14 Burst results for "Virgin Pulse"

"virgin pulse" Discussed on Behind the Numbers: eMarketer Podcast

Behind the Numbers: eMarketer Podcast

01:34 min | 2 months ago

"virgin pulse" Discussed on Behind the Numbers: eMarketer Podcast

"Typically produce better yea produce most. Stay longer some of the the susan talking about making friends they said at work is getting harder even before the pandemic in one thousand nine hundred five twenty seven percent of americans have at least one confidante at walk twenty years later two thousand four it gone from twenty seven to sixteen percent according to the survey by the independent research organization Knock see the university of chicago 2017. Study i've a half folks had less than six five or fewer friends at work of two thousand managers and employees in ten countries by walnuts. Tech firm virgin pulse and hr advisory company future workplace fuel. Points it before we move on is awesome more difficult to gage tone of emails from people. You've never met before. I'm fortunate in that. I get to kind of see everybody or save a lot of people i talk to you through the show whether we're think about what content set to come up with scheduling things or just recording the podcast. So i get to meet a lot of new people that way but not everybody has opportunities Interact with ton before you actually see them. Hit that voice. See how how they behave. And finally mr browning amezcua. Fifth of the times not help prevent more folks from leaving that company from living their jobs because they're not they've not formed bonds impasse in bonds. Some employers like facebook are reconfiguring corp coaches and spinning up new positions. They say like head of remote to help employees well while together feel motivated and help the company adjust to a mostly remote. What else my folks. We got time for for working from somewhere. You wanna email us.

independent research organizat virgin pulse susan mr browning amezcua gage corp facebook
"virgin pulse" Discussed on Startuprad.io - Startup Podcast from Germany

Startuprad.io - Startup Podcast from Germany

04:27 min | 3 months ago

"virgin pulse" Discussed on Startuprad.io - Startup Podcast from Germany

"Say anything about it yet. So but one thing that i can say is that the amazing concept is really great. Because it's a fatty some bill and it's all around safety. All around safety mindset so the likelihood is very high. This is going to be one of you first. Maybe the first obama the company will. You'll be able to take right. Why being the same safety level as within commercially alana. It's safer than helicopter much safer than the automotive We've forget of nece automotive Dramatic plan crushing bunch. Streetside angels place so again. Couple one of the pioneers of this of this still evolving earthly early. Feel i actually had to smile. We when you talked about Also automotive is a dangerous place trading on the streets. Everybody knows an idiot from the last few weeks. Just cut a cut in somewhere. Make you step on the breaks or something. As i think everybody can feel that and we may add for everybody who doesn't know that voter copter is a company that offers something that looks like a drone on steroids so it has a lot of ro tors going upwards. It looks like a small remote control. Tro tro on. But it's much larger and it can actually transport people in there. So that's what we're talking about. And as i said there's a rumor going on that there's a spectacle on the table but obviously for illegal reasons. You cannot talk about it When i've been seeing a lot what you did. Basically you an all digital entrepreneur tech entrepreneur and You've you've been talking about those Patine tcc for example. Luca one of the founders of get penta talked about that. There was a moment with app store opened. Death enabled companies like Like snapchat like what app to become successful and the omnipresence of the devices Do you think what an able to you and wendy see options right now that open up opportunities on unlocked level. Something like this. Because i do believe a hell of people back in the days did not see anything happen in the app store besides like Like how's it called all those. Those angry birds right. Yes when aimless sometimes yes sometimes come you. Don't even see them coming. Obviously a big enabler was the tenant rights. The internet grew procedures was the biggest a lot but then for example in this also goes back to to europe. One of the ablest for me was to political that this was like the wind tara union in germany just around the time in germany the euro. Obviously when the euro's introduced before that you had like all these different currencies yes oh law complexity so spread shirt to be able to boots. Trevor the monetary union wounded key some simplifications in the laws. And so. this was really important for me. I'm very grateful that this happened. We take it for granted. sometimes. And i'm a proponent of more simplifications across across europe hours to resume death for this was one that is like sort of Sort of sort of political at on that on the tech side knowledge moving from all digital law hardware and the arabic for example is enabled by out of chips What is what is the flight control but also like electrification so Major majoring la foster still yet again. Like regulatory would be very interesting. Yeah regulatory who'd be interested but then there would enable us because of leg with all this new it would be a virgin pulse..

Tro tro alana app store penta tara union obama Luca germany europe Trevor
"virgin pulse" Discussed on Sustainability Explored

Sustainability Explored

03:55 min | 6 months ago

"virgin pulse" Discussed on Sustainability Explored

"That's the first part. The second part is is the mindset change. I'm really tired. And i don't mean like exhausted. I mean like like like almost like annoyed that the good smart people of this planet are being taken advantage of by corporations. Now look on. I'm a capitalist. And i'm a socialist at heart i am and but the thing is at the end of it. Look it's that you're the lies done. Okay the fact that texas got crippled the fact that suez got block the fact that went running for recycled pellets. When they couldn't find virgin pulse just proves the point that there's room for everything there's room for everybody at the table. The environmentalists in the non environmentalists and finally. Look i. it sounds funny. My partners don't like it. When i say this but i want to be put out of business i want somebody tomorrow in some parts of this world come up with a bigger and better technology than me and put me out of business because then i'll know that we did something right then. I know that we've reached our goal. Look i i said something like this to a to a group. And i said there's gold in the garbage okay but there's also prosperity in the garbage and this this message will give you today resonates every country in this world if we eliminate the landfill of this type of stuff if we reclaim this stuff back if we give joe environmental jobs to the masses if we reduce our cost to healthcare to support healthcare if we reduce our environmental footprint then we've achieved everything that we wanted be green party to democratic party to whatever party. We all agree that if we do. What's right for the environment. The environment will do. What's right for us. It's an excellent approach to business. I wanna run out of business in quite some tire Yeah mason words of wisdom. So what's what's after that. What's simba life cycle. Remind a journey in the future. What do you see as your next steps. So life cycle revival will be rolling into life cycle health which will be a A manufacturer of recycled Medical goods and ppe. We are We are going to create it education program. We're actually working with a group in australia to finalize the details to have an international education program We want to reach out not just the healthcare but to all industry We wanted we want to be able to assist in all their plastic needs. Not just a pp's and at the same time we wanna make. We wanna make a splash. We wanted definitely Changed the way how governments think we would we would love to. Have you know. Another paris type of conference which deals with know the idea of plastics. Because it hurts my heart to see masks in the water. And i don't mean to sound Inconsiderate about it. If i had the money. I'd be going out into the water. And pulling all those mask with the lobster net and taking them to the closest recycler possible and recycle them like. That's the thing we there is a lot of people in this world who will hurt the planet who will do bad things to the planet. And i'm hoping that we could get more people to do. Good for this planet so wherever someone sees this type of situation this type of opportunity. We should be out there doing something about it. We should be getting boats with big nets or big rakes. Whatever we have and dredge the water of all these bad stop and take them somewhere where they can be turned into the good stuff. That is not a pie in the sky dream. It's it's a real. It's a realistic dream. It takes money and it takes devotion and it takes attention and hopefully one day. I'll have all three of those to dedicated this type of project hundred percents a very visual example..

australia today tomorrow second part three first part hundred one day paris texas people
"virgin pulse" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

06:24 min | 1 year ago

"virgin pulse" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Welcome back once again, , see the outcomes, rocket , podcasts where we chat with today's most successful and inspiring health care leaders. . I really WANNA. . Thank you for tuning in again and I welcome you to go to outcomes rocket dot health slash reviews where you could rate and review today's podcast because he is one outstanding individual and healthcare is name is Dr Rajiv Kumar he's the president and chief medical officer at Virgin Pulse during medical school he realized that many of the worst health problems we face as a nation diabetes heart disease cancer hypertension. . Et, , CETERA. . I related to the collective unhealthy lifestyle, , and so he has pledged to make a difference in this industry. . He's done and as a frontline physician and now through various different companies, , some amazing things and so what I WANNA do is open up the microphone to Raji to fill in any of the gaps of the introduction and then a so we could get into the podcast. . Reggie welcome to the PODCAST. . Think saw glad to be here. . So Rajiv, , what would you fill in in your intro that I that I left out? ? I think that was pretty comprehensive. . Just, , a little bit about virgin pulse. . You know what? I ? think that may not be familiar name to a lot of folks on your that are listening to your podcast. . We are an employee wellbeing company. . We work with large employers all around the world, , and our goal is to help them activate their employees to lead healthier lifestyles which had to kind of go around the healthcare system a little bit, , and go direct to the employees and figure out ways to motivate them to inspire them and to help them sustain behavior change over time, , and it's not just about healthcare cost reduction. . It really is about how do we help people be? ? Healthier, , happier and more productive at work in their personal lives. . So that's really what our mission is. . That's beautiful and listeners for those of you who haven't connected the DOTS virgin pulse. . One of Sir Richard Branson's Virgin Group companies. . So you know with the gentleman like that behind something like this and and Rajiv as part of the executive leadership team, , you can imagine some great things are happening. . It's an exciting time for us. . We definitely are inspired by Sir Richard Branson leadership in his philosophy is if you take care of your employees, , they'll take care of your business, , and so we're trying to empower employers to take better care of their employees. . So strong, , and and you know it's really interesting that you guys are tackling this employer perspective of the entire health career equation because costs are soaring and aside from labor costs, , it seems like healthcare cost is oftentimes double digits in that front. . What are your thoughts on what should be on every medical leaders agenda today? ? Well, , I'm biased but I think it has to be a behavior change remember too often looking for a magic pill or magic device or something to kind of stem the tide of rising obesity, , diabetes and heart disease in our country and at the end of the day, , there's so much. We . can do to actually change people's behavior a lot of what we're facing as a result of our diet, , our physical activity or lack thereof the stress that we have in our lives just how we how we treat ourselves and how we don't take care of ourselves, , and so I think it's not necessarily a hot topic I. . Think it should be and and I wish there was more focus on it is the perennial that if we can change behavior, , we can prevent a lot of disease and we can produce significantly greater outcomes and Reggie. . What would you say right now at at at <hes> Virgin? ? Pulse. . Is an example of how you guys are improving health outcomes. . Well, , I think we really tried to think outside of the box I think traditional health interventions and and health and wellbeing platforms have largely been ineffective and they've been around for decades. . So we sat around and we said what if we took a different approach rather than making people feel like they're failures rather than telling them that they're sick what if we actually make them feel successful what if we make them feel good about themselves right off the bat what would that do for self esteem for their motivation and for their ability to change. . Most of what we see in our industry is a heavy focus on screening, , and so employers asked their employees to take health risk assessments and do biometric screenings and so forth, , and the problem with that is they take a health risk assessment tells them you're sick. . You know you have high risk, , your unhealthy needs to do more change your lifestyle, , get your biometric screening results and you have high blood pressure. . You may not like the results that you get back and that can be very demotivating, , and so we've said is, , is there a scientist out there? ? Is there a behavior change model that focuses on success? ? We found a scientist by the name of Dr Bj fog out of Stanford University and Dr Fog is sort of a new guru of behavior change and he's come up with a behavior change model that he caused the fog behavior change model and it's very simple as model is is a formula to it is called B. Equals M. A. T.. . Equals motivation times, , ability times a trigger, , and so what he means by that is to get somebody to do a behavior that we want them to do or they want to do. . First of all, , they have to have the motivation to do it. . Second is they have to have the ability to do it, , and a third is you have to trigger them. . To trump to do that behavior and too often in the in the kind of behavior change space, , we ask people to do things that require either too much motivation or too much ability. . So we say something like go to the gym four times a week and exercise for sixty minutes. . Each time you go that takes a lot of motivation and some people may not even have the ability a really know how to do that where to get started so forth so Dr Fog says, , well, , motivation is hard to change. . Your motivation waxes and wanes on a daily basis on an hourly basis, , we can't really change somebody's motivation that easily what you can do is changed the behavior you're asking them to do to make it easier. . You can change the ability to perform the action, , and so the idea is if you take a behavior like washing your teeth and you break it down to the smallest tiniest thing that somebody could possibly do like floss one tooth and you ask them to do that they can actually do. . That very easily, , it doesn't take a lot of motivation is very quick to do, , and if they do that and you celebrate the fact that they did it, , you can help them build what we call success momentum, , and then they're going to feel better about going to the next step and try something harder and so in our entire approach to behavior change, , we break behaviors down into their simplest most basic action we ask people to do that would trigger then and then when they do it we. . Reward them make them successful. We . give them social status. They . might get some kind of points or some kind of reward, , and then we ask them to do something harder the next time around and stuff feedback loop that builds up momentum, , and it changes behavior in a very sustainable way in a very habitual way, , which is really the key to behavior changes creating habits.

Rajiv Sir Richard Branson Dr Fog scientist Virgin Group Dr Bj fog Reggie Stanford University executive
Why Dr. Kumar is Changing The Wellness Game

Outcomes Rocket

06:24 min | 1 year ago

Why Dr. Kumar is Changing The Wellness Game

"Welcome back once again, see the outcomes, rocket podcasts where we chat with today's most successful and inspiring health care leaders. I really WANNA. Thank you for tuning in again and I welcome you to go to outcomes rocket dot health slash reviews where you could rate and review today's podcast because he is one outstanding individual and healthcare is name is Dr Rajiv Kumar he's the president and chief medical officer at Virgin Pulse during medical school he realized that many of the worst health problems we face as a nation diabetes heart disease cancer hypertension. Et, CETERA. I related to the collective unhealthy lifestyle, and so he has pledged to make a difference in this industry. He's done and as a frontline physician and now through various different companies, some amazing things and so what I WANNA do is open up the microphone to Raji to fill in any of the gaps of the introduction and then a so we could get into the podcast. Reggie welcome to the PODCAST. Think saw glad to be here. So Rajiv, what would you fill in in your intro that I that I left out? I think that was pretty comprehensive. Just, a little bit about virgin pulse. You know what? I think that may not be familiar name to a lot of folks on your that are listening to your podcast. We are an employee wellbeing company. We work with large employers all around the world, and our goal is to help them activate their employees to lead healthier lifestyles which had to kind of go around the healthcare system a little bit, and go direct to the employees and figure out ways to motivate them to inspire them and to help them sustain behavior change over time, and it's not just about healthcare cost reduction. It really is about how do we help people be? Healthier, happier and more productive at work in their personal lives. So that's really what our mission is. That's beautiful and listeners for those of you who haven't connected the DOTS virgin pulse. One of Sir Richard Branson's Virgin Group companies. So you know with the gentleman like that behind something like this and and Rajiv as part of the executive leadership team, you can imagine some great things are happening. It's an exciting time for us. We definitely are inspired by Sir Richard Branson leadership in his philosophy is if you take care of your employees, they'll take care of your business, and so we're trying to empower employers to take better care of their employees. So strong, and and you know it's really interesting that you guys are tackling this employer perspective of the entire health career equation because costs are soaring and aside from labor costs, it seems like healthcare cost is oftentimes double digits in that front. What are your thoughts on what should be on every medical leaders agenda today? Well, I'm biased but I think it has to be a behavior change remember too often looking for a magic pill or magic device or something to kind of stem the tide of rising obesity, diabetes and heart disease in our country and at the end of the day, there's so much. We can do to actually change people's behavior a lot of what we're facing as a result of our diet, our physical activity or lack thereof the stress that we have in our lives just how we how we treat ourselves and how we don't take care of ourselves, and so I think it's not necessarily a hot topic I. Think it should be and and I wish there was more focus on it is the perennial that if we can change behavior, we can prevent a lot of disease and we can produce significantly greater outcomes and Reggie. What would you say right now at at at Virgin? Pulse. Is an example of how you guys are improving health outcomes. Well, I think we really tried to think outside of the box I think traditional health interventions and and health and wellbeing platforms have largely been ineffective and they've been around for decades. So we sat around and we said what if we took a different approach rather than making people feel like they're failures rather than telling them that they're sick what if we actually make them feel successful what if we make them feel good about themselves right off the bat what would that do for self esteem for their motivation and for their ability to change. Most of what we see in our industry is a heavy focus on screening, and so employers asked their employees to take health risk assessments and do biometric screenings and so forth, and the problem with that is they take a health risk assessment tells them you're sick. You know you have high risk, your unhealthy needs to do more change your lifestyle, get your biometric screening results and you have high blood pressure. You may not like the results that you get back and that can be very demotivating, and so we've said is, is there a scientist out there? Is there a behavior change model that focuses on success? We found a scientist by the name of Dr Bj fog out of Stanford University and Dr Fog is sort of a new guru of behavior change and he's come up with a behavior change model that he caused the fog behavior change model and it's very simple as model is is a formula to it is called B. Equals M. A. T.. Equals motivation times, ability times a trigger, and so what he means by that is to get somebody to do a behavior that we want them to do or they want to do. First of all, they have to have the motivation to do it. Second is they have to have the ability to do it, and a third is you have to trigger them. To trump to do that behavior and too often in the in the kind of behavior change space, we ask people to do things that require either too much motivation or too much ability. So we say something like go to the gym four times a week and exercise for sixty minutes. Each time you go that takes a lot of motivation and some people may not even have the ability a really know how to do that where to get started so forth so Dr Fog says, well, motivation is hard to change. Your motivation waxes and wanes on a daily basis on an hourly basis, we can't really change somebody's motivation that easily what you can do is changed the behavior you're asking them to do to make it easier. You can change the ability to perform the action, and so the idea is if you take a behavior like washing your teeth and you break it down to the smallest tiniest thing that somebody could possibly do like floss one tooth and you ask them to do that they can actually do. That very easily, it doesn't take a lot of motivation is very quick to do, and if they do that and you celebrate the fact that they did it, you can help them build what we call success momentum, and then they're going to feel better about going to the next step and try something harder and so in our entire approach to behavior change, we break behaviors down into their simplest most basic action we ask people to do that would trigger then and then when they do it we. Reward them make them successful. We give them social status. They might get some kind of points or some kind of reward, and then we ask them to do something harder the next time around and stuff feedback loop that builds up momentum, and it changes behavior in a very sustainable way in a very habitual way, which is really the key to behavior changes creating habits.

Dr Rajiv Kumar Virgin Pulse Sir Richard Branson Reggie Dr Fog Scientist Virgin Group Dr Bj Fog Raji President Trump Medical Officer Stanford University Executive
"virgin pulse" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"virgin pulse" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Relevant as an organization despite constant change you constantly experiment with new ideas and you embrace failure. What's the one area focus? That should be driving everything in your organization. Adopting the consumer mindset understanding. What people are doing in their personal lives and how healthcare can and be more relevant to them than more similar to the types of programs and services and products that they're engaging with on their own time and finally what book? And what podcast would you recommend to the listeners as part of this syllabus. I've got a couple of books that I find that I keep going back to in the course of Sort of entrepreneurship and healthcare technology. They're not necessarily surly healthcare books but they seem to be relevant and kind of timeless. The first is crossing the chasm by Geoffrey. Moore it's been around for years It's not a new book book. But it's really about kind of high tech entrepreneurship. And how do you bridge the gap between can early adopters of a of an innovative disruptive solution and early majority ready which is where most people are so the visionaries versus the pragmatist. A lot of people can get visionaries to adopt their new way of doing something but they fail and getting sort of the rest of everybody everybody to come along and I think it's a fascinating book that has ramifications for almost any type of interpret Murshid Entrepreneurship whether you have your own company whether you're trying to innovate inside of have a larger company. I think it's a really relevant book and we go back to it again and again another author that we really kind of embrace. Here's Patrick Once Yoni he's written a lot of books about how how companies should operate the one that really resonates with us as the five dysfunctions of a team. At the end of the day. We have the best ideas in the world and the best innovations autumn's on the people. And how do we get people to work successfully together as a team to execute across industry across product it's all about people and so the five dysfunctions functions of a team sort of looks at one of the reasons why teams failed to achieve their maximum potential and Y Y companies and ideas often fail and how you can avoid that in how do you kind of constantly invest in a team and teamwork and so. I think that's a book that I would highly recommend everybody read wonderful. And what podcast would you recommend. Well you know I I love your podcast so keep listening. Keep listening to your podcasts. I think there are so many podcasts out there there's not one that kind of stands out out for me. I keep trying to experiment and just constantly listening to a lot of different ones. I I kinda like the idea of. Don't pick one podcast just constantly kind of rotate in experiment. Urban and try a bunch of different ones and see what you think. Love it so there you have listeners. The one one Dr Rajiv. Kumar go to outcomes rocket dot health. Slash Rajiv Steve. That's our a J. Iv You're going to find all the show notes to our discussion today. Full transcript as well as the syllabus that we put together links to the books is that he recommended and by all means the understanding that he just share with us is GonNa make a difference so go back and re listen if you found something inspiring before conclude Rajiv. I'd love if you could just share a closing thought. And then the best place where the listeners could follow you or get in touch with you. My closing thought would be that there is so much opportunity eighteen eighty for innovation in the space of behavior. Change lots of people are going after there's massive amounts of venture capital and private equity money being invested and we're just scratching the surface of. What's possible mobile technology? wearable technology artificial intelligence. All of that is opening up tremendous new opportunities for us just to reach people to engage them into improve their lives so I think digital health and health technologies are very exciting space right now and I hope that you know all of your listeners. Thinking about how they can leverage that in their own personal work to better achieve their goals and improve health outcomes does place to learn more about what we do is virgin pulse dot com which is our website and and You can also find me on twitter at Rajiv Kumar. MD Outstanding Rajiv. Hey just want to say thank you again for sharing your story your words of wisdom and we're excited to keep up with what you an virgin pulse her up too so thanks again from all of us thank you thanks. Thanks for listening to the outcomes rocket podcast be shoot a visit us on the web at. WWW DOT outcomes rocket dot com for the show notes resources sources inspiration and so much more..

Dr Rajiv Rajiv Steve Rajiv Kumar Murshid Entrepreneurship Geoffrey Moore Patrick
"virgin pulse" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"virgin pulse" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"What's interests goals activities healthy habits? You name it. We're collecting the data through our platform. And so what we're trying to do is kind of track. WHO's successful and one of the things that they do? In what order they do them. That helps them succeed in the program. And if we can match personas and profiles we can put other people on that same track to be successful and and and it's very hard to program that with rules engine so we're using artificial intelligence so that the platform itself can learn over time and then guide people in a much more successful hustle way. And that's really. I think one of the most exciting areas in healthcare technologies use of Ai to create highly personalized highly relevant experiences. That will drive the people toward success so in five years. If you're a I focus works. What would you be able to do what we will be able to say? You know you're a member of our platform we would be able. Also you know saw other people like you have done this next step and that next step has led them to this result. Would you like to do that as well. And we don't necessarily as individuals need need to know anything about you but the platform does ascertain who you are. And what you like to do. And what's your health status and demographics and all of that and now it's starting to coach shoe in a very automated way and hopefully it'll be very successful because it will understand what you're likely to gravitate toward and want to participate in and so the the platform will guide you through behaviors through programs and interventions it will provide motivational messaging. That will pick you up when you fall down and it will be that sort of coach in your pocket that seems to know you so well and feel like it's sort of part of you and that's really what I think the dream is. I love it man and you know what Rajiv you. You've done such a great job just building this and partnering with Virgin and getting it to where it is that. I have no doubt that you'll get there. I sort of got goosebumps when you started saying what the vision is in five five years and to think it's not too far away even with like I was sitting with my wife Over the weekend we were GonNa Watch a movie and Net flicks. Does this like match. You know eighty nine percent percent ninety percent match and sure enough when one of those matches is high without fail. We enjoy the movie you know and like similarly if you're a patient and these guys over at virgin pulse are putting this engine together and you are in a certain state or in a certain point in your care and they make a recommendation for you. How L. Inspiring is it to know that you have something at your fingertips to be able to to make adjustments in what you're doing and that'll make you healthier and happier and that's inspiring Reggie so Man Keep it up. This is really exciting. We will we will. We've got big plans or making a lot of investment in research and development and I feel like we're just scratching the surface. So there's there's a lot more to come Love it so Rajiv getting here to the end my friend. This has been a really great conversation. Let's pretend you and I are building a medical leadership course on what it takes to be successful. Fill in medicine. It's the one of Dr Rajiv Kumar and so got four questions. Lightning round style for you followed by a book and a podcast that you recommended mended listeners. You ready okay. All right. What's the best way to improve healthcare outcomes focusing on sustainable behavior change what is the biggest mistake or or pitfall to avoid believing in quick fixes? Hebrew changes hard. It takes time and requires multiple vectors multiple approaches over a a significant period of time. How do you stay?.

Dr Rajiv Kumar Virgin Reggie
"virgin pulse" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

09:51 min | 2 years ago

"virgin pulse" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Can achieve certain metrics and along the way you get badges. There's social sharing within the platform so as a user of it pretty cool and now to put together the Science Rajiv is really fascinating fascinating to see how you guys put this together. Yeah we're very excited about it. And the best part is that we have demonstrable results Over years we've been at this for about fifteen years now and we've been able to show some pretty compelling in sustainable behavior change over five six seven years with participant so it really does work well this year. I went to the dentist one more time. Because you guys there you go Rajiv what would you say a time within the last fifteen years at the organization that you guys had a setback and what you learn from it as you may know an entrepreneurship There are setbacks every single day. And it's it's a crazy roller coaster. You know I I started this company. Precursor cursor this company which was called shape up when I was in medical school a twenty three years old and I got very passionate about behavior. Change how to prevent obesity or how to reverse diabetes and I actually dropped out of medical school for three years to build. The company eventually finished my degree but I decided that I wanted to focus on health. Promotion and using technology to scale interventions across crossed arch populations so after medical school instead of going do residency actually went back to the company and continued to invest and grow it and then two years ago we were acquired by Bertram Virgin Pulse in that stayed on as chief medical officer so as you can imagine as a twenty three year old starting a company I knew nothing about how to build an organization and you know about how to build a technology platform learned through the School of hard knocks along the way and made a Lotta mistakes. I think when I look back Rather than sort of picking on one MM particular event. I think one of the big mistakes that we made in our company was. We started to drink our own kool aid. We started the company on the idea that social support is is critical to behavior. Change that nobody will be truly successful at changing their behavior and sustaining that over time unless they modify their social networks that the people around them are supportive in encouraging. Them catching them. When they fall and sort of could've been conducive to their healthy lifestyle Because so often we go into the workplace in our co workers or having muffin often Monday and Bagel Tuesday and Friday. You know we are sabotage each other in that way in. That happens at home as well right so we need that kind of social support. That sort of where a lot of motivation comes in we saw other companies including our competitor virgin pulse focusing quite a bit on extrinsic motivation really kind of financial financial reward so paying people to change their behavior and I think we were very purist about our intrinsic motivation the social social incentives versus financial incentives. There's an we weren't really hard at that for many years in in it it does work and it does create sustainable eight affordable behavior change. But I think because we were so fixated on our own. What idea we fail to see that? The market was evolving and people's ideas were evolving and in fact the research was evolving to say. You know what the answer is not so cut and dry. It's not really one or the the other and in fact if you blend the two intrinsic plus extrinsic motivation you can actually have an even greater impact on people in on their behavior. And so you know. It's funny that we ended up joining forces with virgin pulse and I think we both sort of moved to the center of that spectrum. You know they came from the extrinsic side. We came from the entrance aside and we met in the middle and now our approach is to do both and I think it was a mistake we made and and really kind of just believing that we were right and we were sort of ideological about it and we failed to realize that maybe is. There are other people out there that we're doing things that were valuable as well. We learned that and we really started to thrive we embrace that sort of broader thinking. That's a great message Rajiv and one of the other. Thanks to that that just comes to mind is when you're in that spell because it does become a spell right you get into your head and what is it that you you do Rajiv to get out of it because so many of us do by our own ideas we we do. Eat our own cooking. How do we break out of it and see a fresh perspective perspective? What would you recommend the listeners? I think we have to actually seek out contrarian points of view and so people who we disagree with we have spent time listening to them on understanding. What what they're working on what their research says you know where they're coming from so we spent a lot of time shape listening to learning from our competitors? We go to a lot of conferences and we go to things that we might not otherwise go to because they might not confirm our beliefs they might challenge our beliefs. And that's what we thrive and so I think we've just kind of had to remind ourselves consistently that. Maybe there's a different way. Let's not get stuck in our conventional way of thinking and I think it's that constant challenging ourselves and putting ourselves feels uncomfortable positions that drives us to kind of keep an open mind. Wow fascinating a really great tip there for the listeners. Whether you be an entrepreneur more in in medicine listening or if you're an established executive provider leader in an industry Facet you really have to think and surround yourself with contrarian view sometimes even though it's not the comfort zone it may be what helps you see that blind spot that could potentially be fatal to your business and so really great call out the Reggie. Thank you for sharing that. What would you say one of your proudest medical leadership? Experience to date is so for years. I've been working with populations both an employer groups as well as in the community sort of running these kind of behavior change campaigns fitness challenges and competitions grassroots efforts to help people improve their life and my proudest moments were really when people would come up to me and you know. Even though I wasn't their primary care physician I still think of them as patients but people come up to me and they would say things like you save my life. You know not really you but this program saved my life. You know. I've gone off my medication. I was diabetic. And I've reversed my diabetes season. I'm off my medication. Lost so much weight that my knees no longer hurt and I can walk again. You know I took my grandkids Disneyland for the first time and I was actually able to keep up with them. So it's really those moments and I. There are hundreds of them in my head. The people that I've met that we've actually had an impact on and using technology people we have never met before but using zinc technology and using the science and figuring out a way to sort of engage that we were able to help them and empower them to make small changes led to huge results. And I think those are the proudest just moments you know. I don't know if the call that leadership or not but that's certainly where we get our excitement from working out of bed every morning. Yeah for sure. That's definitely leadership. Reggie even behind behind the motivations that you do this every day. Is there any story that you wanNA share that really got you into this because you have such passion United Behind Passion. There's a story. There are a ton of stories raise for me. When I was the first medical student I was shadowing physicians and working in their clinics and seeing a lot of patients and it just struck me that there were so many patients the majority of them struggling with? How do I lose weight? How do I eat healthy? How do I be physically active? And how do I if I have a condition like hypertension. Ah By blood pressure. How do I lower my cholesterol? We had no tools to help them. We really didn't other than just some sort of empty advice right going to join a gym though. Checkout outweight watchers. We were sort of resigned to the fact that they probably weren't gonNA change their behavior and ultimately we will put them on medication and that would be sort of the end game and that was frustrating to me. Because I knew that people had potential a change and we simply weren't giving them tools and understanding. What would work then? So I really thought how can we prescribe health and wellbeing and is there a resource that we can send people to program that we can give them. That would be truly successful. I couldn't find one and so I created it in that was originally called shape up Rhode Island which was the precursor to our company shape up and now virgin pulse. So that's sort of what my motivation was was. It just didn't feel resigned to the fact that we would have to prescribe medication for everybody. Everybody felt like we should really be focusing on prevention and when I talked to people who did change once in a while we get a patient that would say you know I lost twenty pounds or we the come in and their blood pressure will be down and say what did you do and they always said the same thing. I had an exercise buddy. I formed a group of friends and we motivated each other. My family did this together. It was always. That's social thread. And that was my sort of inspiration to say you know. Let's figure out a way to connect people and this was at the dawn of social media around two thousand four hundred thousand five and I thought maybe we can sort of take a facebook like approach to bring people together online to support each other offline. And that's what we did. That's so awesome and listeners dare to be the change you wish to see in the world and Rajiv found himself in the situation where he just didn't accept the fact that empty promises we're going to be he would he gave patients and he thought bigger he saw a couple of things at work in Iran with it. So I think Rajiv embodies that quote is he was the change that he he wished to see in the health world and with that has been an amazing ripple effect of better outcomes for patients stories that continue to come in to his inbox of people's lives that he's changing so the question is what can you do. What do you today find unacceptable and health? And what are you GonNa do about about it. Because it's doable. You just gotTa move it little by little. And it'll eventually get their Rajiv. What would you say an exciting project or focus that you guys are working on today? We're spending a lot of time. Around artificial intelligence we believe that one of the keys to motivating people will be giving them personalized highly relevant recommendations nations things that they can do and so we're trying to use artificial intelligence to learn about people over time and also to learn what makes people successful over time. So we've got millions of people on our are software. They use our mobile application on average three times a day. We're collecting seven billion data points every single month everything from biometric results to health risk assessment results..

Rajiv obesity Bertram Virgin Pulse diabetes Rhode Island School of hard Reggie facebook Iran
"virgin pulse" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"virgin pulse" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"You may not like the results that you get back and that can be very demotivating and so we've said is. Is there a scientist out there. Is there a behavior. Change model that focuses on success and we found a scientist by the name of Dr. BJ Fog out of Stanford University and Dr Fog is sort of a new guru of of behavior change and he's come up with a behavior change model that he caused the fog behavior. Change model and it's very simple as model is is a formula to it is called B. Equals M. A. T.. Okay of your equals motivation. Times ability times a trigger and so what he means by that is to get somebody to do a behavior that we want them to do or they want to do first first of all they have to have the motivation to do it seconds they have to have the ability to do it and a third is you have to trigger them a remind them to trump to do that behavior and too often in the in the kind of behavior Haber change space. We ask people to do things that require either too much motivation or too much ability so we say something like go to the gym four times a week and exercise for sixty minutes each time you go. That takes a lot of motivation and some people may not even have the ability Really know how to do that where to get started so forth so Dr Fog says well motivation is. It's hard to change right. You may be your motivation. Waxes and wanes on a daily basis on an hourly basis. We can't really change. Somebody's motivation that easily. What you can do is has changed the behavior? You're asking them to do to make it easier. You can change the ability to perform the action and so the idea is if you take a behavior like washing your teeth and you break it down to the smallest wallace tiniest thing that somebody could possibly do like floss one tooth and you ask them to do that they can actually do that very easily. It doesn't take a lot of motivation is very quick to do and if they do that adding you celebrate the fact that they did it you can help them build what we call success momentum and then they're going to feel better about going to the next step and try something harder and so in our entire approach to behavior change as we break behaviors down into their simplest most basic action. We ask people to do that. Would trigger then and then when they do it we reward them make them successful. We give them social status. They might get some points points or some kind of reward and then we ask them to do something harder. The next time around and stuff feedback loop that builds up momentum and it changes behavior in a very sustainable way in a very habitual way which is really the key to behavior changes creating habits. Yeah Ranchi this is a really interesting model and and the science behind it so I have used your application and I have found it to be really really cool. It's good to see the science behind it. Now I appreciate the little wins and then you give badges and then on the back end is so listeners. If you're an on employer I think you'll you'll really like to learn that the way that they structure this is in such a way that they help the employee be healthier so part of the carrot is is and they use more carrots than sticks in the software. They'll give you a your employer will give you a discount in your insurance if you.

Dr. BJ Fog Stanford University Haber
"virgin pulse" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"virgin pulse" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"We work with large employers all around the world and our our goal is to help them activate their employees to lead healthier lifestyles which had to kind of go around the healthcare system. A little bit and go direct to the employees and figure out ways to motivate rotate them to inspire them and to help them sustain behavior change over time and it's not just about healthcare cost reduction it really is about. How do we help? People be healthier happier and more Productive at work in their personal lives. So that's really what our mission is. That's beautiful and listeners. For those of you. who haven't connected the DOTS virgin pulse? It's one of Sir Richard Branson's Virgin Group companies. So you know with the gentlemen like that behind something like this and and Rajiv as part of the executive leadership team you you can imagine. Some great things are happening. It's an exciting time for us. We definitely are inspired by Sir. Richard Branson's leadership in his philosophy. Is If you take care of your employees. They'll take care curb your business and so we're trying to empower employers to take better care of their employees so strong and and you know it's really interesting that you guys are tackling this employer perspective of the entire health career equation because costs are soaring and Aside from labor costs it seems like healthcare cost is oftentimes double digits that front. What are your thoughts on? What should be on every medical leaders agenda today? Well I'm biased. But I think it has to be a behavior change too often looking for a magic pill or magic device or something to kind of stem the tide of rising obesity diabetes and heart disease as in our country and at the end of the day. There's so much we can do to actually change people's behavior a lot of what we're facing as a result of our diet our physical activity or lack thereof the stress is that we have in our lives. Just how we how we treat ourselves and how we don't take care of ourselves and so I think it's not necessarily a hot topic. I think it should be and and I wish there was more focus on it is the perennial that if we can change behavior we can prevent a lot of disease and we can produce significantly greater outcomes and Reggie what would you say right right now at at at Virgin pulse is an example of how you guys are improving. Health outcomes. Well I think we really tried to think. Outside of the box I think traditional health interventions inventions and health and wellbeing platforms have largely been ineffective. And they've been around for decades so we sat around and we said what if we took a different approach rather than making people people feel like. They're failures rather than telling them that they're sick. What if we actually make them feel successful? What if we make them feel good about themselves right off the bat? What would that do for self esteem for their motivation? And for the ability to change. Most of what we see in our industry is a heavy focus on screening and so employers asked their employees to take health risk assessments and do biometric screenings and so forth. And the problem with that is they take a health risk. Assessment tells them you're sick. You know you have high risk. Your unhealthy needs to do more change your lifestyle get your biometric screening results and you have high blood pressure..

Sir Richard Branson Virgin pulse Virgin Group Rajiv Reggie
"virgin pulse" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"virgin pulse" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Welcome to the outcomes rocket podcast where we inspire collaborative thinking improved outcomes and business success with today's most successful and inspiring healthcare leaders and influencers and now your host so Marquez. Welcome back once again. See The outcomes rocket podcasts where we chat with today's most successful and inspiring health care leaders. I Really WanNa thank you for tuning in again and I welcome you to go to outcomes rocket dot health slash reviews where you can rate and review. Today's podcast because he is one. Outstanding individual in healthcare is name is Dr Rajiv Kumar. He's the president and chief medical officer at Virgin Pulse during medical school. He realized that many of the worst health problems we face as a nation diabetes heart disease cancer hypertension et Cetera. I related to the collective unhealthy lifestyle. And so he has pledged pledge to make a difference in this industry. He's done and as a frontline physician and now through various different companies is doing some amazing things. And so what I WANNA do is open up the microphone carphone to Rajiv to fill in any gaps of the introduction. And then a so we could get into the podcast. Reggie welcome to the PODCAST. Think saw glad to be here. So Rajiv Gee what would you fill in in your intro that I that I left out. I think that was pretty comprehensive. Just a little bit about virgin. Pulse you you know what I think. That may not be familiar name to a lot of folks on your that. Are Listening to your podcast. We are an employee wellbeing company..

"virgin pulse" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

Inc. Uncensored

07:17 min | 3 years ago

"virgin pulse" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

"Jeff. As we tape. This. It is late January two thousand nineteen which means we are still in the high point of cold and flu season, according to the CDC which last through February, but sometimes seems to Laos forever. There was a time when it was frowned upon to take a sick day off. You know, you're supposed to play hurt. Now. Of course, the opposite is true. It an era of the we work as Asian of the workspace where there's lots of open areas and lots of socializing with colleagues in an era when productivity is all who wants to be sitting next to someone who sneezing and sniffling their way through the workday. More importantly, what do you do if that situation happens to you Cameron who I wanna say looks very healthy today? You've been looking at the latest in office etiquette around cold and flu season. What do you got? Well, let me ask you this. I John have you ever heard someone in office, cough or sneeze immediately by reflects told them to go home? No, no. Well, then you are not as much of a six shame. As I expected. You would be. This is the term people are yielding now every every cold and flu season. Like we're in right now. This argument comes up if you're sick. Are you required? Stay home. Should you? Stay homecare are people justified in yelling at you to go home and on its face, as you've stated this seems like a pretty clear cut argument, at least in the modern era. If you're sick don't come to work, you'll get everyone else sick. And of course, it's like most things it's not it's not quite that. Simple. So let's start with. This fact, there is no federal sick leave law, and according to the US department of labor only two thirds of private companies offer paid sick leave. So there are third of companies that that that don't and that may there's also an increasing reliance on contractors who to drive, right. If you work hourly, for example, you might need those hours you can't afford to to you literally can't afford. I mean, like, for instance, in the restaurant business, you basically don't take a day off if you're sick, you just go or, you know, there are other reasons to say at work as well. Even if you know that you. You are sick. For example. You might have a job that doesn't lend itself, particularly well to remote work, or maybe you're on a deadline of some kind. The work has to get done by this date and time, and you are a key player in whatever that project happens to be those these these situations happen. It's one hundred percent true. Or maybe you just don't think you're that sick. I mean, how do you define sick light coughing sneezing, your brains out onto your desk? I've I've been told to go home when I haven't actually felt that sick from my point of view. That's just reactionary. You're contagious for five to seven days after you start symptoms with a cold. I mean who who thinks who who can actually stay home from their job from five to seven days with a cold the whole week off. That's I mean, that's like that's crazy terrifies matching the number of Email, high need my paycheck. I'm sorry. I need to. I mean, you do get sick days. We we just be sort of, you know. But what about other other companies and other people for sure, you know, hourly employees for sure we'll so Cameron. So what have you done? I mean, like, it's like the latest how come you should be dealing with us or just people should be dealing with us. So so let's say you do yell at your co workers your proud six. Shame or you don't wanna fall victim to getting sick from them yourself. I research does it supports research supports you studied by virgin pulse. Says that when employers show up to work sick, it costs the company ten times more in overall facts than if they had just stayed home. There's a term for this, by the way, it's called presented him. Because of course, as opposed to absenteeism, but where's where's the line? Right. Like where is there a point at which six shaming gets too intense? There was a Wall Street Journal article this week detailing the rise of sick shaming and it had a few really crazy samples. There was one manager who literally created a quarantine section of her office. There was another. That's good. I'm like, she took it. On herself to fully disinfect a sick employee his desk, the keyboard the monitor everything with Lysol wipes and spray. She was shot city were still function. There was so much liquid in it. So that that's disgusting. So if I remember that the piece correctly, she basically got to work early like desperately trying to do it. And then the person who sick like showed up in Qatar disinfecting his desk. Right. You're exactly right. Excellent. And and ideally, it doesn't get that far because I've like. To think that that. If you're listening to this podcast, you're fair and empathetic boss or you have a fair an empathetic boss who makes it easy for your employees to stay home. When they're under the weather. So this is the question that we're all driving at how do you do that? There are a few ways I revisit your sick pay policy, or if you don't have one get one because obviously there can always be extenuating circumstances, and we've gone through some of them already. But when push comes to shove, not only is it healthier, both literally and metaphorically if you stay home when you're sick. But you are costing your company money. Second maybe yelling at someone isn't the solution. You could take a more gentle approach you yelling at someone is in the solution. I don't understand understand. It's twenty nineteen ask how they're feeling say you need them at at your best, and they'll recover faster. If you go home, but you know, without me putting so much emphasis on the go home part and third don't be a hypocrite. You know, I if you're sick, if you're sick, stay, home or. Maybe even stay off your Email to your co workers, or your employees, the other people in this scenario can do a great job without you for a day or two, and if your company or your culture isn't built on that kind of trust thing. That's depress. You might wanna revisit once cold and flu season is over. It's like lead, by example. Exact right. So I have a question has anyone on this call when? On an airplane disinfected the tray table that you had off. I've one who doesn't do that. I stopped doing that. 'cause I started feeling bad that I was doing and I realize I should probably start doing again. I've definitely thought about like being on a plane and everything everything I've read enough stories about how a the planes are so old and be so many people are on them every day and see they are there. You know tin cans that you're stuck in the pressurized for hours stuff in there has to marinate, right? I mean, I've gotten off of planes in the the combination of fatigue, and whatever I guess was in the air. I've I've been post travel sick before. I think everyone has well, you know, what the germy thing in all of air travel is. The bins in the airport where you put your luggage to put it through security. No. So so you disinfecting those now too. But I stopped at every single one of those little hand sanitizer spending stations and use that. And you know, what I think we really enorm- that we really should have that that you're seeing a lot of air travel that we get the offices is where people who are sick wearing those little surgical masks. If you can't touch your face. That's most of the contagious nece. Problem solved. Jeff. It sounds like you've thought about this before J Jefferson a lot. I have. That was actually the surgical masks. I think you should definitely share them at work. I'm you know, I'm trying to figure out if it's kind of a shame that the biggest germophobic on this podcast is in the room. But maybe appropriate. They remote. Right. Oh, yeah. And that's just something that happened accident. It's not like moved across to see my co workers.

flu Cameron Jeff. US department of labor cough Laos Wall Street Journal John CDC J Jefferson Qatar seven days one hundred percent
"virgin pulse" Discussed on The Small Business Radio Show

The Small Business Radio Show

11:08 min | 3 years ago

"virgin pulse" Discussed on The Small Business Radio Show

"Stronger ties me because especially now since we're in the age of the A, I and I know that, you know, I love the movie, you know, her and I have a great relationship with Alexa. You know, we're we're we're trying to make those connections. But it does fall short. Even when Alexa pays me compliment. It just doesn't feel right. It's not the same. And I think if you re if I were to really be honest, I would say if I didn't see in here. My for my business partners for a long period of time. If I if we didn't have for events year where we were interacting with our customers. There would be no business. It would be no business relationship. It would all combust because we ties do not yield strong B two B business relationships. Right. And so I think that technology can be good because it can serve as a reminder. Right. If I'm commenting on so Instagram profile. It's like, hey, remember, I exist, but if you only do that over time, you never create the bond that you could create if you use the technology as handshake in order to eventually meet in person or over phone call. So I think that technology can be good to remind someone to go to a meeting. But if you're in a meeting, and you're just looking at your devices, you're not. The present. And you waste your time. Even going in that meeting, and I think that's part of why meetings are dysfunctional is because people wasting time looking at devices instead of paying attention. You is interesting every two years, I go off the grid with my family. There's no devices, no internet, no social media. And I realized Dan how much extra time I actually had to connect with my family, and what was going on around me. Not having your phone is a new vacation. Exactly, I love that. The average workweek in the US is forty seven hours a week and then on nights and weekends and on vacations were still connected. And the reason is because technologist convenient we have guilt feeling for not responding and gets all right, especially as business owners and even more. So we can grow on Colleen, maybe we are in the sense always on call not to reestablish boundaries. And then I vacation we don't want to come back from vacation with a hundred emails, so psychological in order to prevent that. Where like oh. Well, if I check my Email every hour, we'll come back, and and it won't be as bad. And so I think these are all bad habits that we have. I think out of offices are still valuable. I think setting boundaries between you and your manager your team or it's just really important. I see more in poor people without pushing these boundaries because it's the the only way they can stay healthy. And when you're away from work you actually, come back more refreshed productive. And you might have a different lens. On how to solve a problem. So Dan is the place to start where you just recently said is that to use technologies a good reminder? But to remember that it's not a basis for real relationships. That's a huge a huge factor. I mean, a lot of people are interviewed for the book. They don't read technology be in their bedroom or when they're having. I mean, look at these technology founders Steve Jobs and Bill Gates, didn't let their kids have technology in a lot of the suburbs. Now, I'm we have a client in Atlanta, and they have wait till eighth grade. So wait till eighth where kids aren't allowed cellphones until eighth grade. It's because their brains aren't even ready to handle all those dopamine hits. Like, you're pointing out. So I think that we have to be smarter about how when we were using it. And and if you have an argument with a colleague attacks is only gonna make it worse. If you find yourself resp- going back and forth, sending a bunch of emails and the other person on the other end. You know, doesn't understand what you're trying to do what you're asking them that this confusion that is a signal that you should've picked up the phone or donor buddy O'Connor. Your walk foot to their office and studying there Harvard Business Review down that one face to face interaction is more successful than thirty four emails exchange back and forth statistic. You also talk about in the book that you should promote work friendships to keep people engaged. And I think the advice has been for so long that we shouldn't be friends with people we work with especially if you're the leader of the company. Mckay's for work friendships, and I did a study with virgin pulse. Over two thousand marriages employs ten countries and found that seven percent of the global workforce has zero Bruns at work in half a five or fewer, and the reason why make a case of work friendships now even more so than five ten years ago is that we're working so many hours, and I believe this the two most important things based research when it comes to work is the work you do and who you do it with. So when it comes to work, you do you want it to be purposeful? You want to be passionate about it that you want it to play to your strengths you sow at that work. But the people you work with or even more important because you could love what you do. But if you have a toxic manager and team you'll never be successful. At that. You'll hate it. The experience will be so terrible for you. So I think that if you're not if you don't if you're not in love with what you do. But you have a supportive team you'll RAF longer than if you love what you do. And you don't have a sport of. Team. So I think I think the human element is so important, especially because you're spending so much time with these people at thirty year life. Absolutely. We're talking with Dan Schwab, bell, ten of his new book is called back to human how great leaders create connection in the age of isolation. Danielson the book, that empathy with your colleagues is so important, and we don't necessarily hear that empathy is important at work too much. Yeah. It's really interesting. I mean, we both know Seth Godin. He's even said when I interviewed him for his new book, this is marketing that the quality when it comes to consumers them leadership across the board, is empathy and Ivanhoe chapter called lead with empathy chapter nine, and the reason why it's so important is because in many ways, you're less empathetic. If you're just using technology, you just are because it's hard to have that connection and understand what these people are going through if you're disconnected from them for minimal standpoint. And so I think today, especially with all be SWEB. He's coming out like Mariah Carey's thing. She's bipolar. Anthony board games death to Ryan Reynolds coming up as separate things -iety. You people wanna bring their people are becoming more comfortable with who they are and their mental illnesses and issues, and you know, maybe down the family and people want to bring their off into the workplace and. And meaning that they're full south could be their cages got you've got a school or their mom just died in. So we have to respect that empathize with them and support them and their needs not moment because this could happen to you. This could happen to anyone and we have to take note of that. And and really ties with those people things, Dan, I can't stand when people say, well, it's just business. Not personal. I've really see those things together. And especially because you're an entrepreneur, right? Even more blurred. Right. So it's it's blurred already. But then you're not sure preneurs and like, I never know. And you probably relate to this. I'd never know when the holidays are like I'm just kind of doing my thing. Right. But I think that yes, I think you do need Some Marines. You need to set them you need to have these intimate conversations with your team to see what's going to work for everyone. But yeah, boundaries important because work in life or blurred and work. It's creeping into people's personal lives and found in a recent study with Cronos that of a few thousand employees globally that over seventy percent of workers. Don't have enough time for personal related activities work interferes with their personal life, and to me that's not healthy in and it's going to actually cost the company more in the long term. So last question what ask you is? Because it seems like this whole situation, Dan is really exacerbated by there's so many remote workers these days. How do you? How leaders form those connections to breakdown than isolated late if they're remote and people are working all over the world ended up being the most interesting part of the research in the book and the most relevant right because the workplaces very decentralized. That's the big that's one of the biggest changes in terms of work cultures in the past one decade or two decades. A third of the global workforce works remote yet two-thirds just engaged in their job. And if you work remote, you're much less likely to say, you wanna long-term create your company, so working remote impacts team and organizational commitment, and and to me this assassinating because everyone always talked about the promise of and the light side of Oromo at work, which is you got the freemen flexibility to work when wearing how you want, and that's great. I'm working remote right now. But no one talks about the dockside. The dark side is the isolation and loneliness you get from not having human contact that you need not just to be productive in. Functional, but I revival. And so if you are just always working from home, and you don't get the human contact, you know, video conferencing, you don't have social events you're disconnected, and that doesn't just hurt your work, but it hurts your entire life because work is a huge part of life. And so what would your recommendation be for small business owners and entrepreneurs that want or make sense for them that the skill? They want for their company is remote. Yeah. I mean, there's so many small business owners that ever more workers because it's more cost effective. And it expands your talent pool. Those are the two two of the big reasons and lowers costs, right? Those three top. And so knowing that and knowing that that's good for your business. That's great. But because of that, you need to have certain things in place, for instance, in the research, you found that you know, video conferencing is is good because not only do you get to hear them, but you get to see them. So it's of course, as we can you can get in today's world of being there without being there. And then from there we've found that. I like doing one social event a your team. They'll be some thing that it might be outside of the office or or in a different country is gonna create a more socialized work environment. People when you're not in a stodgy boring office, let's say, and you are out and you're doing on terrorism you're getting to know people on a personal level that establishes charge relationships in a in a more of an incentive to stay with the company longer. Well, Dan, I appreciate you being again on the show the Tel the book is called back to human how great leaders create connection, the age of isolation where can people get in touch with you? And find more about the work. You're doing my podcast is five questions with Dan, Charles bell, the book is back through human, and my website is Dan Shah, bell dot com. Damn thanks again. This is an a twenty w CPT in Chicago be right back. Small

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"virgin pulse" Discussed on The ONE Thing

The ONE Thing

05:07 min | 3 years ago

"virgin pulse" Discussed on The ONE Thing

"Survival in general. So I wanna make this interactive. So for the people who are on here. Live me, you're here. You're investing your time. This is your webinar so feel free to put question in in a questions box, and we can feed them down as we go, and I'll keep driving down because you look at the future of work. I'm gonna ask you to to play fortune teller, you're a little bit. What's at stake? You're really if we keep going in the direction that we're going if we fast forward ten twenty fifty years. What's the consequence is a few things that I'm looking at one is we've surveyed students before. In forty percent of them said that technologies hurting their soft skills and this was several years ago. So now, they're older. And it's not like technology is not hurting their soft skills. People are being more. I said lonely in US half of Americans or lonely. Forty percent lack meaningful relationships look at you in the U K nine million people lonely. Not loneliness cost UK economy two point five billion pounds per year. They have a minister of loneliness there in Japan. In Japan, thirty thousand people die from loneliness. So it's really, you know, a global epidemic. We did research with version pulse. A global study of over two thousand employees and managers in ten countries. And we found that seven percent of the global workforce has your friends at work after five or fewer yet. We're spending more time at work. Not having your phone new vacation row is kind of connected because of our addiction because of the convenience because you know, because Moore's being demanded of us as workers as leaders than than previously. And as a result. If we don't have strong relationships were less tied to those working relations. It's much easier to leave an organization where you have loose ties and acquaintances verses one where you have relationships maybe really strong relationships in friends and best friends. Yes, I think I think this is going to become more important in the future. One of the really interesting things is. Is Jen jen's e namely teenagers is the first ever group to say they would rather text over having an in person communication, meaning that millennials in gen-x and in boomers all other generations. But rather have an impersonal conversation than you'd been taxed but teenagers, the first group that said, they would rather taxed, and I think that's gonna make its way into the workplace and make things even more complicated. And so with really interesting in the study, we deal with virgin pulse. We found that emails. The biggest thing that gets in the way of face to face communication yet. A study in the Harvard Business Review found that one face to face conversation is more successful than thirty four emails exchange back and forth. So anytime, you're sending an Email back and forth. And the point is not getting across that should be a signal to you that you might need to pick up the phone or walk over to someone's office. Because what you're saying is not actionable, and it's creating misunderstanding, which is creating more work in this kind of. Active. I love that. That's that's good. I'm going to want to get that Harvard article from you, by the way, I wanna read that one. So here's what I'm interested in because we got a lot of people here who are in a leadership position. And we believe if you're an employee all eater ship starts with self leadership. So we all have to look inward. What are the factors that really drive employee engagement the core? Four factors that drive employee engagement or purpose. Trust belonging. Happiness, purpose is having a real purpose means that you're not just doing what you did yesterday that you're driving to something that's more meaningful. And that you have a higher purpose for your work that your work is in service of other people communities, maybe the world. And so as a leader, you need our purpose I ball, but you need to explain to your employees that the work they're doing impacts others, and you need to make those connections. Even if they especially if they can't make those. Actions on their own. So if someone's coming to work in there, they have you know, certain tasks they have to get done. Don't just communicate. Hey, can you do these tasks explain why they need to do those tasks and how it supports the greater mission? And vision of your of you'll yours where your company as a whole, and that's way, more powerful. And that's gonna make them much more engaged because then they'll come to work like a while the work on doing here is actually meaningful matters. It's going to affect people. And so I have to take this more seriously and work harder on it. Yeah. That's on trust. I think is huge. I mean, I'm curious how many people who are here. Live feel like you've developed a sense of purpose. But a yes or no in the questions box. I'm just curious in this point. Because we've this is something we've been studying on the back end. We may actually write a book on it. It's inconsideration a lot of people say, yes, that's awesome. For those of you. If you this is something that's focused

Japan Jen jen Harvard Business Review U K US UK Harvard Moore ten twenty fifty years five billion pounds Forty percent forty percent seven percent