweeted out, by the way, I'm a pretty big fan of the Canada. I know by the way range of reasons why. But Toronto was great to me. No need to lie though. You know, there's a picture of former mayor rob Ford, and he said are cops actually serve. Him. Protect don't shoot. First ask questions later. Lots of things going on here. Lots of things going on your your thoughts. I can tell from right now. It doesn't sound like the first guy really did that much. Right. He did sound like a lazy don't be talking about race guy. You know? And I really got to hear that. It was all the mad at before. He says something else stupid. So it was probably a good idea for me to get them up out of here. But that other dude. He did it to himself, shall we? Get our minimum phone. Yeah. Yeah. The first guy gets comeback the other guy. Yeah. Okay. Bomani was going on. We're going on though, you'll call me eighty it. Now. You're gonna call me an idiot. Now debut called me eighty right? I didn't call you that you block my boy. So I just say why you block them for day day gate, read it read it k-. What tweets congrats Bomani Jones you've joined the elite company of at Rio. Skip Bayless Heche idiot. You got that thing. He said about when I got a guy me a job. What do you say to recall that three ESPN you're pretty stupid hired Bill money Jones after all he claims? No one cares about the Olympics. I just wanna know if you go you idiot now that wasn't much week though. Right. But I did peop- you Cleveland to and I was like allowed you block for and he just walked right back. Day. He say he did do it. But you gotta do front. You got Danny sing at. Zero seven to three the twenty third of February two thousand fourteen. Allows back and probably I probably did say. I just wanna say this. You're a good friend because you got your friend unblocked we're gonna call him, and we're going to unblock him. So I just wanted to tell you that you are a great friend, and apparently not trying to call me in idiot. No mo. Is we put that aside? No, no. No, no. I ain't put it aside. You about here gave hangup. Let's talk to the guy that gets blocked. Hey this Bomani, Matt. How are you? How you doing doing? All right, man. I gotta say I really so much like you initially tweet an ice change. But I realize I may have overreacted bit in blocking you, and so we go we're gonna bring you back around. Nice. Nice. Yeah. You know, that was a long time goes and stuff like that. But I look forward to show every week and everything like that. So you know, it's a long time ago. Just want to get all the content. No, happy to be on blocks. Appreciate it. You homeboy though. He's in the dark. Yeah. Yeah. He he didn't. He did see how he wasn't getting on block. He's saying there forever. You, and I'm gonna tell you that just so, you know, he's a good friend because he made a fool of himself in such a way that guaranteed that you will come back and that he was staying the dog, and I wouldn't have done that for you. If I was him. So I gotta take about. Yeah. So I appreciate it, man. I'll talk to you soon. I take, sir. See there we go about making dreams come true. People submit to this, by the way. Well, so here's the thing about that guy. I mean, he literally forgot that. He sent those tweets there are receipts to this thing. Like, I'm literally like in my hand. Got them. Don't be half Sepah this. Yes. What what do you think about the guys saying that he saw you with the clevelander hosted him? I don't know. I don't know. Maybe I'm sure if I knew he was speaking to me, I would have spoken to him. How many times do you get people coming up to you send please unblock me? It doesn't happen much in. It's never worked. Do you hold these people in the same realm as people just coming up to you trying to take a picture when I come up to you asking block, not pretty nice of the people that want to take pictures, but he asked me to say people when they asked me on blocked. I first thing I say is would you say, and I can tell them their reaction, whether they should get blocked. And so we don't remember this at all. No this happens a lot, man. But you need to be does this like he talked to me. It sounds like wallpa- isn't he has to be on blocked, and I just kept Longo keep it moving. Yeah. They clearly because wasted is boy he knew he should have been blah. So then spray Shen for this was after the last one added ton of people reaching out directly to me saying, please, please them block me and blog me Mukmin book me, I responded with the gif are men from the wire come at the king you best not miss. Yes. And sure enough this guy shooting points today. Also forgetting originally what he said, so yes. Oh, well, welcome back, and I so much joining us here on the right time thing couple times week Mamane gay by saying how does everything behind the scenes? Thank you, sir. Thank to our sponsor light strength. Thanks to our on black. Meet candidates have already forgotten their names. But one of them's back in the other one will stay in the darkness forever. And thank you to Bobby marks the conclusion of our baseline series on the supermax. We appreciate his perspective on it. As a former executive show to check out the to calm shows draft week and before hidden Nashville Meena Linney to start the new ESPN commercial chat with my buddy. Dominic Foxworth about the needs of possible strategies of the teams in the top six cardinals forty nine is jets raiders books in giants to her show and hours apple podcasts about five wherever you get bucket. What's guys a couple of days? Thanks for checking out the right time with the mighty Jones podcast. You can listen or subscribe on the ESPN app apple podcasts or every listen to podcasts. Go right time with Bomani Jones.

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Langston Hughes born - February 1, 1902

This Day in History Class

07:04 min | 1 year ago

Langston Hughes born - February 1, 1902

"Here's the thing saving money with. GEICO is almost better than playing pickup basketball. Because there's always that guy who joins your game. He never passes the rock. He constantly bricks threes. And who completely hack you. And then put his hands up and say no foul no foul with GEICO. It's easy to switch switch and save on car insurance no need to fake. An ankle sprain. Because you're absolutely exhausted. So switching save with GYCO. It's almost better than sports. Hi I'm Bobby Brown. Welcome to my podcast beyond the beauty. A new show from IHEART radio. I'm going to be sitting down with different from people each week that I think we can all learn from IHEART. Radio is number one for podcast but don't take our word for it. Listen to the on the beauty on the iheartradio APP APP apple podcasts. Or ever you get your podcast because we all have something to learn about the real meaning of beauty in this day in history class is a production of iheartradio. Everyone I'm eve and welcome back to this day in history class. A podcast asked where we unwrap a piece of history. Candy every day today is February first. Twenty twenty the day was February first. Nineteen ninety-two writer and activist Langston. Dan Hughes was born in Joplin Missouri. Hughes was an important figure in the Harlem Renaissance and he is considered a pioneer of modern black literature. Aw though it's long been believed that he was born in Nineteen. Oh two recent archival discoveries do suggest that he may have been born a year. Earlier Hughes Lineage was full of prominent and politically active people. His maternal grandmother's first husband Luis leary died in John. Brown's raid at harpers ferry grandfather. Charles Henry Langston was an abolitionist and one of the first black people to attend Oberlin College. His great uncle. The John Mercer Langston was the first Black Congressman from Virginia. The first president of Virginia State University and the First Dean of the law school at Harvard University versity and his grandmother frequently told him stories about their family history. His parents were James. Hughes and carry Langston Hughes was young. His father left the family and moved to Mexico and his parents divorced. His mother moved to different cities for work. As a result. Hugh's grandmother grandmother raised him in Lawrence Kansas though he lived with and visit his mother in some cities like Kansas City in Colorado Springs. Eventually he settled with his mother and stepfather and Lincoln Illinois. Then Cleveland Ohio by this time Hughes had already begun writing poetry. He went to High School School in Cleveland and there began delving into leftist literature in ideology took interest in the souls of black folk by W E B Two boys and studied the work of Paul. Laurence Dunbar Carl Sandberg Friedrich Nietzsche and other writers and he started publishing his poems Hughes wrote one of his most famous poems. The Negro speaks of rivers when he was a teenager on train to Mexico once he graduated high school. He spent a year in Mexico with his father father but he had a strained relationship with his father who considered black people inferior even though he was black and he urged Hughes to pursue a career. That was more practical than writing. But Hughes immersed himself more in his writing he moved to New York City attended Columbia. University took odd jobs. Jobs then dropped out of college. He traveled to Africa and Europe as a crewman and he lived in Paris for a while where he continued to write poems and fiction and learned more about Blues Jazz artists when he returned to the US he moved to Washington DC and took trips to Harlem where he met literary figures. It's like county colon and Jean toomer in nineteen twenty six alfred. A Knopf published his first book of poetry the weary blues in addition to poetry Hughes wrote novels short stories and plays in which he portrayed black American life in the nineteen twenties through nineteen sixties. His works include the simple tales which began as a regular column in the Chicago defender. A book of short stories called the ways of white folks and apply Cotton Lotto that ran on Broadway for more than a year. H- used it reading tours and he traveled throughout the Soviet Union and Asia. Riding a lot of fluffed his poetry he wrote prolifically and many people around the world supported his work but many others disliked his portrayals of everyday working class nice black people believing it was a disturbance to the race to display the less desirable aspects of black life and other critics thought. That Hughes didn't take a strong strong enough political stance in his work regardless Hughes became successful enough to live off of his writing and public lectures Hughes wrote up until his death in nineteen sixty seven. His ashes are beneath a floor. Medallion at the Sean Burke Center for Research in Black Culture in Harlem. I'm Eve Steph coat and hopefully you know a little more about history today than you did yesterday. If you haven't gotten your fill of history yet you can find us on twitter facebook and instagram at Ti D. H.. Fee podcast. You can also email us at this day at Heart Media Dot Com. Thank you again for listening and we'll see you tomorrow for more podcasts. From iheartradio vis the iheartradio radio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Hi I'm Bobby Brown. Welcome to my podcast beyond the beauty. A new show. Oh from iheartradio. I'M GONNA be sitting down with different people each week that I think we can all learn from IHEART. Radio is number one for podcast but don't take our the word for it. Listen to the on the beauty on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. or Get your podcast because we all have something to learn about the Real uh-huh meaning of beauty the richest most powerful place on earth of fiction. PODCAST TUMAN BAY on an epic scale. How does everything power everything we have to get away from? This place is our destiny now on the podcast network Luke. Maye old episodes of Tumor Bay Seasons One and two now for free on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts.

Langston Hughes Bobby Brown GEICO Mexico Harlem Charles Henry Langston John Mercer Langston iheartradio basketball IHEART Laurence Dunbar Carl Sandberg Jean toomer apple Cleveland Harlem Renaissance Oberlin College Luis leary Joplin Soviet Union twitter
Greensboro sit-ins began / Langston Hughes born - February 1

This Day in History Class

13:31 min | Last month

Greensboro sit-ins began / Langston Hughes born - February 1

"Today's episode is brought to you by ford. The ford f series has been america's pickup truck leader for forty three years and counting the all new twenty twenty one. F one fifty. It's completely redesigned to be the toughest most productive f one fifty ever then tear has gotten a huge upgrade with more luxury and comfort than there's ever been an available tailgate work. Surface helps simplify and support. Your work includes guides for measuring even built in slot for a smartphone or a tablet computer. Tough this mark can only be called. F one fifty check out the all new two thousand twenty one ford f one fifty at ford dot com built fort proud built ford. Tough the therapy for black girls. Podcast is your space to explore. Mental health personnel development. And all of the small decisions we can make to become the best possible versions of ourselves. I'm your host dr joy. Hardin bradford a licensed psychologist in atlanta georgia. And i can't wait for you to join the conversation every wednesday this therapy for black girls. Podcast on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcast take care everyone. Technically you're getting two days in history today because we're we're running two episodes from the history. Volt hope you enjoy hi. I'm steve and welcome to this day in history class. A show that uncovers history one day at a time. The day was february. First nineteen sixty. It was the height of the civil rights movement. In america and black students across the south were organizing to fight for equal rights segregation between african american and white people was the norm and for years activists have been fighting the status quo with methods of nonviolent protest. So on the afternoon february first four students name ezell blair junior david richmond franklin mccain joseph mcneil purchase items than down a whites only. Let's counter at a woolworth's store in greensboro north carolina. They refused to move their action. That day was simple but it took careful planning and it spurred more citizens across the country the four men all students at north carolina agricultural and technical state university what become known as the greensboro four. Four students would meet in their dorm rooms and so-called all sessions where they discuss the treatment of black people in the us and what they could do about it. But after blair now named gebreel. Kazan was denied service. When he tried to get food at a greyhound station. The crew was moved to action. They knew they needed to do more. And talk. less to be able to incite real change. So they decided to protest racial segregation by conducting at woolworth which was a large enough entity that any major disruption get national attention from black and non black people and if they got enough media attention they thought then they could get woolworth to desegregate. It's been said that. White store owner ralph don's encouraged and council the greensboro four into the woolworth bids but mccain zayn have denied. The student was john's idea. Anyway the concept of in was not new activist had engaged in this kind of protest for over a decade by this point in nineteen forty-three pauli. Murray a howard university law student who go on to become a lawyer and priest organized stool sittings in segregated cafeterias women in the citizens civil rights committee in saint. Louis missouri held lunch counter. Sit ins in the nineteen forties and in the nineteen fifties the congress on racial equality stage. Sit ins in baltimore to protest discrimination but even those students had already been happening all over the country. The greensboro woolworth's sit in sparked a massive movement on february first the greensboro four. Tried to order coffee at the woolworth's lunch counter but they were refused service. As was the store policy the staff asked the students to leave but the students did not budge when police got to the woolworth. They said they couldn't take any action. Because the students hadn't provoked anybody and even then local media was already all over the story so the four state at the lunch counter until the store closed early and then went back to campus to find more people to join their cause the next day nearly thirty students showed up at the woolworth's to protest segregation and the day after that more than sixty students showed up the student. Executive committee for justice sent a letter to the president of w woolworth asking the company to quote. Take a firm stand to eliminate discrimination in the following days. The protests grew students from bennett. College in deadly high school also joined the demonstrations as well as white students from nearby colleges members of the klu klux klan and white patrons heckled a student but by february fourth the senate had spread to another lunch counter at s h kress and co and on february fifth the protests had grown to over three hundred strong and was getting a ton of media coverage some students protesting at the woolworth and chris. Stores did get arrested. But the boycotts were hurting the store sales and soon people all over the country were organizing sit ins and other forms of non violent protests against racial segregation. The student nonviolent coordinating committee formed in april nineteen sixty at the encouragement of civil rights organizer ella baker and in july nineteen sixty. The woolworth and chris counters were integrated. F w woolworth employees charles best mattie long susie morrison and jamie robinson or the first african americans to eat at the woolworth's lunch counter. I'm eve steph coat and hopefully you know a little bit more about history today and you did yesterday. Hey y'all if you listen. Yesterday you know that i had a cold. I'm still recovering from that. Cold my is still horse. So thank you for bearing with me again. You can subscribe to this day in history class on apple podcast iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcast. Come back tomorrow for another tippett from history. Good afternoon would you like to try. Free of our double fudge brownie. Oh sure ooh. That's very good. I'll just take one more just to be sure. Yep still very good. Some things never change like never being able to take just one free sample and geico saving folks. Lots of money on their car insurance Macadamia nut i taste. We take one more sir. Yeah i thought so. Fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percents or more. Hey i'm andy if you don't know me it's probably because i'm not famous but i did start a men's grooming company called harry's the idea for harry's came out of a frustrating experience i had buying razor blades. Most brands were overpriced over. Designed an out of touch. At harry's our approach is simple. here's our secret. We make sharp durable blades and sell them at honest prices for as low as two dollars. Each we care about quality so much that we do some crazy things like by a world class german blade factory obsessing over every detail means we're confident and offering a one hundred percent quality guarantee. Millions of guys have already made the switch to harry's so thank you if you're one of them and if you're not we hope you give us a try with this special offer. Get a harry starter. Set with a five blade. Razor waited handle shave gel and a travel cover offered just three bucks plus free shipping just go to harrys dot com and enter four four four four at checkout. That's harrys dot com code. Four four four enjoy everyone. I'm eaves and welcome back to this day in history class. A podcast where we unwrap a piece of history candy. Every day today was february first. Nineteen o two writer activist. Langston hughes was born in joplin. Missouri was an important figure in the harlem renaissance and he is considered a pioneer of modern black literature. Though it's long been believed that he was born in nineteen oh two. Recent archival discoveries do suggests that he may have been born a year earlier hughes lineage was full of prominent and politically active people. His maternal grandmother's first husband luis leary died in john. Brown's raid harpers ferry. His grandfather charles can relaxed. In was an abolitionist and one of the first black people to attend college. His great uncle. John mercer langston was the first black congressman from virginia. The first president of virginia state university and the first dean of the law school at harvard university and his grandmother frequently told him stories about their family's history. His parents were james hughes and carry langston. When he was young his father left the family and moved to mexico and his parents divorced. His mother moved to different cities for work. As a result. Hugh's grandmother raised him in lawrence kansas though he lived with and visit his mother in some cities like kansas city in colorado springs. Eventually he settled with his mother and stepfather and lincoln illinois. Then cleveland ohio. By this time hughes had already begun poetry. He went to high school in cleveland. And there he began delving into leftist literature ideology. He took interest in the souls of black folk by w e boys and studied the work. Of paul laurence dunbar. Carl sandberg friedrich nietzsche and other writers and he started publishing. His poems hughes. Wrote one of his. Most famous poems speaks of rivers when he was a teenager on a train to mexico once he graduated high school he spent a year in mexico with his father but he had a strained relationship with his father. Who considered black people inferior even though he was black and he urged hughes to pursue a career. That was more practical than writing. But hughes immersed himself more in his writing. He moved to new york. City attended columbia. University took odd jobs then dropped out of college. He traveled to africa and europe as a crewman and he lived in paris for a while where he continued to write poems and fiction and learned more about blues and jazz artists when he returned to the us he moved to washington dc and took trips to harlem where he met literary figures like county. Cullen and jean toomer in nineteen twenty six alfred. A knopf published his first book of poetry the weary blues in addition to poetry hughes wrote novels short stories and plays in which he portrayed black american life in one thousand nine hundred nineteen. His works include the simple tales which began as a regular column in the chicago defender. A book of short stories called the ways of white folks and a play called mulatto. That ran on broadway for more than a year. H- used it reading tours and he traveled throughout the soviet union and asia writing a lot of leftist poetry prolifically and many people around the world supported his work but many others disliked his portrayals of everyday working class black people believing it was a disturbance to the race to display the less desirable aspects of black life and other critics thought. That hughes didn't take a strong enough political stance in his work regardless hughes became successful enough to live off of his writing and public lectures hughes wrote up until his death in nineteen sixty seven. His ashes are beneath a floor medallion at the schaumburg centre for research in black culture in harlem. I'm eve jeffcoat and hopefully you know a little more about history today than you did yesterday. If you haven't gotten your fill of history yet you can find us on twitter. Facebook and instagram at t. I eight feet podcast. You can also email us at this day. At heart media dot com. Thank you again for listening and we'll see you tomorrow.

woolworth ford greensboro dr joy Hardin bradford ezell blair david richmond franklin mccain joseph mcneil woolworth's store north carolina agricultural an White store ralph don mccain zayn citizens civil rights committe Louis missouri greensboro woolworth Executive committee for justic w woolworth College in deadly high school harry
Answering Listener

Casting Actors Cast

23:30 min | 2 years ago

Answering Listener

"So yet you're headed on the resume under special skills can sneeze on demand thought. I thought that special skill. Casting actors cash incites actors on acting in the business of show casting director, Jeffrey drives Bach takes you behind the scenes and reveals secrets to successful acting career. You can find out more on the web at casting actors cast dot com. Please enjoy liken share casting actors cast now, here's your host Jeffrey dries up. Well, hello. And welcome to another episode of casting actress cast, how are you? I'm Jeffrey dries back. I'm a casting director with mccorkell casting in New York. Thank you. So very much for tuning in today. I hope you having a good day. I'm really excited to be sharing some answers to the questions that you've been having over the past several weeks. I've been receiving some really nice feedback and many folks have gone to casting actress cast dot com, and there's a place where you can fill out a comment form. And that's where you can ask a question if you like, and you simply click that form, and by the way, if you do that you're also given the opportunity to download a free. Yes, I did say free PDF book the book is called conversation pieces out of the studio the voice over workshop for professional actors. It's a one hundred page book about what it is to be an actor in voice over work. I. I have got many people have downloaded this book, and I'm really really excited. So we're answering your questions today on casting actors cast, this is that moment in the podcast where I want to just share by extreme thanks and appreciation for those of you who have been tuning in for those of you who are regular listeners. Or if you're a new listener, it's a real thrill for me to be able to do these podcasts, and hopefully help a few of you out there, if you're an actor, and you really want some support and some help and some advice than you've come to the right place because you know, advices for free. And so is the podcast. So please, join your other actor friends, tell them about casting actress cast and go to the website casting actors cast dot com, you'll see some previous episodes. I've been taking an inventory of the colleges and universities that I have been going to both solo and many times I go with Pat the list is just kind of incredible. And a big shout out to our friends at Penn State university. Thank you so much for hosting us. We had a really wonderful time. The work is really great. The BFA training program is quite exceptional and subunits campus. And a really significant imprint is being made by this fantastic BFA training program at Penn State university. So I couldn't be more thrilled to have been invited and patent. I really enjoyed ourselves. So thank you, very very much. Depend state university. Sorry about that little background. If you heard it. Meyer conditioning, just kind of popped on without me. Remembering to turn it off in it. Kind of sounds like a fifty seven Chevy. It's kind of crazy. But anyway, so a significant list of places that I have been this season in the new year northern Illinois university Rutgers University southern Methodist university, Washington state university, Indiana, U Penn State university row in college is coming up university of Connecticut, I'm finishing up a workshop there next week. And then of course, there are lot of university showcases coming to New York of most recently I've worked with the northern Virginia state university and Montclair state university students, they're doing really awesome work as well. I thought it would be a great moment for us to answer some of those questions that actually these students have been asking me and Pat over the times that we've been visiting these places they come up with similar questions. And I thought well, you know, what lot of people are having the same question. So let's reiterate some of these answers. And let's go ahead and. Look at some of the questions that I've been getting on the the website again, if you go to casting actress cast dot com, you'll see that there's a place where you can leave a comment. I encourage you, please. If there's any question about the business whatsoever that I can be any help to you. I would love to be able to answer. And that way, you your question can be helpful to the rest of the community of actors that's out there. And it's really true. No two programs are like in no two programs have the exact same kind of training. They all have a kind of a different philosophy. I think that that's really interesting. I think that that's really exciting because I don't think there's any one answer. And that leads me to my point. There's really no one answer to all of these questions that we're going to be dealing with today. And I want you to keep that in mind, these are just based on my own personal experience, and you might have some other ideas, and I'd love to share those ideas. So please let me know if I missing the boat on any of these questions have you had some. Experiences that you might wanna share just in terms of you know, helping out your fellow actors with some of the questions that I'm about to discuss with you today. Please truth is like a community. Let's help each other. And that way, we can not only answer questions, but we can feel more confident about our work. And to me that you know, the best thing ever, it's just to kind of do the kun-bae thing a little bit and reassure each other. Because I continue to believe that this is an excellent time to be an actor. And this is an excellent time for you to consider jumping in and participating. So that's the way I feel about it. We've got a lot of of really fantastic shows coming up that were casting first of all we just met with a producer and unafraid. I can't really talk about the three films that they're asking us about and we're excited because that means that we'll have a summer of doing some fee. Film work. So that will be a lot of fun. We've wrapped up Barrington stage, which is a monumental task summer theater that one all kinds of wards and doing really excellent work. So we're really happy that that seems to wrap up have wrapped up really well also contemporary American theater festival. C T F. They do such original and creative. Interesting work. Ed, Harris green is the heading up that program and has for many years, and we've been casting him for many years, and it looks like we've got a really exceptional cast. They do affor- productions sometimes they'll rotate it's like a rotating repertory situation. So you might be playing the lead one night. And then the next night, you might be playing a supporting character. But it's just amazing because these are new plays and new playwrights. I'm C ATF actually commissioned Michael Weller to write a piece and they're so they'll be a new Michael Weller play. That's being seen at sea. ATF? You have a chance to get down. Down there that would probably be great. Plus, you know, Barrington stage in pittsfield, Massachusetts. So if you're in the northeast put it on your summer to do list will you because if you're traveling kinda wanna see some theater, no better place in Barrington stage company. There's a lot of really nice theaters up in that area. But Barrington is something we've been working on and Pat has been casting for over twenty years, and that seems to be really kind of a cool thing to do. So let's jump into some of these questions. The first question that I received that I really wanted to take a minute to answer is Indiana University where a student said I've applied and been accepted to some grad schools in. I don't know if I should go or not or whether or not armed with my BFA degree. Should I go right to one of the major cities where there's stuff going on? For example, this actor was considering New York Atlanta, Chicago, Los Angeles, they were even thinking. About Minneapolis Minnesota because of the work being done at the Guthrie. And so the actor was really in the quandary like, you know, I've been accepted to a grad school. Should I take that time and it happened to be a three year program? And the good news was is that it would be paid for by the university because you'll be teaching some undergraduate classes in theater and acting. Whether or not that three year period of time would make it more difficult or challenging for you to come to some of those major markets after you're done with your masters degree, and would that hinder or help you in an actual acting career? That's a great question. And you can see why there's so many variables to the answer. Only. Because if you are for example, if you are somebody who is perceived or looks quite young maybe younger than your own age. Maybe going right into the profession would be a really great thing for you to do a Mony because if you spending three more years at three more years out of the profession only because you're sort of back into a pervert Buell bubble when you're training in a master's program. So that's something that's difficult to consider the other options are do you have the support to be able to go into? To a major market and be an actor. What kind of job would you have in order to sustain yourself financially while you're starting your acting career? So that's a big one. Maybe you're kind of thinking that your parents would be really really supportive of you more. Even if you did get a masters degree because then there's always some teaching opportunities that might be a head of you, and many many many actors decide that they enjoy the environment at a university and then want to jump into some teaching opportunities. I think that that's also quite valid. So you can see all of these questions are open. But I think it has to do more with your marketability. And that means are you and have you come into your own in terms of the way, you look your energy. How your presence is being looked at now. Because if you think that this is something that you could be doing TV series right away. Then. Why would you wait? Why would you want to wait? If this is something that you've always wanted to do is that just prolonging something which would make you probably or perhaps make you more frustrated by going into an MFA degree program. So I can understand and appreciate the challenge. I guess the answer is such an individual thing really based on how you feel about your readiness based on two things your own emotional sensibilities. But also what's going on in the industry? A theory interested in doing film and television what three films and three television series are shooting right now that you know, that you would be right for based on the training that you've had in your BFA program. I know that a lot of BFA programs are really excellent at at foundational work and excellent training. But maybe they are lacking in film and television experience, maybe they're just not quite enough to warrant you jumping in to. Film and television career because you haven't had enough training in that. That's something to think about if you think gosh. Well, okay. I haven't had that much training and film and television. But what I will do I'm going to go to Los Angeles. And I'm going to enroll in some film, and television training classes. Now, that's a great idea that might be the trend of supplement you need to get yourself feeling good and ready for a television career. Again, I'm not trying to hedge the question, but you can see that. I'm thinking about all of these variables that one choice is not right for everyone. It such an individual choice would you benefit from more university training in a setting that is a little bit more protected where you can do exceptionally. Good work is that more beneficial than you, you know, deciding to jump in with both feet and become a professional actor in one of the major markets since we're talking about major markets. Let's talk about minor markets, perhaps you're an actor in a small environment. Maybe you're a smaller location. What -tunities are there for you? And that is an excellent question as well. Maybe you're getting some pressure from home if you just kind of finished university or you have some time left at university training may be jumping into a summer. Feeder then going back to school. Maybe those kinds of opportunities are there for you. But oftentimes, I find that the actors are told that gosh who really great for you to come back home, and maybe just worked for the summer to earn some money in that leaves you out of the running for maybe some acting opportunities. What I would encourage you to do is to really research. What might be available where you are that can help you in your acting career because I know that there are all kinds of dance of tr-, summer theaters, even community theater productions taking place over the summer getting involved is probably the best thing you can do for yourself. So do that job that can earn you some money over the summer? But you know, you're young and you're got the answer G for God's sake. Check out those kinds of opportunities in the third aren't any opportunities. Why don't you make some why don't you get together with some like minded people in your small community and come up with? Plan to either do a reading performance may be reading a play. Maybe a staged reading of a new play. There's all kinds of things that you can do get yourself involved. And keep yourself feeling sharp and connected. So I have in front of me a communication that. I received from the contact form. Message place on the website casting actress cast dot com, and I won't use their full name. But I got this really nice note from Sean, and I wanna thank you very much on for a sending this. He says thanks so much for your inside full in positive outlook on this industry. It's always been nice to have a weekly reminder that casting professionals are not only on your side, but artists in their own right? Keep up the good work. Gosh, Sean, thank you so much. That means the world to me that you would actually recognize that we're all in this kind of creative environment together. And that we're on your side. And the more empathy. You have for what we do. And the more understanding I. Have for what you're you? Do I think makes for a better creative environment? So thanks so much shot. Here's another one. This is from a gentleman named Sam I won't go through the whole message. But he says I would wonder I was wondering if you could help me find voice acting job. Even though you never heard me sneeze before. I have the deepest knees. And my dream is to do sneeze overs to TV commercials or anything that has a sneeze over. Very specific Sam somebody who's perfected their ability to sneeze. Well, you know, what this world is becoming more and more specialized. I'm sure that there may be some sneeze opportunities there for you. I'm at a loss though to say, how would you put a demo of that together? It's one minute of sneezes. Here's my intellectual sneeze that. And here is my mechanic sneeze. I'm sorry. I couldn't resist still Sam listen. I appreciate it. It's a specialty world out there. So you might want to figure out how you're going to market the sneeze. And then get it out to people, and listen, I'll be more than welcome to listen to your sneeze demo. Okay. Did my day really did hook as so let's go onto another message. And I really appreciate this nice complimentary note from Nina who's from another country, and I won't use your last name, Nina, but she has talked a little bit about her background. But she comes down to the question. And she says my question for you is this are there agencies in New York City or Brooklyn that are specialized in foreigners so Nina's from another country, and she's had some success in that other country. Now here she is in the United States. She came here to learn to speak better English only because that meant there more opportunities for her. But the answer to her question is really interesting. The second part of that is to you. How can I find or access information about real agencies to work with and that's another important question? So I appreciate these questions very much. Here are my answers number one. I do not know of any agency. That's. Specializes in people from another country because there are a couple of reasons for that one of them is honest all agencies have talent that is by lingual. It's a matter of seeking out an agency that would really appreciate the fact that you speak another language, plus, and I don't, you know, have to kind of beat this with a big drum here, but they're very very delicate issues surrounding people from other countries now working here in United States. And I don't mean to make this political at all I'm just saying that that is another reason why you won't see somebody specializing in that. If you are able to work in the United States than simply check out agencies in general checkout agencies that are appropriate to the kind of work that you're looking for and that brings us to the second part of her question, which is this. How do you find out about what agents are doing what? And whether they're like, not creepy, whether they're, you know legitimate agents. How do you find that out? Well, this is an important thing. And I mentioned this in previous podcast. Let me just reiterate this that legitimate agencies are what's called franchised by the unions sag after and actors equity association that means that they abide by rules and regulations set forth by the union. They also have union approved contracts. So if the talent is going to sign with an agent, for example, that this would be a say after approved contract for the agent to represent the talent. So that's the very most important. First question is is this particular agency franchised by the union? Now, I'm not talking about managers because managers can just put up a shingle and decide that they're representing talent. You don't need. Any kind of union approval? And that's why many times there are some managers out there that are little unscrupulous because they're not really acting as managers there really acting as providing a products and services like, you know, if you get new pictures through my agency, and frankly their despicable their their ripoffs and run away as quickly as possible to anyone who calls themselves a manager. But his ask you to pay for anything. You should not be messing with somebody. Who's asking you to to to pony up some funds to help get your career started. That's just totally wrong. There are many many good managers out there as well. The question to ask any managers. What agencies do you work with only because legally any sag after or equity contract has to be negotiated through an agent. So the manager has to go through an agent for that particular job. Whether it's film. Mm television or theater? So good question for managers. What agencies do you work with and those agencies that they work with would probably be franchised by the unions. And that makes this a legitimate organization. Now, how do you find out about this? Well, you know, what it's like the famous cool thing called the internet. And you could simply Google in agents in your area, New York talent agents or franchised agents in New York and you'll come up with an entire list. I did an entire thing about agent so just know the differences between those booty agents, those mid-size agencies and those Bohumil agencies. There's a really important distinction between the three of them based on their size and each one has a legitimate purpose. But might not be worth your time. To for example, go into a huge behemoth agency many times actors entering the profession will go to a smaller medium sized agency that just because those agents are little more open and interested in working with newer younger talent. So that's something that these to consider Finally I didn't want to imply that you have to be a member of. The union in order to work with these agencies. That's not true. You do not have to be a member of the union to work with these franchised agents. I hope that makes sense. I hope that this has been helpful to you. Thank you so much, please. Please, please. Keep those questions coming in go to casting actors cast fill out the message form that's on the website. And I look forward to hearing back from you, please send me a question. This is casting actors cast, and I'm Jeffrey dries back Heather fantastic. You've been listening to casting actors cast with host Jeffrey dry spot. Find out more at casting actors cast dot com, and let us know if you would like us to cover topics you're interested in thanks for listening. I'm out to disarm.

New York Pat Penn State university United States Sam Jeffrey New York City director Los Angeles Michael Weller Nina Jeffrey Barrington Indiana University Barrington Chevy Sean ATF Illinois university Rutgers Un Minneapolis
The problem with grand juries

Post Reports

33:04 min | 5 months ago

The problem with grand juries

"Tune into the optimistic outlook podcast at Siemens. Dot. com. Slash optimistic. From the newsroom of the. Washington. Post. Washington. Post. Watch. Ellen Nakashima with Washington. Post reports, I'm Martine powers. It's Thursday. October eighth. Today new questions about Brianna. Taylor's case the challenge for college students trying to vote and eighteen of two leaders with coronor's. Senator Harris in the case of Brianna. Taylor was justice done. You have two minutes. I don't believe I've I've talked with his mother to make a Palmer. And her family. And Her? Name in the vice presidential debate Senator Kamala Harris and Vice President Mike Pence were asked about Brianna. Taylor and the fact that no police officers have been charged in her death, we'll our heartbreaks. For the loss of innocent, any innocent American live. In the family Brianna Taylor has our sympathies. But I trust our justice system, a grand jury that refused the evidence. And it really is remarkable that as a former prosecutor. You would assume that it impaneled grand jury looking at all the evidence. Got It wrong but. you're entitled to Your Opinion Center. Pence was basically saying we should trust the grand juries decision. But what he didn't mention was that there are new questions about that decision based in part on audio recordings that have now been released from the actual grand jury proceedings. Mussa Yati has been reporting on what we can learn from that audio. So. Last month, we got the results of a grand jury investigation into the fatal shooting of Brianna Taylor in her apartment in March. There were three legal officers who their weapons, that night and none of them were directly charged in Taylor's killing one officer but Hankinson who was fired this summer was indicted on wanton endangerment charges, and that's for allegedly endangering three of Taylor's neighbors bullets went into their apartment but the other two officers who fired and who's bullets are believed to have hit Taylor were not charged with anything. I. Think a lot of people saw that and we're really surprised and in many cases frustrated at the fact that there were not even charges against these officers let alone convictions. So what information are we hearing now? That gives a little bit more insight into what actually happened there. So last week, we got about fifteen hours of grand jury recordings, and that is the evidence that prosecutors told the grand jury about what happened that night and it gave a lot of information about what exactly the jurors heard but it actually didn't answer a lot of questions at the same time and there are still a lot of protests and a lot of questions about what the jury heard and how much room they had to bring charges or not bring charges against these officers. Or. Just want to back up for a second make sure that I understand. So so a grand jury proceeding that's basically like when they're trying to decide whether or not someone is going to have charges brought against them. It's like a pretty preliminary part of criminal charging process, right? Yes. So again, jury proceeding is different from a trial in a trial by jury hears from both sides here from prosecutors and a here from defense attorneys but a grand jury is convene just to decide whether to indict. So the here from prosecutors, those prosecutors give them evidence they walk them through what charges they could bring, and they make suggestions and my understanding was that usually these grand jury hearings are supposed to be super secret they are. So legal experts say that it's to protect a lot of people involved that is to shield reputations of people who are investigated, but not ultimately charged also to protect witnesses to protect grand jurors from outside influence or from potential threats if it's a high profile case like this one. And it's pretty unusual that the audio would be released in this case, and partly that was because a judge ordered it to happen, and at the same time, there was an anonymous grandeur who also filed a court motion asking for it to be made public and asking for the ability to talk publicly. Background Juror has accused Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron who prosecuted this case of using grand jurors as a shield to deflect accountability. So there was a lot of pressure on the Attorney General's office in this case to file proceedings with the court so everyone could hear them. So what did we learn from these recordings about the process that went into this? So we heard from the. Witnesses that talked to the grand jurors and the jurors also heard recordings of some previously conducted interviews mostly with. In the case and one of the main takeaways was that there was a lot of disagreement about whether or not officer is knocked and announce themselves when they went into Brianna Taylor is home. Did. Lease so please. evil. The jurors heard from several officers who were really adamant that they announced their presence that they for up to two minutes. Each. Day began as A. Police Who is By taking presumptive sleaze and at the same time, they heard from six witnesses mostly neighbors who said, they did not hear anything at all. Lead vocalist. Anything prior. That the first thing they heard was gunshots sometimes been. Thirteen I'll set in their noses from her of the word. We send a lot of no rain gunshots. Sure, she was. In a way. And the noise. and. Why is that question of whether or not the police Knox before they entered Brianna Taylor Department why's that important? So when police broke down the door to Brianna, Taylor's apartment her boyfriend Kenneth Walker fired one shot with a gun that he legally possessed and he says that he didn't know that the police were law enforcement that he thought that they were intruders and that he was firing in self defense and Deano Cameron said that the the officers who actually shot Taylor were justified in firing because Walker headshot. I. The question of whether or not Kenneth. Walker and Brianna Taylor knew it was police breaking down? Their door has had a big impact on how the public perceives this case and what happened when mentor opened. So that was one part of the grand jury trial that we're hearing about from these tapes. What else should we learn? So the grand jury heard from bread Hankinson, the former. who was fired and is now charged in the case and he describes how when the door to Brianna Taylor apartment opened he thought that he saw someone there with an ar fifteen or similar rifle. Soggy. Nation on fire. Off. What I saw time. And figure in a shooting stance. And it looks as if he was into he or she was holding a. Walk, net rifles a and that he ran away, he ran back outside and he started firing his weapon in the direction that he thought that person was he fired through a sliding glass door and he says that the reason he did that is because he heard a lot of gunfire Keith thought that it was a person in the house shooting at his fellow officers. Signed firing. At the door or when. It satellite. Rapid. Rapid Fire. From. which and he says that he thought that his colleagues were being executed and that's the word that he used, and that's how he describes his decision to shoot. Cool? Fiery clash. Then, you. Execute because I knew the rebellion. But. Presumably if Brian. DILLARD's. Boyfriend. One shot back. Then the sound that he was hearing was his fellow police officers who were also shooting right the reason his testimony is so striking is because his interpretation of what happened is not what we now know to have happened we now that can walker Brianna Taylor boyfriend fired one shot he did not have ar fifteen he had a more standard gun that you would keep in your home and that the other few dozen shots that were fired came from the officers, his interpretation of what happened and his reason for firing was based on a apparent misunderstanding of what was going on that apartment. And we learned that grinders had a lot of questions. They ask things like why there was no body camera video in the case you. A. This. Also. Any. Of. They sometimes were told that there wasn't enough time to watch all the available video of something. In one case you hear somebody from the General's office say we don't have time to watch that. Mouth. Videos. And somebody else in the room. Probably a grand jury says we got time. And they move on and attorneys for Taylor's family have pointed to that and said, look the prosecutors didn't answer jurors questions they wanted to know more about the case they were confused. They found conflicting information and prosecutor is just moved on and what do you think that tells us about this whole process about the intentions behind this process I think it's likely to still remain questions about how aggressive prosecutors were in bringing charges. In this case. So Gregory's really are led by the prosecutors. They are the legal advisers to them. They have a lot of influence on what charges eventually get get brought or or don't get brought, and so what exactly was said to the jurors and how much information they got has a lot of burying on how the Public perceives this case and whether people feel confident that it was handled fairly and that the jurors had. Every available chance to bring whatever charges they thought were were fair and warranted, and then frankly is surprising for me to hear because it feels like if you're the prosecutor in this scenario, your job is basically to try to prosecute people, and at least I would assume that you were trying to move as hard as you can in that direction, which can bring on problems. But in this scenario, it seems like even the. Prosecutors were like we're at least it appeared that they gave the impression that they were actually trying to prosecute as forcefully as they could've. Yes. Oh, Attorney General Cameron initially said that he walked grand jurors through all six of Kentucky's homicide charges and the grandeur agreed with prosecutors that the wanted endangerment charges were the only ones that were warranted. In this case, the grand jury was given all the evidence presented all of the information. In ultimately ultimately made the determination. that. Detective Hankinson. Was the one to be indicted. But he kind of reframed in subsequent statements, we'll basically your question is about whether we recommended any murder charges against cosgrove in mattingly and the answer is no ultimately our judgment that the. Charge that we could prove at trial beyond a reasonable doubt was for one endangerment. Again's Mr Hankinson. He later said that he only recommended the endangerment charges and clarified that he did not recommend homicide charges. So he has kind of put the reason on the grand jury and said, look we presented all the evidence to them, and this is what they decided, and ultimately we still don't know exactly what prosecutors told the grand jurors because that part of the proceedings. WAS NOT. Recorded and legal analysts that we talked to you said that dot leaves some questions unanswered. It's an important part of the proceedings and it certainly doesn't answer the public's questions. The Grand Juror who has been pushing to be able to talk publicly about this has made clear that they feel like it's important to be able to speak beyond just what's in there according so that They can share their interpretation of what happened and I think we. We may still here from from the jurors and other if the court rules they can talk there is scrutiny of Daniel Cameron because he is viewed as pretty political. He's kind of a rising star in the Republican Party. He's a protege of Mitch McConnell. He talked at the Republican National Convention this summer so I think. There's particular attention being paid to how he handles this and and sensitivity to whether political considerations are included or not included into the fact that we're getting a better understanding of what was happening behind the scenes. In this case, can it change anything for the prosecution against these officers for Briana, Taylor's family or is this just helpful information even though the whole thing is done at this point? It's not really clear yet the attorneys for Briana. Taylor. Family are demanding that a new prosecutor reopened the case and convene a separate grand jury. But as of today, there's no indication that that's likely to happen but there is still a federal investigation into this. There is an FBI pro that's looking into potential civil rights investigations, and that looks into how these search warrant for Taylor's home was obtained in the first place. So we could still see federal charges I think be outcome of the state investigation is likely to only put. More attention on the results of the federal investigation. And I also wonder whether there are conversations about Jerry trials themselves and how those trials work in the criminal justice system and the problems that they sometimes present I. Think we're definitely starting to see some conversations about that the fact that so much of these trials are secret. I think people are starting to question and the fact that even in this case, the one really important part of it apparently wasn't recorded at all is also gotten a lot. Of Notice and I think we're in a time where there's a lot of demand for transparency around the criminal justice system generally. But particularly in police killings and police killings of black Americans in particular and people really want to be able to kind of judge for themselves, how being handled and I think people are starting to look at this and and feel like there is a lot about how these situations are handled that they often just don't know. Marissa is a national and breaking news reporter for the Post. Michelle, you know it feels like just a really hard time to be a college student right now. So many college students are dealing with outbreaks on campus for dealing with trying to figure out remote learning they're making big decisions about whether or not. Now is a good time to be in college at all but you've been reporting on what it's like to vote when you are in college right now. Right it is a really difficult time to be a college student for all those reasons you mentioned and it's especially difficult to try to figure out. How. To vote I mean voting as self as really confusing just for the rest of us right now. But when you're college student, it's probably your first time voting and you don't know where you're going to be in the next couple of weeks whether there's going to be an outbreak of colonel, virus on your campus whether you may be sent home where you're supposed to register to vote all of these are really major questions that are just totally confusing. I'm Michelle you. He put on national politics and I've been covering voting access issues. And, it seems like a lot of this is coming from the fact that there is a lot of geographic confusion for college students, students who. A couple of weeks ago maybe up until now, like don't know where they're going to be a November if they're going to be on campus or at home or otherwise right. We've already seen some schools send their students home because they couldn't contain outbreaks on campus. Some schools have canceled fall break so that they can send students home after Thanksgiving. But that means that a lot of students who had planned on voting during fall break when they were home now don't have that option and this is all with the backdrop of the fact that voter registration deadlines are happening like right now over the past couple days and over the next couple of days a lot of states. Are. GonNa be requiring people to register to vote and that means that students have to figure out. Okay. Where do I think I'm going to be on November third and where do I think I should vote and in any given year college students who are voting for the first time have really unique challenges one of which that they had never voted before most of them as their first major election. So voting itself is new to them and then they have to figure out the question they have to figure out whether their student ID will be accepted as a ballot form by D. at the polls. These are all questions that college students are really grappling with in real time. And is there a world where some of these challenges can be so so? So burdensome that it actually changes in a meaningful way the ability of young people to help shape the election results. What we know this year is that students have a huge potential to make a big difference in the presidential election. Especially, typically young voters don't show up at the same rates as older voters but this year we know that the youth vote could actually make A. Really big difference. Especially, in swing states, we saw the number of youth voters turning out to vote in the two thousand eighteen election's that was just a huge jump from previous midterms and they were an actual key voting bloc to making sure that House Democrats were victorious and flipped control the House, and now in the presidential election, likely young voters are leaning very heavily toward Biden We saw sixty percent of likely young voters preferring Biden and twenty seven percent supporting president trump, which means that Democrats have a lot to lose when it comes to young voters and the barriers at they're facing to actually turning out to cast their ballot. So if they're dealing with all these complications right now in terms of trying to figure out how to vote in November what is being done to help fix that or is anything being done? So a lot of these students are organizing online and one of the great things about reporting the story is that you talk to so many really engaged college students who just want to make a difference and they're just so energized about the opportunity to vote like johnny stay goal who's a student at University of Texas at Austin she is one of those super. Active people on campus who leads her civic engagement group on campus than helping other students to vote nearly everything that we do in a typical election year where global pandemic is not in the mix would be primarily in person. So we would table in person on certain locations on campus, and we go into classrooms and person in do registration and also voter education presentations. And then on the last eight registered to vote for Texas was this past Monday. We would have been on campus until Monday had a bunch of free pizza for anyone that registered last minute and so they're filming tiktok videos, Youtube Videos instagram graphics, they're organizing around Google forms. We've also created a canvas module for professors to integrate into their classes We've been going into classrooms via zoom and doing presentations that way which is. Which is fun and interesting in its own way, and then we've also been doing the same with org meetings going in presenting in the leaving. It's a lot of these activities that typically would be happening on campus. Right now, you'll be seeing students tabling on the quad kind of chasing after each other with clipboards trying to get each other to register vote. But now it's all happening online. My name is Denise Jefferson. So what we've done Virginia State University so far is one we've got a voter survival guide which. Basically with that is it is an in state and out of state since we have both at our institution guide of House vote or check voter registration if you're already voting, but you may of which addresses or a lot of students on campus you registered under your campus address. But you're now back at home, there is a new slack community that students have created for each other to try to help each other vote or figure out how to vote and each state has its own channel with him. This slot community. And these students are just really wanting to support each other and try to figure it out one challenge that they're facing as that because each state has such different rules they don't WanNa, confuse each other and leave each other astray. So they're being really mindful about just telling students. Okay. Here's how you go to your state's election requirements. Here's how to navigate it, and if you have any other questions, help each other out and this sort of online activity is really strong right now it's not as visible as being on campus, but it definitely exists. So so what were some of these videos that you saw Tiktok? Okay. There was one video where a woman walks her tortoise named Tiptoe. Tinto hundred and seventy five pounds tortoise and they walked together. They walk together to drop off her mail in ballot to show how easy to vote by mail. Eligible to vote actually but. Magazine evoke is others the power to make decisions for you. It's kind of affects on health insurance, civil rights, and then after the trip. The Tortoise get strawberries as a treat. Wow, that's so wholesome. There's another one where a college student who has a following of one point six, million people on talk does a cooking challenge. So he had his followers goat on which ingredients they wanted him to cook with and it's really random. It's coconut Angel Hair Pasta Mango and rice, and he makes some desch out of it but in turn for his followers to register to vote and is there a way to gauge how successful those efforts have been so far? One thing you lose by going so online is that it is difficult to keep real time track of the number of students who are signing up or sending their mail ballot, for example, when you're looking at. A clipboard you can see the number of names that are actually on your clipboard but when you're urging other to do it through tectonic videos, the impact of that is not necessarily visible. Some of these campaigns that keep track of voter turnout by precinct can keep track one day you know see these college towns, actually record votes at the precincts, but when they're relying so much on mail in ballots, that sort of voter turnout is hard to gauge I miss seeing how excited people were when they got the receipt and they knew with that in their hand that they are registered to vote whereas US using a service like turbo vote, we have to tell people. The State of Texas doesn't have an alert system to tell you when your form has been received and It could take several weeks for the website to be registered. So you just the only way to know is to harass your county, which is in a very fun response to have two kids. So, there is something that you lose by not being able to see it in person but you can actually see a lot of activity for example, on Tiktok I spent some time just kind of scrolling through with Hashtag, vote or Hashtag voter registration, and there are a lot of videos out there and you can already see a lot of younger voters enthused about the opportunity to vote. So for a call in right now, who is trying to figure out what exactly am I going to do to be able to vote like how should he even figure out this question where to vote in the best format to vote in what advice you have for them in in figuring out this uncertain terrain A lot of them are actually giving advice to just register at home, for example, alley. Longo who's a student that I talked to from Columbia College Chicago. She is one of the student leaders advising other students on how they should navigate this process and she's worried about potentially stranded ballots if students register to their dorm, address their campus address and then they're sent home, then there's no way for the school to forward that mail to wherever their students. are going to be and that sucks, and even if we were able to send it back, you know there's a chance it will get there in time. So she's advising students who are living on campus to just register at home just in case college housing shuts down before election this way their parents can put their ballot into a new envelope and just mail it to them or they can vote at home if they're sent home before November third. Michelle Lee. A national politics reporter. Tim. And now, one more thing from London correspondent. Carl Adam, we've written a few stories in the last few days have compared and contrasted president trump and prime minister Boris. Johnson's experience with testing positive for covid nineteen. Effects I want to bring you up to speed is something happening today, which is I'm developed mild symptoms of the coronavirus that's the same a temperature and a persistent cough. Think everybody for the tremendous support I'm going to Walter Reed Hospital I think I'm doing very well I am working from home. I'm so vice waiting and that's entirely the right thing to do but we're going to make sure that things work out first lady is doing very well. So I WANNA thank everybody who's involved I want to thank. Above, La Amazing NHS, the two leaders are often compared to one another. There are some similarities they are both populace. They go seem to have a loose relationship with facts at times, and there's many differences too. So we decided we look at how trump and Johnson's experience with Kovic was similar and also had their paths diverged. If you go back to before Johnson tested positive for covid nineteen that would be earlier in the spring. He was initially cavalier about the virus he talked about shaking hands with people at a hospital. The other night. I think the review if Ukraine of ours patients and I can't everybody you'll be pleased to know and I continue to shake cans and. I think. It's very important that we know people can make up Martha. Matter. said that people tested positive. He didn't venture out into the public for about a month I mean he did send a few tweets and videos, and of course, there were briefings from Downing Street and other ministers who were saying that he was in good spirits just like the these spinners at the White House did with President trump. Residents been fever free for over twenty four hours We remain cautiously optimistic but he's doing great. Estimate in even here when Boris Johnson was in intensive care Downing Street was still saying that he was in good spirits boot promised to has been following medical advice on the promise of this country. He wants to do his very, very best for us. We. Didn't actually see him in public for about a month. He self isolated in his apartment in Downing Street his meals were left on a tray outside his door. He did that for ten days before his symptoms got worse and he was taken to hospital and there his condition deteriorated quickly he would later say that. It was touch and go and that things could have gone either way if this virus. Where a physical salient. An unexpected, an invisible Mugabe. We can tell you proposal experience. It is. then. This is the moment. When we have begun together. To wrestle it. To the floor, he did personally lead an anti obesity campaign and has suggested that his susceptibility to the virus was linked to his being overweight. Even if the force John Government is taking the pandemic seriously, it's important to stress that it's been widely criticized for how it's handling it. The number of krona virus cases are rising rapidly. You already has the highest death toll in Europe. Perhaps, you recognize me it's your favorite president and I'm standing in front of the oval. Office at the White House President trump like force Johnson has said that the virus has influenced. Are got back a day ago from Walter Reed. Medical Center is spent four days there. They take away that trump seems to emphasize is that the viruses overblown because? I feel great I feel like perfect. So I think this was a blessing from God that I caught it this a blessing in disguise. Think, it's important to note that the two leaders got the virus at very different times and trump is in the middle of a presidential election. So whereas Pours Johnson disappeared from public view for about a month, that's that's clearly not happening with president trump. Carla Adam in London correspondent for the Post. Proposed reports thanks for listening. Last week, we introduced you to a new podcast from the. Washington Post canaries seem to seven part series about truth and justice, and once you start listening, you won't be able to stop. All seven episodes of Canary The Washington Post investigates are available. Now will put Lincoln our show notes or you can search canary in your podcast. I- Martine powers. We'll be back tomorrow with more stories from the Washington. Post. I'm Barbara Hampton CTO OF SIEMENS USA and I'm an optimist and if you come along with me on this journey, you're gonNA see in structure in a whole new way as a tool for building a society that's more equitable, resilient, and sustainable.

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Thursday, Feb. 14: Dr. Ruth Westheimer

The View

00:00 sec | 2 years ago

Thursday, Feb. 14: Dr. Ruth Westheimer

"Are you hiring with indeed you can post job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started today at indeed dot com slash the view. That's indeed dot com slash the view. Subscribe now to our podcast to get hot topics delivered every afternoon and while you're at it rate us in labor review. They're getting to the heart of hot topics 'cause it's Ballantine's day live on the view. Swiping left. The new batch of progressive politicians under fire for accusations of anti-semitism could this destroy the Democrats hopes of taking back the White House media's mistress the Jeff Bezos, Lauren Sanchez affair has been slashed all over the headlines. Why critics are slamming the coverage as sexist. Legendary sex therapist. Dr Ruth Westheimer is helping you feel the love this Valentine's Day. Topics are on the table with Rabin. I'll be huntsmen joy Behar sunny hostile and Meghan McCain. Now, let's get things started. So. The lovely Whoopi is still out happy Valentine's Day won't be a help you're watching. So we're sending our love to you. And also we have plenty of fun stuff plan for today. But it's a serious day sort of. So we're going to I mean, it is a serious day because it's the one year anniversary of the school shooting in parkland Florida, and we're thinking of everyone impacted by the tragedy today. So a lot of a lot of coverage on it. Okay. Then there are other things. So let's dig into hot topic. Some of the newly elected Democrats are under fire right now. Like, Minnesota congresswoman Ilhan, Omar she's being accused of antisemitism. Yep. For suggesting that Israeli lobbyists of buying off congress to sway policy tweeting. It's all about the Benjamins baby. Okay. Benjamin's meaning money. Okay. That's why it's a problem. She ended up apologizing after she was criticized from both sides of the including speaking Pelosi. So. Since we need expert for this topic. We have somebody here. Here to break down. How bad this could be for Democrats is the head of ABC news, political unit recline, welcome. Rick. Your to that. No. This is the white place to be loved the sweater of the the energy said, we're all radio, I have earrings. I think at the moment. So so how much of a problem is going to be for the for the Democrats? Really? I mean, she did apologize profusely. It seems to have been acceptable politics. Sometimes they're not Nancy Pelosi was said, okay. And what happened equivocal apology? And I think you saw how seriously Democrats felt like they were threatened by these kind of comment by how fast they came out. This was a freshman member of congress a lot of people in congress will say they don't give give someone a chance to make some rookie mistakes that wasn't the attitude and within hours you had everyone from Nancy Pelosi on down saying this is unacceptable and you had her issuing an apology. It doesn't make it. All right, necessarily doesn't end as a as a topic of discussion and certainly not for for President Trump continuing to to focus on this. But I think they recognize that this had the potential to become a major distraction for them. Well. Trump's the last one to say anything about it. But he, of course, he did. You know, Rick. I wanted you to come on. Because this seems to be a weird trend in freshman, specifically congresswoman coming in I'll gender okay, zero Cortez claimed that Israel was illegally occupying Palestine for she to leave supports the BBS movement and tweeted they quote forgot what country they represent. This is the US where boycotting is a right and part of our historical fight for freedom and a quality what an to just to clarify. It means boycott divestment and shanks sanctions movement, which is a proponent of actively sanctioning everything from Israel. So I want to know from you. Why is it that there seems to be this anti-israel probe ES movement happening specifically among freshmen members of congress? I think there's an important distinction in this is a difference between anti-semitism, and that's why congresswoman apologized and being critical of American policy toward Israel, which is a legitimate discussion and a legitimate debate. I think both parties will continue to be engaged in the left has had a. A sentiment of pro Palestinian, and some would say anti Israel anti the current Israeli government sentiments for a long time. You Jimmy Carter is written about it. The elements of it in the Bernie Sanders campaign, and I think that discussion around human rights in around the the treatment of Palestinians is a part of the legitimate realm of discussion that's different than trafficking anti-semitism, and that's where the lying profit. Well, it's easy enough to get mixed up. And you don't really know what's in a member of congress has heart when they come out and say something like this. What is their actual intent? That's another question. And sometimes that is just the question of learning. What things do allowed to say or acceptable to say as part of this discussion and not Twitter can be sustained congresswoman saying Israel has Omar saying Israel has hypnotized the world though. I mean that that's dog whistle language in an anti semitism. And there are I think the concern is not just the the sanctions. But it's also there's a lot of language being used that is unusual for freshman politicians. And I think that's why there was such a blowback for her right now, should should she be worried going forward? Well, I. Democrats need to watch this very carefully. Clearly, this is a member of congress that doesn't intend to go anywhere. She's not taking the president's advice nor necessarily should have just resigning. She's not being removed from a committee. But I think they've all leadership served notice that they are watching this, and they're going to monitor this and make sure that they are they are focused on this. They're also going to be turning the attention to the other side. I mean, President Trump was so quick to condemn this. He hasn't condemned. Steve king. There's there's there's a lot to look at that. As part of a broader debate in both things. I'm sorry. He wants it off the house foreign affairs committee, which Omar has not been which I do think there is a distinction. I don't believe she should be on the house worn with house leadership. Do this president. What's interesting to me, though, is that some of the loudest voices condemning Omar have espoused this sort of antisemitic, imagery and stereotypes in the past themselves. So you have house minority leader Kevin McCarthy Republican out of California, he called for the chamber to penalize Omar and Rashida tallied. But last October. He tweeted this nefarious looking image of Jewish liberal billionaire? George Soros saying we cannot allow Soro's and two other rich Jewish Democrats, Tom sire and Michael Bloomberg to buy this election. He deleted the tweet. He never apologized, then you have President Trump, isn't he apologized. He never politics. President Trump also in two thousand sixteen ran his own ad featuring sort of a menacing Soros along with Goldman Sachs chief executive executive, Lloyd blankfein and Federal Reserve chair Janet Yellen both Jewish. He also told her room of American Jewish folks at the White House that Israel is your country. He hasn't apologized for that. And so you see this being used I think by Republicans as a wedge issue when they're they don't come into this issue with clean hands. Why do you think they believe this is a winning issue for them? I think there's there's an element here that these to be avoided, which is your anti-semitism is worse than by anti-semites. Right. That doesn't really get you anywhere. In terms of a discussion. I think there's a there's a reckoning that has to happen in terms of the rhetoric in both parties around this issue. And I think you're starting to see that play out the parties in some ways self police, and it becomes a question of what's the Republican rank and file demand of their leadership? Demand of their president versus what the Democrats demand of theirs. And for Democrats say there's a double standard here. I think the standard ends up being imposed by members of the party. It's what what you what you think the appropriate responses to something like this, and we should say that neither of those comments represent the mainstream of the parties. Even Democrats seem to be concerned about this far left, and I'm all for new. Faces a new voices. But polling even some of the candidates that we're seeing running twenty twenty so far left, and they're saying look this should be a slam dunk for Democrats. There's an article today in the Washington Post a an op Ed from a liberal Saint Democrats to be aware of their looney left. And we've heard the president on the campaign trail, saying Democrats are gonna turn this country in Venezuela. He talks about the green new deal, which most of the candidates running on on the democratic side have in their own way endorsed this should Democrats. My concern Eighty-one percent of voters agree with green jail. Well, they don't even know the lawmakers. I don't even think understand fully what's in this deal. But should Democrats be concerned as Nancy Pelosi needs to take on a bigger role there and raining this back in because there's a concern that the tea party movement that we all saw with the Republican party may happen on the democratic side. You ordered two key words there Nancy Pelosi and in talking to party strategists and even some of the potential candidates. They point to her as someone who can rein in some of the impulses. Make sure that a vote on a green new deal done. Happen until people know what it is because joys right people byte support it if they understand what it is. They say legal Kasi has name out if you don't have a name, and you don't misconstrue it. They're not going away your hamburgers or your cars or you're playing. So you have to if you present it accurately, maybe there's an argument. But you know, I I had an interesting conversation earlier this week of Sherrod Brown. The Senator from Ohio was asked about the green new deal. And he said look just because someone has a good idea. These these these great energetic freshman if someone has a good idea. That's nice. Maybe it's something I do. But I don't have to go chase that as a presidential candidate. Why are they doing that? Well, I think it becomes it becomes a new standard for everyone. And you want to be the democratic candidate who's against the green new deal when you realize there's energy in the party, and especially because climate change is real. And and as a real problem, motivating for Democrats, the majority of Americans agree with a lot of eight seventy six percent agree with taxing the very rich. I mean, it's you're talking to. But I don't I mean, I. Into arizona. But we have to read Klein we'll be right back. Laser hard problems the reveal how much they're feeling the love this Valentine's Day. Okay. So there's a big election coming and the candidates are lining up to work for. We can't do impossible things when you come together. It is raining candidates here on the new place different us, you'd think this country is ready for gay president only one way to find out. Thank all have one thing in common. The eight comes year because this is the best place in this epic year ahead anybody who's anybody who wants to make it to the next level in politics has to come on this show because this is the place to be her view. Republican wanna make news come on the show. That's your view on ABC. Trumping back being so that was the kissing booth. We set up an on Aaron around two years fuel. We set up our kissing boots and Honora Valentine's Day later in the show. One couple from kissing booth is winning a romantic getaway for two with four thousand dollars. Could be good. So she'll ask me just today is Valentine's jam wearing red. Do you have any red on hearing reading hearings and shoes any read on you, Meghan? No. But I feel like I'm paying giving like Pretty Woman. Eighties realness. Yeah. Yeah. Thank you. Thank you have with your hair pink. Sorry. I love theme used to the that would fit me today. So we're. Water. This is what got you pregnant in the first eight. That is alcohol so this too spicy Margaritas. So sunny, I must start with you on Valentine's Day because last week. Well, I don't celebrate Valentine's Day commercial holiday. I never find out that you went back on your word. I did that leave manner. You know, what it is? My mother is a teacher. And so she goes all out. And so I came home one day to like place mats with like hearts, and then like things hanging and chocolate and all kinds of stuff, and then I got into spirit. Oh, and then I put I've caught in the software at kids and our or pear Anna and stuff for my mom. And then I bought stuff for Manny this morning. I said have you found day, and he was like what we're not celebrate this commercial. And he felt so guilty because he didn't find anything after we decided it was too commercial. So if he doesn't come up with something he'll be sleeping on the couch for the now, I don't know what got into me because I usually expect something back from, you know, tell the true. Yeah. I I don't I feel like you should just show love to the person that you love every single day because you're not promised tomorrow. Men can understand when when we say 'cause I said this just remind said, no flowers Honey, but you won't flowers like you say that men have got understand like that is code word for like. Yes, I need to present me. I really mean it. But I did he did bring me flowers this morning, which was very sweet. Yeah. I got home last night. And I put my feet in his lap. And he looked at me like what what is happening now. It's Valentine's eve, I serve. The song until he was very nice to his mom's actually staying with us. This week was very sweet to watch our daughter and to this morning. He gave me a kiss and gave his mama kiss. And then he gave my daughter gets. I'm like, oh, this is just. Yeah. Big my mom, the same thing though, growing like we'd get up and it was like, it's not always for your your spouse. It's like your kids, and they showed always give us like the the sugar cookies, the heart shape and would buy less like a cute. I went into the coupe. I get extra corn to my chicken. I was like lingo got all twisted when I was the longest that was single on this panel. And so when I was single I always get singles awareness day. So shout out to all the people are single. I don't care about Valentine's Day either. I really don't care what I will say I care about your outfits you to look amazing. Towing on but the red dog. Nate. I appreciate that. But you know, I'm going to gallon tines day lunch with friends. So I mean, it's really it's really it's not really my vibe. I don't know if you guys knows, but like love and hearts and talking about feelings is not my vibe. It'll yo pay but you're going to generate joy. No, I'm gonna Jenner. But I don't wanna chocolate goes right to my ass. I know I know about in our us is going to have romantic, well, you know, we were going to go. We're going to go out me and him, and my girlfriend Suzie, which was busy, my friend Susie as close as to nausea joie. Now, her husband is coming to. So that Jeff. Yeah. So it's a double wing like from Steve like, what would be the best gift? Nothing. Nothing. He, you know. He cooks tenor every night. Oh, you want less of Steve? He's the best husband. I don't need. He's very very good. He's watching. That's why I'm saying this. Right. I'm down. That's I it's time thing so Cheik into something sexy. But not right now, I watch me on the view. Hugh. That was another couple getting busy in our kissing booth. Which is a subject. No one knows better than our next guest at age ninety and a half, Dr Ruth. Westheimer is busier than ever her documentary s Dr Ruth just premiered to rave reviews at Sundance and book sex for dummies. We all need that one having out in a new edition from the lineal over moment. So if you have kids at home now is your chance to get them out of the room them read the book later, right? All right. They're all there. Oh, the please, welcome the fabulous. Dr. Happy Valentine's state. Route tonight. Go back you've been on every show that I have ever done. You have been on that show. That's toll. Yes. And always always will be. So you be kidding around though that you were at the Grammys then fashion week. I mean, they weren't fashion. This. That the designer of this lovely thing. You're wearing lovely outfit. Is Helen your MAC? Yes. What what don't tell anybody? Don't tell the tax people. But she gave it to me as a gift. To have that beautiful. It is it's small on fits me. I want to hit because I knew you would wear and I wanted to stay. Okay. So do you ever to have to start with a hot topic? We were talking about this apart this apartment was the house. And in the basement were a lot of contraptions. Let's put it that way. The cycle dungeon a lot of sexy shape. The gresh fifty shades of grey and in in a quiet suburban area. The the neighbors were not happy with it. Sunny was furious. She felt that they would be a lot of Purves walking in and out. And she didn't like anything turned it into a Airbnb, by the way, they were renting the house to people. So that they could make you happy in the basement with a lot of chain heavy Angus while you're bringing into this. Rather get better. I and his friends it out for the next year. Yeah. I agree with you. This is not something I had fifty shades of great because I didn't want to ask me. And then I would have to say, I don't know what it is. Yes. So interesting about the book, I didn't see the movie interesting about the book of shades of gray that it proves what I've been saying for many years that women do get hours by all the literature. They need to think that it's only for men not. So so I'm all for people to read it. But I would not want to have a warm of fifty shades of grey in my building first of all they're trailing second. It does not belong there. However, they might fish there should be a place. Maybe a little outside of town where there is a house like this people who. Would like to adults. Yes. Keep children essential incenting, though. Some literally where they want to go. I don't know normal. If it's consenting adults absolutely ever since nothing like this like Norman for some people. If that's what is particularly interesting for them. Sure. But you know, what on Valentine's stay with all four of you yet. That's not the norm. Not everybody's engaged in that kind of sexy. If it helps you to be rows use it. Keep your mouth shut. Doctor. This is a different generation and this book is specifically catered towards the sex lives of millennials. What is the difference the biggest difference between the sex lives? We'll tell you when they asked me many years ago doing the sex for dummies. I said, no, I talk to people like the view, I talked to intelligent people. Then I went up to look at. The books for dummies on on computers. I said, oops, I'll I'll do it because they are little paragraphs. You don't have to eat a whole book. I will do that. It's all to twenty seven languages while. Now, they approached me to say, the millenniums don't know me that's to some do some of you of US do know me. Some don't I said, I will do that. And I'll tell you what I'm very concerned about the new generation. They have heard people like me are not the only one talk about. I can say it you you did send two children out. They they know that I can talk about orgasm. I can talk about Trump. I must sake setup. His I can talk about what you can do to help people. I can talk about what kind of sex. You can do when you are very pregnant kit. Can you give me? I. I did I however he is I'm Bill Clinton devout. It's not so much. The issue of the question stood. I heard until now from men about premature ejaculation, which means that they truculent faster than they want to or women who could not have orgasms that pipe has been done. Look at the ball. We have questions for from. However, I tell you what I'm doing in this book. I'm very concerned about loneliness. Yes of the millenniums meant of all been from. I work a big, and I'm very content Vaki concerned about the aft of conversation is getting lost except on the view. You know? Have we his people? Sex the men don't view is cycle your phone in your hands. Yes. So I'm concerned about that. So we are going to give specifically to the younger generation to help them. Go ahead. Right. So this is from it, by the way after this. I need the tips on pregnancy seconds. Please. Obviously, you know, when you're when you're pregnant all right. So this person says my partner wants to have a threesome I'm open to it. But is it a bad idea? Very bad. I can't. Y. Yeah, if he or she or two guys or two women if they want to have that use your brain your fantasy. Yes. Do not engage in this is because the third person might be a better level. And then. Talk to. Please. You have to fake it for two guys asset of what? I have a question he is the g spot real if so can I send out a search party for him? You know, better because you know, me for many is. Yes. Loud and clear. There is no such thing as G-spot because what they have been doing is a tremendous disservice to women they said that there is a spot inside the giant properly stimulated would bring about a fantastic at over and orgasm. And I have had women asked me maybe not normal because I can't find the G split. Our ten clear. No such thing. Please ignore and tear me get as far institute is Meghan. This is so bad. I just you got it has not my favorite thing. This is not. Want to talk makes me uncomfortable. But really turns my husband on should I do it. Anyway, I tell you what if it makes me uncomfortable. No, however, if you drink and little glass of wine. Two. That's an aging documentary s Dr Ruth will be at the Tribeca film festival this spring and in theaters and on and on Hulu in men who who. Is it still struggle to get that good night's sleep? Then maybe it's time to try the purple mattress. It's made out of new material that makes it firm and soft so keeps everything supported while. Still feeling really comfortable. Try now with one hundred night risk-free trial along with free shipping and returns. And if you order one, you'll get a free purple pillow with the purchase of mattress just text view two four seven four seven four seven the only way to get the spree pillow is to text view two four seven four seven four seven. Message and data rates may apply when it comes to hiring. You don't have time to waste you need help getting to your shortlist of qualified candidates fast. That's why you need indeed dot com. Get started today at indeed dot com slash view. That's indeed dot com slash the view. There that was more PDA for Valentine's Day kissing booth later on one of three Cup leak. These couples will win a trip to four thousand dollars. So let's talk more about love and sex. This Valentine's Day. So this could be very expensive Valentine's Day. I'm John Jeff basis, you know, him right yet. Everybody knows he had this affair with Lawrence. Sanchez and has been all over the headlines. People are slamming the media for repeatedly calling her his mistress. They say that it's sexist. It's a sexist term. There is no male equivalent for mistress. True. Isn't it? It's not I think a lot of words all the mail. Like, Mr. arbiter faster faster? That's. Home wrecker nasty dog. Tons of words. I was thinking of words that we use to talk about women that you don't for men, of course, Mr. floozy slut versus a player. I think we define those differently. Like also be seen as sort of like a cool thing. Shrill did see catty. Yeah. Just words that I think are you sometimes for women where I think about it. They don't they will get that. Well, you know, the wording lot of names. You know, the word is hysterical comes from hysterectomy. I mean that's in that about a woman's uterus. That's true. Yeah. Jovanka? That's sterile. Yeah. So what does the equivalent? Is it Mr. no, I just gave you a bunch of them. But but we don't let you wear this started. Was Paula Broadwood who had an affair with general betrays in two thousand twelve scandal? She actually petitioned the Associated Press to ditch this term and revise their guidance on the term and discouraging it's us. I mean, my problem with her was she put our national security at risk and had nothing. I mean, I don't prove people sleeping with people's husbands and whatever. But my problem with her that you put America's national security at rental, so yeah, exactly flight, nothing, we need your. I thought it was like a weird blame shift on her part. I mean again like you slept with Mary guy and got caught as well mistress with the term in the me and how it's used as is up for argument. I do think women are are sort of slut shamed. Into different way than men are in both parties are equal in this situation. But I don't know it's interesting. I don't wanna I don't like the idea of censoring the word mistress completely out of our lexicon. Now. We just come up with a male as well. Yeah. I think that's fair. And my neighborhood they had they if you were whore. That's another one that's another one. But then my family, they say he is a who of missed anybody hit, Robin Hood. I. A lot of homework. Masta you heard of it. Yeah. But we take prisoners in my neighborhood like, yeah. But they've isn't sound as bad to me as a whore. Want your masters? Yeah. Well, that's great. But you don't want to be with a guy who's been with a ton of women. You don't wanna be the guy like that? You like, oh, he's a whore. You don't be with him. Like, this is a situation. Where with Bess os is was married. Lauren is married or was married, and they were having an effect. So they both committing adultery. So they're both adulterous in this case both of this referred to her as his mistress. I don't see it that way. I mean, the traditional word was mistress for a single woman who was with Mary Bray. Right. So that even worse on her, right? That's true. I should say sorry general portrays was also at fault in that too. If I didn't make that clear, I blade of them forgetting our national security, right? Ralph my problem with okay, go to black his shaming any. No. Well, we have today. Black history month F, I. We are moving Reginald Lewis of financial genius pioneering philanthropist and the first black man to build a billion dollar company. It was born in a work and working class neighborhood of Baltimore. He graduated from Virginia state university and became the first person to be admitted to Harvard Law School without formally applying in nineteen eighty three he founded TLC venture capital and after a series of investments that made him a rockstar of finances company. TLC Beatrice international became the first black owned billion dollar company. Brain cancer. Just fifteen years old generous philanthropist pave the way for future black bid, doors foods. Yes, I remember that very handsome man to airy handsome, and I know his daughters and his oh you and they are offend tastic Motassedeq family. Okay. And thank you. That was very good. We'll be right back. Tomorrow on the view, we're fired up for the hottest topics around. I love it. Docker, Freddie, Highmore is hitting the table. The I have to one of you on ABC. That was more loving and are kissing. All righty cute. So so let's do this hot topic. The other day we were talking about how the celebrity big brother house was concerned that Dinna lo Han was being catfish to everybody know what that means. Good because I don't want to explain it. Basically means he never met or saw a picture of of her. He never saw her met her anything for five years, but she just went public posting these photos ain't claiming or he did rather. And he's claiming that is moving to the orc to be with her. Our that's very acted. Yes. It's ridiculous. He says that wanna combine wants to come back, and they can be like Bonnie, and CLYDE that did not end what two things needs Schulman who hosts MTV's Kathy has an update he said found her boyfriend what historians way bigger than I ever could have imagined celebrity big brother offered to fly him from San Francisco to Los Angeles to have him reveal. And he said he couldn't like an hour and a half flight all of this seems shady do they couldn't do it? I think is Louie being catfish is very embarrassing for her. And I feel bad already me. I did it we showed. There's again is that the same person. Okay. Look at that one. Now, look at that one. So look at that one. Does it look the same? Well, you don't know you you don't see is out of hand. Not glory. I mean, maybe maybe the the the last two are the same or maybe they would take it years apart. Well, TMC has video of this guy. I don't I haven't seen the video. But he's entity says that I am the real guy. This is me. But if you watch catfish, which I do it is very show. It's a strove trove show Anna movie showman. Oh, it's amazing. Yeah. But it's very sad. Because these people are in love, they get emotionally and more times than not it is either it's someone that they don't it's like a guy's in love with you think is hot model, and it's like an old, man. There was one time that there was a woman who purpose because her like cousin screwed her over as she was messing with her cousin tended to be in love with them on the internet. But it's sad, and Dino and is going to be publicly humiliated. You know what I'm talking about? Sorry. Famous really compelling show. I hope not I so I met my husband on Facebook. It seems like that's where they've been talking. I hope the best for her. I always believe that. It's like all I can for five you're finding my five years and you're an hour and a half, and they never faced times or anything. It's really bad for Dina, Lohan, honestly, and maybe I will eat crow, and it will be truth, but more times than not catching is really dangerous, and it messes with people's emotion. Meghan that she's currently promoting big brother. Maybe. That's awesome. Don't feel so sorry Braxton, by the way, I believe but one. I know I would really too hot near Schulman on the show. Oh, man. I can't correct. I wanna just correct one thing we said in the last segment, so we don't get into trouble because all of us. Misspoke. Specially me Jeff Bezos Lawrence Sanchez both say that they were separated from their spouses when they got together o so it's not it's not the delta if you're separated doing it. And it changes the whole changes the whole set. No. Can we get erased around? Here are he'll be right back. Which one of these couples is about to win the romantic Valentine's Day getaway that fantasies are made of find out next. Bagman long, Utah couples in our kissing booth and right now each of those couples has a heart with their number on it in our kissing win. Boot who better to choose our loving couple than our lovely joy Behar. About to win a romantic getaway for two worth four thousand bucks. Here. We go. The. I. The winning couple. Congratulations UT were headed on a four night by David -cation at the newly renovated Wyndham grand real, mar Puerto Rico golf and beach resort you stay willing clue daily breakfast, a romantic dinner at the resorts new iguanas cozine went to the Kenya. Restaurant. A couples massage an eighteen hole round of golf, including Gough clinic with a pro and dollars towards airfare. Everybody take a little time to join the view. Happy time. Are you hiring with indeed you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started today at indeed dot com slash the view. That's indeed dot com slash the view.

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Renee Montgomery

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

1:10:15 hr | 5 months ago

Renee Montgomery

"Hey It's Sarah too quick reminders. Before we get started I make sure to check out the meantime show featuring lenny this week means going to tackle the biggest NFL STORYLINES DAX injury changes in Atlanta her seahawks being five. And The New York teams being a combined Owen Ten ouch Charles McDonald of the New York daily. News is GonNa join or you could find the show wherever you get your podcasts. Also, you're invited to the eleventh annual ESPN W Women and Sports Summit Taking Place October twentieth to twenty I. It's hosts by me and sage steele, and the virtual summit has the best lineup I think we've ever had rockstar women across sports business culture big huge names conversations. You're not gonNA WANNA miss and it's totally free. So Register for free at ESPN. W. Summit Dot. com. It's October twentieth and twenty I hope to see there. That's what she said. That's what she said. That's what she said what she says. Well, that's what she said. Welcome to that's what she said conversations with interesting people from the world of sports, music comedy and more talking about their lives, careers, successes, and failures. Hello there I'm Renee Montgomery a model is I want more than one vice presidential debate. Okay. So on the one hand yes you know I'm with you. I want more facts for undecided voters more policy points plans made clear I want you know more faces pulled and flies posted on heads on the other hand. I feel like this election has lasted for years and I'm also worried that even after the election is over, it's going to be weeks before we actually know the result and are we going to trust it and what's GonNa Happen during those weeks? Is Someone GonNa prematurely claim that they've won they're going to be a fight over the legitimacy of the voting voter intimidation, loss ballot, hanging Chads, I mean I'm going insane here thinking about it. So I'm kind of ready to be done. You know I think if people still need those extra debates and things good. Then have them. I just want everyone to vote and you can go to when we all vote dot org if you haven't registered and made a plan to vote and I hope everyone gets themselves counted in the census you can go to two thousand twenty cents Dot Gov to make sure you do that super important to get resources for where you live and all sorts of other stuff and I just hope when we're on the other side of whatever the hell is we. are less divided and less likely to attack each other or believe conspiracy theories or refuse to listen It's just been a lot and I've been doing this happiness challenge through friends, Yoga Studio leading up to the election, and I'll probably extend it beyond because it will be necessary but it's like Yoga and pilates and sending gratitude letters to people who've made a difference in your life and watching a sunset and supporting local business doing random acts of kindness. All sorts of things to kind of try to provide some peace during the day gets endorphins pumping stay sane during all this. So I recommend that other people find. Self Care To. Former guests of the pod Dr Lori Santos that professor of happiness at Yale you didn't hear that one I highly recommend going back and finding it She just didn't interview with the New York Times about how self-care always sounds like making yourself a bubble bath or doing something but real happiness actually comes from helping others. The data actually suggests that the right way to treat yourself is to do nice things for other people we get more out of being open and social and other oriented than just spending money or time on ourselves. So maybe consider that in the next couple of weeks as we all cling with a death grip to everything in our lives is the world's lies by. The commissioners spoken. My guess this week is Renee Montgomery We started out respecting each other and liking each other from afar and we ended up best friends. It's a truly delightful journey I think you guys are going to enjoy it. She's a professional basketball player. She's on the Atlanta dream of the WNBA won a national championship with the Yukon Huskies back in two thousand nine. She's one to wnba championships which was with the links in two thousand, fifteen in two thousand, seventeen She'd been all over the place media wise. Recently including Gen Z. and me show she does with her son and nephew that's coming back. October. Thirty first you can find it on instagram at Gen Z. and meet TV. she's been so impressive of late as she's finding her voice and become more visible across media that people are legitimately saying she's going to run for president one day. So I really recommend you give this a lesson We talk a lot about her choosing to opt out of the WNBA season how she spent months out of the wobble using her voice crating her foundation the work she's doing on voting helping HP. US and encouraging conversation around civil unrest racial issues place reform What it's been like to watch the CO owner of her team. Kelly Leffler Slash officer we figure that out be sort of against her own team that she owns during the wobble and during her her political run, and then we giggly about her fiance and how they met and shooting her shot and all that stuff I think he has enjoy it. That's what she said these days it feels like life forces us to be on all the time but every now and then it's important to stop and reset. That's when you reach records light it's mountain cold refreshment made to chill coors light wants you to know that no matter what sport is on this fall Saturdays are your time to chill doesn't matter what team or sport is playing chords lights the official beer of watching any sport or team just to drink beer. So flip through the channels find a sport and crack open of. Course light watching football is therapeutic to fans. Uninterrupted meantime ends an excuse to Chile drink beer coors light is cold, cold, filtered, and cold packaged. It's literally made to chill. It's as crisp and refreshing as the Colorado rockies. Perfect for a moment to unwind cores. Light is the one to choose when you need to unwind. So when you want to hit reset reach for the beer that's made to chill coors light in the new look delivered straight to your door at get dot coors light dot com celebrate responsibly coors brewing company Golden Colorado. Super happy to have Renee Montgomery on the podcast she's been on Spain and fits and I think Spain and company before it became spending fits again and just such a powerful and and smart and thoughtful voice in. So many issues about US basketball player and I wanted to have her on to talk about all of those things sort of longer format to figure out how she became the bad ass woman that she is. So Rene, thanks for being on. Let's let's start at at the way back you grew up with a mother who was a professor tell me more about just your childhood in which your parents did and where you grew up. yes. Oh, my childhood like things that were fun for us was learning things ahead of time. So I used to always think it with cool that I would go to school knowing already what the teacher is GonNa teach me they actually tried to skip me agreed my parents was like Manna. Now we're going to keep her where she's at which thank you parental is they didn't know that I was going to go on to play basketball so. I was growing up in West Virginia though different and different than what people can expect innocence of it's just a different culture is slower. It's country in its three percent black. So now living here in Atlanta. Obviously. I'm emerged in a black culture and black excellence the WHO's who are black people here. So that was just a completely different shift from from what I knew before and thank you for having me Sarah Yeah, which is nice What did your dad do for a living or what does it do? Yeah he worked at Bayer. So he was a like a chemical engineer there. So he and I would say what he does what I think he does best is like he can just pretty much build anything. So he built cars from scratch. He's one of those guys that have a beautiful mind. So he just built my nieces bunk bed. Like just that Kinda Guy. So a Lotta last arts in some ways actually being Han like knowing how to build and do things is like it's easier to order something. Off. Like when we first moved into our house and my husband fixed like an electrical outlet I like. Okay. Why wasn't even impressive? He watched a youtube video. It was like Oh. Okay. So you obviously grow up in an intellectual household and that informed desire two learn, which is you know very clearly something that's a through line for you. What about the sports part of things? How much of a part of the household was at? Huge My sister was a cheerleader who also went on to be the cheerleading coach. For West, Virginia State University. My oldest sister was a track athlete hurdles high jump. She might still hold records in. West Virginia My Dad went and he's a football player. He played football and college at West Virginia State University where he met my mom So yeah I would say that sports is big in our household as well. Yeah. A little bit. But I know it's weird because I don't feel like that I feel like I'm like the dummy of the family because my sister one of my sisters is a doctor. So I I don't really that I hold up the intellectual end of the family, but I'm trying okay lease holding up the sports in for now. So you mentioned three percent black in the state or the area lived in. The state it's a state. So air you grew up in what kind of diversity was there for you at school and in the spaces that you are in. I'd say less than that. You know I grew up in Saint Almas West Virginia. It's about ten fifteen minutes out from the capital of Charleston and I I was the only black girl in. Elementary for sure junior high there was one other black guy has, Asia he he was he was the other but you know so growing up for me, I was used to being the only one. I was the only one and when it came to black history month I hated being the only one just because black history month doesn't necessarily celebrate black celebrates like history and as we know the history for black people is in great. So I would say I grew up kind of having to be comfortable in my own skin just because I was the only one in that skin. Yeah. Well, and it's sort of fascinating how everybody can recognize that but especially at a young. Age It doesn't necessarily mean that you're equipped to not like reach out a hand or be welcoming I was the opposite my school I think had maybe four or five black students in it, and it was like Mr teased daughter Bill Cartwright's son was I grew up in separate from Chicago and so all the bears and like bulls players live in that suburb and then there goes like Yeah and you know it it was it was not something that impeded upon my. Ability to thrive into. Feel welcome. But it didn't really occur to me to even think that they might feel alone or in any way like separate from everything that's going on and when you get older, you've course realized that that's a massive part of the experience of growing up feeling like you belong and seeing representation So you're bad ass basketball player you're. You know crushing it and you end up at Uconn, and I was doing some research for this pot and I of course, do that you are bad us at Uconn but somehow your name does not come up as much as it should for you started thirty five of thirty seven games as a freshman and you were the big East conference freshman of the year. You left and you were top ten in almost all the Yukon categories like names. Points field goals three points free throws assists steals like you dominated you or you know a senior when when you guys went undefeated thirty, nine, one, one, a national championship, and for some reason Renee Montgomery not one of those names that when we talk yukon excellent, it's like the very top echelon. Why do you think that is Yukon? Is Full rockstars has. Is kind of what you choose in a sense of even when I went to you, I knew that there were some big shoes that that I was going to be walking into as far as point guard that went to uconn category within itself. You know like we went to you gone did they go on to do or what did they do it a yukon man there's a long list, and so I'm part of that list I would say it just it depends on who you talk to but it's hard because when when you have a sue bird and and you have different players who? She just wanted to championship in the WPA. She's won four gold medals. I would talk about her alive thousand. Also I usually never get offended I just like being a part of the conversation because you are part that conversation that means that they're talking about you have to be doing a certain level of good to be in that conversation right to stand out there. What was your feeling about going there I know you said, you already knew when you got there year, we're going to be in a pretty remarkable group of people. Did you have any desire to be big fish in a small pond instead of small fish in a big pond? Did you have any desire to go somewhere that have the reputation that Gino? AURIEMMA team does. That was the question you know a lot of people in West Virginia. They got really upset with me because I didn't choose West Virginia University and so that became a thing but I just felt like coming from West Virginia I, felt blessed to be a McDonald's all American because we just don't have the press coverage in West Virginia that maybe others cities like new. York or California did so I wanted to go somewhere where people like live eat and breathe basketball and and in no one can argue that you is that you know and his post anywhere else. So for me, it was about going somewhere that that people would like support US wholeheartedly just coming from West Virginia is more of a West Virginia I mean it's more of A. Football place than basketball, and so I was craving something where it would be a big deal. So yeah, I was looking for that that that big Pun I was looking at the make to make that and it makes you step up. Once you get there when you're playing alongside my more in Tina Charles and folks like that, we'll get to my more later and and how. That relationship may have influenced later later, choices that you made but she gets picked fourth overall in the WNBA draft by the links and then sort of bounced around a bit before coming back to the links. Can you talk about sort of those early couple years in the league and how you felt about not sticking in one place and being able to establish yourself? Yeah. It was interesting because when I got drafted to Minnesota. I didn't think I was even GonNa, play my rookie year. They're like I had already kind of known that there was some rumblings that Connecticut was coming for me. You know obviously having played at uconn. It makes a lot of sense that the Connecticut t would WanNa keep me in Yukon. So whenever all that was going on I'm like, okay. Yeah. Cool. So what's the deal in the deal basically didn't go through my? First Year. So the deal ended up going through my second year when there are different pieces as people no different pieces in made the deal and so Tina. Charles became available plate with a Yukon and so she became a part of the deal where we were giving we meaning Connecticut at that time we were giving Minnesota a Lindsay whalen and people should know that is because she's Olympia but lost judo right there. Basically Minnesota was going to get their Minnesota University girl Lizzie Waylon in I. WanNa go back to Connecticut and so that kind of caused a bounce around because I don't feel like bounced around a lot I feel like I was in Connecticut for five years and then then started moving around but it was that first year that I just I. Kind of new coach. Tibo. Connecticut were coming in. It just didn't come. It didn't happen fast enough. But like I, it was a learning experience from Yukon where we went undefeated my senior year and then I went to Minnesota and we didn't even make the play also that was rough. That was hard. So you get to the sun, you become an all star. Then you become a six woman of the year talk about that because you have a remarkable season that puts you in that echelon of all star and the now you're coming off the bench but instead of feeling sorry for yourself, you become six woman of the year. How difficult was that? Because again, you're also coming from Yukon which means best of the country and now you're a bench player. Yeah. That was rough and again, I was a younger player and so it's like. They tell you all the time. Your gift is also your curse. So everybody knows that I'm kind of like the team player at all costs. So my my coach time, which was coach Tibo he was like man, we're just missing this one thing to make us like a really really good team and I'm like what is that? He's like we don't have no firepower off the bench and I'm like, okay. Yes. So we're we're we GONNA do about that and he was like I want you to come off the. Bench and I'm like what's like I'm like way way what in again as you mentioned, I had literally just came off of a great season and so this is this is not like I was an all star four years ago and I literally just became an all star for the first time the year before, and then my coaches asked me to come off the bench. So yeah that was a doozy but but honestly, just it Kinda for a while there I was bitter I'm not gonNA allow we'll Y me. Okay. Now I'm getting penalized because I'm a good team player you know like that's what I was thinking in my mind but in hindsight I think that you know he made me have so many different aspects in my career because all the coaches were looking at that. So when I came off first game with the season the year following all star campaign and I'm coming off the bench and I'm still like being the same me saint positively saint team attitude not acting salty on the bench like it built my. Stock in the WB honestly, and then became six woman, and that really I think gave me a whole different avenue because people looked at me now is not just having to be a starting point Bar Garba somebody I could play one or two coming off the bench and be incident sparked. So it was tough but it actually helped me in the long run. We're so used to thinking of success as this like what's up parabolas at the word I'm looking for whatever that is that line that just goes army their. Line that goes you know low to high We've been talking about it a lot recently as a a curve that's not really curving because we're not flattening it. It's still just going straight up we think of successes that and for you in some ways, you would imagine going from all star to the bench as going down. But because of the way you approach that role you turned it into a positive you're with the sun and then you get traded to the storm then back to. The. So what happened there? Yeah. Okay. So that one was really aging saying. So and Connecticut it was it was a lot going on in a sense of most of my teammates had lab. So the team that we were killing with coach Tibo got fired. they got rid of a lot of my teammates and it was just it wasn't the best to situations for me. So when I was got traded to Seattle I was actually really excited just for a fresh start a new team. Is All the way across the country. So as nervous, but boy was that short-lived because I was there I don't even know if that's a record but I was there for half of the season. When I found out, I was getting traded my family was there visiting me they just so happen to be there and then. but the the kicker was that I actually had salmonella poisoning of that time. So I wasn't even practicing with my team. So I was in the. So when I found out, I was traded somebody came knocking on my apartment door and they're like, Hey, coach wants to see you and I'm like no coach knows I practice like I'm super sick and they're like, no no, no you need. Do that coming to the office so Like when you hear that as an athlete, everybody knows like your playbook yeah. Over and over. Doesn't work. By All of the above. So I'm like sick as a dog and and I like why can't drive so they took me there long story short found out I was traded and so then my head coach from Minnesota causing me was like, Hey, did you hear the news? We're so excited we need you and I'm like, yeah, coach review. No, I'm a little sick right now as she was like, yeah, it doesn't matter gets you brought on the planet? Day and so at that time though I didn't know it was salmonella poisoning. Test, and then later found out that that was what was wrong. So now I'm Kinda in the history books is playing a WNBA game with Manila poisoning getting traded during it all it was a whole doozy but that year as you guys know, I ended up winning a championship. So it's like that. What's that word? You try to teach me today earlier Barambirwa Yeah. I was nothing like that. AM I. My story has nothing to do with that word because boy did. So many bounce but like people don't even know during that championship run, you know my coaches found out afterwards like. Like Salmonella poisoning rector inside. So I had like no conditioning as an athlete my shape was gone because my whole diaphragm was gone. So I was going to practice in the morning in running on the treadmill at night China just bill back up stamina coaches in them like when they found all of that out, you know it changed their whole again, it change people's whole perspective of me as a person just because they didn't know that like I was pretty much that that beat up out of shape. So just for the kidnap you're listening and also for all of us here learning together parabolas not what I was thinking of. A curve where any point isn't equal distance from a fixed point and fixed line anyway I. I was thinking in my head, which is unrelated to just the line graph I was thinking of you know line graph with the x axis and you're going up anyway. Everybody knew what you were talking yeah. Everyone knew pictured in their head some people who know what a problem is in those people were like wait. So people screw start high and then they dip really low and go back up again. Anyway that's why I don't get in. Math Science whatever the hell we would. Call any of that, right? So you end up with the links and now you're bag with Lindsay whalen who was a part of the trade. That hadn't been away the God in Minnesota and in the WNBA that team is just legendary dynasty. She went to titles there. How'd you talk about your role with that team and did you feel like you settled into a role that you like they're? Yes. So you know that role that's why talk about that coach Tibo you transition me perfectly Sarah. Thank you very much. That's why that coach Tebow thing was. So important though because Minnesota might not have really wanted me if they thought She's a starting point guard. How is she feel about being a backup point guard Lindsay whalen we don't WanNA causing problems again, they were already dynasty in the making 'cause they had already won two championships in the four years since before I. Got there. So just that experience alone with Connecticut where I had to come off the bench and people saw that I'm still going to have a good attitude and everything I became the backup point guard and I, say that with a certain level of pride because. All the time I've been backing up like Olympians a care lawson backed up sue bird backed up Lindsay whalen. So I don't really look at it as a slight to be a backup point guard. I was a part of dynasty that's kind of how I look at it and and he played a lot when she was out. So yeah instead of them saying this team dropped off because Wilma's out it was able to hold up because the backup was quality exactly me and Lindsay whalen like we had this thing we call ourselves just the one two punch though sometimes like I would tell you I dropped the ball today. Like you killed it, you got your numbers. So we almost looked at it like we're a team. Yeah, and so the reason I say that is because like when I was leaving Minnesota that was like the hardest thing to me because I knew that we had like we we had the nucleus to keep going for many many years everybody knew it. But like I just being the backup point guard there I didn't really feel like a backup I felt like I was part of the nucleus she ended up going to the dream and your first year they're fantastic season started all thirty four games, double digits thirteen of them. Were on a run until injury sort of made it tough to get past a really good mystics team I remember talking to Leyshon Clarendon about being on the dream and how all of you on that team until this year really didn't know Kelly Leffler as anything other than a part owner who would invite you over to her house and seemed like someone just really loved basketball. So before we get into anything beyond that, take me through sort of that first season and you know, did it end up feeling? Okay to have moved away from that links team that felt connected to Yeah, you know everybody pretty much thought that I had lost my mind when I decided to what I said I was leaving Minnesota. To, go to Atlanta who Minnesota as in that twenty seventeen season we want to championship, and then I said, okay I'm leaving and I'm going to the team that was last place. A lot of people were like your trip in My thought process was I wanted to live in my own house. So with the WNBA, I don't know a lot of people know, but we play overseas every year. So basically, I'm in America for six months and then I'm overseas for six months and in those six months in actually in America Amac I'm not even in my. House in a House that the team provides for us and I kind of just got tired of all of that you know and I want to be in my own home I live here in Atlanta and so I'm like they got a new coach Nikki Colin and so I was like, okay, this is the fresh start a new coach, a new, a new team for me. Let's do it, and so I came here to Atlanta also for TV and different things of that nature and a lot of people. I. Didn't know how we were going to be. Basketball Wise. Honestly like I'd be lying if I said that I thought we were going to have the season we had every athlete hopes we have that season and boy killing it like we stunk in the beginning and then we hit this crazy run that you're talking about and we won like a lot of our last gains and we ended up being the number two seed entering the playoffs and everybody were like what and then like you said, the injury bug cottages demolished us and we lost our our main superstar agent. Mkhatshwa, and then it was Just a trick defect but Atlanta Atlanta's been good to me and yeah. No You talked about Laughlin I didn't even when I came here the owner wasn't a part of my decision making I. Hope People that that's never a part of this decision making when you're talking about sports, well, it can be but only if that person is so far out in front and so involved in the everyday dealings of the team that everyone is of it and none of us had heard of her or anything about her until very recently when did you move to Atlanta? I'm going to Atlanta three years into the league. So say I've been here nine years now. So I've been here a while I'm as I've had a house here for a long time just never used it. Yeah. We get into that. I was looking at the list of countries you played in it's it's lengthy. So you're with the dream and you're so with the dream and you decide to sit out this year now before any of of the pandemic and George Floyd and the civil unrest that cause many to decide to opt out you're already on top of these issues even in the midst of being a full full year round athlete you started the Renee Montgomery Foundation Twenty nineteen. What was it about last? Year that inspired you to get that going I kind of always wanted to do it, and as I talked about I was doing a full year calendar basketball and last year is the first year that I had off where I'd no idea overseas anymore. So I had that time to actually be in America and do things. I wanted to do is something I've been wanting to do and my foundation just being an athlete People honestly, we were to do a lot of community events is mandatory. We have a certain amount of appearances that we have to do. So as I saw those different things I saw like different ways that we should be doing it, and so I basically wanted to start a foundation just to do mock humidity community work that I wanted to do do it my way so that that was my thought process in two, thousand, nine, hundred. Twenty twenty eight and I was ready to roll. Yeah. So let's talk about that. Why when you made the decision months ago, to sit out what was the ultimate deciding factor for you in going to the wobble and being able to talk about these issues using the platform basketball was not the choice you'd rather be outside doing the work. Yeah my heart wasn't in it. You know in an when people talk about sports that People Watch me play if I say my heart wasn't in it then I can't play because I'm passionate player. I'm screaming yelling all the time getting people high because I'm high like I just enjoy it that much and not that I don't enjoy basketball any less. But like my heart was here, my heart was in the community. My heart was in what's going on right now. So I just kept on thinking about like trying I was trying to even envision myself being there, and I just never saw it like i. just couldn't see myself doing it and that's just because I just saw myself doing different things and I saw myself like sitting out and bringing attention to what's going on as if like the the people see what's going on. You were teammates of mine more as I mentioned in college, and obviously is the most noteworthy in most high profile athlete of either gender of any gender gender binary to sit out and decide to bring attention to a case that she was really passionate about. Do you think that had any influence on you? You know it's interesting because. I, like I didn't know enough details about what Mama was doing all I knew was that I'm so impressed with her and so when when I saw what she was doing saw the effort she took you know she sat out for it to you and to me when she sat out I didn't understand why she did. I'm like my girl I was kind of what people were kind of sad to me like why can't you do both like I get it why can't you do both and then when when it when it hit me I was like see why you can't do both you know I got so I started to understand her move more when it started to happen to me. So. Not to get all Oprah Barbara Walters on you but. What emotions were you actually feeling when you say that because because I have felt both ways about my felt the this is this is the stance to take when something really matters that I've also thought I don't know if it serves you to sacrifice this thing that you have a very short window in in athletics can't you do both so for you to have felt that way and then feel the difference between you that approach and then it's not it's not possible to do both I can't allow myself to play what what was the big emotional shifts there. that. The emotional shift was that, wow, this is really happening like on TV in broad daylight and aqap knew he was being recorded I. Think it was the arrogance of it like the arrogance of. The cops really probably feel like they could do this and get away with it I. think that. The arrogance of people not assuming that we're not going to get justice. You know the arrogance of America like you know I think that all of that I was. Pretty shocked like I I. Really Thought that the George situation was gonna to go completely different in a sense of like I I just when I before I saw video I couldn't believe the video. When I saw the video I, really couldn't believe the video. So I think that that that emotion was just like it was I was pretty surprised in and for me it made me more like angry in a sense of like the do something like I don't know what it is but yeah, I'm about to do something. So I was like mad and wanted to take action. Now they have the benefit of hindsight you've seen the entire wobble season happen and and the storm get the championship you watch your team from afar. Is there any part of you that that feels like you regret the decision? Is there any part of you that looks back and and feels differently about choice Yeah no I don't. I definitely don't regret the situation and also like a gratitude to the the players in the wobble and also the W.. MVP. A the commissioner. I felt very connected and so for me I don't I didn't necessarily feel like I was disconnected from the League at all. If nothing else you know NBA TV giving me a whole show wnba weekly to. Just, talk about the WNBA every single week I was interviewing two players a week you know the commissioner was one of the people I was talking to. So for me, I don't I think that void was filled by just me sheer being connected like I felt connected when something was happening people were asking Yup I knew it don new? They was one wear them shirts. You know like felt like I was a part of it. Yeah. Talk about watching the dream and I keep saying, Kelly, Leffler law floor I can never tell I make it up on the fly but. This one you whatever you can get, Leffler but. It's spelled law but I think it's Leffler. But I don't know either way Kelly L., the CO owner of the dream so much conversation around her running for office and in in being a politician who simultaneously is co owner in a league that is very outwardly progressive and make no bones about that. In fact, the WNBA believed last year was the first year that they tied ticket sales and investment in the League to actually causes that the League wanted to be supportive of. With no apologies and an embrace of a very lgbtq plus fan base, very fan base full of people of Color and a fan base and players who are very progressive more so than any other sport by far So for her to be a CO owner and be a part of that while simultaneously running on a platform that outwardly and an. Directly attacks black lives matter as both a movement and an idea which I think matters. While that's on the courts. What did that mean for you and what conversations are you having with your teammates who were trying to figure out how to be a part of you know essentially, sometimes, she would use them and their disagreements with her as a political ploy. Yes see that's the thing you know the players team they felt like they wanted to make a statement to say that the you know they disagree with everything she sang, and also they want to give too much attention to it because as we know in politics, there is no no bad news. All News is good news. All occasion is good publication so you. See all the time where different politicians will do different stunts or different things just to have their name in the press you know, and so it was that fine line of you know how much are we gonNA talk about Kelly L. or how much are we not going to talk about her you know and so it was it was tough because when when people attack? If you're attacking that black laws the idea of black lives will we're black on black. So a lot of people felt attacked and it was a way of like how do we go about it? So they actually reached out to me and we got on zoom call and I was just asking players. Would you WanNa do like what do you want to do something drastic? Do you want to? Because I think that we should probably just take it step by step you make a statement first, and then if you still feel a certain way, you escalate you know and and I think the main understanding was that. All right we're going to make a statement. We're GONNA say we reject your letter that you sent to the commissioner and then we're just GonNa go play basketball and ignored basically. We're going to go on about business but is difficult because as players in a climate like this, you don't want to be the player that's playing for the owner that's not not with the movement. You know you got you got different who are bending over backwards to support the movement. You have the NBA a whole new game slogan the as dedicating the whole season to social justice the Briana. Taylor on the back of the jerseys and then there's one odd team out You know you don't want to be that odd team out where all we talk about what later dream is is our owner, but you know Atlanta Dream has players on on the League that are executive committee members and we're not even talking about it, but it is difficult you know and and politics is politics. Yeah, she just threw up her hands since this is an audio medium I think we all do when we say it's politics. but interestingly though and there was a great espn daily about this about the idea of if we don't want to be spun into this political web and we don't want to be turned into ponds for her campaign how do we still react in a way that empowers without buying into to hers her BS I should say, and the the vote warnock shirts were were the answer to that were you involved in that decision making r? Can you take us behind the scenes on that because I was a bold move I, mean I. Could be like showing up at your game wearing shirts, telling people to vote for your owners opposition. Yeah. That was a big move in you know sue bird actually contacted me about that and she said, Hey, since you're in Atlanta, we feel like this will be very relevant to you. I want you to know or were doing and then she she proceeded to tell me how you know they interviewed him. A lot of people didn't even know the back that went into they didn't just wear the shirt and just say, hey, let's pronounced. Sure somewhere they. Actually interviewed him multiple occasions. Talk to other people that know him talk to advisors about him before they wore the shirts and the reason I say that is because everything they ll the WB had been doing these were calculated moves. You know there was a social justice committee dedicated to specifically addressing anything that came up at the time say her name campaign different things. So they did their homework and they let me know and the reason that's important is because you're right that's a solution to our right. We're not gonNA address this topic but hey, here's this. Here's here's a way to sort of. Create. Change instead of just talking about it so. You know you said, you wanted to sit out in part because you couldn't do both talk about what you've done the last few months and how you've made good on that decision to not play and how you've made use of those months so that it wouldn't like you sat out without something to show for it. Yes. So when I sat out, that was the show. Me Sitting out was as you know people saw it happen later in the season when the NBA boycotted the game, that's the act the act is I'm boycotting because I want you to see what's going on. So when people start to ask me, why are you in now? Perfect? I'm glad you asked there's a lot going on right now we need to talk about it but that that's the point. So whenever I opted out, everyone was asking me like, what are you GonNa do what are you going to do and I was like oh? Wow I don't know I thought. Was the. But since everybody's asking, I'll get back to you guys like you were one of the people I talked to the beginning. I was like I don't have a clue. So then I realized. Okay. So I'll probably do need to do more than just sitting out I started to think well, what do i WanNa, do, and then as we talked about education is just part of my mouth of my foundation. So I thought are we need to stick at something educational but wasn't education away now? So I got to Hec us because I kept on thinking like no. We don't have answers like police brutality, health system prison system. We don't have answers right now, but those all tear down the black community, those all tear down the black and brown color community, and so for for me, what's the way to build them up and I thought all right HEC. US Let's let's start there. So that's how I got to the last yard and the last Shard is basically given. Point. Guard. So giving assist to Hec us when it involves tech eastwards, all these different coding, all these different spaces that the black community and the Brown community or not in when you start getting them because as we know in this digital age, that's where everything's going through and that's not even something that we thrive in or we even are interested in from start to finish. So for for me I. Just want to assist and then I have a campaign remember the third in its educational campaign is talking to people like a lot of people are scared of the mail system will order your absentee ballot, get it in put it in a dropbox. You know a lot of people don't know that there's just different ways, and now I know that a lot of the drop boxes are being taken honors. Nayan. Now, different things going on I get that but I just want people to know all their options because if you are scared of Michigan that's not a reason not to vote like good dropbox dropbox. So remember the third is just like we got to educate people and get that passion move to the polls yet. Remember the third of November is educational about the voting system the last yard helps provide. Opportunities and assists to HP see us, and then you have moments equal momentum, which is another passion of your foundation talk about that Yes a moment momentum in my tweet a lot of people kept on asking him about that it was. Yeah. The one. That you were sitting out. Yeah. Yeah. Announced through twitter I didn't really think it was that big of a deal. Honestly. WNBA. Just in media has never been considered that big of a deal you know. So I didn't set up a press conference or anything that in really think a lot of people because I thought people like who cares and then I sit out the tweet and I thought and I saw that a lot of people did care and so in that tweet it literally. had. The word is I believe that moments equal momentum and I wanNA keep this moment going and people latched onto it. So that's what I've branded all the initiatives that birth through this moment has like it's all under the moments momentum umbrella, and so under that that's how the last yard started in remember the third started but it all it all the. Initial start point is from almost equal momentum. Mejia's opting out in creating that moment and it just kept going. So one of the things that I've seen you doing a lot of and to the to the question from before you know how spent the last couple of months is just finding that platform that maybe you didn't realize existed the interest from people in why? You sat out and then using your voice impressing the hell out of people until you get invited to more. Thank you mentioned the the weekly show on NBC TV The athletes after our show on TMZ did a panel for week a panel for USC did all sorts of stuff. So it feels like a whirlwind. It feels like you're everywhere in everyone's starting. Learn the magic of Montgomery. So one of those things kind of stood out to you that you've done. Well. The first thing that stood out is that I opted out and I didn't have a job. So you know you just listed all that stuff all that stuff happened like I would say three weeks after I'll opted out like I started to get things that were actually paid jobs like you know like I was doing a lot of interviews in the beginning but when I opted out literally out of my job without a job. So yeah, I was I was. Probably. To to that point, you know they say fortune favors the bold and it was really Craig is I've always I went to school for for communicate I'm communications major. So I went to school for TV that's always been the plan I've been trying to get on TV for a while and then when I opt out for something completely unrelated here comes the TV. So that's just like, wow, how life works you know in the craziest thing, but I would say for me. And you didn't even mention any of those. But what really births for me is is is talking to two students like I talked with the stuff that people don't really see I've talked to a lot of students a lot of times and just hearing how they think of me in hearing like they think I, have all the answers and I'll be like, whoa. I don't like I. Let them know right off the top like I don't have probably any of the as there's just pretty old that's what you can take on. Bold. But I was say the best thing I've. been is talking to to people. In another podcast, you actually said, you don't have to have all the answers. You just have to make the move and then start to figure it out and there is a lot of paralysis because of perfection right this idea of if I don't know exactly what to do. I can't do anything and that really prevents people from like you what is it leap a leap of faith? There's another saying that I should have memorized. It's like leap at. Here but that doesn't make sense. Why would a door? was there you're killing with the new thing? None of them are right there all. Overdue. Not. Trying new things you reap and the net will appear that makes more than than net will allow. Or appearing I think when one door closes another opens. Yes. Hallway Christian people yeah. I just I have a job but I was praise him in the hall. So yeah. So it was a combination you left and then a door appeared and annette. Scrape for you. Pay The door to. What one thing that stood out in those opportunities that you got is. The way that you speak about the issues and this is something I. Think we're all striving to better understand because now that there's a platform. For athletes for people like me who had essentially three or four months of three hours of radio every night without sports where I was allowed to and given the space to talk about social issues and civil unrest that really mattered to me. But how do you talk about it in a way that actually makes people listen instead of the platitudes that we hear about and that some companies or leagues are going with like. More, it takes us all those are nice thing right but I. Just specific to NFL once I wasn't even trying to the. Justice. But those are the I do that I thought, and again there's no issues with end racism or takes us all those are true. But they are so wide ranging and nonspecific that it's very easy for everyone to attach to them, and then when you dig down to very specific issues, that's where the conflict lies but until those policies change and until those minds change about the specifics. That are really the things that caused the problems. We don't advance at all because we've been saying and racism for the entirety almost not entire any or country there were there were times when it wasn't a goal, but we've been saying that and we haven't been achieving it through our actual practices and so I've really I've liked your approach and so I wonder when you're thinking about. The way you express yourself on these things and the opportunities you have in the platforms. What is your approach to like cutting through those platitudes on those big picture ideas and idealism behind this to actually changing people's behaviors changing policy and to draw attention to the specifics of what perpetuates these problems. Yeah I would say my main goal every time I talk is like inclusivity. You know a lot of times when people talk, it's a US versus them more. It's a day in in the pronouns matter in a sense of your as a country, we gotta do better. That's what I always like. Instead of saying white people in America need to do better when it comes to black people in America says the country we gotta do better because we're a part of this country to so I always try to use inclusive inclusive ideas or inclusive thoughts even when I talk about race start to talk. Gender inequalities, as well as all the same especially when we're talking about why the WNBA players so apt to be so aggressive in at the forefront. Yeah. Because where a lot of us are black women and in America that means something that means that we probably used to being discriminated against. So also connected to now, we're not just talking about race but I know a lot of women understand what? I mean when we see Formula One not let one of their racers be a racer because you can't get pregnant for three years. Now she has to decide between being a formula one racer or or having. A baby you know, and that's the same thing for Allyson Felix who Nike dropped her when she had eh, she got pregnant. These are these are normal things. There's a lot of women in the corporate space they thought they were on the fast track they get pregnant is stopped. So what I try to do is include problems that we're having in our community. The same problems they were having in the the women community because there's problems need to be fixed. So I would say every time I talk is inclusivity like let's just get it off cleaned up right now America while we're under construction right now, royal? List clean it all up and that's one of the things that came up. So often in the conversations about whether the NBA should finish their season whether the WNBA should play. Was this idea of distracting from this moment in time that if we didn't grasp it and take advantage of might be lost again like it has so many other times in the past I think one nice thing to see throughout this is that it has felt like continuing education instead of starting over again. This time when it happened with George, floyd instead of forgetting all the times in recent years that we've had these conversations, there was less patients and less acceptance of white people saying well, hold on. Let me understand this. It was known. We've been over this a million times pick up a book and read watch. Even do Veronese Thirteenth Watt things and actually understand the systemic ways at this is perpetuated instead of starting fresh again with the I'm not racist. So I'm not the problem bullshit. But unfortunately. So much of the actual information I love you. Well, I mean, it's exhausting. It really is I can't imagine what it's like for you but it's you know it's taking the the argument you just said about women that we've had a billion times like running our head against the wall and then amplifying it because it actually affects more of your rights and equality and more of your safety even more so than women and a lot of cases and doubly so for. Black. Women. But you know I think one of the things that I've really respected about specifically the WNBA and the NBA is that in those moments that they've been given time to talk, they're not just saying empty things they're bringing out numbers and and specifics than so much of that. Unfortunately, a lot of people who don't WanNA, learn and change are not going to. But for those who are in the middle or maybe don't understand, they're contributing to the problem actually seeing the errors in the prison system and the ways in which there's a pipeline from the black and Brown communities to those spaces and they don't actually benefit America, they benefit privatized prisons. money-making and how doesn't exist anywhere else that all these Are All this kind of back to the Diabolo comes back together and so many of us are of a privileged enough to not have to understand it and understand what it does to other communities. So it's been really impressive to see that one of the things you're doing addition to that all the other shows and everything else is the Gen. Z.. And me show it's at Jen's Ian. Me On instagram you're coming back at the end. Jen's IAN ME TV on Instagram is the, handle. and. It's with Some Kiddos tell me about it S. it's like it's my baby, a sense of it actually birthed through the pandemic. So I started to just check son he's thirteen year old he's a thirteen year old and then my niece she's a I think she's fourteen or fifteen, but she's going into her freshman year in high school. So I just started to ask them what do they think about how the adults are just really blowing it right now like I just had to ask what are the kids because we think that they're not Paid attention but they actually are so I started just having these weekly calls with them and talking to them and then on my yelled this is good and so I started turning into let me just film you guys to see how it happens in. So we did three episodes and we didn't want you to been basically like we got numbers uninterrupted started to re tweet us because them physically is not a kids talk show is not the most normal thing you see in especially to two Brown kids talking about social causes but also talking about fortnight in all. Different things. So it almost like an educational show that I'm educating them, they don't really care, but I'm going to educate along the way but it's just interesting to see what kids are thinking. So yeah, genzyme me is is, is like my I call it my baby because I like talking to kids and I like talking about about these topics and it's like a way to do it both in a light manner. So so yeah, it's been fun. Awesome at. ME TV on Instagram I didn't realize you had a thirteen year old son. was there a moment when you weren't playing basketball? Is this through marriage? Where does this Ed this kid arrive on the picture? Yes. So so my fiancee she I was blessed I was blessed into him I. Remember. You ever missing not I did that. We, just left that out somewhere between those trade. WAS THAT WEIRD Time no he I. It's a blessing. So it's through a relationship. So he's not thirteen year old in. So that's why it's different for me. So to put it in perspective I didn't always have this thirteen-year-old. So people ask into what changed I got into a relationship, and now I have this thirteen year old son that I'm looking over. So yeah, I feel way more protective when I see black men being killed by police because now I, have a son. So people are asking to what shift in my Mind that was a big factor like a huge factor because I look at him every day now and I'm like he's so innocent in in in three years he's going to be driving, which means in three years he could be pulled over. Yeah. Yeah. There's so much conversation about that that age in that moment at which young black boys stopping cute and start being seen as a threat sheriff and that moment for parents So a fiancee you said, yes, a fiance on plans yeah. Can Loca wrote a by I am interested in how I mean. I. Have So many friends that have done the like delay delay again and then. Kobe friendly weddings I've heard codes tough to pull off. Yeah. I'm not interested at is going I'm not interested big or I'm waiting. That's how I would have operated bigger that and so we are the same then. So yes. So Like this, not to me is not that big of a deal anyway. Were not like we're not going to be together because have a wedding. So for me, it's it's we're GonNa just see what happens but we don't want to we don't necessarily want to have to to go out and have people wearing masks the actual wedding and different things it's just Wrong before it's on hold for now we'll. On the on the more, not on hold the weddings on what is. That right. That's right. We don't WanNA. I don't. WanNa be on my own TMZ show. We heard on. Sirius. No no you guys are good. How did you meet? Oh. Well, it's kind of a funny story. Not. We actually met. She was seeing at the Hawks game and I just so happen to be sitting courtside. So random. Slip through the digits. How do we make that introduction? I know this is This is hilarious. Though. Johnny made Rene uncomfortable. I've figured out the topic where she turns giggly and and not at all boys. Honeymoon phase right. In Love Love. To the game and Angel Mukasey, we're going to a hawks game and so we were sitting courtside I missed she actually sang the national anthem for the Hawks but as luck may have it as I was talking to Darius slay that's how I met him to people wonder I was in course out with him and watching I look over and I tell. Angel, at the time I was like Oh snap, I think I just saw my wife and she was like oh my gosh calm down. Okay. She's pretty but calmed down and our like let's go talk to her. So that's literally how it happened like I saw an end by the way I. would like to add that she was talking to like some other. Like they were real listeners, she was talking to real celebrities. It was like Owen Wilson and different people like Tony I. Guess she did a good I didn't see it. So when I walked up to her, she was just like Oh. Thank you and I'm like thinking for what like she was just like, Oh, I thought you were talking about me and I'm like Oh you're a singer in that's literally held the conversation started. But yes. So so you know she had sung you just are thought she was hot. Yes, I saw her sitting courtside down the way and I'm like that's amazing I. Don't I just love as someone who's Of? An. Aide Right actually remember when people would hit on each other in bars by. Life the people and saying that, hi, this is my name I find your inactive. Let's that was always me to like I. had no the're which just like whatever let's go see what's up and now no one how to engage in conversation anymore I literally my friends will be like I don't know but like I'll go excuse me are you married? It's not for me I'm married but you know I just wanted to get what's going on with you before I send my friend over. No. Okay. Okay. Well, you're very house. Be Best Friends I mean. Literally like my friends are those people and what's wrong. Now. What's the worst thing that's going to happen? They're going to say no. And that's. Why you started I don't know if you guys know that how it started how it's going. Around on the Internet so yeah, she she's actually about the posted because even then. Even then we'll here's the spoiler alert posted but even then so when she dan, me posted the photo from the game like this game was a blast in on one of the whites of all the celebrity or whatever she talking to I'm told her you get Outta my ideas I'm really going to start flirting. So that's Off Shoot Your Shot She'll listen you miss one hundred percent of the shots. You don't take on them all so I shot it at Work Lemme ask you a question because I'm fascinated by this too because I don't I don't give a F as you can tell, but I, I walk up to most men. Before I was married of course, and I presume based on just general vibes that they're straight and if they're not, then you know I'm GonNa find out. Tell me hopefully. or or by or something that would be interested in me. You know just bring for the brain I. Suppose. And then and then so when you see her across the way, are you already getting some sort of like is your Gaidar on there's something happening your like I'm getting I already know or were you like, let me go shoot my shot and find out. So. There's the thing. Because I don't want because you know there's there's this new ones that a lot of straight people think that every person if you like the same sex, they think he liked them it's like if you like girls, every girl thinks that you must like me I'm like you know. That's actually not the case. So whenever whenever I see someone if I find them attractive then I'm just GonNa go speak yeah. Like it and and I don't whether there's no there's no gaidar not it's just like if I think you're attractive I'M GONNA. Go say hello. So even when I was trying to talk to her you know I was just like let me just try to be as funny as possible who have a couple jokes on dagger and then when she when she deemed me that's what I'm like Oh, you better get Outta here I'm GonNa Start Flirting like that. To be like, okay, what's your reaction to this? Let me? Yes. Okay. Alright. Temperature. Love us. Yeah and then she just kept on the enemy so I'm like. All right. We're going to do this job because I don't check it enough. You know that line everyone used as. Don't check. So I don't shake instagram enough. So text me I right you're on like. Okay. I've seen that you watch every story put up. I. Every time. It is funny though because I I'm I'm prepping for this Abby Wambach Glennon Doyle panel for the W. Summit. I KEEP Reading back through the book and I'm thinking to myself like how many women are reading this right now and thinking to themselves like and I'm not looking for an ad I'm looking for an Abbey what I've been doing this all. The Way Glennon talks about like she walked into the room and it was just like the universe said there she is. So you know maybe. Let me. As, you know 'cause Serena that's my fiancee. She had never been with a woman before So my point. Yeah shoot your shot and then maybe the person's like Oh shoot. This is what I was looking for a long and I had no idea. You'd never know not binary either that's a spectrum for sure. Serena grace. WanNa people can suck. It is what I I mean, honestly, if you if you still don't think that sexuality can be a sliding scale instead of binary, then you should talk to more people that are different from you. Or even just stations. Matter. Ask Yourself. You know just how against that idea are you or they're sometimes you're like, oh, I could see it. You know like whenever I watch super plan. And I. Actually think it's completely different for men and women. There's a lot of women that are like Oh. Yeah girl, right well, I think the older woman gets the more. They're like awesome. Not Having to deal with men at Oh. I could see that. Know my fiance says it all the time like she was like if I knew women were this understanding would probably be. I'm like Whoa Whoa Whoa online at all. No need to find out if all women are like the. I. Well, that's exciting and I love that ambitious crossover of. Late athlete and artist. That's great. That's great. Really quickly because we gotta go but I wanted to ask if if there's one standout moment because you played in Lithuania Israel Russia Australia and Poland I don't know if I forgot any countries but that's How Long my Gosh, look so much fun travel really interesting and I know that I've read stories certainly where people have felt really isolated whether language or food or anything else. Is there a wild and crazy story from any of those places that standout? Oh Gosh there's so many. So difficult I'll just say not even a crazy story, but a dope story is I took my brought my family to Israel because my family's very religious like born and raised in the pews and so we kind of saw everything that happened in the Bible. We went there in real life. So we were floating in the Dead Sea what you can actually do that thing not on some people thought it was a myth. Google it but. It's a real thing and so we kind of just hit those spots that you read about all the in the Bible. So for me, that was one of the dope stories because it was like the Bible stories coming to life. Yeah. That's really cool All right before we let you go, you have to do the one thing that everybody does but nobody expects the Spanish inquisition. Spanish position. Expects the Spanish inquisition question number one what's your desert island album? You can only have one and if you would insult your fiance but not saying I will give you the out of saying an album that is not by your fiance. My baby is coming out with one soon as she hasn't came out of one yet. In the clear. Thank you sent. into the album I. would go with. Let's say. This is very difficult because now. It had drake drake. Thank me later is that what it's called let's no one of the drinks. Old Stuff. 'cause drake is like he has any moves. If I'm sad, there's going to be a sad song where he singing sad that he's going to turn up. So Drako Gimme whatever it is a good one on island to have a variety number two what habit or quality do you think has contributed most to your success? Communication. Good one three. What would you consider your biggest failure? NOT ASKING FOR HELP all the time are like general or specific and general like engineer. I probably could have done so much more and been so much like just ask for help that is such a great one and a especially in the workplace. A lot of people are afraid of doing that and then they end up getting the information they need to thrive even more number four. Have you ever been in a fistfight? Yes. Oh. My Gosh. Yes. Like. Many Times on Oh, I got what I don't WanNa Yukon. It actually is supposed to be a secret so but I did Why was it a secret? Did you get arrested? It was a whole big mess we one. So you can assume that when you win, it becomes a problem. Right. It was a problem because we won. You won the fight. We won the Feis. Usually the loser is the one that wants to press charges or different things like you know. You take your hearings off in that old cliche move. I did not. I just got right to it. I wouldn't have found prepare. Number five if you could switch lives with anyone for one day, who would it be? Michelle Obama. It's a really good one number six. What's the most embarrassed you've ever been. Oh Gosh, I think the Muslim barris ever probably after the fight. Fighting over something good or no I was fighting for one of my teammates. So again, that's that yeah. So I, M my teammates it made me like dope to my teammates you know, but it was still embarrassing when people were talking about it. Afterwards, they were calling me like Lali on campus and that was embarrassing to me because that's just not me. The fighting. Yeah. So Embarrassing on seven. What's the thing about yourself? You'd most like to improve. Stubbornness. That's a tough one. Yeah. It's a tough one. I was very tough I have control issues like like like get it right I know that I can get it right if I do it. So I'll be wanting to do everything I need have like delegate delegate. We are going to be best friends unless. You controlling of our friendship into stubborn about what our friendships GonNa look like, and then we might be in trouble. Number eight if you could be commissioner of life for a day, what one rule would you enforce that all of society would have to adhere to? Oh my goodness. Everybody has to do it? No matter what. I would say. This is very interesting. There's one hundred things that I want everybody to do but if Everybody has to take accountability for what they say to humans whether it's on the internet or impertinent that is a good one. Out So, Hey got off to take account ability. Yeah that's what I'm saying Ross don't even get a say so they wouldn't even get a CEO minute world or the. Number. Now, what's the most scared you've ever been? The most scared I've ever been was when I got into a car accident. Longtime ago. Yeah. A pretty say five years ago and I was just scared because first of all a car accident and then it was like it was I was scared about the other people making sure they are. Okay. So just that moment of like I hope I didn't hurt anyone for sure. Number ten what three words would you most hope people would use to describe you? I like her. I like that everyone always. Kind and considerate. A good one good. Yes. I just sometimes, you might not agree with me but people have told him before like I don't necessarily agree with that but I like you. So at school whatever it is a very good personality trait to have. especially if you're pushing for people to think hard about things, it's the remainder. Things you care about, but do it in a way that makes people want to fight with you. I think I got that one right Only me one I'M GONNA. Look it up later and be real. disappointed. Right Now I remember that s right for that one balance. All right. Good good. Finally, who have on this podcast who someone interesting great I should talk to. Okay, other than Serena Grace She hasn't shown up yet. So when she when she grows up. Let me think who should you because I'd like somebody that needs. Like because you are good situation, people can actually say whatever they want like you're cussing you're saying you're sticking your mind ooh. This is difficult because I felt like you've probably already had probably saying people that you probably would already know like throw out there. Have you had Lucina Robinson your podcast and I haven't I should have her you know who I'm talking about. tastic her covered. Great loved her. Yeah. I would say her Maria Taylor because you know those that were that you were trying to talk about before in the very beginning they don't have those stories either so I've made. Thing yeah, I had maria she was fantastic. Okay. I'll added to the list for sure this. Hosting GIG recently, she's been doing it for a minute. Oh. Yeah. Yeah for sure. Well. I love you. Got Friends. That's what she said colorful days of fall are now upon us are your small business as needs evolving despite the current uncertainty having the right people on your team is like feeling the warmth of being wrapped up in a blanket. So when Your Business is ready to make that next higher lincoln jobs can help by matching your role with qualified candidates. That, you can find the right person quickly linked in is an active community professionals with more than six, hundred, ninety, million members worldwide getting started is easier than ever with new features to help you find qualified candidates quickly managed job posts in contact candidates from a single view on the familiar Lincoln Dot com as functions are streamlined onto one simple screen identify strong. Candidates with their efficient rating system to help quickly get your job in front of more qualified candidates, and now you can do this all from your mobile device. No matter where the day takes you that's how Lincoln jobs can help you hire the right person faster when your business is ready to make that next higher find the right person with Lincoln jobs you. Could pay what you want and get the first fifty dollars off. Just visit linked in dot com slash. Sarah again that's linked dot com slash Sarah S. A. R. A. H. to get fifty dollars off your first job post terms and conditions apply it's time once again for South Bitch sessions where I rant about something that bothers me and I fix it this week. Deep dish pizza haters first of all y'all are crazy K it's a super thick slice of cheese tomato crusty goodness and it's heaven on earth. Secondly, most of you spouting off about it have never had real deep dish Chicago pizza and it shows Malnati's Eduardo's the good stuff you went to some strip mall shit in Arizona that called itself Chicago Style Pizza. What was really a giant hunk of bread with toppings laying on top of it and the. Fact that you've never had it and don't know what the hell you're talking about is clear based on your terrible unfunny comparisons. It's a casserole it's lasagna. It's tomato soup in a bread bowl. Why does Tomato Tomato One day? If I snap, it's probably going to be about you making me say tomato because I'm so mad about this because lasagna has noodles casseroles do not have Chris. Delicious. buttery crust and tomato soup get the hell out of here. Okay Calming. Down I feel good about what we accomplished today. All Pizza is delicious. Deep dish pizza is especially delicious and if for some reason you're lunatic and you don't enjoy it just shut the hell up about it and let everybody else. Enjoy it. Don't create new names for it. It's just pizza it's thicker. Let's just all love one another and love pizza. There are fixed it. Don't forget to go to the I tunes or podcast subscribe rate and review. That's what she said. Give me five stars obviously leaves some dilemmas in your reviews and some of those questions a couple of weeks ago we're going to be coming up hopefully next week to. Thanks as always for lasting about an hour. That's what she said.

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S3E19: Making Changes in Political Office with Senator Jennifer McClellan

Directionally Challenged

56:59 min | 5 months ago

S3E19: Making Changes in Political Office with Senator Jennifer McClellan

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That's SAN VELO DOT com slash challenged San Velo a place to feel better. Hey guys. It's candidates and Kayla and we are directionally challenged yet. We thought we'd have it all figured out by the time we were in our thirties. That's right. But surprise we don't we don't to mad cool. Is Cool. It's okay to not have it all figured out. There's a lot of crazy stuff going on in our world right now and you know we started this podcast, try to become better individuals and learn how to be better and I am so incredibly inspired by our guest today the conversation that we have with her she's truly a force to be reckoned with. There are so many things she's accomplished. And so many things that she will continue to accomplish candidates. Who are we sitting at talk with today we are sitting down with Senator Jennifer McClellan, who is an American politician of the Democratic Party. She served as a delegate for eleven years before winning a Senate seat in two thousand seventeen representing the ninth district in Greater Richmond Virginia She's led Virginia's bills to ratify the equal rights amendment. which passed earlier this year, we're going to talk all about it protect pregnant workers discrimination, and the mandatory ultrasound Ma, and other restrictions on abortion access. She has helped stop harrassing discrimination against the LGBTQ plus community among many others. She was also the first woman to be pregnant while in office not once but twice and as someone who is a very pregnant right now and who's just like. Chilling at home like I'm very impressed. Cheese currently running to be the governor of Virginia and the upcoming elections, and if she's elected, she will be the first black woman to become governor not only Virginia, but she will be the first black woman to become governor ever in the whole country. So this is very exciting. We both did a lottery search. How much research did you do to prepare for this interview a ton and not only that but you know anytime we discuss politics I know you and I get a little nervous to have these conversations but. I could not have been more comfortable discussing things with her she's just truly exceptional. So without further ADO, here's our conversation with Senator Jennifer McClellan. And we are back with Senator Jennifer McClellan, thank you so much for joining us today were so excited to be talking with you. We have a million questions. You can't candidate Gail, I'm very excited to be here I always wonder did you for anyone who? Works in public office like did you always know that you wanted to run for public office? Was this something that came up later in life l. both kinds of when I got interested in government politics when I was eleven. Because I'm a huge nerd he just revolve. My parents were older they grew up during the depression. to their stories in our family stories in history. I came to decide that government could either be a force for positive change in solving problems or force. It oppresses people, Eleven I thought like I wanted to be part of that I. didn't know what that meant. And then I watch a TV movie about John Kennedy and Got Hooks, and the more I read about him and and just different President like that might be fun, Monday but I started out more as a young Democrat in the community activists thought maybe one day after I. Get married and have kids and retire then maybe I'll on. But in two thousand and five by delegated the state legislature ran for Governor and friends started saying he should run you should run an awesome. Do you WanNa be the one running and writing laws and So I decided to run and then I got married and then I kissed I have not retired but. You would definitely not retired. You've in fact, the exact opposite now you grew up in Petersburg, Virginia do your true. Virginia native did your parents grew up there as well and what did they do? Know. So my dad was born in Nashville Tennessee. And he was Alex Professor at Pastor. And my mom grew up on the Gulf Coast Mississippi. she was the youngest of fourteen kids actually the first line our family to go beyond the grade and met they met in Arkansas they both worked at Arkansas, State University Mama's services in my dad was professor. They met they got married my oldest sister warned any move to Kentucky. My middle sister born, and then they moved in Virginia and I was born in a figure they better moving. And by then she she became a counselor. She had started doing early childhood education and then was a counselor for at risk college students at Virginia State. University. That are they both work by the time mouse. Yeah. I love it. You say that you know the kind of the spark in the idea of going into politics is a career just. Dreaming as a Young Child Kinda came from you Did your parents? Did you feel like looking back that you saw that your parents would try to lead you guys? INTO BEING Thinking having those thoughts that that was possible or do you feel like? That was kind of separate. They led us to believe we had to do some kind of community service You know nobody in either side of the family ever remotely ran for us. and actually I started bouncier young Democrats and I couldn't drive yet. So they drown me all over the state and then they actually got involved because of me. So that was actually really the opposite Interested I mean they voted in. Yeah. We were that family that watch the six o'clock news at dinner in talk about current events and all that Casa voted My Dad was actually very active in the civil rights movement. But they never in their wildest dreams stopped at anybody in our family would would around for office let alone daughter. I. Mean. There were a lot of signs growing up your eleven and you're interested in politics almost eleven year olds have boy crushes enter into. Kennison I. We're into backstreet boys and instincts. Your your cool factor is already they're. Secret the whole reason I watched that many series almost give my age now. Was it was the night day after was supposed to be on and we didn't have cable to watch that. But Martin Sheen Played Kennedy and I had a huge crush on Melia S to this auto accidents new instead, and then the Russians history. I love it I. Love It. Thanks Amelio. So at what point did you know that you wanted to become a lawyer? I mean what an incredible I'm sure. Your mom. Obviously you will. There's so many things you've accomplished at this point, but you know hearing that your mom was the first of her family to go past the eighth grade, and then now her daughter is becoming a lawyer When did you make that decision as you got older? So it was really when I, decided I wanted to go on the government. So my grandfather, my dad's father. Was a lawyer. He had after his his wife. My grandmother died he went back to school became a lawyer. And again, the more I read about government and and read about the civil rights era was the lawyer. Who May things have early strike amazing cases. And and so I decided I was going to go I wasn't sure me practice player actually when I went to law school wanted to be legal counsel to Congressional Committee. But then Republicans Sicko. Allows Muscle House our work for them so. Just practicing at arm. And but I I kind of you know I did have with my grandfather some sense of lawyers did and originally thought like that's how I'm GonNa Change we're all these like helping other people make policy. but it has been very helpful. Being a lawyer being a legislator I'm sure I mean before diving into your current platforms, we want to talk a little bit about the bills that you have led to pass in Virginia. especially. Since they were what I would assume incredibly personal at the time can you discuss working on the equal rights amendment which passed this year in January. Yeah ev every single year it was introduced and it would go nope fair and then after Nevada and Illinois passed it that's when it really got leads in I remember sitting in a committee in twenty eighteen. one of my colleagues Scott Serravalle were carrying it and I remember looking around the room. And it was full everybody in the audience was a whom are white woman. And the only women of color in a row was. A senator was on a diet and and and I was like this doesn't look right because. Black women are impacted by inequality we need to be part of this fight. started thinking about like in the suffrage movement, how black women were it but never got. And so started talking to a lot of the advocacy groups was we really need women of color leading the site. And so I agreed to carry it Well, I spent a year traveling around the stay. Raising awareness. There are a lot of people who thought that was already law. Until we started really building grassroots movement, but also intentionally getting younger women and women of Color to see the unique to and then it. It helps that we have a brand new election than Democrats, majority last November, and then we got it through what was amazing. Is On the Senate side? Senator Louise Lucas who's president pro tem the Senate she's the first African. American woman. To be in that role she presided the day that it asks and I still I still get goosebumps thinking about what stood on the floor. And said Madam President and move passages the resolution like I I would bet moment will stick with me forever. It was just so mazing and I was just really proud to be part of it yet. It's moving that moment is so moving. That's. What you do I would love just say that like I knew all about the are a before talking with you but it actually kind of took me. It was a little bit of an educational process. I'm embarrassed to say So what happens now because Virginia was thirty eighth states to pass the amendment but The deadline was in nineteen, eighty two, and so what what happens now is it just continuing to have more states passed the amendments and then. Yeah. This is my question for you. I don't. Think, there's a lawsuit. and. There's there's a bill in Congress to get rid of the divide. There's there's really you know. A lot of big question about whether that deadline was even legal to begin with ask the answer is no. There I think four different state attorney generals including Virginia. Foul lawsuits force the national archivist to certify that the amendments are the constitution. And then there's some states that tried to send their ratification. But again, there's no, we'll process for that either. So on one track you've got the lawsuit, but then we're hoping that Congress will just ask a lot getting rid of. The the deadline together and that'll just Because, it's just outlying sex discrimination. That's. Yeah. That that's Knocking and radical right Yes why would they? Why would rescind that you know? I don't know. So the the era mealy roadblocks in the seventy each when there started to be this view that it got tied up in abortion politics are actually it got tied up in the social conservative agenda. And that's how it stall and so I think while that was happening, some of those states can be Tennessee with one of them that were led by conservative legislator legislatures thought like you know wait a minute. You don't want like abortion on demand for everybody and we don't want. Les. Girls and boys living in the same dorms 'cause like castle on sue which are actual arguments we heard on slower Virginia by the way. They I. think that's why but it just it doesn't make sense to me. Well, I'm glad it doesn't make sense to you either because it didn't make sense to me at all. At all at all, well, we want to talk about the I'm actually seven months pregnant right now and I. So I just love just your experience being pregnant twice. While on the floor you are also the first breastfeeding member of the House of delegates So I WANNA talk about the pregnant Workers Fairness Act that you helps pass and And that whole experience of also being pregnant and the first breastfeeding member like do you feel like you had to? Teach people was it a teachable moment? Did you do you set the bar for other mothers who'd be working? Yeah at least. I've been told that. So I remember and it was crazy about it was. So I was pregnant. I was pregnant in in twenty ten. I was in my first trimester wasn't public yet. and. That was actually the first year. You probably remember two thousand twelve when Virginia was the laughing stock for that mandatory ultrasound bill. And it was like a transactional oriented and that was the first year that it to the House floor and again, you already know how nerd. So when I'm pregnant I had to know everything that could possibly happen good or bad. And my the doctor did my bound. Started talking to me about how abortion laws impact all kinds of pregnancies started telling me these stories. Abou-. Like a patient who had a hole in her heart. She you know she couldn't get cried nets. You Don Breath Kajol got pregnant had to decide between putting her life at risk. To carry the to term to tell you about a friend of mine who lost her pregnancy suffer fetal in the seventh months having the DNC which is had been abortion that ultrasound law applied, and so I stood up on the House floor with only three people in the entire building knowing I don't. Telling these very personal stories about pregnancies that went wrong and how that bill would have made those tragic situations worse. And I remember being stopped in the grocery store. In the halls of the Capitol by people saying that happened to me like you told my story and these stories that had never been told. In House before. We were able to kill the bill that year. but then the unfortunate ash couple years later and then I remember. So that was twenty ten session, and then there were the weird things like my pregnancy was outed on A. anti-choice log. which would we're and then like when people found out, I was pregnant they were like, oh, psychic retire Why would I retire? And they're like, well, 'cause you're gonNA take care your baby and I'm like well. You. Know there was a guy crispy. Should that elected the same year as I did his wife was expecting a baby three months after me and I might. As you US Chris Matthews on retire I love that. Feeling with that. And then the following set was when I was nursing and I pumped jets I had a really hard time. Resident I. And I'm. Just enough to get daycare. So we were still on the floor still in session and my husband would bring my signed Jack. And I remember one time again, that was another abortion bill, the ultrasound bill again. Because they had passed yet and I was in the queue waiting to speak. My husband was downstairs you know texting me like. Get down here, Jackson Green on my. Feet. and. When it's finally my target I got up, told those stories spoke against bill again and he said in the room where they were TV. And he's. Screaming his head off, and then he heard my voice look not and Saami stock was transfixed and then as soon as I finish the game. I ran downstairs to nursing because I didn't have the courage than than our some or because the end of verse one who would ever knocks anyway. And just trying to get at. This. Institution that had been around for almost four hundred years to understand like you've got accommodate my abilities nurse. You've got like find room giving me breaks. was. Weird. But then this year will in twenty seventeen we had. Kathy Tran who had just had a baby was elected and then that next session she nursed on floor. And to see her nurse on the floor dislike fill me with so much fry sounds just like you know what? That's like studying the question for her. But for me, it was this whole like we gotta do what you like. Things, they had never thought about because no one ever had to do before we'll in that is just a perfect example of why we all need to join in this together because you were the trailblazer and being the first breastfeeding. and. Then now she gets confidence from that and it's like, okay. No. Now I'm GonNa breastfeed on the floor and so we can eat. You know help each other in this whole process. I have to tell you you inspired me I was watching this youtube video of you. You're making floor remarks on the fetal abnormalities budget amendment, and you are so pregnant and you are standing in front of a bunch of wight males telling them. If you think you know better than the mother who has the baby inside their belly or the family who is struggling in having to make these financial decisions than you can vote? No, and you are looking right looking at them right in the eye and it is you are such a force when you speak there is such conviction and it's just incredibly inspiring. Oh. Thank you. Thank you. You. Know. There are a couple of times going back to your question about the education. So I I had a bill before the pregnant workers fairness dealing with. Teachers. And requiring schools to have lactation policies for teachers, students, and our member senator. I was in the house then he's like we'll can't they just retrain their breasts or can't they? Nurse will burn our. And I'll say, no because chronically been there since six her lunch hours probably twelve and let me tell you what happens if you don't. And I started going into great detail. Okay. Now by. y'All. Like mastitis. Leader that. It is crazy how many laws everyone's trying to control for like while the mother is still pregnant, but then no one wants to make any laws for when the baby is born for the mother or the child's wellbeing. That's just a really interesting. Thing a yeah. It boggles my mind. I JUST WANNA go back for one second because you spoke about how you always thought Oh after I get married after I have kids after I retired then I'm gonNA run right and that is such a mentality I completely understand that mentality and how we women there such a double standard we're we're supposed to you know think this way and we're brought up thinking this way or expected to work like we don't have children Mark Spector to mother like we don't have a job i. mean why do we feel this way? Why does society put this on us and what help change your mentality so that you could just dive in make change Than a really good question I think because I knew I can help people and I am in my motivation changed APP came to be honest it was it was before. It was on help people who don't have the same resources don't have the same network. Or experience that I do. And I just make better place. Then when I became a mother, it was. Doing for them. And and their future, as well as other other kids, and especially, I'll be on this year's been really tough with you know crowded virus. And especially after her. George Floyd and I remember thinking. When motivation you now? I'm fighting the same fight that my parents and my grandparents, my great grandparents fought. And as I look Jack Samantha I, say how do I look them in the eye? And tell them. I did everything within my power, keep them from finding those same fights. It don't every day even when I'm tired even when I'm frustrated even when I say this e. Putting myself out there to do the most, I can do to keep them by those same fights. And It's really I mean that's why I do it and and how I keep motivated win it gets hard and it is a sacrifice because. We always feel like we have to put everybody else's needs above ours. And when you take on like that added responsibility of I, gotTa help like. All. Of. Society. It's hard but it's important. So. That's what kind of keeps me going. We're GONNA take a quick break. We'll be right back in just a minute. I've been riding motorcycles for fifty two years. I started having back pain that turned into the knee pain couldn't even sit on a motorcycle. Give Up Riding Bikes Kaiser permanent they need need a hip replacement so I was going to do it through outpatient surgery. Out Great recovered overnight was home by eleven o'clock the next morning. I'm glad I made the choice for Kaiser Permanent I'm enjoying life. Medical Unique Foundational Fundamental Annex two zero one be services. Early. A. And we're back well, we have a list of. Many of your legislative accomplishments Obviously, we discussed the your a creating a state based health exchange under obamacare you participated in passing the historic Clean Economy Act raising minimum wage expanding tenant rights and protections creating school construction and modernization. Commission legislation to end. Discrimination the list goes on and on In, reading this incredible list an and all the things that are currently. Part of your platform. Like especially, right now in twenty twenty, there's a lot of change that is happening and there's a lot of change that needs to happen. How do you keep from feeling overwhelmed in? How do you prioritize in taking it? One thing at a time I think by recognizing that any progress is good. When we when we took back so that list you just read bounces this year. Are you? What? but I say that. It it. So this is my fifteenth session. And there are a lot of things that we were pushing for. For that entire time. So it was like, okay. Now that we have the majority, it's like, why wouldn't we go for at all but at the same time, you have to ask yourself if I can't get one hundred percent of what I want. How far can I go? In his in his that better than stuff slow then you take that when You for a minute and then you push to keep going. And at the end of the day knowing. that. I've helped somebody. Or are. I've made a significant impact in policy for the better. Is really all I need to keep going. I've been added enough where I can see change that I've made either know not just from bills. I've introduced like a question I've asked in committee that killed a bad bill or an amendment I offered that made a bill better. In. Those are things that a lot of people don't pay attention to, but I've seen. Either individual people who said Hey you helped me. Or groups or organizations or just alyce that has made a difference. then. I'm like. All right. That's what I'm Beth. Flag. It wasn't miss certain to Feign. Definitely wanted the money. And Like. Rush frankly that I get from say you know what I saw problem. And I did something about it. Then I may not one hundred percent solved it, but made it better. And absolute. That's what keeps you motivated how prioritize really depends. On. I think in politics, we often silo issues and forget to look at a holistic community or holistic person in recognized how interdependent. Issues are so you can't talk about. You can't talk about how do we rebuild our economy is you're not talking about. Education. Childcare and family friendly policies that help workers and you can't talk about the economy without talking about how do we break our dependence on fossil fuel based industries that make it harder For wrestling than healthy communities and be healthy. And so I will often look issues. holistically and decide like what has to get done right now. Versus. Do we need to start going to make progress down the road So. That's Kinda. How I prioritize it's tough because you know. There are a lot of an era was actually a really good example where you had a lot of people who are saying look. I have problems like right now. I'm being addicted. Yeah I've lost my job. How do asks Lucas on this theoretical saying that may or may not happen. When I have immediate news right now, part of the trying to make that connection between how long term policy. is also important to short needs. Yeah. Knowing the so it's so inspiring to listen to you speak. We could go on forever What what we want to talk about is Monument Avenue, and this is a huge topic right now, Richmond was the capital of the confederacy you were for the bill allowing local officials to move confederate monuments. Can you talk about what this means to you? I know you've openly spoken about what it felt like to pass those monuments every day to work while you're constantly trying to fight change. What does that mean to you? You know it's funny. So, I live right around the corner from the big giant Robert e Lee Statue and I never really looked at it. Until When the when the protests are after George Floyd. And I never realized how much emotional energy. I spent ignoring it because it triggers a lot thing. And the relief that I felt when I heard the words from our governor. Now you know I'm ordering mass statue taken now. and. Then I went to I was doing an interview and I went to new pictures for an Early and I took a real hard look at not only the statue but the reclaiming of it in that space they were like African American families. Taking. Graduation. Pictures Sam and I was like you know what? We can finally start back healing process that never fully happened after the civil war reconstruction and. That's what it means to be for that monument to come down. But it also means we have to I have a role to plan and we as society have a role to play in telling our complete history in our our full story because for a lot of people. Some of my neighbors included. That statute tells the story of. The loss cause and pride in the south. Veterans and a love of Virginia and it's like, yeah but. They were fighting to keep my ancestors and say. They were put up at a time and in response to the rising political social and economic our people. And they were put up as part of a movement along with Racial Terror Lynn changs and laws that Jim Crow into effect to say to my people in place. So on the one hand, that's what they trigger for me all that pain. Knowing I drive past that statute every day shoe, the building that was more capital confederacy to pass laws to make life better for everybody is is incredibly in power. but I'm ready for. Come. down. Of course, we all know what is what is happening with that because I think and correct me if I'm wrong, it is the only confederate statues buffs standing. And Okay is continuing to stand or is it being taken down? Well so that was owned by the state and There's there's a lawsuit right now that I think goes to trial soon to to see if the governor had the baron ticket down or not. and if they find that, he didn't my guess is we can success in the legislature because it stayed on property. And so it will come down. It's just a matter Tom can't come soon enough. well, we wanted to talk about. The fact that you're obviously running to be the governor you said the current governor of Virginia. You're running to better of Virginia something else I learned in researching for this episode is that not all states vote for the gubernatorial elections at the same time right Virginia's one of those that is there an off numbered years so Essentially if you live in Virginia, you would be voting in two thousand, twenty one just a fun facts for if anyone's listening. And needed to learn that like I did Time to be running for office. Yeah did you always plan on running and twenty twenty or did? was visit this thing hey. Where you like twenty twenties my here like this was all of us last year New Year's like twenty twenty guys. I news. No actually I so I used to any Virginia politician that tells you don't WanNa be governor is a liar. So I always wanted governor. But I never really thought about running And there was another like maybe one day after I've done everything I, feel like I can do with legislature. and. In. The last year we made news again with some scandals in February. and. I started thinking about how we really needed. To heal again as a commonwealth that that people were doing. Okay. But not everybody. And maybe in twenty, twenty, five. Around for governor. the more I thought about it last year like you know what we're at a critical moment as a Commonwealth and then I pretty much made up my mind last year but not quite. Because I really like being in majority and asking for bills. But code kind of sealed it because it was like we we are at a critical moment as a nation, but also is accountable on. Who are we going to be? Are we GONNA be Commonwealth that finally addresses four hundred years of systemic inequity. That rebuilds in a way that also rebuilt trusted people have lost in government's ability to solve problems in new jobs. In yourself saw problems in help people. Are we going to be a Commonwealth that bring people together to solve our problems or just continues to fight and divide and conquer? And that's what really pushed me around now. and. It goes back to what I said earlier you know. Am I doing everything in my power? To stop these PROB Long. So my kids don't have to fix them if I'm not running for governor, which is the most powerful. Office in the state that sets the agenda. For public policy in the legislature so that all lie decided to Ryan wide decide now. What I love so much about your story is that you you know were a lawyer but you had no. Experience Holding Office and you just spoke with your friends and some family members and said Hey I, think this might be something i WanNa do what are your thoughts and advice for people running for office? You've never held office before. Do. It do it. Just do it. I'll be honest middle hesitate minute once they decide it does not matter what their experiences doesn't matter what their qualifications are at. They're just like you know what I'm GonNa. Do It women stop and ask themselves at Emma qualify what have I done to prepare for this? And we just think. because. Women and run the world. They don't give us credit for. It. Though, you know just do it and and I. Think. Find. Start with your friends and family because the hardest thing for any candidate is is raising money and raising your networks and getting your name out in front of people and learning to talk about yourself and and Brag on yourself. But you start with friends and family and your your crew and get them to support you and then spread out from there so. Any other trainings that people can take, but at the end of the day is all about learning how to sell yourself, which again Mendel doing of women women tend to not. Want to Brag. But just get over that. What what has that been like running during a pandemic I, mean, and what is the difference now? It's very hard I. You know I'm I'm an impasse. and. My original plan was we adjourned session on March. Twelfth. And my original plan was you know do a thirty day victory lap and talk about all the great things that we did that I did and then launch April and then go travel around the state Osceola race on the all that. Five minutes. Governor Declare State of emergency and I immediately went to into crisis mode fielding calls constituents. Trying to get information to them about coded in what to do. and. I felt every problem. That people had ended at the same time like my kids school shutdowns I'll try to deal with that and I really had a hard time. Switching, from impact crisis mode to okay I can help more people when I'm elected governor. So. Maybe, I need to focus a little bit more which may feel selfish but really isn. And find that balance and I think it took probably a good month. Of like. Just get through crisis mode. And then get back on track to to start Garon, but all the fun parts campaigning are gone. Most The rallies and being out? I miss. People. You know the Democratic National Convention would have been like an amazing opportunity But you just you. You make your own opportunities. Now that's what we're dealing. We're doing virtual meeting grades, fundraisers helping twenty twenty candidates because this is an existential year. And Just grinding it out and I'm I'm actually amendment right now. So I turned into my office slash room I noticed the pink walls. Grind it out in your. Meeting many people audible raising as much money as possible. And just spreading the word about my campaign and why why it's important that the governor is. What. Are you hearing from the people of Virginia right now I mean obviously, there's so much. There's health pandemic social unrest, a nation divided financial crisis. I mean we we were talking in the beginning before we started recording that you know where the whole west coast is on fire you know the climate crisis also, you know the incredible black lives matter movement which the long overdue reckoning on the systemic racism that's existed in this country. Forever, essentially. Weird you start what are you hearing from people in addressing essentially all of those things. Yeah I think A it's different by generation so What I hear among Gen Z.. Is. A growing loss of safe. In, government's ability to solve their problems or even care. and. Why does it matter? which started to change with the protests I. Think I think, George? Floyd. Was the moment when everybody said like enough. and. But we cannot ignore can't deny anymore we can't ignore it anymore we can't accept no for an answer. And so I've seen a lot of genes e. Kids leaving the protests and leading the charge and they're like, okay like. Would tell me what to do but share my demands. How do I make them happen? I hear and then you know parents. and. People who have jobs? Are just trying to figure out how to balance. And find. Normal. And there's there's anger and frustration that we are where we are and like how do we get through it? You know a lot of people who have lost their jobs you know businesses that. Are Gone and may never come back and the despair with that, and so there's a lot of like. How do we recover and how do we find normal? But there's also An amazing amount of hope. Because it's almost like we the nation hit rock bottom. And so we can rebuil-. Better is still Joe Biden's back that. We can rebuild better because. If, we're just going back to where we were on March is not good enough. So let's rebuild. The biggest. The biggest argument against change was operates like this is the way it's always been. And it's like, yeah but that's not a bit. And then we're never going back there just like we can't go back there because so much jank because Kobe that I think is GonNa be carbonate? that. We've gotTA figure out what is the new normal move forward in this a transformative moment just like my parents lives through after the depression. Just. Like you know. After the Vietnam War in the sixties like this is the next transformative moment for us as a nation as Cosmo, and there's hope a that because we can do it better. It's interesting. You touched on regression and the younger generation and was reading an article on you and how you sat next to a young woman and she was discussing how she'd only ever seen regression because she grew up with. Obama in office and then now seemed trump and she feels like what's the point in trying and so what is it that we can do to make sure people continually are inspired to vote and remind them that their vote counts. I. And she works for me by the way. The. Way I thought your story. Forgive me I forgot her name. Alicia Lucia. It's. It's I think. Making. People understand. And I think it's easier now how? It matter. Like government matters. It matters in a crisis for sure. But it matters day to day because everything government does affects our lives every possible way. So for for her generation. and. What I said to her basically was if you are not part of the solution. It'll never get better. and. Helping them see how it's not just about showing up and voting but showing up in city of City Hall, learn the state legislature in Congress in telling people your stories. Because at the of the day. Everybody's political news and policy views are shaped by their life experiences. And and. But those bodies aren't diverse. So if we are not telling our life experiences to people in power. And if we are not trying to put ourselves in position of our government will never chew he'd be by a girl equal. And so I invited you know I find it her to come start you know working for me in my office and eventually brought her on staff and she's working on my campaign. and and naturally just showing people how you can make a difference. Right. But you gotTA show up you have to show up and you running I would like to say when you win You would be the first black female governor of Virginia. And does that factor like do you think about that often like while you're campaigning? Is that something that you've really thought about and intentionally this year during your campaign. Yeah. I'll actually the first in the country. and. Should base neighbor but she ron but numb. I do think about I mean that's not why I'm running but of course not. But yeah yeah, I, feel the weight of it and In part because. One of my favorite phrases is like your your ancestors while the strengths and like that is I feel that every pop a of the bills that I introduced I've got a personal connection. I've got personal story. The domestic worker bill of rights. Every woman in my mom's side family was a domestic worker. Those are those are experiences I can help elevate. And bring a perspective. That hasn't been told. But I can also help bring people together because I have a perspective that's never been there before. And hopefully, inspire somebody else to do it but I feel it every day. and. Pretty. Excited about it. I know you inspire people to do this. I know that you do What do you want to say the young women who are listening and? Maybe feel they want to run for office one day. Do it. Just, you guys. Well I would say I. Really ask yourself why. because. It I know this is the hardest thing I've ever done in my life. It is going to be a year. Of Really Grueling Work That takes me away from my family sometimes and when you get tired. which will and when you get discouraged, you have to be able to go back to your core and say, why am I doing? and. That will fuel you to keep going. Because people are gonNA say Nasty, things value. People are GonNa, pay too much attention to what you wear. Now which hair looks like I was once called the Barbie, the House of delegates. And Asking people for money is not fun. Putting yourself out there. Potentially endanger is not fun. To be sure that you're doing it. For a reason that will take you through the dark conce. Because if you do, it'll be worth it in twenty twenty, one day. One of being governor Virginia. What would you do? What would be your main focus? Our education system. So Building a world class education system for early childhood through Higher Ed Because I. think that is the key to our economic. Recovery both short-term and long-term. and that's like my number one passion and I think. It'll probably take the full for years to do everything that we do here in Virginia. But then also helping us Immediately start to rebuild our economy in a way that doesn't leave behind. and I am I am hopeful. We will have a back scene and least through the health and. I'm preparing in case we are but but I'm hopeful that will be more in recovery as those will be my my top priorities Senator McClellan. We are so grateful that you were able to join us today and we're going to have all of your websites and we're all of our listeners can find you in our show notes are you also active on social media in case? The follow you on the Graham. I am so instruments litter are both Jen McLellan via an two ends. I can't remember what my facebook is. Everything's on my website and I actually do my own social media. which is in, you'll see just how big a nerd I am. Always love it. Wow. Having someone like you office is truly inspiring and be able to sit down with you today just exceeded expectation. Thank you so much for taking the time to talk to us. We're so honored and we wish you the best of luck. We'll thank you for having me and and good luck with you guys and they for what you do. You now had i. not gone into politics. I would have gone into act cash had to make a choice. The theater track or the political drag not just try. It goes both ways I'm sure we we. Dishing, with twenty people that look exactly like you like talking about you know zombies, it can go both ways. Awesome something Virginia and then you'll Jim you're giving me a cameo we'll have. Hey. Done. Thank you. bye-bye. Honor. I just got so excited to vote. Like I can't vote for her but like I'm really excited I hope if you're in Virginia and you're listening to this, you're very excited to go to and we learned a new word before we started recording with her didn't Kayla gubernatorial gubernatorial. Yes. We we we. We thought we knew what it was, but we just wanted to make sure and turns that we work correct. But now we know how to pronounce it what my favorite things that. She said that I wrote down immediately was you are your ancestors wildest dreams and I don't know anything more inspiring than that to make you WanNa, be your best self to make you want to inspire change and I. I mean I I can only imagine how her ancestors feel looking down on her right now I mean we listed that list of everything she had done it since she says, Oh, all of that happened this past year I mean hands. Down I. could bow down to her I think she is phenomenal and I it does make me want to move to Virginia and be able to vote in two twenty, twenty one for her because I just think she is fantastic. I know I loved also every time she'd kind of talk about goals that she had set for herself in her own life. She'd say you know I thought okay. You have the kids or you get married you have kids. And then maybe all get into politics or you know eventually maybe I'll retire and then kind of do that or I'll from being a lawyer or eventually when the kids are older, maybe I'll run for governor in race in just that realization. Now I'm GonNa do it. Now you know and this incredible reminder that is women we don't need to have this laundry list of of accolades to show to prove to the world that like we are so insanely. I mean you have to learn as you go and you get in there you can't you know. That's part of it. No one is born just knowing how to do all of those things. Someone's born being like, well, I automatically know how to be a lawyer. Now you go to school. And you know I know exactly how to. You know serve as a delegate no. You you end up on the floor you know and you hope that everything that's led you to that moment prepares you the best. It can Gosh. I'm just so grateful for this conversation, and so am I in the senators words do it if anyone is if you can take anything away from this episode, if there's something you've been wanting to try or you've been toying with stop. Thinking you might want to do it just do it just do it? There's a CA- you have a calling go for it. I also want to give one more shot a few weeks ago we had an episode discussing emerge America. So if you are. Considering getting involved in politics, and you don't know where to start they specifically or community for Democratic Women who want to run for office and that need a place to start. So checkout emerge America. and. Obviously. Senator McLaughlin's incredible advice just to it Jeff, do it. We need more women in office not too bright and We hope you guys enjoyed this conversation and our justice inspired as we are. We've another awesome episode for you next week we'll see then.

Virginia Senator Jennifer McClellan senator George Floyd Senate Virginia State Senator Louise Lucas San Velo President John Kennedy Congress Jack Samantha Gulf Coast Petersburg Nashville legislature Democratic Party Tennessee Kayla
Moving Forward Part 3: A Voice from Inside the Sports Industry  Work In Sports podcast

The Work in Sports Podcast - Insider Advice for Sports Careers

50:19 min | 4 months ago

Moving Forward Part 3: A Voice from Inside the Sports Industry Work In Sports podcast

"The Working Sports podcast moving forward is brought to you by empowered. This is the most important election of our time, and let's be honest voting during a pandemic is a little confusing right. Now, there's so much misinformation out there aimed towards making you believe your vote doesn't matter. It's called voter suppression. And, we need to stop it. Your vote does matter. Voting is the most important responsibility of citizens do not give up that power or that right getting, gauged, informed, and ready to vote all with one APP called empowered e. m. p. o.. W.. R. D.. I've used a I learned a lot. It made me feel more confident through this entire process I. got my ballot last week I filled it out in dropped it off and official ballot box and I'm feeling good Pennsylvania is ready to rock. All these top athletes are out there supporting this great APP and makes it easier for you to get all the information you need to vote. So please get involved, download the APP today, and get empowered. EMPOWERED EM, POW, party. Our four part moving forward miniseries analyzing social justice through the eyes of ten young diverse aspiring sports professionals. I'm your host. Brian Clap from work in sports dot. com. Social Justice in Sports, the idea of communicating anger and frustration based on racial equity. took a few decades off. Bill Russell five time NBA Most Valuable Player twelve time all star eleven time NBA champion Olympic gold medal winner Ncaa Champion Hall of Famer. was famous for using his platform to fight against the racism and inequality that plague our country today. Russell believes you stand up for your beliefs no matter what the cost and he has always lived that way. In. The sixties fans were violent towards him. The FBI surveilled him fellow pros criticized him. But. He persevered. He spoke his truth without fear of reciprocity because his goal was to do more than win basketball games he wanted to change the world for everyone that followed. This was the sixties, the energy and fervor to fight oppression and inequality slow down in the seventies, eighties, nineties, and early two thousands. Forty years of silence from our sports stars the leaders and most powerful voices for change. Gently Shut up and dribbled. Michael Jordan Lawrence. Taylor Charles Barkley Barry Bonds. They were all outspoken but rarely if ever about social change and inequality. The voice from within became silent glitz Glamour and excess became the voice. Love Him hate him respect him admonish him. It was Colin Kaepernick that woke the sports world up and brought the athletes back down to the people. Others. Followed suit with power and passion, but it became clear. It was no longer a shot up in dribble world. That voice the one that comes from the inside has so much power. In two thousand seventeen bill. Russell posted a photograph of himself on twitter in what she was taking a knee in solidarity with NFL players. He was wearing his presidential medal of freedom. And the image was captioned with proud to take a knee and to stand tall against social injustice. His voice never wavered. In an interview with the SPN Russell said, he wanted the NFL players know they weren't alone. This conversation part three of our moving forward series isn't about the pros and cons of taking a knee or that granular of a stance or approach. It's about the broader topic of using your voice from the inside to effect positive change. Everyone here listening doesn't have the benefit of platform like Kyrie Irving or Bill Russell. But change can come from listening and using the platform you do have inside our industry. To help guide me through this conversation. Join me in welcoming Devon, Walker Miguel Spinoza, and Caitlyn Wallin. Caitlyn. Let's start with you tell us a little bit by yourself. So name is Caitlin Wallin and I'm from Durham, North Carolina I graduated from the University of North Carolina Wilmington in two thousand seventeen with a double major in Business and Sports, Management and then the past three seasons I've actually been working with the Durham Bulls kind of working my way up from an operations position to membership services position until recently when I was one of the lucky few that got laid off due to go. So now I'm just trying to find my way back in. These are tough times. We all understand and empathize Devon tell us little bit about your background. On. My name is Evan Walker born and raised enforcement Virginia graduated from Virginia State University in two thousand nineteen with a major force management I recently just moved down here to Florida Aban work this ratio working as account executive where Jackson That story. I Love Minor League Baseball names just for the record. I mean, the Jacksonville Jumbo shrimp sounds like a fun place to work. It is. Good. I'm glad to hear that Miguel tell us a little bit of your about your background I saw high. If money's Miguel I'm originally from Cincinnati Ohio a graduate of the University of Cincinnati bearcats. I majored in sports management there currently work for locker as a crm in an analyst of been there since. We, still new. And enjoying a down here on the Florida weather. Yeah can't beat that. So during last week seven, we'll start with you during last week's conversation actually week one we focused a great deal on the statement made by you and your field cohort after the murder of George Floyd and I wanNA keep moving this conversation forward from there. But before we do your unique situation because you were actively working with the Jacksonville Jumbo shrimp the time. Which is the Miami Marlins AA affiliate how do you balance using your voice to speak up for positive change versus the factor actively working in minor league. Baseball. Is Kinda challenging because I know. I have all my my superiors, follow me on all my social media. So this is kind of I cannot I can't say I WANNA say, but at the same time, it's Good 'cause I'm in a good position because I worked with the one, the African American general manager hair across. Louis Enjoy Floyd I got killed. Kinda Kinda put its own NEOM. So he was averse He majored put out a statement to make sure that by racism we don't want any of that at at our stadium and he was might he really made? It was like the bag off of me I? Says he made light he made sure that. He pushed pushed pushed ahead. that. Racism is. To the show took it took away all my shoulder so I can actively. Say What I WANNA say is I wanted to. Move forward from there but all my co workers make sure they was always reaching out to me to make sure I was good when it first happened in me like we we all like a family there at the Jackson show wanted a most diverse front office fries offices in Mali baseball. I love their. How much does that mean for you starting on your sports career to be working at an organization where diversity is not just an entry level job but also in the leadership team and to that, there are people ahead of you that see the world through your eyes and understand your impact in that that organization. How much does that mean for you may Alaska to me to be honest is is, is something that I wanna be I wanna be like where heroin I wanna be a general managers Sunday in to see that he's actually taking steps to buy tomat- to be one of the best general managers Minor League Baseball. May makes me WANNA. He May WanNa be on Nayef his wing just wanted to move. On from him. Yeah. So Miguel in your experience, our teams leagues, and Sports. Organizations ready and willing to have this conversation about social justice and equity. In my opinion, I don't think they're ready if you look at a lot of the front offices. There don't have a lot of racial diversity or ethnicity diversity So I think. No in. Then I believe a lot of times. You know they're they have minority committees in things. For people to have but a lot of times when I've been I, don't even know what half of these committees do. It. Just one of those things. Let me check the box off to make sure that we're we have everything ordered. No one can say, Hey, we're not doing the right thing when you're actually doing the bare minimum. And there was even a scenario at the winter baseball meetings where one of my coat members of my cohort. Gerald there was a question. I can't remember the exact question but I, remember we are in the diversity panel in one of the questions was made everybody at your table feel uncomfortable in a his table specifically everybody got up and left. Just, because it was, it was pushed on them. That Hey, step out of your comfort zone. Let's really tackle this head on and see what we can come up with what we can do to become better on. So little things like that. Just show you. They're not ready to do it. They're not either not ready or they're not willing. So it's one or the other. So I think with that you see a lot of social media messages, but there's no plan it. It's something to say, Hey, we support this cause or hey we. Were Against Racism. But when you don't do anything within your organization or outside of the organization to work towards progress, are you really ready to have that conversation? How much just a quick follow with you Miguel. How much our? Young people like yourself who are going out and getting into the sports industry and being on the inside. How much are you able to effect change because I think it's almost an unfair burden. On you and say, okay, Great. You're in your new job I want you to go and make a huge committee change or change the way the organization is run. That seems like too big of a challenge. How are you able to make some positive changes from within? I think really on just breaking a lot of stereotypes is going in and doing the best job that you can in trying to create relationships it may seem in overwhelming times on because I know specifically actually a quite a few of my internship I was the only racial minority. In it's tough to really feel like I feel that you belong in you're able to make something positive of your experience on. So going in, it's a little bit tougher. But why is it just going and doing the best job that you can do in trying to educate people on the when you are presented the opportunities I'm not saying you know a entry level position you're going to go in here and change the whole organization. One eighty is going to be completely different from when you arrived on but just little by little. One. percent of the time just making it better. Working Sports podcast moving forward is brought to you by the winning edge of Leadership Academy, and I'm lucky enough to be joined by executive director and Co founder of the winning edge. Leadership. Academy Korea Million Korean. How are you? I? AM fantastic I'm so excited to be here today. So tell us a little bit more about the winning edge leadership academy. The winning is leadership academy is not as an organization, but a Community Movement to develop the next generation of women in minorities especially soon, athletes in sports entertainment. So your mission to develop this next generation is incredibly important. How do you do it? What are your steps and how do you empower tomorrow's leaders we engage we empower and we elevate we meet them where they are whether it's on campus or instagram live we empower them by providing mentors and resources to get where they to get them where they want to be, and then we elevate we promote their skills and we get them jobs. Isn't that what it all comes down to write is to helping them get to the employment apart and put them in leadership opportunities. Yes, and it can be as simple as that. We don't have to build a school in APP to make real change. Oh I love that and you know I'm sure that you've seen success come through the program. How motivating is that for you when you start to see the people that you've worked with get out there in the industry and start working and making a difference, it literally wake me up in the morning and keeps me up at night. I, have been. Blessed to be a witness on the journey of many industry professionals, young professionals, and we have a couple of future athletic directors in VP's in our in our coffers Saab. So excited for them. That's what we need more of. We need more representations so so much for coming on how can our listeners learn more and get involved? Yes. He can visit our website and keep it pretty simple. We Game Change Dot Org. We can also wear on every social platform other than Tiktok in snapchat and our handle is the we leadership. I love that and I'm also not on talk to old. Thank you. Korean. So great to hear from you. Thank you. I'm excited to see how this is real change. Killing. It feels to me like a young people like all of you are shouting to be heard the fact that you guys put together the statement the fact that you guys all banded together as a group and had that strength together is impressive. My question to you is are the right people listening you guys are screaming are the right people in the sports industry listening? Do you think people are hearing you? So I think it's really hard not to hear what is going on and what is being said. In today's climate regardless of of what is being said, I. Think everybody's hearing especially what we're say but I, don't think that they're willing to listen and be proactive on it and I do think that a lot of it has to do with. Being available to take those steps towards had a deep and meaningful actions and statements being said. And if teams just took the time to really just listen income up with very meaningful actions that actually. Help. Solve problems I think that we'd be going in a better direction than just kind of giving a blanket general statement to say that Oh yes, we heard you but we're just going to give a broad spectrum statement instead of actually creating steps that need to be taken. So what do you think needs to be done I know that's a big question and I know it's a broad question but we so often are seeing corporate statements and we're seeing social media posts and we're seeing we re unite against racism and that's all great. That's important. But what needs to be done? What actions would you guys like to start to see? CAITLIN. We'll start with you. So I, definitely. Would like to see kind of combating the diversity and inclusion within teams I know that during our field meeting back in June of two thousand nineteen we heard from one of our field alumni who was a trainee and they were only paying him nine twenty, five an hour for a time job and he got the cheapest apartment that he could and he ended up sleeping on the. Floor he ended up eating the food out of the like break rooms. He had a boss that kind of helped him out with laundry services to make sure that he had cleaned clothes. But I think that the issue is, is you know these intro training draw jobs, we have are a livable wage or livable salary for a bunch of students who are trying to break into the industry and who are. Trying to get that and it'd be really great if they could. You know really pay for the value that you're getting with any training that comes through but then I also think it's community outreach. I think it's educational classes for both players in front office staff I think it's going out making sure everyone is educated in on the same page for civil justice in and the right kind of movements. Devon, we talk a lot about programs like field, which is a really incredible program, but it's only one week and you guys have banded together. You've got to know each other and you've thrown that community out wherever you guys have gone back brought your influence back to the organizations you're currently in we talk about the development of roles like diversity inclusion these were roles that didn't even exist ten. Years ago. So this is progress in some ways but what does it feel like for you on the front lines actually working day to day in the sports industry it sounds you have a very representative organization, but put yourself in the shoes of both situations. You're positive situation that you're currently in but also what you've heard and seen from other people in the industry, what's it like day to day? day-to-day is we are trying to make to make the steps to to make sure that we are trying to trying to move. But at the same time it flight, we take one step at four retake get back to back. I know once we put out this statement regarding regard everything that didn't they took too long to come out with statement. They actually came back to us and they wanted to talk to us about it wanted to make sure that I was on the same page with dome of. say on the same as with to see if Lewis Todd you we had right to if that we was site get punished a little bit for putting statement out before you daily something. So, what would you like to see as far as progress we we've discussed a lot of different ways but what's one thing that you'd like to see more of across the sports industry across the sports industry allied to see more? In rose, that's what I want to see more to me. 'CAUSE since I meant says I'm in that position where I'm at now. Put, somebody else in position to make them feel like they wanna work more and work harder on a new somebody look just like me. Miguel your current organization footlocker has actually been a leading voice in the sports industry when it comes to diversity and inclusion for A. Did back went back and did some research and read some of the statements from the CEO and some of the perspectives that they've had as an organization and they've led the way. It hasn't been a trailing response and reactive. It's they've been pretty proactive. How does that feel for you to work for an organization and know that you are valued from inside and how does that feel for you on a day to day in the industry. I mean I think it makes it easier especially because like I said, it's just not a statement. They're actually having these conversations in the whole corporate like big corporate meetings that we have. On they're actually having the discussions why? Why this discussion is important in how everybody should feel But I also think. They take it a step further even more where I was day offers you know scholarships for their part time associates not a lot of companies like. Caitlin just said you're you're going through that working for them in the only getting paid nine, forty five versus accompanied that you know you're getting part time hourly wage. But then on top of that, they're covering some of your schooling for you That's something that I mean when I got scholarship felt valued by the company even though most companies are you're as part time employees, why would we do anything for you? So it's been something very for me very special. 'cause I've never been a part of a company that's. Felt this strongly in his actually walked the walk not just talk the talk on I think for that. Like if you if you pay attention to the same, they put out, they don't just put out statements. They're also they have a plan for the next five years on how they're going to municipal support minority communities both with economic development into education is not just, Hey, here's a statement. Let's move forward type thing where we're all about it. So the on a whole scale from internally from all the from part time to corporate. I feel no different feel embraced by the company on its I've been enjoying from when I was a part time employees at Champs sports now. You know being one of the email and crm analyst for the the banner Champs. So I've been enjoying it in its it makes it a lot easier to go to work versus dragging by hey I really feel valid here they don't really care for me I'm just cheer to pick up a paycheck. It's more than that for me f locker I think what's really cool about that too is that we've seen a lot of sports organizations that are flush with cash that are throwing money at the problem and that's not. Necessarily a bad thing like when the when the Boston Celtics say, we're going to dedicate twenty million dollars to social justice reform. That's a good thing. Right. But you want to see a plan to you want to know what that money's going towards and if they're changing things like hiring practices and they're doing leadership program so like to your point is the fact for lockers backing it up with plans I can be really empowering for all of you Caitlyn. Is it possible to make positive strides on topics as impactful as race and social justice as a young voice from within an organization or is that really an unfair burden to place on this generation and the younger people just getting started in the industry it feels like to me not to put words in your mouth but my generation should be the one changing this. This burden shouldn't a on all of you. But how can you how can you make positive strides in this world? So I definitely do think it's possible to make impactful in positive strides within energy I mean energy. Company or an organization I just think that as new and upcoming, and we are the future executives that are coming up like Debbie wants to be a future GM. I'm kind of along the same path as him in following emily's footsteps of being a female GM AAA team I do think that since we are those featuring, we can definitely be making the changes now that need to happen in the future. Because we are creating the future that we want for ourselves. But I do think it's unfair advantage for us to be doing all the leg work and all the changes and all the ideas if upper management and generation that was before us is not willing to sit down and really listen to the issues that we're talking about in the changes that we WANNA make I. Think it is a two way street but if we put in the hard work now we do that a little bit of extra legwork. While we're still young and we have the energy were literally making it the future that we want it to be. The Working Sports podcast moving forward is brought to you by for it's Biz camps and I'm lucky enough right now to be joined by Vincent Pearson Principal Strategist for diversity and inclusion on the Sports Biz camps team and former top guests in sports podcast. One of my all time favorites Vincent. Brian thanks again for having me of course I'm so glad to be having this conversation with you. So tell us a little bit more about Sports Biz camps give us a little idea of your mission and purpose absolutely Saban working with forbid scans for about the past year in the idea founded two, thousand nineteen. The idea was how do we create an experience for students before? They get the college that can give them an understanding of what working in sports means too many students enter college and they just don't have an idea of the breath of the industry and we think that's learning then is a little too late to the ivy was that's tap them before they get into college is the high school and start talking about what in sports really means. I think that's so wonderful because I talk it all out of college campuses and you still find people freshman sophomore junior years aren't really sure where they fit. So it was just of start that conversation earlier is so important how your program has been received by the community so far It's been willie row seat. So we started in Charlotte and there we had about one hundred plus students come out attended enjoy the programming from there. We had fans in Chicago in Indianapolis in the Jersey Shore. So we're like we've got expanded. And then we insert corona virus and we go virtual, and now we've got students from about thirty seven different states who participated in our programming. It seems like we're really onto something where there's both in interest but as you have both there's a need for this type of education for students before they step into the college space. Yeah and it's affordable opportunity. So it's it's allows everybody to come in and learn right absolutely, and that's one of the things that we really pride ourselves on everything is free of charge for students. We've got donors with that granted supporters, but at the end of the day. No matter what we want that programming to be free for students. And that's how all of this starts is with an equitable situation that everybody can thrive under and there's no barriers to entry and everybody gets an opportunity to grow and learn and to get them early interested in the sports industry and growing. So you're creating leaders of tomorrow, which is really exciting. So for everybody listening, how can they learn more and get involved? Absolutely ask You. To Join, US I follow US Social Media Won't Instagram Sport Base camps that's the handle on instagram and Lincoln, but then also on facebook and twitter. But then also visit our website got tons of information on what we've done. But also what we're planning you organization is still new and growing to get involved with our programming at the very least follow in Tallahassee student come along. Fantastic Vincent thanks for telling us more thank you Brian. Dan Lewis talk really honestly here do you think conversations like this help? Do you think there are enough people out there that are willing to listen and have some empathy and put themselves in somebody else's shoes and understand their journey and story or do you feel like? Do you feel like people are more receptive to that now having this conversation and pushing it out there and being able to tell your story? Does that help or are there actually more people out there that kind of tune out when we have these conversations and they do open up? Fillet might now everybody is some my majority of the people they wanted light they WanNa light listen to what you were you coming from. Where you come from what they want they wanNA listen to you more now by at the same time, we still have people. Might be trying to talk to drain. Chinatown. Tone is still it goes to air throughout the other absolute now more. Say More recently now since since we this since we we try to like move. Athlete athletically more might we try to move to move now? Miguel, what do you think about that? So I think a lot of times where diversity inclusion is seen as convenient. That's when people are listening or when it comes with dollar signs. not really if it if it's not come with dollar signs or if it's not convenient for the organization, they're really not going to tune in and open up in really embrace it I. Think a lot of times. They to now on. It's like will either we've been doing it this way the entire time why should we change anything or it doesn't really make business sense for us why would we do that on an? We actually experienced that. When we visited a Minor League Baseball Organization with the field program where we asked a question, you know why haven't you guys stepped up to do more of a diverse and inclusive events on making everybody else feel comfortable they pretty much said a it doesn't make business sense in its why would we do that Our demographic really isn't that so why why should we push the table? It's so frustrating to hear and I'll be completely honest in here to I've been very excited about these conversations and this whole four part series because we need to amplify the young diverse voices out there because you are the future of the sports industry and yet I will be just completely transparent here as we publish these episodes, we've had there has been less downloads for these episodes and there have been for normal episodes at that has made me very upset a lot of ways because it's like people put on a show and act as if they want to be a part of change progress but when it actually comes time to listen with an open mind and heart. And try to put yourself in somebody else's shoes they're not as interested. Kaelin. Does that does that ring true to you or does that sound like I'm just overreacting? I definitely think it's probably true I think everybody at the beginning of the Social Justice Movement that's been happening since George at the beginning they were all gung Ho and they were willing to listen and they were willing to you know do the blackout screen on Instagram or you know those kind of steps but now that it's been some time, they're just kind of like letting it pass over there had been said and I think that there is now less of willing to. Listen and kind of more of shrugging of the shoulders and being like, okay like we hear you. But it isn't something that we haven't heard before and I just don't think it's fair because these are some really important matters and issues that we have right now that were trying to make changes and we just have more people listening and being willing to be willing to open and have those conversations. I think we can take this all the way that it needs to go. There needs to be relaxing, but behind it, it's easy to put a blackout square. It's harder to listen and analyze yourself. It's harder to say, maybe I need to change maybe I need to go at this differently. So we can all do like superficial things but to actually really start to force change requires everybody to be a little bit self reflective and I hope that that will. Eventually to happen Miguel a few months back. I had on a guest on the show Amina Souleymane a Muslim woman working in scouting for the Philadelphia Eagles, and she stares shared a story of being in Tulsa Oklahoma and getting a Lotta strange looks inside glances and she referred to them as microaggressions which I think is apropos She's tough and she was like I don't let it affect me and I kept doing my thing and I wasn't too worried about it. But for you from personal standpoint, do you feel embraced? Do you feel like there are these kind of microaggressions that happen to you in the industry as well? Yeah I. Believe happens to really anybody of a minority the Senate. Luckily I've never really felt embraced Typically an organizations you see a lot of the minorities grouping together 'cause they know I can feel comfortable around your you may. We may not come from the same exact background. We have similar experiences while we're in this organization So for me, there was one example where when I was interning for a company I had done. Let me back up. They were introducing new interns and I have been an intern there for about two months or so and I've done a couple of projects for the gentleman that was introducing the new interns in when he came over to my desk Hey I don't know your name I don't think we've met what like what do you do type thing in? Could you introduce yourself and for that it was like a slap in the face like I've legit dot three projects for you already. And, I'm the only Hispanic on this floor on the only one in this organization with two last names I clearly stand out but there's a lot of times where. I would never eat lunch in the like our little break area in on my floor specifically I would always go to the fourth floor and will my friends that are also minorities because I felt comfortable that you with them and talk to him and be myself not creating this whole different. Personality that that isn't Miguel outside of work. Miguel. On the on the second floor was a lot different than begin on the fourth floor when I was around with that look like me and I can talk to. So I. Think. There is I've never really felt embraced or anything like that. Even when you try to have these conversations like a, let me try to be the person initiative conversational talked to him the really just short one answers. They don't don't really have the conversation on and I'm not saying it's everybody. There are people that are going to have discussions but I feel like when I have discussions or start building relations with people I have to find what I have in common with them versus finding what's in common with me. and. That's really tough and demoralizing to go to work every single day in. I don't I'm not valley here. No one cares or anything like that or not even realizing also that like. The minorities are continually grouping with each other and there's a specific reason you feel comfortable around people that are similar to you. And I don't think anybody ever realized that that was going on no matter how often it happen. Devon what about you? If you faced microaggressions like this or even more outwardly aggression? I kind of face a little bit of microaggressions. It's been a couple of times since we had light events by events. 'CAUSE WE DON'T Have Incense Minor League Baseball could baseball season will mean we up to the dude to generate revenue so we have like a couple, a movie nights, I socially distant Bengal nights anti. It's been a couple of times where I where I might work in front desk or something people just happy night does look at me in they will go to if I'm working if I'm workin aside some people will. To try try to go to the other side or they will try light to not even though I wanna make on contact with be. So this is we were working in sports is kind of. 'cause I mean you can't really lash out because it's not. It's not what you want. That's not even what you WANNA do use not wait. You don't want Hadi behavior by people I. I'd Esta over the G- wrestled black bike by right there so. I try to keep everything in my Emma in my mind. So I just tried his if I see him just move is keep moving past. I'm asked the right attitude. It's just that you have to even get yourself to that point. I was thinking recently during the presidential debates and I won't make this a political conversation but I was reading where Barack Obama felt like he had to be back in his presidential debates prior. He felt like he had to represent himself in a different way because he didn't want the media or anybody else to liebler angry black man and it's so hard that he has to think that way and that's exactly what you're saying here is that you can't react in a certain way because somebody's going to label you or judge you in a certain way and that's just it's unfortunate and again that's why we try to have these conversations. So everybody can self analyze a little bit and see where they are a problem in the process. Keelan. If, feels Lake we've we started touch on this a little bit, but I'd like to dig a little bit deeper into it. The, the idea of money in the in the in the change, right the use of money to. Make a positive influence into to pledge money. It's it's not a bad thing, right? So recently Harris Blitzer the owners of the sixers and doubles pledged twenty million, the Boston Celtics by twenty, five, million, footlocker I read pledged two, hundred, million, which is amazing. If you had the opportunity to advise these teams if they came and had a conversation like this and said, we want to gather together young people who aspire to get into our industry and we want them to help us to say one of the best things we can do with this money to effect real change. What kind of advice would you give them? So I think I would like divided up into different sections of the biggest one being treating your employees. And your trainees like they're actually of value and paying them a value. I. Know During my training days none of the money that I was being provided by my hourly salary was enough for me to rent a place in Durham by myself and I had to have luckily I have parents who have been great financial help to me. But I know that not everybody has that option. So while it might be lowering your training numbers down but providing them actual livable salary and wage. And benefits and not just giving him nine dollars an hour but telling them that they need to be here forty hours a week I think that that's really big. I think that they also need to take time to create partnerships and scholarship programs for those local universities that are around them and You know be able to have partnerships with those schools to create automatic training jobs or internships within the team. I know one of the minor league teams I was. Looking at was looking at partnering with HP Cu that was in town of creating a direct pipeline of communication and marketing internships and jobs for those students at that school with that team to help make sure that they know that there's there's spots available for them. So I definitely think it's putting in the money and adding that value to their employees and their training position but I also think it's giving back to the community making a better community around them and giving everybody the. Is Best Educational, and prop property Educational and other available options like healthcare and food and doctors and stuff like that that they they they need that they might not be able to get elsewhere. It's so true. I think hiring practices are a big part of this and how this should be affected hiring practices. An education I would be the two biggest things that I'd like to see develop Miguel what about you? As you think about this and you think about these huge dollar signs I mean your company pledging two hundred, million where would you like to see those kind of funds go and an effect change? So a big thing, I believe in would be education i. mean me being a first generation student first person from our family to graduate from Grad School. I like the economic strain on. It is very, very tough and if it wasn't few I was fortunate enough to receive scholarships along the way I probably would ended up having to drop out on at having to work getting money and then going back to school. So I definitely think our for minorities. It's a big thing. In taking it a little bit further than that as well. on the education side of things you know mentor ship. In internships in actually helping these people grow professionally as well on more than just, Hey, here's a scholarship. Go do whatever you want to feel like especially as a first generation student, your your heads all over the place you don't know what direction going. You don't know what you should be doing on and I was lucky enough to have professors. That guided me and mentored me like, Hey, this is how you would want to navigate this. When you want to start interning these are the type of internship should start doing these in connecting you with people as well. I think that's a big thing but also on the. Develops economic development side of things you know investing in minority owned businesses cursing more. Products from black owned brands? And you know in also. Giving, resources to the communities that you're serving on a lot of times forget like who they're actually serving. Just you know writing a check in hoping the money goes in the right place For for four Locker I. I've read the plan and I think it's it's something that that is very well written out in. It's you know. It's a good goal, all the goals that they have. So I think education economic development is going to be the two big things for me where the money should go I. Love the point you made in there too. It's not just throwing scholarship or grant money at somebody and say, all right you're on your own, but it's paid for like actually giving guidance and mentorship and leadership, and just being there for somebody to be a part of their community in part of their growth journey is a really good additive point to this discussion. So one of the things that struck me in one of the prior conversations we had was about the small steps to like we talked we're talking big numbers. Now we're talking about having a voice from within. And that's super important. Those are big things we need to consider and make a strategy for that will set us up for future success. But how can we all make positive changes on a small scale and what are those things that we need to a better job of Caitlyn? We'll start with you CAITLAND. What are the small steps we can take his individuals to represent in the right way. Are we talking about like on a sports or just in general community way all the above. So I think definitely, education is always important. Self Education I think is extremely important I know for me I've been shopping local I've been shopping Hispanic based businesses for most of my groceries like I have a local Bodega around here that's actually called the Mexican grocery store but I'm trying to support a local business. That's my corner instead of going to a big box store like Walmart, I make sure that when I'm shopping in Durham I do it. Through a list of approved own businesses because they have the exact same products that I want and I'm just trying to make myself more immersed in my community. So I. Have my community problems and ways that I can help make changes and then I'm also. Giving my time and going to our Haitai community center they're giving out virtual free lectures right now on ways that other people can be allies I'm doing protesting like undoing everything that I can to make sure that I'm helping the voices that need to be heard right now that fits with my schedule I. Think there's always something that you can do whether it's a virtual you know educational seminar walking in the streets or anything like that. I had a bit of a Fanie after the first episode of this public because I referenced earlier. Download numbers for these episodes of been a little bit smaller than others and I reached out to a friend of mine and I I told them that and I said, you know this is a little bit maddening to know that we're not reaching our normal audience on such an important topic and they told me and I keep holding tight to this. They told me look it's about impacting people in small numbers. It doesn't always have to be massive if you're impacting. Even. Just anyone it can make a difference that resonates for years to come, and that's given me some solace in all of this Miguel. What about you? What are the small things that you'd like to see more people even from ally ship perspective or any of this the anywhere in this conversation we're talking big things. But what are those small things that you'd like to see people get better ask? I just honestly having the conversation those uncomfortable conversations that most people don't WanNa have I have all the time with my friends as I have a very diverse group of friends in everybody. Everybody has different story. Everybody sees the world in a different Lens So I just haven't those conversation be open to this conversation actually listening not just hearing people listening in absorbing that information. And really just using that information to live day by day you know making sure that you're making you're trying to make everybody as comfortable as. Wannabe as you want to be, you don't want people. You know I air takes me when people mispronounce by name and don't ask, Hey, did I pronounce it wrong right? Sorry. If I pronounce it wrong. In those little things like that like, Hey, pronouncing your name right Doing that and then. Also, I think just. Like Kaelin said self. Education. Taking a step further and actually doing the research of why certain things are way that they are in not just making assumptions not thinking all this Hispanic families living in poverty because they're lazy they're not they're not smart or not anything like that And for me like growing up in poverty and you know having a dad that came here at a very young age. My Dad's been working since he was sixteen years old eighty hours a week, and we me and my brother finally, the ones broke through and know got the educational opportunity because a lot of times it's not it's not laziness. It's not any of that. Is just that one opportunity that you need to break through the door Just educating yourself that A. These people aren't in this bad situation because they're lazy or because they're not doing the right things or anything like that But I think those are the two major things that I see as at a small level that people should start doing self education in having those uncomfortable conversations. And breaking down all those generalizations that people have I totally agree Devon. What about you? What are the small changes you'd like to see people make that you interact with on a day-to-day that you'd like to see people get better at Some might WANNA touch on said about these uncomfortable conversations, I know. Ever since I've been working here with John. Lewis I. Mean it's been a couple of times like some people didn't WanNa have that conversation with me but I made sure I wanted to conversation just as he. was at in an just a wanted to see the wanted to know where where I was coming from also in I wanted to see. Ashli I listen to your community by Sway If you listen to your community if he I try to give back to I mean dusted is going to get better from there i. I mean you can if you work in sports like as majority defense. So you gotta listen to your fans this he was gone in your community. Guys go ahead Miguel. Adding there, just one quick thing I just thought about it So from like sports for active. and. This is more of like a smaller level when you think of the resources or the amount of teams at allow kids to play. So I'm fortunate enough to work or coach for a club that offers scholarships for low income families and that's something that you don't a lot of people don't think about that the opportunity to even play a sport is something huge for kid in further development at a very young age So I think if more clouds or more organizations, I know that's not the situation for everybody but there are certain clubs have this opportunity to open the door for more kids to play on and I think that's GonNa. Be something huge from a sports level side thing. Y- opportunities to play opportunities to educate opportunities to hire. It always comes back to opportunity, and that's on all of us that are in leadership positions in the sports industry to influence positively change and one of the points I've tried to make many many times in the past is. Internships every one of them need to be paid there should not be any free work because that is in itself prohibitive to so many people and I make this rant all the time I think even made it one of the episodes of the show, but I just can't get enough of this conversation of saying you know not everyone can work for free and they need everyone. Needs to gain experience. So there should be not a single organization out there that's listening to this show or that is connected to us. That is even considering giving out an unpaid internship because that is just an unfair tenuous situation everyone needs to get paid for their time so that they can also get an experience and get the opportunity to get hired out in the sports world. Thank you guys this has been incredible conversation. I'm so glad that we're able to have it. Thank you all for being a part of it. Thank you. Thank you. Brian. Thanks to McGill Caitlin, and Devon for joining me in this important conversation about change and using your voice a finish up by quoting historian Howard Zinn author of a People's history of the United. States. We don't have to engage in grand heroic actions to participate in the process of change small acts when multiplied by millions of people can change the world. Thanks, for listening.

Walker Miguel Spinoza Devon Brian Clap Caitlyn Wallin Bill Russell Durham Caitlin Wallin NFL Baseball twitter Boston Celtics Colin Kaepernick FBI basketball Lewis Todd analyst