9 Burst results for "Virginia Historical Society"

"virginia historical society" Discussed on Transition Virginia

Transition Virginia

01:50 min | 3 months ago

"virginia historical society" Discussed on Transition Virginia

"Couldn't vote. Let's go and take a break. We are talking with Dr Paul Levin Good. The former president of the Virginia Historical Society and current president of the George C Marshall Foundation, and also our friend delegates. Schuyler van Valkenburgh from Henrico. And we're back on Transition Virginia Brunell going to talk about the fall of the readjustment. So this is a group that we talked about earlier had a meteoric rise to power eighteen, seventy nine. The party is founded in the early part of the year. By the election in November, they were able to gain a majority in both house of delegates and the Senate. They had fifty six out of the one hundred seats mouse twenty, four out of the forty seats and the Senate and the next election cycle and eighty one they kept the general assembly and elected their own Governor Governor Cameron, and then the. Next year and the congressional election they had six out of the ten house seats meanwhile, the General Assembly of course, at this time is picking the US senators. So they pick Mahone who went to the Senate and ran the political machine from his US Senate office and they also picked the other US senator. So they had both seeds of the US Senate. They had six out of ten house of representative seats. They had the house ability. They had the state Senate, they had the governor's office when that's all within three years and then it all falls apart doctor Levin. Good. What happens to the readjustments? It's a really.

US Senate Governor Governor Cameron US Dr Paul Levin Virginia Brunell Schuyler van Valkenburgh General Assembly president Virginia Historical Society doctor Levin George C Marshall Foundation Henrico Mahone representative senator
"virginia historical society" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

03:57 min | 4 months ago

"virginia historical society" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"So used to keep one in my pocket and I would show it proudly share it. Instead of just talking I would read Fourteenth Amendment the First Amendment and So I had been keeping that that worship that worship sits in. Virginia Historical Societies A. Making a for Gina Section that is because I became a historic moment. So. Go ahead and so I just want to end that conversation. So that was the reason I had that constitution, my pocket I always kept it in my pocket. The original sentence in this speech was not I lend you my copy not at all it was. You have not read the Constitution of the United. States. If you read it, look for the word, liberty and equality protection of Loyd all that and that's that. So now we had in Philadelphia. The CAB has come to pick US uptake to the commission to the Convention and the last thing I put on his my coat. And We were told not to bring any keys or any metal things, and so I am checking Michael I feel bulging my court faulk at left side. And I see that the constitution is in my pocket Smell Vier. In the elevator getting the cab and I sit I said the law this constitution in my pocket and I'm making reference to have you read the United States Constitution. Why don't I put it out and say I would lend you my copy instead of saying. Read the Constitution of the United States. So she said, no, she always had been a balancing in in my life and she said, no, no, you cannot do this. Let's take permission for. So once we dare we will take permission, but in the meantime. Because I had put it out. She said your pulling it out upside down it really wouldn't mean much. Make sure we let's practice. In the. Around to that, we are in the cab and I am practicing Lewis this way or this way or. So. that's when idea came we got to. Green Room in the convention hall in the Basement, and we talked to the producer and a row of other people to help and all that because they take you to get familiar with the lights and flood noise and all of that. So you don't lose your composure and your senses when you face all of this. Outside. Upon the stage. So I asked him that is. In my pocket can ice instead of saying, I would like you to read the Constitution if United States. Why don't I just say I would gladly lend you my copy. and. So the producers standing there and he comes all the way appeared and he looks at. Me As. Ally the standing here. And he said Mr Khan you showed you gonNa do this I said yes. Do that. and. So that's smart smart smart producing area. He must have been so we have to wrap up but you mentioned that you live in Charlottesville. You saw what transpired there and what the president said in response to it. You've seen everything that's passed since the moment that you've made that speech. And yet you You said earlier that you're optimistic. About the future. And so I, WanNa ask you as we leave what about and you've been I we should point out you've been traveling around the country the last several months you've you've had contact with a lot of people what makes you so optimistic in in these very frayed times.

US producer Virginia Lewis Gina Section Mr Khan Loyd Philadelphia faulk president Michael Charlottesville
"virginia historical society" Discussed on Your Brain on Facts

Your Brain on Facts

08:25 min | 1 year ago

"virginia historical society" Discussed on Your Brain on Facts

"You Load Sixteen tons runs and what are you get another day older and deeper in debt Saint Peter. Don't you call me because I can't go. I owe my soul to the company store that Song Sixteen tons was a smash hit in one thousand nine hundred eighty five selling half a million copies in a month but why did a song with such depressing racing lyrics resonate with people and what are those lyrics mean my name's. Moxy and this is your brain on facts Tennessee Ernie Ford was singing about a company town accompany town was a community built by a business owner typically in the steel lumber or coal industry to house their employees it was also usually an exercise in microcosmic fascism where employees were told old how they could live at their height three percent of the US population and many of them immigrants lived in one of the twenty five hundred company towns in the country country workers lived in company owned housing the cost of which was taken from their wages. Many companies also pay their workers in scrip basically funny money that could only be redeemed at company owned stores the unions that fought to eventually eradicate this system saw it as a form of bondage edge designed to keep workers trapped in poverty without enough money in their pockets to even think about starting over somewhere else the West Virginia Historical Society diety who's sparsely populated state saw half a dozen company towns wrote pricing in the company stores often higher than in surrounding non-company establishments published wants. It's true that in the mining families coal operators had captive purchasers for their goods. When the miners wade the price of shipping his purchases this is from a mail order catalogue or a local merchant against the price of what could be purchased at the company store often? The store ended up being the better bargain for the company's companies script provided an easy way to pay the miners without the necessity of keeping large amounts of cash available minors drew scrip advances for many purposes this should he run short in need food for the next payday. Script credit was available. If a minor was sick or injured companies would advance scrip pending receipt of his worker's comp checks for the operators. This was a no lose situation. Companies had the ability to virtually garnish a worker's wage to collect on a debt uh it would appear that the availability of such easy credit most miners would in fact oh their souls to the company store to give us an example couple of one of the nation's most famous and infamous company towns are the hosts of one of my drop everything to listen to podcasts cutting class which you can follow on your podcast player cutting Class PODCASTS DOT com. Thank you Moxie for introducing us. We are cutting class podcast. We're just JOE and we do history from a teacher's perspective but also try to look at the lighter more fun side of history right and in fact today we're going to get Super Fun with George Poelman Ullman and the pullman town right now and it is it doesn't sound very exciting but it's probably one of the most well known examples of a company town in American history three and a little bit about why here what makes this town special. Why do we seem to always see it in a textbook well. Let's let's get to like pullman and why why pullman it was a well known figure and then we sort of get to why the town is sort of a well-known thing. George Pullman is going to make his name in the train car business he was working with these things called superpowers. which are you know the passenger cars that people would travel in and what pullman did to really make his name and to make his fortune was he took these? Dank Dank dirty grimy old school sleeper cars and made them luxurious and comfortable and sexy and more importantly fairly expensive to travel avalon. Yeah is the first class of the train yeah exactly if you wanted to travel in style if you wanted to see and be seen on the train. You wanted to be traveling in a pullman in car and that's exactly what he did is. He made those cars available. He would lease these cars to the major railroad companies so he would never quite sell them. I am so in fact you know he's constantly making some money off of the leasing of the cars but it was in the railroad owners best interest to continue leasing those cars because they noticed high class. Americans pickens lots of dollars to spend likes to travel on the wind sleeper so that's where you know pullman makes his name and his fortune and he really Kinda hits his high point in the eighteen seventies denise into the eighteen eighty s now what appointments sort of crowning achievements and this is what breaks him out of just sort of a sort of a Titan of American industry into now one of these dudes. It's chasing the capitalist Utopian. Dream is the PULLMAN Company town that he completes construction on an eight hundred eighty four. It's right near Chicago Illinois and it's this massive like four thousand. Acre think of it as like a compound where pullman workers could live and work. It's like kind of a college campus. If you WANNA think of it that way for your workspace you work all day and then you come home to your fancy house and these houses czar nice for the day right. You've got running water. You've got maybe a little yard for yourself. You've got some you know room. That's yours. You're not crammed into. I don't know entire slum with bunch of other immigrant families room and the idea behind the whole thing was you can work play and live all in the same town but things of course art the utopia that they always seem they actually turn out to be kind of dark and scary what goes wrong in this perfect community so it's like it's like an episode of the the twilight zone whereas like you know the neighborhood always looks perfect but isn't there something rotten on maple street or something like that and the thing that's going on is sure you may have you know basement and separate bathrooms and water faucets that you wouldn't probably have in other big cities but you also couldn't just go out and buy some cigarettes and booze like you would any other town because pullman had fairly strict rules against that type of advice and behavior and in fact. If you want that kind of ice you would just go live in Chicago itself exactly you don't come here to trash my town in this where you get. The George pullman thought police right he was not only new band name. It's not only like doc you can't buy booze and alcohol but you also can't read certain books and certain things work sold in the stores and get to the micromanaging part that seems to ruin almost every utopia via right pullman had final say over the literature that would have put in the libraries he had final say over performances that would happen in the local theater and that was kind of the price you paid for living in pullman so sure they'll collect your garbage. Every day ensures. You're going to have running water but at the same time you are kind of turning over a little bit of that freedom that you have in your free the time to George pullman not only that but then they suspend the ability to have public meetings and speak your mind basically take a lot of your basic American American rights and put them on hiatus because you're living within this town so you abide by all of our rules well. Hey let's think about this. PULLMAN is offering a sweet deal. What is it that you have to complain. Lean about or meet about or speak about publicly anyway right. Oh yeah maybe that was the thought process but again down a very very slippery road there and so that's just a little tease a little inkling of the pullman company town and there's a lot more interesting stuff about this that you can check out of course on the Internet and on different videos and stuff F. or you can always check out cutting class podcast and learn a little bit more about it including a very famous railroad strike that happens with the epicenter at the pullman the company town thanks guys the town of pullman featured more than a thousand homes public buildings and parks residences says had yards indoor plumbing gas daily trash removal rare amenities for industrial workers of the era pullman didn't build his workers good houses to to be kind to them though he thought the working class were barely better than animals and if he could surround them with good things they would become more civilized the houses this couldn't be purchased only rented managers lived.

pullman George Pullman PULLMAN Company Chicago US West Virginia Historical Socie Tennessee Ernie Ford business owner George Poelman Ullman Illinois JOE Acre denise Sixteen tons
"virginia historical society" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

09:33 min | 1 year ago

"virginia historical society" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Politics in Kansas this exhibit about Vietnam POW's but really about their wives and how when they were first taken W's they were the wives are told to keep quiet about and pretend like nothing was going on and go on with their life and that's crazy so years went by and finally civil Stockdale should the right dell said nothing this got the women together and they raised awareness of of their husbands who were being tortured and no one knew no one American which is would while for us to think back and think that that would ever be possible so she's in town now filming some of these women who are still with us and and their story and and putting it together for this exhibit and the book comes out a few years which is super excited about as well you you hinted at this this thing that I this this is the part that I think you're making up here he everything else is great very wonderful but you mentioned like spying and stuff what does that give it give us a rundown I love this I I'm a big James Bond fan is here but he's such a missile I love James Bond and so I think of my ladies as Jane bond they're all doing this code for spying for the government but nobody knows about it and even this information was only declassified not all that long ago this is for people just tuning and so these women were told their husbands are missing or prisoners right and don't tell anyone right so for awhile I would imagine I don't put words in civil or Jane or Helen earlier that they don't like the government right I mean I don't know there they go along with their military wives said they do what the government tells them for a long time in some cases several years and they're terrified that they will hurt their husbands chances of getting out of jail or they they will be hurt if they say anything but after a couple of years of this impossible task of not being able to talk about it civil organizes the women in Coronado and says we have to talk about this what should we do and then it still takes two more years till nineteen sixty eight when she finally breaks the silence of the why she's the first she goes to the San Diego union Tribune and says the world does not know about the abuses of the north Vietnamese and they should know and that's the breaking news and then it's like a flood all the wives of the country start telling their story many hours at that so where the spine bar come in said the spine heart so these women had a naval and I'm and mainly focusing on navy wife some Air Force wives because they were pilots wives say they have a naval intelligence contact name Bob or is he will also be in the exhibit some of his artifacts and and items from here he is now he's actually from South Carolina originally but he isn't working out of the Pentagon for naval intelligence and he starts contacting these women and saying please come see me and he he basically we so women kind of interviews and realizes that some of them are capable of learning a coding system and the he's going to get them to code letters to their husbands this is after they've gotten a few letters and identified where the men are in a most of them in the hole in Hanoi Hilton but in some other prisons said he gets some to code letters to them so they can figure out what's going on so who have you got a cell so that your government and the wives by you know extension can figure out what's going on online see civil is one of the first to to sort of start coding these letters with bobber isn't and other naval intelligence folks and she finally when they get one of Jim's letters back they figure out in in code it says leg irons and torture sixteen hours a day what's so people start to flip out hold on so what is it what is the letter that civil sent Saturday and and how do we know what the cold look like one thing about the coding you know I try to be pretty general because some of the coding is still used as a basis today of coding and so the PW community I want to be really sensitive to that that I do I will not in the book where the exhibit we're not going to be revealing the mechanics of coding but there are certain things we we are allowed to talk about like symbols for example that will have in the exhibit symbols pictures of raises so simple would send a picture of roses and these were some neighbors of German symbols that had military connections and say just in a vague way he figured out by the images and the weird thing she was writing she meant this or a reference to a book this means this so it was a lot of guesswork on bass parts and what it really relied on his them knowing each other so well that he knew and she knew these were weird symbols and weird phrases and they didn't make sense how many letters to Jim receiver her before one of these coded letters came you know I would have to check on that but I I knew there were a number of letters that weren't hated that went on before because I don't think like when did he get tipped off that may be there is something called it in here you don't like I think it was so odd in the letters he sent her like they both they were just nonsensical sometimes it without revealing you know the exact hooting and how it works which I don't even know all the dynamics of that but the it was so off search such strange symbols and phrases that he realized it and also to street we had talked about this earlier but the seer school the search of Asian rescue school some of the POW's were taught how to could in Sears school and they all had a basic knowledge of these ways that you could communicate if you were in prison so they were all on alert wow so so do you think the letter that that Jim Stockdale sent back do you think's who even cracked the code because as Bob burrows guy who could recognize right well well what it what it Jim Sagan said the naval intelligence people were all trained in these things so it wasn't just fiber is it was the whole naval intelligence department the Air Force six cetera and I I couldn't give you one example there were a number of different examples actually I could give you one which was the title of a book that was some sort of communist related it was a book that bet civil and Jim had read and I'm not recalling the title but the title was in one of the letters and symbols like oh my gosh I read that book and it's about this kind of thing and so from there civil and barber is would work on it and the naval intelligence people would work on it and between a big team of people they would piece it together what was the what was the Iron sixteen hours a day yes and the line that they figured out from the coding was in leg irons sixteen hours a day experts that torture and not the one that just sends chills through your spot and sent chills through several spine because she knew from then on and they didn't know that at the time the government had no idea that was there well and I and I'd have to check the date on that letter there were a couple there was that and then another big indicator cheered Jeremiah Denton was another one of the the POW's that was well known and he blinks torture in Morse code on television and though the general public didn't know that and this was I believe it was broadcast her on mother's day it was I think in nineteen sixty five so this was one of the early signs naval intelligence saw this and they picked up that this guy was thinking so out of the box he blinked torture and more scared that was the first indicator and then these letters said there were some in these POW's were super out of the box thinkers in years into it yes and it went on for eight years in some cases so they think they're gonna get a lot they did the POW I think they really did not know from day to day they tortured them so brutally and for years on end I think a lot of them I know from reading their diaries and letters a lot of them thought they were gonna die in there right they all brick I think the what they said that I liked is you break but you don't you you bench but you don't so they would you know hold out as long as they could and then give some and knock US information or give miss information this information and then the Vietnamese would think they had gotten something when they really hadn't gotten much yeah that every delicious or to share their story and then the wives story after the whole of the bar and it is Bob Dole in there yeah so so good friend it was good to see this video of him at the inauguration of that it doesn't ladies we have to run it's been a pleasure doing wonderful let's chat again before the exhibit start so when and where Audrey is the this exhibit about these was sure sure the the exhibit will open at the beginning of may on may seventh of the dole institute of politics on the university of Kansas campus it'll be open through the end of the year and this December and thanks to a gift from Harlan an Alice in oaks of Colorado springs who funded the project and Colorado springs pioneers museum in the Virginia Historical Society it will travel to sites and through twenty nineteen at least very good we'll be in touch what is our website dole institute dot org okay get the info that you guys are wonderful thank so much thank you for having a good and seven sixty talking into breaking for.

Kansas sixteen hours eight years
"virginia historical society" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

11:53 min | 1 year ago

"virginia historical society" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Sorry. Could settle anything so much for that kind introduction. Coming back here is place that makes me nostalgic makes me because and he summer of nineteen eighty five. I was a seasonal historian at apple Matic's courthouse. I had to play union soldier body fields nine to five everyday dire summer, pretending sixty five. It was a great experience, of course, and Ron Wilson the former cheapest oriented there that I was interested in willy, Peter as you all know the peak family of Richmond. And he said, why don't you come to then Virginia historical society and getting to that point in my life? And I've said you remember when and you remember when it was just about a lobby. I did my first major research project there other things that I perceived since then I've relied heavily upon the collections here in many ways. This is my home court to do research. I have had. A number of people who have helped me along the way. And of course, it's always a mistake to start on this team names because you want evidently, forget somebody. But I have to certainly mentioned Francis policy was always so wonderful so kind and so is and you've got great folks here as well. So it is a real pleasure. It's an honor. And I hope this isn't some way to sort of express my gratitude because historians. They can't do this job alone. They've got to have partners in crime, right and archivist are critical to any historian success and any original research. Now, I say that and I should know my wife. Is an archivist by training you. And so I've got to get good played in here for artists is I know that she'll be she'll be watching it. So again, thank you so much for for having. On august. Twentieth. In the middle of the night. Thirteen veterans of the third North Carolina picked up the rifles slung on their cartridge boxes and fled camp. From that point on. There was absolutely no turning back. They had a track of a few hundred miles that would they hoped? Eventually bring them back to North Carolina. Now, as you know, these North Carolina's were hardly alone in the aftermath of the defeat at Gettysburg. There were likely thousands of men who these army without permission. So who were these deserters and not just these deserters in North Carolina. Who were these men who took great risk and fled? Their commands to us today. They are relatively faceless mob. Name your favorite dessert, or you can name your favorite general, but you can't name famous your favorite dessert. And you're right. We don't know them as individuals. So why is that? Why is there a silence here? And that is something that is I got deep into this study. I was reminded of the fact that acknowledged violences is also acknowledge how the historical record is created. And it's also when historical records or historical narratives, I should say that when they're created. Here's a reflection of who has power, and why we'd not heard from the deserter why you don't have your favorite deserter while you probably can't even name a single deserter is because the sources that we typically have access to the sources that are written by military officials government officials newspaper. That's here. That's what we have access to. And that's largely why of course, we cannot put a face on these men. I think there's a problem in the scholarship. And that problem in the scholarship is that. We have stereotype deserters stereotype deserters as men who were cowardly. As men who did not have a strong sense of duty. And that perception or I should say that interpretation and the scholarship. It actually reaffirms. I think. A pop their belief that the common civil war soldier was what always face the front. Always brave. Those are the stories we'd like to hear those are the stories we repeat and the scholarship by professional stories to some degree has reaffirmed that I'll just give you one example, an example for the man who I greatly admire whose work is deeply influenced me, and that's James McPherson. It's always a risk of force to take a shot at a very prestigious and very important story as Dr McPherson that of course, like any story and his interpretations. I think that they're open to questioning and open to revision. Dr mcpherson. He described deserters as. Mostly conscript s- substitutes inbounding men. He did not believe that they were motivated, and if they were motivated at all it was not by duty, honor or ideology. And. Deserters were not political. Now, I have very I think significant reservation about that claim. I think that's something that we're all going to have a chance to discuss and debate at the end of my talk. I'm not going to raise through my presentation. But I I certainly want to give you all chance to have a conversation with me about this. I of course, I can't identify the person in the audience now. But before my talk person said to me. This book that you've just written you could slap any war on the title. It could be more one World War to Vietnam. And the stories are saying because the story of ice soldier is a universal one. It's timeless one. I don't believe that. But what I have often heard is it for these men. These men who decided to flee the army. They left for reasons it's you can find again throughout time. Follow that porn away. Chew on it a little bit. And we'll have a chance I hope to be able to discuss it. I'm deeply concerned about is. This stereotyping deserves which I've made that point when I went to today for you. And what I would like to believe that I accomplished in my book is that I want you to stand in the shoes in this case of a deserter. I want you to stand in the shoes of that deserter. And I want you to take in the world as that deserter took in the world what he perceived what he felt how he made sense of that world and more importantly above all else. What options what options did he imagine? What was in the range of possibilities? Key of this talk. And of course, as I said before it's elemental toward I tried to do that my book, so. Get you all to stand in the shoes of deserted. I gotta hear their voice Ryan, I've already told you that's a challenge. Just simply not any sources, and which we hear we hear the words of the men who fled. I got lucky and in any book, you gotta get lucky, and I did when I picked up a pamphlet pamphlet was entitled tragedy and now Puglia JiJi amount. Puglia described the execution the largest execution in these army northern Virginia. It took place in September eighteen sixty three picked up that little book. I knew about this execution was always fascinated by it. And when I picked it up. I noticed that the author quoting one of the men condemned and executed. At my. They're the words right there. I was shocked surprised, and of course, they're excited and those words came from a north Carolinian his name John botch. F U T C H John Peter Carmichael on American history on C span radio. He's spoke at the Virginia museum of history and culture last February John again, there's nothing really that stands out about John fudge. He was from New Hanover county North Carolina, which is right next to to Wilmington. He owned no land Ono land. He didn't own any slaves at all. But he lived within a network of family members and some of them did own slaves. But he's certainly on the what you might say the margins of white southern society as I said, nothing really stood out. There was exceptional about him. Except for one thing. He's literally. I told you he left a body. Of course, bonnets a body of others. He obviously he dictated he dictated his thoughts and his feelings to combat. Many of these comrades were barely literate themselves. That's all I ask you to think about the books that I'm sure many of you have read about the common soldier and those books rely heavily upon those who are very educated those men who are of a highly privileged class. Those are the voices that surface when we think about the common soldier the voices of John FOX we rarely hear because as you all know, those kinds of manuscripts, those letters. I'd be willing to bet. There are many right here at this institution that come from illiterate and poor soldiers. So here I had I had to go mine. I had my path to get into the inner world of John Futch. John did not right. Up take that word out. He did not speak about his opposition to the war. He did not spell it out. He did not condemn the confederate government. He did not in any way. Critique. This life holding class. Didn't know that. But what he did say in letter after letter to my amazement is that he had reservations about the war. He had reservations about the war because he believed that it was a violation of humanity. That it was a violation of God's will that Christian should be killing each other should be shooting at each other. That's the origin. That's the origin of his disatisfaction. Again. If you one more thing to think about here. Disatisfaction? Did he had with the war? His moral reservations about having humans kill other humans. How or does it? I should say does that. Anyway. Make him political. They can political in his opposition. That would ultimately lead to hint taking that amazing act of desertion. That's what we're wrestling with here. Seeing the world is solid and try to understand understand this great risks that he took when he decided to desert is it a deeply political act..

North Carolina James McPherson John Peter Carmichael Virginia historical society Richmond apple Francis Ron Wilson wrestling John FOX John botch Puglia JiJi John Futch Virginia museum of history Puglia Virginia confederate government John
"virginia historical society" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

06:21 min | 1 year ago

"virginia historical society" Discussed on WRVA

"He died in that train wreck on January first nineteen forty eight. We'll Maryland Bela's a local historian the author of the book the Dooley's Richmond who is very well versed in all of this and has a deep appreciation for the items on display. I appreciate you. Joining us to set the stage for this. And I regret that I didn't say at the beginning. We were going to have Jamie basket on just a second to respond to what you have said. And but MS Bela's, thank you so much for for being on the air with us and explaining it. I apologize for that buzz over the the radio there that made it a little difficult to hear you. But I think everybody probably understood what you were saying, I she weary much Jamie Boskin who is the relatively new president of the Virginia museum of history and culture, formerly the Virginia historical society joins us now. And you you heard what MS Bela said Jamie, I wanted to give you an opportunity to explain what's happening here. And and kind of counter if you can what what the concerns are about some of the folks who've been supporters of you offer a long time. Good morning, John. Thank you for having me happy to do. So appreciate the opportunity. This is an important project that we've been working on very thoughtfully for more than two years to MRs Bela point, not long after my arrival. It was clear that Virginia house was remarkable asset that historical society should make much better use of and so we thought thoroughly in about how would we make use of this property, and we are focused now on far more public engagement opportunities community engagement member stewardship using the houses, I think the wells wanted us to use it misses Bayless mentioned the use of the collections, and I think there are couple of clarifications it would be important one. The house itself was left to us entrust by the wells. That is true. And we're so appreciative of that. And now what some seventy or eighty years later, two houses is still looking great. And I think inspired the same way that. They had intended to be the property within it. However was very different that that was left in their will to us in a long list of personal property along with garden tools. You pencils and table linens in that article of their will they specified that these items were to be used as we see fit and for the benefit of Virginia house and so for us. We're undertaking. What is a very standard practice for every museum anywhere. That's collecting 'institution that from time to time you have to take an inventory of what you have. And then think about what can you use the best deprioritize were you get her though that there if there's something that's sitting on a crate in the basement, that's kind of a second tier item. That's three hundred years old that no one that doesn't help tell the story that's one thing. But it sounded like her concern and the concerns that I've seen expressed on Facebook is that some of the items have been on display Richmond are used to seeing them when they come that. They're four hundred years. Old. They tell the story of Virginia and those are now on the auction block. And and some people I want you to respond to this directly some people feel like they've been deceived that this isn't just items in the basement that these are kind of top tier showpiece items why auction off great Claire. Clarification, john? So just as a reminder, we're talking about four hundred and eighty items of what is a collection of several thousand and it is important to note that vast majority of the items that are being auctioned as part of these four hundred eighty items were in storage Virginia house, the important part, though, is that if we're going to do this and to do this, right? We thought it was important to pick a variety of items that would make for a very compelling auction. And so you have to pick a variety of items both some works of art, some silver some furniture to fill out what I think would make this interesting and useful. And would then contribute to what all the proceeds of this auction will go to a hundred percent every cent made from this auction. We'll go be reinvested back into the houses preservation in the care of the several thousand remaining collection items. So there are a few portraits that that personally I love I think they're beautiful, but none of the items relate to the history of Virginia. None of the items directly relate to the history of the wiggles. So we had to pick those items. We thought would be most compelling that could hopefully go to another museum through auction could benefit far more people than a few hundred people that are seeing them now and then benefit the future preservation of the site. I'm watching the clock, and we have to go. But let me ask you why not try to raise money from outside sources into a big capital campaign, rather than do anything that causes you to lose part of this very carefully collected series of items that clearly have a lot of people loving them. Great question. Two points one. It's all about priorities. The museum business is his is actually tough. And there's a lot of a lot of causes to raise money for to focus on our primary mission of saving Virginia's history and telling it to the largest possible audience. Also, this wasn't just about creating this preservation fund. It was about being smart stewards. And there was just far more things that Ginny house than we could properly take care of them to have a basement. That's like an iceberg. Right. That most of the stuff people never even saw. It's just in storage and sub par storage. So we thought we were doing in. We firmly believe still we're doing the right thing by rightsizing that collection picking things that we really treasure and long-term will support the story the Wendell's. No, it's gone. I know it's gotten a lot of attention over the last few days. And I appreciate both of you. Joining us, Jamie basket, whose voice you just heard the president of the Virginia museum of history and culture. Thank you very much, and we'll continue to monitor of this here w RV. And of course in the Richmond times dispatch. Thank you, Jamie. Day. It's nine seventeen and we are back with more in just a moment here on NewsRadio WR. Virginia Cavaliers twenty nineteen. She don't champions, congratulations to Tony Bennett. And the who's on reaching the pinnacle of college basketball from Richmond soul that national chance radio. You know,.

Virginia Jamie Richmond Virginia museum of history MS Bela Virginia Cavaliers Virginia historical society John Maryland Bela president Richmond times MRs Bela point Jamie Boskin Facebook Tony Bennett Dooley basketball Ginny house Jamie basket
"virginia historical society" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"virginia historical society" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Transatlantic slave trade twenty nine hundred marks four hundred years since the arrival of the first enslaved Africans in the American colonies, it's an important milestone that changed the world and it seen as the original sin the United States. We still don't know a lot about this. I and slave people and over the centuries it's not been African Americans who've been the gatekeepers of their own history. In today's story, the world's Rupa Shenoy looks at that. And at the forgotten people there he is I'm at the Ballantyne gallery in Richmond with activists free agam femi-, she showing the portrait that'll be unveiled later this year. Gabriel. She tells me was an enslaved man who tried to hold the governor of Virginia hostage in eighteen hundred to bargain for freedom for slaves. No one knows what he looked like egg femi- commissioned the painting, so interesting about this is that we use a pattern for his voice is based on his descendants. That's the closest they can get without any contemporary description of him. The only reason we know about Gabriel is because he broke the law in official history Gabriel's rebellion failed. Someone told his conspirators were discovered and they were hanged in agam Femi's version of history. Gabriel's a hero one of many from the time who've gone mostly on remembered, those are the narratives that were deliberately submerged those are the stories. Nobody wanted to tell those stories begin in the sixteen hundreds with the arrival of the first in slaved Africans in the English colonies. White Virginians used African slavery to rapidly expand the tobacco industry that quickly made Virginia. The most powerful colony in the new world enslaved people like Gabriel fought back and white Virginians created a system of laws to oppress them a system that other colonies than states used as a model. Nice to meet you. Nice to meet Karen Sheri's curator putting together a special exhibit on the history of slavery to Mark the arrival of the first enslaved Africans. She started the job in twenty seventeen just weeks after Charlottesville an hour and a half away those events have really crystallized for me. How much race is still an issue in American society, Sherry works for the Virginia museum of history and culture, the modern version of the Virginia historical society, the oldest of its kind in the country. Put it on. She shows me this pristine sheet of paper a letter to the governor dated sixteen ninety may it please your excellency. Whereas there was a rumor of an evil and desperate design contrived by the negroes..

Gabriel Africans Femi Rupa Shenoy Virginia Virginia historical society Virginia museum of history Sherry United States Ballantyne gallery Karen Sheri Richmond Charlottesville official four hundred years
"virginia historical society" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"virginia historical society" Discussed on WRVA

"As the news transformation unfold than we see more non traditional news, outlet Okay well that's interesting a real fast what's going on around central Virginia this weekend A fun, wise yeah fine wide how. About some you know? Let's see I've got you know? Innsbruck after hours tomorrow night has your group, station has the beat fast coming. Up. A, lot of. People know the. Route there the Jimmy Fallon has. That band There could be a bunch of Ambon Saturday there including. Some local guys OG Ella black liquid skill tesol famous and also locally, famous groups so that should be a lot of fun if the weather holds off and then tomorrow there's an interesting battle of the bruise at the Virginia museum of history and culture normally a place you don't. Think of as a place to drink beer. But, they have this historical beer recipe and they're asking, for. Lemon. Beer and they're asking some local breweries to kind of re imagine this local recipe and have a a battle, of, the bruise, from six tonight and, this is, the former Virginia historical society okay Innsbruck. And, and Bruce. At the old, historical society, right yeah. And if, you want, something right after work today. And in one little? Culture in your life at the? Library Virginia five thirty seven thirty food trucks. Free parking and they have this Program that's going over new and old tradition of, migrants, who've come, to Virginia over the, last three, decades they have a A an exhibit that's coming. Up about that and. This is going to be a program to help kick that off that. Should be pretty cool too that's interesting as well Jason Roop former editor of. Style weekly of the founder of spring story the public relations firm always a great chance to visit with you on. Friday thank you Thank you Well.

Virginia Innsbruck Virginia museum of history Jimmy Fallon Jason Roop Ambon founder Bruce editor
"virginia historical society" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"virginia historical society" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"Eighty four four walmart is investigating a photo that purports to show a sign reading own the school year like a hero displayed a topic case filled with guns in one of its store photo is been making the rounds on social media drawing comments of outrage and mentions of school shootings walmart spokesman says the photo is consistent with the interior of its stores but the company hasn't determined which one or if the images even real at walmart says what seen in this photograph would never be acceptable in its doors rich thomason reporting hundreds of people in richmond packed a contentious community meeting to weigh in on what should be done with the city's confederate monuments local media report more than five hundred people gathered wednesday night at the virginia historical society the meeting was the first of two public comment sessions that had been scheduled as a commission appointed by the mayor studies that in context the statues or building new ones news and analysis at town hall dot com i'm keith peters and the lawsuit claims elected officials violate people's free speech rights by blocking them on social media the american civil liberties union this week sued maine governor paul a page and sent warning letters the utah's congressional delegation that followed reached with lawsuits against governors of bear ledee and kentucky and pressing trump the president's use of twitter and allegations he blocks people with dissenting views has raised questions about water elected officials can and cannot do on their social media pages most officials say they do police social media mostly to get where the people who post abusive messages by new reporting ousted fox news channel star bill o'reilly is launched an experimental video comeback with a daily online show initial halfhour was posted on his website wednesday for premium subscribers the rich and aiding from what he calls a new.

walmart social media virginia historical society keith peters utah president twitter richmond local media town hall maine kentucky fox news bill o'reilly