35 Burst results for "Viral Infection"

The CDC Never Considered the Opportunity-Cost With Mask Mandates

The Dan Bongino Show

01:49 min | Last week

The CDC Never Considered the Opportunity-Cost With Mask Mandates

"Has it ever occurred to you that there's an opportunity cost to this? I'm serious. Opportunity cost for those economic economics majors out there. That the relentless focus by the CDC and liberals on putting a face diaper on your face against your will, In many cases, that this relentless focus and this nonstop And vaccine mandates has taken away from measures that may have actually stopped or mitigated this pandemic significantly like treatments, hydroxychloroquine ivermectin. Remdesivir whatever it doesn't matter. Has that ever occurred to you? That this relentless focus you've cost yourself time. That there are other things out there other than face diapers. Has it ever occurred or you so focused on this? Because Donald Trump once said he wasn't so sure about master whatever. That you're never that This is the only thing you're going to talk about forever. And why haven't you applied? Then this same approach to other viral infections and respiratory. Are we going to do this now? Every cold season. You understand there's a risk here. If these things work to face diapers, then why didn't they work? Jim, are these dumb question? I mean, in my, uh Okay. Thank you Think. Why didn't why do we have to keep doing it then? Masks will stop this spread. We have an outbreak of the deadly No. No Mass will stop the spread. This time. There's a lamb the very never no mask, you'll stop the spread this time. This mess. Definitely stop the spread in India. India has an outbreak. No, they'll stop the spread after the outbreak. Why do we live with crazy

CDC Donald Trump JIM India
BYU-Hawaii: Student Must Vaccinate or Give Up College Dream

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:57 min | Last week

BYU-Hawaii: Student Must Vaccinate or Give Up College Dream

"In nineteen. I was diagnosed with theon beret syndrome also known as gb s which hand because by vaccines and another a number of other viral infections. Lots of different I was paralyzed from the waist. Down or about a month was the scariest month my life. I was a fulltime dancer at the time. I thought my life is over as walking through pasta with my parents. One day i walked on the floor. And i remember the not walk. It was near fine. Was after you got a vaccine yet. So i got influence of and do you think that was the reason have so. That's what my medical providers. We're unsure. Because i got the influenza vaccine influenza and then i was paralyzed so you can get gps from having influenza or from the vaccine. So it's a little unclear was the vaccine. Personally yes because i. I think that's why got blue so i recovered from that which is seriously miracle. I relied on my feet. The whole time i knew heavenly father had plan for me. I said if he doesn't want me to walk again and if he has a plan from not the dance. So when i found out. Byu hawaii was going to be doing this. I reach out my medical providers and we decided yes that it was not a good idea for me to get back needed so. Byu hawaii came out saying that they would offer a medical or religious exemption and they made it seem very assessable. Those okay great all right out my exemption for him it'll all be fine. Whatever i submit it with my doctors my doctor's note than everything and i waited a month to hear back and they denied me a medical exemption and i was shocked to say the least. My whole family was like. Oh no it's fine like you're going to get it. You can't get back to nate. It's okay they're gonna let you in so as a big letdown. I decided to appeal this with my parents. My mom and my dad were very. They were just not happy because their daughter had always had this dream house being taken away from her for something she control like. It wasn't fair

Influenza Hawaii Nate
US Jobless Claims Rise to 419,000 From a Pandemic Low

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | Last week

US Jobless Claims Rise to 419,000 From a Pandemic Low

"An increase in the number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits after falling to the lowest point since the start of a pandemic the labor department says the number of Americans filing jobless claims increased to four hundred nineteen thousand last week up from three hundred sixty eight thousand the week before that's the most first time applications in two months the increase comes at a time when the job market appears to be rebounding thanks to a re opened economy however analysts are concerned about the potential economic impact of the increase in confirm viral infections as the highly contagious delta variant spreads my camp in Washington

Labor Department Washington
US sees lower death rates among children

Inside Outside Guys

01:27 min | 4 months ago

US sees lower death rates among children

"Rates for Children are down for about everything and for Corona virus, Except for the rare obese adolescents seem to be the patient that would pump the Children's hospital Michigan or another pediatric facility and have a bad outcome now bad outcome, meaning that they would need to go to the ICU and that they might need to be on a breathing machine. We're not usually talking about somebody passing away that that's a rare rare exception in pediatric doctor Rudy Valentini, chief medical Officer of Children's Hospital of Michigan, says the near disappearance of the flu corresponds with the small number of coronavirus cases and deaths among Children were being so few cases of viral infections in general, because I believe distancing and mask and sanitation of your hands. Nobody behaves like they used to call the small numbers of kids who have gotten Corona virus. Ah, higher percentage of cases are among minorities spread with people who live in close proximity. That's why we talk so much about distancing while we talk about masking, they think about if you have a household With four people in it for household is more densely populated in that tends to be less affluent communities to this could still spread the virus. So any one of us you, me or any child could have covert infection today not realized it we call it pre symptomatic and actually be infectious for one or two days before we become symptomatic. And if you're very infectious, early on, and so, yes, that's definitely been shown that Children can do that. But in a year marked by pandemic catastrophe, the lower childhood deaths from all causes is a welcome. Change. I'm decay thinner for WJR Health

Rudy Valentini Children's Hospital Of Michiga Viral Infections Michigan FLU
"viral infection" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:32 min | 5 months ago

"viral infection" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Often confirmed viral infections. Though the pace of layoffs diseases the year began, they remain high by historical standards. All told, 4.3 million Americans are receiving traditional state unemployment benefit correspondent Jeremy House the White House not taking a military response off the table following a rocket attack on an Iraqi air base. The House is American and coalition troops. President Biden says the U. S is keeping close Watch on developments in Iraq. We're identifying who was responsible and it will make judgments from that point. No one was killed by the Rockets. But a U. S contractor died of a heart attack following last week's U. S attack against Iranian backed militia targets. The White House says it will take action again if a further response is warranted. Greg Clugston Washington It's called the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act. Police Reform Bill that's clear the House without any Republican support. Ohio Republican Jim Jordan, saying it's just another attempt by Democrats to defund the police de funding the police. Police retire 72% increase in retirement of police officers in New York City alone think of what it's like around the country. That's what happens when you send the message is that Democrats sent all last summer. It's wrong. We shouldn't stand for it on the bill now goes to the Senate, its prospects uncertain. Wall Street job futures up 33 points. NASDAQ futures down four points more on these stories, town hall.

New York City 72% 4.3 million Jim Jordan Police Reform Bill 33 points Senate Democrats last week George Floyd Justice in Polici Republican Iraq Greg Clugston Washington White House Iranian last summer four points U. S President Biden Americans
US jobless claims fall slightly to 793,000 with layoffs high

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 6 months ago

US jobless claims fall slightly to 793,000 with layoffs high

"The number of Americans filing for unemployment dropped slightly last week but well first time claims for jobless benefits were down at seven hundred ninety three thousand they remain evidence job cuts remain high the labor department report also revised its numbers from a week ago upward now showing eight hundred and twelve thousand applied for benefits for coronavirus infections erupted in the U. S. last March weekly applications for jobless aid had never topped seven hundred thousand even during the Great Recession and while new viral infections have slowed the jobs market remains tough with employers cutting one hundred and seventy eight thousand jobs over the past two months nearly ten million jobs remain lost to the pandemic Ben Thomas Washington

Labor Department U. Ben Thomas Washington
"viral infection" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:52 min | 6 months ago

"viral infection" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Getting covert dramatically, so I take five drops of Dr Joe's vitamin D every single day. Bluetooth I own is an antioxidant. If you have a viral infection or inflammatory reaction, your body is going crazy. Creating free radicals. Free radicals are like Pac Man They eat through things so glued Italian was an antioxidant. So I take that also take Dr Joe's probiotics because 80% of the immune system is in your colon. Then what I do I have in my car I have in my office. I have zinc laws injures. So if I've been under stress like I went for a long hike today and was great hiker was outside and I was huffing and puffing a lot. And so I was breathing a lot of air into my lungs. And my my, my mouth got a little dry. So I took his ink laws and journey just sucked on. The reason is zinc. When it comes in contact with the virus will bind to the virus and prevent it from replicating. So if it's in your nasal passages and in your throat, the zinc laws injured. That's why I say suck on it. It's very good to help that as well. So super greens and essential source vitamin D glucose I own and a probiotics is my minutes. My supplement protocol do a lot of other things, too. Um, if I get any symptoms whatsoever, I upped my dosage of vitamin D to 50,000 international units for three days and then drop back again. Omega three fatty acids huge when it comes to inflammatory reactions. I take Dr Joe's Omega threes as well. So the answer is yes, there's a lot of protocols we have. I do prophylactically. And then if I do have any symptoms, whatever. I got this in class singers and I got extra dose of vitamin D. Get all that anything. Yes, your partner. That was great information. Is there any naval watch maybe recommended you could just use saline water. Just saline solution Just scored up, you know, is happy fine. Okay. Perfect. Thank you so much for your time. Appreciate it. I appreciate it and folks a lot of times, people ask questions. So a lot of times, people ask me this healthy bite sized nuggets of information to help you.

Dr Joe viral infection partner
Breaking the Sugar Habit | Dishing Up Nutrition Podcast

Dishing Up Nutrition

09:30 min | 7 months ago

Breaking the Sugar Habit | Dishing Up Nutrition Podcast

"Good morning everybody. i am brittany vincent. I'm also a registered dietitian. I work individually with clients. Teach many of our different nutrition classes but one of my favorite classes to teach is breaking the sugar habit so if eating sugar is a difficult habit for you to break i really recommend taking this online class for only twenty five dollars you can go to weight and wellness dot com. Click on nutrition classes at the top of our website. And i really think the most important reason nowadays to kick the sugar habit is because controlling your blood. Sugar plays a key role in the risk. You may have contracting and then the outcome if you get the cove it or if you get krona virus infection because studies have found that the way people eat in the. Us often result in a weakened immune system because sugar process. Carbs will actually slow down How your white blood cells work and that's a serious problem. Yeah and it makes it so important for us to kick that sugar habit. Research has found that sixteen teaspoons of sugar a day reduces the ability of a special kind of white blood cell. Called neutral fills to help your body fight off infections particularly those caused by certain bacteria and viruses to. I know you listeners. Are saying i never eat. Sixteen of sugar is an obscene amount. Well let's take a look at where you might be getting all the hidden sugar and you're gonna find out it's pretty darn easy to get sixteen teaspoons to. Here's a pretty common scenario. You make your daily drive throughout your favorite for your morning. Vanilla lock and then a muffin. Just sons delicious especially with the lot tastes. You grab one of those. while you're vanilla. Lattakia has seven teaspoons of sugar and the muffin contains eight and a half teaspoons. So you're starting your day off with fifteen and a half teaspoons of sugar with just one quick trip through the drive thru. You're already at your sugar limit for the entire day in starting your day like that i can almost guarantee you're gonna eat more sugar right because as we know the more sugar you eat the more sugar as i was introducing myself Earlier i mentioned that i am trying to prevent my children from developing a sugar habit. So here's some interesting news from food business newsletter. In the fall. Pumpkin spice latte as are very popular but they typically do not attract new customers but rather they appeal to the former and existing customers who purchase them more frequently. Pumpkin spice latte today. Lovers tend to be women who are forty five years or older. So what does that say that. Sounds like my demographic will not quite but it says that basically once you have that pumpkin spice latte those are the people that are going to continue to buy that particular item. And they're going to keep coming back for more so i don't want my kids to even taste pumpkin. Spice latte day or a peppermint flavor or the chocolate mocha or any of those types of sweet drinks with fifty grams of carbs or more per per cup. I mean shoot. My kids have enough energy. I certainly don't need to give him that much. Sugar much less a caffeinated burger. I drink so remember. Just sixteen teaspoons of sugar a day. That can slow your immune function. If you have one pumpkin spice latte with twelve and a half teaspoons of sugar and then say like brittany was saying it. Sounds really good to have something with it. Say you decided by a slice of coffee house. Banana nut bread which has thirteen teaspoons of sugar. You have taken in twenty five and a half teaspoons of sugar all before ten. Am in the morning and like we said once you start the day that way it's gonna keep on that's right. The american heart association recommends limiting your sugar intake to only six teaspoons of sugar per day. Just six that is not much at all no and today. We know that over. A third of all calories come from sugar and white flour and our bodies do have great resilience but frankly i bodies are not able to cope with that amount of sugar and flour on a regular basis. And i do think you know most of you know the story about sugar and what it does to us but sometimes you have to hear it many many times for it to actually sink in. So i'm going to repeat what you may have heard before but shit just reminds me just because they've been talking about my kids. You know we as adults were just like kids right. We have to hear the same things over and over and over again before they start trade especially if you love sugar because you don't want to accept the truth now we do what we do we like it. Yeah yeah so but we know sugar gives you that initial high then you crash. Then you crave you want that high again and again over and over happens you're on that roller coaster and sugar stresses your adrenal glands get more anxious moody fatigue sets in your brain. Your body just start to not function as well however. The long term side effects are really the real trouble troublemakers. That recap vic on your health and often times. People don't even know that that's happening inside their body So before you grab one of those sugary treats that you received from a friend during the holidays. Truce and i want to share some of the health problems. You're inviting to come into the first. One is decreased immunity. Which makes you more susceptible to infectious. Bacteria and viral infections. Right and research suggests that that susceptibility happens. Because that sugar will it inhibits vitamin c entering into your white blood cells. So the more sugar you eat the less productive. Your white blood cells are and the more likely you are to get sick. Sugar also directly affects your chocolates ride number it's sugar and processed carbs not fat that stimulate your liver liver's production of triglycerides. So many people really don't realize the triglycerides are linked to stroke two heart disease and of course obesity a usually suggest to my clients. Say look at their checklists number on their blood chemistry panel. Don't just silk the total cholesterol number. Look that that whole breakdown. You'll find the glass rides and your triglycerides level is the fat in your bloodstream. And many experts believe that your triglycerides number is really the best predictor of heart disease and stroke so the number we recommend the optimal number is seventy five or less in. We've had clients with numbers over two thousand bright It's crazy but at the same time i've had clients in a matter of a couple of months drastically reduces so. That's possible we. I just read an email from a listener. Who eats a weight and wellness way and she also exercises daily. She just received her blood chemistry panel and her reckless rides. Were twenty three. Well yeah that is. That's number to strive for as you've just heard and as we all know we have these intellectual reasons in our head based on science for why we should eliminate sugar and carbs from our diet. But it's hard because sugar is sneaky and it finds its way into foods that we wouldn't even consider to be high in sugar for example pizza. Would you consider to be a high sugar food absolutely no because it's savory right it's not sweet. The stock prices of domino's pizza have risen ninety nine percent in the last three years. My gosh and i wonder how much of that was in twenty twenty. Yes but we will talk a little bit more about that when we come back. You are listening to dishing up nutrition. The holidays are over. So perhaps it's time to break your sugar habit because eating excess sugar is certainly worse for you. While we are all experiencing the ongoing cova nineteenth stress the center for disease control and prevention reports that people with underlying health conditions such as type two diabetes heart disease high blood sugar and obesity are at an increased risk for complications. If you become infected with covid nineteen we will share ways that we help clients reduce their sugar consumption with the hope that it will reduce their risk of serious health complications.

Brittany Vincent Lattakia Viral Infections American Heart Association Brittany Heart Disease United States Obesity Stroke
What Science Has Learned About the Coronavirus One Year On

Science Talk

04:58 min | 8 months ago

What Science Has Learned About the Coronavirus One Year On

"It's a really important moment to look back at our very different reality just twelve months ago. In december twenty nineteen the first infections were just emerging inside of china sars. Covy two didn't have a name yet and no one could imagine the global effects that the virus would have on us all but it was also clear that this novel coronavirus lit a fire underneath the seat of science so my question is how far has our scientific understanding about the biology and the behavior of the virus. Come since then yeah. We have learned some really critical things. About how the virus works and also importantly about how our immune system responds to it and how. This virus sars cope chew. Essentially causes our immune system to misfire in cases of severe covid nineteen and miss misfiring really centers on the very early immune responses that. Our body mounts. These are called innate immune responses this innate immunity is a part of our body that really uses sensors that detect pieces of pathogens. Like the co two virus that are not from our own body in once. These factors are sensors detect these viral bits. They sound out an immediate alarm system. That operates through molecules called cytokines and interferons. These are important for activating those later. Immune responses like t cells and antibodies. That we hear about and what we think is that. It's likely that people who sound this innate immune alarm early upon exposure to the virus and induced early in high levels of that interferon alarm system. Go onto pretty rapidly and effectively clear the virus so these might be the individuals with a symptomatic or moderate or mild disease however what scientists have learned. Is that people who go on to develop severe covid. Do so. Probably because in them. The virus causes a misfiring of that. Immune response so like the wrong sets of immune cells may be brought in and they might not deuce that early interferon alarm system. Quick clear strongly in they can't control the viral load. The virus amplifies to really high levels in their body so their body responds to this continued presence of the virus basically by increasing production of factors. That are involved in inflammation. This is an over exuberant inflammation or inflammatory response. And that's what leads to the lung tissue damage which is really a hallmark of code pathology. So what we've discovered. Scientists over the past year is that there are biomarkers. That can give clues about who ultimately goes on to get severe disease. Scientists have also discovered genetic. Differences are mutations that some people have in those innate immune genes that can contribute to poor initial control of the virus. I think that this understanding that there are essentially two phases of covid nineteen disease that initial phase that's dominated by viral amplification in a second phase that in severe cases is dominated by a misfiring of the immune response is really important is important because it ill. At they're two types of therapies. That are probably needed. Depending on the phase of the disease so drugs that charge it the virus directly to stop its replication is would be things like remdesivir that we've heard a lot about in the news or maybe treating with things like recombinant interferon. This is Something that's used to treat other chronic viral infections. Those types of therapies are probably only going to be effective at stopping nets first phase of the disease but are not going to be very effective If they're given during that second phase because it's then it's not the virus but the immune system that's driving illness so conversely drugs that damp a net over exuberant inflammatory response and decks. Methadone is one of those. These might be dangerous. If given during that first phase when you really want a rapid and robust immune response but could be helpful at dampening the damage that's caused by the immune system at later stages one of the key parts of understanding the virus itself. How find it is scientifically really about timing right. Exactly timing is really key to figure out how your body responds very early and later and you know the timing and dose of the virus that you might receive understanding how that timing or the kinetics of infection response are essential and we've made a lot of progress on that over the last year

Mild Disease China Chronic Viral Infections
What the immune response to the coronavirus says about the prospects for a vaccine

The Guardian's Science Weekly

12:52 min | 8 months ago

What the immune response to the coronavirus says about the prospects for a vaccine

"With a number vaccine candidates against the corona virus sharing promising results in clinical trials and a growing number of studies elving into our mean response to infection. The spotlight has turned once again. On the body's defense mechanisms. I think two questions that really relate to the ability of the vaccine to protect us and our ability to fight off a second infection and so that is the quality of the immune response and the duration of the immune response this week. I'm joined by professor. Eleanor riley from the university of edinburgh to dove into these questions and more. I'm nichole davis. Welcome to science. Weekly ellena you came onto the podcast in july and talk to us about immunity and covid nineteen specifically the relationship between antibodies and immunity. So let's start with a recap on the major players in the immune system that are of interest when it comes to an immune response and potentially immunity so antibodies are protein molecules that are produced by immune cells kobe cells and these cells live in our spleen and narrow and they secrete antibodies off. They've been exposed to a foreign organism such as virus. There are two types of cells that produce. Antibodies on short-lived cells that produce. Antibodies for a few weeks national to the first line response and then some of those cells transition into lonely cells that goto a bone marrow and can produce antibodies for months years. Possibly even to case and then on top of antibodies. have that can kill virus. Infected host cells t cells the two types of t cells one of which we think of such of the conductor of the orchestra of the immune system and these kotei health cells and they very much help the b. cells to make antibodies produce. Growth factors may direct the direction in which the be cells developed and they will still give them signals to turn into cells and then there are the cdte cells and they actively kill virus infected cells and then Antibodies can also bind to these specific cells and help them to kill cells so they recognize little bits of virus on the infected cell bind to the infected so and kill it and then there are cells which are less specific cells that we call macrophages are neutral fills and they just recognized that. Something's not quite right with the cell. They don't necessarily recognize the infected with the virus and they kill it actually or bits of the immune system work together a little bit like you need a whole orchestra to make a good tune when you need all of these cells working together to make a good news arms. And i know you said in july that at that point it was too early to tell how quickly people were losing their antibodies. And we've got to remember here that it's a relatively new virus. What's the latest research saying that seems to have been some movement on that now. What we're seeing is if you all the data together. There's an early peek in the antibodies wants. Lots and lots of antibodies are produced to mop up all virus. That's in your body and then as that virus goes away the antibodies start to decline a little bit. Because you don't need them any antibodies anymore and they settle into a of steady class. O of antibody production. And that's very typical. This kind of two phase response the only peak lots of antibodies followed by sort of standing level of antibodies. That nick for a long time. That's very typical of an antibody response and it sort of relates to the short lived long lived cells. You have lots of short-lived cells making lots of antibody that off and then the long lived cells who that fewer in numba keep on producing. Antibodies for much longer so yes. Let's talk about these long-lived b. cells in the no said the t. cells. What is research telling us about what happens to them and how. How long do they hang around for. So we don't have much data on those are actually quite difficult to look at in humans. They tend to live in the bone marrow for example not very accessible and so we tend to rely on mathematical modeling of the change in the dynamics of the antibody concentration to predict what's going to happen even though we haven't actually been able to see it because it hasn't gone on long enough so the moment the infants is that we have suggests that things are probably okay these cells behaving as we expect them to the was one pay published early on suggesting may be a little bit of a fault with the production of these long midsouth. But i'm not sure that that's been replicated in other studies. I think i saw a preprinted study. That hasn't been peer reviewed yet. Which jested that these visas and t so's lost for at least six months is that. What are the problems here in terms of measuring this so we only have six months data at the moment and the virus really hasn't been around that long so what we can say the moment. Is that the cells assisting for as long as we are able to measure them at the moment obviously in six months or another twelve months time. We'll be able to go back to those people and say have they still got those cells. Yes or no. But in the meantime just looking at the change in the dynamics of the response and mapping it onto what we know the other viruses. My prediction is that these that there will be some long lift immunity to this virus. He said there might be some long term protection. How long term are we talking here. I mean i've seen a lot of people saying well current viruses such as that of course common code some codes of course by coronavirus is of course the protection only lasts for say a year or so. Do we think that our protection against the corona virus that causes covid nineteen mike baxter timeframe or or could it be longer. I think it's very difficult to say at the moment. Say all of the data. We have suggests that these antibody responses are going to be at least as long lived as response of corona viruses. And possibly i might think even probably going to last longer your immune response tends to be proportional to the level of threat that you face so the common cold corona viruses really only colonize our upper respiratory tract so on nose throat and so the virus doesn't go very deep into apology and we make rather grief that effective noon response nose and throat that controls it this coq nineteen causing virus goes much deeper into our bodies it goes down into our lungs into bronchial and therefore the immune response tends to be stronger and they struggle we call systemic immune responses do tend to last longer because they are recognizing that there is a more serious threat that has to be dealt with. Do we know if factors like ethnicity gender age factor in the scale of the immune response. She said stronger. Immune response to your first. Infection is is more likely to me. You have great protection against the second infection. Those factors correlated at all. There's very little day to so far on ethnic differences in the immune response the data. That's coming after the vaccine trials suggests that there aren't any major differences in at between ethnic groups in terms of whether the vaccine protects them will not but we haven't yet seen lab data on their antibody responses with at t cell responses. There is a lot of genetic variation in the immune response. People be aware that some people unfortunately have very severe genetically determined immunodeficiencies. That's just the tip of the iceberg of genetic variation in the immune response and some of those differences do have geographical and ethnic components to that certain genes that either make good or bad immune response on more common or less common in groups countries. But we don't yet know if any of that is going to influence really the totality of their immune responses. We just don't have any evidence much by age. It feels like ages is. It's very important given that the older you are the more risque from caveat nineteen so there are two components to that one is whether you are able to make an immune response again's a virus. You've never seen before and there is. I think really quite good evidence that you ability to make a completely new immune response does decline as you get older. The other component is that a lot of the disease we say in coke nineteen excessive inflammation. And there's also evidence that we get older with less good controlling inflammation so it's a little bit of a double whammy as we get older way are less able to make an immune response to a new virus such as the covid nineteen virus and if we then get the viral infection where less good at controlling the inflammation that it causes a so we know there are several different vaccines. Which looking very promising. You have the rene vaccines at you have vaccines which used a chimp. Virus to bring genetic material from the corona virus into cells. The question is is the immune response that generated the same as it would have been to a natural infection and do the t. cells and so on hang around in the same way. The vaccine is just a tiny component of viruses this spike protein which is on the surface of the virus and so if you vaccinated with spike protein. You make antibodies in tesol responses just to that protein. If you get the virus itself then you get many many more pro teams that you're exposed to a new may make antibodies to some of those. So you responded more limited but you might also say that your response is more focused because it's actually antibodies to spike coaching a really important for neutralizing the virus so the vaccine in juices a narrow immune response but one would hope it would also be focused on therefore stronger on the base the matter and would it be expected that this will provoke a stronger. Immune response natural infection. I've heard some people say that actually vaccine can producer a strong response it coun- if they initial infection is quite mild say with virus like sauce covy to which induces very mild infections in some people i would expect the vaccine to tobacco to jason mewes which is much stronger than you would get after nascent dramatic or mild infection. People get serious dose of coca to make a very strong immune response. And i doubt if the vaccine it doesn't need to be any strong national adopt if it is when it comes to and viruses the coups common code. It's been some concern that these viruses somehow elude the memory b cells. and so. that's why even though we have thousand cells to to the common cold viruses. We will often get reinfected with them. I wonder if they're those same concerns about the coronavirus behind covid nineteen so there is a little basic data. There's one paper that suggests that the sauce kofi to virus that causes covid nineteen disables particular pathway in the b. cell response leading to a poor long term memory response but these experiments done in the lab in a in a in a petrie dish. And i think it's too early to know if that's really what happens in humans so i think we do need to be a little bit cautious and we need to be aware that it might happen. Good news is that the proteins that are believed to cause that problem are not present in the vaccine so even if it's a problem in natural infection it shouldn't be a problem with a vaccine

Elving Eleanor Riley Nichole Davis University Of Edinburgh Mike Baxter Inflammation Nick Cold Infection Mild Infection Jason Mewes
"viral infection" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:44 min | 11 months ago

"viral infection" Discussed on KCRW

"Welcome. Oh, thanks for having me and Elizabeth who are we going to meet this month? This pontiff we made Matt Fentress, who's now 31. He lives in Taylor Mill, Kentucky. And he wrote to us because of the hospital bill that was more than $10,000 for something called post viral myo card itis and complications on DH. That's something we're also seeing with the covert virus and young people, and Dan Weissman, host of the podcast and arm and a leg. Talk to Matt. Let's listen to that. For someone with a $10,000 medical bill and a modest salary. Matt Fentress seems pretty cheerful. He answers a zoom call wearing a friendly smile and a baseball cap that says, be nice, which he designed himself. I started this thing where I make T shirts and then I'll donate all this stuff to charity. I don't make any money off of it. Working with a friend. He's designed dozens of T shirts and ball caps and, of course face masks. That all started around the time. His $10,000 medical bill arrived early this year. I can figure my out, but there's people who need it more than me. Maybe one reason he's not freaking out is he's seen plenty of big medical bills. He's only 31, but he's already been sued by a hospital and declared bankruptcy. Six years ago, when he was 25. Matt passed out at work One second he was stuffing Connelly. He's a cook and assisted living center. And the next he was on the floor. I was sweaty. I was a mess. I just tried to get back up and keep working. I didn't want to go the hospital because I knew how much it was going to cost. Good thing. His colleagues made him go. Ah viral infection had weakened his heart. One of the nurses like Yeah, You know, I'd say you're fine. If you're an 85 year old. So every time somebody's like you're not that old. I'm like I am 85 at heart, literally. He paid that hospital bill with help from his grandmother, But there would be more because you're going to be in the hospital. When you have heart problem, That's the life you're going to get used to. The needle sticks the oxygen meters all that stuff. Three years later, when he was 28 he needed surgery after insurance. Matt owed $5000. Rather than calling his grandma again. He set up a payment plan with the hospital. Then he missed an installment ended up in collections. The person's like of you pay double the payment this month. We won't see you. And some I can't do that. Then the like, will sue you And I'm like, Well, then I'm going to file bankruptcy and you're not get nothing which he did at 28. Late last year, his doctors recommended a procedure that would improve his heart's performance and his quality of life. He says the hospital told he'd end up paying $7000. Great news. The procedure worked bad news. His bill was 10,000. I'm like, you know, 7000 was going to be a stretch in the first place, but 10,000. Yeah, it's just a mess. The hospital offered him a payment plan. $500 a month and normal paycheck for me is like $700 every two weeks. Mats insurance is supposed to cap his medical bills at 7900 year about a quarter of his income. But that cap is 7900 per calendar year. This bill includes treatment from late 2019 and early 2020. That's the thing that hurts me. The most about all of this is I love my doctors. Like I am only alive because of them. I only have a quality of life because they fought so hard for me. After a conversation with a reporter, Matt says he's applying for financial lead from the hospital. He says they've been very responsive. Maybe because they know there are reporters watching. For NPR News of Dan Weissman, Elizabeth Rosenthal, We heard that Matt was told to expect a $7000 bill that came in his $10,000. Is there any billing mistake that was made there now? The problem with this case is it's all perfectly legal from a hospital in insurance standpoint, but it's far from fair to patients. Mattis, one of tens of millions of patients who are what we in the field call functionally uninsured. That means they did their best and bought insurance but have a policy that requires more patient outlays than they can afford. Is this a high deductible health plan where he's just left with more than he can pay? That's part of the problem, but really, in this case, it's not just the deductible. And remember, insurance doesn't pay out a penny until you hit that. In Matt's case, his deductible was $1500 per year. That's really not so high compared to other plan Summer over 8000 now. On top of that. There's also what's called cost sharing or co insurance. So you may have to pay 20% of many charges after that, in a hospitalisation that can easily add up to tens of thousands of dollars. Is there any lesson here for other people who don't want to end up in Matt situation? Well, there are some first of all these high deductible hiko insurance plans do have cheaper premiums. That's maybe all you can afford, so they are very, very tempting, but people have to realize they come with the possibility of huge cash outlays. Also, everyone should remember since it's September now and we've all avoided a lot of care. Close of Cove it if you've gone through your deductible for this year, start scheduling those medical appointments before December 31st because your deductibles your out of pocket maximums. They all reset January 1st, and you're gonna have to start paying those bills again. Elizabeth Rosenthal, Thank you for being here today. Thanks for having me And if you have an outrageous or baffling medical bill, go to NPR's shots blogged and send it to us. We'll take a look. In its own time. It was the soundtrack to a shattered United States of America, the title track inspired by police violence against protesters in Berkeley, California. There's too many of you. This week,.

Matt Fentress Elizabeth Rosenthal Dan Weissman reporter baseball Kentucky Taylor Mill NPR NPR News United States Connelly Mattis Berkeley California America
After record low flu season in Australia, US hopes for the same

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

01:06 min | 11 months ago

After record low flu season in Australia, US hopes for the same

"The Northwest expect to see fewer cases of the flu this winter. Because most of us are wearing masks at camels, Brian Calvert tells us, you still might want to consider getting that flu shot, Dr Dan gets says. We learn a lot about the flu every season from our friends down under Australia. They've had a very light through season really, because they're masking their social distancing their hand washing. And again there getting vaccinated. You could chance it by saying wearing a mask is enough. But the doctor advises. It's a risk you might not want to take, considering we're in the midst of battling another bad virus that goes by the name covert 19. If you're dealing with two viral infections, your body is now having the mount response on two different fronts space like fighting a war on two fronts. The flu shot will not immunize you against Cove it, but he's confident it will be very effective against the current flu strains. Looks like the vaccine that we have this year hits it pretty good. Should give us pretty good protections, he advises. Be vigilant about keeping your home and office space is disinfected. Viruses love the indoors and for the next several months, that's where the majority of us will be hanging out. Brian Calvert Camo News For the second time, Public

FLU Brian Calvert Northwest Dr Dan Australia
Drugmaker Novavax begins late-stage vaccine trial in UK

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

05:02 min | 11 months ago

Drugmaker Novavax begins late-stage vaccine trial in UK

"Company Novavax kicks off the late stage of its vaccine study on 10,000 patients in the UK at least a quarter of the trial participants will be seniors. We get more now from Bloomberg's Michelle Cortez. It's very interesting how they're doing it. They're taking a new approach, and they're going to be combining it with a flu vaccine that it will know how it day in terms of fighting off both of the viral infection, and they're also really worked very hard to make sure that they're including a lot of people who are Divers, maybe high with a lot of minority population who have been hard hit by the virus. And other backs joins the ranks of AstraZeneca, father and others as vaccine enters the final stretch on the path towards regulatory approval. We

Flu Vaccine Michelle Cortez Novavax Bloomberg UK
Mosquito Spraying to Start in Parts of Boston

WBZ Afternoon News

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

Mosquito Spraying to Start in Parts of Boston

"Aerial mosquito spraying is going to begin tomorrow. The aerial spraying for mosquitoes comes after public health officials announce this year's first human case of Tripoli. The viral infection spread by mosquitoes. In fact, a boy under the age of 18 and Plymouth County Thie aerial spraying gets underway Monday night and will continue for several evenings across a wide swath of 21 Plymouth County towns and extended to four Bristol County towns as well. Thekla he's affected have been found to be a moderate to critical risk for the triple the virus. Public health officials encourage residents to be vigilant and take here to use mosquito repellent and avoid outdoor activity between the hours of dusk and dawn. Mike Macklin

Plymouth County Mike Macklin Bristol County Tripoli
US consumer spending up 5.6%, but virus could stall gains

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

US consumer spending up 5.6%, but virus could stall gains

"As the U. S. economy struggles American consumers continue to provide a boost the commerce department says consumer spending rose a solid five point six percent in June that followed a seasonally adjusted eight point five percent surge in may but those increases followed a record plunges the corona virus struck hard in March shuttering businesses triggering millions of layoffs and sending the economy into recession the June increasing consumer spending coincided with the one point one percent drop in personal incomes meanwhile with confirmed viral infections rising in a majority of states many businesses have had to pause re opening or close a second time and cut jobs Ben Thomas Washington

Commerce Department Ben Thomas Washington
Could your smartwatch detect the coronavirus?

Sean Hannity

00:28 sec | 1 year ago

Could your smartwatch detect the coronavirus?

"Are looking at smart watch and fitness tracker data to see if someone has become infected with a virus like Cove in 19 San Diego metropolitan transit system, employees and scripts. Health care workers are participating in the study Scripts. Epidemiologist Dr Jennifer Radon says a faster heartbeat as well as abnormal sleep in activity levels are good indicators that you're coming down with some sort of viral infection. Dr Radin says public health officials can respond quicker if we can know where these hot spots are quicker and faster.

Dr Jennifer Radon Dr Radin San Diego
A Coronavirus Update with Dr. Steven Taback

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

04:52 min | 1 year ago

A Coronavirus Update with Dr. Steven Taback

"Look I know we've all had about enough of this. Kobe, nineteen thing we're tired of the politics of it. We're tired of the endless conflicting reports what we should do what we shouldn't do what we should wear and not wear you know surfaces transferred disease, or maybe they don't. We're ready to open schools. We can open restaurants, baseball, or maybe we're not. Oh and please don't blame my co host for this opening. I didn't tell them about it and so forgive him, and you can blame me. This is a particular pleasure today. I, get to chat it up with my very best friend. Dr Steven Taback. who also just happens to be? The quadruple board certified doctor of Internal Medicine Pulmonary Disease Critical Care and neuro critical care whatever that means. He's also on the frontlines fighting the COVID battle for us every day at his hospitals, which were eternally grateful for and by the way he saved my dad's life twice. Dr Steven Tailback. You Doing Stephen? Doing great good to hear you in and see you at least virtually anyway. It's weird, isn't it? We would normally see each other all the time right at least twice a week during the week, and then on the weekends dinner, and by the way I know you've been teetotalling for like three months. You'RE GONNA have to explain that to the group why I am drinking the mcallen twenty-five that you gave me for my birthday, so thank you very much happy birthday. I'm glad to see that. You still have some left in the bottle as of. mid-may. So, why is it? YOU'RE NOT DRINKING STEVE? From my perspective thing on the front lines you Wanna do everything you can to. Protect yourself immunologically, and so my goal was to optimize my immune system, considering the fact that there is no scene, but in order to optimize one's immune system. You want to eat healthier. You WanNa sleep better. And when I looked at the things that I was doing in my life I was not exercising as much as I would have liked to. My sleep was always fragmented. Fragmented and I do know. The alcohol suppresses the immune system not that I. You know I have more than probably one drink a week. When I see you I. Never drink otherwise, but nevertheless I felt that in order to really give myself the best possible defense against this miserable virus I should do. Everything could now to optimize my immune system until you you eating differently to. Eating Vegan I've been avoiding caffeine which has helped my my sleep tremendously of avoided alcohol I've started back on a regular exercise, so exercise has something to do with your immune system absolutely exercises very important for your immune system why it's a very good question I'm not sure I have an answer is simple answer as to why, but exercised absolutely increase the circulation. It stimulates your your. Your metabolic rate kind of wakes up your cells, and it optimizes cellular performance and metabolic performance, and at the end of the day. That's what your immune system is is the doing constant surveillance of cancer cells is doing constant surveillance for viruses and bacteria, and you wanted at optimal performance, but you're telling me that a glass of macallan twenty five is not so good for my. My immune system. It's certainly not good for your immune system. Now the question is, does it actually have any deleterious effects truly having a glass? You know a week or so probably not, but what would it do to your system? That would affect your immune system. What we do know that you do have we call Milo suppression and Rith Rope Suppression. That is you stop manufacturing red. Red Blood Cells. People who use alcohol to excess clearly are have increased susceptibility to bacterial infections viral infections. They manufacture less red blood cells so obviously they're gonNA. have difficulty adequately getting oxygen to vital organs. Organs are going to suffer in terms of their peak performance speaking of having a little fun with it. I'M GONNA put your feet to the fire a little bit right away. Before months ago, Steve we had the honor of being joined by Dr Suzanne Donovan, who broached the concept of this corona virus and you guys? We're talking about it. And I almost could hear battle hymn of the Republican, the background and a Glory Glory Hallelujah and you guys were talking about how America was so strong and so well designed as far as our health care system. We really knew what we were doing. Chances are this corona. Thing wasn't going to be a big deal for us as it would be potentially some other parts of the world. That was then. This is now a steve. The US has four percent of the world's population and we're currently running at twenty five percent of the world, global cases and deaths. Why is that first and foremost? Let's say that the superpower of the world absolutely blew it as far as efficiency in terms of testing in terms of reporting in terms of personal protective equipment. We really were not ready, even though we could have been ready, we missed multiple steps in the preparatory process.

Dr Steven Tailback Dr Steven Taback. Doctor Of Internal Medicine Pu Kobe Steve Mcallen United States Stephen Caffeine Dr Suzanne Donovan America
"viral infection" Discussed on The Model Health Show

The Model Health Show

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"viral infection" Discussed on The Model Health Show

"And for good reason, medium chain triglycerides are in a rare category of nutrients that are able to cross the blood, brain barrier, and actually feed your brain cells actually deliver nutrition and power to your in your brain. That's running everything about you. And not only that medium chain triglycerides. Stimulate the body to produce key tones as well, which is this kind of cleaner burning fuel that your brain can use and several other cellular functions in your body as well, and if you look at some data coming out by researchers, and this was published in the annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. They're looking at whether or not. mcat's could have an impact on improving the condition of patients with Alzheimer's, and this is largely regarded as a condition that simply cannot be improved. It can be managed can delay the inevitable decline, but there's not much evidence that we can improve the condition. And what they discovered was that the consumption of medium chain triglycerides are mcat's directly lead to improved cognitive function in mild to moderate forms of Alzheimer's disease and cognitive impairment. The actually saw improvement in cognitive function. That's not a word that's used, and we're talking about Alzheimer's and dementia and cognitive decline. We don't see improvement. We see management of symptoms. We see, let's find a way to slowest thing down, but not an improvement. This should be front page news. This should be something that is very remarkable that we should take note of an start to have a broader conversation about because I don't think a lot of US realized that Alzheimer's disease is just skyrocketing, and this isn't a condition where. You know we tend to think of it if somebody's just losing their memories. But. This is a very very. Man It's A. It's a difficult. Situation to watch as a family member begins to degrade and to the degree. That with Alzheimer's. You don't just forget names. You can forget how to swallow your food. And it's inching its way up into the top ten causes of death in our country today, but we can do something about it. We know there's tons of evidence. We've done multiple shows on this someone. The top world's experts on to talk about. Delaying and help it to prevent Alzheimer's, but what about when it takes hold. What are some of the things that we can do to help? are going to continue to play out. In the equation as something that's very beneficial, and as I mentioned, it's also been found to cross the blood brain barrier in be utilized by brain cells. and. This is just a great fuel brain fuel to have on hand, and also a fuel for metabolism. Because as you're GONNA learn today, you know your body's going to be made out of the fact that you consume. You also want to be cognizant of where you're getting your oils from so even when we're talking about MC t oils. We don't want to get it from some random leg. Company exit might be getting it from an unethical source, or even claim their oils and adding different things it shouldn't really be in there, and I'm a big fan of enjoying the process of having my nutrition and getting joy out of it as well so there's the general mcat oil, but also emulsified him. T T oil that I have just about every single day definitely added.

Alzheimer Alzheimer's disease New York Academy of Sciences US MC t T T
"viral infection" Discussed on The Model Health Show

The Model Health Show

05:41 min | 1 year ago

"viral infection" Discussed on The Model Health Show

"Welcome to the model. Show this fitness and nutrition expert Shawn Stevenson and I'm so grateful to be tuning today. This episode here I am so pumped about. This is one of my favorite physicians. One of my favorite scientists and she's got a new project is really helping shed some light on a very very misunderstood topic in this the topic of body, fat. Sustain that we tend to see is a very cosmetic target is a very cosmetic issue for hundreds of millions of people right now, but in truth, our body fat is a major player in so many different dynamic ways as far as our health as far as our ability to fight infections, viral infections, even and I think that this is going to be incredibly enlightening and something that you're going to walk away with having a better understanding of this. Incredible tissue that we're all carrying around in what's led to the surplus that were carrying around for many of us, and also some more intelligent ways that we can address this in not just for cosmetic issues, but to truly get our society healthier. And hope that you've been employing different strategies to get yourself healthy right now, and also your loved ones. It's more important than ever to reach out. Make sure that our friends and family are doing some of the basic necessities of just getting some fresh air, going out and walk move their bodies, engaging in some stress management practices, and we've done episodes dedicated to these things, and also making sure that they're getting in some high-quality foods as well as supersport right now, but we just recently went on our first outing since the corn team began first outing to a restaurant with our FRIZZ nextdoor, nextdoor, neighbours, families both wint. And it was very a felt like I was visiting another planet, I definitely felt a little bit like that scene and back to the future when Michael J. Fox goes back to pass, and he's got like a has met suit on, and he winds up in a barn, and these folks happened upon him in his hands. Matsue with this delorean in the sign has his comic book. which is like the cover? The Comic Book Kinda shows what the future looks like are. These alien invaders look like. So just to get into the restaurant you walk through. The. Lobby is about five feet of lobby, and you have to wear masks. Go through the five feet, but then there people already there sitting at tables there socially distance. Of course you know one table apart, but they've got. You know they don't have mask on because you can eat with a mask on yet. Until maybe we get permanent mass installed on her face faces in little openings, but the science there. Wasn't really accurate. You know like that five feet, but then once you go pacify feet. Take your mask off, and you can each her. You know whatever your therefore, but he's a very strange experience. Because the waitress had on, the has metsu she had on the face shield. She had on the mask at that point I was like why be here in like there's so much that goes into it, and it's so abnormal. We should just go ahead and you know. Make dinner ourselves have family. Get together something like that. It's just an added. stressor is so much uncertainty in all. The tables had to be labeled that this table has been sanitized in, you know. We've hit it with the flame thrower all these different stuff just to feel comfortable going outside, and it was like this was like a you know there's a strip mall and everybody is just a very dystopia and situation, and this is the situation that we're facing right now. There is a very infectious. Virus that is that we're dealing with as a society and at its core. We Really WanNA. Look at this what we've been dedicated to. How do we get our citizens healthier? so that were not as susceptible to this virus in the mini viruses that are to come because this is right now. This is just the first of many that we're going to be faced with as humanity you know, and the thing that is overlooked in that I've really been working to up level the conversation is. As a species? What are the things that make us more susceptible to viral infections? What are the things that we can do to help? Improve our bodies response because in truth we've had such a relationship with viruses throughout human evolution that we are in fact, the human genome is eight percent over eight percent in dodge in his viruses that we are. Our genome is made of. We've had such interaction with viruses. We are made viruses on that level talking about our human genome, what our jeans are made of the human genes with the things that make us human. We're part virus. And even more tangible aspect because I think there's really a hard pill for us to swallow as society right now that we are virus ourselves. But you know this is something that we can test track now. We have some affirmation to the fact that we all are carrying upwards of three hundred trillion virus particles in and on our bodies all the time. We are. We're like a playground for viruses and. Pathogenic! Many of them <hes>. Symbiotic. But this equation really plays into. How healthy are we interact with other people's virus load? How healthy are we or what can happen to damage our health immune system health that even the pathogenic viruses that were carrying right now can become opportunistic and take advantage of our system and make us sick.

Shawn Stevenson nextdoor Michael J
The Fat burn Fix And Our Growing Susceptibility To Viral Infections - With Dr. Cate Shanahan

The Model Health Show

05:41 min | 1 year ago

The Fat burn Fix And Our Growing Susceptibility To Viral Infections - With Dr. Cate Shanahan

"Welcome to the model. Show this fitness and nutrition expert Shawn Stevenson and I'm so grateful to be tuning today. This episode here I am so pumped about. This is one of my favorite physicians. One of my favorite scientists and she's got a new project is really helping shed some light on a very very misunderstood topic in this the topic of body, fat. Sustain that we tend to see is a very cosmetic target is a very cosmetic issue for hundreds of millions of people right now, but in truth, our body fat is a major player in so many different dynamic ways as far as our health as far as our ability to fight infections, viral infections, even and I think that this is going to be incredibly enlightening and something that you're going to walk away with having a better understanding of this. Incredible tissue that we're all carrying around in what's led to the surplus that were carrying around for many of us, and also some more intelligent ways that we can address this in not just for cosmetic issues, but to truly get our society healthier. And hope that you've been employing different strategies to get yourself healthy right now, and also your loved ones. It's more important than ever to reach out. Make sure that our friends and family are doing some of the basic necessities of just getting some fresh air, going out and walk move their bodies, engaging in some stress management practices, and we've done episodes dedicated to these things, and also making sure that they're getting in some high-quality foods as well as supersport right now, but we just recently went on our first outing since the corn team began first outing to a restaurant with our FRIZZ nextdoor, nextdoor, neighbours, families both wint. And it was very a felt like I was visiting another planet, I definitely felt a little bit like that scene and back to the future when Michael J. Fox goes back to pass, and he's got like a has met suit on, and he winds up in a barn, and these folks happened upon him in his hands. Matsue with this delorean in the sign has his comic book. which is like the cover? The Comic Book Kinda shows what the future looks like are. These alien invaders look like. So just to get into the restaurant you walk through. The. Lobby is about five feet of lobby, and you have to wear masks. Go through the five feet, but then there people already there sitting at tables there socially distance. Of course you know one table apart, but they've got. You know they don't have mask on because you can eat with a mask on yet. Until maybe we get permanent mass installed on her face faces in little openings, but the science there. Wasn't really accurate. You know like that five feet, but then once you go pacify feet. Take your mask off, and you can each her. You know whatever your therefore, but he's a very strange experience. Because the waitress had on, the has metsu she had on the face shield. She had on the mask at that point I was like why be here in like there's so much that goes into it, and it's so abnormal. We should just go ahead and you know. Make dinner ourselves have family. Get together something like that. It's just an added. stressor is so much uncertainty in all. The tables had to be labeled that this table has been sanitized in, you know. We've hit it with the flame thrower all these different stuff just to feel comfortable going outside, and it was like this was like a you know there's a strip mall and everybody is just a very dystopia and situation, and this is the situation that we're facing right now. There is a very infectious. Virus that is that we're dealing with as a society and at its core. We Really WanNA. Look at this what we've been dedicated to. How do we get our citizens healthier? so that were not as susceptible to this virus in the mini viruses that are to come because this is right now. This is just the first of many that we're going to be faced with as humanity you know, and the thing that is overlooked in that I've really been working to up level the conversation is. As a species? What are the things that make us more susceptible to viral infections? What are the things that we can do to help? Improve our bodies response because in truth we've had such a relationship with viruses throughout human evolution that we are in fact, the human genome is eight percent over eight percent in dodge in his viruses that we are. Our genome is made of. We've had such interaction with viruses. We are made viruses on that level talking about our human genome, what our jeans are made of the human genes with the things that make us human. We're part virus. And even more tangible aspect because I think there's really a hard pill for us to swallow as society right now that we are virus ourselves. But you know this is something that we can test track now. We have some affirmation to the fact that we all are carrying upwards of three hundred trillion virus particles in and on our bodies all the time. We are. We're like a playground for viruses and. Pathogenic! Many of them Symbiotic. But this equation really plays into. How healthy are we interact with other people's virus load? How healthy are we or what can happen to damage our health immune system health that even the pathogenic viruses that were carrying right now can become opportunistic and take advantage of our system and make us sick.

Shawn Stevenson Nextdoor Michael J. Fox
"viral infection" Discussed on Diet Science

Diet Science

05:36 min | 1 year ago

"viral infection" Discussed on Diet Science

"This is our co host Michael McCaffrey so D-. What's the topic for this week this week? We're talking about a particular little fruit called elderberry elderberry. Yeah, they're little little fruit almost grow on a vine, grapes, and they have actually it's kind of known as black elderberry, because it has almost like the blackberry color. Okay, and but it almost looks like a blueberry so. So and many people may have heard of like elderberry. Wine was just about to say. Berry Jam Right. Yeah, so elderberry has been around for a very long time, and in fact it's been used medicinally by the native Americans, and by people in Europe, as a preventative treatment for infections and even for wound, healing, so but it it has garnered some more recent attention in you know as it because it was found to be very effective against the H, one N, one flu virus Oh In fact, there were studies showing that It, it worked in a couple of different ways against that one was as a preventive meaning that if you had it in your system, and then we're exposed to the virus that it prevented, you know basically like stopped the the virus from getting into host cells within the body, so prevented the infection altogether, and then other studies showed that another way that it was beneficial in in the flu virus. Was that it? if it, if you already were infected that it could actually like. Stop the infection from getting worse. Oh, so it had a so it works in two different ways in in relation to particular flu virus. So it got a lot of attention. in fact it, you know I mean it's been around because of that with the flu. And so people have been getting either extracts or or syrups of it, and sometimes they can come in capsules as a dried extract. And taking it as a preventive against the flu, so obviously during this cova time. They're probably taking it for that or any any evidence that it can help with that. Well that's where it starts to get a bit..

flu Michael McCaffrey Europe
"viral infection" Discussed on Diet Science

Diet Science

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"viral infection" Discussed on Diet Science

"So D-. What's the topic for this week this week? We're talking about a particular little fruit called elderberry elderberry. Yeah, they're little little fruit almost grow on a vine, grapes, <hes> and they have actually it's kind of known as black elderberry, because it has almost like the blackberry color. Okay, and but it almost looks like a blueberry <hes> so. So <hes> and many people may have heard of like elderberry. Wine was just about to say. Berry Jam Right. Yeah, so elderberry has been around for a very long time, and in fact it's been used medicinally by the native Americans, and by people in Europe, as a preventative treatment for infections and <hes> even for wound, healing, <hes> so <hes>, but it it has garnered some more recent attention in <hes> you know as it because it was found to be very effective against the H, one N, one flu virus Oh <hes>. In fact, there were studies showing that <hes>. It, it worked in a couple of different ways against that one was as a preventive meaning that if you had it in your system, and then we're exposed to the virus that it prevented, you know basically like stopped the <hes>, the virus from getting into host cells within the body, so prevented the infection altogether, and then other studies showed that another way that it was beneficial in in the flu virus. Was that it? <hes> if it, if you already were infected that it could actually like. Stop the infection from getting worse. Oh, so it had a so it works in two different ways in in relation to particular flu virus. So it got a lot of attention. <hes> in fact it, you know I mean it's been around because of that with the flu. And so people have been <hes> getting either extracts or or syrups of it, and sometimes they can come in capsules as a dried extract. And taking it as a preventive against the flu, so <hes> obviously during this cova time. They're probably taking it for that or any any evidence that it can help with that. Well that's where it starts to get a bit. <hes> controversial and it also gets to be a little bit <hes> like scary, because you have to really know whether or not, it's the right thing to be taking at the right time so <hes> and some of the where this kind of comes from. Was that <hes> people started you know when when covid became you know a pandemic. People started buying up elderberry supplements off. You know the Internet Mac I remember you. In early March every place that I looked including my own sources for physician grade elderberry. It was all out. And, then like you know back order. Yeah, I mean. People were just buying it up like crazy, and so you know obviously people were thinking I've got to get this stuff. 'cause he's list. We know that it can protect against certain flu, viruses and <HES>, but the thing is, is that we? We obviously have no research. Right on whether it can be effective against Kovic nineteen virus <hes>, however, <hes> I wanted to give our listeners just a little bit of background on. Why <hes> why it was considered to be a potential. <hes> you know supplement that could help people with their immunity. Okay <hes>, so there was a research research study that was that was published in two thousand nine, and it demonstrated that <hes> elderberry have particular fighter nutrients in them called flavonoids that <hes> they bind to that influenza as one n one of. The virus in you know in the <hes> in the host cell, so they protect it from infecting the host cell, and that was the the study that a lot of this was based off. The also found that it's very high in vitamin C.. which is another <hes> you know nutrient that's essential with antiviral properties. So you know so there's so that so that was out there that the thing about <hes> elderberry that's concerning though is if so as a preventative. The the experts are saying it's great for that as a preventative, because if you don't have the virus <hes>. And you want to protect yourself from it. It's very probable that it will you know it can be helpful in preventing you from getting it?

flu Michael McCaffrey Europe
Elderberry: Friend or Foe Against Viral Infections?

Diet Science

04:45 min | 1 year ago

Elderberry: Friend or Foe Against Viral Infections?

"So D-. What's the topic for this week this week? We're talking about a particular little fruit called elderberry elderberry. Yeah, they're little little fruit almost grow on a vine, grapes, and they have actually it's kind of known as black elderberry, because it has almost like the blackberry color. Okay, and but it almost looks like a blueberry so. So and many people may have heard of like elderberry. Wine was just about to say. Berry Jam Right. Yeah, so elderberry has been around for a very long time, and in fact it's been used medicinally by the native Americans, and by people in Europe, as a preventative treatment for infections and even for wound, healing, so but it it has garnered some more recent attention in you know as it because it was found to be very effective against the H, one N, one flu virus Oh In fact, there were studies showing that It, it worked in a couple of different ways against that one was as a preventive meaning that if you had it in your system, and then we're exposed to the virus that it prevented, you know basically like stopped the the virus from getting into host cells within the body, so prevented the infection altogether, and then other studies showed that another way that it was beneficial in in the flu virus. Was that it? if it, if you already were infected that it could actually like. Stop the infection from getting worse. Oh, so it had a so it works in two different ways in in relation to particular flu virus. So it got a lot of attention. in fact it, you know I mean it's been around because of that with the flu. And so people have been getting either extracts or or syrups of it, and sometimes they can come in capsules as a dried extract. And taking it as a preventive against the flu, so obviously during this cova time. They're probably taking it for that or any any evidence that it can help with that. Well that's where it starts to get a bit. controversial and it also gets to be a little bit like scary, because you have to really know whether or not, it's the right thing to be taking at the right time so and some of the where this kind of comes from. Was that people started you know when when covid became you know a pandemic. People started buying up elderberry supplements off. You know the Internet Mac I remember you. In early March every place that I looked including my own sources for physician grade elderberry. It was all out. And, then like you know back order. Yeah, I mean. People were just buying it up like crazy, and so you know obviously people were thinking I've got to get this stuff. 'cause he's list. We know that it can protect against certain flu, viruses and but the thing is, is that we? We obviously have no research. Right on whether it can be effective against Kovic nineteen virus however, I wanted to give our listeners just a little bit of background on. Why why it was considered to be a potential. you know supplement that could help people with their immunity. Okay so there was a research research study that was that was published in two thousand nine, and it demonstrated that elderberry have particular fighter nutrients in them called flavonoids that they bind to that influenza as one n one of. The virus in you know in the in the host cell, so they protect it from infecting the host cell, and that was the the study that a lot of this was based off. The also found that it's very high in vitamin C.. which is another you know nutrient that's essential with antiviral properties. So you know so there's so that so that was out there that the thing about elderberry that's concerning though is if so as a preventative. The the experts are saying it's great for that as a preventative, because if you don't have the virus And you want to protect yourself from it. It's very probable that it will you know it can be helpful in preventing you from getting

FLU Europe
Why An Experimental Therapy for Inflammatory Disorders Could Help the Fight Against COVID-19

The Bio Report

04:46 min | 1 year ago

Why An Experimental Therapy for Inflammatory Disorders Could Help the Fight Against COVID-19

"As a researcher Joe Garcia Applied Functional Genomics to understanding genes that contribute to inflammatory disorders such as acute respiratory distress syndrome or arts as founder and CEO of the Biotech Company. Akwa Lung Therapeutics. He's working to advanced therapies to hit these novel targets to treat unchecked inflammation with the company's lead experimental therapeutic candidate targeting arts. We spoke to Garcia about the company's arts. Therapy how it works. And why it's time we focus given the cove nineteen pandemic Joe. Thanks for joining us. To be here thing we're going to talk about Aqua Lung Therapeutics Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome or arts and your efforts to develop a treatment for this condition. Let's start with ours though. What is it and how big a health challenge? Does it represent about half a million people. Every year get air F- Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in the United States alone. And you know close to two million. Maybe globally so it's it's not a uncommon Disorder But it is a extremely challenging to treat disorder because mortality of this. Anyone that had gets a yard is Thirty to forty percents In the US and it's probably higher Outside the US what makes it so challenging to treat? Well it's It's sort of the ultimate in inch in the stress to To a human being in that They have multiple attacks on a variety of Oregon starting with the lung though the the most common causes of ARD s are sepsis which is infection in the bloodstream and trauma and Smoking elation will do it and that Curiel and viral pneumonias and so as a result the starts off with inflammation in the lung from those particular Causes the inflammation becomes waves waves of amplify inflammation that starts to affect other organs. Like your kidneys and heart and ultimately patients with AIDS wind up. They don't survive. They die from that multi organ failure and that he's organs weren't able to sustain the inflammatory injury we've heard a lot about the respiratory challenges that can occur to people infected with the covid nineteen virus are the ones who end up on respirators suffering from arts and what role does arts play in the mortality of patients with Covid nineteen arches probably the primary cause of death in most of the cove in nineteen patients. At least that's what the the reports from China and elsewhere suggesting Covid NINETEEN INDUCE. Cards has a lot of similarities to garden variety area but it also has some unique changes that that may not be typical. Air S. as well and The ventilator Think this is an important part of the story. That patients with With Kobe nineteen viral infection or other causes of Respiratory distress like I mentioned substance or bacterial pneumonia trauma and you have Increasing respiratory distress your lungs. Start to fill with Lewis and the work of breathing when your lungs are. Our full of fluid is very very rate. So these patients generally run out of Energy the fatigue and they need then later to help with their respiration and so the the the the irony of of this is that the ventilator while saving your life because your new patients for an out of energy agreed on their own then later also the major cause for information as well. That's been known for now sometime and so strategies to address a yes whether it's cove nineteen induced or otherwise need to take into account the fact that then later contributes to that inflammatory burden patients with they as an academic. You've done functional

Respiratory Distress Aqua Lung Therapeutics Acute Akwa Lung Therapeutics Joe Garcia Biotech Company United States Curiel Covid Founder And Ceo Researcher Oregon Bacterial Pneumonia China Lewis Kobe
Is it finally time to hug your grandparents again?

Coronacast

09:38 min | 1 year ago

Is it finally time to hug your grandparents again?

"While we're still keeping social distancing mommy made up with people when will it be Arcada? Say Hug out all the parents when we visit them. Look I think this is a hard one and I think that we're taking away autonomy from older people here. To be honest I think when the viruses that low levels in the community and families are being responsible. Sofas a cough for cold or a sniffle any doubt or anybody's been tested. You simply don't go to visit your parents at all but if everybody's well I think it's up to the parents if there's a small risk but how long do you go without hugging your kids. You're so what are you doing here? You're T you're making a decision on the part of your elderly parents that you're not going to hug them to protect them but they might be prepared to take the risk. And if so why not so? I think this is a conversation. You need to have in families because it's not so much about spreading the virus. It's more about protecting them against serious illness. And if they're prepared to take the small risk you know why not but families have got to really be responsible about. No coughs colds. Sniffles slighted symptoms maximum testing particularly families. Their parents so that you know that you're you're as much as you can know that you're safe as you can be. It's funny because we've actually got quite a lot of questions along the same lines of just elderly people trying to know how to take care of themselves and rub its asking He sort of pointing at people. Seventy are at greatest risk of covid nineteen. But he saying he's feeling like this little advice that specifically for his generation he wants to know Kenny sees grandchildren. Can they visit his hyman eight with him? Can they drive them to and from school? Can I go back to work? How do these people know how to protect themselves? If they can't be informed. I mean I think it's a fair comment. The answers aren't easy because just like the previous comments have a risk based discussion and decision. So if you're over seventy and quite on well and you've got lots of other problems and you are worried about yourself. Then you wouldn't want to expose yourself very much at all. You probably want to wear a mask when you're outside even though a mask doesn't protect you as well as other people protecting themselves from spreading it but nonetheless you might want to wear a mask lots of hand hygiene and so on so if you're seventeen really healthy the still an increased risk of dying if you get covered nineteen but it depends on whether you're prepared to take that risk as an individual if the rule is in your family just repeating myself is that nobody comes to you with a call a cold. If there's any doubt toll the family gets tested then it should be no reason why you can't come round and have dinner with you at home assuming this basic hygiene driving to and from school where you probably put the kids in the back of the car anyway. So that's that's going to be okay. And you disinfect surfaces. And you have you have hand sanitizer with you and going back to work. That's a risk based decision. And if you maintain a reasonable amount of social distancing when you can if it's felt well-ventilated workplace then the risk is probably going to be relatively low but again if you've got lots of other problems if you're obese if you got diabetes heart disease and so on you've really got to think this through whether or not you're willing to take the risk. The risk is low at the moment because we got very low levels of virus. But it's there and I think now is the time when you can start easing back into things but with a lot of care a lot of care by the people around you. I think people feel like they may maybe getting mixed messages because we have another question from Lennon's that are going for kids to go to school because statistics show. They haven't been getting the virus and transmitting it to adults as much but at the same time we're being told died visit elderly grandparents for fear of spreading the disease. So he's kind of going like which one is it? Well it's it's not one size fits all here so for example residential aged care. The problem there is that as you go into the residential care facility. Your elderly relatives might be perfectly fine and well but there are other people in the facility. Who ARE REALLY SEEK. And therefore you don't want to bring in any disease or infection and that's why residential aged care facilities are being super careful. You just don't want an outbreak like the one they've seen short contact outdoors is pretty safe. Indoor contact that's prolonged. Even with social distancing can be risky. So you've got a balanced these things out but essentially grandparents in the current environment was not allow around with hand hygiene sensible disinfecting surfaces particularly in bathrooms and nobody coming close. Who's got any hint of illness and people are getting tested in the family. I think the we're getting to a point was pretty safe. So do you think that maybe it sounds like the theme? That's coming through. The what you're saying is families should be having conversations and deciding what their rules are going to be for their family. That's right and giving some autonomy to older people. There's no reason why they can't make decisions about their own lives themselves and the fair prepare to take a calculated risk. Why not it's just. He can't take a calculated risk in a residential care facility. Because you're taking a risk for other people who are not your relatives who live in the same facility so residential care. You're going to have to follow the rules of that residential aged care facility but when it's your elderly grandparents living separately from you then you should make the rules together. So Norman. Last week on chronic cost we were talking about measures that people could take to be able to basically go back on public transport. And you recommend will. You were making the comment that if ever wearing a mosque and if everyone had the carpet Saif App then maybe we could have more people in public transport. We had some feedback on that from a couple of people including Helen who says that not everyone has a smartphone especially all the people she can't actually use smut fine. Because of a hand impediment she has and she says that your suggestion is discriminatory and presumptive. Take that one on the Chin Teagan and say meal Copa. That I hadn't really thought that through in terms of order people's access to that I was kind of assuming that smartphone access was broader a shooter through. But they're still might be a way of doing it which is particularly for young people who are spreaders so for example forty percent of infections that are causing spread between twenty and forty now they will have smartphones so the question is. How do you administer something that this understand that but you could have somebody asking? Do you have a smartphone is it. They're encouraging it. You might have a washing period for example so I think even if you got that twenty to forty year old age group with the covid safe APP with high density than that would be a big step forward for what it's worth. We actually got other feedback from people who have oldest smartphones and even those people with smartphones but all the models are finding that the site. That doesn't actually work on them. I think it's quite a lot of work to be done on the covered safe at which I think I did say last week. So it's not. This is not a straightforward exercise and I thank Corona Kastner's for keeping me right on this one. Well let's talk about some research now. We are learning more way. Scientists are learning more every day. About how the virus is working in body including how to fix our immune system this new research into these which also has some implications designing treatments. Yes this research looks at how the virus gets attacked by the immune system or not as the case may be and broadly speaking. There's there's a to phase response to There's an earlier response of the immune system. There's a slightly later response of the immune system to a viral infection and viruses. Incredibly clever getting round this. I mean for a little thing of that doesn't actually live by itself. Just a little bundle of irony doesn't by itself needs our bodies to replicate it. Devises fiendishly clever ways of getting round our immune system and so what what they're discovering with this forest and they've never seen it seen it to the same extent with other viruses. Is that when it gets? Into the cell it really inhibits the chemical messengers alert the immune system these are called interferon so these are the chemical messengers that tell the immune system. Something's going wrong here. Come on guys and gals get in here and start attacking and whistling the army so it suppresses these interferons and then the second response is actually an over an overactive response but it's a dysfunctional one terribly. Clever response on the part of the virus but it is a serious respond. Swear it interferes with the jeans in the second wave of response. These are called site kinds and some people that have heard of the site. Kind storm that you get. Which is what largely kills you with the COVID. Nineteen seventy makes you seriously ill now. What this means is there's an opportunity in this first response. So for example there already finding indications that interferon treatment for a covert nineteen does seem to be helping particularly in combination with antivirals or other medications and this makes sense when they started using it own with covid nineteen. They didn't know the results of the study. But this was study shows. The interferons are very low. So in fact you're replacing them and then also now that you know more about the site of kind response. There are some targets there that you can use to block that response which again. They're already trialing but it allows you to do that more effectively. So you get a sense. Where if you really do attack the virus and its effects in that first episode you're going to help minimize the reaction the second episode as well because it won't get a chance to whistle up. This overreaction

Covid Interferon Hyman Kenny Viral Infection Lennon Corona Kastner Norman Helen
"viral infection" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"viral infection" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Things are going badly for you like it. It doesn't get much worse than bleeding out of your ear. You have serious issues if you're bleeding, unless of course, you'd like, you know, Nick, the inside of your ear with your fingernail if you're bleeding out of your ear from. Inside of your head. It's bad news. Yeah. Went to make sure I'm on the record as being having that position on bleeding out of your anti-arab leading pretty much and with the war effort like again, it's just all these things are happening at once. So it was sort of just kind of sneaking through the back door in like the worst way you could ever imagine. So this is all going on the reason we do know so much about it. And I know that it hasn't gotten all the attention of like the plague and things like that. But in the medical community at has they they weren't like all right? Well that went away. That's great like here in modern times. Like starting in the nineteen thirties. They started, you know, on the download collecting blood samples and examining tissue slides and getting either from from people who died from the bodies or from people that were still alive that survived it, and they have really been doing all this kind of cool like almost. A criminal case like this research to try and learn because you know, you can only you don't want them like this to ever happen again. Right. Right. Well, that one of the scary things Chuck is that like most people who are in public health and FD meteorology ver- al-ajiz say like this could totally happen again. And it would probably be way worse because of our connectability or how connected we are. It we probably have a greater chance of containing it. Just because of the the advances in public health that we've we've undertaken far. Yeah. But the. It could it could happen. I actually talked about this a lot including the Spanish flu. And this one biotech episode of the end of the world, and it from what I saw it. It could very well happen just about anytime. Well, this other part, I don't quite get. Does it does this train still exist or not because it was a little confusing that part? Okay. Get this to it had gone. Totally extinct it'd come and gone as we'll see it just basically maybe burn through everybody. It killed off everybody so fast that it couldn't spread any longer. And like you said flu, viruses mutate like very frequently. So also our body like if you survive of viral infection, you typically conferred immunity for the rest of your life. So the people who are left we're not going to catch the Spanish flu again. Right. Okay. So it had run run its course gone extinct so much. So that not even just the strain of flu, but all h one in one flus left human circulation by the fifties. Nineteen fifties. Somebody at the student Johann Holton who's microbiologist in the fifties. And then later on in the nineties, he went to a little town called brevity mission, Alaska, and he. Dug up the corpse of a native American woman, and then UPS woman who had died had been buried in a mass grave from the Spanish flu and took samples of her lung tissue and took it back to another microbiologist whose name I cannot remember who basically synthesize the genome of it. Okay. Great. We understand that genetically. We've got it. No. They went one step further and actually created the Spanish flu virus again resurrected it from extinction. And yes, the Spanish flu is still around because humans brought it back to life. All right. Well, that makes more sense now. I mean in one way. Right. Not not a great thing to do. But what's funny is if you depending on what you read like if you read like popular mechanics, I'd go about it's it's like this is an amazing great achievement. But for my money it was a terrible achievement..

flu Nick viral infection Alaska Johann Holton
"viral infection" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"viral infection" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Damani, I have a question for you. In regard to my granddaughter. She's almost sixteen middle of when school started a couple of weeks, and she started with some virus, high fever, and what sick like a week and they put Iran prejudice own an antibiotic, and then it. Two weeks later, she came down and they tested her. She didn't have they said, no, she didn't have mono. She didn't have strep. But then two weeks later got really sick. And they said she did she tested again did have mono put him on another antibiotic and on zone again tonsils where extremely swollen. She couldn't they look like they were joined together. Like, let me just jump in here. Let me just jump in here. Second first of all antibiotics do not kill viruses. So they gave her that. Because she did you hear what I just said you're telling me she has a viral infection and giving her an antibiotic which kills bacteria but not viruses. So that doesn't make any sense. The thing of it was they figure ears were infected. So that's why they gave her. Viral infection or a bacterial infection. It sounds like it's a viral infection. And that's why she keeps getting sick. They're treating the wrong thing. And here we are back. She starting to feel better. So Todd and still can't hear out every year. Doc. Pat. It can't be a one sided thing. Okay. Let me just quickly tell you because we have a whole bunch of other people on the line, and we want to be able to get to them as well. I would look at taking the anti formula. Have take two capsules twice a day. I would also look to do colloidal silver into the sinuses as well as into the years..

Damani viral infection Pat Iran fever Todd Two weeks two weeks
"viral infection" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"viral infection" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"A viral infection of the liver the Roebling suspension bridge will be. Closed starting at nine o'clock this morning inspection will force the Roebling suspension, bridge too close for two days this weekend two days next week traffic will not, be able, to cross the bridge from nine AM, to three PM Friday and then, again on Tuesday and Wednesday September fourth and September fifth Allison Wyatt NewsRadio, seven hundred wwl w the boyfriend, of a woman killed in a car wreck in Pennsylvania, charged with homicide after admitting. To cutting her brake lines friends say the boyfriends, explanation, in, court documents in Scranton Pennsylvania He cut his girlfriend's brake lines trying to get a piece. Of pipe, for crack smoking never made sense one friend Lisa, Vargas I mean can't you find something else around the house that smoke crack. And John Jenkins done more is being held without bail accused of a homicide and last week's. Car crash death of Tammy. FOX the court papers say FOX was driving Jenkins crazy because she was. Looking for a crack pipe he allegedly told state. Troopers he didn't want. To go to the store and. Buy one Chuck Sivertsen, ABC news was. One of those nights for sure a. Great American ballpark here's. A reds update last night it's log festival exit. Which reds fans it's not seen in quite a while a great American ballpark and it was all decided in the tenth inning when the brewers scored two times one off of rice salad lacy is the other offer Jackson Stevens and went on to. Beat the reds by a final score of thirteen to twelve twenty five runs thirty six cents of which nine were home runs this is Marty Brennaman reporting like slob mardi. Final game of the three game series later on this afternoon at. GAB first-pitch twelve thirty five on the home of the,.

Roebling suspension bridge John Jenkins Pennsylvania Tammy reds Allison Wyatt Chuck Sivertsen FOX Marty Brennaman Scranton GAB ABC Lisa Jackson Stevens Vargas mardi brewers two days
"viral infection" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"viral infection" Discussed on Science for the People

"So that's that's another big one of course there's also you know sinus disease rhino sinus disease which be kind of nose and sinus in which is probably at least more correctable van someone who's had a viral infection in lahser simpson smell or someone who has had t b i you know go synthesis if you have a a markley deviated septum or open or nasal polyps those can be corrected right seems the difference between something that's wrong with i guess the nose or sinus as opposed to the brain right although again remember though battery epithelium which has all those receptor neurons is in the nose not the brain fine line yep so i you mentioned phantom smells and i have to ask more hallucinations that are smells yeah yeah you got that right there's not a whole lot of kind of form clinton clinical research done on this say that a well documented phantom smell could arise from seizures sorry allowed caesar's emerge from the temporal lobes which is where hippocampus macdill appear from and so if you have uric aided cortex from whatever reason whether it was i dunno multiple sclerosis a very small stroke may be an infection in that area of the brain you can or you know it's really common among epilepsy patients with medial temporal lobe epilepsies of cog medial temporal square roses if that you know ends up triggering the smell pack way you can get these phantom smells and sometimes patients will come to attention.

viral infection markley caesar van clinton temporal lobe
"viral infection" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"viral infection" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Who of different strategies that have evolved to resist the potentially lethal effects or viral infection and the one that we have find the bacteria appear to commit suicide after viral infection this superficially doesn't seem like a clever strategy but actually that leads to the termination replication of an any invading virus that means us new release of any new virus and that means the arrest of the back to you population are protected from for subsequent viral infection the bacteria are essentially putting themselves into isolation orbit terminally in order to prevent the spread of that infection through that population how do they know they've been infected that's a very good question we know that the only certain bacteria viruses can induce this system is called a bart of infection and essentially the must be tight trading a particular viral signal which we've conley trying to investigate and the in their cells they have a thing call the talks toxin antitoxins system and somehow the viral product seems to stimulate or destabilize this toxin antitoxins system which leads to the killing of the bike to you sell the suicidal event so i suppose you could think of it is a bit like a seesaw wave gotta balance says his talks in trying to tell the cell to die an anti talks in telling it to stay alive and when the virus comes along it adds weight to the end of the seesaw the says die and that triggers the cell to then say will i must what myself out because if i allow this virus to replicate in may ongoing going to then infect the rest of my population what's the benefit to the population as a whole of that bacterium surrendering itself you need to think back to you populations of course was clooney when so what does that mean that are identical in a population what genetically 'cause they're splitting to win one becomes too becomes four becomes items on this just because the cells dividing so that sharing the exactly the same genetic information thus right the right dental in that sense.

conley clooney
"viral infection" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"viral infection" Discussed on WTVN

"Humans and dinosaurs coexist it how 'bout this i'm of the sabah you but it's happened may have gone to the doctor the doctors as well you know i think you have a viral infection on like okay bummer and say well we're going to give you prescription dr writes a prescription for antibiotics we then go to the pharmacy we hand in the prescription still think that the sun revolves around the earth and the earth in the center of the universe and their populations of folks i sleep forty one percent almost half of americans believe that that humans and dinosaurs coexist it how 'bout this out of the sabah you but it's happened may have gone to the doctor the doctors as well you know i think you have a viral infection on like okay bummer um and and say well we're going to give you prescription dr writes a prescription for antibiotics we then go to the pharmacy we hand in a prescription the pharmacist gives us a pill bunch bells as takes me at exit tre well the doctor who he or she went to medical school allegedly is giving you eight antibiotic meanwhile they're telling you they think you've a viral infection well antibiotics are anti bacteria they have no use whatsoever to to to fight a viral infection and now he's hospitals around the world including in this great city people are getting these terrible infections with multidrug resisted antibiotic resistant bacteria because of the misuse an over prescription of of antibiotics go size dr frederick bergling more highlights from 2017 town hall hiault shows after this if you.

viral infection dr frederick bergling forty one percent
"viral infection" Discussed on Adam Ruins Everything

Adam Ruins Everything

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"viral infection" Discussed on Adam Ruins Everything

"Bacteria in but uh so if i'm take if i take it in a biotic that i don't need can that also creates a resistant bacteria or is that a risk as well of taking a absolutely time you take an antibiotic dares this risk of of resistance developing and you know when you need nano biotic that that's a risk that we have to take all medicines half risks and we know that and we accept that the issue is is that if you take when when you don't need it you're exposing yourself to all of the risks and getting zero benefit and that is something that we really want people to understand that you know why would you wanna do that you know so if you don't need nano biotic if you go into the your doctor's office here peterson's office until you hate new antibiotics not necessary here you have a viral infection or you what is going on with you isn't an infection at all you don't need antibiotics you know a lot of times we hear people will say well but you know just in case i really want that antibiotic i think it's going to help we feel better and what we want people to understand is that you're actually not doing yourself any favors by the asking for demanding or trying to get that antibiotic in fact you're probably doing yourself more harm right uh and it's real i want to get getting back to the uh really quickly the idea of you know these is a limited resource it's really like any time someone is taking an antibiotic there's like an a number of a chance it's going to create resistance that it really is like every single pill that we take of these medications is diminishing their effectiveness a little bit and sort of getting us closer to that date where that entire population of bacteria is becoming resistant is that right yeah that that's exactly right and i i think that's a really good way of thinking about it is that you know these are drugs we need and their drugs that we have to use every day and we wanna make sure that we're using them as carefully as we possibly.

peterson viral infection
"viral infection" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:25 min | 4 years ago

"viral infection" Discussed on KQED Radio

"With the emergence of new technologies and break through science infectious diseases can come from many sources bacteria viruses fungi parasites and more it can be a little difficult to grasp but if you have such a condition from a common cold to a much more serious disease you've been infected by all living organism which was somehow past to you and you may unwittingly pass it along the symptoms are frequently the same but the cause makes all the difference in treatment for example if you have an infection caused by bacteria antibiotics can address the bacteria directly but if your condition is caused by say a virus or a fungus antibiotics simply won't work dr marco tightly at ease the president and ceo of sign nexus which is working in the area of serious invasive fungal infections i asked him what's the difference between a bacterial infection a viral infection and a fungal infection we'll as reigning fficials specialist all views are all specific bothell jim but this pathogen on a very different revival the viruses are remorse the let's see basic type of pathogens they need the tool leverage the metabolism of the cells with in fact in order to spread and these are actually type of infectious with a very very common called the flu the bacterial infection of beauty pageant which is a little bit more for me in evolutionary point of you a little bit more evolved the soysay aim organ his capable of of leaving by itself and its spreading spreading around he step of infections of that are of course onto this different types of bacterial infections inveigh evaucation can range from very very mild infections two very very cbs's two especially when they involve the patients with our of very you for gile in the form got infections which is be audio interest though for myself and my company is really be the one with that out of the most the the the most divorce type of ogonis more similar actually to the human cells and this is explained of.

president and ceo viral infection bothell cbs
"viral infection" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

01:46 min | 4 years ago

"viral infection" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"And other training opportunities like the physics of the every day astronomy gravitational physics come on that's pretty relevant considering the newest gravitational wave finding and even computer science algorithms neural networks computer memory and machine learning there's so much to explore here and there there's a really great community built around it so i highly recommend you guys try it out by visiting brilliant dot org slash nerdy today that's brilliant dot org slash nerdy all right let's get back to the show but bacteria are most definitely alive they are these simple yet deceptively complex organisms and this is what your research really focuses on so i would love to maybe break down for a second like take a step back from the top line conversations we always hear about in the news about okay antibiotic resistance staff or antibioticresistant gonorrhea or antibiotic resistant whatever don't you know don't take an antibiotic if you have a viral infection or make sure you finish your entire course of your at about it like we know this conventional wisdom but i i wonder how many people actually you know why that's important like what is happening at from an evolutionary perspective when a bacteria that's living creature goes from being susceptible to a drug the drug can kill it to being like more ha ha you have no effect on me like what is happening within the population of bacteria right so a lot of people have kind of the misconception that the antibiotics causes resistance which isn't exactly true so with any population of bacteria.

viral infection computer science
"viral infection" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:14 min | 4 years ago

"viral infection" Discussed on WTVN

"Pill bunch bills as takes three rd ache center well the doctor who he or she went to medical school allegedly is giving you eight antibiotic meanwhile they're telling you they think you've a viral infection well antibiotics are anti bacteria they have no use whatsoever to to to fight a viral infection and now he's hospitals around the world including in this great city people are getting these terrible infections with multidrug resisted antibiotic resistant bacteria because of the misuse and over prescription of of antibiotics and so that's a real for example where our healthcare system is you know from from a fee sandpoint going through the roof trying to figure out how to deal with this and a lot of people are getting sick unnecessary so the concepts that help us figure out what i would what many people seem to thicker fairly simple a you're telling me the art the concepts of how you go about helping people become more scientific litter scientifically literate where where do you start yeah i think i think he's you start from the very i mean the odd thing about a ninety nine adam you talked about you know you're young kids going to to cosi children come out of their mothers completely curious their scientist by nature that's how they learn to talk to hang all these adult see all this noise deal and understand the keep trying iterating iterating practicing all of a sudden he lindsay momma data and these startline speak that's how they learn to walk to lean on something they follow over the leaned it's a constant trial an era process and that's what science is all about and so where do you start kids are eddie porn curious asking a kid put him out in the yard you're playing their explore nets what they do but then somewhere along the the kind of elementary school middle school it's like sciences hard and then unless you have a teacher that lakes you're parent that's force in your whatever you can easily get rounded off and so so where where we started to think we start with with this great radio show and just getting people to understand that you know media can play a great role in saying that science is important just appreciated have fun with it and anybody's learn the signs of a phenomenal hasn't hasn't been that down the get excited we're going to learn more about helping us all become more scientific illiterate as we continue our conversation with the.

rd ache center viral infection healthcare system adam scientist eddie