35 Burst results for "Virginia"

Walmart shooter left 'death note,' bought gun day of killing

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 1 d ago

Walmart shooter left 'death note,' bought gun day of killing

"New details have emerged about the Walmart shooter in Chesapeake, Virginia. Investigators say the Walmart supervisor who shot and killed 6 coworkers left behind what he called a death note. Andre Bing blamed others for mocking him and said he wishes his parents would have paid closer attention to his social deficits. Bing also said he did not plan the shooting, but that, quote, things just fell in place like I was led by the Satan. Coworkers who survived the shooting say was known for being difficult and for being hostile with employees. Police say Bing legally purchased a 9 millimeter gun he used, the day of the killings. He had no criminal record. Bing died at the scene of an apparent self inflicted gunshot wound. I'm Mike Hempen.

Walmart Andre Bing Chesapeake Bing Virginia Mike Hempen
Biden brings Thanksgiving pies to Nantucket first responders

AP News Radio

01:06 min | 2 d ago

Biden brings Thanksgiving pies to Nantucket first responders

"President Biden vacationing in Nantucket for the Thanksgiving holiday, spoke out against a recent spate of mass shootings in the country and calls on Congress to do more to limit assault weapons. 6 people killed in a southeast Virginia Walmart 5 dead in Colorado Springs in just a week and President Biden says more must be done to prevent these killings from taking place. The idea we still allow semi-automatic weapons to be purchased is sick. It's just sick. He tells reporters he'll take it to Congress, even though the sessions almost over and Democrats soon lose control of the House. Meanwhile, the president reached out to the owners of club Q in Colorado Springs, offering support and condolences, while a worker at the Virginia Walmart, whose life was spared, says she doesn't think the victims were randomly chosen. He was going hunting. He was looking, he was picking people out. Jesse will chesky on the job just 5 days, says the gunman who apparently killed himself aimed at her and then told her to run. I'm Jackie Quinn

President Biden Colorado Springs Nantucket Walmart Congress Virginia Chesky House Jesse Jackie Quinn
NYPD: No known threats to Macy's parade, but tight security

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 3 d ago

NYPD: No known threats to Macy's parade, but tight security

"Police in New York say their planning tight security around the Macy's Thanksgiving Day parade in the wake of mass shootings in Colorado and Virginia. Police say there is no known credible threat to the event, but they say they'll deploy additional resources to ensure the festivities across the city are safe for all. The parade comes just two days after a manager at a Walmart in Chesapeake, Virginia, shot to death 6 people, and then himself, and four days after 5 people were shot to death at a gay nightclub in Colorado Springs, Colorado, Macy's is promising that the parade will be bigger and better this year than ever before, and the event is starting at 8 45 a.m. this year instead of 9 to accommodate all the balloons, floats, marching bands, and other participants. I'm Donna water

Macy Virginia Colorado New York Chesapeake Walmart Colorado Springs Donna
US DOJ Seizes 7 Seven Domain Names Used in “Pig Butchering” Crypto Schemes

ZyCrypto

00:20 sec | 3 d ago

US DOJ Seizes 7 Seven Domain Names Used in “Pig Butchering” Crypto Schemes

"9 p.m. Wednesday, November 23rd, 2022. U.S. DoJ seizes 7 7 domain names used in pig butchering, crypto schemes. The U.S. attorney's office for the eastern district of Virginia has seized 7 domain names used in committing pig butchering cryptocurrency crimes.

U.S. Virginia
Walmart Shooting: Manager Kills Six at Virginia Store

The Officer Tatum Show

01:48 min | 3 d ago

Walmart Shooting: Manager Kills Six at Virginia Store

"Authorities in Chesapeake Virginia released an image Wednesday of the suspected shooter, they say gunned down 6 people inside of a Walmart where he was employed and injured several more in a deadly rampage authorities have identified the gunman as 31 year old, dumb, dumb, McDonnell DOM, Walmart previously told Fox digital that this dude was an overnight team lead and he's been employed with us since 2010. Chesapeake police responded to the Walmart on Tuesday night amid reports of an active shooter just before ten, 15 p.m. once inside officers began to evacuate the big box store, at least 50 people were inside, the building, according to police, three people, including his fool, were found dead, and an employee break room, another found dead, I need the front of the store, three other victims were taken to the hospital where they later died in total 6 people were killed and several others were wounded, employee, Breonna Taylor, said that overnight stock team of about 15 to 20 people had just gathered in a break room to go over the morning plans when shots rang out. She said, meeting was about to start and her team lead said, all right guys, we have late night ahead of us. When her manager turned around and opened fire on the staff, that's which is crazy. How many God dang? He was just shooting all throughout the room. She said, it didn't matter who he hit. He didn't say anything. He didn't look at anybody and he's specific type of way, a witness also told the news that she heard the suspect laughing at one point and that she believed that the shooting was planned.

Walmart Fox Digital Chesapeake Police Chesapeake Mcdonnell Breonna Taylor Virginia
Razorfirst and Sebastian Discuss the Mechanics of Collecting Ballots

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:47 min | 3 d ago

Razorfirst and Sebastian Discuss the Mechanics of Collecting Ballots

"I have drawn the following conclusions. Tell me if I'm off base or what's missing, raise the 5th. My take is the following. Where we have normal elections, let's say, two weeks of voting, we should do politics. We should campaign on a message, build a platform, get that candidate in front of as many people as possible and have rallies. Everywhere else, like Pennsylvania with 50 days, Virginia with 45 days. I mean, a Republican government, 45 days of voting, it's not about elections anymore, razor fist. It's about the mechanics of collecting ballots, not votes collecting ballots, and we just have to build that machine. And policies, platforms really don't matter because if Pennsylvania can vote for federman, then this isn't about politics. What do you think? Well, and some states come right out with it. They even venerate. I mean, California law venerates the practice, just explicates it is actually legal to ballot harvest. Right. Which makes it makes it a really tough sell in all the states where the Democratic Party is pretend that ballot harvesting does not exist and is a conspiracy theory. California doesn't seem to think so. They actually passed a law passing it. The thing that's hilarious about what you mentioned was Katie Hobbs, of course, the candidate that Carrie Lake was running against. It's bigger than that. People outside of Arizona only know Carrie Lake is the charismatic person that they've caught maybe an advertisement or a speech from. But here in Arizona, she had been a journalist and very, very visible here for over two decades. She was in the biggest markets from north to south for 25 years. She was a phase, right? Absolutely. And what's worse, her opponent was in charge of the election,

Republican Government Federman Pennsylvania Carrie Lake Katie Hobbs Virginia California Democratic Party Arizona
What Have We Learned and What Is Our Strategy?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:59 min | 3 d ago

What Have We Learned and What Is Our Strategy?

"Says Charlie, this is actually a really good question. Charlie, what have we learned and what is our strategy? Look, a movement that does not adapt. A military that does not adapt. An organization that does not adapt will die. It's that simple. You must always constantly be adapting and improving. And one thing that we have to learn from is in Maricopa County, if we just all broadcast election day election day election day, it doesn't go well. You can sabotage ambushes all this nonsense. So instead, and I want to make sure I'm very clear about this. The ideal, the ideal way, how we want elections to operate is different than what we have to navigate. The ideal I would love to have a national day where everyone goes and votes. Voter ID, one day of voting, that's it. The way France does it, you know the winner by the election night, but that's not the world we live in. So if you live in Georgia, I would not recommend voting by mail. But in person early voting. In person early voting, go get your vote banked. We need the entire America first, the entire conservative movement in Georgia. I could tell you there's going to be shenanigans and nonsense and all of this, but we have got to get Herschel Walker across the finish line. This is the difference between the Democrats, having reliable 52 48 Senate or a 50 50 Senate. And with a 50 50 Senate, you're going to have cinema in a tough reelection fight and cinema with hopefully a tough primary challenge that seems to be bubbling up in Arizona with congressman gallego. And also Joe Manchin, who's going to have a very difficult race if he decides to proceed. Joe Manchin just might go become a lobbyist. Where it looks as if the popular governor justice might run Morrissey might run. There's a lot of different people in West Virginia that will keep pressure on Manchin. So this Democrat 50 50 majority won't really even feel like a majority.

Charlie Maricopa County Georgia Senate Herschel Walker Joe Manchin Congressman Gallego France America Arizona Morrissey West Virginia Manchin
Walmart manager opens fire in break room, killing 6

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 3 d ago

Walmart manager opens fire in break room, killing 6

"A Walmart manager opened fire on coworkers in the break room of a Chesapeake, Virginia store, killing 6 people last night at leaving several others wounded. Walmart employee Brianna Tyler says she was standing in the break room with 15 to 20 other coworkers, starting the night restocking shift when her manager just walked in and started shooting. He just opened fire on everybody in the break room, and it is by the grace of God that a bullet missed me, not gonna lie. I literally looked at him, I saw the smoke leaving the gun and I literally watched bodies drop. Chesapeake police say he used a pistol then apparently killed himself their investigating motive, Tyler says he had issues with almost everyone. He was already kind of rocky with people, but to this extent I would have never, yeah, I would have never guessed this. Walmart identified the gunman as Andre Bing and says he's been with the store since 2010. I'm Julie Walker.

Walmart Brianna Tyler Chesapeake Chesapeake Police Virginia Tyler Andre Bing Julie Walker
Police: 6 people and assailant dead in Walmart shooting

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 3 d ago

Police: 6 people and assailant dead in Walmart shooting

"Another mass shooting in America, this one last night at a Walmart in Virginia where 7 people, including the shooter, are dead according to police. Police say the shooter went into the Walmart in Chesapeake, Virginia around 10 p.m. and opened fire officer Leo Kaczynski says they're investigating that person's connection with the store. We're looking into the relationships and all that. He says, when police went into Walmart, they found the shooter dead along with the victims and the injured. It's sad, you know, we're a couple of days before the Thanksgiving holiday. I mean, anytime it's a set of it's just a bad time all around. You know, it just for everybody involved. Especially the victims. This is horrible. That audio courtesy wvc, there have been 40 mass killings in the U.S. so far this year, according to a database by the AP USA Today and northeastern university. I'm Julie Walker

Walmart Leo Kaczynski Virginia Chesapeake U.S. Ap Usa Today Northeastern University Julie Walker
Police: 6 people, assailant dead in Walmart shooting

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 4 d ago

Police: 6 people, assailant dead in Walmart shooting

"Police in Chesapeake, Virginia say a gunman walked into a Walmart Tuesday night and began firing, killing 6 people. Police say they believe the gunman stopped shooting when officers arrived at the scene. They say the gunman is also dead, and that they don't believe officers fired any shots, a spokesman forced centaur a healthcare, says in a text message at 5 patients from the Walmart store or being treated at Norfolk general hospital, their conditions are not known. Walmart tweeted a statement saying we are shocked at this tragic event at our Chesapeake, Virginia store, were praying for those impacted the community and our associates. I'm Donna water

Chesapeake Walmart Walmart Store Virginia Norfolk General Hospital Donna
Virginia police: Multiple people killed in Walmart shooting

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 4 d ago

Virginia police: Multiple people killed in Walmart shooting

"Police in Chesapeake, Virginia say there are multiple dead and injured after a shooter walked into a Walmart Tuesday night and began firing. Police say officers entered the Walmart store and found several dead and wounded, and that the shooter is among the dead, Chesapeake police say they believe the shooter stopped firing when officers arrived. They haven't said whether the shooter is dead from a self inflicted gunshot. Walmart tweeted a statement saying we are shocked at this tragic event and our Chesapeake Virginia store, where praying for those impacted the community and our associates were working closely with law enforcement, and we are focused on supporting our associates. I'm John water

Chesapeake Walmart Store Walmart Virginia John Water
Who Is DOJ Special Counsel Jack Smith?

Mark Levin

01:59 min | 4 d ago

Who Is DOJ Special Counsel Jack Smith?

"What happened here In this case several years ago about The Republican governor Bob McDonnell who had a hell of a political career ahead of him Bob McDonald took a lot of gifts Mostly his wife did too At the time there was not a legal in the state of Virginia Was a wise No Did he commit a federal offense That's the issue The public integrity section of the criminal division of the United States Department of Justice was headed by this guy Jack Smith Jack smith's wife just done a documentary on excuse me Michelle Obama And is donated heavily to the Biden campaign So these are radical Democrats very very partisan You can assume this U.S. attorney or this head of the public integrity section is the same So what happened Well there's a definition in federal law in terms of bribes official bribes There's a definition for it In the bribery statutes in the interpretation of it Basically it's an official act The official act done on behalf of somebody as a result of receiving a gift a quid pro quo There is no evidence whatsoever The governor MacDonald had done an official act for anybody That there was any quid pro quo But that didn't stop Jack Smith the new special counsel investigating Trump From expanding it

Bob Mcdonald Bob Mcdonnell Jack Smith United States Department Of Ju Michelle Obama Virginia Biden Governor Macdonald U.S. Trump From
'The Devil and Bella Dodd' Author Paul Kengor on the Communist War on God

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:53 min | 4 d ago

'The Devil and Bella Dodd' Author Paul Kengor on the Communist War on God

"Book is the devil and Bella Dodd, but you wrote a book called the devil and Karl Marx, where you talk and I think it's very important to understand that there are satanic foundations to atheists, communism, obviously we're dealing with it today in China. What they believe is true or what they what they work against are the most basic things life, the sanctity of the individual, the family. I mean, it seems, if you weren't sure what to think of it, you look at it and say, this looks like a war on God and on God's principles and God's reality. I mean, when you go to war with the family and you start saying that the state owns your children, the state will determine what your children get in school. You, as a parent, have no stay. That strikes at the heart of everything for most people. And we just saw that before young can became governor in Virginia, you have the man whose name I'm happy not to remember, running for governor in Virginia saying something shockingly similar. It is as un American and as um biblical as anything. The idea that parents should not have a say in their children's lives and that kind of thing. But that's at the heart of communist theory. It's at the very basis of it and you're saying that's part of what triggered Bella dot, a died in the world communist, finally to wake up. Yeah, in fact, she read the manifesto where it sneers out and makes fun of what they call the hallowed correlation between parent and child, right? And Bella dot actually believed, well, yeah, the correlation, the relationship between parent and child is hallowed, right? This is something special. But they declared war on that. They declared war on religion. And she learned this very early on when she went to hunter college, one of her professors who, by the way, she's a communist, the professor, and about committing suicide, which a lot of these people did, you know, they had very unhappy lives. And Bella tried to write this innocent little paper, right, about monastic life, which she thought was kind of interesting. And the teacher pulled her in and said, this is a good paper, so I'm going to give you a good grade, but we need to have a talk about this religion stuff. And the other instead, the teacher wanted to wanted her to write positively about the French Revolution, rather than rather than about life and monasteries. But Lenin called it called a medieval mildew spiritual booze. He said there's nothing more abominable than religion. Marx called religion, the opiate of the masses, Mark said communism begins where atheism begins. It was a war on God, which is why they went after and tried to infiltrate the churches. And they tapped her to do that as well.

Bella Dodd Karl Marx Virginia Bella China UN Hunter College Lenin Marx Mark
AP Sports SummaryBrief at 3:00 a.m. EST

AP News Radio

00:59 min | 5 d ago

AP Sports SummaryBrief at 3:00 a.m. EST

"AP sports I'm Josh rowntree the U.S. began its World Cup group action Monday playing to a one one draw with Wales Tim wea opened the scoring for the Americans which next play England on Friday On Monday Night Football in Mexico City the forty-niners rolled over Arizona 38 to ten Jimmy Garoppolo had 228 passing yards and four touchdowns San Francisco is now 6 and four Colt McCoy and trace mcsorley played quarterback for injured Kyler Murray They combined for 247 yards and two picks for four and 7 Arizona In the NBA the bucks beat the heat one 19 and one 11 behind Yanis and 37 points on the ice the bruins got by the lightning 5 three It was a historic night for Ford Patrice bergeron who picked up his 1000th career point with an assist And in college football Virginia has canceled Saturday's game a second straight This time against Virginia tech in the wake of the shooting deaths of three of the team's players I'm Josh Valtteri AP sports

Josh Rowntree Tim Wea Jimmy Garoppolo Mcsorley Kyler Murray Arizona Niners Yanis AP World Cup Mexico City Colt Mccoy Wales Ford Patrice Bergeron U.S. England Football San Francisco NBA
Closing Arguments Are Underway in the Oath Keepers Sedition Trial

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:00 min | 5 d ago

Closing Arguments Are Underway in the Oath Keepers Sedition Trial

"Closing arguments are underway in the oath keepers sedition trial. And I haven't been watching the trial, but I'm keeping track of a sort of running account of it. That is it's been covered by two or three different people, including our friend Julie Kelly. And quite clearly what the government is doing and this does not surprise me at all, is giving a completely distorted picture of what was happening. Now, we have an adversary judicial system. So the prosecution is going to do this to the defense's job to counter it. But let's go through some of the claims that they're making in their closing statements because I think they're on the face of it. Exaggerated, if not, in some cases absurd. So the first one is they called for the violent overthrow of the U.S. government. Now that part I think is true because you're talking about people who are given to a hyperbolic rhetoric. Oh yeah, so we're gonna, this is, you know, we're gonna have a new American Revolution. So there is this kind of language. Granted, it by itself does not amount to any kind of conspiracy of heated rhetoric by itself amounted to sedition. You'd have to lock up half the country at some point or the other. What disturbs me more is when they say things like, here's the government. This is the Biden DoJ. They brought their weapons with them. Now the implication here is that the old keepers brought their weapons to Washington, D.C., but that is not true. They brought their weapons to Virginia and they left them in a hotel room or hotel rooms in Virginia, where it is legal to have those weapons. They were very conscious. Listen, we are not going to take our weapons where we will be an illegal possession of them in Washington, D.C.. So you can't have an insurrection in my view without weapons. If you take the weapons and you leave them in another state, what you don't have access to them, the statement they brought their weapons with them is false.

Julie Kelly Washington, D.C. U.S. Government DOJ Biden Virginia
The Power of State Legislatures

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

00:59 min | Last week

The Power of State Legislatures

"Debbie and I have been talking about the power of state legislatures to address issues in particularly election issues. I mean, look at this. Look at the not just GOP dominance in all these states, but it's the degree of dominance. I'm just going to read very quickly Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, West Virginia, Wyoming. And again, those are the states in which Republicans dominate both houses, but the margins are huge. Look at Wyoming. The Senate Republicans 28. It doesn't surprise me in white. And the house. 55 to 5. 5 to 5. But look at Texas, honey, Senate, 19 to 12 House 86 to 64. So I mean, you're not talking about one seat or two seat. You're talking about decisive majority. What Republicans say in these states go? Yeah. Those.

Debbie GOP Wyoming Arkansas Idaho Alabama North Dakota Louisiana Indiana Iowa Kentucky Mississippi Nebraska Georgia Kansas Montana South Dakota Missouri Texas South Carolina
Former Rep. Mark Walker Talks North Carolina Politics

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:34 min | Last week

Former Rep. Mark Walker Talks North Carolina Politics

"Have a sort of a pet thief. And that is everybody sort of lives and dies on the federal races and the presidential rights of the Senate at the house. And you and I are part of that. But the reality is governing this closest to the people is actually the governing that affects the people the most. And that would be things that you just got through working a lot of Supreme Court Justices, circuit appeals justice. And county commissioner, city councils. Tell us a little about what you did after the Senate race in North Carolina and had some really good results at. Yeah, you know, in North Carolina, for the last several years, we've had a democratic led North Carolina Supreme Court. They've thrown out legislative that was passed by the state House, things like voter ID, last year they rewrote the congressional lines, had two guys for Michigan come in and actually draw the maps overriding their own state's constitution. Other things in the past and what has happened. People like Eric holder and others have come in and sued her legislation because they knew the North Carolina Supreme Court would go along with it. Well, thank God we were able to flip that from four three Democrat to 5 two Republican as well as some wins on the Court of Appeals as a backdrop. The reason why this impacts all the way down the local person is the people that they're voting for state House to go and represent the past legislation now it is protected. So whether it's school board, whether it's county commission or whether it's state House, whether it's your north judges or Georgia judges or anybody else. Virginia judges you name it. That's why this is so important that people engage at their local level.

North Carolina Supreme Court Senate North Carolina Supreme Court Eric Holder Michigan Court Of Appeals House Georgia Virginia
Virginia Finds and Corrects Voting Discrepancies

The Officer Tatum Show

01:56 min | Last week

Virginia Finds and Corrects Voting Discrepancies

"P 6 12 is the Virginia 7th congressional district and P one O four is in the tenth. Let me go down here. P 6 12, the ballot scan reported 531 ballot scan, but only 504 ballots were actually collected in the machine. Election officials realized that Scripps C and when compared to the check in on the poll books to the number of ballots, the scan had reported. Let me go to this other area. Election officials hand counted, let's see. Election officials hand counted the ballots according to the election. Our procedures, multiple times, the outcome was 27 more votes on the machine tallies than physical ballots. A total of 22 of those votes were for a Democrat candidates, three for the Republican candidate and two were for right hands. And P one O four, there were only about 5 to ten more ballots on the machine tally compared to the physical ballots out of the total out of a total of 1500 balance. And so with this story, because you're going to hear about it. There were discrepancies. And just because there were discrepancies don't necessarily point the fraud, just because they're, you know, weren't discrepancies don't mean that they were in fraud that was covered up. But when you see numbers of 27 votes, misappropriated, counted off, the beauty of the election is that they had a recount. They had a manual review, they reviewed it and they were able to find the mistakes. I would argue that in many states they have these measures in place. And so when people try to commit crimes, I think that a lot of times, not all the time, but a lot of times they're able to find it and thwarted before it makes a tremendous effect. And that happened in Virginia,

Scripps Virginia
"virginia" Discussed on Transition Virginia

Transition Virginia

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"virginia" Discussed on Transition Virginia

"It's worth thinking about the alternative history when there were not to debates but there were three debates and that first debate happened over the summer at the omni homestead in hot springs where the virginia bar association was hosting that debate that traditional debate. That happened in the dead of summer when there wasn't a huge spotlight on the candidates and they could hone their talking points. And so now we're sort of forced to do that and you know the fall campaign season. Yeah also i. I thought it was interesting. Where the candidates were distancing themselves from their own base. We saw that with terry mcauliffe in two areas where he said that he would preserve qualified immunity for police officers so he disagrees with the democrats that want to get rid of qualified immunity and he was specifically asked once again about overturning right to work once again he did not answer the question of overturning right to work which means he supports right to work Once again distancing himself from the democratic base which is interesting and noteworthy we also saw duncan surprisingly distance himself from the republican base on election integrity. He said that he believes virginia. Has legit elections does not have questions about the legitimacy of virginia elections. And if he lost the election he would concede the race mccullough. So like that's distancing himself from trump who specifically said the opposite about virginia in particular junkin did not was given the opportunity but did not take the opportunity to distance himself on this issue of critical race theory. He once again said critical race. Theory is being taught in virginia classrooms. Which it's not it's illegal theory. It's like saying that. The theory of equitable distribution in divorce cases is being taught in the third grade. It's not. What do you make of that disparity thomas like. Why would you choose to distance yourself from the trump iast of trump issues which is election integrity but then maintain this idea that critical race theory is being taught in classrooms. Virginia what why the disparity there. Well yeah i couldn't tell you what glenn youngins team is thinking or telling him preparing to do. But what i can tell you. Is that those. Two things aren't equivalent supporting right to work or not supporting right to work as a legitimate policy position. And saying that you have trust in. The electoral system is a prerequisite to run for office for any party. So like the fact that that is what we're talking about as having young and separate himself from the base like who the heck is his base and mike. When i say that they're still working on their talking points. When i mean is terry mcauliffe is still running a message campaign about like send a message to donald trump. We don't want people like donald trump in this state and on young inside. It's and a message to joe biden. Then that's why you're voting me. I think ultimately neither one of those tactics are going to work because neither joe biden nor donald trump are running in this race and this is historically not what encourages people to come out and vote in these kinds of off year elections. The california recall election is proof positive to democrats that. Running against trump is still successful strategy in twenty twenty one. Like i'm not saying it's not going to carry them over the hump. What i am going to say is that it's not going to carry.

omni homestead virginia bar association virginia terry mcauliffe junkin hot springs glenn youngins mccullough duncan trump donald trump thomas joe biden Virginia mike california
"virginia" Discussed on Transition Virginia

Transition Virginia

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"virginia" Discussed on Transition Virginia

"Well that rendition. Of god bless america. Sounds like something my so hurts but that duct tank does sound like a good fundraising idea michael but that was the one and only award. Winning editorial cartoonist steve arly delivering yet another masterpiece this time inspired by the justice for j six raleigh last weekend also i thought that idea about the dunk tank was really solid. We should have a transition. Virginia dunk tank. I'm sure there are lots of people who would pay top dollar to dunk. Michael pope you that will be an exclusive patron benefit seeing. I don't know which tier to add that to but once a minute here at the dunk michael pope. That's right it doesn't currently exist yet so don't go looking for it. We'll let you know when it's out. But i think i know that amanda chase would probably want to sign up just dunk you michael and maybe the glenn young campaign raising money all over virginia. Okay let's get onto the news last week. The two major party candidates for governor met for the first of two debates out at the appalachian school of law in grundy former governor. Terry mcauliffe says he will preserve qualified immunity for police officers and mandate vaccines for kobe. Nineteen his opponent in the race. Republican glenn junkins says. He's worried critical race. Theory is being taught in virginia classrooms. And he says mccullough is trying to recycle the politics of the past. We have a twenty year high in murder rate and yet my opponent embraces radical groups that want to de-fund police enclosed prisons. We watch our education system fail our children because he has sold out to the teachers unions and the cost of living in virginia is absolutely running away from us..

Michael pope steve arly amanda chase glenn young michael appalachian school of law raleigh america glenn junkins Virginia virginia Terry mcauliffe grundy mccullough
"virginia" Discussed on Transition Virginia

Transition Virginia

19:39 min | 1 year ago

"virginia" Discussed on Transition Virginia

"In traffic is nowhere near as fast they thought it would be therefore they want to get more passengers and they want people to be able to fly to get on planes easily. Offer planes easily with minimum disruption. So on that side. I presume do not like the idea of testing on the other hand off. People won't fly unless this testing will evidence One has been vaccinated blows. I think you have to look at the longer term picture if people do get any form of a transmission flights and has demonstrated. The airline industry will herald problems in the longer term so the airlines are in a tricky position but buyer might also be an a tricky position because as bill if it becomes law would be challenged in court. Here's what virginia legal expert rich kelsey says about the potential legal challenge. He has to brew that his bill which he says will help prevent the spread of cova that the vaccine actually does that. And i'm not really sure. I know a lot of people feel that way but i'm not really sure that anyone has ever actually said that with the vaccine does according to the cdc is. It helps to prevent the severity of an outbreak of kobe. But everybody knows that a person that has been vaccinated can a get covert and be spread. Covert and so. I think the problem that we're going to have here is this idea that merely being vaccinated prevents the spread of. I do think he'd have a better chance. If he just simply said you wanna fly. You have to show that you've been tested in the last seventy two hours because that goes to whether or not a person has covert and so. I think there's a legitimate challenge there so thomas. What do you think about this debate here. In terms of requiring a testing mandate instead of a vaccine mandate for domestic flights people who are unvaccinated are eleven times more likely to get cove and there is a long legal history of vaccine mandates across the spectrum for hundreds of years in american history. So any thought that it wouldn't stand up in court is just wrong. The supreme court has already ruled on the legality of vaccine mandates and found that absolutely. It's legal and they did that over a hundred years ago. Schools have vaccine mandates in fact win the covert vaccine gets recommended for school. Children by the cdc then. It will automatically become part of the regimen for virginia school children. Thanks to a law. That the virginia democrats passed in two thousand nine hundred thousand nine before cove. It was even on the scene so because of that yes. The vaccine. Mandates will absolutely stand up in court. Anybody who tries to fight it is absolutely wasting their money and these vaccines are absolutely effective at preventing the spread of kobe. In the first place in addition to making it far less likely that you would have a severe case or hospitalization or god forbid even death. As far as the airlines go michael the airlines actually have incentive to mandate vaccines for their passengers. And there's a few reasons for that one the people who don't want to get vaccines are also the people who don't wear masks in many cases who are presenting problems to airline workers and they're having to actually ban them from flying altogether on their airline. The other thing is that they've already lost customers and the reason that they've already lost customers is because they perceive flying as an unsafe activity in this pandemic and rightly so because we know the science if you are in a contained area with covert around and for an extended period of time and by the way delta allows for fleeting transmission. So somebody can literally just walk past you even outside and transmit cove to you. That's how quickly. It transmits compared to the original wild strain of kobe. Michael which used to take about fifteen minutes of exposure so yeah airlines are not frankly safe right now. So people are more likely to travel on an airline where they know for sure that everybody around them is vaccinated and this is not rocket science right so they had like for example in the past polio vaccine mandates to travel on airlines smallpox vaccine airline mandates You have to show your smallpox vaccine card or your polio. Vaccine card as recently as the sixties or seventies so. This is not a new thing. This is not something that anybody can legitimately challenge because in order to legitimately challenge that you have to prove that you were harmed by the policy and by definition there will be not a single human being that can prove they were harmed by vaccine mandate so i think it would just get dismissed outright from core or just completely shut down so i mean michael. These airlines know that they can attract more passengers by having these vaccine mandates. You're already seeing some airlines starting to do this specifically i can think of qantas is the first airline to mandate vaccines for all their passengers. And i know other airlines are considering it including american southwest and some very big carriers in the united states so And now it's more likely that you're your fellow. Travelers going to be vaccinated. With biden's new mandate that requires a vaccine for workers in businesses with over one hundred employees. So we're going to get there. We need to get there faster and people like rich kelsey. Who are trying to throw up false legal arguments. And i'm not sure why. But the science is available the case histories available. You don't have to be an expert to know it's going to stand up just fine. So the point he was trying to make. Is that if your concern is that you don't want to catch co vid on the flight and there's this person sitting next to you that you're worried about there are sort of two choices that we're presented with here and this sort of discussion one is that person has been vaccinated in which case kelsey makes makes the argument. That person actually could have cova. Despite the fact they've been vaccinated or the alternative is that person has had the test within the seventy two hours and tested negative so from his perspective that you know you would rather want the person sitting next to you to have tested negative and probably be negative versus having been vaccinated and potentially could be positive but wouldn't know therapa zip or not. Yeah but why does he think it's gotta be a binary choice to science is very clear that you should be doing both will. The legislation buyers legislation is a binary choice to get on a domestic flight. The choices a or b. Either you haven't been vaccinated or take the test okay. But it shouldn't be a binary choice the best policy that would actually be rooted in science is to be vaccinated and show up with a test. In fact they have rapid tests that you could actually if you wanted. Take in the airport. That's what the school guy said. Actually when i interviewed him. Is that buyers. Bill would be better if instead of being a or b was a b. Yeah well then. I would agree with that is. That's where the sciences. What maybe congressman buyers people are listening to this and they make make an amendment do their legislation. Okay so let's move on to the next part of our show where we check our messages. This one comes from at like. I give a damn on twitter he asks. Can we get some update on how the legislative races are shaping up. Well thanks for the question. Adam and thanks for being a regular listener and an og fan of the podcast from way back in the day before the pandemic even so adam. Republicans are targeting about a dozen incumbent. Democrats the republican state. Legislative committee actually has a list like a published list. The thirteen democratic incumbents that they're targeting for defeat so the most competitive races are roz. Tyler and south side and chris hurst in blacksburg in northern virginia. They're targeting wendy godiva so josh cole. Elizabeth goose mon- dan helmer and the richmond area. They're targeting dawn addams scholar van. Valkenberg and rodney. Willett down in virginia beach. They're targeting kelly converse fowler. Nancy guy alex. Ask you and martha mugler thomas. What do you think about this. List of specific incumbents that republicans are targeting well from the republican perspective. This is exactly who you want to target because these are the people who are most likely to lose if you feel too high quality candidate against them and to they're to have very expensive races just because you're fielding a candidate against them. Nothing is for sure in virginia politics and so these are the people. If you're the republican party that you want to go after because you stand the best chance of winning and you can potentially just beat them by having more money than the incumbent does and michael. I also on this issue checked in with a member of the house of delegates about these races and this delegate said they were particularly worried about six races in particular. Josh cole kelly fowler nancy guy chris. Hurst rose tyler. And alex ask you. These are some of the most competitive races. And that's six seats. And that is enough for the fifty-five that are currently in the majority to lose that majority the bare minimum right. That's the bare minimum. They would need right like so they were. That gives them no room for error. Correct now the democrats believe that they might be able to flip a seat or two and they're targeting Glenn davis in virginia beach. Some republicans in the richmond suburbs. And exurbs like kirk cox in colonial heights roxanne robinson in chesterfield and rob block some in apac county on the eastern shore. Now the problem is that they go after these republicans every year. So i don't really feel comfortable saying whether or not they're like easy ones because the democrats already have the easy wins. They're sitting on them. So the good news for some of these people is that they're not all running against strong republican challengers particularly. I can think of when they died is running against what many people consider to be a week republican candidate and loudon county and most observers that i've spoken with think that she should be able to hang on but like i said my god. There are no guarantees in virginia politics. So the democrats have had two election cycles. Were they picked up a lot of seats. most notably the one in two thousand seventeen where they picked up a whole bunch of seeds. So i guess the real question is are there any democratic incumbents out there who are actually in. What should be republican seats. Roz tyler comes to mind. She just had her District redistricting did after the racial packing court case and she is now in as lean republican district very slightly. Lean republican one. That some buddy who was an active candidate could potentially hold on for the democratic party. But roz tyler. She is not as active compared to like. I can think of a candidate like irene hsien. Who's knocking doors all day long even in a democratic district. She's not necessarily doing that so that is going to be one. That is very difficult for the democrats to keep Not impossible and certainly given enough turn out. They could keep it. But that's going to be a tough one. I think that's the one that they are most likely to lose chris hurst in blacksburg to is one where they're likely to lose because again turnout. Margins are not amazing there and you need a very activated democratic base in order to keep a seat like that so we'll see it's not impossible they could of course just keep everybody but there are also could lose some people and some of the reason for that. Michael is fundraising. Now that democrats have the majority and the trifecta even it's a lot less compelling of a pitch to donors to say help us keep the majority then to help us take the majority so when they were trying to take the majority they had partners like mike bloomberg and a lot of money pouring in from california and new york democratic donors who wanted to assist with that but those people are gone. Now michael now that democrats have that majority. There's no incentive for them to try to take it so what we're seeing is that a lot of lobbyists money becomes more important and normally for the average members at least twenty to forty thousand dollars depending on your rank and your committee positions of lobbyists money available. Where all they have to do is call. But i'm hearing that. Some lobbyists are refusing to contribute especially to the leadership. Pacs the speakers. Pack and the reason that i'm hearing for this is because they're playing footsie with unions. Luke torian specifically came out in favor of a number of union pro union issues including the repeal of right to work on his labor day edge. Yeah i actually thomas. That was a huge moment. Because luke taurean such an influential member he's part of the legislative black caucus. He's chairman of the appropriations committee. He's an extremely influential member. Do you think. Thomas luke torian moving in the direction of overturning. Right to work will bring other democrats along with him. Yeah i think it does. And luke torian by the way was never previously known for super progressive policy. Stances and i think that this reflects a couple of things one luke torian as a pasture and so he believes in doing things because of the right thing to do luke torian is also a relatively high ranking in the black caucus and because we know right to work history as a jim crow law this could potentially be an issue that the black caucus decides to take on and i think it would be who've them to do so and that could absolutely shift the tide in virginia because the black caucus has often been very cooperative with the republican party when they were in the majority and so they've built up a lot of credibility among some of those people in those with those relationships that they have and it could at the very least cindy signal that it is time to consider such a policy and michael because he's chairman of house appropriations because he's so high ranking that could very well send a message to people like terry mcauliffe who's running statewide. That says come on. We're ready for this. Let's do it This is a bill. That would likely pass the house if they thought it could pass the senate which right now. I mean unless something changes with the senate. That's not going to happen. Thomas i mean like i. I've interviewed these. Senators are not on board with it and it's for unless things change and things of course could change but the way things are now the senate just not gonna go for this at least the current senate and so you would really need to wait until after the next senate election to get any movement on this. That's right michael. The virginia senate is a far more conservative institution. Just all around and there are a lot more. It's not fair to call them southern dem's because they're not southern dims the way that they would be known colloquially but they have the inherited spirit i would say of the southern dams and they're they liked to be far more pro business. I can think of at least like people like monty mason and lynwood lewis and cree deeds would not support this or would only support it under arrest. It's gonna take something like terry mcauliffe coming out in favor of repealing to work in this campaign. i don't get. That sense was gonna happen. Thomas even if the senate decides they want to go for this or or let's even say after the election after the senate election and enter in the next governor potentially mccullough or potentially glenn youngin is in the second half of his term. I get the sense that a governor mcauliffe a potential future governor mcauliffe would sort of use his powers of persuasion to prevent that bill from ever arriving on his desk. I just don't think he's in the cab of people that want to overturn right to work. And so you know. I'm kind of wondering about torrens movement here. Does this actually change the potential course of future events or is terry mcauliffe's unwillingness to move forward with this. Just going to put a stop sign on that. I would consider to shot across the bow michael. Most of the lobbyists in richmond are republicans and they represent nonunion or anti union organizations. These people are in their ears all the time. They have a purse that they can use as a stick or a carrot if they don't like the things that the democrats are trying to do and they are overwhelmingly in favor of big business. So if you support any of these policies what you need to do is get in touch with your elected representative or someone like chairman torian and you need to tell them one that you're glad that he's taken the stance or that they've taken the stance that you want to see the right to work repeal. Because they need to hear from more people than just the ones who are lobbying them representing big businesses. All right we gotta take a break because when we come back. We're gonna talk to david broder. And tammy dogs from sei five twelve about employees of local government entering into collective bargaining agreements with their employers. We'll be right back. Hey look transition. Virginia has another voicemail. And this one's from richard crouse. Let's see what he's got to say. This podcast is so jack. Clegg that john. Frederick's radio show is five steps above it never mind. It's just another crank call we want your voicemails and it's easy to do just launch the voice memo app in your smartphone record a reaction to something. You've heard on the podcast. It's that easy. Send the sound file from your smartphone to transition. Va podcast at g. Mail dot com. We might even play your voicemail on the air..

rich kelsey luke torian virginia cova chris hurst michael virginia democrats cdc polio wendy godiva josh cole Elizabeth goose dan helmer dawn addams Valkenberg kelly converse fowler Nancy guy alex martha mugler thomas blacksburg Josh cole
"virginia" Discussed on Transition Virginia

Transition Virginia

07:55 min | 1 year ago

"virginia" Discussed on Transition Virginia

"Out. They said that about everything. Well you kind of just hit on something. Probably a little bit more interesting. As far as the show goes which is. How do you become a judge and like walk us through that process because we would like to know who these candidates death alleges considering. Is there anybody that's going to be controversial genuinely controversial potentially and why they might be doing it in secret or is this setup why it set up this way so we don't know who the people are. Outside of the public candidate lists. When i spoke to legislators ahead of it they made it sound like the public meeting would have a larger are large ish like the leadership would meet and they would whittle it down to a certain number and then that number of like fifteen or something like that. I didn't get a specific more than the exclusively open seats. And instead so this eight open seats right made it sound like lead series of both to ahead. It's made it sound like we'd get like fifteen people at a public meeting that the public. Let's get to ask questions up now. We're hearing that. They're going to present a people for that public meeting. Which essentially means those are the people who will become the next judges on the Steak or repeals and all of that has happened. Allegedly behind closed doors. I mean gas officially behind closed doors which has brought the ire of those on the right because they are feeling like they've left out but as jeff shapiro noted in his headline democrats behaving as a majority party. Should there's a long history net oliver over at the mercury to the nice right up on. Just how partisan the judicial selection process. You're asking about controversial judges. We don't know who they are yet so we don't even know if they have the capacity to be controversial The list i've seen in public have been existing judges from across the state which goes back to the geographic concerns. there's also individual lawyers I reached out to some of them and they denied interview requests which keeps in the virginia tradition of judges not talking to the press ever. We don't know what's going on. Republicans don't know what's going on. I'm guessing there's five people in democratic leadership who knows what's going on and then a lot of folks are just gonna show up. Vote yes brad. You mentioned that. The republicans are upset about the lack of transparency. I think what they're really upset about is the lack of ability to participate in this because if they were behind closed doors doing it. I think it would be fine with that. So i think people who are concerned about lack of transparency. Probably should be worried that all of the conference committee stuff happens in secret and members of the public are not allowed to be in the room when they're making these decisions and all of these the process for electing these judges all happens in secret and so why is it. People in virginia have this fetish for secret government. I think that's all governments. Michael but no i mean well. This is going back to what i was saying before with. The are part of my job is like in order to see a civil documented court opinion in the state of virginia. You have to physically go to the local court to see a copy of the document. There's a long history of keeping things obscured from the public in the judicial system in the state and shouldn't people be outraged about that. The ensure i mean we spent the first fifteen minutes of this conversation trying to explain. What are the court of appeals is and i'm not sure any of us are better off now if we still have anyone listening like these are very complicated intricate things that there's a reason the process exists. Trust me. i'd like to more but even if you had a list of forty people to look through Is that going to offer more insight. I i mean you can say the following some abidance stuff you say. This person has background in public. Defending you have You know Civil rights law. They're all going to be civil rights attorneys at some point. I'm sure so. Yeah i mean do we want to know sure. Does anybody actually care. Unless they're a lawyer probably not And we will get at least a similar arca of a hearing with the public one that happens with with these eight candidates like you're totally right. This is a completely hidden behind shade. I just don't know how much people actually will like. Are they going to go to this meeting now. Because because they're mad they didn't get to go before. I don't know brad points for using the word simular on transition virginia. I think you're probably the first podcast to do that. So one last question before we wrap this thing up. Republicans have made the argument. That democrats are trying to pack the court. Is that an accurate way to look at what's going on with this. I was a bipartisan process. Every bar association every legal group and the state has been asking for this for years open. Chain said what you said earlier that it was expensive and just increasing bureaucracy and blah blah blah. When i spoke to stanley he took to bill. Stanley senator bill stanley he spoke he took issue with the capacity for partisanship in the selection process. He said had there been guardrails. He would have voted in support of it whether or not that's true is up for for them to say. But yeah the as we've mentioned beforehand you know the republicans bed in charge For real long time to have the capacity to fill almost every judgeship in the state. There's good stories about a mcauliffe appointing of the state supreme court getting removed by republicans. Six months later so there's a long history of partisanship On the bench. Is it any worse or better now because democrats are doing it. I guess it depends on what side of the ion pat. I'm glad you mentioned that. Because i think that's great fodder for a future episode if we can get judge Sean though that'd be funny. I was going to just push back once again on the republican narrative. That democrats are packing the court one. They're doing the job they were elected to do. Which is make government run more efficiently and fill positions which the republicans deliberately chose not to do and then the other thing is the republicans had thirty years of power to fill an appoint all the judgeship set are currently there except for the ones appointed in the last couple of years and so the judicial bench is already heavily. Skewed to the right and We learned in a previous episode of from michael that they're overwhelmingly white males and older so the courts are already packed. We are unpacking the court. And i think that is the message that should win the day because people know like the average person knows that government is not working. It's not functioning properly and this is one of the reasons why so your argument. Thomas is yes. The democrats are packing the court. But they're reacting to decades of republicans packing the court there unpacking the court. They're bringing balance back to the force when they when they when they appoint current judges to these to the court of appeals to fill those vacancies. And that was one of the questions. I had for one of the Legislators interviewed i said. Does that mean that if they open these seats by with these new appointments will they have to immediately or will. They want to immediately turnaround and fill the vacancies. They created themselves because the house is up for grabs this fall. If i was them i would fill the seats as soon as possible. Just in case there might be a veto session on the other side of the special session so there could be a version where we see if any current sitting judges are appointed. We might come back in a month. After post veto and appoint those judges fillers again so continued. Quarterback never ends so. That's all for this episode. Support us on patriot or send us an email to transition. Va podcastone gmail.com. Like follow at transition. Va on twitter and anywhere pods are cast. Read the transcripts at transition. Virginia dot com and special. Thanks to emily cottrell for figuring out what the heck were saying. Thanks for being on the transition team. Where your hosts. Thomas bowman and i'm michael..

jeff shapiro virginia whittle brad Every bar association Stanley senator bill stanley oliver Michael stanley supreme court Sean michael Thomas Va emily cottrell twitter Virginia Thomas bowman
"virginia" Discussed on Transition Virginia

Transition Virginia

07:11 min | 1 year ago

"virginia" Discussed on Transition Virginia

"Lopez won this primary with more than seventy percent of the vote. So once again. Sarah keeps the top spot as predictor in chief here on transition virginia and this idea that democratic socialists of america is a force to be reckoned with in fairfax thomas. When did you make of that. Well definitely not in fairfax michael. Look the reality is as northern. Virginia especially while it is very liberal. This is the home of the establishment people who work for big corporations. The defense industry the military the elected officials themselves often. They all live in northern virginia and many of them vote in northern virginia. So yes it's liberal but it is not a bastion of super progressivism as far as the desa's concert. And i actually have an interesting story about that. So when i was a union lobbyist i had the privilege of sitting on one of the amazon. Hq to hearings for the arlington county board and desa showed up in mass and disrupted the hearings twelve hours later at the end of that hearing turns out most if not all of them shipped in from dc. They weren't actually northern virginia residence at all. So yeah you've got a. You got a little bit of presence of the say in parts of northern virginia and they certainly go out and turn up and marches. They're all over twitter. But the reality is you know as a voting block. Maybe small growing but northern virginia is the establishment home. The one place where an incumbent did lose to a challenger from the left. Is steve heretic now. Mark levin loss because of alexandria city politics ebrahim samarra lost because of russian politics. A heretic loss. Because he was a alleged financial predator in a district that does not have a lot of wealth and so yeah he had a lot of bilton advantages one being the incumbent having to opponents that in theory could split the vote but he did himself and by having all of these negative news headlines unfortunately right after we published so neither one of us got the memo. That steve kerr dick was going to lose until of course our episode was already out so i think i actually had some of my own comments about the race in that episode. Do you remember what i said. I can pull the audio right now. This is what you said on our episode. Back in april i will be watching the lopez reyes closely as a former constituent of alphonsus but i think ultimately. He's going to be fine as you catch that last part play that again i think ultimately he's going to be fine on more time i think ultimately he's going to be fine so yeah look. I didn't say that he was going to win by a lot or a little. But i did say he was going to be fine and he was more than fine at seventy percent so affonso sarah predicted you would have seventy percent of the vote and i predicted you at win. Jazz got it wrong. I think it's worth noting here for the record. Most of comes predictions were actually spot on I think the parts of the show. That may have been a problem. In retrospect is when he's talking about incumbents who ended up losing. Let's remember here for the record. We had a number of incumbents. Lost steve heretic. Lee carter mark levin and also ibrahim samara. Now i think thomas there was a point of the show where you were talking about that race. Here's what you said on our show back. In april ebrahim samarra irene chen i think irene chen is an incredibly strong challenger. She got the endorsement. Janet powell and that district and that is it easy to get when you are trying to take on an incumbent and so she is absolutely one to watch. Yeah so what. I didn't say there. Michael is that i knew that she was knocking. Doors and raising money the entire time. And it's funny because shortly after published that i actually got a call from abraham samaya who told me he thought it was cute that i thought his race is going to be close cute. He's the word cute he is. And so yeah. I knew that she was working hard. And then i knew that abraham wasn't and so okay like people lose and so the one i didn't see coming necessarily was harder. The reason i don't. I didn't see carter. Losing is because lee. Carter is kind of the every man of manasseh city. He is working class far left but at the same time like salt of the earth. And that's exactly who votes in manassas city But what. I didn't know at the time was that carter was not knocking doors. And he wasn't letting his campaign. Volunteers knocked doors on his behalf. Either why was that. The reason league carterton do that is because he understood. The science around cova did not want to risk exposing him other people that were his constituents or his campaign volunteers or staff to the corona virus. That was obviously not a good call. If you wanted to come back to richmond at least but that's the decision he made. I would also point out. That lee is now a father of four. And he's got a young baby at home and it's a lot more preferable to be a dad with an enjoy that time with the new kid than it is to go knock doors and this guy has gotten death threats by the way multiple times every day of his life. So i'm sure lease kind of thinking. Good riddance to you guys here. Also it's worth pointing out that he was a double filer and his name was literally on the ballot twice. Voters hate that right. Yeah and so same thing. Hurt mark levin in in his race who got right to and that claim the other person who had the same situation but totally different dynamics is jay jones who is an extremely popular incumbent in his name was on the ballot twice and he won one of those races and lost the other. You and nutty comb actually had that all of that spot on in terms of jay jones winning despite the fact that his name was on the ballot twice but yeah levin and carter actually suffered from the same problem which is their name was on the ballot twice and they weren't as strong as they should have been in their own districts and they got knocked off. Yes and levine's case. He was running against incredibly popular candidate and relative newcomer. Elizabeth parker who's now delegate elect presumptive i should say delegate presumptive elizabeth parker there is a republican challenger who has lots of yard signs up all over alexandria. So yeah. she's got to make it through the general i mode. It's good that they're paying attention to their constituents and or potential constituents in alexandria city the republican party there is but anyway so get mixed bag. Predictions are always risky game. But they're fun and that's why we play right. Lopez did win with seventy percent.

northern virginia steve heretic fairfax thomas arlington county board alexandria city ebrahim samarra lopez reyes affonso sarah desa Lee carter ibrahim samara ebrahim samarra irene chen irene chen Janet powell Mark levin bilton steve kerr fairfax mark levin
"virginia" Discussed on Transition Virginia

Transition Virginia

08:05 min | 1 year ago

"virginia" Discussed on Transition Virginia

"Law brings about consumers. You know and the future is now on this issue. Because if you're a dominion customer. At least like i m you can go to your account online and you can choose an option that all one hundred percent of your power generated and used comes from renewable energy and you can also opt into their existing solar net metering program and so there are more than one way to skin this cat but for energy efficiency conscious environmentalists. Listening to our program. You can do some of this right now. I've always thought the concept of net metering suffered from a marketing problem which is the phrase net. Metering doesn't give you enough information in fact it seems kind of perplexing net metering. What the heck is that. Maybe they should call it cash money panels or rooftop windfall like that but one thing one part of this that is perplexing to some is that there is a cap on the amount of energy that can be generated from rooftop solar which i think is like six percent right so like it. Caps at the total amount of energy at six percent explained this cap. And why you wanna go about doing it this way. Yeah let's be clear that that cap was a negotiated agreement under the law that captured previously been at one percents of total generation the marketplace that i'd cap represents a sixfold increase upon the the limit that had been imposed before. So you know. Is it everything that solar advocates a would necessarily want absolutely not to expect it. We're gonna continue working to continue expanding. provide more access to folks absolutely but it is a dramatic evolution from where we were in virginia just a year ago senator. I'm wondering about the future of that cap. Is that something that can be tweaked by a future general assembly and i think that You will you will see conversations on that going forward. Would you care to elaborate in terms of. Are you going to introduce something. Not sure yet. You know we're were gearing up for special session than are just beginning to think about the twenty twenty two session as you alluded. I thought i would have had a different job so Still in the beginning phases of what i'm going to introduce specifically until two thousand two and beyond but i think more broadly that is definitely a conversation that is happening as we go forward now. The last pillar of clean economy act is reducing carbon emissions. So that that is a very broad and expansive goal senator. How does it clean economy. Act force us to reduce carbon emissions. Well you know. It's simple as when you are transitioning right now. I think about and i'm going on. Memory about sixty percent of the electricity generated in virginia is from fossil fuel based sources that coal or gas that emit carbon into the air and so going from that sixty two zero and replacing that with solar and wind Emit zero carbon emissions is police span torches by having that renewable energy mandate is the first step but the second step goes back something eluded to earlier of when you are looking at what is the least cost way to generate electricity. Part of that is not just looking at the facility that in place or the facility. That's being bill. But what is the broader impact that has on society and we've sort of through the clean economy act us market incentives to ensure they're gonna be no more emissions in the air and again. This is part of larger puzzle so when you combine that with joining the regional greenhouse gas initiative which was the first step to put us to one hundred percent carbon-free power the to work very well together to ensure that we're not only reducing carbon emissions. But eventually we're eliminating them here. In virginia 'electricity generation easiest way. I think for your listeners. To think about this is that there are two glide pads in the clean economy act. There's a glide path. We talked about which steadily ramps up. The amount of clean generation were using to power grid. And we're requiring the utilities to go out and acquire at the same time as we're ramping that up we're ramping down the emissions that any individual power plant in the state of virginia can actually mitt as well as having and this is a belt. Suspenders approach as well as having specific retirement. Dates for a set of emitting power. Plants in by emitting power plants coal oil natural gas so were setting those off line in the ones that remain online. Had you get cleaner and cleaner over time. They've got shut down by twenty forty five. We've gotten to a system where we really have one hundred percent clean power in that regard but it's both of those glide pants working in tandem moving in the opposite directions in research which he what rolled is carbon reduction in carbon offsets. Play in the click to me. I can we expect to see companies like planning more trees for example right now. Those emission reductions specifically based upon looking at emissions at that point of emission. You know how many tons of co two does this plant put out this year. You have to go about admitting less than that. The regional greenhouse gas initiative which the center alluded to before parallel initiative. That basically looks at the entirety of virginia's power emissions and steadily shrinks. Those would allow those plans to go about trading between each other in order to go about achieving those reductions. But in this particular case we're talking about the clean economy act. This is saying every single year we need to see those emissions. Go down year over year over year so to answer your question. No the idea of saying only this powerplant running but we're gonna find an offset over here. That's not something that's envisioned the clean economy. There's another interesting part of the clean economy act which surprised a lot of people. Which is the all this social equity. That's built into the bill which people don't naturally associate with energy policy. Senator talk about the social equity piece of this. I know if you talk about like the net metering where you can make money on the solar panel. That's on your roof. There's part of that. That's set aside for low income households and there's another part of this where there's a fee that's in your energy bill and that money goes to subsidize low income people so that they don't pay more than six percent of their income on energy. Explain the social equity. Part of virginia clinic. Comedy act yeah so it recognizes the intersection of many different issues and many different policy lovers going all at the same time and we wanted to ensure that win. We are expanding access to renewable energy and clean energy. That transition doesn't overburden one part of virginia or one community or one income bracket over another. And so we sort of built the concept of environmental justice in by. I require review that we're going to actually annually look at the implementation and make sure that there's not one community that shouldering a disproportionate burden of this shift because we know now. There are certain communities that are disproportionately bearing the burden of fossil.

virginia mitt us
"virginia" Discussed on Transition Virginia

Transition Virginia

07:09 min | 1 year ago

"virginia" Discussed on Transition Virginia

"Be you know farms and forests. What do you make that criticism. You know. I think the first thing to do. I don't know where they're getting. Those particular calculations i think in part. They're thinking well if you've just met the entire the clinicals with x. y. and z. You'd have to do these things. I think that is a is a overly simplistic interpretation of it. So that's unfortunate to think about because there's a whole host of clean energy resources that can be deployed will. Help meet the clean economy goal. So right there. There's a problem. The center i spoke with and i'm sure we'll talk about this further. The degeneration the rooftop generation that we're able to do so you're able to take that solar and not necessarily having on an any individual land but instead put it on rooftops and utilize it there. There's a real opportunity in thank goodness we loosen those regulations so that we're able to do that because that was an obstacle in the state but i think even more fundamentally you know. Let's think about our neighbor immediately to the south in north carolina north carolina. Has you know as of the past couple of years installed five thousand megawatts of solar. We have about seven hundred. Thirty megawatts solar. I don't know about you. I've driven through north carolina periodically. I do not think of it as one vast solar farm. I do not think that sort of growth is fundamentally notable so. I think there is ample space in virginia to accommodate solo developments while rooftops but also on land that is underutilized on utilized in this process with out necessarily fundamentally changing the character of our rural communities. Think there's lots of opportunity. There obviously indigent solo developer works with localities to make certain that they're accommodating the needs of the residents there but there's a real opportunity there. I mean these projects do not put any sort of stress upon local fire. Police services they don't send kids to school. They don't create additional traffic but they're enormous infusions into the tax base of counties allowing for a host of different investments to occur that are real net benefit to these communities as a whole. So you know. I think about that. Land use dynamic. And i think it really doesn't look at the full picture but in addition to that it also really disregards all the really significant benefits that are coming through these projects as they are deployed throughout virginia. Yeah i would just add to that. I mean we've already seen anecdotally the repurposing of land not necessarily clear cutting using farmland about a month ago. There was a new story out in wise county that there are about five different sites that were previously used for coal mining that are going to be converted into sites for solar development. So we've seen in california where some wineries have started to figure out how they can coexist the on the same lan the vineyard for the grapes and the the solar panel so And then thomas you kind of touched on in another question about their their lots of brownfield areas or abandoned buildings. That can be re purposed as well so i think that criticism ignored again. You gotta look at this holistically. What we are trying to do is shift in an entire industry and and do it in a way that recognizes in some parts of the state where industries have left and are not coming back. There's infrastructure in place and sites in place that can be re purposed for this new industry. Yeah and a lot of those cities are on railroad tracks. And if you're building a big old solar farm or a big old windmill for example in these towns and abandoned factories. That you've repurpose. You're going to have to transport them to the eventual site. And way you're gonna do that is through trains it. It makes a lot of sense that you would want these places that are not necessarily attractive to businesses. that want to be right next to d. c. or richmond. Or or norfolk and you can build it. In the small towns that people have been leaving traditionally over the last twenty years and revitalize them this is a great segue by the way to the third pillar of the clean economy act which is expanding consumer ownership through rooftop solar that includes residential and also solar net metering. Which is then there's been a barrier to using that traditionally in virginia senator. Can you explain that priority. And what the reality on the ground will be moving forward. Yeah i mean. Part of the goal of the clean economy app is. We wanted to be sure that. All of the solar generated solar energy generated wasn't just generated by dominion and atco and with the solar freedom bill which overlaps little bit with the clean economy act. That was also part of the goal in life. we're we're democratizing access to solar and that's why allowing rooftop solar on multifamily homes was critically important goal and it just makes sense because there are a lot of homeowners or even renters or apartment owners who want to on their own reduce their carbon footprint in. Oh my best. Friend moved back to virginia from massachusetts. A couple of years ago and was able to very easily have rooftop solar on her home in massachusetts. She was just like it. Doesn't make sense that i can't do that here in virginia. So part of the goal here is it's also consumers themselves who want to reduce their carbon footprint but laws not based on technology or anything other than a policy decision may decades ago was keeping them from doing that and so we began to what i like to say democratized access to rooftop solar. Yeah i think one really great example of the clean economy undertook so a number of years ago. Virginia established what's called a power purchase agreement pilot. What power purchase agreements. Ppa's allow schools. Non for profits governments to do is enter into a contract with solar developer who builds solar on their rooftop and then they essentially lease the generation to and that resource to the school. So there's no upfront cost to the school or not for profit so it's easy for them to get access to it but what it helps them do is cut their overall energy costs while still. The point is resources under virginia law. That pilot had a cap at fifty megawatts and we were rapidly meeting that tap where within this year i think we would have hit it and solar businesses. All those folks wanted access to it couldn't get access to the clean contract took that cap from fifty megawatts to a thousand megawatts unlocking that for a whole host of folks who are now better able to access solar and manage their energy bills the process. That's just one small example of the sort of democratization that this.

north carolina virginia wise county atco thomas norfolk massachusetts california richmond dominion Ppa Virginia
"virginia" Discussed on Transition Virginia

Transition Virginia

06:59 min | 1 year ago

"virginia" Discussed on Transition Virginia

"Like that. But that's kind of what we need. Is those policies in state law that disincentivize or make it more difficult or outright prohibit the installation of rooftop solar utility grade solar or wind projects. This bill got rid of him. In addition to that the other thing the bill puts place is clean energy standard. And what that says really simply is every single year. Our utilities need to go out and get an ever-greater share of the energy. We use from clean energy resources. That's wind solar hydro end. If in the future new technologies are invented that are zero emission clean resources they too can be part of that mix as well so utilizing those starting from our existing sort of base load nuclear generation. That's your look about thirty. Percents of virginia's energy system is already powered through zero emission resource. That's nuclear generation. This law keeps that in place and builds upon that foundation with wind solar and other renewable resources. But that's what it really means to harness the wind and down and build that out over time or creating a clear. Pathway that steadily steps up our state every single year giving us time to make that transition in the least cost possible with maximum transparency in competitive bidding through that process. Lots of different ways. The utilities can go about acquiring that generation. So it's the least cost to customers but ultimately doing that every single year so that we're getting steadily more and our grid gets cleaner and cleaner one of the criticisms you hear about solar power. Is that these. Solar panels are made in china with toxic chemicals which are reaction to that criticism. Senators start with you. Well i think by opening up a market. You also will open on hair kind of touched on this. In the beginning you open up a demand for more solar panels to be built here and creating that market for manufacturing here if you don't have a marketplace for those to be soul it doesn't incentivize anybody to even internet market so i think that's the first response to that you know. In addition to that a couple of things noting here the vast majority of the soul of that we're talking about here is polysilicon. Sounds really technical and complex but it's basically refined sand and then with glass. Aluminum steel frame racking structure on it so the claim of toxic chemicals doesn't seem to be based in a factual analysis of the actual technology being utilized and deployed here. This is not a toxic risk. And certainly that's only one type of renewable generation that we're talking about here. and then i would reinforces centers. Point is well on this. Were seeing a domestic. Solar industry steadily grow as we do more in virginia and the nationally with things like the american jobs plan that president biden has proposed. We're going to see more of that. Industry come here but until we make these commitments and demonstrate a long-term growth trajectory like the virginia clean economy act. does there's relatively little reason for solar manufacturers to locate closer to sources of demand. Because they just don't know whether it's to the clean economy helps to change that. Yeah i would add one quick thing that is there is there is no question that the fossil based generation whether it's coal or natural gas clearly has toxic byproducts and the social cost of carbon as you see not only increased sea levels in the higher higher temperatures and climate change but asthma and higher incidence of asthma in the areas where these plants are that is also something. You've got to take account you've got to look at that. Broader holistic impact and cost of continuing to use fossil fuels going forward and the impact on communities and the environment of solar and wind. This just by far less so it strikes me that with all of the empty factories and warehouses in dying or depressed towns including danville bristol. Martinsville places that are republican strongholds traditionally. What the democrats and the people who voted for the vce are proposing is to put more money eventually and the residents pockets. Who live there and that is just putting on my political consulting hat. Literally the most popular policy any politician can propose. Yeah thomas absolutely. I was just at at just under a month ago. I was actually at a solar unveiling at palate. elementary school. at. If you've been to pout in county outside of richmond about forty five minutes outside it. This is a deeply conservative area but thanks to provision like those in the clean economy act the school district. And it's not just intel mentoring some powder in the middle and a couple of other schools in the district has been able to take a share of their energy load and move it over to solar in the process. They're going to save over three million dollars of the lifetime of those projects in their school budgets dollars. They can put back into the classroom dollars. They can return to tax payers and so there are absolutely economic opportunities that can flow to. Whether it's you know. Deep blue. Northern virginia or deep red central virginia or southwestern. Virginia this does not need to be a partisan dynamic and indeed when the clean economy talks about historically economically disadvantaged communities. We are talking both about communities in the south side where there has been issues of environmental injustice. But we're also talking about communities in central and south western virginia where changing energy landscape is making increasingly difficult to sustain their way of life and that grades an economic impact as well now solar energy. The generation of solar energy has been so controversial. And you hear people say all kinds of things about you know as i was saying earlier. Solar panels are made in china. they got toxic chemicals. They might give you cancer another thing. You hear critics say is that all these requirements and the clean economy act will require the clearcutting of forests and farmlands and the number. They always use his five hundred square. Miles which is a huge amount of trees. That would be cut down. What do you make this. Criticism that requiring the solar generation will in turn require the clearcutting of forests and farmlands in virginia which will be replaced with like a hundred million solar panels. In what used to.

virginia president biden asthma china Martinsville danville bristol south western virginia elementary school richmond thomas intel Northern virginia Virginia cancer
"virginia" Discussed on Transition Virginia

Transition Virginia

03:10 min | 1 year ago

"virginia" Discussed on Transition Virginia

"You say to that criticism. I think this sort of jobs that we're talking about creating to clean economy act. Which just aren't aren't just the installation jobs. The operations and maintenance jobs as well as the larger jobs building out the entire businesses in the manufacturing johnson particularly excited about the offshore wind opportunities that this greats we have an ideal location for building a robust offshore wind industry around the port of virginia around hampton roads. Newport news virginia beach in that area. I mean those are good manufacturing jobs. The likes of which we do not often see sorta grow and become established in virginia in this day and age. I think there's real optimism there you know there's also this dynamic absolutely. We are seeing the fossil fuel industry. And i'm including coal and that gradually shrink managing that just transition also that there is environmental justice in this but that those communities seem new economic opportunities. Because let's be clear entirely at side of the clean economy. Act i think. Michael this goes you point a bit earlier entirely. It's clean economy. Act that segment of the. Us economy has been on the wane as the cost of renewables clean. Energy has steadily dropped below the cost of running even an existing coal plant let alone building a new one increasingly is getting comparable with or below that of natural gas plant so as those fundamental economic change whether or not we have something like the clean economy act in place. We need intentional. Policies to help transition those communities to the resources the future the clean economy act in specific provisions intentionally sets out to help transition those in create good sustainable jobs the future a forty thousand dollar job in south western virginia is.

virginia virginia beach hampton Newport johnson Michael Us south western virginia
"virginia" Discussed on Transition Virginia

Transition Virginia

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"virginia" Discussed on Transition Virginia

"When we pass the clean economy act. I literally want to jump out of my chair. Shout the eagle has landed. Because this bill is going to ask transformative in virginia as landing on the moon was in nineteen sixty nine on this episode of transition. Virginia the future is now getting to one hundred percent. Renewable sources of energy a cleaner or prosperous and more affordable future for virginia. We take a look at the virginia clean economy act. You can't win a race until you've got the car on the track from eliminating carbon emissions to allowing people to profit from rooftop solar panels we dig into the new law and how it works clinic codemax not only helps us make the transition to energy but does so in a really cost effective man. We're joined by senator jennifer mcclellan. It is a massive shift. That takes virginia from the bottom of the pack of the fifty states as far as clean energy policy to one of the top twelve in the country and number one in the south and harry godfrey at virginia advanced energy economy. There are absolutely opportunities decade clo to whether it's deep blue northern virginia off or deep red central virginia or south western virginia. This does not need to be a partisan dynamic the transition from being a retrograde commonwealth to being on the vanguard of states actually doing something about climate change. We had to make sure that we were doing this transition in a way that still allow the lights stay on every single year. We need to see those emissions. Go down year over year over year. If you're not looking at both the supply side and the demand side then. It's going to be very difficult to meet your clean. Energy goals wants to build a solar farm. Wants you build a wind farm. The cost of that power does not change. Because there's no fuel risk and we also asked senator mcclellan. Are you planning to run for governor again on the answer to that question and so much more on this episode of transition virginia. Okay.

virginia senator jennifer mcclellan harry godfrey south western virginia Virginia senator mcclellan
"virginia" Discussed on Transition Virginia

Transition Virginia

05:22 min | 1 year ago

"virginia" Discussed on Transition Virginia

"To hear somebody talking about it. It's an important issue. Great okay and so. Our last candidate here is paul goldman. Mr goldman has been around virginia politics for many years. He worked for howland henry. Howell who ran for governor unsuccessful several times in the sixties and seventies. He also worked for former governor. Doug wilder now when goldman speaks. You'll hear about henry hall and doug wilder quite a lot just about every time. He speaks campaign finance records show. He raised about three thousand dollars. And this is how he introduced himself at virginia. people's debate. truth is i thought about not participating. Never been more embarrassed by my party. I was henry house campaign manager godfather of progressive politics in virginia. The only white person in virginia willing to be doug wildes campaign mets. They threw a lot of stuff at us. We results we could handle it but last month. Democrats in the house of delegates killed a constitutional limit to take a racial poison pill in the education clause in the virginia constitution. He thought about not participating in the debate because of something. Democrats didn't want to do and henry hall something and doug wilder. What's happening here. yeah. I mean i'm just really afraid of when somebody comes out with the drinking game because if henry how is on it i don't know from make it to the end like every answer talked about wilder or henry. How he wasn't adult in the nineteen seventies when all of this was going on. And if you're somebody who wants to elect new blood. This man's not it one of the things he wants to focus on is education and on the campaign trail. He talks about education every opportunity that he can including this question when he was asked about his support of lgbt. This is how he responded one of the reasons. I'm fighting so hard for these. No school bathrooms particularly for the women in the sports facilities for women in these rundell. Obsolete schools is atrocious. There would have been fixed them up. And i'm surprised. We haven't heard more about education so far that is the great equalizer is education an issue that will capture the attention of voters. Yeah i think. Education is thomas mentioned. That's one of the big issues The bathrooms that some of our schools are atrocious. He ends correct. I really think that was a very good statement by him. It probably would have been better with a henry. How reference though. Yeah yeah he. He's not wrong on the issue at all and people should listen to him and listen to what he says. At this point though i would say that like when when you're somebody who says you debate whether or not you even want to participate. You're not a serious candidate and it's just that simple. I just can't believe he has got mclean virginia money. What's the hold up there. We actually we got a rep this episode. Let's talk about that. So i read off all of the time clean. Virginia had donated to these campaigns which was many. What do we make of the fact that clean. Virginia has given twenty five thousand dollar donations to so many of these candidates. This is what they've said they would do. They said that because they've primary was so large and because there were so many people that identified with their organization that they would give an equal amount to each one of them. I'm pretty sure the only camera soul hasn't gotten it is that he is not taking any pac money. Which clean virginia is a pet now. Obviously a supporter of clean. Virginia could ride an individual's check the same so. I don't think they've done that. So i don't know until benefit from that but yeah they're spreading the money around to support all the candidates that support their organization. Yeah it's a really interesting move from them because you don't usually see organizations split. Their money that way cynical you might just look at it as an interest group trying to hedge their bets right and say well. We've got a lot of friends here and let's make sure one of them remembers that we were there contributor early on trevor one last question before we wrap this up so about eight candidates is they're going to be a ninth candidate. It sounds like there's going to be a ninth candidate getting in the race It's not someone that i know. It's not an elected official. So i guess we'll see. I guess there's still time you know. I don't even know when the deadline is for the petitions but it's the twenty fifth. I we got time to get to an even dozen here michael. I think we should get there. If people just dig down work hard enough you too can get on the ballot and possibly be the next lieutenant governor of the commonwealth of virginia. Yeah that's a nice place to leave. If you have comics questions disagreements serious objections to what you just heard or maybe you only want to tell us what you think about the show right an email. Send it to us at tradition. Va podcast at g. Dot com so we can read it on the air subscribed to transition. Virginia anywhere pods are cast. Follow the transition team on twitter at transition. Va find us on the web at transition. Virginia dot com. Don't forget to like and subscribe so you can enjoy our next episode of transition virginia..

paul goldman twitter Doug wilder thomas goldman virginia Howell twenty five thousand dollar ninth candidate Democrats michael last month twenty fifth doug wildes doug wilder about three thousand dollars one dot com each one sixties
"virginia" Discussed on Transition Virginia

Transition Virginia

07:49 min | 1 year ago

"virginia" Discussed on Transition Virginia

"Constitution liquid with the nineteen sixties and. What a period of upheaval. It was it was a period. Where you would assassinations of jack. Kennedy robert f kennedy martin luther king you had riots and arson and some of the major cities but it was also a period during which there were significant changes in federal constitutional and statutory law. You had the supreme court decisions laying down the one person one vote rule. The supreme court struck down the poll tax. You had the enactment of the voting rights act of nineteen sixty five. Which covered virginia as well as other southern states. So there was a massive shift in the way politics would be configured in virginia. It was also. The era of one has to realize the era of toast brown versus board of education so called massive resistance where in virginia for example prince. Edward county closed at school. So you had all of that. As the backdrop so that commissioners among other things set out to step forward get out of that period of massive resistance and opposition to brown into different age. I among the things they did was make it. Clear that there's a constitutional mandate on the general assembly to provide education for every child of school asian virginia coupled with a mandate on all the localities counties and cities to put up their share of the the school money in other words it will not be any more prince edward county's in the future in virginia so they revise rules were setting out. They hope to close the door. That euro virginia history. They put into the constitution the first anti-discrimination provisions that the shelby. No governmental discrimination on the basis of race or color or might add sex. They put education into the virginia bill of rice. They set up the provision for standards of quality and virginia education. It was both an effort at one time to put an unhappy period. Virginia history behind us and at the same time to look prospectively to a more inclusive period. And that's why the felony disenfranchisement rule seemed to not resonate well because they constitution taken as a whole was meant to sort of put the era of harry byrd in his machine rule behind us and look towards a future that one would hope would be fair of more just more and more inclusive. Could i jump in here for a second. I think dick makes a great point. And i think putting all these constitutions that we've discussed context is important and i'd dick wrote a piece in the richmond times dispatch. I think it was last year about the constitution. And he touched on a number of issues including felon disenfranchisement. And i like how you put up dick. In that piece you talked about the various constitutions defining the political community going back to george mason virginia declaration of rights and on through and so. I really think it's interesting to see. We've come to the point where we've as a society said you know. The political community includes all males regardless of property holding and then it becomes all males regardless of race and then it becomes Women and then in more recent days the political community is broadened to include lgbt q. Americans and it seems to me. It's almost of a continuum that we then turn to in some ways one of the the last of groups that sort of lacks that kind of recognition and inclusion in the political community and that is people who have been convicted of felonies. And i just think it's an interesting An interesting sort of point on this spectrum that we that we talk about as we as we enlarge that political community. And i think it's also important to remember that in some ways convicts felons have always been thought of as in As less than full participants in our society in virginia back to the to the pre revolutionary days to the colonial period when convicts are imported into virginia and exploited terribly by those who utilize their labor In a quasi sort of slavery moment. And you know you go through the through the early national period at post civil war I don't know if any of you ever read the book john. Henry is steel driving man by scott nelson. Who used to william and mary but he talks about finding the actual john. Henry who in eighteen sixty six is arrested and sent to the state penitentiary and then leased out as a convict so that john henry story of him fighting against or racing. The machine and digging a railroad tunnel has basis in history and it's convict labour And so this notion that convicts were of of of a lower status in our society could be deprived of rights has long historical roots. And it's finally kind of being addressed but it's not just in the constitution but it's in our society's view and treatment of those people that we get to this point and i think that's just i think it's just an important thing to remember that it's part of that evolving notion and is what what's made this country sort of fascinating and great in its own ways that we make mistakes but we we do what we can for hopefully do what we can to try to write those mistakes as we move forward. You know paul you bring up an interesting point. And if if i can have a little too political philosophy. There's an alternative reading of america's political history where we never outlawed slavery we just regulated it under the thirteenth amendment to people who are imprisoned. And and so if you carry that through line where you know. People who are in prison can be forced to work that can be there. They're not extended a minimum wage. They're they're not extended the ability to vote. What you have is a legacy slave system that basically got regulated and now you have entire populations of people who count for the purposes of a census and they don't count at all for the purposes of being able to vote right. It's interesting by the way that the european conventional human rights that governs human rights in the european scene up actually gives the vote to to those who are in prison that would be very controversial. I think i'd be surprised if that were adopted. In virginia adult that we would necessarily go that far but it does raise the question of are there portions of the community around us. Who really are seeing in. Constitutional terms is not counting. That would change the spirit of politics anywhere that got instituted because one of the through lines we see is that nobody ever scores political points for being soft on crime. This is throughout united states. History a political history. One reason for that is because felons can't vote or people incarcerated can't vote. I imagine if they could vote they might have something to say about the people.

harry byrd scott nelson william last year virginia Henry mary Virginia jack nineteen sixties united states asian thirteenth amendment lgbt supreme court eighteen sixty six one person america post civil war one time
"virginia" Discussed on Transition Virginia

Transition Virginia

14:11 min | 1 year ago

"virginia" Discussed on Transition Virginia

"Of progressive politics and my sense of what was going on is that the more conservative factions needed the progressives on board to bring about the nineteen two constitution and they were pretty much all agree that that black was a problem because it led to corruption and should be african americans should be ousted from the suffrage but there was also as you say this progressive thread and so among the things they nine thousand nine hundred convention did was to create the state corporation commission Railroads sort of bought and sold legislators. They were that was a corruption of a of a corporate gun worth pointing out here that the martin machine was led by the us. Senator senator martin who was a railroad executive who used money from the railroads to finance his campaign. So this is sort of like the today in our modern context. We think about money from manian in this era. We're talking about railroad money. And of course. That's how martin came to power and maintain power was railroad money. So what you're talking about is. The state corporation commission was a reaction to that right. That's that's correct. I think the creation of that commission was a gesture in the direction of the populace who the more conservative wing needed to have on board. And i think by and large the nineteen ninety-two convention. If you judge it looking back at what progresses hoped would happen was a failure a may despite the creation of the corporation commission. They get to give you an example. It was the nineteen o two constitution that introduced the poll tax as a prerequisite devoting. Now that was only a dollar. A half a year doesn't sound like a lot of money to us today. But in nineteen o two to a working man that was a lot of money and so the combination of the poll tax and fairly complicated registration procedures which were nominally directed at black. Voters turned out to disenfranchise a large number of poor whites. The actual number people voting after nineteen to plunged nearly among blacks. Most of whom were disenfranchised but a lot of poor whites as well so the result was to reinforce machine rule the martin machine morphed into the bird machine. Hurry birds machine and so People who might have been a progressive state of mind. I think we're worse off after nineteen to than they were going into the convention. Say that one more time dick. How much was that. Paul tax dollar and a half dollar fifty so it was also if you didn't pay last year yoed three dollars this year. What's interesting about that is a dollar fifty and nineteen two is worth forty five dollars and sixty two cents and twenty twenty one so imagine basically every year you wanted to vote getting slapped with a fifty dollar charge not only that but the registration requirements were very complicated you to register in that first round of elections after nineteen o two. If you are a property owner you are automatically on the roles. That was not a problem. If you were a son of a confederate veteran you got the. This is the so-called grandfather clause. You've got to vote otherwise you had to register. The registrar could present you with the virginia constitution and open it to any place at random. Show you a section of the constitution. Ask you to interpret it wealth. There are provisions of the virginia constitution. That i can't really interpret so if you're just the average citizen back in those days and the registrar distant. He didn't like the cut of your jib. He could just say sorry. You didn't interpreted Interpretation won't do this again. Was aimed particularly a would be black voters but it could be applied to white voters well with so when you take the poll tax on the registration requirements. And all the rest of it and you're working. Then why would you take off day day lose a day's pay to go in and go through the process which probably was gonna be unsatisfied. Anyway so i think it was all structured in a way that they black voter was the was a nominal and the real of object of these religions but the there was a collateral sort of effect on poor whites. There were some points in the convention debates where delegates would not only saying. We won't black solve the roles but they would say we don't want the rabble we want people who are respectable people to be exercising the franchise and running the state. So i don't think that whereas upfront about that as they were about disenfranchising blacks but they were not uncomfortable with the notion that they ought to keep the hands of the state at has falsely in the hands of the of the right people. Can i just jump in and make a note about progressivism and remember. Progressivism isn't a national movement but it had quite different terp retations regionally so but but one of the things. I think that you know if you look at the eighth overall goals of the progressive movement it was toward efficiency and against corruption and against waste. And so i think Really in the southern context in a place like virginia the corruption can be interpreted in a way that if you were a progressive in you know chicago and you were. You may be thought that big city bosses controlling immigrant. Votes was inherently corrupt similarly. I think for some progressives in virginia they legitimately thought that black votes were easily manipulated by powerful whites and so i think there may have been some initial impulse toward some of the tenets of the progressive movement. But they take on this starkly racial tone in a place like virginia. That is very much. At odds with maybe a our conception of progressivism today and of course distinguish between the use of progressive in current political terms. With what would have be considered progressive in the early twentieth century. But i do think that's kind of an important thing. When we we learn about progressivism at school we we tend to focus. I think on more on northern locations and less on places like virginia where progressivism kind of had a different variant. Let's put it that way. It was very populist to be progressive back. Then you even have president at the time. Teddy roosevelt getting elected on a progressive platform. So i find it fascinating. Paul your point. Progressivism bore regional characteristics for sure. Absolutely absolutely you know. It's really interesting. That there's this southern flavor of progressivism That was so racist. And it's it's actually difficult for the modern mind to think of progressives as being racist but mr levied you're making this point but it's worth sort of sort of underscoring this. The progressives from this era thought the black vote was inherently corrupt because their view was the black vote was for sale and so preventing black people from voting was a way to in their minds. Clean up elections right absolutely now. I mean obviously inherent in that judgment is that somehow black votes are for sale because blacks are willing to be corrupted So there is a you know. There are assumptions under girding. That but i think that's absolutely the case one other point about nineteen two. That's worth mentioning. This was sort of alluded to earlier. But it's again worth underscoring is how openly willing they were to talk about white supremacy and racism. I mean so today you would. You would try to do dog whistles or try to use other language but they literally are talking about white. They're using the words white supremacy in this in this constitutional convention right. Dick pointed this out. This was not this was not coded language. This was very very overt that the goal the goal of this was to disenfranchise black voters and to although they stated their goal was to not disenfranchise too many white voters a result of this but i think they were very clear what they were doing. And it's as dick mentioned. I think today you would not have been quite so you know bald-faced about it but they certainly were you mentioned. Carter glass the debates. Where he he was floor manager. The franchise provisions and one of the delegates asked him about the poll tax on the registration requirements. And all that and said we won't these provisions. Discriminate said discriminate. What do you think we're here for. We're here. We're here to discriminate justice far. The us constitution will allow us to do and what he had in mind. Was the supreme court in eighteen ninety had decided to challenge to the mississippi post-reconstruction constitution. That was the one that about eighteen ninety started. All this often had the poll tax and the grandfather clause under registration requirements. All that the ones they then used in virginia and the us supreme court had rejected that challenge rebuff that challenge on the grounds that on the face of it. The constitution was looked to to satisfy the requirements of equal protection. And they weren't willing to look into how these laws might be administered in practice so they they basically. We're giving a green light to the post reconstruction conservatives in the in the south generally so each of the former confederate states between eighteen ninety thousand nine hundred two rewrote their reconstruction period constitutions to have a post-reconstruction constitution that set out to disenfranchise blacks. You know what. I find quite fascinating about this point in history as you have one of the few times in history where progressives however you might defined them are in charge relatively of virginia cheryl assembly and they put together this constitutional convention and a point four independent democrats to some of these commissions and committees who in turn appoint conservatives to the rest of them and so one of the criticisms about this era is that you get progressive reformers who they got hoodwinked by corporate interests and to making them even more powerful so you have a few. Let's call them legitimate bones of contention with the existing system so one thing they wanna do is get rid of courthouse rings where the general assembly appoints judges and those judges appoint local officers. Like commonwealth's attorney Sheriffs clerks court who carry out that judges interpretation and at leads to vary cliquish ruling classes in localities. One thing they wanna do is installed the state corporation commission to control rates We still see as a political flashpoint today back then. It was for railroads and insurance today. It's for electric utilities etc. But we see the roots of a lot of today's issues and one of those issues that really start in their modern dialogue and their modern context is felon disenfranchisement. So dick howard explain the through line. Where are we on this through. Line of felon disenfranchisement. Once we get to nineteen o two. Well we've talked a bit about the nineteenth century and helped the word. Felony as grounds for disenfranchisement came into the constitution of eighteen. Seventy in one thousand nine hundred two they drafters of that constitution vestment expanded the classes of people who would be disenfranchised. Not not only felons but all entries are the light but also bribery. Petty larceny Obtaining money under false pretenses embezzlement forgery perjury on and on and on that was clearly aimed at black loaders on the theory that they would be convicted of these petty crimes. and therefore they would be disenfranchised. Right longfellow with felons wealth in the drafting of the nineteen seventy-one constitution the present constitution the commission constitutional revision eliminate all of all those those other categories petty larceny. And the like but kept the felony disenfranchisement. I have to be candidates. Say i don't think they commissioners who worked on the president constitution had the problem of felony disenfranchisement front and center the way we do now Because it's not enough that a constitution be neutral on his face. You run out to think about the impact of it and as you pointed out already so many more african american persons of color who are disenfranchised by the provision is true. The white population vastly disproportionate. So if you think about the actually effective. Felony disenfranchisement is a running sore in virginia politics. I think the commissioners who worked on the draft that became the president constitution. I think they thought it was enough. That the governor could restore the voting rights of felons on distance on application and fifty years ago when the president constitution came into being felony disenfranchisement was far more pervasive among the american states than it is today as a practice. That's happily atrophying. And i think one of the assumptions the commissioners made in.

Teddy roosevelt virginia one thousand Paul forty five dollars early twentieth century fifty dollar last year Dick chicago this year nineteenth century Seventy Carter after nineteen o two fifty years ago twenty twenty one sixty two cents dollars nineteen two
"virginia" Discussed on Transition Virginia

Transition Virginia

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"virginia" Discussed on Transition Virginia

"I think as you know as you've pointed out comes very tied to a race to african american participation that somehow african americans are inherently going to be corrupt politically perhaps because of what was conceived as as as their inferior character so that the reconstruction era which remember is weighing very much on the minds of people in night at one nineteen. O two. i think is really important as shaper for the impulse to this convention. Those very poignant. Poignant moment at the opening of the nineteen ninety-two convention. The president of the convention is making his remarks sort of setting the stage and he refers to the fifteenth amendment to the us constitution one. That says that the show be no discrimination. In voting on the basis of race or pre previous condition of servitude or color and he proclaims the fifteenth amendment to be a crime against civilization and christianity. This is in the opening remarks setting the stage of courses general applause in agreement with that and then one delegate after that goes on during the debates to sort of tilonia say yes. It's an evil. That blacks were allowed the ballot. It was the federal ban at that forced us to do. This was punishing the south of what it had done that off and on in that sort of and and one delegate gets up and says i wanted to be understood. I'm a i'm a white man. I'm here to defend the interests of white people and another says You know we. We can't have this inferior race Telling us what to do they. They invoke history. They vote theology. They say it's god's plan for the universe of the white show be superior to and the blacks to be inferior It just makes an amazing transcript to today. I think you would probably dress it. Upper prettier language. But i have to say nineteen thousand nine hundred to the delegates at that convention. Made it clear what they were there for and what they will therefore was white supremacy are. That's a great segue into our next segment where we're going to discuss nineteen to constitution. We're here with eighty dick howard from uva one. Virginia's very own founding fathers and paul levin good of the george c marshall foundation. I'm thomas bowman and my co host is michael pope. We'll be right back. And i'll tell you what doesn't help is when we have reporters like michael pope from wwltv f. These were not rioters and looters. These were patriots. I never called the people who stormed the capital. These were not rioters and looters were patriots. I never called the people who storm the capital patriots. We have to hold armenia accountable. You can help our podcast hold. People in power accountable head over to transitions. Virginia dot com and hit the button. That says contribute on patriotic. For as little.

michael pope thomas bowman nineteen thousand paul levin today fifteenth amendment christianity Virginia one delegate dot com george african american nine hundred nineteen ninety-two convention c eighty dick howard wwltv marshall foundation constitution african americans
"virginia" Discussed on Transition Virginia

Transition Virginia

07:04 min | 1 year ago

"virginia" Discussed on Transition Virginia

"Virginia. The podcast that documents the ongoing transition of power in virginia. I'm michael lapoma. And i'm thomas bowman today on the podcast felon disenfranchisement controvercial constitution straight. The democrats have wanted to undo for years. Now the general assembly considering a constitutional amendment to ditch the provisions and allow former felons to vote without petitioning the governor to restore their rights. Now you may think felon disenfranchisement as something that was created during the era of jim crow. You're not alone. Many people have talking points. They say something like felon disenfranchisement was created in the constitution of nineteen o two but felon disenfranchisement actually stretches all the way back to eighteen thirty during the age of jackson. That's seventy years before the jim crow constitutional so felon disenfranchisement was not created to exclude black voters during the era of jim crow but it was undoubtedly weaponized during the convention that brought back the poll tax and made a new literacy tests specifically to black voters and poor white voters spa and it worked. The electorate was cut in half today. One and five virginians are permanently. Disenfranchised african americans make up about one-fifth virginia's population but more than half of those disenfranchised virginia is one of only eleven states. That common lead disenfranchises voters. That's why the general assembly is considering a new constitutional amendment. That would be on the ballot next year to ditch felon disenfranchisement and we've got a fantastic panel to dig into this issue. Joining us is the founding father of virginia's current constitution. He was executive director of the commission. That wrote the nineteen seventy-one constitution. That's the one that we still have today. He's the water booker. distinguished professor of international law. Movie a a e dick howard. Thanks for joining us. It's great to be here also. Joining the transition team is the former president of the virginia historical society. He's currently george. C marshall foundation president at is making a return appearance on the podcast. Paul levin good. Thanks for joining us again. It's great to be back. This is such an exciting panel. I'm really glad that i talked both of you to actually doing this today. To to walk through these different constitutional issues and talk about felon disenfranchisement and perhaps we should set the stage here by talking about the very first constitution. The which happened in seventeen seventy six. So let's set the stage here and talk about that that founding document and and who was able to vote so obviously we're not talking about women voting right and african americans can't vote and even poor whites can't vote right so like back in that seventeen seventy six constitution who was able to vote. Well that's an interesting document was drafted in williamsburg and may seventeen seventy six by george mason and his his distinguished colleagues and that declaration famous declaration of rights opens on a very inclusive note. It seemed talks about constitutions being made for the common benefit talks about the natural rights of all men so it opens on a note of inclusiveness but then when it charged to the question of who can vote It's rather more qualified. Because the drafters who met in williamsburg would not interested in enlarging the elected at that time. Indeed they talk about health. If you won't vote you have to show that you have some permanent interest in an attachment to the community language of that sort and of course what they were talking about was property owners back in those days it was even among the white male population. If you didn't own property you didn't vote. It's interesting turning to our topic today. It's interesting that the seventeen seventy six constitution does not explicitly talk about people who are disenfranchised because of crime at something that actually appears later when that first constitution was ultimately revised there was a great convention at eighteen twenty nine and thirty the first rewrite the constitution that's when they begin to include constitutional language about who's not allowed to vote so in the intervening years between seventeen. Seventy six and eighteen. Thirty disenfranchisement was a matter. Statute would be only in the code not in the constitution. Apparently in eighteen twenty nine and thirty at the convention they begun to think well maybe ought to make clear in the constitution itself. Though that's so that's when they they don't yet use the word felony but they use something very like it they talk about disqualifying people for what they called infamous offenses leaving that as opposed to judicial interpretation or legislative implemetation. mr levin. good. I want to bring you in here. And and sort of set the stage in terms of what was going on the political environment and eighteen thirty. So we're talking about a time period here. The age of jackson as we as we mentioned in the intro where This was a time when you had more and more people who were wanting to be part of the process so you had white men who did not own property but they wanted to vote and so there was sort of a movement and can we sort of view the eighteen thirty constitutionists kind of a reaction to that. Yeah i think in a lot of ways. that's true. I mean just to put a little bit of context around us by the time the convention sits virginia is one of only gosh. I can't remember exactly but it's very few states that had still limited voting to landowners That was in some ways very much. An antiquated notion and obviously in the age of jackson the move toward more popular participation in electoral politics is a hallmark of the era. So i think the other thing that you have to remember. Is that virginia. In some ways in the early nineteenth century really into the mid nineteenth century is a tale of two states. It's eastern virginia which is still dominated by large plantations big planters kind of entrenched power. That went back. Generations and then western. Virginia which is more newly settled less dominated by the plantation system and large scale slavery at. And so it's i mean maybe it's a little overly simplistic to call it. Planters versus yeoman farmers but always a little more complicated than that but it really was a question of whether virginia would continue to be dominated by those who had held.

george mason Paul levin thomas bowman virginia michael lapoma two states mid nineteenth century One jim crow early nineteenth century Virginia next year five eastern virginia williamsburg one first constitution both Thirty today
"virginia" Discussed on Transition Virginia

Transition Virginia

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"virginia" Discussed on Transition Virginia

"That really should be in place For people who've been convicted in the past or are currently serving time for nonviolent marijuana related crimes. it's seems like it should be obvious. And i know that the state lawmakers working on this are really trying to bring sort of an equity lens to how they do about legalizing cannabis. But it's a tough one because you've got years and years and years of own equal enforcement and series issues around it and they don't have access to banks and banking either so like it's an industry that is going to have to rely on cash and for entrepreneurial people that want to get into the business going to have a really hard time putting together the capital to open a storefront location or that sort of thing without access to bank of america or suntrust are sort of your major banking institutions. Don't have anything to do with this Because of how federal law works. And so. I think we're going to see an industry try to merge with both hands tied behind his back well and when both its hands are tied behind its back. There's no space for the small business owners right. Nobody's going to be able to set up to small little shop run a farm and do their farmers market we business. I mean it's not a maybe a little bit but with all the costs you have to have a store gift to have like you know space in place in order to get the license. The license takes time and costs money. And you've got the carrying cost of the space and you've got the supply and you got no access to banks or typical insurance. I mean all that means is that the only capitol that can help us. Industry emerged is going to be venture capital. Vc money and who has access to that now people who already have money and business acumen. It's gonna be really hard for new startup players or people who've been involved in the cannabis industry as an illegal industry to get footing. Yeah i agree you know. The other layer to this is where half of the tax revenue is going is to the cops. Oh you know. I guess if you care about equity and justice you should not be giving half of that tax revenue to the cops that should be going to social programs or education or health care. Maybe would be a great way to spend that kind of money giving it to the cops who are going to have less of a role moving forward because they're not going to be spending as much time. Cracking down on people dealing pot is completely unjust thomas. What's in your crystal ball for twenty twenty one. Well nathan you hit on the eviction crisis which i've been watching closely but poverty and food insecurity is in my crystal ball in addition to the eviction crisis So just to color at a little bit more thirty. Five percent of all americans are having trouble or can't pay their rent or they're behind on their rent or their end forbearance or something. Like that. Just came out on cnn. The other day and that number is higher and dc by the way which is not too far away where it's in the sixty percent threshold and that actually you know if you can't pay your mortgage or pay your rent that says that not only are you most likely unemployed Meaning that real unemployment is nationwide at thirty five percent. But there are other problems that you have like. You're going to have trouble buying food. You're going to have trouble paying your electric and water bills and the insecurity created by. Poverty is a national security concern. You know we're already seeing it and the political extremism Happening right now and Giving people a stake in the economy is the fastest way to decrease political extremism..

bank of america nathan thomas cnn
"virginia" Discussed on Transition Virginia

Transition Virginia

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"virginia" Discussed on Transition Virginia

"Greenwashing and show. We've got wind with got sola word green company. Now you know it's like okay guys. Yeah well you know for the last decade you've been trying to to bring a millions of gallons of natural gas and other nonrenewable you know across the state but alright ensure fine point to point to what you want to their. Yeah you know. Some buddies over a dominion are going to be super have been. I'm sure incredibly unhappy about the amount of money that was lost on that but then at the same time it's a regulated monopoly so all of rape players are just going to pay for it presumably. Which kinda sucks. Funny you talked about the to greenwashing of dominion trying to make their image seem more environmentally friendly and like we did that episode several months ago now and the the kind of consensus at least among us was like okay. Whatever sure but we talk with peter galactica a couple of weeks ago and he was talking about how you know with. Virginia's burdening tech sector a lot of those companies do on green energy and dominion whether their incentives are pure or not. And i think we can assume they're not still genuinely seems to be moving toward that end which is on the whole a net positive. You know what's really interesting especially about the money that you mentioned on the pipeline so full disclosure at one time in my life it feels like a whole lifetime ago now but in twenty eighteen and twenty nine thousand nine. I was the virginia lobbyists for one of the sub organizations under the laborers union. Now i was not touching anything to do with the pipelines but many people in the organization were so you pick up things here and there and one thing i learned is that dominion was spending over a million dollars a day just on like for every day that they weren't building the pipeline just on paying their workers union contracts so they had to pay them and so when we sat and did the math back in twenty eighteen somewhere in like july of twenty eighteen assuming now correctly that the stop orders would have prevented them from working until everything was resolved. We realized that the pipelines were dead in july of two thousand eighteen. And so it's hard to hard to overstate. Just how much of a role. The money played and making it not profitable for them way earlier than they thought it was going to be at all and the other thing too. If you just look at it from the point of view of a company trying to make money. There is way more money to be made in the renewables and alternative energy sectors right now than there is in the fossil fuel sectors. And so you can be cynical about the motivations are not. It's really interesting that you know. They've sold off their natural gas distribution assets to Now warren buffett who is comfortably. No big daddy. Buffet is now the number one like fossil fuel company in america..

peter galactica laborers union Virginia virginia warren buffett Buffet america