20 Episode results for "Viola"

Viola Davis

Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

44:30 min | 2 years ago

Viola Davis

"Hey Guys Willie geist here with another episode of The Sunday. Sit Down podcast my thanks as always clicking and listening along my guest. This week is a Hollywood powerhouse house. She is the Oscar Tony Emmy and Golden Globe winning actress Viola Davis we walk through not just an extraordinary career but an extraordinary life she was born on a former plantation in a one room shack in South Carolina moved as an infant up to central falls Rhode Ryland with her family where she lived in destitute poverty roaches in the house. You'll hear all about it counting only on her school lunch for a meal every day to rise from that place to where she is now is an incredible story and you're going to hear every bit of it. She went to the juilliard school she went on became a Tony Winning winning actress on Broadway and then worked her way onto Hollywood's a-list with breakout roles in the help and then an Oscar winning performance alongside Denzel Washington offenses not to mention starring role in the hit T._v.. Show that earned her an emmy how to get away with murder interesting to hear viola talk about fame still kind of uncomfortable with it knows how fleeting it is and talks about giving back and doing the important things with her platform among them her latest project a documentary Patrick called a touch of sugar. It's about the diabetes crisis in our country. She was diagnosed with prediabetes a few years ago and it runs in her family using the platform platform to talk about an epidemic in this country a powerful conversation Viola Davis. I have to say sucks you in. She speaks so passionately and powerfully she is inspirational and she's here now on the Sunday. Sit Down podcast. Thank you bye again. We're as a sort of an interview series. We're conducting. We start at thirty thirty rock then we move here. We'll do another one somewhere downtown later today. I'll some keep talking. I have to say I didn't know this about you. The diabetes that's in in your family and touched your life enough that you wanted to be the voice of this documentary film. I did want to be the voice because it you know the the thirty million adults that have type two diabetes the eighty four million have prediabetes and then I think about my family it has been affected by my two sisters my aunt who succumb to the disease after two amputations my grandmother it it's an unacademic obviously and it and it seems like it's almost everyone story and when it becomes everyone story and but then no no one really talks about it then I always feel like someone needs to blow the lid off of it and get it out into the public guy. That's why I'm now leading this film. That's why I want to be a part of it. <hes> there is something about the aloneness of anything that someone is suffering from that I feel lose my sort of mission in life and then it came knocking on your door as well about a year and a half ago when you got word I have prediabetes you know and I went in for Hormone Moan tests and then my doctor took the one seat test which is Comprehensive Test that measures you average glucose in the last two three months so you take a test four times a year. I didn't know anything about that and then she told me the results and I had to go to work I was going to how to get away with murder and I remember it just leveled me. It just stopped me. I didn't know what to do. It's like what can I do exercise. I eat right. It's almost it's like waiting for this sort of silent. I Dunno Marmi to come right in decimate you <hes> and you're not armed <hes> <hes> and so I just felt like what do I just become hyper vigilant. It doesn't mean that I have to develop type two diabetes <music> Beatty's but what do I have to change my lifestyle which is already good to something. That's better in a busy with a busy schedule and that's the thing how do you manage with this disease. How do you do it and what do you say to people who are living with this disease in terms of hope because the numbers are staggering one in ten adults in this country live with it and many many more like you were pre-diabetic? Is there more research being done is there's something on the horizon that you can point to and say we're working on this. Well listen. I hope that there are you're more drugs on the horizons or something that can be done. I'm sure that there are my sisters are always conversing with each other every single goal day about something that can be done. <hes> and everyone's diabetes is different some our diet and I'll wait related. Some some are genetic. There are some things that you can do to manage the disease. There is a website that created a touch of sugar film DOT Com. I <hes> but that's what I'm doing. I exercise I think about my carb count <hes> I'm hyper vigilant but I do have the genetic factor there right you know <hes> that's what I can. That's what I said and it's all there in the title <unk> a touch of sugar. Some people may not be familiar with that term but you talk about growing up as just an accepted part of life. She's got a touch of sugar. He's got a touch of sugar absolutely because I I was born. In Saint Matthew South Carolina literally singleton plantation and everybody got a diabetes diagnosis. It was called sugar. You've got the sugar and busy. She got the sugar and it was almost sometime. said in silence you know almost like something you should be ashamed of and just the reference to it as diabetes shows the lack of education in what it is when it came from how to manage it and of of course the State Bowl of African American Hispanic communities really have high numbers of diabetes the staple of our diet diet corn bread rice. I remember we used to make sugar candy. When we were kids? You Know How you make sure candy with CRISCO and sugar you put it in the frying pan and you heat it up and then you take the heat off and you wait for it to just harden and that was sugar candy. You know you ate cornstarch our charge the box. That's a big thing you know down south. Nobody ever knew that those factors could absolutely be the the cause and the root of diabetes. It was what you did right. It was what you knew. Those foods are very cheap very accessible well and so there we go so now you've gotten to a root of the problem which is poverty which is access to good foods which is access to food ooh to fruit and vegetables and eating well and education about the importance of that that obviously is a much bigger problem to tackle but also a piece of the problem that you can speak to because as you said it was part of how you grew up once again it was I mean I always say I grew up pope which is a wrong lower their poor you you know and but I I'm one of the forty six million people in this country who live in poverty. That's what twenty four twenty five thousand dollars a year if you I have two kids and more and that's before taxes and I just you have access to nothing you you have access to nothing you know. It's what you call even food desserts. You know there are no whole foods in poor communities. There's barely Ralph's or on you know so. That's something that needs to be addressed. It's just something that no no one talks about. I can't tell you how many speaking gigs that I've done around the country and when I mentioned poverty and I mentioned just the every day of poverty that I don't can't tell you how many people say no one ever talks about that. There is a shame attached to it when my mom when we were young we grew up on public assistance and one of the things that my mom did she really wanted a different life for us and so she really was involved on welfare reform and one of the things that she really really fought for was a health clinic in the city of Central Falls Blackstone Valley community the Action Health Clinic. She fought for her and a bunch of other poor women who were living on public assistance because otherwise you know you sort of have to wait for any disease to get completely out of control to walk to Memorial Hospital and sit in the E._r.. For five six hours before Oh you got treated and so we had that little health clinic there wench didn't provide much but what it was was a source of information. I sat there as a eight nine year old and I I was taught about nutrition and so it was good for me but the the level to which she had to fight for that is the sort of warriors we need within those impoverished communities or people walk outside those communities who see the issue who see the problem and take it upon themselves. You need the same warrior spirit on the outside of the diabetes. He's epidemic as you need from the inside and what I mean by that is even with my prediabetes diagnosis with my two sisters diabetes. You gotta be a warrior with your health. The Self Care Aspect of it is so enormous in terms of just managing it understanding it understanding the root causes of your you just got a tackle it you know and we that's how we have to be about the poverty crisis. Also you see it as important. What can you do? How can you stand in the gap and there are people who will say yes but how can I worry about having a good diet when I don't even have a diet to begin with I mean you've talked about the school lunch? Sometimes the only meal you would ever have in a day or the best meal for sure that you had during the day so I think for some people getting a meal is the is the goal getting a healthy meal might be a nice bonus. If you can get there. We've got to be able to provide food for It out there and and people who understand that a lot of those foods provided in schools have a high sugar content all all of those things but in impoverished communities. Certainly you know here's the thing we care about each other. You know I'm sorry to sound combine and make it a grand sweeping statement but the people who have and the people who get to a position where they have the resources says need to reach back. I know that when I was a kid we had so many different programs that helped me even to just get an education. I mean beyond the health clinic that provided you know a lot of information. There were some in the city on this up with bomb prepartory enrollment programs. There are things that you can do outreach things that people in power that have some some semblance of anything they can throw someone the rope. Certainly this is what the documentary is all about it. They've set up the website light. My husband always says you got to plant the seed. You don't know how it's going to grow but you have to plan it and <hes> I know that when I was six years old I was always begging from the inside for help. It was was like a begging for help and I think that people who have not there was always sort of a silent begging for help and hope <hes> Ooh if you see it if you then address it if you have the power to do that and you're doing that and your your journey doing that with you as much much as I can do in any number of ways and certainly with this documentary narrating it then and getting the message out there and not stigmatizing something that is affecting like you said one out of ten people but <HES> but I've done it in other aspects too you and I will tell you that it does make a difference your your journey to be in a position to help the way you do help not just on this but on hunger is an extraordinary one when people hear your story or as you said born on a plantation in South Carolina yeah growing up as you've said abject poverty in Rhode Island. What was your childhood like. What was it like to be a little girl. The way you grew up while it was like everyone's childhood filled with happy memories and you know going to the reservoir and you know playing with my sisters and bicycles and all of that and it was also filled with the darkness of when you pour so you have bad housing you just do nobody regulates housing for poor people. They just don't so we lived in condemn building building certainly apartments infested with rats never having a phone bad plumbing filling the bucket full of water pouring the water in the toilet and flush it certainly the clothing shoes always chew tight because we bought everything from Salvation Army called Saint Vincent de Paul and and you know just the stigma of poverty the feeling on the outside but feeling invisible bull a lack of access which is why I talk about it all the time and it's uncomfortable for me. It really is it it. It's uncomfortable for me to talk about it but I always find that once you blow the lid off of anything in wants wants to tell the truth it becomes a domino effect and it gives people permission to tell the truth and then it gives another person and another person and another person and soon what it becomes a revolution a revolution and it becomes the norm and it stigmatizes it and then once you. D- stigmatizes it. D- stigmatize it then you have to address it in a small way. I say what I say a lot of times because it's a little narcissism in me that I it's a demand for people to see me. You see me I am because I didn't have the power to do that as a kid and I feel that way about all things that people are suffering in silence with is I want them to be seen an heard. I hate when people are not seen in heard because I think the next step is metaphorically speaking death and I think that that's happening in the world too much. I think that we're seeing the side effects of that too much even zeitgeist now and you're in the unique position to have lived it so when you talk about poverty you know from whence it comes. I mean you've been there. You said it makes you uncomfortable to talk about. Is that because it reminds you of those times times what's uncomfortable. When you talk about poverty not enough talk about it you go online. Is anyone on the instagram or twitter your page talking about. They're talking about this great. I don't know Alexander McQueen jacket. They just bought or the new diet that they're on in how they have type ADS now. They're an extraordinary mom and they can juggle being you know a C._e._o.. Of A company being a mom being the wife and then making homemade meals. Everything is about winning and everything is about conquering and everything is about about a great result. Nobody wants to talk about the other okay. There is no romance in sexiness sexiness involved with poverty. There is no romance in sexiness involved with being invisible and not having access to health care the housing to fresh foods <hes>. There's no swagger to it and that's hard. You know it's Rene Brown. Mom says to own your story. Either you own your story or you stand outside of it hustling for your worth. I'm not hustling for my worth anymore more. I feel very much like I was born worthy but I know that now and that's why he does make you feel comfortable because I understand how I'm going to be seen with it but the other part of it is just demand <hes> given where you came from given all you went through as a child. Where does your light come from. Where did you say I can grow up can be an Oscar winning actor. When did you start to see yourself that way that I can step out of this childhood into something bigger and better for myself. What gave you that hope you know what I don't know if I always saw it. I'm just going to be honest with you. I think I believed it a huge amount of time in my life but seeing a physical manifestation of what you want to be a mentor as Joseph Campbell says in the journey video when you have your call to adventure in your catapulted out of your ordinary life what you don't fit in and a mentor into your path someone who's who's who's seen the road who's WHO's paid the way and they come and they show you the path yeah. That was Miss Tyson. That was my sister Diane. That was someone who teaches you how to master a skill teaches you how to fail how to succeed in. Someone just likes you simply too. That's what helped me now. I have to tell you. There's a cap on awards <music>. There's a cap on cuteness in. I don't know being on people's most beautiful list. There's a cap to it if someone tells you. There's not a cap to it. They're lying what you say. There's a cap to greatness. There's a cap defame. We've seen fifty million documentaries of people who just destroyed. We're there live on top of their game because the truth of the matter is is that everyone fights for success because they feel like once you hit it. You've got it. You've got about the Elixir. That is the magic elixir that Joseph Campbell talks about right that is not the elixir. The Elixir is living the life of significance. The Elixir is living a life that is bigger than you. That's what it is and if you're not doing and then you're not doing anything nothing that message needs to be pounded in people and I think that probably you'll see less of even what I'm talking about. Now which is people living with the disease where a lot of people not throwing them a rope and it needs to be part of like sort of normalize conversation even when we re talking to kids you know instead of saying we want mixed race premed become a lawyer. What about living a life. That's meaningful like urban says the great existentialist psychologists who says I will not truly be dead until the last person who has a memory of me dies. You know we want that to be hundreds of years. From now. We want people to benefit from our legacy. Whatever legacy you have hundreds of years from now now and that's not just a cute face. It's not trophies on a shelf right. Absolutely we have the we. We live in very we. We saw our country. It's a very wealthy country. I think that we can come up with a solution in terms of how to help people who are suffering even in terms of health. That's very well said but I do want to ask about those trophies on your shelf. That's okay that's all right. So when I'm I'm curious when you your first acting Gig. When did you even get into that. When did you know that was a possibility coming from where you came from oh I could do this. Miss Tyson changed inch the game for me because she looked like needs you like my mom. I started acting when I basically was eight or nine my sisters and I because because we wanted something to do. We would write skits. We'd right WHO's skits and we would have rehearsals. We would have rewrites. We would have a wardrobe. The budget and then I started acting really acting in high school in Drama Competitions Rhode Island Drama Festival. I got a scholarship when I was fourteen to young people school of the Performing Arts at the travel three hours one way just to get to the school and once again everyone who we went to the school they were coming up in Peugeot's and Saab's and B._M._W.'s. I was coming on foot proud to be there and I always say that I'm an O._G.. Because people ask me that question. When did you get started? I have done so many plays so many productions Sion's in church basements and basketball courts off Broadway on Broadway regional theatre. I've worked with everyone. I love the work <hes> I loved paying my dues. I just thought it was such an awesome thing for people to say so viola. So what do you do to actually actually say I'm an actor. I thought it was awesome and like anything led to juilliard it led to getting an agent. Just created needed a domino effect and it brought me to Hollywood and here I am. It's funny almost every actor I've ever spoken to talk about their career. Say People see the end product which is me standing on a stage with a statue in my hand and they don't know the twenty twenty five years that led up to that they off Broadway. Nobody knows the truth of anything. You know. They really don't if you're born with a statue in your hand there was a little work came before it yeah and they also kind of think you just this kind of stroking the statue every day. You know I don't look at the statutes so what was the most exciting when you get out of juilliard and you get it onto Broadway and you're nominated for Tony Pretty quickly in that time afterward. What was the most exciting first day for you on Broadway was walking out onto the state also here I am I can tell you exactly what it was opening night of seven guitars on Broadway when I think about everything I believed that being an actor was that was it walking into your dressing room and Florida's ceiling flowers the all the camera crew outside the theatre working with August Wilson on my mom and Dad Ed being in the audience and my dad crying during the curtain call the cameras you know everybody taking pictures and you know movie? Cameras were then my father standing up crying clapping he didn't know what to do. We shaking my mom it. It was everything that I thought being an actor was it was the work and the joy of the work. It was the smell of the theater and it was working with the Greek playwright August Wilson the great director Lloyd Richards Great Actors. I was like I met this is it I've arrived. I don't need anything else in my life. I wish there because now I know I'm like really you really thought that was it right but that's the journey right you feel like you've reached the mountaintop and then Oh there are more mountains after that are you've reached the point you always dream getting and then and you win a Tony for King Hedley win another Tony for fences and now you're sort of like the queen of Broadway for that time I mean that must have been an extraordinary ordinary thing for somebody who was playing church basements to start her career. It was an extraordinary thing you know to dream the biggest dream you can possibly imagine imagine in your life and having no kind of foresight of how that was going to happen and then all of a sudden it happens you you you you you sort of hit it. It's sort of like magic and it speaks to the power of belief and hope and hard work <hes> but life doesn't end there. I always say the three most important words that happens especially after you have big old trophy in your hand or anything the three most important words are and now what and now what what's the next thing what's the next chapter. Denzel always says the Denzel has the best quotes by the way I don't go out on a new says. There's no u-haul in the back of a hearst you sort of can't take it with you and once ensue hit it. That's what you realize. It's like. Oh my God. Oh I got an Oscar. Your heart is about potatoing and then you go home and then you sit down amount and then the next day and it's like and how what what's the next page and <hes> that's sort of where I'm Matt Right now. <hes> what was it like to jump into movies from the stage given the fact that you built your whole career on stage work. What did a movie set set feel like to you when you first started doing like speaking another land language speaking Mandarin at Mandarin and movie once and they cut it out? I'm so glad I did it. It was so hard it took two months to learn one sentence. That's what it was like like learning Mandarin. It was a black hat and I thought I was so good I would go to my friends who were Chinese and say I'm going to say something and they would say but it was like speaking. Man is just a completely different world and it completely different world. I mean I always say all you have to do in a movie is sustainable performance for thirty seconds. That's it that's as long as a take glass so you got thirty seconds all right. When you're on stage you can have a twelve page scene and there are no edit buttons? There are no cuts and that's just one scene. I've been I've done plays where I've done them for year six seven months and you're on stage the entire time thirty seconds to sustain the performance permits so it was much different and you're acting opposite someone like Meryl Streep so you standing there going. I'm good. I'm really good. I'm good I know that this street but I'm Viola Davis and good and then you're acting opposite her and you're thinking Oh my God. Oh my God it's Meryl Streep. Oh my God it's Meryl Streep and it's like hot Kat by okay. Let's not in the scene but the other part of movies. It's very difficult so much of what we do in movies and T._v.. Sex Appeal right cute you are. Do we like like you. What's your cue rating? You know I'm not. I'm not so good at that I think are you may not know it. I seem to like Viola. I'm glad people like me but you know to actually manufacture right is is very very difficult. I'm just I'm just about just telling the story you know. Doing the work loved the work. Love it. When you get nominated for an Oscar for one scene in doubt were you surprised by that nomination because it felt like a lot of people including including Meryl Streep by the way as the beginning of something when she famously said <hes> get her a movie yeah? was that a surprise to be nominated for that yeah all of it is a surprise to me. Every bit of it is a surprise you know when I when I got the role I thought that was the reward and award I didn't see beyond that you know so and then being at the Oscars the red carpet carpet. I had a panic attack. It's one of the one to panic attacks I've ever had in my entire life AAC. I would not recommend any I would even wish that upon my worst enemy. I don't have a lot of enemies but I would not wish that upon anybody who had added on the red carpet Oh yeah I had car and what does that mean what happened the sides shaking uncontrollably me besides hyperventilating besides provides a very beautiful woman named Meryl Streep who told me the day before Viola listen. I can't be at that award show but if I win and can you accept the award for me and I said Yes yes. I'll do that and then I got there. I was like what it's just that led to the panic attack along with the red carpet you know and you know I didn't want to say will kill Oh you because Oh my God you got through it. I don't think anybody noticed you survive pretty well. I know you say winning. An Oscar isn't the end of the world and what's next but to have Oscar winner in front of your name every time someone says it does mean something you're in a club with Meryl Streep and some of your other idols and now people are friends of yours. What does it mean to be in that sort of elite club? You may not think of it that way but people on the outside certainly do has it changed your life's. I know it's changed your career. I'm sure but does it. Change Your Life to be Oscar winner Viola Davis Yeah. It's changed my life to be Oscar winner to be on a T._v.. Show T._V. Show really trans out on my life even more than the Oscar take the truth. Everything is all of it as the money all of it. I remember someone saying you know if you're not poor anymore. I I was like you didn't know what to do with that. Information is but I'm yeah it's it's totally but I'll tell tell you what it's probably more of a transformation to people who observe my life than me being in it right me being in it. I don't know the Viola that you talk talk about. I don't I'm aware that you know it but in my every day when I have my rap over my head and I'm running around with with my daughter and we're going to Ralph's or bonds and I'm cooking. I'm Viola. I'm me and and you know in terms of me getting through my everyday life and certainly living a meaningful life. It doesn't play a role except except for the power of influence. Which is what I'm doing here? The power of That the power to literally stand up on the stage and have people listen to you when you're coming from a pass when one saw you know. No one listened to you so it's like now. What do you WANNA say. What do you want to do? You know well. It helps that you have such a presence to a lot of people have the platform but they can't deliver it. I would argue the way you deliver it. Have you always had this presence about you. You speak almost poetically and I I mean. It's not everybody who can pull that off is that part of being an actor being comfortable on stage well well comfort is like a dirty word for an actor. You know that they tell you not right for comfort right to be uncomfortable in the moment you're alive and all that you're not afraid of the spotlight and on stage clearly well. Sometimes I am but I'm I'm used to it. I'm used to the spotlight. I guess I'm used to the camera being placed on me. I am thank you for listening to the Sunday. Sit Down podcast stick around to hear more from Oscar winner Serviola Davis including what her younger self with think of the woman she sees now. Hey it's Josh Mankiewicz from dateline. Do you need your true crime. Fix on on the go. Dateline episodes are now available in podcasts. You can listen in the car or on the beach or wherever the summer takes you mysteries with a twist from dateline subscribe now so don't miss an episode welcome back to the Sunday sit down podcast now more of my conversation with Viola Davis. Do you have moments. Do you ever stop in your life and look back at the little girl in Rhode Island. Look at your life and go. I don't know how I got here. Thank God I did but I don't know how. I got here all the time every single day you know when I they think about her a lot to first of all it's every day when I opened my refrigerator when I wash my toilet when I could put a robe on when I have hot running water when I know that there's no lead in the pink in my house when I could get in a car and I can go somewhere and not walk. She is with me every day to understand that every little thing in my life is to be celebrated okay but I always say I always want to heal her because she was always so sort of traumatized. I grew up in dysfunction my father ah who I loved more than anything was an alcoholic. It's just a byproduct a lot of times poverty right that it always want to heal her. I just want to reach back and go. You know what everyone I see in my life. I I I'm GONNA remember you. I'm going to listen to people I'm. GonNa love people because it's like healing might the little girl but it's like someone just recently said. Can you allow the little girl that little girl who survived. WHO's pretty tough. Can you allow her to be so excited. At the fifty-three-year-old she gets to become <hes>. Can you our the hug you and just squeal and it took me a long time to do that but I finally did it because I think that there's a grace gratefulness that needs to come and Ajoy that needs succumbed with celebrating the fruits of your Labor that I have not allowed myself to do because I think that's also something that comes from poverty is survivor's. REIVER's guilt is making it out when you see other people who are still in the hole so I'm allowing allowing you to sort of hug me and squeal and I do things like this that feed my soul touch of sugar because I love my sisters who we're here in New York with me. I want the live. I'm reconciling my childhood but as you say it took you a while aalto get there. You're comfortable with your success and your fame and people like me telling you how great you are yeah. What what was the tipping point for you. How did you get there to say. You know what it's okay that I am where I am well. You know what a friend of mine said this once I mean besides therapy but a friend of mine said this once. She said you know what Viola when I tell my story a lot of times. I stand outside of it. I think to myself wow you awesome. That is such an unbelievable testimony. You know then you begin to see how God work miracles in your life and then I started really listening to my story and understood how sort of awesome it was uh-huh incredible. I just thought you just work hard and you get out. That's it. It's nothing credible about it. So the more I've told my story the more I have embraced it but I gotta keep telling it and not live outside of it like grenade. Brown says as Joseph Campbell says when you go and you going out there to that call to adventure and you're going out there to find that Elixir that answer to your life that you gotta go into that Inner Cave and you gotta go in there and slay those dragons and I find that when I went into those innermost caves or that infamous cave that the dragon I needed to slay was me that sort of hurt in that pain of sort of railing at God like why do I have to be that kid growing up or filthy healthy houses and Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah and why do I do that anger that sort of pain and all the bad that that innermost cave and slay her and understand that I'm still alive. I have the power of influence that God has always been with me. Upward bound program preparatory enrollment program teachers have been awesome. Great actors like Cecily Tyson Meryl Streep People like like my sister the ropes that have been thrown at me. That's what I found in the inner most cave and then you know I- nickelback after I found that answer to sort of give that Elixir to people who are still there there is a way to live a life of significance significance and reconcile way. You are now that there's a way out and there's a way to make your life meaningful forget per day Brown now. I'm following you through the wall. You're you gotta get you. I'm sorry but I think you take it over awesome. I would be derelict in my duty. Judy if I didn't ask you if there's going to be more of the show you mentioned how yeah that's A._B._C. to decide. I think that analysts Keating in has more in her. That's what I think I sort of. I'm seeing something. Is that a suspicion or something. It's a suspicion in a hope that they'll be more. I need for analysts to have some labs. I really do. I you know it's just like me. People think that I'm not fun. I I am so much fun. If you come to my house I'm telling you we have me and my husband would have green parties. You know but I need to have some lab. Let's give her another sees at the laugh. Okay that doesn't get enough for that. I also want to ask you about work you do with your husband and your production company and we were just talking briefly about the manual documentary that DUHR executive producing with steph curry boy. I've only seen the trailer but it looks incredibly moving. Absolutely it looks like something you did the the right way. Why was that a project. You wanted to take on well. We met the victims of the Ame church in Charleston when I was and I had to present them with the award that the Glamour Magazine Event and and then we spoke to them afterwards at the party really sat down with them mm-hmm and you know the big thing with them is they said we're not gonNA live in. Hey we're going to live and forgiveness. What struck me as forgiveness is a journey yeah but I just didn't Walk People Forget that story. I didn't want people to forget that tragedy. You know so often with the number of tragedies at that happened in this country. It's amazing how you have to keep reminding people of it they they remember it for a while. It's it's on the news. It's trending and then because of the twenty four hour news cycle within seconds. It's forgotten again. I didn't want people to forget. I felt like I owed it to them. You know the pain that they still goal to with losing their loved ones as a son a mom <hes> I didn't want people to forget that and how awesome it is like I told you before they use whatever power I have as a source of of influence and so when it came to us as a producing goosing project we wanted to do that. We just felt like we had to. It looks fabulous. I applaud everything you're doing with this platform especially on diabetes. I told you my father other has diabetes so it means a lot that you've given your time to this. Thank you so much thank you. I enjoyed talking to you. Thank you my thanks again to the great. Viola Davis Davis for a great conversation loves spending time with her. You can learn more about her new documentary at a touch of sugar film. Dot Com as usual as has always my thanks to all of you for listening along to the Sunday sit down podcast this week to hear more of the full length conversations with all of my guests be sure to click subscribe five so never miss an episode and don't forget to tune in to Sunday today every weekend on N._B._C.. I'm Willie geist. I'll see you right back here next week on on the Sunday. Sit Down podcast good evening everyone breaking news lister hall. Are you afraid Iran as playing with fire hire the most trusted TV news anchor in America here in Normandy hundreds gathered to honor the heroes what it means to be American evenings on your local N._B._C. Station.

Oscar diabetes Viola Davis Davis Meryl Streep Viola Viola Davis Willie geist Broadway Hollywood South Carolina Denzel Washington Miss Tyson Tony Emmy murder Ralph Joseph Campbell Rene Brown juilliard school Rhode Island
Local Legends: Viola Desmond

Encyclopedia Womannica

08:26 min | 6 months ago

Local Legends: Viola Desmond

"All i wanted was to see a movie. Dante's i can't sell downstairs tickets to people. Hello from wonder media network. I'm jenny kaplan and this is encyclopedia will manteca. Today's local legend is an icon for human rights in canada her defiant refusal to leave a whites. Only area of a movie theater led to the first known legal challenge of racial segregation brought by a black woman in canada. Let's talk about viola desmond viola. Irene davis was born on july sixth nineteen fourteen in halifax nova scotia. She was raised in a family with ten siblings and parents who were prominent in the halifax community. her father. james. Albert davis was well known as a local barber. Her mother gwendolyn irene. Johnson was well known for a different reason. Gwendolyn was the daughter of a local white pastor and a black mother though halifax was an integrated community mixed race marriages were still rare at the time by her parents. Success in the community viola aspire to be a successful businesswoman after a short stint spent teaching viola. New aspirations lay elsewhere. She enrolled in the fueled beauty culture school in montreal. One of the only pd schools in canada that accepted black applicants. She continued her education in the us before opening up her own salon by studio of beauty culture. Catered to the black community of halifax i. Ola had tapped into a cultural movement at the start of the twentieth century new beauty trends required special products in maintenance salons offered rare opportunities for female entrepreneurs this movement was particularly impactful for black women for whom opportunities to own a business. Were incredibly scarce. These salons became a point of connection within communities and elevated the owners to positions of authority and status viola quickly found success. An expanded her influence. She opened up her own school. The desmond school of beauty culture which focused on hiring and training young black women in her community. She also started a line of products that were sold in salons across the province but violence life took a dramatic turn on november eighth nineteen forty. Six violence is car. Broke down a new glasco when she was en route to a business meeting. In sydney nova scotia a nearby mechanic told viola other repairs. Take several hours so she checked into a hotel room and muzy to a nearby movie theater to pass the time when she arrived the roseland theater viola purchased two tickets for a seat on the main floor of the upcoming film instead. The cashier handed viola a ticket for the balcony in one thousand nine hundred forty six canada. Racism wasn't institutionalized in the same way it was in the united states there were more unspoken and insidious rules of how black and white people were supposed to interact unbeknownst to viola. The roseland theater did not permit black people to sit on the main floor of the theater when she tried to enter the theater. The ticket takers signal that she needed to go up to the balcony level. Assuming there'd been a mistake viola return to the cashier. he responded. I'm sorry but i'm not permitted to sell downstairs tickets to you. People file low wasn't having it. She marched right back into the theater and took a seat on the main floor. The situation escalated. The manager of the theatre was called over and demanded by all leave her seat arguing that the theater maintained the right to refuse admission to any objectionable person faial explained that she hadn't been refused admission. She'd been sold a ticket. Just not the tickets she requested. She offered to pay difference in price for a main floor ticket. Eventually a police officer dragged viola out of the theater injuring her knee and hip in the process by was taken to the local jail where she was held overnight of her time in jail. Viola recalled being shocked and frightened sitting bolt upright all through the night. The following morning via was taken to court charged with attempting to defraud the local government. It was alleged that she had refused to pay the one cent amusement tax remain for ticket viola had been more than happy to pay the difference in price between the two tickets but this counterpoint was not heard by the court as throughout by olas trial. She was not provided a lawyer nor informed that she was entitled to one the court found her guilty of the crime and find her twenty six dollars at no point in the trial was raised mentioned yet. It remained evident that the real violation viola refusal to adhere to the unspoken rule to black movie goers relegated to the balcony. It was common knowledge in the black community around new glasgow that the roseland theater was segregated. File was husband. Jack desmond grew in new glasgow and was not at all surprised. When he learned about retreatment his inclination was to let the issue go and carry on with their lives but viola had other ideas after having her injuries examined by her doctor. Violet became determined to reverse the charges. Along with the nova scotia association for the advancement of colored people. Viola raised money to fight her conviction. The clarion a black owned and operated newspaper closely covered the details of violence case and brought attention to the roseland theaters. Discriminatory practices the legal. Nature of racist. Criminalisation was unsettled in canada at the time. But the case never made it to trial due to legal technicalities suit balance between various nova scotia courts before it was finally ruled that the original conviction could not be overturned. Though viola didn't win her case her quest for equality under the law and her resistance to the status quo mobilized her community the black population and nova scotia continued to organize in nineteen fifty four eight years after violas initial incident segregation was deemed illegal in nova scotia. This fight for equality came with personal costs under the pressure of the court. Battles in widespread attention. File is marriage deteriorated. She eventually abandoned her business and left halifax altogether moving first to montreal before settling in new york city as a result of poor health viola died in new york on february seventh nineteen sixty five posthumously. In april of twenty ten viola was granted a pardon by the lieutenant governor of nova scotia the pardon accompanied by a formal apology from the province recognized viola conviction as miscarriage of justice that same year the viola desmond chair and social justice was established at the cape breton university. Two years later the canadian post issued a postage stamp with her image on it and twenty eighteen viola selected to appear on canada's ten dollar banknote making vile of the first black person and i non royal to appear alone on the country's currency we are here today to unveil canada's new ten dollar banknote which features the iconic nova scotia native viola desmond's while much of the recognition. Violence fight the indignity. She suffered came nearly fifty years after her death. There's no doubt her. Pursuit of equality was foundational in the canadian civil rights movement all month talking about local legends for more on. Why we're doing what we're doing. Check out our newsletter. We'll manica weekly. Find us on facebook and instagram encyclopedia will manica. You can also find me on twitter at jenny. M catholic special. Thanks to lose. Kaplan i favorite sister and co creator. Talk to you tomorrow.

viola halifax nova scotia canada roseland theater jenny kaplan viola desmond viola Irene davis Albert davis gwendolyn irene desmond school of beauty cultu glasco faial Gwendolyn Dante new glasgow one cent Ola montreal twenty six dollars
Viola Davis

Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

36:19 min | 2 months ago

Viola Davis

"I'm oprah winfrey. Welcome to super soul. Conversations the podcast. I believe that one of the most valuable gifts you can give yourself is time taking time to be more fully present. Your journey to become more inspired and connected to the deeper world around us starts right now. Viola oprah so good the so good to see to just let me offer my deepest congratulations on your golden globe and your sag award nominations for ma. Rainey's black bottling you thank you very much. The incomparable viola davis has done it again with another jaw. Dropping performance. A nearly unrecognizable viola transforms herself into ma rainey. The real life mother of the blues in my rainey's black bottom streaming now on net flicks the film based on the play by pulitzer prize. Winning playwright august wilson covers a single recording session on a sweltering hot day in chicago in nineteen twenty seven but at the heart of the story is so much more racial injustice the transformative power of the blues and what it means to fight every single day for dignity. Viola brings the full force of her talent to this role and the late chadwick. Boseman is electrifying in his final screen. Performance he plays levy trumpet virtuoso coping with deep seated trauma. You have so many awards already so when you do a role like this and the awards start to reveal themselves. What does it feel like for you. Is it a great affirmation. You know oprah. It's a combination of a great affirmation. Also a fear of while the impostor syndrome follows everyone. I don't care. I mean i feel like it's sort of a false narrative if i said that you know every time i get award i just walk off the stage and i feel like the boss i feel like it's affirmation but real in reality. Those three words keep playing over and over in my head which is and now what you start the next job you get on that set and for minute you feel like you're just starting all over again. They found out that. You're not as good as people think you are. You have an added responsibility and added visibility. It's fair it's something. That's deeply human i think but yes. It's an affirmation. I i always have to remember that little girl growing up in central falls. Yes that makes me feel good for a little while longer. Not only just growing up in central falls. But living under such circumstances you know where roaches and mice and everything just trying to stay alive and thri and now look at this glorious life. Because her parents lacked opportunity and resources viola has described her childhood with her five siblings living in abject poverty often going without food for internal drive and fierce talent brought her to the prestigious juilliard school of performing arts. She then spent years. Mastering her craft on television rodway or the big screen. Viola has become one of the most acclaimed actors of our time. Earning an emmy to tony's and an oscar commanding performances in fences doubt and how to get away with murder to name just a few have built her legacy after we taped. Our interview received an oscar nomination for best actress. Burma rainy first. Black woman in history to be nominated for four academy awards after. Tell you a quick story. When i was watching arrays on broadway years ago during intermission. Someone said oh isn't venetia shod marvelous and i said is she in this play. I saw that same production. Yeah so i must tell you. I felt that same way about you. Watching this film. I was watching with two of my daughter girl from south africa and that opening scene that is you know so boisterous and vivacious and i said who who is. Who is that one of the girls said you know who that is. I don't know who that is. Who is that. And they said oprah. It's you i went. Oh yeah i can see her in there now that you mention it but i'm telling you you were so immersed you were unrecognisable. Was that your goal. thank you well. That really is always my goal but this character is probably further away from me in terms of just the look in terms of everything about it so that is a goal you know you have to become another human being is what you have to become. Yes but you know. It's like that opening scene that opening shot. It took some time to make the decision in terms of the makeup and in terms of the look at took a leap of faith on my part. Because i did not want to make up to look pretty. I didn't One of the reasons why didn't is see the thing about our profession is an acting. You have to study life. it's gotta be about life and you know me and you know that life is messy right right and when studying marini people who knew her said that are makeup under the lights looked like it was melting looked like melting greasing. And then i thought. I thought about the fact that before this. She did coon face shows with her husband. Par rainy and i thought to myself. What if the makeup is beautifully. Imperfect beautifully and perfect than the actual. When i remember when i started out as an actor. We had to get makeup boxes. There were ben nine make boxes and if you were an actor of course you had to get the black makeup box and the makeup was really heavy. It was called dark negro light negro light agip shen. It had names like that. So i imagine what that would look like you know and i actually thought when i saw it i said for me. That was something specific as opposed to just falling into the general notion of just wearing pretty makeup just pretty makeup. That's how you started to craft her from the makeup. I was wondering. Did you start with a look the dialect the movement. What comes first but for you. In this instance. It started with what she was going to look like at what that makeup would look like. And then how did you begin to layer because is such a layered performance. Well really i had to start with the given circumstances. And you know unfortunately oprah with so many and i will say this. There's so many black people who have lived have done extraordinary things in this no information about them. There's very little information about marini. Only seven pitchers existed of her. I mean people said things about her like she would be in church on sunday but then she would be at an orangey by monday to the bisexual sexual. She went the bars and beat up grown men but she was very kind in. Odessa massive contradictions. I had to deal with that i. That's what i had to deal with. I and she had a mouthful gold t if someone says that about a human being then that's who they are and then after that i ran out of information that just is not a lot of information out there so then i had to rely on what i know about life and what i know about women the women that i know in my life the black women in my life and i started with my aunt. Joyce i'm not gonna lie. Because i loved my aunt joyce other than my mom. She was the first woman that i knew that was absolutely beautiful. She was a woman of a bigger size but for me and my sisters every time we knew she was coming. We sat by the door. She always wore the latest fashion. She was extraordinarily confident and extraordinarily flawed. She was with. My uncle ran who she always bossed around and she always tried to boss around my father they would get into it. She would take take her earrings off and then she would you know. Take your shoes off. She would yell at my. I mean i. I rely on what i know about life to sort of fill in the blanks with with ma in twenty twenty one. It's finally okay to talk about our mental health and happiness. Humans are meant to keep everything inside and makes us. Sick and therapy helps. But what is therapy exactly. Well it's whatever you want it to be. Maybe you're not feeling motivated right now would like some tools to help or maybe you're feeling insecure in relationships are at work not dealing with stress. Well whatever you need. It's time to stop being ashamed of normal human struggles because you deserve to be happy and now you don't have to worry about finding an in person therapist near you to help. Better help customized online therapy that offers video phone or even live chat sessions with your therapist. So you don't have to see anyone on camera if you don't want to. And it's much more affordable than in person therapy and you can start communicating with your therapist under forty eight hours. Join the millions of people who are seeing with therapy is really about. It may or may not be for you. But it's worth looking into because you are your greatest asset. This podcast is sponsored by better help and our listeners get ten percent off their first month at better health dot com slash stitcher. That's better h e l p dot com slash stitcher. How much of what was happening at the times in terms of systemic racism being blatant in the face of particularly black women played a role into the creation of her. Because of course those were the times. Watch that lovely sixty minutes interview where you talked about. The drinking of the coca cola was of course not about the coca cola. So how much of construction of her was about those times. A huge part of it. This is during the great migration. This is during a time when there was great. Promise for black people. There was a hope of getting beyond the circumstances in sort of redefining yourself. In on this is a woman who was coming from the deep south and chitlins serpent shows. Which is the only shows we were allowed to perform in. Yeah and then you add onto that with each it. Something that i always want to interject into narratives. Even today is that. She's dark skinned black woman. She is a woman who's not considered beautiful and valuable and worthy. See they all go hand in hand and at the same time she is famous but that fame is not getting. Bur the golden ticket into that school of worth but she was very much liberated woman. Because i feel that. She did not fall prey to the traps of her time. She bought for herself from the moment you see her. She is fighting for her worth when she did eventually retire. She literally bought a theater in her hometown of columbus georgia. And these are this came through town performed in that theatre and she got a cut of the money. So i felt a resistance with maw with what was going on in the times. And here's the thing. I think that that's valuable. Because all the stories of insurrection all the stories of my husband's mom his grandmother people who did speak up for themselves people who didn't just bow their heads people who did have moments of understanding that worth. That's sort of buried under there. I felt that ma very much was a product of her time in understanding that there was limitations of where she could go with it but at the same time her voice was something made from. I don't know supernatural allies supernatural forces. I mean this is a woman who knew that she was the show from the moment she walked in the room. I love headline. She knew she was the show. Yeah it was a hard thing to navigate. But i always hope that when people watch it. They understand the weight of toledo saying with the leftovers. Yeah of saying all they want is my boys. They don't care nothing about me of the way of her. Saying urban has been my manager for seven years and the only time. He invited me into his home once to sink. Plays white friends just the way in the value of that. Because i think from the moment you see her for that. She has wrapped around her neck. Even though it's not cold that everything is telling you that. I'm worth it. You don't see me. But i am worth it if i have to punch it into your face if i have to use the coca cola if i have the yell at every band member yep i have to make people wait for me that i want to show you that. I'm worth it. Yeah and that's what that coca cola is about. Not only having him get the coke but the way she drank the coke like taking her time with the coq making noise with coq. When you drink the coke. I know watching you drink all got. We used to drink coke out of a bottle and that's what it sounded like. And i had peanuts in a two by the way salted man. I was eating a hell on those peanuts to. I'm not gonna go You know that was the central falls thing. I thought that was true. Thing i didn't wow. You described the opening scene from our rainy days as probably the most unbelievable experience in your entire career. Why was that. Oh you had to be there. That's the only thing i could say was absolutely first of all just going into the tent with the big bales of hay. And sort little mateship stadium seating and then hundreds of extras black extras dressed. Really specifically with the bags of popcorn and they will all waiting for the show. I mean they will all waiting. You know like my makeup artists said he said he into this profession because he always wanted to experience time travel. And that's what it was. It was time travel. And then when i came out on the stage the man screaming and sweating and saying oh wow look they were there an an w-we went to each and every one of those audience members and she explained the costumes the material that they were made from You know the time period. What was going on. And so by the time those actors came into the tent. They had stepped into the scene. Honestly because here's the thing oprah. There is a resistance to specificity. When it comes to black artists there is sort of either general notion of who we were or we exist in metaphor. But there's no exploring the absolute specificity of how they bought the tickets of what they were eating when they were sitting in that theatre where they were coming from how each of their hair what they were wearing how they would've thought about what they were gonna wear getting that hair done to show up for that performance absolutely and then to actually be there and to have people believe that i was who i was. Wow i can't say more than that. It's it's sort of was like nirvana and i'm a shy woman in general. I'm really introverted. So that was a lot to me to stand up in front of people and flirt with men in the audience. A lot for me. That's not me. I love the l. A. times review where they wrote resplendent in bold spang legaue nhs and she inform padding rubber. Her ma rainey is both a stellar performer and a mesmerizing object of contemplation. How much the costuming and the gold teeth. Also help you. What would help me believe that i was her. That's how it helped me. It helped me believe that. I wasn't by ola anymore. But i could soda disappear that i sort of you know as an actor you have to be an observer a thief right yeah you have to observe life in order to morph into it and the fact that i did not want to cover up my breasts as mob because i know that the women i knew who grew up you know and their breasts were hanging out. They just let him hang out. I never knew people who cover them. I didn't know those women. I actually didn't even know the people who even always mop their sweat after a while they mopped whatever and then they just let it drip. So did you do all of your own vocals for this phil. i didn't. I did some of them. I really did you know in hindsight. I wish i had more time. Because i would have done the vocals. I had very little time. Because i was. You know how to get away with murder you doing this at the same time. I'll know when. I you got the role then. I had just a couple of months to prepare. But i was still juggling how to get away with murder. It was the final season. Was the final episode. Yes it was a lot of juggling when you finished that last day and were in the process of beginning to let her go. I don't know how that shows up for you. Do you let her go on the day of the last shah. Yeah but when you had finished did you know you had served her. Well that you had brought her spirit alive in a way that people could receive it and know who she was in a way that we didn't before your performance. Did you understand that. Viola davis well oprah winfrey than i served the character. Well i will say this. I had one of the best experiences of my life. Wow i felt like. I was armed with all the tools to be able to morph into this character. I felt good about it. But you just never know how it's going to land it. Just don't listen. You have more control on stage than you do on screen you just do. Because you're not looking at yourself. It's not predicated on what you thought you did. And how it actually looks. But i'm really good with leading character. Go i really am. I just walk away from it. But i had great. It was a perfect experience. It was just one of those experiences. Where all the artists came together in the most perfect way. Because it's not just on me. It's the makeup. It's the hare it's the costumes. It's george wolf's direction it's the other it's everything coming together at once. It's only collaborative art form. Yes and we now know that. It was the last performance of chadwick boseman who passed away last year. The age of forty three. What will you remember about chadwick's legacy what our member about his legacies. His integrity and i know that people say that saul often people say that to the point where it's ridiculous i mean. They dole that out just like they dole out the word brilliant. But there's not a lot of integrity out there. Just isn't i mean. I think it takes a lot of curry. You know that is true. You know to me you know in like they say courage is just fear said with prayers but i just felt that he was not interested in being a movie star as much as he was concerned with being a really great artists. There was a sense. In chadwick that there was some other force operating besides the the earthly realm. There was something transcendent about him like. He would play the gym bay drum in his trailer. He carried that giambi drum with him everywhere he said viola and i do it just me. I play it just for me. I don't care how. Well people think. I play it and you know what's called the talking drum. It takes on the spirit of whoever plays it and so you would raise our trailer and you would hear him just playing with everything. That was his body. Wow does something different. That was going on there. Yeah yeah transcendent in a way that you can. There's no language for really. There is no language for it and you know what he did not like being famous although i really really believe that he was grateful his too much of a generous spirit to not understand that he was blessed. But i don't know if he liked it so much and the thing about that is because you're serving so the two masters is serving that that is out there. And then you're serving you. And they are diametrically opposed. He wasn't interested in the famous image. That was not chad's thing he wasn't even interested. He had left black panther behind. And you're so right by. You're so right that the word integrity gets thrown around people say oh was brilliant and one. I can't. I actually asked everybody on my team. Please stop using the word because it so over. Amazing everything's all amazing but it is rare to find someone who actually lives out of the spirit of themselves in such a way that you feel and their integrity is duly noted at all times absolutely i read one of the ways that you discover a character is to ask yourself. What are they living for. And when i read that. I thought that is such a profound question to ask of building a character and also in your own personal life. What are you living for and when you answer that question for rainy what was the answer. Value worth great. Every last one of those characters were fighting for their value in a culture that erased it in a pass that he raced it. And so how do you hustle for your value. What does it look. Like for instance if you walk into a room and you don't like someone because of their actions say it's a woman who is very flirtatious. She's probably overtly sexual. She probably says things that are inappropriate. So you make a judgment based on those actions right and whatever that could be a lot of times with women. We have a tendency with women like that to not like them. Okay but if you sat down with them and they shared their story that she was sexually abused when she was a child and she talks about how traumatic that was and she talks about how she i don't know feels dirty. Then all the sudden you see those actions in different contexts. Yes they are a tactic. A tactic bed is an extension of her. May be seeking love. Thinking some semblance of wholeness and then it's hard to go back to just not liking them right. You understand the whole human being. Now you as an actor you have to understand that because you are the character so you have to understand. The motivating factor. You cannot just deal with the mask that the person puts on and the mask that someone like my rainy puts on. If you don't understand it. And that's another conversation. I would love to have but it gets into a different arena but if you just looked at my rainy would just think paper deba. She's not a bieber. She's a person who very shortly after this is over is going to be rendered invisible irrelevant. She is what carrie fisher said. Fame is nothing but obscurity. Waiting to happen. She's being shadowed by people like bessie smith who she taught. She can't copyright her own material. She is with the manager. Who is building her out of money. She is a black woman. Living in america nineteen twenty seven. So when you look at that and you deal with that context then you see the sheer depth and scope of who she is. I loved when i heard that your experience with august wilson. Who wrote this. Play back in one thousand nine hundred eighty two that your experience with him was that he had said to you. You were beautiful at my question to you is when he said you. You were beautiful. Could you receive it and believe it alive. It i received. I received the only because it made me feel wonderful. And you know. There's a part of that. That's devastating to me with black women. Because i still feel very much built with the intersection. -ality even feminism. That was so still rendered invisible. That there is a part of us is still sort of finding to be accepted into that fold womanhood. I'm not saying that we wake up every day saying please you know i'm data's yeah but there is a part of being protected feeling wanted Feeling desire desire desire desired. Yeah desire that's ornette feel is escaped. Does i mean i see it. Even in movie making in terms of the films that are made with women. Yeah only thing we have is strong black girl black girl magic which all of that doesn't really help you in your day to day mental health. We are way more vast than being strong but a huge part of that has been put on us through history. We all vulnerable. There are times when listen. i want to be protected. there are times on. I'm very hurt. You know when people just are soda. Okay with saying you're ugly. I've had reporters say that to me. I know carey. Mulligan is out there now. Which i absolutely love by the way by her. I will shake her hand and utter well after kobe but actually a reporter from variety. Guess in a review said she wasn't hot enough for promising young woman. And i guess he apologized and people are demanding more nepal. Aji i i get that my thing is with my apology. I've had a lot of interviews or reviews with people especially during hard to get away with murder. She's ugly she's not vulnerable enough. So i'm not gonna watch it like literally saying man in a review and do you feel that apology will come. Do with this little reckoning having or supposed racial reckoning we're having here's the thing about an apology in please take on about the same with a grain of salt is a lot of apologies now because of the cancel culture. Nobody wants everything that they built to be completely erase okay. So a lot of it. And i don't know which ones are coming from a place of not sincerity but protection and survival protection for themselves absolutely. Don't cancel me. The real part of an apology comes from a revelation that you've done wrong and you want to make amends but i don't believe people understand that they don't understand the depth and the scuola of systemic racism and how it has metastasized into a cancer. That permeates how you see me your perception of me you'll lack of perception you're microaggressions that are so pervasive so i don't know how apology can come from that. I don't because there hasn't even been in acknowledgement yet. No there's not been an acknowledgement. We we have not had those really hard conversations. Our beloved sicily as we know passed recently and you wrote that gorgeous forward and her memoir just as i am and she says in her memoir just as i am. She says that every character was able to leave her with something. Left her with something i want to know. What did my ramey leave with you all man. I have to say this just knowing my wife. I cannot stress that enough know. Brennan brown talks about it. I didn't know that you so to come into the world worthy. I really didn't. I felt you know you have that you know. Get an education. You gotta go to the top school. You have to look a certain way. And so i didn't know that it was something that was already in me and there was something about putting on that padding and swishing my hips in the room and telling that ban. It's what i say. What i say goes and my listen to your heart. Model listens to the voice inside of her. This something about playing ma that became an affirmation for viola. Because i've always been the shy girl but there is a feeling when you reach a certain position where i met at that. There is a power that you need to harness and my helped me to harness the viola power that feeling that i deserve to be in the room the feeling that i deserve all that i received in my life because i worked for it. I came away from watching performance thinking first of all in awe of what it took you to do it. And my sincere deep belief that you had brought her to life through your immersion into her and also just like i just thought about all the black women of that time and what it would take to be the kind of woman who could say you going. Give me my money absolutely and that is where we come from and we come from that. That's the stuff we come from. Yeah we do. We come from that zone of history. We coming from a history where black women were chattel. Yeah and if you read joyce guys post traumatic slave syndrome. All of that is rooted in our past. They'll get over it this strong off. They may have been traumatized in the past but they're like animals they just recovered very very fast. I'm sure that ma that that was her. Every day. your worth and who you are was defined by a system that didn't recognize you as a human being. So then how do you evolve from that. Well you did it whether you recognize you did it. You certainly do come to know that you did it. You served her. Well you served or up to the world and we thank you. viola davis. Thank you so much talent. You have a great understanding of human behavior. You know like interpreting human behavior in such a way that you can literally create a human being's life on the screen that is what you do so beautifully so thank you. We'll be watching for you this award season. Hey i hope you enjoy it where some pretty gown all the wesson print gown enjoy it all and have my best accessory which is my husband. That's beautiful salo to julius in genesis for me. Okay i will. I will bless expressing to you. I always appreciate you. i do. i love you. Thank you so much. Love you back. I'm over winfrey. And you've been listening to super soul. Conversations the podcast. You can follow super soul on instagram twitter and facebook. If you haven't yet go to apple podcasts and subscribe rate and review this podcast. Join me next week for another super soul conversation. Thank you for listening.

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Why We Should Stop Choosing Violence Even Though Its Fun

P.S.A Podcast

45:22 min | 2 months ago

Why We Should Stop Choosing Violence Even Though Its Fun

"Okay so not thank. You know to the environment you've seen the title you for this man's on awesome awesome crazy stuff. You notice what i do. But i won't understand something. There are interested where susan violence is needed. Besides just you know in. i guess. Trolling amanda out though. But you know this episode was a good one. I really think the child like this. You know after coming from really is like the first episode greatness nestles. I gotta You know But rodeo shahnaz gymnastics from last week because people still talking about job. So y'all clearly did which i do but this week we talking about choosing violence. Oh you know. I'm gonna always say that to do the right thing. Even if i don't do the right thing not because i don't know there was right is it. Sometimes you get caught in a moment when we choose violence a lot of times. We get caught in the moment so helping us to see what is the moment in knowing. What is your trigger like. What triggers you and not to just quick response everything you know michelle. Obama was a major for this episode. Because you know she said when. I go logo hat but then somebody else was. I wanna go to hail. So what about the average person who wanna do right but they stuck in the middle. They stuck in the middle of you know. Call it the pause and you hear me mentioning episode. You know like. I said the people that go no like. How low can you go. you know you know. All the way to the flow location go chatchai slide low or How low can you go. Ludicrous songlo you know. It is something to think about. Yeah but yeah as i wave. Hit the intro less guy. Welcome the privacy. Sport podcasts unconventional podcast. That jonah's outside the box. A real life experience clever narrative original and creative use of satire audience route from negative paradigm. Own personal this is by no means method for fast audience but instead encouraging showcase and give them respect it might not be see before. Psa designed to showcase to listen to the power of the mind is not a joke and if a person learning control mine ns thoughts. They will also control their lock. This podcast serves as entertainment and educational purposes only and not replaced or other type of professional hill. Audience may because now. I'm not going here for real. Like learning is aches and his video. But i definitely would you know as long as i can remember. So it's at the point where honestly it's a normal watch for me watching people get going and it's just like and she was like the we'll be back fast this and she disappeared Before we get started with today's episode we have to give a shout out to a few of sponsors shouted to the sponsor. Today's episode cannot be famous dot com a website. That will teach you the steps and give you the keys to become the biggest influence in taking your life to the next level. You will become an arlo superstar Sell your soul or by fake followers and take your business or brand to a level that supersedes was you could ever imagine. Start your business at the website. Can i be famous dot com all lower case or hit a country cowboy instagram. For more information. Listen i understand. It's hard to be nutritious in today's society that's were juice. Plus in juice. Plus is a brand new line of dietary supplements containing concentrated fruit and vegetable juice extracts fortified with added vitamins and nutrients are right. It's something that'll help you get off the vegetables and fruits that you need daily are you do is take some capsules and do that. And you'll see an increase in your immune system you'll notice you just feel lighter healthy throughout the debt. I'm using myself. So i noticed stuff works like i said. It's hard to fruits and vegetables in you know because in reality to keep up with all the fruits of vessels that you need daily is kind of impossible so this makes it very possible. I'm also a partner. If you like to get some juice. Plus starting with different plants that can be set up for you days affordable and keep them coming monthly hit me up on instagram undisclosed. Easy bake oven or twitter underscore easy baker at hook you off in his said seek to another day. Another seven thousand dollars. I was gonna say another nickel. But i believe words have powell some nothing to see her and sign up another nickel possess will. Spongebob see you see where he at in. I'm trying to be like that. what anyway. Hello everybody So new day some new week. Y'all are these streams. I love it. Let's keep it up. let's keep running it up. Keep dropping fire. Content will visuals coming soon and But you know the audio so i got you know. I can't let you see me out of time. I le-let today's able so is a good one. I think because it's something people do regular and maybe by technical definition i do. Today's episode is called why we should stop choosing violence. Even though it's fun the marine reads the main repeat stuck in between when they go low. We go hi and when they go low we go to inspiration comes from a quote by just the boys as you destroy a piece by confronting everything that is a fact It's the truth and we don't get to that as we go along the fact that people say that i choose violence Technically yes by technical definition. But it's a lot of stuff that i don't do jesus but again let's keep going. And then obviously inspiration is michelle obama's infamous speech that she gave him twenty sixteen about donald trump in his campaign when you know she quoted which people may t shirts about she didn't have interviews about you know when they go low. We go hot and i really wanna go into that whole statement. I mean it's pretty obvious what she meant but just to kind of give my take on and both sides of it so i don't have a guest today against shouted to my two games last week. That killed it. They got the whole world talking about a lot of comments. Was you know. I'll say i kind of because you know a lot of people's Tweet text me chatting mean me specific things. They said in comments in lines. They were saying that stood out and they thought it was interesting whether they liked it or didn't like either. They laugh that. I didn't like but either way people talking. They still you still want you know now saying essentially go out here make people talking about doing the most negative publicity stunt possible but i have commentary netanyahu. I'm talking about and we're gonna talk about that but let's get to today story please. On left the title is kinda funny is kind of stupid. It's kinda pity but today's title is violent. viola viola have been i her best friend alpha ten years. I decided to start talking to this girl. That had drive for viable. She was rude nasty to her for what seemed to be no reason. Viola didn't want to explain how she felt about the girl because she didn't want to make things alkyl out so she continued to ignore it and just allow things to build up nonetheless. That girl kept being painting rules to via an out either notice and ignored it or really did notice. Viola continued to choose peace until one day. She found out some information about that girl and after struggling with wanted to tell her best friend al. She decided to share the information. You i'll blue abon vile until her. She was just agilis hater. He cut her off. Viola chose violence but in her mind. It was justified. What do you think our just again in. Moscow is a cliffhanger Situation like that. I know i have where harlem so anyway The less story is violence is dangerous. It is dangerous now is different ways to choose violence. And we're don't get into that. How i'm against donald Always talk myself is it. Can it can result in even worse circumstance. So in this case she lost her friend and but then again it can cause unrest so this she wanted to be you know this is a friend and you know sometimes people that we wait are in relationships with whatever they get new people in a stark than we're toys us or we may feel is worried. I always save you feel that way down. Just go off of one thing you know watching for a while and then speak on it but you know tuesday pieces is always the best answer this another lesson even you want to. I mean sheet. Now is one thing to have. Let her know. Maybe i think viola where she messed up was she wants to go. Should information about the girl. I think maybe she should have just said you know how she was feeling and a win from their versus being like nina girl. Kind of and nasty next to me you know versus going out and being like the girl because it does look like a hater if you go on a repeat some somebody versus just keeping that to yourself. Because i'm a firm believer everything. Come out when you need to so you have to tell. The person in person probably already hurried anyway. But 'cause do somebody told him you know we don't have too much information from a store only because you know it's short stories just for this loan but i'm sure out in her something about that group but she could have just maybe winter and just i in a way where was like you know. I feel like this hour so i went ahead and defined violence. I went urban dictionary to define any says defective answer to everything here to find peace and it says freedom from disturbance quiet or tranquility so we we kinda got the idea that right all right so moving into good segment. tna questions that need addressing question so it's says why has choose. Violence become so popular or is it is from stay. Hip dot com and says the phrase woke Violence a wake-up twos violence is often used on twitter. Typical referred to someone who has done something savage. Like being brutally honest or trolling people. It also refers those who can cause chaos social media and the social city. I meant to be funny not to refer to actual violence so now when it comes to choosing violence like this always think is like actual everybody. I tell everybody troll you. Am i really offering 'cause. I told my friends. Like i just comment on pictures inside stuff grasso surely the other day i say. She dressed like she was on enter into the matrix because she is black leather thing going on dominatrix looking look like shoes into the matrix so at saudi. She looked like she was into the matrix. But i do believe that can go too. Far some cases we people on twitter. Just get up control daily. They get up and just find something and just comment on it or they find or they just intentionally start like beef or you know a twitter war with somebody you know like how And so did yeah yes. She started that one she did. She did the second question. Do you choose violence or piece from okay. So by technical definition. I probably would choose peace more often now than violence. I choose violence on doing the real. When i inner trolling controlling our shoes at but when it comes to being real life i would say i choose definitely piece more divided. Because there's so many times. I wanted to react or do something in i didn't or something i do. Wanna get better from the standpoint of when somebody say something to me. Text message or social media. I'm quick to respond. I want to get to the point. Where i lady let me sit in it. I versus just going respond film. 'cause lie yesterday for instance on doing somebody's paper right and the girl sent me some directions and the direction a one page single space. So i said okay bit. Because i'm like with two pages double space so i taught the same. I will charge for that. And so she said the directions change and she explained but the way she explained. It didn't really sit right with me. But i thought i understood what she was saying. So then she takes me back and was just basically like going off lied I'm assuming you your money. But there were asked for now and appreciate half the work i said. Well ma'am what you explain. Didn't make sense to me. So i stayed in the future. You need to. You say. I said this fully but i'm life you should have sent me the directions that he updated insent versus explaining the way you did because the way you explain it to text message. I didn't understand i understood. In one way. She should've center screenshot of what the updated information versus. You know what she said because now she complained. She got half agree. Well i tell her name would have pay if it was two pages single space. That's full pages. Doublespace mean you would pay more than what you paid in the first place so you thought you was getting off and getting away with cheek. But because of hobart communication. That's what happened really you see so. I still chose peace against it was peace with a dab violence. Maybe but i feel like i was trolling as time where you can choose violence. I think so but then again everybody has a different views violence. Because what if you know. I don't know why we're without any really random. I guess but like you know when like moses has two feral now i'm sure thought he was choosing violence but really he was just like you know this one was supposed to do so. I'm sure his mind he lau. He's choosing violence. Kill him. behead them give them away from here. Maybe so all right The third when they go low. Do you go. Hi when they go do you go to hail. Okay This honestly if you would ask me years twenty twenty one maybe like a sixteen twenty seventeen. You know twenty eight. Tina maybe a little bit to our say you. I'm gonna go to. He'll do because now. I'm not going here for real island. Isaacs in his video. But i definitely would you know and i still have my moments and when i go to head. What does that mean like. Okay so feel like that means like if somebody's until you give back now in two in extreme cases like if someone does some evil things to meals some rulings. I'm not going to retaliate with them. Say for instance like you know just an example kind of going back to the store. Somebody running a mouthful right. I'm not gonna run back. You know our may. It may be something where you know somebody you know the until you. Can you say something back. Like in the heat of the moment but like says choose like i feel like there's levels to violence so like like maybe if it was like a five levels violence i may respond to a level one or two. But i won't responsible five you try to destroy me. I'm not gonna try to destroy your back or if you try to send me up not gonna set you back but if you say some to me i might say some You know what i'm saying. I'm like level one level two. I wanna get to the point where hill but still there. Now when it's funny trolling. I'm always do that. Goes one now. How does this battalion. A mental health Honestly i think self is the issue. I think people like self control and i think people you know react out of emotion and you know that's why best before doing anything you get a clear mind. I definitely think you need to see guy. Whatever prey acts like before you do some crazy you know. Even i'm getting to the point where i wanted. I haven't done it yet. Eligible high goals in episodes to come. When i see some crazy message as my my big thing. I wanna not respond right away. An even as for y'all yadav have to respond right away to stuff and and you don't want to hear this but you know are made the comments alexei. Now that's not true. It's very true you choose to be offended. People don't believe. I didn't choose for nuggets twisted. I'm not telling you that your feelings aren't valid. But what i'm saying is when you you can choose to sit in a fence over you k but as far as mental health violence. I think sometimes if it's funny and it's like we all joking in his awesome like trolling fun stuff. That i feel like. That's okay but when it becomes you deshaun first reaction in like a negative manner you know. I think it's a lack again lack of self control. And just the fact of you feel as though you gotta get them back like it's a mental thing really fly. I gotta get you back. I gotta get you back and it's like you have to. I don't know you tell me what you think. So example of people in things that use violence. Yo boss Yano message was with my old boss. I told you what used to be doing So we know about that. Mosquitoes tweet this. Mosquitoes virus. Every day they do especially as getting hotter more and more sucking your blood and olive kerr's leaving bumps on you people on social media especially twitter violence. I saw something talking about azaleas banks. They said that was the earliest recorded. evidence somebody choosing violence honestly. She definitely choose violence. She definitely choose violence all the time. Like i'll be like she wild like it was like she would just get up starts when she was on while now she was crying. She told him he dc on fly. He was apartment or something and unli- eubanks stop into that. I still From baffle dionne warwick The bureau yano at the award season legend whatever. But it's funny because like she choose violence on twitter. She was had made a tweet air. Saw somebody posted. It was like what's up with all these new artists with dna name. I need to have a conversation with y'all and she says some one day about what's up with generation outweighs yelling screaming. And i'm not talking to me. Because that's all i always say they went on laugh and i'm like i'm yelling screaming always there so i don't literally screaming yale but i mean i could. She was just like why you're saying that if you're not doing it so i mean if you wanna challenge me i can do that. You know we can set that up. We can set that up learn as he went low for real low low. Low down to you know inhale and we saw the video of was my take on the video. I you know first of all our got. A glows and grows so I you know. I guess the asking great creativity going on under megan personally Tannin creativity but it's creativity. So i'll give him that But it it it you know was Publicity stunt i mean. I wasn his camp. So i don't know but it just seemed like you want people to talk and this what you got you know if you want to know where oops and you know. Dance on the devil. I mean that's what she wanted to do. You know you chose violence because you knew that was thorough some controversy so at this point i mean it is what it is you know. He was peaceful when he came out but now he just didn't you know he didn't devolved. He owned a whole new level People who've violent people can't control their liquid. You know the people that'd be drunk and then they get angry people and it's like they always do it and we all had one friend whether you drink now still you. Don't he's got one friend you had him. You know what i'm talking about. They'd one frame trickle blow my god here they go at. I've had a few over the years. I just looking at him like hidalgo and i just feel like is is one of those situations. Where a gist you know could just ruin by and people can't control their emotions people flare with stuff you know. We've all had any time. I feel like people are going to have a moment's you're gonna have a moment where you just getting gulf the your moses but it i just don't think it should be a high you say a regular thing like all the time 'cause then then it gets to the point where people i don't really want to be around you because is going to be always something you know and i've been at one point miles but it was always something. Is this gist. I know from both sides. Say that all right. So i for a psychological insight into the causes of violence coming from harley. Therapy dot com. He says the most common motivation violence can be viewed as inappropriate attempts to handle emotions often. Violence is the medium used by individual to openly express their feelings such as anger frustration. Sadness other times violence can be considered as a former manipulations for individual. Try and get what they want or need. Aggressive behavior can also be used as a form of retaliation means by which one us the even the score. Finally violent behavior sometimes caused because people grow up saying violence openly displaying violence. Dan becomes learn as appropriate way to behave and handle behavior. So with that so like even social media say for instance. Somebody tweet some. you don't like you don't have to comment on it. Somebody posted them. You don't like you don't have to comment on. You can just ignore it but see when you do not handle your muscles than you. Just get routed this summer stuff. I see that i'd be like i don't agree with it and don't even like i just keep scrolling. What's the point of meat Comment on you know your angle. You won't to people know that you don't like the comment. I mean i i just feel like is not going to do. I mean i mean this is some cases maybe they'll deleted Edges feel like you know and the nurse ways i feel like if you see some via social media we back on that were if you don't like something and you want to have a healthy debate with somebody i guess ways. You could go about it but you know is just you can turn people choose violence like say for instance you and somebody joking right a yacht going back and forth and we all noticed person and y'all going back and forth and you think is a joke and you start noticing they start saying somebody low blows like you over joking about Something and not eight talking. About how you your momma did eight talking about how down nobody likes you for real or they talking about. You know you broken handle money in. Why gave you money does we can cause you ain't got no money. You look like whoa fellow whereas is coming from you. Know attended tensioning personally. I used to do this thing. Where i would intentionally may choose violence and make people mad to see how they really felt as anybody ever done it before. I used to do that. All the time and just to see highlight because i feel like i feel like my mind at the time was like people will say how they really feel when they angry as so i would see like you know which to an extent is very but not really. Because it's it's a heightened because sometimes they'll say stuff and don't really mean it. It may be semi true but not religious. Saying because i know is going to be hurtful so i say yesterday more than no but still the no one there too and i will see lie. You know what they was. You know what was really only mine advances from the same source. It is common for those who act violently to have difficult to control. His emotions for some behavior can be attributed to pass abuse neglect false belief that intimidating others will gain respect or belief that using viable solve his or her problems other factors which can because of violence include. The eighth floor wants periods having lack of attention or respect having low self work experience abuse or neglect witnessing violence in the home or community or media access to weapons. I look at people who you know when they use violence in We always talk about physical to like. That's all they know people outside fighting all the time. I was getting into physical altercations. Like that's they way to handle stuff. Maybe that's all they d. Maybe they seem you know maybe people who lash people verbally. That's what they did to them. You know. I think a lot of people have been there where they parents got mad and says occurs though today looking at them like you know they do. It's other people is just kind of like a lot of stuff does start at home now. Of course violence in weapons. We do live in a society. Were especially in the black community. Where people do you know. Have guns and you know that's our culture. You know is a sticker you know and people had guns in repose in wilmington you know is like gets argument. Somebody i've seen people that's the first On is just like. I've seen it many times from a lot of different people since as long as i remember. It's at a point where honestly it's a normal watch for me watson people go get that going and it's just like is it worth it ain't workin 'cause to was invited if full is extremely. She was in violence. I think so people choose. Violence are there some instances where people can choose violence. Somebody's scenarios i don't agree with but they open for debate so rioting people have done that. I'm sure a lot of people will say yes killing someone who killed someone close to you self defense. Somebody tried to break into your house breaking in your house and you know you do what you do Rightfully respectfully standing up to authorities. I use the air's mos- earlier. That was the first one i can think of. I'm sure it's many other ones. With as far as when i can think of and and killing the demons that were sent to kill you. You'd better engage in warfare spiritual Takeover and harassing by the you. I had a homeboy who said he had sleep paralysis the other night he said it felt like a liberal calm walking on his back now see they even got too close to you. Got to close. Don't get too close. Is it easy to choose. Violence absolutely and in some cases is phone. Some cases is phone. But in other cases i do feel like it's like a craft a help in some cases but when they go low we go to hail daily struggle. It really is a struggle for some of us to be in a situation where stuff happens and we can just ignore an act like on bothers. Sometimes we choose peace but then it's killing us on the inside so then there could be of somebody say is it. I feel like viola where i was choosing piece but i just couldn't get over it. So what do you say to that. I say that's when you know you may be go to the person who you may have a feeling about whether it be a boss a friend or whatever and ever again always pray on it so that you say the right things the net you pray for the right opportunity because if you try to voice at the wrong time it's not gonna work but at the right time in the right you know demeanor. Johanna reiss buys they hitting rights-based voice. How you feel about something. In that way yagi have a good conversation about any not be. Make it worse because again with viola using story which i just made up on the spot She shows violence by going to tell the dude about the rumors about versus be alike. You know i feel you know. Listen again and i don't know needs it is. You're going to see that post today. And it's gone sound like they talk. You don't respond. I'm gotten so good saying posted sub tweets responding so you do the same wagner. What you're gonna do listen. I feel like i'm a look back at these episodes. You know kinda like home movies in the sense and about some stuff. I used to have issues with and i'm look back and be like wow i remember. I struggle with that. And it's going to be faster than you think you know where any of us you know what i think about the lady in video the infomercial and she was sitting in that chair new church or whatever and she was like law will be back faster and she disappeared the owns about. I think i know of my page game. Ballistic i'll fill like this. I suggests faster and we all know. This is a major major spiritual principle you know it was started in the bible but other places and other people do it to either way. It's still beneficial. And i say you should try. And you know unit his article twenty four hours. You can do it. But don't just be like i'm not gonna eat like actually like you know. Do the work with to you. Know what i mean. Donges b. ly arms. Not gonna eat because if you're just not gonna eat. It's no point he just on a diet due to work that comes with it. I'm telling you your is opening. Ears would be opened. You'll hear things and see things a little clearer. So try it now as always we gotta flip the narrative. And i'm saying why is best to choose peace from why we should i choose peace. My delaney away is at times especially doing work for me and this past week as the first of this mess zam six place. I felt as though i was in a relationship with the world and those that were part of it were costing heartbreak throughout my life putting myself down because of the effect this had on me. She says it's individuals couples community a country where we have the ability to walk in these houses. Encouraging pieces will ascend example of that in how we choose to live our lives. It is easy. What was on picking out the problems that come our way and blame someone. Let's pick up the property. Put the pieces together. Piggy peace now. Sometimes we we pick in peace but we not sometimes like if you are around some situations around people were you know just an example popped in my head. Say for instance you do some friends as some gangbangers right and it's like you don't want to stop hanging out with them because in a sense you feel like they choose violence daily day rob a killer. Still you not knowing that they respect you that you're not doing that but you still around them doing and you feel like you choose a piece by not saying nothing but you feel like you should say something to them about it and he felt. I'm not say nothing but then you feel like this burning. Say something inside of you so i feel like case. We think we choose the people of be surprised to say something. Or if you know somebody out here you've got a friend or somebody is out her essentially doing evil and you know they don't even at the mice ain't going to do it to me. They may not they probably will but they may not but still is the fact that those traits you notice in you not saying nothing you know. It's kinda like when somebody you know. Guess they wash these scenarios on tv where you know police are doing these horrible things in police officer not stepping up saying nothing because they save you. Don't say nothing then it comes off like you agree what they doing silently although We can go back and forth with their because you could say what have been called to the yet. I'm just being quiet about it for now. So it s a slippery slope. But i say this to please. The best is the best choice but we also know what choosing pc's because again if you know use supposed to say something you don't say the you not choose a piece you actually violence on yourself. Now you ain't that come. But i have some tips on how to choose. Peace from tiny. Buddha dot com says the practice being aware without the judgement. So you know you'll trigger if you know you aware of what triggers you a bothers you doesn't. I'm a firm believer. Everything's telling me like. I was telling situation where it was somebody that i really didn't to be around. And now they will be over here. And i'd be over there and he was like with s avoiding and he's absolutely right but i'm a firm believer that you need to avoid it until you get passed it because why he engaged in something that you know is gonna stir up something you know what i'm saying to you over until you pass the whatever you know validate yourself said own up to your feelings. Don't allow yourself you feeling is the don't try to be the allow care. Yes you say this generation especially me and we all care al. Yes you do. Yes issue like thumb line. It says look beneath the surface so basically look beneath like would it is. Why do you think you get to the of honestly can't do it on your own power definitely. No god can help you know with that. But again to i still believe in therapy as well. You can do both in getting to the root of it with a licensed professional. I was watching iam athlete. And then i was watching. I am woman with you. Know they the wives and stuff and it has chef lowering there. He was like they said. How do you feel about. And they said he was just like well. I talked to god and you know. He was basically saying that he was. He would be hesitant to go to therapies if she wants to go but he was kind of like you know. I'm sorry i still believe you can do both. I know you can do both. And i felt like when he said that he was just kinda like you know you can tell. He didn't wanna offend nobody. But he was basically saying like you know. I got i. Don't you know therapies. Like i talked to family but then wanted awasa camera. Abundant right now but she has said but you don't feel their family. Our families are biased. And that's your family is going to be biased. That's like doing therapy accounts in which family member. That's stupid because they're going to be biased. They're gonna take it say they're not being biased. But they're going to be biased. I would never do therapy accountable. The family member elvin in my life. I don't care you can call me. Subaru whatever i i just wouldn't do it. And lastly the one. I've even practicing right now personally. Is this practice thoughts and actions until they become reality for. I'm a firm believer in that. I believe it works. I believe in you know when you catch yourself in your way or you're always thinking ads. Joseph is is right being justified in being right and not the same thing. You may be justified your own technical wet as being right but it's still not right okay. What's a good example. It is if your boss does softer to you. Keep going back with this one. It would be justified if they was wrong. And you went off on them. But it's not right is ways you can go about it in his ways you can respectfully handled things got email the other day talking about some crazy My response was going to be. Okay well you know what. Thank you for the email. I would like to take this up with district. Because y'all not gonna keep trampling me and i'm not going to disrespect authority. I try not to these days. I at one point. I didn't care now. i'm very conscious silken. I don't really do the now. I had a not not so much. But it's the processor. Everybody all right. Tim scenarios my college students. Y'all now so when you in college. Amateurs and violence is easy to choose. Viruses easy to be petty is easy to you know follow. The crowd is easy to you. Know everybody likes somebody you kinda be like. I don't like them either. you know. Look petty stuff colleges go through. You know you'd think stocks higher school where they don't. Don't you know being cyberbullying thing especially college from twitter wars instagram wars. You know dot insane Or them you know. Expose pages where people Admitted information that kind of stuff know people being snake for positions in autumn organizations. You know people go above and beyond to get a position and you know that they think is really going to they like to the next level in may in some way but not really Somebody lying on you. That happens everywhere. But i know especially happens on college. People do be lying and somebody made me say they slept with your idea and you know you could choose violence of blasted them again as the difference between justified in being right and i gotta do on that just on that justified in being right so accustomed be justified. Would be right to tarnish them. No but you definitely can say something to them in a respectful way. Even i'm so so people but not fda. I'm gonna do this listening you. do you use school man now. This one. I know for that. You'll school is being petty especially financial aid in Housing then people are so petty now then we had to get them with them. We had to get them together. One year you know. I remember situation. Y'all where. I was at school to whole summer iraq. The wholesome summer wind back home for a week because i lost my wallet in i had to go back i lose on of the megabucks not megabucks greyhound twenty four hours during backyard. That was terrible week. Why was there for that. Week is a pretty active week. Because that's when this stuff with mike brown happen and people choose violence. They was riding doing all this stuff. And you know where the infamous Legendary pitcher was made with the do the driest throwing the grenade. The smoke rene whatever back at the police. Now the good stuff right so when i give back before i give back they basically tell me i didn't have no housing and my mom was going off. Y'all so my momma did the right thing. She respectfully wrote a letter. Y'all fucker fired lead. I'm going to post it. And she basically was just like you know. It's unfortunate that my son has been here. The whole summer has been dealing with this now having housing a you know. It's unfortunate when things have went down like this. She said at this point. I don't know what to do. But i think i just have to go report this to the news and see what they say. Why house the call my mom within our ya. And they found me an apartment. Stop playing with me. Okay you say mama chose violence and in some says you'd be right but i don't think it was one of those situations where it was a respectful. Speak up because that's what it was. She ain't choose vies with going off. Shane do that. She did the thing the right way. So good example of that our up. Today's questions the challenge. I want you to let me know and just being honest. Are you quicker to choose vilest or peace. And why i write. I won't be able to realize what she was in violence especially in a negative way inches in angry way or in a way of just over being Whatever to get to the root of you know start right. now you'll triggers. Why trigger bodies you know and really trying to do some soul searching. I guess right so this is a good one. I like this when i'm next week. Tune in we got some zooms going on and Is up a right Again thank you for the streams. The been going crazy with them. You know we in a triple digits weekly now a nothing but god and hot triple digits to or loans Thank you for that. Thank god i within. Y'all everybody who talks about the topics you know whether they be to me amongst each other. Whatever that's the point. I right so again when they go loud again. When i go. Listen if you ready to go high and you ain't ready to go to. He'll just paul is just like that when they go low paul's for minute. I'm ended up with that. Just paul's now saying i'm encouraging. Go to hail or going lower with. They did like how locate you go. You know all the way to the flow go down low by churchouse slide but just gather yourself i right is i. I'm going. I gotta go to work. Visa always remember. Keep your head of like net curtain. Remember who you walk and make your mind up. Don't they make

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Viola Davis

Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

44:30 min | 2 years ago

Viola Davis

"Hey, guys, Willie Geist here with another episode of the Sunday, sit down podcasts. Thanks as always for clicking and listening along my guest this week is a Hollywood powerhouse. She is the Oscar Tony EMMY and Golden Globe winning actress viola Davis we walked through not just an extraordinary career. But an extraordinary life. She was born on a former plantation in a one room shack in South Carolina, moved as an infant up to central falls Rhode Island with her family where she lived in destitute poverty roaches in the house. You'll hear all about it counting only on her school lunch for a meal every day to rise from that place to where she is. Now is an incredible story, and you're going to hear every bit of it. She went to the Juilliard school. She went on became a Tony winning actress on Broadway and then worked her way onto Hollywood's A-List with breakout roles in the help and then an Oscar winning performance alongside Denzel Washington. In in fences. Not to mention a starring role in a hit TV show that earned her an EMMY how to get away with murder. Interesting to hear violet talk about fame. Still kind of uncomfortable with it knows how fleeting it is. And talks about giving back and doing the important things with her platform among them her latest project a documentary called a touch of sugar. It's about the diabetes crisis in our country. She was diagnosed with prediabetes a few years ago and it runs in her family using the platform to talk about an epidemic in this country. A powerful conversation viola Davis, I have to say sucks you in. She speaks so passionately and powerfully. She is inspirational and she's here now on the Sunday, sit down podcast. Thank you. Bye. Again were as a serve an interview series. We're conducting we started thirty rock, then we moved here. And we'll do another one somewhere downtown later today. Some keep talking I have to say, I didn't know this about you the diabetes. That's. In your family, and is touched your life enough that you wanted to be the voice of this documentary film. I didn't want to be the voice because it, you know, the thirty million adults that have type two diabetes, the eighty four million have prediabetes. And then I think about my family has been affected by my two sisters, my aunt who succumb to the disease after to my grandmother it it's an epidemic, obviously. And it, and it seems like it's almost everyone story. And when it becomes everyone's story. And but then no one really talks about it. Then I always feel like someone needs to blow the lid off of it and get it out into the public guy. That's why I'm now leading this film. That's why I wanted to be a part of it. There is something about the aloneness of anything that someone is suffering from that. I feel. Well, is my sort of mission in life, and then it came knocking on your doors well about a year and a half ago when you got word I had pre diabetes, you know. And I went in for a hormone tests. And then my doctor took the one see test which is comprehensive test that measures. You average glucose in the last two three months. So you take that test four times a year and know anything about that. And then she told me the results, and I had to go to work. I was going to how to get away with murder, and I remember it just leveled me it just stopped me. I didn't know what to do. It's like what can I do? I exercise I eat, right. It's almost like waiting for this sort of silent. I dunno Marmi to come in decimate you and you're not armed. And so I just felt like what do I just become hyper vigilant? It doesn't mean that I have to develop type two. Diabetes. But what do I have to do to change my lifestyle, which is already good to something? That's better in a busy with a busy schedule. And that's the thing. How do you manage to live with this disease? How do you do it? And what do you say to people who are living with this disease in terms of hope because the numbers are staggering one in ten adults in this country live with it and many many more like you were pre diabetic. Is there? More research being done is there's something on the horizon that you can point to and say, we're working on this. Well, listen, I hope that there are more drugs on the horizons or something that can be done. I'm sure that there are my sisters all always conversing with each other every single day about something that can be done. And everyone's diabetes is different some are diet and await related some are genetic. There are some things that you can do to manage the disease. There is a website that created a touch of Shikha film dot com. I, but that's what I'm doing. I exercise. I think about my carb count. I'm hyper vigilant. But I do have the genetic factor there. Right. You know? That's what I can. That's what I said. And it's all there in the title a touch of sugar. Some people may not be familiar with that term. But you talk about growing up as just an accepted part of life. She's got a touch of sugar. He's got a touch of sugar. Absolutely. 'cause I I was born in Saint Matthews, South Carolina, literally singleton plantation and everybody got a diabetes diagnosis. It was called shooter. Such as such got the sugar and busy, you know? She got the ship, and it was almost sometimes set in silence. You know, almost like something you should be ashamed of and just the reference to it as diabetes shows, the lack of education in what it is when it came from how to manage it. And of course, the state bowl of African American Hispanic communities really have high numbers of diabetes. The staple of our diet corn bread rice. I remember we used to make sugar candy. When we were kids, you know, how you make sure candy with crisco and sugar you put it in the frying pan, and you heat it up, and then you take the heat off. And you wait for it to just harden and that was sugar candy. You know, you ate cornstarch out of the box. That's a big thing. You know, down south nobody ever knew that those factors. Could absolutely be the cause and the root of diabetes. It was what you did. It was what you knew those foods are very cheap, very accessible. And so there goes will. Now you've gotten to a root of the problem, which is poverty, which is access to good food, which is access to food two fruit and vegetables and eating well and -cation about the importance of that that obviously is a much bigger problem to tackle. But also a piece of the problem that you can speak to because as you said it was part of how you grew up. Once again, it was I mean. I always say I grew up pope, which is wrong low with poor, you know, and, but it's I I'm one of the forty six million people in this country who live in poverty, that's what twenty four twenty five thousand dollars a year. If you have two kids and more. And that's before taxes. And I just you have access to nothing. You have access to nothing. You know, it's what you call even food desserts. You know, there are no whole foods in poor communities. There's barely a Ralph's or von, you know. So that's something that needs to be addressed. It's just something that no one talks about I can't tell you. How many speaking gigs that I've done around the country, and when I mentioned poverty, and I mentioned just the every day of poverty that I don't can't tell you. How many people say no one ever talks about that? There is a shame attached to it. When my mom when we were young, we grew up on public assistance, and one of the things that my mom did she really wanted a different life for us. And so she really was involved in welfare reform, and one of the things that she really really fought. For was a health clinic in the city of central falls Blackstone valley community action health clinic, she fought for it her and a bunch of other poor women who were living on public assistance, because otherwise, you know, you sort of had to wait for any disease to get complete. Out of control to walk to Memorial Hospital and sit in the ER for five six hours before you got treated. And so we had that little health clinic there which didn't provide much, but what it was was a source of information. I sat there as eight nine year old. And I I was taught about nutrition. And so it was good for me. But the level to which she had to fight for that is the sort of warriors, we need within those impoverished communities or people outside those communities who seen the issue who see the problem and take it upon themselves. You need the same warrior spirit on the outside of the diabetes epidemic as you need from the inside. And what I mean by that is even with my prediabetes. Diagnosis with my two sisters diabetes. You got to be a warrior with your health. The self care aspect of it is so enormous in terms of just managing it. Understanding it understanding the root causes of your diet. You just got a tackle it, you know. And that's how we have to be about the poverty crisis. Also, you see it as important. What can you do? How can you stand in the gap? And there are people who. I will say yes. But how can I worry about having a good diet when I don't even have a diet to begin with? I mean, you've talked about the school lunch teen sometimes the only meal you would ever have in a day or the best meal for sure that you had during the day. So I think for some people getting a meal is is the goal getting a healthy meal might be a nice bonus. If you can get there, we've got to be able to provide food for people where they needed in schools and other places, and there are steps being taken along the way. Yes. Backpack program worked with many programs hunger is. They're out there. And and people who understand that a lot of those foods, the provided in schools have a high sugar content all of those things, but in impoverished communities, certainly, you know, here's the thing. We got care about each other. You know, I'm sorry to sound Koumba ya and to make it like a grand sweeping statement. But the people who have and the people who get to a position where they have the resources need to reach back. I know that when I was a kid we had so many different programs. That helped me even to just get an education. I mean beyond the health clinic that provided a lot of information. There were some in the city on the seal up with bomb prepared Tori enrollment programs. There are things that you can do outreach things that people in power that has some semblance of anything. They can throw someone the rope. Certainly this is what the documentary is all about they've set up the website, you know, mice. My husband always says, you got to plant the seed, you know, know, how it's going to grow. But you have to plan it. And I know that when I was six years old. I was always begging from the inside for hell. It was like a begging for help. And I think that people who have not there was always sort of a silent begging for help and hope. If you see it if you then address it if you have the power to do that. And you're doing that and your your journey doing that with you as much as I can do in any number of ways, and certainly with this documentary narrating it then and getting the message out there and not stigmatizing something that is affecting like, you said one out of ten people. But. But I've done it in other aspects too. And I will tell you that it does make a difference your journey to be in a position to help the way you do help not just on this. But on hunger is an extraordinary one. When people hear your story as you said born on a plantation in South Carolina. Yeah. Growing up you've said abject poverty in Rhode Island. What was your childhood like what was it like to be a little girl? The way you grew up while it was like everyone's childhood filled with happy memories, and you know, going to the reservoir and playing with my sisters and bicycles and all of that. And it was also filled with the darkness of. Then you pour you have bad housing. You just do nobody regulates housing for poor people. They just don't. So we lived in condemn building certainly apartments infested with rats. Never having a phone bad plumbing. Filling the bucket full of water pouring the water in the toilet the flush it. Certainly the clothing shoes. Always chew tight because we bought everything from Salvation Army called it. Saint Vincent, depaul and. And, you know, just the stigma of poverty, the feeling on the outside but feeling invisible lack of access which is why I talk about it all the time. And it's uncomfortable for me. It really is it. It's comfortable for me to talk about it. But I always find that. Once you blown the lid off of anything at once, you tell the truth. It becomes a domino effect. And it gives people permission to tell the truth. And then it gives another person and another person another person and soon what it becomes is a revolution a revolution. And it becomes the norm. And it stigmatizes it. And then once you d- stigmatizes, it d- stigmatize it. Then you have to address it. In a small way, I say when I say a lot of times because it's a little narcissism in me that I it's a demand for people to see me. You see me? I am because I didn't have the power to do that as a kid. And I feel that way about all things that people are suffering in silence. With is. I want them to be seen and heard I hate when people are not seen in heard because I think the next step is metaphorically speaking a death. And I think that that's happening in the world too much. I think that we're seeing the side effects of that too much even zeitgeist now, and you're in the unique position to have lived it. So when you talk about poverty, you know, from whence it comes. I mean, you've been there you said it makes you uncomfortable to talk about is that because it reminds you of those times or what's uncomfortable. When you talk about rapidy not enough time slot. It you go online is anyone on the Instagram or Twitter page talking about ATI where they talking about this great. I don't know Alexander McQueen jacket that they just bought or the new diet that they're on how they have tight ads. And now, they're in extrordinary mom, and they can juggle being, you know, a CEO of a company being a mom being a wife and then making homemade meals everything is about winning. And everything is about conquering. And everything is about a great result. Nobody wants to talk about the other. Okay. There is no romance. And sexiness involved with poverty, there is no romance in sexiness involved with being invisible and not having access to health care the housing to fresh foods. There's no swagger to it. And. That's hard. You know, it's Rene Brown says to own your story, either you own your story or you stand outside of it hustling for your worth. I'm not hustling for my worth anymore. I feel very much like I was born worthy. But I know that now. And. That's why it does make you feel comfortable because I understand how I'm going to be seen with it. But the other part of it is just I've been manned. Given where you came from giving all you went through as a child where does your light come from? Where did you say I can grow up and be an Oscar winning actor. When did you start to see yourself that way that I can step out of this childhood into something bigger and better for myself? What gave you that? Hope you know, what I don't know. If I always saw it. I'm just going to be honest with you. I think I believed it, but a huge amount of time in my life. But seeing a physical manifestation of what you want to be. A mentor as Joseph Campbell says in the journey of a hero. When you have your call to adventure in your catapulted out of your ordinary life. What you don't fit in and a mentor into his your path someone who's who's who seen the road who's who's paid the way, and they come and they show you the path that was miss Tyson. That was my sister Diane that was someone who teaches you how to master a skill to fail. How to succeed in someone who just likes to simply like to. That's what helped me. Now, I have to tell you. There's a cap on awards. There's a cap on Putin is in I don't know being on people's most beautiful list. There's a cap to it. If someone tells you is not a cap to it. They're lying. What did I mean? When you say there's a cap to greatness, there's a cap defame. We've seen fifty million documentaries of people who just destroyed their lives who were on top of their game. Because a tooth of the matter is is that everyone fights for success because they feel like once you hit it you've got it. You've got the elixir that is the magic look suit that Joseph Cambell talks about right? That is not the Alexa. The elixir is living a life of significance. The elixir is living a life that is bigger than you. That's what it is. And if you're not doing that, then you're not doing anything nothing. That message needs to be pounded in people. And I think that probably you'll see less of even what I'm talking about now, which is people living with the disease where a lot of people not throwing them rope. It needs to be part of like a sort of normalize conversation. Even when we're we're talking to kids, you know, instead of saying we want you mixed case premed become a lawyer. What about living the life? That's meaningful. Like urban says, the great existential psychologists who says I will not truly be dead until the last person who has a memory of me dies. You know, we want that to be hundreds of years from now we want people to benefit from our legacy. Whatever legacy. You have hundreds of years from now. And that's not just a cute base. It's not trophies on a shelf. Right. Absolutely. We have we we live in very resourceful country. It's a very wealthy country. I think that we can come up with the solution in terms of how to help people who are suffering even in terms of health. That's very well said, but I do want to ask about those trophies on your shelf. Okay. All right. So when I'm curious when you your first acting gig. When did you even get into that? When did you know that was a possibility coming from where you came from all I could do this miss Tyson changed the game for me because she looked like needs like, my mom. I started acting when I basically was eight or nine my sisters. And I because we wanted something to do we would write skits. We'd right who's skits. And we would have rehearsals, we would have rewrites we would have a wardrobe budget. And then I started acting really acting in high school in drama competitions Rhode Island drama festival. I got a scholarship when I was fourteen to young people school of the performing arts add to travel, three hours one way just to get to the school. And once again, everyone who went to the school. They were coming up in Peugeot's and Saab's and BMW's I was coming on foot, but proud to be there. And I always say that I'm an OG because people ask me that question. When did you get started? I have done so many plays. So many productions in church, basements and basketball courts off Broadway on Broadway regional theatre I've worked with everyone. I love the work. I loved paying my dues. I just thought it was such an awesome thing for people to say, so vile. So what do you do to actually say? I'm an actor. I thought that it was awesome. And like anything led to Juilliard it led to getting an agent. It just created a domino effect. And it brought me to Hollywood. And here. I am. It's funny almost every actor. I've ever spoken to talk about their career say people see the end product, which is me standing on a stage with a statue in my hand. And they don't know the twenty twenty five years that led up to that based off Broadway. Nobody knows the truth of anything. You know, they really don't if you're born with a statue in your hand. There was came before it. Yeah. And they also kind of think you just kinda stroking the statue every day, you know. I don't look at the statutes. So what was the most exciting when you get out of Juilliard, and you get onto Broadway, and you're nominated for Tony pretty quickly in that time afterward. What was the most exciting first day for you on Broadway was walking out onto the stage saying here, I am. I can tell you exactly what it was opening night of seven guitars on Broadway. When I think about everything I believed it being an actor was that was it walking into your dressing room and Florida's ceiling flowers. The all the camera crew outside the theatre working with August Wilson on my mom and dad being in the audience and my dad crying. During the curtain call the cameras, you know, everybody taking pictures and movie cameras were then my father standing up crying clapping. He didn't know what to do. We shaking. My mom it. It was employee thing that I thought being an actor was it was the work and the joy of the work. It was the smell of the theater, and it was the working with the great playwright. August Wilson, the great director, Lloyd Richards, great actors. I was like I'm at this. Is it I've arrived? I don't need anything else in my life. You know, I wish we're back there. Because now, I know I know. Really? Really thought that was it right? That's the journey. Right. You feel like you've reached the mountaintop? And then oh, there are more mountains after that. Are you've reached the point you always dreamed of getting and then you win at Tony for king Hedley, then you win another Tony for fences. And now you're sort of like the Queen of Broadway for that time. I mean that must have been an extraordinary thing for somebody who was playing church basements to start her career. It was an extraordinary thing to dream. The biggest dream you can possibly imagine in your life and having no kind of foresight of how that was going to happen. And then all of a sudden it happens, you you sort of hit it it's sort of like magic, and it speaks to the power of belief and hope and hard work. But life doesn't end there. I always say the three most important words that happens, especially after you have big old trophy in your hand or anything the three most important words are and now what? And now what what's the next thing? What's the next chapter Denzel always says Denzel has the best quotes, by the way. I don't mean out. I would you. Says there's no U-Haul in the back of a hearse. You sort of can't take it with you. And once you hit it. That's what you realize. It's like, oh my God. Oh, I got an Oscar your heart is about potato. And then you go home, and then you sit down and then it's the next day. And it's like. And how what? What's the next page? And that's sort of where I'm at right now. What was it like to jump into movies from the stage? Given the fact that you've built your whole career on stage work, what are the movie set feel like to you? When you first started doing it, like speaking another land, language speaking, and that's Mandarin and movie once and they cut it out. And so glad I did it. It was so hard to months to learn one sentence. That's what it was like like learning Mandarin. It was a black hat. And I thought it was so good. I would go to my friends who Chinese and say, I'm going to say something, and they would say. But it was like speaking man, it's just a completely different world and it completely different world. I mean, I always say all you have to do in a movie is sustainable performance for thirty seconds. That's it. That's as long as a take lass. So you got thirty seconds. Or when you're on stage. You can have a twelve page scene. And there are no edit buttons. There are no cuts, and that's just one scene. I've been I've done plays where I've done them for year. Six seven months, and you're on stage the entire time. Thirty seconds to sustain the performance. So it was much different. And you're acting opposite someone like Merrill street. So you're standing there going. I'm good. I'm really good. I'm good. I know that this is Meryl Streep, but I'm viola Davis and good, and then you're acting opposite her and you're thinking, oh my God. Oh my God. It's Meryl Streep. Oh my God. It's Mel Streep. And it's like hot cut by. Okay. Let's do it. Again. You're not in the scene. But. And the other part of movies. It's very difficult somewhat. Joe book we do in movies and TV sex appeal. Right. How cute you are. Do we like you? What's your cute rating? You know, I'm not good. I'm not so good at that. I think are you may not know it I seem to like you by Ola. I'm glad people like me. But you know, to actually manufacture right is is very very difficult. I'm just I'm just about just telling the story, you know, doing the work. I loved the work love it when you get nominated for an Oscar for one scene in doubt. Were you surprised by that nomination because it felt like a lot of people including Meryl Streep by the way as the beginning of something when she famously said get her a movie. Yeah. Was that a surprise to be nominated for that? Yeah. All of it is a surprise to me every bit of it is a surprise. You know, when I when I got the role I thought that was the reward and award. I didn't see me on that, you know, so and then being at the Oscars and the red carpet my first red carpet, I had a panic attack. It's one of the one to to panic attacks. I've ever had in my entire life. I would not recommend any. I would even wish that upon my worst enemy. I don't have a lot of enemies. But I would not wish that upon anybody who had it on the red carpet. Oh, yeah. I had a carbon. What does that mean? What happened besides shaking? Uncontrollably me besides hyperventilating. Besides a very beautiful woman named Meryl Streep who told me the day before. Viola listen, I can't be at that award show. But if I. Win. Can you accept the award for me? And I said God. Yes. Yes. I'll do that. And then I got there. I was like what? That led to the panic attack along with the red carpet, you know. And you know, I didn't wanna say kill you because match. Oh my God. You got through it. I don't think anybody noticed you survive. Pretty well. I know you say winning an Oscar isn't the end of the world. And and what's next, but to have Oscar winner in front of your name, every time someone says, it does mean something you're in a club with Meryl Streep and some of your other idols, and now people were friends of yours. What does it mean to be in that sort of elite club? You may not think of it that way, but people on the outside certainly do has it changed your life. So I know it's changed your career. I'm sure but does a change your life to be Oscar winner viola Davis. Yeah. It's changed. My life to be Oscar winner to be on TV show, the TV show really out on one life even more than the Oscar. Tell you the truth. Everything is all of it as the money all of it. I remember someone saying, you know, if you're not poor anymore. I was like I'm not. You didn't know what to do with that information is? But I'm yeah. It's it's totally. But I'll tell you what it's probably more of a transformation to people who observe my life than me being in it. Right me being in it. I don't know the biolo- that you talk about I don't I'm aware that you'd know it. But in my every day when I have my rap over my head, and I'm running around with my daughter, and we're going to Ralph's or bonds, and I'm cooking. I'm viola. I'm me, and you know, in terms of me getting through my everyday life and certainly living a meaningful life. It doesn't play a role except for the power of influence, which is what I'm doing here. The power of influence is awesome. I will say that the power to literally stand up on the stage and have people listen to you when you're coming from a pass when one saw, you know, one listened to you. So it's like now, what do you want to say, what do you want to do, you know? Well, it helps that you have such a presence to a lot of people have the platform, but they can't deliver it. I would argue the way you deliver. It have you always had this presence about you, you speak almost poetically. And I mean, it's not everybody who can pull that off. Is that part of being an actor being comfortable on stage? Well, well comfort is like a dirty word for an actor. You know, that they tell you not right for comfort right to be uncomfortable in the moment, you're alive and all of that you're not afraid of the spotlight and the stage. Clearly, well, sometimes I am. But I'm I'm used to it. I'm used to the spotlight. I guess I'm used to the camera being placed on me. I am. Thank you. For listening to the Sunday. Sit down podcast stick around to hear more from Oscar winner viola Davis, including what her younger self with think of the woman. She sees. Now, I'm Chuck Roosenburg. My new podcast youth, Rosenberg is based on a simple premise thoughtful conversations with interesting people like Jim Komi, Lisa, Monaco, and pre Perot are each of them took an oath as I did to support and defend the constitution of the United States. The oath with Chuck Rosenberg. Listen for free wherever you get your podcast. Welcome back to the Sunday sit down podcast now. More of my conversation with viola Davis. Do you have moments? Do you ever stop in your life and look back at the little girl in Rhode Island? Look at your life and go, I don't know how I got here. Thank god. I did. But I don't know how I got here. All the time. And we single day. You know, when I think about her a lot to first of all every day when I opened my refrigerator. When I wash my toilet. When I could put a robe on. When I have hot running water. When I know that there's no lead in the paint in my house. When I could get in the car, and I can go somewhere and not walk. She is with me every day to understand that every little thing in my life is to be celebrated. Okay. But I always say I always want to heal her because she was always so sort of traumatize grew up in dysfunction. My father who I loved more than anything was an alcoholic. It's just a byproduct a lot of times, poverty, right? That it always want to heal her. And this is one to reach back and go, you know, what? Everyone. I see in my life. I I I'm gonna remember you. I'm going to listen to people I'm gonna love people because it's like healing might the little girl. But it's like someone just recently said can you allow the little girl that little girl who survived who's pretty tough can you allow her to be so excited at the Fifty-three-year-old? She gets to become. Can you allow her to hug you and just squeal and? It took me a long time that do that. But I finally did it because I think that there's a grace gratefulness that needs to come and a joy that needs to come with celebrating the fruits of your labor that I had not allowed myself to do because I think that's also something that comes from poverty is survivors guilt. If is the making it out when you see other people who are still in the hole. So I'm allowing her to sort of hug means squeal, and I do things like this that feed my soul touch of sugar because I love my sisters who are here in New York with me, I want to live. Yeah, I'm reconciling my childhood. But as you say it took you awhile to get there. You weren't comfortable with your success and your fame and people like me telling you how great you are. Yeah. What what was the tipping point for you? How did you get there to say? You know, what it's okay that I am where I am. Well, you know, what a friend of mine said this once I mean, besides a lot. But a friend of mine said this once she said, you know, what by Ola when I tell my story a lot of times, I stand outside of it. And I think to myself. Wow, you want awesome. That is such an unbelievable testimony. You know, then you begin to see how God we're miracles in your life. And then I started really listening to my story and understood how sort of awesome it was. Incredible. I just thought you just work hard and you get out. That's it. It's nothing credible about it. So the more I've told my story the more I haven't braced it. But I gotta keep telling it and not live outside of it like renege Brown says in Joseph Campbell says when you go, and you going out there to that call to adventure in you're going out there to find that elixir that answer to your life that you gotta go into that inner cave, and you gotta go in there and slay those dragons, and I find that when I went into those innermost caves, or that Imos cave that the dragon I needed to slave was me. That sort of hurt in that pain of soda railing at God. Like, why do I have to be that kid it's growing up or filthy houses, and blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. And why do I do that anger that sort of pain and all the bed that that innermost cave and slay her and understand that I'm still alive? I had the power of influence that God has always been with me. Upward bound program. Prepared tour enrollment program. Teachers have been awesome, great actors like Cecily Tyson Meryl Streep people like my sister, the ropes that have been thrown at me. That's what I found in the inner most cave, and then, you know, I- Nickelback after I found that answer to sort of give that elixir to people who are still there that there is a way to live a life of significance and reconcile way, you are now that there's a way out and there's a way to make your life meaningful forget per day Brown. I'm following you through the wall. You're you gotta get you. I'm sorry. I think you take it over ever. He's awesome. I'm I would be derelict in my duty. If I didn't ask you if there's going to be more of the show, you mentioned. Yeah. That's for ABC to decide. I think that analysts Keating has more in her. That's what I think I sort of seeing something. Is that a suspicion or something a suspicion a hope that they'll be more? I need for analysts to have some labs. I really do. You know, it's just like me people think that I'm not fun. I am so much fun. If you come to my house, I'm telling you, we have me and my husband green parties, you know, but I need to have some land. Let's give those things at the laugh. Okay. She doesn't get it up for that. I also want to ask you about work. You do with your husband and your production companies. And we were just talking briefly about the manual documentary that you're executive producing with Steph curry. Boy, I've only seen the trailer. But it looks incredibly moving. Absolutely. It looks like something you did the right way. Why was that a project you wanted to take on? Well, we met the victims of the AME church in Charleston. When I was I had to present them the award the glamour magazine event. And and then we spoke to them afterwards at the party really sat down with them. And you know, the big thing them is. They said we're not gonna live in hate. We could live in forgiveness. What struck me as forgiveness is a journey. But. I just didn't want people to forget that story. I didn't want people to forget that tragedy. You know, so often with the number of tragedies that happen in this country. It's amazing. How you have to keep reminding people of it. They they remember it for a while. It's it's on the news. It's trending and then because of the twenty four hour news cycle within seconds. It's forgotten again. I didn't want people to forget. I felt like I opened to them, you know, the pain that they still goal to losing. The loved ones as a son a mom. I didn't want people to forget that. And how awesome it is? Like, I told you before they use whatever power. I have as a source of of influence, and so when it came to us as a producing project we wanted to do that we just felt like we had to. I applaud everything you're doing with this platform, especially on diabetes. I told you my father has diabetes. So it means a lot that you've given your time to this. Thank you so much. Thank you enjoyed talking to you. Thank you to my thanks again to the great, vile. The Davis for a great conversation loves spending time with her you can learn more about her new documentary at a touch of sugar film dot com as usual as always thanks to all of you for listening along the Sunday, sit down podcast this week to hear more of the full length conversations with all of my guests. He sure to click subscribe. So never miss an episode and don't forget to tune in to Sunday today every weekend on NBC, I'm Willie Geist. I'll see you right back here next week on the Sunday, sit down podcast. Hi, it's Katy Tur want to keep up with MSNBC while you're on the go subscribe to the MSN BC daily newsletter. You'll get the best of what you've missed during this unprecedented. Era of news, text MSNBC, two six six eight six six to subscribe.

Oscar diabetes viola Davis South Carolina Meryl Streep Tony EMMY Broadway Willie Geist Hollywood Juilliard school Rhode Island Denzel Washington miss Tyson EMMY Ralph murder Rene Brown Rhode Island Joseph Campbell
Ash Wednesday Meditation: We Are Beloved Dust And Spirit

From Silence Something To Say

08:32 min | 2 years ago

Ash Wednesday Meditation: We Are Beloved Dust And Spirit

"Sunday night at the Oscars. One of the winners gave powerful testimony about life. And whether she realized it or not she was offering the Christian community everywhere. A great perspective on land. Viola Davis who won the award for best supporting actress in the movie fences, began her acceptance speech with these words now, I didn't see it on TV. But just imagine there. They are all the celebrities all of the glamour of the world. And she says these words first words, you know, she said there's one place that all the people with the greatest potential or gathered one place. That's the graveyard. What does that mean to be greeted on this day in the church? Remember that thou art dust and to dust the shot return, what is this imperative to remember? As I said for me, it's a double amnesia. And the first is that it is easy for us to forget. That are fundamental nature is that we are creatures. We are dependent. We are contingent. And we are vulnerable. Life is precarious, and we are insufficient in of ourselves to protect and to deliver ourselves from the reality of death. This is a very counterintuitive message and one which I was absolutely stunned to see as the opening words of the acceptance speech of Iowa Davis. It's not about our guilt. It's not about our sin as much as it is that we forget that we really are creatures made of the earth made of the dust, and that we are not in of ourselves sufficient. Why do we need to remember that? Because without remembering that, we lose sight of the goodness. And grace and mystery of God, God is our source. God is our sufficiency. God is the one who has given us life and the very breath that we grieve is a sign of God's presence to send with us. We forget that. And we forget Secondly that God knows this. He knows all about us. I think the great text for this day is psalm one or three and we read a portion of it. And listen again to what it tells us about God. As a father cares for his children. So does the Lord care for those who fear him? For he himself knows where have we are made. He remembers. That we are best. How is the imperative for us to remember that we are creatures but also to acknowledge that God remembers us. Our life is surrounded behind and before by the steadfast love and mercy of God. So the question for us. Stay is what are we going to do at twin the time that we get ashes smudged on our four Ed, and when we actually become them. What are we doing with the gift of life? We're told as well in psalm one oh three the merciful goodness of the Lord and doors forever on those who fear him and his goodness on his children's children. Not only are we made of the dust, but we are made of spirit, we are unceasing spiritual beings with the life of God breathed into our soul. And God remembers that. So as we come to the service, we remember our creature leanness we remember that we are dust. We remember that we are contingent. We remember that we are dying and will die. But we also acknowledge the great mercy and goodness. And remembrance of God. Who gives us a new quality species of life? That is eternal. We also come this day, and I close with this reminder to name the pain in our lives. Every time we go to physician the physician is going to look at us. Look at our condition to determine the nature of the pain, the source of the pain. And this is where I believe there is true joy to be found in this day. Because we are called to the so bring words of this litany of penitence confession of our sin and like a scalpel. We say words such as the we confess to you Lord, all the past unfaithfulness pride hypocrisy in patients of our lives and on and on we acknowledge the pain and the struggle of our lives. Why? So that we can be healed. I'm forgiven. So my friends it's all about the heart. This day. And I would ask you to listen deeply. To this in invitation of land. To a profound rake through of remembrance to heal the amny. We are made of the dust and to dust. We are returning. But also we are remembered by the God who cares for his children. And given a source of unending life. Buy friendship by love by discipleship by seeking by receiving love and presence and reality of Jesus and his way. I close with words from Julian of Norwich framed it all in God's grace when she said. I the fall. And then the recovery from the fall. And both are the mercy of God.

Viola Davis Julian of Norwich Iowa
Viola Davis: Essentials

Pop Culture Happy Hour

19:45 min | 2 months ago

Viola Davis: Essentials

"This episode contains language. some people might find offensive. These days by davis's name is rarely far from award season chatter and this year is no different. The highly decorated performer received her fourth oscar nomination for her role and ma rainey's black bottom and could become the first black woman to nab to acting oscars. She worked hard to get to this point popping up in small roles early on and everything from ocean's eleven to get richer die trying a pivotal supporting role in the two thousand. Eight doubt. Really put her on the map and now she's achieved leading lady status in both film and tv creating some indelible characters along the way i'm glen wilton and i'm asia harris and today we're talking about some of davis's essential performances on pop culture. Happy hour from npr. So don't go away. This message comes from npr sponsor. Mini cooper mini cooper invites you to explore the newly redesigned twenty twenty two many. It's the most exciting model year yet. You can decide whether you'd like a two door. Four door or convertible model then choose from an array of bold new painkillers and interior. Finishes no matter. What you're into every detail is customizable just the way you want it behind the wheel of the mini. We may all be different. But we're pretty good together. Visit many usa dot com to explore the full twenty twenty. Two lineup welcome back. You just met glen also. Joining us is e alex cheung features writer for new york mag and vulture. Welcome alex i. It's great to have you here to talk about viola. I'm so excited to hear your picks but first a little bit of background viola. When she won her first oscar for best supporting actress for fences and twenty seventeen. She became the first black person to win the so so-called triple crown of acting a competitive advantage emmy and tony award because of this in how omnipresent she's been over the last decade including her turn in the blockbuster period piece the help and as the shady complicated lawyer least keating in the long running series how to get away with murder. It might be easy to forget that. She has more than paid her dues to get where she's at. Now she graduated from juilliard in nineteen ninety-three and bounce between theater and screen throughout the rest of that decade by the early offs. She'd become a reliable supporting actor. Popping up in steven soderbergh movies like solaris and playing rations on the mom rule or the urban professional. She spoken candidly about how being dark skinned. Black woman has impacted her career like in this interview. She did with tina brown in twenty eighteen. I have a career that's probably comparable to meryl streep julianne moore. Let's sigourney weaver. They all came out of jail. They came out of juilliard. They came on nyu. They had the same path as me and yet i am nowhere near them. Not as far as money not as far as job opportunities. Nowhere close to it. But even when she's taken on roles one might consider to be less than worthy of her talents. She's always done the work. And that's what we're going to discuss in this episode as we examined three key performances from her career. These aren't all necessarily her biggest or most well known characters but they're essential to understanding what makes her such a force onscreen so before we dig into these three specific performances. I love to get your takes. Just initial thoughts on by as a whole glenn. Why don't we start with you. Well the word. I keep coming back to is intelligence. And it's a very specific species of intelligence. It's grounded Slightly world-weary intelligence that comes out of self awareness and self knowledge now. Look she's a great actor. I'm sure she could play someone really silly or flighty or self deluded. But that's not what you go. Viola davis for Whoever she's playing sees the world around her as it is iranian a perfect example of that. And that'll add layers to any performance but on a show like how to get away with murder which makes her do and say some very over the top ridiculous things. None of that show works. If you don't have viola davis planted there with both feet grounding that show and that's how a line like why is he a penis on it. Did girls phone is a great line woodland no matter who said it when she says it. It's iconic that is a classic line. I'm so glad you got that. And i completely agree glenn alex out you especially that line as another line that we'll talk about in widows. There are certain lines that it feels like only she can say and she can pull it off because she has obviously a lot of words at are thrown around the gravitas or the pool to make you pay attention to give something and under girding of seriousness to however ridiculous or operatic robot the actual proceedings may be. What's been interesting to see for me. Has been the ways in which her role choices as of late have been in some ways coinciding with a public persona as well around trying to take power and trying to make space for herself in hollywood that has historically dismissed her and i think that that has been kind of like interesting tension both in terms of what she's taking And then how those roles play out against the backdrop of the industry. Yeah i think that's a great point and it's a great segue into the first choice that we have here which is mine and it is far from heaven now. You might have forgotten that she was in this movie She has a very small role If you haven't been in a while or you don't remember that well. It is the todd haynes film from two thousand and two it is Basically in a mogae very very explicit. Oh my gosh to the douglas. Sirk melodramas of the nineteen fifties specifically imitation of life. and all that heaven allows and stars. Julianne moore and dennis quaid as a nineteen fifty suburban couple with a lot of secrets between them and viola. Davis plays sybil their housekeeper. Now this is a very very small role. It's a role that i think. If you're not really paying attention to its it can easily pass she by. You can cast it off as a very insignificant moment in viola davis career. But i think having watched it and watching it very closely. There's a lot that she does. That is so subtle and small and takes this. What could have been stereotypical role of the made in the two thousands of all places and really adds gravitas. As you mentioned. alex. I think is part of what is so interesting about it. We also know that simple is always privy to. What's going on because she's always there. She's taking care of their children. Most of this is done not by dialogue. But by the way in which davis you know cast a glance exchanges glances with other black characters in the film and i think it really works well in this a to the douglas sirk phones because so much of it is subtext. And then at some point it becomes taxed by the end of this film. A pivotal moment. Where davis davis's character tells julianne moore something that she knew and i think it's just a really smart performance and there's a moment towards the end. Where after the julia more character and The dentist character have to force or are getting a divorce where they have this exchange between each other and let's take a little listen to this clip civil. You'll need to do that. I know it's friday but there's so much to be done now. I can hardly expect to be polishing tables reason not to keep things no reason at all. Don't forget the grocery lists thank you on her side. So if you hear that part julianne moore says. I don't know how on earth ever managed and she likes stops herself halfway because she catches a glance of viola davis. And it's like well. I know how you manage. Because i've been here the whole time lady like i'm doing all the work and so i really love just the way in which even with a small role she gives all of this emotion and thoughts and make sure the main character is smarter than the white characters around her think she is and it's kind of a nice also precursor role in the help a few years later which you couldn't pay me to re watch that movie. There are a lot of like undertones from that And there's like a line between that and the help in which i actually think that her character is treated with a little bit more dignity here than she is in the help Glenn and alex. I don't know how recently you've rewatch the film. But how do you feel about her role in this movie. Will you pick that because yes it's a small part but it underscores it kinda breaks. Open that film a weird way because of course it is as you say no majd. Douglas sirk melodrama and is a very stylized kind of acting that he kind of has people go into and uses. The measles saw uses the lighting of the costumes of that. The very specific genre and has viola davis undercut that by acting more naturalistic than melodrama typically does. So she's standing out even in such a small part i mean. I haven't seen the film in many many years probably over a decade. But i do remember some withering glances from the news and i was trying to before this conversation like look for them but of course no one has done like a proper super cut of this so i beseech the internet to at least do this work and i do remember them. You know like i. I remember them very clearly because it does puncture the world that they've created right this fragile fictional idea of perfect white suburban life right like it's very important that she exists to poke holes in that even if it's ever so slightly and subtly yeah well onto our next performance which is a few years later and glen. This was your choice at tell us about doubt. Yeah this is another very small parts probably about ten minutes of screen. Time out of the whole film doubt is two thousand eight film Written and directed by john patrick shanley based on his play. It set at a catholic school in the bronx and it centers on a none Played by meryl streep grow suspicious when a priest begins taking what she perceives to be too much of an interest in the life of a young black student Who is the school's only black student And we mentioned at the top. It's a breakout role and look. It's a very well written part but there's no guarantee you would make any impression at all because you're still acting against meryl streep in the scene that you get and again. You're only unscreened for ten minutes so in this scene. The none played by meryl streep confronts. Viola davis is character. Mrs miller who is the mother of the boy in question With her suspicions. Excuse me but you don't know enough about life to say this enough. You know the rules. Maybe but that don't cover. I know what. I won't ex. You accept what you got. Accept any work with this man is in my scores. He's gotta be somewhere. Maybe doing some good to maybe some of them boys want to get caught now. I didn't click that moment for the way her voice rises at the end there. I clipped it because of the way. She delivers the lions. You don't know enough about life and you know the rules may be. I love that because that breaks in this character It delineates her character. And really smart way. You can see that. Mrs miller throughout the entire scene is just silently appraising streep's character trying to gauge. What she can and can't say what she will and won't say to her and for most of the film we've been kind of seeing this whole thing happened through streep's character's is and this shifts it because now we see this. School is mrs miller's son. Her only his only chance to make a better life for himself and she sees this none with the potential to destroy it based on only suspicions right. That's all she has. She sees a nun who doesn't live in the world. Who doesn't know all. The kind of tiny moral bargains are forced to make every day and in the seen over the course of it. She starts to see that future that she's idealized for his son kind of vehicle rising in front of rise and the thing that everyone mentions about. This scene is that when viola davis starts to tear up later on. Her nose starts to run and she doesn't do anything about it. But that isn't why you remember it. It is only the outward manifestation of this aching paralyzing sadness that she is portraying in this scene and the very complicated moral calculus that the characters performing in that scene and it is just just leaps off the screen. Yeah i do remember. There's a lot of chatter about that news reading and to me. It reminded me a lot of the conversation around denzel's tear in glory. Where it's just like. He had the single tears. She had the single snot but like again. Both of those performances are about me than that ability to conjure up. You know bodily fluids for lack of a better word. It's about the understanding of the character and the way it's very clear to the audience that the actor understands the character as well. It's incredible how in a seven-minute scene she packs a whole lifetime. You know and you like feel it in every little line. I remember one of the lines was where she just says. Then maybe there's nothing to it and she just kind of size and there's just like this feeling of you know as you said before this world weariness to the character you can feel the weight of how much she's gone through and what she's focused on in this Setting and what. She needs to happen for her son and so even though she's only onscreen for not that long you feel dislike full human being just like rattling you know and it's so good even listening to that clip. I was like moved again. You know. I remember when this was her first oscar nomination and she only appears in one other scene. I believe in the whole film and that seems she doesn't even speak anything so like it was clear that this is going to be the oscar. Clip that the us. I also know that like from now on any time. There's a retrospective of viola davis performances. That's going to be. It has to be in there. There's there's no choice that in weiser pena's on deadman's so alex. What did you bring for us in our final key davis performance so i went with a leading lady performance. I picked widows a by steve mcqueen from two thousand eighteen. Who you know as you might expect from the director who made hunger shame. And twelve years a slave. It is not your typical heist film. Basically via a woman named veronica. Who is the wife of a very successful crime boss. He dies during a job and two million dollars vanish with it and the people who had that two million dollars stolen from them one it back and they want it back from her. So in order to sort of pay the bills she rounds up the other widows from the heist Including elizabeth and michelle rodriguez and they form a team. That also includes cynthia revealed later. We got to start thinking like professionals win business together. There's gonna be some cozy reunion after this job done. We have three days to look and move like a team of men. The best thing we have going for us as being we are why because no one thinks we have a balsa. Pull this off you know. That's another line. Yup that could easily easily slide into ridiculousness right in anyone else's mouth but you need a kind of commitment. You need a planetary force of character to sort of say it and for it to land into theater when you're watching it and obviously reminds me of like why is your penis on the girls phone But i did sort of feel like widows was the peak performance or the best performance of this kind of violence. Archetype that i think we all kind of started to become familiar with because of how to get away with murder and later on twitter Of dislike incredibly tough highly competent woman. Who hasn't like deep trauma needs more forces together and like sort of get out of this impossible situation right and i feel like in the tv. Show it kind of like veered into camp at times. Whereas i think in at least in the hands of cpa queen there's a little more artful nece to the calibration of her performance. But but even you know like i love widows one hundred percent but you don't have a lot of her character in terms of the dialogue in terms of really knowing where she's from or what her relationship chicago is and i sort of felt like like those things you kind of just like patch over a little bit because she's so good and she's like this force in the film that can just kind of keep it going the course of two hours. You know absolutely. I you know for this conversation. I rewarded it for the first time. Since it originally came out and boy i think it holds up so well in so many ways and even once you know all the twists like. I still marvel at the twists and the way they unravel. And she's a key part of that and her experiencing this sort of cushy life as a wife in a nice little penthouse and never having to really do anything. I think we get little glimpses of who she is like. She works as a teacher or she was like a part of a teacher's union. Or something on those lines but And so her work was clearly being funded by illegal happenings and whatever but knowing those little things in those details about her is just really really fascinating and again. I can't stress enough the fact that ten years ago a movie like widows probably wouldn't have been made because black women weren't getting those types of roles you know. It took her so long to get to where she is now. But it's great to see that she is still doing so well there. I was watching an interview with and she talked about how even though she's won these awards. She doesn't quite feel comfortable like she's not like resting on her laurel. She's like for me the only thing that get begets. More work is work. Not awards awards absolutely wonderful and nice but for me at the end of the day. It's worked begets work. And she's like as long as i keep getting the rules. I know this world is fickle. I'm just going to keep doing the best that i can. And that sort of perseverance as every single role she plays just like you were saying. It looks like you can see the similarities. Between the character she played and then her public persona as well so all three of those films are available to stream. You can rent or buy both far from heaven and widows and doubt is streaming on. Hbo max and we want to know about your favorite viola davis performances. You can find us at facebook dot com slash pch and on twitter at p. c. h. h and that brings us to the end of our show. Thank you both for being here. Thank you so much for having me and of course thank you for listening to pop culture. Happy hour from npr. If you have a second and you're so inclined please subscribe to our newsletter at npr dot org slash pop culture newsletter. We'll see you tomorrow when we'll be talking about the new season of queens sugar. Are you interested in one day building a business. Join us for the first ever. Virtual how i built this summit will have four days of interviews with some of the best entrepreneurs out there and opportunities to connect with other entrepreneurs in our global community. Thank you to tell technologies a supporting sponsor of the how. I built this summit for tickets and more information head to summit dot. Npr dot org.

viola davis mrs miller Julianne moore davis oscar glen wilton asia harris Mini cooper mini cooper alex cheung emmy and tony award alex meryl streep julianne moore meryl streep glenn alex viola Sirk ma rainey davis davis glen tina brown
Byte Chaos Walking

Sci-Fi Talk

05:25 min | 2 weeks ago

Byte Chaos Walking

"Hi this is tony tomato and welcome to bite here on the. Sat podcast network and so parenting an apocalypse. It's it's not the same way that we would do. You know how it works. Any views usually two to four minutes long but sometimes they can be a little longer story when you when you live long enough. All kinds of strange things happen very right in saying that. The greek heroes the original superheroes in part because of the nature of genes vision but also because of its message of diversity and inclusion chaos. Walking is an interesting premise. Removing based on the novels by patrick nest who gives us a glimpse of what the story is about. Cats walking is about a boy caught hewitt who lives in tuck apprentice time apprentice town is not at all like other towns There are no women in the tone was terrible war just after todd was born and the work half of them in all of the women in the town is dying. And he's the last boy born in the townies less will ever before and And culturally i wondered you know what would that be like. What would that feel like. How would you grow up the change. You as a not just as a man but as a person and the other thing that is different the noise which is a phenomenon where you hear everyone else starts all the time with you. What's or not and if you think about what that might actually be like. It's really horrifying. Because you know your brain is a messy place in the books. Men's minds are messy places and could noise living breathing face at that mess and it starts tonight. He views the world one way. He has taught that the world is this way that there are no women that there is one enemy that there is really no future and the one day he finds a girl who shouldn't exist. She shouldn't be there. Everything's been taught is contrary to that. And she's called via and her presence is a danger to her as a danger to him dangerous town and she and he invited to go on the run. Daisy ridley is viola stranger in a strange land that has crash landed on our big blue marble chaos walk. It's interesting because the film has ended up spanning different parts of ood three books in the trilogy not necessarily anyone order not necessarily as like every bit from every book but the but the script has ended up encompassing actually more of the world. I think one would assume and i think because so much in. The book is descriptive of the noise. Because we're able to do that in an audiovisual way. I think it's helpful having not because you're able to tell the story probably in a more condensed way because the noise does so much of the work that has to do in a narrative way. She meets todd. Played by tom holland viola and taught meet sorta by chance and what is amazing in the store. A is taught can't really explain why he's drawn to viola but he basically well i mean he's told to as well by ben kellyanne but he leaves everything he knows in order to help her which is amazing And it's and that's i think is why we did the additional photography too. Because it's quite a it's a challenging relationship to make work because there has to be like a poll but also you have to understand why they stayed together and he's super helpful to viola so it's clearer that way. Christopher ford wrote the screen the basics of cans walking has. I've seen a heightened science fiction adventure but at its core Was interesting about the movie is that it's really just a story about a boy girl so in the end not to give anything away instead of trying to blow up a battle station. Word is hoping that they can work it out. Even though they're on the alien planet matt mickelson love this act. Who is mayor. Prentiss tells us more about the noise. I mean the nice plays a vital part of asli but to the men have been around for twenty years. So it's it's part of their day. They take it for granted there a few times. Obviously where we'd take in houston noise As a dramatic effect where we'll folsom somebody to reveal the noise and then it was a technical thing whether it manifests itself on the side above around the character technical things what we're looking at but in general people trying to keep the noise out. Meaning that we're not reacting to noise constantly that will be complete madness but it's constantly there so you can imagine a radio that the place non stop with a lot of lot of annoying music and that's the kind of world in potato. They don't take it in. they have to keep out. The film is out on. Dvd and available on amazon prime boo and fandango her bite. This is tony tiller.

tony tomato patrick nest viola Daisy ridley todd tom holland viola ben kellyanne Christopher ford matt mickelson Prentiss folsom houston amazon tony tiller
Viola Davis

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver?

34:33 min | 2 months ago

Viola Davis

"Mattress warehouse knows that buying a mattress can be tough with so many choices. Where do you start introducing bed match a patented diagnostic system. That determines your pressure points and recommends the mattresses that are best for your individual sleep needs and it's found only at mattress warehouse. Come try bed match at a mattress warehouse near you. Visit sleep happens dot com for locations and get free next day delivery on. Select purchases. Papin dot com. I'm any driver and in my new podcast many questions. I explore on differences similarities by asking people the same seven questions questions. About what makes us happy. What would curious about what love needs to us this season. I'll be speaking with the brilliantly talented actor. Viola davis epic firefighters from dave grohl and investigative reporter ronan farrow listening. Subscribe to many questions on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you got your podcasts. I can't believe that i'm getting told him. I cannot believe. I'm going to answer these questions. Lean let the building minute let me take some viola. We've been working with you anymore. Brain fire you my brain fis me. Every morning i wake up and put it on any close your guy anyway. You're not doing anything. Guess what hello. I'm minnie driver and welcome to the first episode of many questions growing up. My family always had the radio on. I loved the ritual of listening to shows like desert island discs on a sunday morning and hearing interesting people onto the same set of questions later whenever i got my copy of vanity fair back when you actually hard copies magazines i was to the back page. I and re diversion of proust's question. I i think it's the scientific method really in asking different people the same set of questions you can make interesting observations about the way. We're the same and different. I love this discipline and it made me wonder what if these questions which is jumping off point what greater debts would be revealed if i asked these questions. As conversation. starters with thought leaders and trailblazers across all these different disciplines. I think of this show as a mini archive no pun intended. Well that sort of unavoidable. Invite you to observe how these trailblazers overlap and also where they don't so i took the format of proust's questioner adapted what i think a seven of the most important questions you could ever ask someone they are when and why will you happiest. What is the quality you like least about yourself. What relationship real fictionalized defines love fear. What question which you mice like onset person place or experience has shaped you the most. What would be your last meal. And can you tell me something in your life that has grown out of a personal disaster and i've gathered a group of remarkable people. I am honored and humbled to have had the chance to engage with. You may not hear their answers to all seven of these questions. We selected the ones felt closest to their experience or with the most surprising. All the ones that provided the most fertile ground to connect and. We're starting with fire. Davis who to me is one of the most passionate thoughtful and compelling actors. I've ever watched onscreen. She's one tony's emmys and oscars but since sally all that hardware side she is extremely interesting person with a generosity of spirit mayfield at starstruck and frankly a bit tongue tied. I don't think that's a bad thing. It is humbling being around people. You know very well but admire greatly. I am thrilled. I get to talk to viola today. It's really hard being an actor and interviewing you. Because all i really wanted to be doing. It's like sitting in an empty theater asking you questions. And then getting to guns of de scenes walk you move your your most recent beautiful lorraine is black bottom twice now and i don't know where to start i don't know about you and i don't know where to start about chadwick boseman and that's not even talking about the supporting character who a role in their own movies. That are exclusive. I'm telling you. I'm gonna get my baseball bat and all common stars swinging around if you good either way to t- because you don plenty of that i'm going to stick to these questions first question. What relationship real or fictionalized defines love or mercy. Oh i know shadowlands. Fat film is about redemption. And the idea that love is not the absence of pain and with with so conditioned to believe that that. It's supposed to be the absence of pain that it's meant to be joy and happiness in this. It redeems. love redeems does reading. And it's not based in mystery a friend of mine at her wedding. She said something absolutely beautiful with her vows. She told her then she said i promise to love you exactly as god made you and i think that that's i mean i watch my mom. Sit by my dad's day bid when he was dying pancreatic cancer and he would he would just scream her name every two seconds may- alice malice balas and she would say dad. I'm right here. It say oh oh and then shoot. Hold him and for me that that's it. I've been with my husband twenty one years and all those things that probably are not in the sexy romantic comedies. All the things that i value someone who's gonna be there when you sake someone who literally yunos good. Hold your hand when you're going someone who like i said just simply loves you. I mean my mom and dad together for forty eight years and at the end of his life. It became her telling him to go. There is something for me in terms of the kind of love. I have now from my husband. It's not about hence sealer and tight ebbs and you deserve what question which you must like onset. Oh man i'll tell you that right now. Why are we so cruel to each other. I please answer that question to me. Why are we so dishes if you would ask anyone. What's the most vicious animal in the world. I mean they probably swift say the black mamba over you know a female lion an adult the two legged variety the depths to which we are cruel. And here's the thing. The thing that is really really really interesting is were cruel and we know how hard life is we know the road and even after knowing the road we go back and the level of judgment how we saw the don't protect each other how we think of killing someone will make us feel better. I mean i don't know. There's no measure of cruelty men towards women black towards white. And i think there's a human answer to genuinely the closest i ever came to understanding at. Was this extraordinary. Geneticist called michael winston. Who was of the team who isolated the gene initially and we were saying backstage going on a english talk show. It was years ago. The iraq war was happening And i was talking about just the share loss of innocent life and he said he's a christian a devout christian and he has also you know this extraordinary scientists and he said. I've always felt the nexus of my spirituality and science comes in truly understanding that you in the universe and scientifically you literally cannot have one without the other each thing has its counterpart nine day good and evil and he said however simplistic it sounds. It is part of this this order. We experience it so harshly. We also experienced joy so profoundly as human beings but our cruelty to each other. I don't. I don't think we understand it or measure in human terms. Because i think it's it's an energetic. Its energy that was set in motion by god source energy. Whatever you want to and and so it is and so. They're always to to everything i mean. That's the only way i could ever. That was the closest. I got my head to get around it. Being a theater geek. I remember the one thing. I was taught that stayed in my head was the divine right of kings. The hierarchy to which people feel like they're born and the whole idea is to be in a position in in terms of status as high as possible. Because then the only one you're answering to is god. You're basically dancing with god and everyone else's beneath you when men make sense of their own existence there is something about status. I always say the bumper sticker in the eighties. It was on the back of everyone's car that said he who dies with the most toys wins. The ego is that what is is it is ego. it's. I don't know who i am unless i have my foot on someone else's neck status is your social standing above another person to gives you meaning and value. It's a powerful. It's a caste system. But i agree with you. I think it defies understanding. I always say. I wonder what the caveman thought. That caveman who didn't have a computer couldn't speak didn't have any clothes he's standing there. He's looking at the ocean. He's looking at the sky. what is he thinking. How is he making food stamps or where. He's or. how can run away from the tailgate. That's what he's saying here. That's it total instinct. It's crazy how much we have to pay for outdated impersonal healthcare and even crazier that we all just accept it. It's time to face facts. Healthcare is backwards. Luckily there's forward a new approach to primary care that surprisingly personal and refreshingly straightforward forward never makes you feel like just another patient backed by top rated doctors and the latest tech forward gives you access to personalized care whenever you need it. Using in-depth genetic analysis and real time bloodwork forwards top rated doctors provide you with in-depth insights to better understand your genetics mental and physical health. They then create custom easy to understand plans to help guide you to achieving long-term health with forward you get unlimited in person visits with your doctor and access to care anytime via the forward app offer. One flat monthly fee. It's time to stop accepting backwards. Healthcare and start moving. Your health forward visit go forward dot com today to learn more. That's go forward dot com. No please like a cowboy. Please go waylay the cowboy way on that home now ground. We let the cowboy album like day. The big damn. Try the new. Big burger at roy rogers stress drums. It's a quarter pound. Burger was smithfield old. Beer battered onion rings. American cheese in spicy barbecue sauce on a corn dusted kaiser. Bun ain't no way like the cowboy song. Have a cowboy count wrong yourself a big drive. The big sky burger at roy. Rogers restaurants jordache and uber eats available at participating restaurants. Wearing when and your life we happiest. You know what. I'm going to have to say at twenty five. When i went to africa for the first time i went to the gambia west africa for two weeks. And i was at juilliard. Juilliard gave me a scholarship. Twenty five hundred dollars. Because i guilt them into it. It's very eurocentric training at juilliard. And i said it was suppressing me so much. It was tethering me so much that i no longer knew. My voice was. I sort of had lost my identity in trying to make me and my blackness disappear in george bernard shaw and strindberg and chekhov and shakespeare. I just didn't know what kind of artist i was supposed to be if i couldn't use myself and my voice so they gave me a scholarship and i went to africa when i was twenty five to study the dance music folk glove four different tribes in changed my life. It just changed my life and maybe it was because also had broke it up with a boyfriend right before and and so i was devastated. My god it was like a greek tragedy. You know. I look back on that now and said well. Why don't you just go to to mcdonalds or something. Just have a drink. Now go to gambia. Gambia ghana palencia graphical. Over this hop break. I went to the gambia. And it was transformational like that. Radical shifting that takes place in your life. It just takes you by surprise because it's the power Rituals that worked for me. It was the getting in the car every single day. And singing this song and dances and the rituals that were about finding one's valued or becoming a woman or a baby surviving after seven days when i saw those kenya. Women in the men dinka tribe in africa. They were infertile. Women women who could not have children and they dressed as clowns oversized clothes makeup on their faces and they went into these compounds. Screaming shouting with the gym bay. Drums everybody would scream and shout with them. Dozens of people like a mob scene and then they pass a calabash around with food and then they sang the song and it translates to. I did not come here for food. My stomach is full. I did not come in for food. I came for much more. And the whole ritual was about pardon the clouds of heaven making so much noise that god would hear the deepest pain of not being able to have a child and somehow poor down the blessing. It's like those types of rituals. That i took part in. That made me believe that there was something in the abstract world at i could. I don't know that. I could claim to define myself. I'm extremely moved by that amazing image. And i wish that we had more ritual around the hot things in the west the way that we live around death around infertility around loss around getting old. Did you feel that. The ritual itself or the community performing the ritual created the scaffold. Upon which you could actually have something to yourself to that. When you came back you would still be connected. I love that question. I know exactly what you're saying. And i think that's a great question. It was more of the community. The connection it was more of being seen. I mean i'm a dark skinned woman. From the moment you come out of the room and use step forth into the world you get all the values associated with being dark skinned and then being at juilliard with a deep voice. Dark skin wide nose. Big lips it's like you're basically nothing the visibility to the notion of visibility. Yes okay it's so fascinating. Because i can only empathize with a feeling of growing up invisible event. Going to a place and what you just said of. What community does is a community seas. They see the howling sadness of these women and they wrap around it and literally to make. God listen so you becoming an actor and the bizarre oxymoron in visibility that there is supposed to be was saying oh she disappeared into a role. Oh really disappeared into character. It was extraordinary. That must be very particular attention. Fee you with the idea of what is it to disappear into a character or is it rather to know yourself to see yourself and to gather them into what you already are but you gotta know what that is in the first place you do have to know what that is in the first place. I don't know if i did not know that. Or if i just didn't trusted at the time it just didn't value with at the time because as you move through life people tell you who you should be or who you should not be. And that's what was happening. I i don't mean the blast juilliard at all. I compared to music. Like i said musa next. Hey sped but it works the permission. That's what i want to say permission. That's what i've got when i was in africa. It was literally a week into that trip. That i sat down at one point and it was the one time in my life that i had absolutely knowing's -iety like none like floating on air so i think that what i was looking for was commission that god made me right because i didn't have that permission throughout my entire childhood and throughout juilliard. And that's really overly simplifying it. It's like rene brown says when you start with the foundation of worth and value than you can live better when you start with that foundation when he came back and you're back into the chaco from the strindberg you're taking a look at masher. Did you feel that. The distance had been lessened. Who do always feel that there is a scrim in between the plethora of wight playwrights and you as a black woman. Yes i did i did. I didn't feel like i was being wit for doing everything wrong but it was only until maybe twenty something years later that i can literally sit here with you and say that i reject everything that i've been taught i reject people telling me that i'm not smart if i don't read the classics. So does tony. Morrison does that qualify as a classic. What does that mean. Who wrote those rules. Who told me that. I wasn't beautiful. Who told me that. If i did not fit into any character in george bernard shaw then. Somehow i'm really crappy at what i do. What if george bernard. Shaw doesn't speak to me. What if he doesn't does that. Make me what. I think that the keepers of the structure of the way things should be have been extraordinarily flawed. I'm coming from a country. That's build on a science basically a bunk science to explain why i as a black woman is less than scientists of beauty sciences of intelligence science of sexuality. That told us it. You're never going to be pretty your brain smaller sub. You're never going to be smart. Glad women could take as much pain as possible because you don't feel any pain you're strong almost masculine. You could cut them open without any anesthesia. you can rate then with impunity. That's where i'm coming from so now at fifty five i could say the foundation in which you explained my existence and who i am. I rejected the fact that you are telling the stories that you tell now given that you felt. Voiceless and invisible is truly inspiring. If you're ready to travel again dulles international and reagan national airport's are working hard to help you have a safe and enjoyable journey. We've implemented health and safety measures like sanitizing more often and requiring face coverings and was shopping and dining options available in every concourse. You can enjoy a meal or grab a snack before you board visit. Mwa dot com slash safety to learn more about our safety measures and see available concessions. Did you know that we spend forty percent of time on non work related tasks while at work as we've adapted to work from home we've lost over a third of our productivity to distraction disorganization and work app fatigue. One company click up is making waves on the internet for its flexible platform that brings ear tasks docs goals chat and more all in one place with two hundred thousand. Plus teams from companies like uber. Google and web flow. Click up might be onto something. Click up is free forever. So sign up today at click up dot com slash and see. What the grays is all about the courtesy. You like least by yourself the quality about myself that i like the least is team shoes. Although i will say that. I am a lot better than i was like. Look by ninety something percent. But i don't even like feeling one of it where all of a sudden you're in a situation and then you're right back to where you started and if i were to track any situation that brings that out of me that feeling of not feeling worthy when people try to attack my worth it could be anything. It could be the mommy skills it could be anything with acting with your work with your skillset. As soon as i feel like i'm under attack. I feel it. It cost me something. Do you have any ritual tale that in those moments well. There's two things that i do. I'm a believer in connection and finding people in your life that love you therapist told me that once. Find someone who loves you. Viola that roots for you. Just sweats for you. Just has your back. I mean i grew up in abject poverty and people always ask me. How did you get from that to this. And i only say those supernatural allies. Those people who come out of nowhere hussein. Let me tell you. This is what you have to do. Okay let suit up and me and you will fight this battle together. Okay but their supernatural which means that you know they come out of nowhere and they're not always the people that you think they're going to be. But the other thing that i do in. It's really working for me. I go to viola the little girl. The eight-year-old i literally talked to her. And i'm not kidding. Adverse i you would always try to heal her. 'cause i said you grew up with an alcoholic father and abuse so i'm going to heal this little girl in know who was always waiting rough and tumble little girl. And then someone made me realize that she a survivor. You have to allow her to be excited at the fifty five year old. She's good become using let her squeal in delight. And so now. I'm just going to say this. If it were up to me. I would put all the trophies in a box in a garage watching myself. I have a tendency to not celebrate my victories. I've a tendency to sometimes just sort of twisted and turn around actually and almost let it destroy me sometimes. It's a weird dichotomy. There when i tap into their eight year old girl and say guess what we're getting some french fries today bio guesswork. We're going to get dressed up today in a cute dress. I hate getting dressed up. 'cause tales wicked dress up today in some heels and we're gonna go to know would show all my then. I have an appreciation for my life. That is the equivalent of a child's joy. That's helping me a lot. It's helped me sleep at night. It helps me enjoy every single moment. person place or experience. My st- altered your life. My dad died was a big one. That's a hard one. Because i was there. I wish i were more brave during that time. In what way it was. After he died that i went on the hospice page and they had a whole section. That talked about how to help. Someone die that they will have dementia and they will see people that have passed before then they would literally call up their names and you have to validate them. You can't just say it's delusional because what that is is once again. It's the word permission. They're asking for permission to cross over. I didn't wanna look at that. They just want you to hold their hand. I didn't wanna look at that. They just want them lips disdain. Moist wanna know that no one tells you about death. No one talks about it still to literally see a parent take their last breath and a half the sit there and go daddy. It's okay to go. And then at his funeral. I remember when we close the casket in my nieces and nephews had all these pitchers put an cast it with them as beautiful and i looked in the casket in didn't have any shoes on and i was pissed. I was like we paid you all this money up in my brain because i was about to custom out and you didn't put any shoes on. My dad looks great. We didn't put shoes and the next stop was. He didn't need shoes. That encapsulates life does. Okay what anyone it does after he died. You're not thinking about how pissed you all you're not thinking about. He was an alcoholic. You just thinking about the fact. That i loved him. He was my father and he's gone and then you're thinking about forgiveness. You're thinking about mercy. You think about all those things that nobody teaches you about in life. There's no other way to measure life. Wills life down to absolutely the essentials of really what makes life and what makes joy. I would say that would be it it. It leveled me defined after these big moments in your life you can take them with you into the evolution of who you are oft them. Are you aware of practicing those things. That you've observed i do but then i had to move through life and someone comes along and knocks my ass down now i now i mean it's a war of attrition learned at the time yeah absolutely. It's it's difficult. But i do and i'll tell you when i do people notice when i came back from africa. Everyone notice the shift. So i know i bring it back. But then i got to navigate through life. Yeah you know what my daddy used to say. He said i don't know why. Keep aiming for one hundred percent of everything he said. This is the biggest misnomer we should be aiming for like fifty eight percent sixty if that's let that be one hundred percent because it's never. You're always going to be disappointed. You never gonna get it right. And he was like. It isn't have lowest standards. It's just appreciate that. That is a set percentage of life that is mostly circumstance or locker. Whatever you wanna call it. This is not going to go away. And in order to not be buffeted by that constantly sort of hold true to the smaller amount that you are sure of all. Yeah i saw how and where it began. It is a rare privilege talking to you it. It really is I feel like i learn something. Every time i hear you interviewed but even more so when i was she work and like as an actor. That's amazing it's right back at your mother. I appreciate you. And i appreciate your time honesty all my love and thanks a love back to you. Please watch vyas extraordinary performance and more rains black bottom but also go back and find that scene in the movie doubt what she meryl streep go head to head by the basketball cool. It is an acting moustakas. Many questions is hosted and written by me. Minnie driver supervising producer. Aaron kaufman producer. Morgan lavoix research assistant manager brown original music. Sorry baby by minnie. Driver additional music by aaron kaufman produced by may languish had he cadeau special. Thanks to jim. Nicolay wilkerson addison. Oh day lisa kasteler. An oppenheim at w. k. Pia daily pescador. Kate driver and jason weinberg and for constantly solicited tech support henry driver. Have you heard of click up. It's the fastest growing productivity tool that saving people one day a week by bringing all your work into one place loved by two hundred thousand plus teams in companies like uber and web flow click up brings your tasks docs goals chat and more into one place to help you get more done. Click up is freed forever. So sign up today at click dot com slash iheart. Have you heard of click up. It's the fastest growing productivity tool that saving people one day a week by bringing all your work into one place loved by two hundred thousand plus teams in companies like uber and web flow click up brings your tasks docs goals chat and more into one place to help you get more done. Click of is free forever. So sign up today at click up dot com slash iheart.

gambia proust Mattress warehouse Papin ronan farrow chadwick boseman alice malice balas michael winston africa Viola davis Bun ai jordache dave grohl strindberg george bernard shaw viola desert island minnie tony
Viola Desmond's unfinished work

Front Burner

15:57 min | 2 years ago

Viola Desmond's unfinished work

"This is a CBC podcast. Hi, I'm Jimmy. When viola Desmond decided to stay seated in a whites only section of a movie theater in new Glasgow Nova Scotia, she didn't think she'd one day become a civil rights pioneer. The people would call her Canada's, Rosa Parks, but over seventy years later, it's precisely that act of civil disobedience that landed her a place on Canada's ten dollar Bill that Bill it goes into circulation this week across the country and a lot of people, including viola sister, Wanda Robson think is a cause I celebrated could dance with Dan. Thank you. Thank you. Replied, but the racism that file it has been faced although seventy years ago. It remains an issue right now in her home province people call Nova Scotia the deep south of Canada or the Mississippi of Canada with the understanding that the love of racism is particularly intense here with these long histories of segregation today. Viola Desmond's unfinished work this is from burner. I am L Jones. I'm a former poet laureate of Halifax a community organizer and the current Nancy's chair in women's studies at mount Saint Vincent university in Halifax. Hi, al. Hi, thanks so much for coming on the show today. Thank you for having. I I know that we don't have a lot of time in one podcast to cover an issue as big as the stomach racism in Nova Scotia. But today, we're going to ask you to help us understand some of the key issues play and before we get into that. I was just curious how you feel today seeing violet Desmond's ten dollar Bill and circulation. I mean, I think something that's really wonderful to see how much she African Nova Scotian community is celebrating today all of this week. I've just feel like I'm plying the high like, okay, remember the journey that got us here right, featuring not only a beautiful portrait viola. But also a map of the north end Halifax where she lived and worked and was born everyone who lives in the north end was openly. I think that it's. Reminder to keep fighting the good fight. Even when you're sometimes your voice might be silenced. I'm so you can see posts via love all along God against St. for example, and particularly celebrating black woman and also African Nova Scotia history in this country, so those are all positive things. And I think it's very important that we take that time to celebrate. But I think celebrating violent Desmond also does mean that we have out if that's the question. Why was she fighting segregation in the first place? What was the history in this province modest legacy today on so I think that uncritical celebration is actually a disservice. Viol- I wanna talk about some of those issues, and I'm hoping that we can start first with a specific incident that happened just a couple of months ago near the town of new Glasgow, which is where violet as men went into the whites only section of theater. John chat mini is a young black construction worker who was shot with a nail gun on the job Jones, Giannis scars till his side of the story. They show where doctors released air from his chest wall last month. He turned around. And pull the safety on the gun and poise at me and says I'll show you how to speed up and he says it was a racist attack. And that a co worker was bullying him for weeks before the attack with a nail gun this case, it's now before the courts, what kind of reaction has this incident elicited from the community. I think people in the community with both shocked, but not surprised meaning it was very horrifying incident. But really nothing new and nothing that doesn't fit with all these other incidents with seeing it workplace racism around the province in Halifax. So for example, there was a recent human rights case transit workers. There was a settlement with transit worker for really incredibly, violent workplace racism, and what place racism across the province. So nobody was shocked that this was happening. But at the same time, the details assoc shocking, and that this is a young person some of the stuff that he alleges is that they were calling him squier. And I just thought what the heck until my buddy, actually. Showed me the real underneath. Meaning just like, wow. I've been letting them literally call the N word he had weeks of racist bullying, and then it culminates in him being essentially told to run and as back his turned a nail gun is fired knee ended up with a punctured lung. So he could have died from that. So it really shows the intensity of the kind of racism and violence is still exists in this province. And of course, the construction company where this happens on one of the worksites is housed in new Glasgow. So, you know, I think that tells us something that at the same time as when naming streets vile, and we have this Bill right in the place with his happened is still this kind of violent racism going on. I just want to make a quick note that the lawyer for Jaas employer has said this incident was an accident. And he's called the police investigation. Ridiculous. They denied these allegations. I know that many young black people had expressed their frustration and their grief over what happened to Jansher. Jimmy, what what are the other challenges that black Nova Scotian youth face today in so on your right that a lot of the protests was particularly led by youth who I think felt very hurt. By this issue. You know, black on employment for youth is very high in this province in the first place. So if you even get a job, and then this is what you have to go through when you get there. One of the big issues come up consistently is education in this province. So in Halifax, which is where I live eight percent of those students are African Nova Scotian and twenty four percent of the the suspensions essentially, so three times the amount of suspensions, we see in the youth Justice system two percent of the population in this province is African Nova Scotian but sixteen percent of the youth jail system is African Nova Scotian, and this is a province where we have restorative Justice youth. So it shows you that black kids aren't benefiting. From that. And of course, attached to this. The reason why I put those two issues together is this idea of school to prison pipeline, right? So that research particularly United States shows that what children experience education system and leads to them being criminalised leads to this contact with youth Justice system. So when we look at the spend rate so black kids, then we see that when kids kicked out of school, the very vulnerable to them becoming criminalising ending up in the Justice system. What are you hearing from these kids when you speak to them? Plumbing kids will tell you stuff. So it starts very early. But particularly in math and sciences, for example. So children's guidance counselors the saying to them deciding them up for for general math right there seeming that they can't take the academic math that would lead to university. So they're streamed out and then all their friends are in those classes. So they think about sign up the class. My friends being told that they, you know, not to bother doing things like be courses or academic courses. So this assumption that they'll just, you know, not be scholastic not academics. They don't need to be these courses. And it's only really generation before that that people's parents were given sin numbers when they were in grade seven that was very common in this province. Because with the expectation was your dropout in grade eight oh, great nine and end up working. So you're still seeing that things like being pushed out of the classroom. They feel that they're disciplined unfairly, and that causes problems at home because they say, they go home, and their parents are like why are you getting in trouble at school the being grounded in the, you know, causing conflict with their parents and their. Trying to explain to their parents that I was singled out or the teacher was angry at me 'cause I had a hood or everybody was talking. But I was the only one that was kicked out. So they're consistently experiencing these things when they talk about how they experienced mental health issues because of this they feel depressed, and then that's not recognized. They feel angry. I remember talking to group of girls talking about when they go on the dollar store, they know not to like to leave the hands in plain sight 'cause they accused of shoplifting. So everywhere, they go they certainly feel that they're not treated equally in the not treated as human beings. These inequalities in the education system in Nova Scotia. It's actually something that a UN report pointed out this report it was looking into anti-bok racism across Canada. But it really honed in on Nova Scotia calling the socio economic conditions of black communities in Nova Scotia, quote deplorable now I remember that this report linked conditions to Nova Scotia's very specific history. There's a lot to talk about here. But I'm wondering if you could give us a recap seal. Yeah. Yeah. Just sort of a small history lesson of the historical significance of how black people have been treated in Nova Scotia might be linked to some of the issues that we're seeing today so to start with Canada. And then to move into Nova Scotia, I think something that's really important that we understand the beginning of this question is that there's a lot of myths of Canada that Canadians hold very dearly in part of that myth is Canada. Of course was the site of the ground railroad. Right. So people believe that Canada's role. Enslave ary was that we were the place of freedom. And they believe that there was really no racism in Canada. Then and that it continues. Now the first race riots in North America where Shelbourne in seventeen eighty four. They call them race riots. What it was was white loyalists burning down the homes and businesses of black people because they didn't want to live beside them. And also wanted their land and community, right? And then of course, we had a segregated schooling system officially until the nineteen fifties in the last school closed in the nineteen eighties. So you have this really really long history of black people in very very visceral ways, very violent ways and very media ways experiencing this racism. So when we talk about viola Desmond, I think sometimes it's easy. So people just gonna go vile, Desmond and not ask them selves. Why was this theater segregated this existed in Canada? This is in the nineteen fifties. And those segregated theater in the first place, which should cause us to ask. The question there were segregation in Nova Scotia and the answer is yes, it was is fair to say that Nova Scotia today is still very segregated. People call Nova Scotia the deep south of Canada or the Mississippi of Canada, and that's not just a figure speech. It's also because there's a long history the people that come here, many of them come from the south ride as escaped and freed slaves. So they're actually is that cultural tie, but that's been a longtime people have called this place, the deep south of of Canada with the understanding that the love of racism is particularly intense here with these long histories of segregation. So I don't know if we can measure things, we say, more or less. What does that mean? But what we can say is it's longstanding and this being a long unexamined history of it that then plays it self out today. So in ova Scotia today, there's you know, you still see black communities that are is located this still go to north Preston. This still no grocery stores is still no sidewalks and north Preston is a stork Louis almost completely black community about half an hour from Halifax I believe it's the largest community in Canada. So it's ninety. Eight ninety nine percent, black and still doesn't have resources. Craft you there any bright spots here. I know that the mayor of Halifax has recognized that systemic racism is an issue that that needs to be fixed. Is there anything happening on any levels of government, or in civil society that that you feel as positive I mean, I think the positive thing is always with the communion with the people. So when we return to our African Nova Scotian, celebrating, I think we always have to take that moment to say this victory for people. The the pardon of desma was because we had a black left and governor man Francis who pardon viola Desmond and worked very hard to get her story out there, we've had black filmmakers that have told her story blunt journalist of told her story her story in the first place was known because of Keri best was a black woman who owned a newspaper the clarion. So there's always being the strong history of activism in this province in a history of resistance and a history of community here that people know. Matter what they're facing have a very strong community identity in those communities a very tight knit. So we always can recognize that and see great hope in that. I would suggest that it's always through this work of the people into the organizing of people on the pushing of people that we push things forward. So whatever would dealing with right now is big issues with police checks here in the city were black people are pleased at chat stopped on the street three times more than people of other races and using people's peaking pushing back against that. And speaking out so at every turn where you look whether it's a young people and people coming out to protest the nail gun shooting or people marching against the police or people pushing back on their workplaces. So a constantly seeing that so to me that is the spirit of desert. We have to hold onto we have to remember that first of all black women have always been at the forefront of this working Candida of liberation work. And of whatever you want to call it rights work of the work of pushing society for that work has taken place on the backs of black woman who have relentlessly spoken out, and sacrificed and that. Going on today. What do you think file a Desmond would have to say about all of this? We know. I mean, we have one two ropes who can tell us about violin. How thrilled she has? But I think for any black person who's looking at what's happening today. I imagine that all of our ancestors Chiro sawn right in this work of liberation which is never ending. We always have to be doing it. I may have to be doing collectively. So of course, I believe that viola Desmond would be looking in pushing us foreign I also believe that we can't stop by only recognizing viola Desmond, we have to continue to uncover these histories woman, light Pearleen Oliva women like Lynn Jones, I could list hundreds of women dozens of women in over Scotia that also I wish to see on bills and on streets and on ferries and on buildings because this history is so powerful. So I think I also challenge us to not just sort of look at all desma on the Bill say, oh, look black people have arrived. This is a sign of quality great without looking at as we're talking about the battles. We still have to fight against the. Emigre schism and also without continuing to do the work to uncover the history, particularly of black woman, but also of black communities in this country, which have still been race and was still have so little knowledge of this history in this country. Al thank you so much for taking the time to chat with us today. Thank you very much. You just heard L talking about Wanda Robson viola Desmond sister, she was on hand yesterday at the Canadian museum of human rights in Winnipeg were violence. Ten dollar Bill was launched. Here's wanda. I find everything she says, so charming think that my sister? A woman a woman is so of unattended built the quiz in good company. I'm jamie. Thanks for listening to from. For more CBC podcasts. Goto CBC dot CA slash podcasts.

viola Desmond Canada Nova Scotia Halifax Nova Scotia Glasgow Nova Scotia African Nova Scotia African Nova Scotian community Bill African Nova Scotian African Nova Scotian Nova Scotian L Jones Wanda Robson violet Desmond Nova Scotia Mississippi mount Saint Vincent university Glasgow
Dear Sugars Presents: Double Date

Dear Sugars

33:43 min | 3 months ago

Dear Sugars Presents: Double Date

"Hey sugar fans were mixing it up this week with something special. It's an episode of the new podcast. Double date hosted by marlo. Thomas and phil donahue fell in love on live television and they've now been married for more than forty years and now you can eavesdrop as they talked to famous long married couples for it conversations about enduring love and all of its challenges juggling family and career dealing with things like addiction illness and jealousy. Everything under the sun in this episode viola. Davis wasn't looking for a man. She loved the nomad life of an artist and she considered herself one. Step away from being a straight up loner but when she met julius tannen a warm and tidy divorce say who learned everything in life from his mother. She discovered how much she needed to be all in with another person. This is an opposites attract kind of love story who is the emotionally open one which one leaves the bathroom looking like a tornado swept through. You can find out right now in episode one of double date enjoy will finding great candidates to hire can be like trying to find a needle in a haystack. Show you can post your job to some job board but then all you can do is hope the right person comes along which is why you should try ziprecruiter instead. It's powerful technology actively fines and then bites qualified candidates to apply to your job. It's no wonder that four out of five employers who post on ziprecruiter get a quality candidate within the first day sale. Well other companies may you with applications to sift through ziprecruiter finds you what. You're looking for the needle in the haystack. Safer yourself right. Now you can try ziprecruiter for free at ziprecruiter dot com slash. Dpd that's ziprecruiter dot com slash dpd. Higher i'm phil donahue and i'm marlo thomas. We've been married for over forty years. But when i was younger i never wanted to be married. It didn't seem possible for two people to live together for life. And you were half right. Nearly half of all marriages end in divorce. The lead about the ones at last. What's the secret sauce. I have no idea but at the best way to find out is to talk with some long married couples. You know like a double date and so we did. We made dates with couples. We admire actors. Athletes musicians journalists. And you know what. I love about a double date. Everybody talks everybody remembers and you get a real sense of who this couple is together. Desert take viola davis and julius tenant one couple here are two great actors with all the talent and none of the ego that i feeling you get from them is welcome remember. Julius was standing outside on the street in front of their house just to be sure we didn't get lost such a great. Hello it told us a lot about them right from the start. My big thing with me. Julius is where the fun. We have the best parties. Glad i'm getting to know you. Let's go work out for. How should we settle down at their dinner. Table with these toll comfy chairs that you could just sink into and we started talking. I felt an immediate bond with olaf like me. She never could imagine herself with a life partner. I've been not wanna get married either. I never had any visions of walking down. I all with a white dress. I admired every woman who was alone and happy and who had a lot of boyfriends. I was a narcissistic artist. That's what i was. And then then i read somewhere that you prayed for a husband when i was up at williamstown theatre festival i was doing the raising the sun and a friend of mine said why you alone and i felt like oh my god. I almost started crying and my eyes were welling up. He was like. Is there a reason why you you don't have a relationship i said while i guess i've just never found anyone who loved me. You know. and then he was the one joseph edwards. I know because he just got married just got married. He said go into your room. This is what i want you to get on your knees and you ask god for bubble cycle on five. Jesus person and you did. I did i did. It and i was a specific prayer right that you re specific because he told me to be specific and literally. I was like okay. This is what i want now. He really doesn't have to be black. But i want them to be black. I want him to look like a football player. Because i love football players. Okay and i want them to be from the south. Because i love countrymen and i kinda would appreciate it. He's already been married. he's already had kids. 'cause i don't want that pressure and i want him to be like very spiritual church going finding you know maybe someone who is an artist. Tuesday is got those artistic sensibility. And i met julius three and a half weeks later three and a half weeks three and a half weeks how on city of angels show steven bochco city of angels. We actually met during the pilot episode. I was dating a girl. I was really trying to run away monster. And so when i met viola i gave her my card and then she called and then we went on our first date and twenty years later here we are and i felt like i had done all the work before. Then i was in therapy. I finally went to there because screen actors guild and so when julius came along. I remember telling my therapists you know. This guy gave me a car and he's really good looking and she was like. Oh okay because you could tell us you. Maybe a little bit bored with what i was talking about. She's like talk about something else. So and i said this guy gave me carton. He oh he invited me to church and she was like have you called them back. I said no. I don't know because i'm i gotta get my credit. I gotta get my life. it order. She said call him. Wow and and i said yeah but you know what. They may be something wrong with him. She's like there's something wrong with everyone viola. There's something wrong view. It took me six weeks to call him. Because i was so nervous i was having anxiety attacks about l. a. and then finally called them. I said he's never gonna remember me and he remembered me and i remember. He invited me to his place where he worked and the openness emotional availability. I never had that before usually men. It's like okay. How do you feel about me love me. Do you not love me. Not julius never had to guess. Mom did a good job. She really did always told me to respect. Women already knew that there was a certain kind of decorum around the way you needed to treat. Women in phil said to me one time. What do you have so much against marriage. I said well. I think that people lose courteousness and i. I really don't like that. I don't want to be treated in discourteous or dismissive way. And we do that for each other. And i'll say they want to get you a sweater. It's cold out here. Oh he'll say that to me. There's a concern for the other person. I went to an all boys catholic high school in one of the things that was given to us. Were dancing lessons and they taught us. You know that you don't call the woman you place your hand gently on her back and you'll be sure to return her to wherever it was when you asked her to dance you'll be taught grace lovely. I will girl school. We both catholic grow. So and i think i think sharing not so much sharing a religion or a faith but sharing the values of that when people ask me what i i think our marriages lasted at will. We define certain important words. The same mike. What's fair and unfair. Yes what's acceptable and unacceptable. It feels says to me. That's not fair. i know. I know what it means. I don't see what you mean. I mean i got it. You have to allow the other person you know there. Say it's always kind of thing agreeing to disagree and it's okay but you know we try to get around thing without it being an impediment what it is. We always just discuss you know and for some people. It works where the anger at each other because his whole tone here can say some things that you can never take back for. You have to be careful with this but some folks have to sleep on it. We never go to sleep on anger. Deify how do you fight on the door slam high. Say yeah and i'm kind of the guy that just goes away. I just go away at the door. And then it's nothing like nothing. Yeah i'm the chaser. Follow till i can get him to here. he's i do that too. He's fighting just getaway. No because i think how you fight and how you come back from a fight. It is a big line in the sand. You gotta know how to do that. I really do might be thing. My advice about marriage that i give to all of my friends. I say your marriage does not start when you walk down the aisle your marriage starts when you look over at a person that you love more than anything in. There's something about him. You just see just one character trait just a glimpse and you're thinking man. That's gonna drive me crazy. I don't know i could do this. You just didn't you bring. I don't know if i could deal with this and the next minute you like you know what but i love him. I'm going to stick it out. What is it that when you marriage star. that's great. Tell us what it is with. Julia drives you crazy. I know i can tell you what drives me crazy. But i know a lot of things. Drive me crazy about julius He's a little. Ocd yes you know. I'm let's just say familiar with this issue. I know. I know. I'm sorry but i think it should be called obsessive compulsive order that drives me a little bit. Crazy am cdt. Tue that's why people like you may never get to use those lives that were to the this all this mess on the floor. I'm like oh my god in ob to walk into my office talking like crazy about everything and straightening up this book. Getting this magazine over here where it belongs. I said things down. And that's where they are. I mean you can tell where i've been in the house. He had oranges over here. Because that little orange caf is there. He had a ginger ale over there beautiful. What it if he ever murdered anybody. I my life got better as soon as we got together. And and i mean that to my life did get better at bad credit when i met julius. I didn't know anything. I had my apartment in new york. That was the ceiling. Was caving in because it was rent stabilized. the pipes had bursts. I couldn't get anyone to sublet it. And then i was here doing a tv. Show not to pay rent here. And i was sending my family money. I was just all over the place. Julius came in he was making my life easy. It's like the this is what we can do me and you can move together. We could share the rent. And i was like. Oh my god. I started saving my money. This is how you build up credit. I was like all really so all of a sudden. I'm like saving money. Mike credit got better. Shouldn't have to clean. I mean i know how to clean baseboards. I know how to wash blinds. I can do it all you know. Viola wasn't used to doing that kind of thing. And i remember the very first time she stayed with me and then i went to the bathroom after she left her. She had to go to work. And i went in the top. They off everything the toothpaste the moisturizer every and i'm like going my god to sing that bafflement been blown up. She came back and she started back. As you said what you do that what you put everything. But that's just what i do. And i said listen honey you ever have to worry about it. Just do what you do. And i'll do what i do. And that's the way we've rolled. Oh wow ever. Since and so. I might take her thirty minutes to an hour to do. I can do and fifteen. She's a slavic. Lets us. I always say i feel is the man who doesn't know the meaning of the word hampshire no idea what and i've always fixing better over. The years took her awhile to do things. Yeah so then. How long did it take to get to serious are moving in together. It seem like we just live together right away. It felt like i always. I always well. Yeah because he brought his close to my apartment. I loved it. There was nothing about it that i questioned. It was easy. It was right and we had so much fun. It was the first time when i was coming from new york with three four roommates. Yeah you know living at juilliard in the dorms and then finally here. I was with an apartment in los angeles and it's like all of a sudden. We had a christmas tree. It's like i had a christmas tree in years. We had thanksgiving remember. Thanks thanksgiving we must have so much. You need someone food for ten people and we ate it in. Four days amazes me how people know how to trust another person. I mean we wait to. I mean he came to see me. The first night i was had moved around. I was doing promotion of a movie so i was in chicago promoting my movie on his show and then i went on to denver and two other shows around the country and he called me and he said I'd like to see you. where are you. i'm in denver. Is denver very far from chicago. And he said no not far at all so he comes from denver to to have dinner with me and we that together was it. That was it and you think to yourself. How did i not know that he would take out a knife and kill. You know i mean you can get into vulnerable place with the person you say. Well you know. I wo- is started that as the act of faith. My goodness well. Relationships are in their faith and vulnerability is the ultimate you know level of courage and bravery and i felt like you felt awfully vulnerable in our early days to be dating an actress. Remember which is said to me. I sure do one do. I know you're not act. And it never dawned on me. And i thought it was such an innocent dear question like when you cry is that you'll cry you cry. The day we've got a great memorizer was we. All are actors. We wrote our own. The house and my friends were with him at the hotel saying he was walking around the courtyard memorizing memories. And i i saw my little. I got it right. So comes time for the wedding do our vows and he does his vows beautifully and i go to do my vows and i just choked it was like when you hear about stagefright. I just couldn't do it. And i and i was crying and i was just. It was just a mess later. We got back to the hotel. After the wedding he said mckinney. Believe you didn't learn. Our vows rattled them off right. He said well. What could you do today. He said you're an actress. I said it wasn't an actress today. I was terrified. Bride in a state of panic. Now you know how to know that. I'm not a good actress. Won a a real person can even remember my lines which is actually a good at. We'll have more after a quick break support for this. Podcast comes from progressive. Saving money on your car. Insurance is easy with progressive. It's an average savings of seven hundred ninety six dollars for customers who switch and save in fact. Customers can qualify for an average of six discounts on their auto policy with progressive including discounts. Just for starting a quote online or owning multiple vehicles get your quote online at progressive dot com and see how much you could be saving national average annual car insurance savings by new customer survey who save with progressive in two thousand nineteen discounts vary or not available in all states and situations for a lot of us are. Home is now more than just our home. I mean ours has turned into a podcast studio. But if you're growing your business home might also be where you're doing you're hiring that's ziprecruiter comes in ziprecruiter makes hiring easier because you can do it. All from one place. Ziprecruiter dot com slash d d ziprecruiter's technology identifies the qualified people for your job. And if you're really interested in candidate you can even invite them to apply for your job with one click. Ziprecruiter sends them an email from you and you stand out from the competition. In fact four out of five employers. Who post on ziprecruiter get a quality candidate within the first day. And right now you can try ziprecruiter for free at ziprecruiter dot com slash d d. That's ziprecruiter dot com slash. Dpd finding great candidates to hire can be like trying to find a needle in a haystack. Sure you can post your job to some job board but then all you can do is hope the right person comes along. Which is why you should try. Ziprecruiter for free at ziprecruiter. Dot com slash. Dpd ziprecruiter does the work for you. When you post a job on ziprecruiter if gets set out to over one hundred top job sites with one click then ziprecruiter is matching technology. Finds people with the right skills and experience for your job and actively invites them to apply. You get qualified candidates fast so while other services may overwhelm you with applications to sift through ziprecruiter. Finds you what. You're looking for the needle in the haystack. In fact ziprecruiter is so effective. That four out of five employers who post on ziprecruiter get a quality candidate through the site within the first day. And right now you can try ziprecruiter for free as ziprecruiter dot com slash. Dpd that's ziprecruiter dot com slash dpd. Just go to ziprecruiter dot com slash. Dpd ziprecruiter the smartest way to hire. We're back to our interview with only davis and ten. And i wanted to know. What are you get from each other that you can't get from anyone else. What i get what i can tell you. One of the big things. I get from her as i can tell her anything and she listens and she listened she takes it in. She's always interested in my wellbeing and happiness. And julius has julius has the capacity to love not everyone has the capacity to love. You know one of the things that julius did when we first got together is he said the you've never had a parent who died. I find that really interesting. Be i was like. Oh yeah both. My parents are still here. He was like all. It's gonna be hard and you know my parents at that point. Were raising several of my siblings children because of drugs and all of that and julie said we let me tell you something. When parents have a hard life they can go from pretty good health really bad health in a very short period of time he inch and they don't have any resources so Do they have any insurance. Whatever 'cause minute happens. It's so devastating you so kind of inundated with can't make choices. No one else in the family could make choices. So i remember. We got insurance on my parents. I remember my dad passed from pancreatic cancer. And the first person i called was joyous. I was devastated. Because i was there hospice. When he passed. I was out of my mind. I called julius. I said he's gone and julia says okay. Oh i'm so sorry. I'm so sorry okay. Now here's what you gotta do. You could hang up from me. You can pick up the phone. You could call the insurance company. You give them all the information where the funeral home is going to be. They will take care of everything. I will get on the plane and i will be there as soon as i can step by. Step that that person who literally has a capacity to love has a really the capacity to really have your back in all of the deep ugly messy but beautiful things happen in your life. that's the elixir. As as far as i'm concerned that's everything with him together. Before you got married for years was there was a moon. There wasn't fear from me. It was just that i wanted to. You know be free of all of my debt and so when we got married we start off on even footing and she said well. We're we're we're we're we're we're together we're going to be together so you have that as my dad. We're going to do this together. And i remember not really saying anything that night and then the next day i told her i said you know what for me a very audible idea that i want to be out of debt. I wanna be responsible wanna right into this. You know without having to drag this roy. Mesfin's right by ola. And julius seem so connected we wondered what throws them out of sync. We couldn't help it dig a little. I the jealous do think i am not really. I think it's to have a little jealousy but not have a little jealous. Because i always pinpoint those women who are very questionable. They may come off really nice but they i. I always feel like we have a radar for those women right. I don't think men do ya. So i'm and then. I'm very very articulate about those. What did you i said. She can't come to the house party. Everywhere everywhere i go i can just go. She's really more introverted. But i can walk in a room. And i can just start having a conversation with anybody anywhere in the subway station anywhere just comes easy for me. I am an introvert. I am like maybe a step away from being straight up loner. I love my alone time. I love getting lost. I could drive to you. Know what theater watch a you know a foreign movie. Eat my sushi by myself with my book. And that's it. I spent most of my time alone. I haven't had a lot of boyfriends have been long-term. So when i got married to have to answer to someone to have to say okay. This is where i'm gonna be was very difficult for me. It's like i almost needed a woman cave. Somebody like and you know the invention of cell phones that does skilled me so that was one thing that i felt like i was gonna have to give up my independence and i want to give up my name. I was like oh. I don't know if i could give up my. I think that commits shoe stable long-term mary. I do more than i think. The people that are in danger of the people. I can't live without him her. Roughly to get married are the ones that come boom weeks about stress. Who how do you handle stress. We had to really learn work on that because in the beginning when he'd panic i'd panic and it was a disaster so we had to really work on. Somebody once said that good marriages where both people don't go crazy at the same time. First thing he told me is always one of those things we're between us. Viola does get more stressed out. I had so much stress living in los angeles. I mean i just didn't understand how to connect with people. I felt like my funky. Look my funky as me not really caring about being thin acute or i just didn't have all of that stuff going on i. Just i felt like i didn't fit in and just new york was my city. You know i was. I never had delusions of becoming a star. Nothing i never had anything. I was a journeyman actor. And then i met. Julius and i did go back. Six months to a broadway show was. It was the second tony center. She gave me goosebumps from the top of my head to my toes and at the end of the show. I went backstage. And you're gonna win the tony award for this. I was sure of it. Speaking of awards you wanted to ask about that speech any speech. Oh feature harriet. Tubman and you it. It was just very political and me speech where you know that she talks about having a dream bottom line right and white women Their hands outstretch. You know reaching for her to come over the line but then she wakes up and she says she can't ever get to that line she couldn't ever. It's as so heartbreaking. You know moments like that where you know and julius just having him in my life my way of sort of saving myself of what. I what i feel. This is just what i feel is that i don't like about l. a. is trying to retain my authenticity took trying to retain something about me. That is just myself. This is just how i felt about being out here. The everything was an audition. Even friendships wasn't audition. Yeah they had to sort a pass a test but in order to be you know even be the cool friend the mom but you know even with. Does your kid go to school. And if it's not the hip funky school that all the celebrities have their kids at then. It's like you're out right that that's my protest. No i feel it is. It's like that's my protest. Now it's like everything you know. We've been with how to get away with murder taking my wig off. Everything is my rebellion idea. I love how supportive he is her work. I don't know something about that. yes you do. I guess we see you as stabilize. Hell i mean you guys are solid and talking to you. I am impressed with the insight you brought to hear union not everybody. Has that one of the things i did before i met. Joyce's was in therapy. Because i was not a great girlfriend. I had a lot of. I would say like bad boyfriends. But i was attracted to them for a reason so and i remember a friend of mine said via. Why do you keep meeting assholes. And i said i don't know. Isn't that something. I keep meeting these assholes she said. Did you ever think it was you. And i remember. That was my big aha moment. And i think that's the best thing that i brought into. My marriage is to really ask myself. What am i contributing to it. Or what am i doing to destroy it at any moment You know it's like my first therapist said what she said was l. a. Whenever you're on automatic in your marriage you're not in it you know and so. That's that's been my personal responsibility not to put everything on him not to say. Make me happy. Julius make the marriage. Good julius being the great husband julius. I also have to step up right okay. I'm gonna give you one last. My husband is looking real. Like you've already. I go i can go on forever really good. I'm so fascinated by this but if there was a young couple here about to be married. Is there something you'd want to tell them to make their marriage. Last the big thing i would tell them is that you have to listen to the other person i mean you really do. You have to really listen. Let it land because once she stopped listening. You're not you're not there. You're not any listening you know. That's a big one for me. Live let you. I would say that commitment is love and and what i mean by that is you can't operate separately with your own joy in go on your own path and your own road if if in the end it doesn't honor the big umbrella of the ultimate commitment the ultimate commitment between bio davis and julius ten. It was wonderful for us to experience it. Until next time. I'm phil donahue and marlo thomas your lovely really. Well thank you. Thank you very little time. this has been. Yeah you've got to invite us one of those fabulous party. Double date is a production of pushkin industries. The show was created by us produced by sarah lilly. Michael bahari is associate producer. Musical adaptations of it had to be you buy sell wagon symphony net marlowe and i are executive producers along with me a little bell and lee tol melodic trump pushkin special. Thanks to jacob. Weisberg malcolm glad will heather fain josh. Nour's carly mcclary. Eric sandler emily rustic jason gambrill. Paul williams and bruce kuker. If you like our show please remember to share rate and review. Thanks for listening. This has been a year. Unlike any other and national grid knows your health comfort and savings or more. Important than ever. If you qualify. We may be able to help you. Create a more energy efficient home at no cost to you. It starts with no cost home energy assessment based on the results of your assessment and your income eligibility you may qualify to receive no cost energy saving upgrades including appliance replacements. See if you qualify at ngrid dot com slash. Emma dash income. That was the brand new podcast. Double date if you like what you heard. Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. Thanks for listening and take care out there.

julius phil donahue Julius julius tannen julius tenant williamstown theatre joseph edwards steven bochco denver viola marlo thomas Mike credit marlo viola davis football olaf Viola new york Davis
December 28th: Victor Avila HR 2

Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

33:50 min | 6 months ago

December 28th: Victor Avila HR 2

"This is mornings with kale in northern colorado's voice thirteen ten. Kfi am terrifying site. Coming out of nashville early. Christmas morning is federal authorities. Just yesterday identified anthony. Warner's the man responsible for that christmas day bombing in nashville saying that they believe the sixty three year old acted alone and died in the explosion. Now the bombing again was preceded this after a sound system in that rv Warned people in the area. And god bless law enforcement who runs toward danger and probably saved so many lives but this sound system a warning listeners. That an explosive was inside and explosion was intimate in imminent at injured at least three people. Of course warner perished according to dna evidence perished in that explosion. The explosion injured at least three people and the damage was unbelievable to at least forty one buildings one of which was destroyed dow. The real work begins in terms of Identifying what warrener's motive actually was seventy eight now thirteen ten. Kfi may a thirteen ten kfi k. A. dot com northern colorado's voice. Victor viola is a retired supervisory special agent with the us immigration and customs enforcement homeland security investigations under the us department of homeland security. And he also served as a diplomat and liaison to embassies in spain. Portugal and mexico city actually conducting numerous international complex criminal investigations while on official assignment in mexico. Special agent availa suffered multiple gunshot wounds and survived a violent ambush by the mexican lows. Ato's to drug cartel where sadly special agent jaime sobotta lost his life. He writes about that in his book. Mr viola does agent under fire a murder and a manifesto sir. Welcome to the show. Good morning gail pick you for having me. I certainly appreciate your service. Thank you so much for that and my go out to you and i wanna talk a little bit about your book this morning as well. But this Explosion on christmas morning in nashville was absolutely surreal. And of course investigators now trying to piece together any semblance of a motive. How does that process start that that. That's probably the the number one key element right now. when when it starts When he started criminal investigation is first of all. You want to identify Two things one identified the target. What was the target. That was identified For this in this case this explosion and of course second would be the motive and those two things go hand in hand. And i think that's what investigators are trying to to come down with because At and t. Center this hub this facility. That was that was blown up and What what was in this. At and t. What other businesses. What other Agencies were held within this building that was targeted by this individual. And in fact. What would be the most to destroy these This at&t her or telecommunications hub Those are the key questions that there are asking themselves this morning. You know and it's been bandied about a lot of conspiracy theories which. I'm sure you're well aware of when it comes to five g. My understanding was is that the would say the suspect about authorities have identified mr warner as being the perpetrator in this Based on dna evidence but he Was involved in i in it. As i understand it he was As his neighbor referred to him a commute. A computer geek. I understand that he built a burglar alarm systems. But there is some conjecture and speculation. Which of course is what we have at this point that he was concerned about Five g and well it's interference in our lives and and that could possibly be a motive And and that's something that investigators will look into Something they're not might not be farfetched if in fact he was the answer. The only individual involved as your stories have already stated The acted as a lone wolf or lone individual this attack. You know if he if in fact committed suicide and it was a a a a suicide bomb here very different than than committing this. Act in your home or somewhere else. He specifically obviously wanted to target this building for whatever beliefs that he had that to be a motive or is there something beyond that belief or something other a something else that he's trying to Destroy that didn't want someone else to find out that was in that building. Obviously domestic terrorism. Well the you know. The domestic terrorism would have especial- Designation for it if if certain elements would fit in there. And that's why they haven't called it that just quite yet. There has to be a political Political bent to that is that correct. That's correct and it hasn't been proven yet or a back. This person had that kind of a motive And in fact it'd be determined that it is it could definitely be categorized as such now. They're saying Victor that this was a lone wolf event. And i understand that you know the investigation is very preliminary at this point in time but what i found odd was is that the recording that warned of cives or an impending explosion. It was a female voice. Wouldn't that be indicative of someone else involved in this The recording tells me a little bit more In in the sense that person did not obviously did not have the intention of hurting other people. the The first reaction is that i had was The the intention was to hurt law enforcement because of the shots fired Call that came out and as you just mentioned earlier that you know along enforcement run now they go towards the danger zone and so that my first intention was this person wanted to harm law enforcement response to the to the shots fired calls but But obviously this person didn't have that intention be because of the amount of last and the amount of damage caused by this explosion. That was not the that was not the motive here. The motive is obviously the building if something surrounding that area. Apparently he had under tennessee law. You can actually deed your house to anyone that you want and not get a dime for it and reports are now that that's exactly what he did defeated at his house about a month ago or it was november. I'm sorry in november two months ago To a twenty nine year old woman in los angeles who says i've never heard of this guy. Yeah and so it goes to Some kind of premeditation and planning purposes on this Individuals you have and who else who knows who else might be involved now just because he acted alone in the actual mom doesn't mean that he there was other people involved to get him help them get their That might not have been aware of what attention to work. I think one of the primary concerns of course and whenever there is anything like this as well is our on us and the concern is copycats event. Yeah that individual. That was that was pulled over Playing the recording again. Sometimes people you know. They They mess with police and might be a copycat version there. But it's definitely a distraction that takes away our our investigators from focusing on on on the investigation at hand and and unfortunately we have individuals that will take advantage of that. And and create that distraction but Hopefully the investigators will be able to those people out and make sure that they're not a threat and then Focused on the education and hand victor interesting if a government surveillance was one of his gripes. Sits fascinating to me that the investigation actually began courtesy of google maps. That saw the rv that the photograph the rv a parked outside of his house back in twenty nine thousand nine. Well it just goes to show that We have very little privacy left and You know there's cameras everywhere from google maps google earth We are all over the internet. So it it's very difficult to remain anonymous in this day and age but he might have legitimate. Gripe they're not as far as a you know blowing up a building and several buildings around that area natural but definitely This individual might have some some strong opinions on on government interference seven seventeen now thirteen ten. Kfi a victor of elisa retired supervisory special agent with the us immigration and customs enforcement homeland security investigations under the department of homeland. Security was also an accredited diplomats and liaison Conducted international complex criminal investigations. And sadly while you were on assignment in mexico you suffered the multiple gunshot wounds and survived that Violent ambush by mexican drug cartel. Where your colleagues special agent jamie's tragically lost his life. This led to your book agent under fire a murder and a minute manifesto and again my condolences to you because i know you now dedicate your life to the memory of special agent jaime sappada. Tell us about that experience. Tell us about your book. I do gail this book is a tribute to Especially like you said you know. He lost his life on february. Fifteen two thousand eleven. The ten year anniversary is coming up just in a couple of months and And my purpose here is a survivor First of all by the grace of god that i survived. And secondly is is my part of my. Survivorship is my duty to inform the public and the The american public that they need to know that that first of all that this incident happened. A lot of people do not are not aware the us agent was killed in the line of duty by a drug cartel and They need to be aware of what our. Us agents are doing abroad in mexico and other countries to protect our homeland. Victor i so appreciate again your service to this nation your courage your your heroism as well Where can we find your puck. You could go to agent under fire. Book dot com For that's my website. You could find it there. And he filings to buy the book or you could go directly to amazon dot com or barnes and noble dot com. Pint it there. Thank you for your time and your insights this morning sir. Certainly appreciate it. You have a great day you as well victor viola author of agent under fire a murderer and a manifesto seven nineteen now thirteen ten. Kfi kfi here mornings with gail weekdays. Six to nine and northern colorado's voice thirteen ten kfi k. Nuggets basketball is the latest stories surrounding the mile high crew by listening to the whole show. Northern colorado's voice thirteen ten. Kfi well more balloonists. Do you remember where you were october. Fifteen two thousand nine. This is when all is were in the sky as well. Ostensibly balloon boy was aloft. Do you remember where you were. I remember exactly where i was. I was sitting in an intersection at a stop sign. And i was like fretting fearfully like looking up into the sky except expecting to see the big jiffy pop with falcon falcon. I've it was falcon falcon inside your remember. Richard heaney science detective ways not scientists. And he's certainly not a detective in. It's certainly was one of the biggest hoaxes ever perpetrated. Do you remember that well. This caught my attention. It's a bit dated at this point in time but it was just last wednesday That governor jared polis granted full and unconditional pardons to falcons. Parents falcon aptly named. I believe he's about seventeen now. Richard and miami heaney who had been accused of concocting a hoax to generate interest in a potential reality. Tv show. well unfortunately they were doing an interview. I believe it was was on cnn. I believe it was When basically falcon was asked the question about this and he said well we did it for the show. Hoops e seven twenty-seven now thirteen ten. Kfi a thirteen ten kfi. Gay dot com northern colorado's voice mornings with gail via the auto collision specialists studio. And you know it's funny. We my husband. And i actually did a morning radio show on another radio. Stations starts with a k. Just on down the road and we actually talked with Mayumi heaney Because apparently I believe they had not only one. But two stints on wife swap and we talked with mamie heaney at that point in time this of course preceded The balloon of october fifteenth. Two thousand nine because you remember falcon was later found hiding in an attic above the garage and his family's house in fort collins said yeah yes the story did unravel in the cnn interview in which out can said we did this for the show but i wonder if governor pull us and i get it you know it's it's it's kind of pardon palooza season. We're seeing it on the national level. We're seeing it on a statewide level because this was one of. I don't know seventeen or so pardons that were actually issued by governor. Jared police last wednesday. But i wonder if he actually was able to grasp the irony of this particular. Pardon this full. And unconditional pardon to falcons parents. Richard and mayumi. They don't even live here anymore. I think they lived in georgia for awhile. I believe their last known address was in florida but in a statement. Here's what the governor said. When he issued the pardon we are all ready to move past the spectacle from a decade ago that wasted precious time and resources of law enforcement officials and the general public. Well as a good friend of mine. Sergeant lee posted on his facebook page. Wait a minute if we want to move past the spectacle of a decade ago. Then why are we bringing it to the forefront of our consciousness once again just doesn't make any sense well someone who knows an awful lot about the waste. A precious time and resources was the gentleman in charge of the investigation. Lamoure county sheriff. Jim alder now. Jim retired in two thousand ten after serving twelve years as the larimer county sheriff. Well i couldn't help. But think when i came across this story that the former sheriff might have a little something something to say about these pardons and i right former. Larimer county sheriff. Jim alderson with his thoughts on the pardon at eight. Thirty five seven thirty now thirteen ten. Kfi k. a thirteen ten kfi k. A. dot com well market reacting to the president signing of the relief. Bill while there is some relief in that bill and wilco. Vid kill the santa claus. rally keith. Wineman presidential wealth management ways in in justify. It's a party a northern colorado's force. Thirteen ten kfi k. The block party wednesdays from four to ten pm most stores at seven. Thirty four keith. Whiteman presidential wealth management in and well looks like some positive signs coming out of the market in reaction to the president signing the well pork palooza. Bill i mean by the way i'm with your listener. Jim i think the republicans are going to have no choice but to go along with the democrats who are in the house who are going to probably past that standalone bill to increase that benefit the two thousand dollars or just increase the benefit. I wonder if they'll increase it. Eighteen hundred or suffer the consequences is in georgia and the republicans in the senate have no choice but to go along with it now. 'cause of the consequences in the election in georgia told that was still by the way. Yeah i i'm there. So the major grants agreed agreed. I'm in agreeance. The major averages were little changed last week than last night. President trump signed that nine hundred billion dollar. Covert nineteen relief bill and we're talking about and he threatened that bill that he had threatened to veto. He this was all set up to to force that outcome by the president It prevents the government shutdown ten million dollars benefits for millions of americans and ten billion dollars. Just for starters for gender programs in pakistan. What's the dalai lama. Yes this is a statement of policy regarding the session or reincarnation of the dalai lama. A statement of policy is are they giving money or just saying. We're in favor of the reincarnation. How did they come with this. Here's my favorite one commission a commission that's going to educate all of us about the dangers associated with using or storing portable fuel containers for flammable liquids near an open flame. Okay it oh. And here's your six hundred dollars. Use it wisely six hundred dollars. That is likely to turn into more right fairly quickly. The house scheduled to vote today to raise that six hundred dollar payments two thousand last and last week f. y senate republicans indicated support to block that standalone bill and there have been no further comments from senate majority leader. Mitch mcconnell up until this point watched that change as keeping his powder dry right now. Yeah and i think the markets have it figured out the dow industrial average up a half percent hundred sixty nine thousand three sixty nine the snp up but seven tenths of a percent up twenty five points. Three thousand seven hundred twenty eight and the nasdaq up. Three quarters of a percent. Twelve thousand nine hundred and one on average over the last fifty years. The markets have risen one point three percent in the last five trading days of the year and the first two trading days of the new here. That's called the santa claus rally but things may be different this year as investors sell stocks to take advantage of losses for tax reasons and to lock in gains at this year's tax rates. And a will that happen or will what we're talking about just a minute ago. Will this chess game with regard to the now. Six hundred dollar payments to individuals increase that six hundred dollars to a thousand or two thousand or whatever and will the market take that as a positive and there will be a santa clause rally again. Don't know just laying out those two scenarios so possible see so far this year the s. and p. Five hundred is up fourteen point six percent. The nasdaq is up. Forty two point seven percent so there are gains to be taken in this calendar year if an investor is afraid that taxes will go up next year because of politics there are also new concerns that long term benefits vaccines may be countered by large surges in new infections after christmas and new year celebrations as the latest from foul. Now said well. Let's let's not over complicate this and let's not get it twisted. I think that's more important point. No one is downplaying or minimizing the number of people around the world that have lost their lives as a result of covid nineteen. But the fact of the matter. Is you remember we were told. Don't go over the river and through the woods to grandmother's house. You don't go for thanksgiving because oh my gosh. We're going to see. The thanksgiving search. Never materialized in colorado. Now perhaps in other states it did. But i've been focused primarily on colorado. It all remains to be seen. It does us as do your retirement years. You know. I mean you don't wanna we wanna see them. You want to enjoy right. You've got that bucket list. I know you do. And it grows longer every day and the younger. You are. Well the louder. That list is going to get as you approach retirement. And that's all the more reason no matter where you are in life to get that retirement planning started make solid. Don't just make it this kind of a the'real thought that oh i start thinking about it. No you need to start doing it. You need to get that plan put to work for you so that you can realize all of those bucket list dreams. Nowhere better to do. Just that then with keith. Whiteman presidential wealth management at is loveland office. Nine seven zero seven seven six. Seventy five hundred. You have more control over everything. Gail just talked about than you may realize. And i've caught an article over the weekend. The headline was basically investors struggle. To find reasons why the current stock market rally won't continue. If you want to take advantage of that. Give me a call. I'll show you what we can do for you with the relatively safe investments that will grow as this market grows and increase your quality of life in retirement love owned office presidential management nine seven zero seven seven. Six seventy five hundred. And do you remember where you were through. All the balloon of october fifteenth. Two thousand nine jason's deli us. Yeah were you running outside peering anxiously up into the sky. No because i was watching it on tv as was everybody jason's deli in fort collins. I know it was just incredible but looking forward to our conversation with Former larimer county sheriff. jim alderman. Who was at the helm of that investigation. And guess what the he needs didn't full him for one new york minute keith. Whiteman presidential wealth management. Thanks so much. Seven forty two now. Thirteen ten k of k code now. Weekdays at four on northern colorado's voice. Thirteen ten k of k day's headlines podcasts mornings with gail and more and a schedule upcoming sports broadcast. Find them at thirteen ten k. f. k. a. dot com Oh what did you do with that christmas straight. Well there's a new disposal method out there. And i'm not saying that i am all in or i recommend it but Well you've got this London based industrial designer turned trained baker. Her name is julia. George ellis she says you could just eat it Seriously some fifty one thirteen ten. Kfi a thirteen ten gay of k. A. dot com northern colorado's voice mornings with gay all via the auto collision specialist studios. Well it is a creative approach. Put one because of a fire retardant and pesticides that well. I just wouldn't recommend but for your consideration this morning a piece out of the wall street journal by charles passi as you try to figure out what to do and i'm talking about the artificial christmas tree now i'm talking about the bonafide a live at christmas tree. That's dropping needles as we speak because your christmas tree sell up or if you're taking it down and well. What do you do with your christmas tree every single year. Nine seven three five three thirteen ten. But yeah julia george. Alice says well You you could actually use your christmas tree. Particularly it's ever fragrant needles to make christmas tree pickles. Or how about christmas tree hot smoked fish or perhaps best of all at least in her opinion christmas tree ice cream. Ms george alice who spent the last five years concocting various recipes from christmas trees and hosting sold out culinary events with her resulting dishes says for some reason when you mix christmas trees with dairy. It's kind of unbelievable. I could think of other words to describe it you. Her latest effort is a newly published. A cookbook called how to eat your christmas tree now. In recent years a number of shafts she's not alone both amateur and professional having braced christmas trees from classic pines to stately firs as a way to spruce up cooking routines others say well. That's pretty unappetizing and it's also a potentially hazardous idea count me in that latter category enthusiasts say the tree needles and even while some other tree parts have a range of flavor from lemony to slightly bitter that put them on par with the best of spices. Devin young is a writer and an herbalist from sheridan oregon devon says. You've you've never had fresh lake trout into you've had it smothered with a douglas fir. Pesto i'd take a pass on that now young's nitty gritty life website dedicated to holistic sustainable living features advice about well forward seeing out in the forest. She encourages you to seek out trees throughout the year in the wild with spring of being. Well the prime time for gathering the branch tips a delicacy. Apparently who knew all of their own. She says the holidays present a special opportunity because well. It's when we bring trees into the home. She offers a recipe on her site for a douglas. Fir infused eggnog. Her assessment best. Eggnog ever i don't like regular eggnog. Do such enthusiasm is countered. With although i hear. It's really really good and mashed potatoes. Such enthusiasm is countered with the major caveat from food safety experts. And well some forager's as well. Yeah think christmas trees which are generally but not always but generally ones belonging to the conifer family. Well they might not be that safe to consume. They note that some conifer trees are poisonous with the you spelled y e w the you've variety being an off example on top of that. They warned that commercially sold. Christmas trees can be farms with pesticides and sprayed with fire retardant. So i think john callous. John callous is based in portland oregon. He operates the wild food adventures outdoor school. He owns a doctor or a key holds. I should say a doctoral degree in nutrition. Well here's what he has to say about that. He offers simple advice to anyone considering consuming their christmas tree for the normal layperson. Just don't do it but well. It's a creative way to dispose of that christmas tree again. Not condoning the practice. But i just thought. I would pass it along christmas tree for dinner now. I think i'll pass seven fifty six now. Thirteen ten kfi k. Whole sports story in northern colorado state in the country tune into the whole show weekdays noon to two and thirteen ten kfi k. When it starts we'll be ready high school basketball and northern colorado's voice thirteen ten kfi k due to covid nineteen frictions kimberlite on the scene. Johnstown had to suspend its production of a winter wonder at but Keeping the spirit of the season alive got to love this well candlelight. Dinner playhouse has decided to extend its run of winter. Wonder s this as a That five star program in larimer county has allowed some businesses including candlelight dinner playhouse to reopen as so winter wonder at will actually light up the stage beginning on january seventh and will run for three weeks. Tell you what we're going to talk to candlelight. Dinner playhouse executive director. Dave clark has all the details in just a few thirteen ten. Kfi greeley causing on eight o'clock.

colorado us immigration and customs enf gail nashville warrener Victor viola us department of homeland secu availa jaime sobotta Mr viola mr warner mexico department of homeland jaime sappada victor viola Kfi kfi google Victor Richard heaney
Thursday, Dec. 31: Viola Davis, Darlene Love (Repeat Episode)

The View

38:14 min | 5 months ago

Thursday, Dec. 31: Viola Davis, Darlene Love (Repeat Episode)

"The view is nationally. Preempted on new year's day. Friday january first and there was no new episode. The co hosts will return monday january fourth. Live with an all new episode. Subscribe now to our podcast to get hot topics delivered every afternoon and while you're at it rate us in labor review yet ready for hot topics on a very merry you twenty twenty vision when the co host and all of us look back at everything that happened this year. Will we see it as time lost or did we gain some new perspective love oscar-winner viola davis on the oscar buzz over her incredible transformation in my rainey's black bottom and sharing the screen one last time with the beloved chadwick boseman. The co hosts are unwrapping their favorite things. Pro last minute holiday gifts that are under. Fifty bucks and doubly love continues. A view holiday tradition by performing her christmas classic right here here come hot topics on a very narrow view with rookie sarah joy behar sunny hostile megan mccain and ana navarro now. Let's get things started low. Hello hello welcome to a very merry view. We're approaching the new year and twenty twenty has given us a lot to think about so a palestinian refinery. Twenty nine suggests that you don't see as last year but as time when you gain some new insight on live along with inside on. How much gained on your backstop. Now what can you say about that joy. Can you do that. Think about insight that you gained insight though you said what are you doing inside. Really anything Gangs near win site at all zero. But i do have a lot of things i do inside and i think that people who are like inside people like me and not having that much trouble as people who are outside people belonging. I don't play tennis. i jog i swim. I don't i don't i skate. I don't do any of those things i read. I read and watch tv. And i talk. That's it so as far as inside is concerned. That's why but not. That explains why you. And i have growth on both our hips and sarah. Just not laughing. The chose to answer. The question wasn't asked ha that mu. Sarah impressive isn't it. That i have the ability to do that is and then kept on. Going debater okay. So i'll go with insight because it was the original question asked say that. There's been a lot gain. This year has been such a hard year. And i think of the fact that i also started cooking things. I said i'd do forever. I always said. I wanted to be more present and then i was very president with kids at home. I think it gave us all joking aside some really important reminders of what matters most so i now cook. I'm like a big deal. So there's that and then i think that's pretty much we don't go outside either joy we stay inside But i would say there's been a lot of insight. There's been a lot of life wisdom. There's been a lot of reminding us of our resilience and what we can overcome. I'm still preaching here. I go now i'm done. I'm done good. You can answer either question inside or incite honest to goodness. I forgot what the question was but i. I haven't had time for naval gazing and thinking about insights. I had a tough year. And you know there's been a lot of health challenges in my family so i don't even want to jinx by talking about it this week because there still two weeks to go. I'm just glad that i'm alive that my close loved ones are alive. That were still breathing. Because there's a lot of people who who can't say that at the end of the year and as far as insight. I think i was nervous about spending twenty four seven inside the house with my dog and my husband. I mean the dog is okay. I knew that was gonna be fine but you know remember. I usually travel for five days a weeks. i was like how. What is this. Fresh hell going to be like and it's been okay. It's been fine We're still we're still in love. We haven't killed each other or had any thoughts of smothering each other with pillows or anything like that so so. That's my insight. I can live without for a year without killing. How do you know. I i like to look at life as a glass half full type of person as you all know and for me. It's been a year full of gains. I'm trying not to think about the losses but it's been a year full of gains. I've spent more time with my kids. That i've been able to spend with them and i love the people that they've become and i'm looking forward to the future and seeing You know just what they do with their lives and spent so much more time with my husband. My parents both my parents live with me. Now is just such a blessing for my kids to be able to be with them. And i'm also by the way building a new chicken coop and i'm having a really good time with that the chicken coop will also be kind of like a barn. And i'm gonna get geese. And i'm gonna get goats. Don't tell manny get a rabbit for paloma. I'm going to have a really good time. And so i've spent time doing that. That's that the board. I'll have like forty chickens if you'll start turning your own butter. I like disowning you. That's resent we eliminate here. Here's here's my perspective. On the year someone put this on tiktok and it went viral. And this is me all the way around please. Would you show this clip had so many cute outfits for this year. That i couldn't wear so i just wanted to show you see the i couldn't wear larry. These couldn't wear my boston. But is that you when. I heard that dog dog sounds like me. Where have i heard this dog for now with. Yes if master while all the bitches style sound in the same. We'll be right back. Come on now the view from home these days. We don't know what's coming and that means neither to you so let's start. This is going to be good. The unpredictable well my cameras not working because now you can see where i am. I love this is still the only place in daytime. Hello ladies view lawrence where the biggest names com. You heard i on this show. This is the realist conversation on tv. And so good we. The people are the ones that have the power from their homes for those the biggest challenge arrest. You have to say what you gonna say. Shut up and we're not used as we have the same innocent. We're the view. I love all you ladies. That's how we roll every day on. Abc still ahead. Oscar-winner viola davis the co host favorite things for the holidays under fifty bucks and darlene love for forms or christmas class. Saying welcome back you know. I just feel like i need to show. Y'all what i'm carrying. Can you just pull back so you can see. Can you see the baby. Yeah you're prejudicing him. Just when i get more surprising that you ever hear those words coming out of my mouth again. I'm pregnant. it means the sun is going out. That's what i'm telling you your how about this. Every year. a lot of people go holiday shopping in their own closets and find stuff they can. We give to people. Where do you stand on gifts sarah. I think i'm alone in this category. But i believe in re gifting. I do not shop in my closet for stuff. But when i get something beautiful like maybe a candle and i know that i'll never get around to burning the ones i already have out. I'm like oh. I'm going to set this aside. This could be a beautiful gift for someone. So i don't like scrape around to find it but when i find get nice things that i may never be able to put to good use. I love giving him to someone else. What about you hannah. I give out stuff that that. I get center that i'm not going to use given away on instagram to viewers later today. I'm going to be giving this away. Okay because i don't plan to wear this again. But i. I actually don't gift what i i do. Use use the gift bags that people give you. Those gift bags are so pretty sometimes. And i forget to take the tags off and so then you know as as very very confusing because sometimes i've given the same gift to somebody who gave it to me to begin with so if you're going to use the same gift bag remember support the tag off. That's all my name about you. Sonny see sarah. You may be surprised at this. But i'm with you. I love a good re- gift. I love a good regifter. And i do it all through the year. I don't just do it for like christmas. I just thought all year. Because i get so many things sent to me and some of them are so beautiful and like you. I'm never gonna be able to use all of it so it makes me feel greedy that i have all the stuff. So there's my friends will tell you. I'm like hey i just got this really great thing which you like it kind of makes me feel good because there's just so much waste in the world and it's a good thing to re gift who cares. I've never seen you give. We'll give away any of the wine. You get set girl way back talking to you talking to me are you here. I'm talking to you okay. I agree with everything they do. I like re gifting. it's fine. see this sweater sweater. This was given to me by barbara after she wore for ten years. Okay so this was the that i got then. I still look at this. She is okay so that's number one. So here's the other thing if you're going to give a gift make sure that your initials are not on it. Because i have seen. This tragedy happened a few times. Our gives a gift to sue. Solomon and the initials are am okay. That's a gift number. I do i do. A party called the white elephant party where people bring heaviest items that they have received from people and play to get to fund. Get rid of those. Is they bring them like garbage. Dump to my house and we play a game about it. They might alvin party. So that's a good thing for rigas. This topic i just go on and on and on with this. It's so fascinating lot. We'll be right back. Oscar-winner viola davis talks about reuniting with chadwick boseman in his final onscreen role in one of the most inspiring movies of the season. Next sure the views here can get hot but just wait until you see what twitter is saying. Twitter is going nuts over so grab your bone and join the conversation. Have you been reading. What's on and don't forget to like us on facebook. Follow us on instagram. Subscribe to our youtube channel. And of course what is every day on. Abc welcome back. Viola davis ask a winner transforms herself to play the title role in the new movie. My rainey's black bottom a legendary musical pioneer who made sure you heard of weiss onstage and off take a look well we just figured who's this we doing. We come talking to this research who we mean. We decided to decide how. I'm just a bump on a log. I'm just gonna go whichever way to river drift that it straight and decided no. We just thought gotten a good sense. No none of my music. I don't know what good song is when eight you know more about fans and i. It's not that my it's more of what the people want and you can go up there. You could tell sturt of to what you all say. Don't come to me on the stand while. Listen to the voice inside her. That's come with mom please. Welcome back the fabulous violent davis. Good morning valid. Davis is welcome back to the view. A congratulations on ma. Say he's got the first question so so vile you're surrounded by fans here. We're celebrating our holiday show today and right around now. People are starting to make all kinds of resolutions. So i'm wondering how will you reflecting back on this past year. Would you take any of that with you into the new year. you know. My life has gotten very simple in terms of revelations resolutions. I'm just happy to have love in my life. I'm happy to be healthy and breadth in my lungs. Some i've just known too. Many people that have lost loved ones during this time. That don't have food on the table. Can't pay their rent. I mean i all. I'm telling you i've gotten back to the absolute basics in line. I keep thinking about what denzel always says to me is that there's no u-haul in the back of a hearse and i think about that as i'm walking around my house looking at my husband. My new puppy off. I'm back to the basics. That's when i'm back in. I liked that that. There's no you hall behind hearst hearst. That's really good. I like that you've spoken openly about growing up in poverty. I've spoken about growing up in public housing. i think it's really important to tell our truths. This time of year can be particularly difficult for people How does your experience growing up influence. The way you approach the holidays. Now while it's hard to not think of people who don't have anything. And i think that that's really hard for americans to grasp the idea that you can possibly not have a roof over your head that you possibly could have no food that you possibly could have no hot water that you possible. I mean listen. It's like it's like. I told people i know what it means to have. Nothing and you know. I think that people have an idea that because it's america those things are probably relegated to third world countries. But it's not and i'm living proof living well. We want to talk about this amazing new film. You're in you're playing the iconic ma rainey in marinas black bottom on netflix from august. Wilson's play now. Mock came up in the nineteen twenties and was known as the mother of the blues and she was quite the formidable woman especially given the time period. What was your connection to her and her story. You know people keep asking me that my connection to her my connection to her first of all web boden but my connection to her really is she represents all the women in my life. I listen my husband's mom. My husband's grandmother. My mother their people these women who knew their worth their women walked into a room and owned it. It's only sort of through this sort of filter down Idea of who we are that you get you know the woman who has a head down in one thousand nine hundred twenty seven. It's jim crow so she doesn't know her words because no black person knew that worth but when you look within the black community. I knew a lot of my rains. My aunt. joyce was on a rainy she probably was three hundred pounds. She wore the latest fashion. She was very sexual. Could not tell them what to do. She absolutely owned it whenever she was in the room. And guess what we thought. She was the most beautiful woman ever so those of the women. I drew wanna do on the women in my life. The black women that i knew i watched the movie last night. I loved them so much. I wanted to be nominated for everything. I want chad nominated. You nominated the costume department nominated. I want the fat suit nominated everything. It needs to be nominate. But listen ma to your point knows her worth and she makes sure everybody else knows it to man that tantrum over drinking the soda and you have said that pay equity is something. Women's specially women of color have been fighting for forever. You spoke about a beautifully and an interview that went viral this summer. Are you able to do more that more easily. Now at this point in your career. And what's what's your advice for the people who are starting out well A lot. But i will say this it is still a lot of inequities with pay with black women. White women this biz inequities but regina king. I think said something very interesting that i really loved. She said she's learning how to harness whatever power she has right now and that's the that's the key that you have to. It's you know it's like shonda rhimes said when she won the norman lear award she said i deserve this award. Because when i walk in the room. I expect to get what i'm worth. She'll ask for it. She says. I asked for it. And that's the key. I think that that that's the ship that's happening. You have a number of actresses of color. Who is saying. We're not waiting anymore. We're gonna ask for it. You know and listen. Then you have the choice in the option. If you don't get it then you're in the position now that you can actually walk away via this has been a sad year for a lot of people and one of the saddest thing things is the is the the death of chadwick boseman and he gives a powerful powerful performance alongside you in this film which would turn out to be his last. Unfortunately of the two of you were were also in get on up together and had been friends for many years. I understand so tell is there. Is there a memory that stands out for you when you think about him now one memory. Is you know whenever we were at events and it's really difficult for actors just of connect with each other because we're all on different schedules. You know when we were ever we were at events as there would be hundreds of people there she would never leave me and my husband side no matter what there would be people coming especially at the black panther. There would be a line of people he'd never left us especially my husband and it was sort of by think. Maternal paternal thing connection that he felt with us. I mean i have lots of memory. He was very deep soul. I mean there are not enough words to describe. That was amazing. And he's amazing in this and you know you're absolutely right whence women find their voice particularly women of color because we're told we shouldn't be asking for things but you know i walk into say this what i want and then they have to deal with it. So this is this is part of re assessing our power. So i'm thrilled to see you continuing that and to see you talking about how to make our cells in a better position and this you do in my rainiers wonderful. You are spectacular. So you know we love when you come so come as often as you want to. Then we'll say my ma rainey's black bottom begin streaming on netflixif december eighteenth and we will be right back hug that baby from me co hosts are up in your last minute gift game by wrapping their favorite things for under fifty bucks nags. Staying informed has never been more information is coming at us faster than ever. So how do you make sense of it. All start here. hey. I'm brad milkey from abc news. In every weekday we will break down the latest episodes in just twenty minutes straightforward reporting dynamic interviews and analysis from experts. You can trust always credible always solid start here from abc news twenty minutes every day on your smart speaker or your favorite podcast app. Well it is seven days till christmas and we have all earned some happy holidays this year. So if there are still names to check off your list and your budgets getting thin we've got you covered with great gift ideas under fifty bucks you earn. Be under fifty bucks. Why don't we start with you and this first gift is one of my favorite cookbooks. I keep it on my kitchen counter all day. It's called memories of a cuban kitchen. It's less than twenty five dollars. It's available at h h books dot com or amazon. It features authentic human recipes with a midst of spanish chinese portuguese cuisine. What i like about it is that it is very accessible. Some cookbooks are really fancy. Some cookbooks have ingredients. You can't get this. Cookbook is accessible easy to make recipes. Also i love peace. This pandemic has definitely stopped many of us from going to the hair salon and this next gift will prevent any future bad hair days. If you recall at the beginning of this pandemic i was wearing hair. Turbans every day on air because my own hair was a hot mess. I love these. I love these. I love these. You can get seventeen in one pack for under twenty eight dollars from amazon. You get a writer colors pink. There's levinger look here. We go from christmas. Green red red green all right sunny. That's it for me your turn well if anyone follows me on instagram. You know how much i loved this first gift. Since the pandemic started there have been plenty of family game nights happening at the house in house in particular. We love to play monopoly. Gabriel's favourite clue my favorite and pictionary coloma's favorite. They range from about ten twenty bucks. Game night definitely brings the family together. What has been incredibly special to me. Is that so many of you have taken the time to read my memoir. I m b shoots and have reached out to tell me how my story made a difference in your lives. Thank you so much for reaching out. And i'm humbled that has also been chosen as one of barnes and noble's best biographies of two thousand and twenty. It's less than thirty dollars. And i tell people to order it from q. In willow dot com which is a co own. Let x bookstore right here in new york. We need to support small businesses. Sarah what are your picks as a mom of three little kids. I'm always looking for great kid. Products and pickle. Lena is one. I love now remember. These are small businesses their clothing line available at pick alina kids dot com the start at twenty eight dollars dedicated to empowering little girls and they feature trail-blazing collection with the lakes rpg. Malala maya angelou rosa parks they also feature great female. Athletes like billie jean king. Lisa leslie and wilma rudolph. And i must say that. I'm i have nothing against the unicorn but to be able to address our little girls and things that they can really aspire to be is like an added bonus for me they just added a black lives matter collection. Our kids are never too young to be inspired and this next company is run by a team of moms. We love the moms fella. Tuna has a great collection of bibs plates spoons. T-there's they're available at villa tuna dot com and they start at six dollars ninety nine cents their items have polarised things like peas. Don't kill my vibe mac and cheese fries before guys. I mean words who runs the world girl's cheeks for weeks peace love tacos and the future is equal now. This is one of the best parts. They also partner with feeding america so with every product sold. They donate one meal to someone in need. I am passing the baton off to you what you got. I'm especially fond of my first gift idea. Because let's face it the inept detainee behavior of rudy. Giuliani is the gift that keeps on giving so remember. Giuliani held a press conference at four seasons total landscaping company that now these four seasons total landscaping t shirts by the clever people at threatless dot com. Were designed to do something i do. Every jay which is call attention to the incompetence of the trump administration so just wear them proudly the best part of this gift is a portion of the proceeds from the sale of these shirts will be donated to fair fight and organization that combats. Bogus suppression ironic. I think so way. Back when bernie. Sanders was the candidate of choice. I was very fond of the slogan. Feel the burn but with this next gift. I'm bringing that phrase back into style with a little bit of zip. These charming little items are called hothead candles they are perfect stocking stuffers and also. I like to use them at a dinner party. If you buy a few of them you can put one right in front of the plate and light it. It's a candle. The handmade they feature many faces including trump and his bff's putin and kim jong among other wonderful. I mean lincoln is in there too so celebrate the holidays by sitting back pouring yourself a cup of whatever it is you drink and watching trump and his administration go up in smoke. Hey okay what be last but not least. You're up what thanks joy my. I give to something great for the whole family to do together. These are growing trees from sequoia trees dot com. I love them. They're only ten ninety nine and they provide everything you could possibly ever need to grow so many different types of trees like sequoias and cherry blossoms redwoods and dogwoods and even christmas trees. It's one hundred percent guarantee so if you're tree doesn't grow they will send you a free replacement cat. I just loved these trees. You know how much. I love books. So here are to my favorite picks for now The first book. I love is ready player to now. It's by ernest cline. You might remember couple of years ago. I turned you onto ready player. One and then it became a movie and then it was out of sight. Now i love kids books pete the cat. This is my new man. This cat's twelve days of christmas. By james and kimberly dean now p friends still rocking groove and lock counting down the days of christmas so this is a book my life go to pete. The cat books dot com. And you can get it. I'm telling you. You will love pete the cat and then the third thing that make great stocking stuffers are these you know the folks that do my socks the ones that sometimes you're not allowed to see because they say things that blue q i love these folks of may always have innovative really interesting things going on so these their toothbrushes and their seven ninety nine zero available at blue q dot com and they have really wonderful things on like this one says. I can't wait till my mouth tastes like coffee again. And this one says you are a winner and a loser. It's only fair. I mean. I love this and the greatest thing about this is they support. The humanitarian effort of doctors without borders for more information on any of these products. Check out our website and today joining us virtually are fifty essential workers. And as a thank you from all of us you all going home with all our favorite thanks music. legend darlene. Love always has a home for the holidays right here. And she continues her tradition of singing her christmas classic on the view. Remember we for the last six seasons music legend darlene. Love has helped us celebrate the season by singing her holiday. Classic right here. And we're making sure we keep that tradition going in two thousand twenty you can catch darlene love for the holidays digital christmas show on demand until december twenty fifth. Check out our website for more information but right now right now here on our stage to perform christmas baby. Please come home with a little help from her friends. Give it up for darlene. Love me to sing. This saw spend The win anyway. nine Hey well that was. It are happy holiday. Show we want you to have a great day. Take a little time to enjoy the view. Wash your hands wear masks but we also want you to watch the credits. Because you're going to see all the people who actually put this show together index from national geographic comes traffic with marianne van zeller wednesdays at nine eight central on national geographic investigative journalists van zeller dives into the most dangerous black markets on the planet from tiger traffickers and international scammers to counterfeiters and gunrunners to give inside access into the world's trillion dollars shadow economy after each episode. Checkout the traffic podcast with mariana van zeller available. Wherever you listen to podcasts.

chadwick boseman viola davis sarah joy behar megan mccain ana navarro rainey sarah oscar white elephant party alvin party rigas ma rainey Oscar hearst hearst Abc darlene paloma norman lear award
Widows and What's Making Us Happy

Pop Culture Happy Hour

25:45 min | 2 years ago

Widows and What's Making Us Happy

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from internet essentials from Comcast. Connecting more than six million low income people to low cost high speed internet at home. So students are ready for homework class graduation and more. Now, they're ready for anything. We does is not your everyday heist movie. Even though it might start like one after a botched robbery leaves several men dead, the criminals, they robbed our out to track down the money, leaving their wives to clean up the mess, but director Steve McQueen and his co screenwriter gone girls. Gillian Flynn spin the caper that follows into something far more interesting. The cast includes viola Davis Daniel Columbia, Michelle Rodriguez. Brian Henry and Liam Neeson. I'm Stephen Thompson. And I'm Linda Holmes today. We're talking about the thrilling genre defying widows with us here in the studio is the host of all things considered. Audie Cornish Audie. Hey there. And also joining us. This is very exciting. Also, joining us is Christina Tucker of the unfriendly black hotties podcasts. I Christine a- Holo friends. We are so excited to have both of you here with me and Stephen to talk about widows now, I want to say first before we get into this a little bit more. Lot setup to kind of explain there are so many moving parts, we didn't even mention Colin Farrell and Robert Duvall. What's going on? Here is basically as we said Liam Niessen is viola Davis husband. He's a robber. He's a crook robbery goes wrong. All the men are gone. And now all the women have to make good on the debt that they owed to a guy named Jamal who's played by Brian Tyree. Henry who's running for alderman, and he's running against Colin Farrell who plays the son in a big white, Chicago political family, and so what you basically have is like both a political story because Brian Tyree. Henry is running for alderman, but to finance his alderman campaign. He needs this money that he wants to get back from viola Davis so viola Davis gathers up this group of women, we didn't even we also didn't even mention Elizabeth DeBakey Cynthia Haribo. There is a whole group of women carry Coon who kind of is one of the women, but doesn't get involved in the heist, which is a whole thing. There's so much going on in this movie. But Audie I wanna talk to you. I you have talked to both viola Davis and Steve McQueen about this movie. How do you feel about it? I loved it so much when I saw it in Toronto, I loved it too. And as you said there is a lot going on. But the thing is I personally think all the threads come together, quite well, I do think that this is a movie made by the man who brought you shame, you know, about sex, addiction and hunger. You know, and twelve years a slave. Okay. So he brings that I two things and there is a kind of cynicism to the film. It's not oceans eight. It's the movie ocean's eight would be if it cared about the internal lives of its characters. Sure. And so it's not about just wearing a pretty dress and walking away unscathed. It basically says if you tried to do something violent if you tried to enter a rough and tumble in violent world. How would you change? How would you survive it? And it's also thrilling like I felt like through many parts of it. I wasn't quite sure where it was going to go next. I think. Altman is kind of the name that was in the back of my head as well. In terms of one of those films that you pass through different worlds from scene to scene and different people. And you feel like you're kind of in the middle of one conversation, and then you pass through to another conversation. It was done really elegantly from both of them the director and the star. I got the sense that they felt like they were taking a risk in a way. Even though you're doing something that Hollywood finds very easy to do the heist film. I think they felt a kind of pressure the being people of color, and maybe not being thought of in this kind of John ra- work would they really be given a chance and the box office where it has not been fantastic out of the gate. And so maybe they were right to be concerned. But it was fun. The fun movie. Yeah. This is when I saw it in Toronto. What I said about it was I wouldn't be surprised if it was nominated for best picture and be surprised if it made three hundred million dollars, I feel like either one of those things or both theoretically could have been its future. But I think it's very rare to have both of those things happen like to have genre movie. Like this get its full do as a good film, which I do think has happened. But then to also have it be appreciated for how fun it is. I think when I got to the end of this movie the word that I used was satisfying. And I actually talked to somebody else who said exactly the same thing when they saw it on Twitter. It is a satisfying experience. And I think viola Davis so good in it. And there are so few films, particularly like an action hice type film that give this kind of role to a woman who is her age and gender and race and particular complexion, they're not a ton of those roles out there, and she. She's so good. Oh my gosh. The other thing is everyone's good in it like it should be a maybe that's called. Daniel Columbia's is are the game. Good. I don't know. Tell me what the movie is. I'll just. Staring into my soul incredible villain and Colin Farrell who I kind of forget about every once in a while. And then he turns in a performance that makes you just think like all right? That guy is good at thing. Yeah. Like sorta work. All right, Christina tell me what you thought. It would owes full disclosure. I am a scaredy cat. I don't love a violent film. So I did what I always do. When I go to see a movie that is rated R. I checked the parents guide. I am db. Nice to just see where the violence would be and what I really kind of took away from it was like yes, it was kind of violent. It wasn't as as I thought it would necessarily, but all of the violence, and the film was so well done in that it both was something that felt either necessary for the characters to do. But also that there was this kind of everyday quotidian like, Yep. This is just what we do. This is how things are done. These are the choices that we're making to be the people that we are. It was just a really interesting explanation as to like what violence can do to the characters in those films. And yeah, it was satisfying. Like, there was still the whooping in my theater towards the end. You know that experience that I love having in a movie. Yeah. It was amazing. I had such a good time. And I think it's so thoughtful about that violet. In the same way that it's not thoughtful about evil one of the things that I said when I reviewed it is like Daniel Columbia is kind of the most immediately menacing person in the movie, he's very scary. And it those same is that turn on you. You know, when he's sweet also turn on you, and he's vicious, but it's clear that like those guys and particularly Brian Tyree. Henry talks about trying to run for alderman against this established white political family, and it's like he sort of presents basically an argument that I must have what am I supposed to do? I mean. Yeah, you understand. There's like a way in which he is not necessarily the most evil force in the movie, even though he's the one who comes in menaces viola Davis, and kind of starts the whole thing off, which you think Stephen I loved it. I it's it's so interesting at one point in this film. I kind of took my brain out of the movie for a second just thought man, this movie's bleak. This is tough like there are no heroes in this movie. They're all just like variations on on villainy. And yet, it's bleak. But it's super fun. There are no heroes. And yet I rooted for people I found myself like kind of the edge of the seat during high STI stuff the scene that you several of you have already alluded to of Daniel Kalou just looking closely at someone getting his face underneath because the shot is in the trailer. And if you see the shot in the trailer, you're like, why am I scared of Daniel clean? If anything even scarier than the trailer would have you believe my one quibble with this movie is I felt like ending left kind of enough. Loose ends for a sequel in a way that made it feel a little unfinished to me as satisfying as I felt the film was as a whole I was left a tiny bit flat by the ending which I'm not going to give anything away, but I will say this movie cared a little bit more about like the race for ward eighteen alderman than than than than I did. And I felt like it was more interested in tying that up than entire hang up. Like, how everything really gets resolved in terms of this major major move that all these people have made in there in the right? If you wanna movie where you're going to watch a person look at blueprints and point in various directions, they want to move in which a hacker will typically tap on their machine and point. Screens. This is probably not the film for you. There's some of that there's some blueprints a little bit of what it's funny. I I wrote about the printing my notes because they basically wave it around. And they're like where is that go fine where that is? It's almost a macguffin the blueprint is like people have bear out any interest in as soon as I get the address. They're basically done. I wanna point out one performance, and that's Lissouba too. Busy see mcqueen's had. She's like six four. Yeah. Do Howard in the film, and she goes through the greatest transition of any of the characters in. What is the underlying thesis of the movie in terms of somebody coming into their own power? She starts out with somebody who's essentially abused by most people in her life, including her husband's slash boyfriend who had been killed at the start of the movie and her own mother and Weaver Jackie was also in this movie. But essentially, she reaches a point where she just kind of stops wanting to be abused and stops wanting to be told that she can't accomplish something. And she does. And it's a performance that you really it is like totally one of the sparks of the film, and I'm sure people will be talking about it later on so people keep an eye out for her. She's got like vogue on. New trend piece written all over her. Like, I feel like I'm going to be seeing a lot more of her being talked about all the women have kind of different attitudes about getting involved in this one of the things I like is Cynthia Rio who plays woman who isn't originally one of the widows, but gets involved in the high Slater is it her attitude toward it seems kind of more matter fact, to me, it seems more just like, well, this is one of the many things that you sometimes do as part of life, which is. Blase attitude toward a heist, but I still found her very fun to watch. I mean, I found it to be a very entertaining movie, Christina how did you feel about the violate this character? I loved her dearly. You know, I love us of your woman. Let's be honest any kind of woman in well, sheathed blazer jacket a lot of great jewelry. I'm very here for it. She was very matter of fact, and in a way just kind of this is what's going to happen. I'm going to be leading this please do not cross me. And if you do there will be consequences. I want her to do that all the time forever. Slap you or something like that the consequences? Are we're all gonna die. No, I ate it out on the table about what the the troubles would be and no one ugly cries like viola like, wow, that woman can really perform grief in a way that feels so immediate and so real she's just she's phenomenal. I love the fact that that character is not always likable to me. She sort of especially with the Elizabeth DeBakey character, she can be very dismissive. And I think they have a relationship that has an element of guidance. But also an element of tension and resentment and also violent Avis being like, why do I have to drag this? Sometimes kind of Dobie seeming woman through this like these are not necessarily this is not necessarily the team. She would recruit for this heist that she just cover shipping and I loved that. Like, I loved that. There's that feeling you know, when you're in a heist movie, the the idea that like okay now, we're all going to be buddies and do our cool crime ING, and she was like, Nope. Not what's happening here. We don't have to speak after this. We will not speak again. We're getting this done and then with and then it's over this is not friendship time. One thing. Steve McQueen said the director was that. When he first came to Hollywood, you know for shame, and it's kind of doing the rounds and everything he'd see someone at a dinner and think, oh, why isn't that woman doing more or like that woman seems like a great she should be doing more. And he said, this is when he sort of got it into his mind that eventually he wanted to do women lead picture, he grew up watching the UK mini series widows, which is the origin of this story. And I think he did accomplish that like he kind of jammed in as many female voices. And characters as he could. And for someone like me who has watched his movies in the past. And thought I wish women did have a stronger presence in like there was no room for that in hunger. You know, which was about this like IRA prisoner. There was no room for that in shame which was about a male sex addict. And in twelve years, a slave like wasn't my fav-, you know, and I know I'm happy for Lipton and it turned into her star. But that was rough viewing. I think as a black woman and for women characters in general, I did not think that was a win. So for him to come out of the gate and do something like this for me. I was genuinely surprised and it was a happy surprise. It was really cool to me to see that Steve McQueen included in this Michelle Rodriguez who unlike viola Davis, and unlike some of these other actresses does have a history in genre movies like this where there's shooting and driving and all that stuff. And I liked seeing her have that opportunity. So I like the fact that here Steve McQueen drew from a lot of different. I kind of women who had had a bunch of different kinds of careers in casting, and who are still really good actors. I mean, you clearly I thought that Michelle Rodriguez performance as restrained as it is really really worked as more than just like I think of her as a steely bad ass investment because she's usually punching are driving her way through those film run here. He does he takes her and has her not do those staging the more kind of a more coiled performance. I think she's terrific. I mean, the thing to remember about McQueen is that he's a visual artists like two hundred prize winning visual artists, if you wasn't being an Oscar winning director he would just be like off doing his art installations out of Amsterdam. The visuals of it are quite specific. He's the director with such a specific I and I really enjoyed. There's a lovely extended scene where the politician is having an argument with his staffer in the car the entire scene is shot from outside the car looking in. I think on the driver, but you off to the side and the neighborhood changes. As they're arguing about the neighborhood and Hallam what they think of it. If you pulled any one of those frames, it would be an incredible photo. I have one more thing. I want to ask you is about because we're seeing such great things about this movie. Is it seems like there is a little bit of a disconnect between what critics think which is a lot of positive conversation and saying why aren't there more movies like this and how it's actually performing right now at the box office. It's not like it opened at number one or something like that. Or even number two or even number three. I think and are there aspects of the movie that you think about now that would make it less appealing to people. There aren't to me. And I actually was very surprised by that. Because when I first saw it my take on it was it had so many different things going for it. It had people who had credibility established in action movies. It also had great actors. It seemed like it was going to be super fun. And I wonder whether the fact that McQueen is more of kind of a prestige director, and the fact that viola Davis is more of like, a prestige actress, I wonder if. People thought, particularly as it started to get these reviews that were very positive about. How thoughtful it is? If people didn't understand that. It was also fun to see that. It was like also had lots of high STI stuff. Yeah. I'm also wondering about the marketing of it like use my parents as the general marketing tool because the only people I know who still like sit down and watch TV and look at commercial. And I mentioned that I was seeing it and they were both like, oh, I haven't heard about that. And I was like, oh like really you haven't heard about this widows movie with Steve McQueen viola Davis, like big names. Yeah. You know? I haven't really seen aside from like, you know, the Twitter conversations from critics and stuff that it's been a great film. But I haven't really seen a lot of like big marketing pushes around it. So I'm wondering if that has any because I don't think anything in the film is something that you wouldn't wanna see. It's all good. And it's all fun. Yeah. And if you do get a chance to see widows, which I think we would all recommend come and tell us what you think of it. Find us on Facebook at Facebook dot com slash P, C H or tweet us. Us at P C H h when we come back. It will be time to talk about what's making us happy this week. So come right back support for this program and the following message. Come from WordPress dot com. Whether you want a website that's simple yet, effective or one. That's packed with features. Wordpress can help you build it. Choose from hundreds of themes that fit your style. Then grow your following at engage with customers with built in social media, tools and marketing plug ins plans include a custom domain. Get fifteen percent off any new plan. Purchase today at WordPress dot com slash happy hour support for this podcast. And the following message come from little passports, the award winning subscription service that brings a world of discovery to your front door every month with the early explorers subscription each month package arrives full of activities like uncovering fossils from around the world fund souvenirs like ancient Greek coins and hands on games. Like coloring, the cosmos all curated for their curious minds. Learn more about their holiday offers a little passports dot com slash. Pop culture. Welcome back to pop culture. Happy hour. It's time for our favorite segment of this week. And every week what is making us happy this week. Stephen Thompson, what is making you happy this week a couple of weeks ago. My daughter came home from a thrift store excursion with an armload of Saudi VDB's. So imagine my surprise when I discovered that. She also loves a French cartoon on net. Flicks called miraculous tales of lady bug and Caton warr, which is this kitty cartoon about to crimefighting teenagers who won has a crush on the other, but they're also secretly superheroes who fight crime together. And somehow don't recognize each other even though they're identical. It is formulaic and silly and weirdly mockup all and yet also very skillfully made. And for whatever reason my entire family four people with four very different interests have come together to really get a kick out of this show, and it kind of remind. And me every once in a while. I would sit and watch it and think cheese, these cliches or this trope that they kind of just hammer episode after episode after episode of this villain who's very one note. And I think I don't know if this is as good as it could be, and then I thought you know, what when I was a kid I loved a TV show called the wacky races. Which was this very formulaic show. And I realized like I love that show. I attached to that show because it's in my childhood and seeing my daughter in particular knowing that she will attach to this very silly show in the same way felt like circle of life. But also man as a family, we're getting a kick out of the silliest cartoon, two seasons of it are on Netflix. If you've got kids, it's very very fun. I had never heard of it. But of course, found that it naturally has a very devoted fan base. It is called miraculous tales of lady, bug and catch and war. Thank you very much. Stephen. Thompson sounds wonderful. Audie cornish. What is making you happy? This week two things. One is Missy Elliott and Mike. Jerry being nominated to the songwriters hall of fame. I'm big UCLA advan, we're heading into Christmas as we know. Mariah at Penn one of the great if not the only truly modern Christmas song, which is about to hit you in your ear buds wherever you go for the next five weeks. All I want for Christmas, which leads to the second thing, which is the hashtag Justice for glitter with was like Mariah Carey superfan. Social media effort to kind of revive her worst selling album and her I think it was like her personal bottom in terms of rehab Loyd. Yeah. Career wise for the movie glitter, which came out, I think in two thousand one well over the weekend it hit number one on the I tunes charts. Even though you can't get it on streaming. It was like on word of mouth only. And honestly, I just think that kind of thing is funny. So has Shagged Justice for glitter. Mariah go back like babies. Pacifies? Well, no Audie. I had a lot of butts on that. Thank you so much Audie Christina. What is making you happy? This week the podcast who weekly has made me happy for many weeks now, and it is a podcast hosted by Bobby finger and Lindsey Weber, and it is about as they say everything you need to know about the celebrities. You don't they are excellent. And deciding who are the who's of celebrity dumb in who are the them's of celebrity dumb. I've learned so much nonsense information from this podcast. In fact, Scarlett Johansson, opened a popcorn store in Paris. Who knew I know there you go. They have episodes on Tuesdays that are kind of like the news of the week as as such. And then they have a call in episode where folks of the show call in and ask you know, what is the Hudgens doing in this Christmas movie? Can we talk about that? They're both very funny and the show is also excellent because they are both journalists. So they're very good at talking about. Why the things that these? Who celebrities do work in the way that they work? Why the marketing that they do works? They have an entire dedicated segment to the idea of Spahn Kahn, which is sponsored content that these celebrities do your, you know, your tummy tease. You're sponsored waters. They have an entire segment dedicated to Rita ORA, which includes the line tens of people want to know all about the number-one who. Twist a really delightful podcast, and they have such great chemistry. And I've just I've learned so much about people that I really don't need to know about. I think everybody should also join me in this venture. Thank you so much, Christina Tucker. So what is making me happy this week? We are into the holiday season. It's not only time for holiday romance TV movies. It's also a time for holiday television baking shows. So I wanna give my shout this week to the food network double shot of holiday making championship and Christmas cookie challenge. Now, your holiday baking championships, your basic baking competition show, people are tasked with things like, you know, make a cake that's based on a flavor that you might find in a thing of candy canes. And all this other stuff that one you'll find Duff Goldman among the judges. If you're a fan of ace of cakes. He's a lot of fun. The other one is Christmas challenge way. Where people are you know, you might feel like a north. That's that's about right. They have to make delicious and good-looking displays of Christmas cookies that one among the judges. You got your re Drummond your pioneer woman. I feel that when the season is setting in and you really truly need that turn off your brain moment. There's nothing quite like seeing a bunch of people be like how do I make cookies, but with eggnog, but also have to make it in the shape of a Turkey. Like that is fun. That is fun. I enjoy it holiday baking championship and Christmas cookie challenge. And I have one of the thing I want to mention really quick, which is I am going to be participating in a holiday special, which is taking place. Live a holiday live event for my friends at the podcast pitch, and you can come and see a bunch of there'll be music. There will be games. I am the party game bringer to this holiday event. It's going to be at caveat. Hot in Manhattan on December second and that brings us to the end of our show. You can find all of us on Twitter. You can find me at Linda, Holmes. You can find Stephen it. I dislike Stephen you can find Audie NPR Audie, and you can find Christina at sea under sport grace, t you can find our producer, Jessica reedy at Jessica underscore Radi. Our producer, Vincent acade- note. The ACA vino and our producer, America's music director. Mike cats, if Mike Khasif K A T Z I F, Mike spanned. Hello, come in provides are in and out music, which you're bobbing your head to right now. So thanks to all of you guys being here. Thank you. And thanks to all of you for listening. If you have a chance, and you're so inclined, please give us her view on apple podcasts that will help more folks to find the show, we will see you. All right back here next week. Hey guys here host of the Ted radio hour and this week. We're going to explore just what it takes to speak up because whether it's asking for a raise or asking for a quality it requires courage to take that crucial step to say, something you can find the Ted radio hour wherever you get your podcasts.

viola Davis Steve McQueen director Audie Christina Stephen Twitter Brian Henry Daniel Columbia Colin Farrell Audie NPR Audie Brian Tyree Stephen Thompson Michelle Rodriguez Christina Tucker Linda Holmes Hollywood Elizabeth DeBakey robbery Gillian Flynn
Introducing: Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Whine Down with Jana Kramer and Michael Caussin

03:35 min | 2 months ago

Introducing: Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"Mini this is such a good idea. I love the questions. And they do dry out a frightening we confessional quality tough wants to grapple with are they adapted preuss questions it was the concept of the pristine question. I've always loved it. It's i would tend to in the back of vanity fair. But i i needed to modify them because other things that i wanted to ask specific questions canvas. It answers to questions other than the ones off. If you see what. I mean i'm minnie driver and i have questions in fact everything i've done in my career acting music writing. I've done to investigate the human experience. Because there's so much we don't know and so much that defies our understanding. My new podcast many questions. I wanted to dig a bit deeper. So i put together a little experiment. I wanted to ask trailblazers across different disciplines. The same seven questions questions about what made them happy. What the curious about what love means to them with each episode presenting a new guest a new data point in this great experiment. I wanted to musicians perspective. So i called up. Dave grohl of the foo fighters. What person place or experience most altered your life. I would have to say the first time. I saw a band play on stage and it was a band called naked. Raygun they were like an infamous. This darbar that smells like bleach beer. And they started playing and life. My chest was against the stage in their sweat was on getting thrown around people with mohawk. Since i was like this is what i'm doing for the rest of my life. I was curious how act to my aunt this question so i asked the brilliant viola davis if i could pickup brain my dad dying was a big one because i was there. You're not thinking about how pissed you all. You're not thinking about where he was an alcoholic. You just thinking about the fact. That i loved him. He was my father and he's gone. Wiggles life down to absolutely the essentials of really what makes life and what makes joy. It leveled me then. I wanted to hear journalists response. So i wrote to pulitzer prize winning investigative reporter ronan farrow. I had pitched a story when i was a tv reporter about the hollywood casting couch. It didn't in my case feel like a triumphal moment of yes to do the right thing. What it feels like at the time is incredibly shitty and scary. But i can q. Do invariably in those situations have a little voice saying Here's what the right thing is regardless of what does strategic or savvy thing is and i think it's good to listen to that and i didn't stop that i called more and more people with my questions and now i'm sharing my archive mini questions on each episode. You will hear a guest. I admire onset these seven questions so that together. We can examine how his people whereby similar and individual. Join me in my exploration on many questions on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your favorite podcast. Seven questions limitless answers.

preuss minnie Dave grohl ronan farrow viola davis pulitzer prize hollywood apple
A Novena to St. Teresa of Avila Day 9  Discerning Hearts Podcast

Discerning Hearts - Catholic Podcasts

03:35 min | 8 months ago

A Novena to St. Teresa of Avila Day 9 Discerning Hearts Podcast

"Novotna to Saint Therese of Viola. Day Nine. Charity Now Teresa, you have said. The blessings gained through true poverty I think are many. And I wouldn't want to lose them. I am often aware of faith within me so great that I think God cannot fail anyone who serves him. I know that they're never is or will be any time in which his words will fail. For. I cannot persuade myself otherwise. Nor can I fear? It seems to me I have much more compassion for the poor than I used to. I feel such a great pity and desire to find relief for them that if it were up to me, I would give them the clothes off my back. I feel no repugnance whatsoever toward them. Toward speaking to. Touching them. This I now see is a gift given by God. For. Even though I used to give homes for love of him. I didn't have the natural compassion. I feel a very noticeable improvement in this matter. According to Teresa while interior developing necessarily involves continued progress in self knowledge and self awareness, it is not egotistical because it also encourages us to look beyond ourselves to God and to others. Thus progress in the spiritual life really authenticates itself in charity. God's Love as the evangelist John tells us is for all and is so profound that he sent his son for our redemption. For those engaged in the life of prayer, we must also love with this divine love. It is a transformative love the changes the way we see and approach our fellow men and women as Theresa illustrates, may we therefore learn to love others with the love that God loves us? That our prayer may be truly perfected. Saint Theresa speaks to us today saying. Christ has no body. Now, but yours. No hands no feet on earth. But Yours. Yours are the is the Ricci looks compassion on this world. Yours by the feet with which he walks to do. Good. Yours are the hands through which he blesses all the world. Yours are the hands. Yours are the feet. Yours are the is. You. Are His body. Christ has no body now on earth. But you are. Oh, God. Your spirit raised up Saint Teresa of Jesus to show the church the way to seek perfection. Grant that we may always be nourished by the food of her heavenly teaching and fired with longing for drew, holiness through our Lord Jesus Christ your son who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit. One. God forever and ever. Saint Theresa pray for us that we may become worthy of the promises of Jesus Christ.

Saint Teresa Ricci Saint Therese of Viola Saint Theresa Holy Spirit John
Viola Davis (2019)

Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

44:25 min | 11 months ago

Viola Davis (2019)

"Hey Guys Willie geist here with episode of The Sunday, sit down podcast. My thanks as always for clicking and listening along my guest. This week is a Hollywood powerhouse. She is the Oscar Tony Emmy and Golden Globe winning actress Viola Davis. We walk through not just an extraordinary career but an extraordinary life she was born on a former plantation in a one room shack in South Carolina moved as an infant up to central falls Rhode Island with her family where she lived destitute poverty. Roaches. In the House you'll hear all about it. Counting only on her school lunch for a meal every day to rise from that place to where she is now is an incredible story and you're going to hear every bit of it. She went to the juilliard school she went on became a Tony winning actress on Broadway and then worked her way onto Hollywood's a-list with breakout roles in the help, and then an Oscar winning performance alongside Denzel. Washington. Inferences not to mention starring role in a hit TV show that earned her an emmy how to get away with murder. Interesting to hear viola talk about fame still kind of uncomfortable with it knows how fleeting it is and talks about giving back and doing the important things with her platform among them her latest project, a documentary called a touch of sugar. It's about the diabetes crisis in our country. She was diagnosed with prediabetes a few years ago, and it runs in her family using the platform to talk about an epidemic in this country, a powerful conversation Viola Davis I have to say sucks you in she speaks so passionately and powerfully she is inspirational and she's here now on the Sunday, sit down podcast. Thank you. Again, a sort of an interview series we're conducting we start at thirty rock then we move here. Do another one somewhere downtown later. Today I'll some keep talking and. I have to say, I, didn't know this about you diabetes that's in your family, and it's just touched your life enough that you wanted to be the voice of the documentary film I did want to be the voice because it. You know the thirty million adults. have. Type two diabetes eighty, four, million that have prediabetes, and then I think about my family has been affected by my two sisters my aunt who succumb to the disease after to amputation my grandmother. It it's an epidemic obviously and it and it seems like it's almost everyone story and when it becomes everyone's story and but then no one really talks about it. Then I always feel like someone needs to blow the lid off of it and get it out into the public eye. That's why I'm now leading this film. That's why I wanted to be a part of it There is something about the aloneness of anything that someone is suffering from that I feel is my sort of mission in life, and then it came knocking on your door as well about a year and a half ago when you got word I have prediabetes. When in for hormone tests and then my doctor took the one seat test, which is Comprehensive Test that measures you average glucose in the last two three months. So you take a test for the year I don't know anything about that and then. She told me the results. and. I had to go to work I was going to how to get away with murder and I remember it just leveled me. It just stopped me. I didn't know what to do. It's like, what can I do exercise I eat right? It's almost like waiting for this sort of silent I dunno Marmi become and decimate you and you're not armed And so I. Just felt like, what do I just become hyper vigilant It doesn't mean that I have to develop type two diabetes but what do I have to change my lifestyle which is already good. To something that's better in a busy with a busy schedule And that's the thing how do you manage and live with this disease? How do you do it? And what do you say to people? Who are living with this disease in terms of hope, because the numbers are staggering one in ten adults in this country live with it and many many more like you were pre diabetic is there more research being done is there's something on the horizon that you can point to and say we're working on this. Well, listen I. Hope that there are more drugs on the horizons or something that can be done I'm sure there are my sisters are all always conversing with each other every single day about something that can be done. And everyone's diabetes is different. Some are diet and I'll wait related some are genetic. There are some things that you can do to manage the disease. There is a website that created a touch of Shikha film dot Com I but. That's what I'm doing. I exercise I think about my carb count I'm hyper vigilant but I do have the genetic factor there. Right you know. That's what I that's what I said and it's all there. In the title, a touch of sugar. Some people may not familiar with that term, but you talk about a growing up as an accepted part of life. She's got a touch sugar. He's got a touch of sugar absolutely because I I was born in Saint Matthew. South Carolina. Literally singleton plantation and everybody who got a diabetes diagnosis. It was called sugar such as such. Got The sugar and busy she the sugar and it was almost sometime said in silence. Almost, like something you should be ashamed of and just the reference to it as diabetes shows the lack of education in what it is, when came from how to manage it, and of course, the State Bowl of African American. Hispanic Communities Really have high numbers of diabetes. The staple of our diet corn bread rice I remember we used to make sugar candy when we were kids how you make sure candy with Crisco and sugar you put it in a frying pan and you heat it up, and then you take the heat off and you wait for it to just hardened. And that was sugar candy. You Ate cornstarch out of the box. That's a big thing you know down South Nobody. Ever knew that those factors could absolutely be the cause and the root of diabetes it was what you did. It what you knew those foods are very cheap, very accessible and so there goes. So now you've gotten to a root of the problem. Which is poverty, which is access to good food access to food two fruit and vegetables, and eating well and education about the importance of that. That, obviously a much bigger problem to tackle but also a piece of the problem that you can speak to. Because, as you said, it was part of how you grew up once again it was I mean and I always say I grew up PO, which is a wrong lower, their poor. You know and but. I I'm one of the forty six million people in this country who live in poverty. That's what twenty, four, twenty, five, thousand dollars a year if you have two kids or more. That's before taxes. and I just you have access to nothing. You have access. To nothing. You know it's what you call even food deserts. There are no whole foods in poor communities. There's barely Ralph's or von on you know. So that's something that needs to be addressed. It's just something that no one talks about I can't tell you how many speaking gigs I've done around the country and when I mentioned poverty and I mentioned just the every day of poverty that I don't can't tell you how many people say no one ever talks about that. There is a shame attached to it when my mom. When we were young, we grew up on public assistance and one of the things that my mom did she really wanted a different life or us, and so she really was involved in welfare reform and one of the things that she really really fought for was a health clinic in the city of Central Falls Blackstone Valley Community Action Health clinic she fought for her and a bunch of other poor women who were living on public assistance because otherwise you know you sort of had to wait for any disease to get completely out of control to walk to Memorial Hospital and sit in the Er for five six hours before you got treated. and. So we had that little health clinic there which didn't provide much but what it was was a source of information. I sat there as a eight, nine year old and I I was taught about nutrition. and. So it was good for me but the level to which she had to fight for that is the sort of warriors we need within those impoverished communities or people walk outside those communities who seen the issue who see the problem and take it upon themselves. You need the same warrior spirit on the outside of the diabetes epidemic as you need from the inside and what I mean by that is even with my prediabetes diagnosis with my two sisters diabetes, you gotTa be a warrior with your health. The Self Care Aspect of it is so enormous in terms of just managing it. Understanding it understanding the root causes of your you just got a tackle it. You know and we that's how we have to be about the poverty crisis. Also, you see it as important. What can you do? How can you stand in the gap and there are people who will say, yes. But how can I worry about having a good diet when I don't even have a diet to begin with I? Mean you've talked about the school lunch. Sometimes. The only meal you would ever have in a day or the best meal for sure that you had entering the day. So I, think for some people getting a meal. Is the is the goal getting a healthy meal might be a nice bonus. If you can get there, we've got to be able to provide food for people where they needed in schools and other places, and there steps being taken along the way. Yes. Backpack programs I certainly have worked with many programs hunger is. Know, they're out there and. And people who understand that a lot of those foods that the provided in schools have a high sugar content, all of those things but in impoverished communities certainly you know here's the thing we to care about each other. You know I'm sorry to sound combined. And make it a grand sweeping statement, but the people have. And the people who get to a position where they have the resources needed to reach back I, know that when I was a kid. We had so many different programs. that. Helped me even to just get an education. I mean beyond the health clinic that provided you know a lot of information. There were someone the city on this up with bomb comparator enrollment programs there are things that you can do. Outreach things that people. In power that has some semblance of anything that can throw someone rope. certainly, this is what the documentary is all about it. They've set up the website. My husband always says. You Got Plant the seed. How good grow? But you have to plan it. And I know that when I was six years old, I was always begging from the inside for help. It was like A. For help and I think that people who have not there was always sort of a silent begging for help and hope. if you see it, if you then address it if you have the power to do that. And you're doing that and your your journey doing that with you as much as I can do in any number of ways and certainly with this documentary and narrating it then and getting the message out there and not stigmatizing something that is affecting like you said, one out of ten people but. But I've done it in other aspects to I will tell you that it does make a difference your journey to be in a position to help the way you do help not just on this but on hunger is an extraordinary one when people hear your story as you said, born on a plantation in South Carolina. Yeah. Growing up as you've said, abject poverty in Rhode Island what was your childhood like what was it like to be a little girl? The way you grew up while it was like everyone's childhood filled with happy memories and you know going to the reservoir and you know playing with my sisters and bicycles and all of that, and it was also filled with. The darkness of. When you pour, you have bad housing you just do. Nobody regulates certain housing for poor people they just don't. So we lived in condemn buildings certainly. Apartments infested with rats never having a phone bad plumbing filling the bucket full of water pouring the water in the toilet the flush it. Certainly, the clothing shoes were always too tight because we bought everything from salvation. Army called Saint Vincent Depaul. and. And you know just the stigma of poverty. The feeling on the outside feeling invisible. Lack of access. Which is why I talk about it all the time and it's uncomfortable for me. It really is it. It. It's uncomfortable for me to talk about it. But I always find that. Once you blow the lid off of anything in wants to tell the truth it becomes a domino effect and it gives people permission to tell the truth, and then it gives another person and another person another person, and soon what it becomes a revolution. A revolution. And, it becomes the norm. And it stigmatizes it. And then once you D- stigmatizes it D- stigmatize it then you have to address it. In a small way. I say what? I say a lot of times because. It's Little. Narcissism in me. That I, it's a demand for people to see me. You see me. I am because I didn't have the power to do that as a kid. And I feel that way about all things that people are suffering in silence with. Is. I want them to be seen and heard. I hate when people are not seen in heard because I think the next step is metaphorically speaking death. And I think that that's happening in the world too much. I. Think that we're seeing the side effects of that too much even zeitgeist now and you're in the unique position to have lived it. So when you talk about poverty, you know from whence it comes I mean you've been there. You said it makes you uncomfortable to talk about is that because it reminds you of those times or what's uncomfortable when you talk about? Not, enough tanks, it you go. Online is anyone on instagram or twitter page talking about they're. Talking about this great. I don't know. McQueen jacket they just bought or the new diet that they're on how they have tight ads now there in extraordinary mom and they can juggle being. A CEO of a company being a mom being a wife and then making homemade meals. Everything is about winning. And everything is about conquering. And everything is about a great result. Nobody. Wants to talk about the other. Okay there is no romance and sexiness involved with poverty. There is no romance sexiness involved with being invisible and not having access to health care the housing to fresh foods. There's no swagger to it. And That's hard. You know it's Rene. Brown says to own your story either you own your story or you stand outside of it hustling for your worth. I'm not hustling for my worth anymore. I. Feel Very like I was born worthy but I know that now. and. That's why he does make you feel comfortable because I understand how I'm going to be seen with it. But, the other part of it is just demand. Given where you came from given all you went through as a child. Where does your light come from? Where did you say I can grow up and be an Oscar winning actor. When did you start to see yourself that way that I can step out of this childhood into something bigger and better for myself? What gave you that hope. You know what? I don't know if I always. Saw It. I'm just going to be honest with you. I think I believed it a huge. Amount of time in my life but. Seeing a physical manifestation of what you want to be. A mentor as Joseph Campbell says in the journey hero when you have your call to adventure in catapulted out of your ordinary life, what you don't fit in and a mentor into your path someone who's who's who's seen the road who's WHO's paid the way? And they come and they show you the pat that was Miss Tyson. That was my sister. Diane. That was someone who teaches you how to Nostra skill teaches you on a fail how to succeed Sony just likes you. Simply like to. That's what helped me. Now, I have to tell you there's a cap on awards. There's a cap on cuteness in I don't know being on people's most beautiful. List this a cap to it if someone tells you is not a cap to it. They're lying would say there's a cap to greatness. There's a cap fame we've seen fifty million documentaries of people who just destroyed their lives to on top of their game. Because a tooth of the matter is, is that everyone fights for success because they feel like once you hit it we've got it. You've got the Elixir that is the magic loop soup that Joseph Campbell talks about. That is not the Alexa. The Elixir is living a life of significance. The Elixir is living a life that is bigger than you. That's what it is, and if you're not doing that, then you're not doing anything. Nothing. That message needs to be pounded in people and I think that probably you'll see less of even what I'm talking about now, which is people living with the disease where a lot of people not throwing them a rope. it needs to be part of the like sort of normalize conversation. Even when we're we're talking to our kids, you know instead of saying we want next. premed. Become a lawyer. What about living life? That's meaningful. Like urban says the great existentialist psychologists who says, I will not truly be dead until the last person who has a memory of me dies. You know we want that to be hundreds of years from now we want people to benefit from our legacy legacy. You have hundreds of years from now. And that's not just cute face. Trophies on a shelf, right? Absolutely. We have the we we live in very resourceful our country. It's a very wealthy country I think that we. Can come up with a solution in terms of. How to help people who are suffering even in terms of Health That's very well said, but I do want to ask about those trophies on your shelf if that's okay. All right. So when I'm curious when you your first acting Gig, when did you even get into that? When did you know that was a possibility coming from where you came from Oh, I could do this. Miss Tyson changed the game for me because she looked like needs like my mom. I started acting when I basically was eight or nine, my sisters and I because we wanted something to do, we would write skits. We'd right WHO's skits and we would have rehearsals would rewrite. We would have a wardrobe budget. And then I started acting really acting in high school in drama. Competitions. Rhode Island. Drama Festival I got a scholarship when I was fourteen to young people school of the Performing Arts at the travel three hours. One way just to get to the school. And once again, everyone who went to the school they were coming up in Peugeot's Saab's and BMW's I was coming on foot. Proud to be there and I always say that I'm an og because people ask me that question when she gets deided I've done. So many plays so many productions in church basements and basketball courts off Broadway on Broadway Regional Theatre I've worked with everyone. I love. The work I loved paying my dues I just thought it was such an awesome thing for people to say some. Viola. So what do you do to actually say I'm an actor I thought it was awesome. And like anything led to juilliard, led to getting an agent just created a domino effect and it brought me to Hollywood. And here I am it's funny. Almost every actor I've ever spoken to talk about their career say people see the product, which is me standing on a stage with statue in my hand and they don't know the twenty twenty five years that led up to that they. Off Broadway Nobody knows the truth of anything. You know they really don't if you're born with a statue in your hand, there was. Came before it. Yeah. And they also kind of think you just Kinda stroking the statue every day you know. I don't look at this statute. So what was the most exciting when you get out of juilliard and you get onto Broadway and you're nominated for? Tony Pretty quickly in that time afterward. What was the most exciting first day for you on? Broadway was walking out onto the stage saying here I am I can tell you exactly what it was. Opening Night of seven guitars on Broadway. When I think about everything I believed that being an actor was. That was it. Walking into your dressing room and Florida's ceiling flowers. The all the camera crew outside the theatre. Working with August Wilson on my mom and dad being in the audience and my dad crying. During the curtain, call the cameras you know everybody taking pictures and you know movie cameras were then my father standing up crying clapping he didn't know what to do with shaking. My mom it. It was a think. That I thought being an actor was it was the work and the joy of the work. It was the smell of the theater and it was the working with the great playwright Wilson, the great director Lloyd Richards Great Actors. I was like I met this is it I've arrived I don't need anything else in my life, I? Wish. There because now I know I know. I'm like really. Really thought that was it right But that's the journey you feel like you've reached the mountaintop and then Oh, they're more mountains after that are you've reached the point you always dreamed of getting. And then you win a Tony for King Hedley win another Tony for fences and now you're sort of like the queen of Broadway. For that time. I mean that must have been an extraordinary thing for somebody who? was playing church basements to start her career. It was an extraordinary thing. You know to dream the biggest dream you can possibly imagine in your life and having. No kind of foresight of how that was going to happen, and then all of a sudden it happens. You. You you. You sort of hit. It's sort of like magic. And it speaks to the power of. Belief and hope. And Hard? Work. but life doesn't end there. I always say the three most important words that happens especially after you have big old trophy in your hand or anything the three most important words are and now what? And now what what's the next thing? What's the next chapter. Denzel. Always says Denzel has the best quotes by the way I don't mean out on. I would you Says there's no u-haul haul in the back of a hearst. You sort of can't take it with you. And wants to hit it. You realize it's like Oh my God. I got an Oscar. Your heart is about to tasting and then you go home and then you sit down and then the next day and it's like. And how what? What's the next page and That's sort of where I'm at right now What was it like to jump into movies from the stage given the fact that you built your whole career on stage work What are a movie set feel like to? I started doing like speaking another Land Land Right Speaking Mandarin at Mandarin movie once and they cut it out I'm so glad I did it it was so hard to two months to learn one sentence that's what it was like make like learning mandarin it was a black hat. And I thought it was so good. Go to my friends who Chinese and say I'm going to say something to you and they would say. But it was like speaking man is just a completely different world and it completely different world. I mean I always say all you have to do in a movie is sustainable performance for thirty seconds. That's it. That's as long as eight glass. So you got thirty seconds. All right. When you on stage you can have a twelve page scene and there are no edit buttons. There are no cuts and that's just one scene. I've been I've done plays where I've done them for year six seven months and you're onstage the entire time. Thirty seconds to sustain the performance. So it was much different and you're acting opposite someone like Merrill Street. So you're standing there going I'm good. I'm really good. I'm good I. Know This street. But I'm Viola Davis. And then you're acting opposite her and you're thinking Oh my God. Oh my God it's Meryl. Streep Oh my God it smells streep in. It's like cut by. Okay. Let's do. You're not in the sea but. And the other part of movies it's very difficult. So much of what we do in movies and TV sex appeal, right? How cute you are do we liked you? What's Your Cue Rating? You know I'm not I'm not so good at that. I think you're you may not know it seem to like you by Ola well. I'm glad people like me but you know to actually manufacture right is is very, very difficult. I'm just I'm just about just telling the story. You know doing the work I love the work. Love it. When you get nominated for an Oscar for one scene in doubt were you surprised by that nomination because that felt like a lot of people including Meryl Streep by the way as the beginning of something when she famously said get her movie. Yeah was that a surprise to be nominated for that. Yeah. All of is a surprise to me. Every bit of it is a surprise when I, when I got the role I thought that was the reward and award I didn't see beyond that. So and then being at the Oscars in the red carpet. Carpet, I had a panic attack. It's one of the. One to panic attacks, I've ever had in my entire life I would not recommend any. I would even wish that upon were sending me I don't have a lot of enemies but I would not wish that upon anybody who had it on the red carpet Oh yeah. I had carbon and what does that mean? What happened? Besides shaking uncontrollably. Besides hyperventilating besides a very beautiful woman named Meryl Streep who told me the day before? Viola. Listen. I can't be at that award show. But if I win, can you accept the award for me and I said? Yes. Yes. I'll do that and then I got there I was like what just? That led to the panic attack along with the red carpet. And you know I didn't want to. Kill you because. Oh My. You got through it I. Don't think anybody noticed you survive pretty well I know you say winning an Oscar isn't the end of the world and and what's next but To Have Oscar winner in front of your name. Every time someone says, it does mean something you're in a club with Meryl Streep and some of your other idols and now people were friends of yours. What does it mean to be in that sort of elite club? You may not think of it that way but people on the outside certainly do. Has It changed your life's I. Know It's changed your career I'm sure. But does it change your life to be Oscar winner Viola Davis. Yeah. It's changed my life to be Oscar winner to. Be On a TV show the TV, show really out on my life even more than the Oscar, tell you the truth. Everything is. All of it as the money all of it I remember someone saying you know if you're not poor anymore I was like. You didn't know what that information is but. Yeah it's. It's totally but I'll tell you what it's probably more of transformation to people who observe my life in me being in it right me being in it I don't know the viola that you talk about. I don't I'm aware that you know it. But in my every day when I had my rap over my head and I'm running around with my daughter and we're going to Ralph's or bonds and I'm cooking. I'm Biolo-. I'm me. And you know in terms of me getting through my everyday life and certainly living a meaningful life it. Doesn't play a role except for the power of influence. Which is what I'm doing here the power of influence is. I will say that the power to literally stand up on the stage and have people listen to you when you're coming from a pass when one saw you know one listened to you. So it's like now, what do you WanNa? Say What do you want to do you know? Helps that you have such a presence to a lot of people have the platform, but they can't deliver it. I would argue the way you deliver it have you always had this presence about you you speak almost poetically and. I mean, it's not everybody who can pull that off. Is that part of being an actor been comfortable on a stage? Well well. Comfort is like a dirty word for an actor. You know that they tell you not right for comfort right to be uncomfortable in the moment you're alive and all that you're not afraid of the spotlight on stage clearly well. Sometimes I am but. I'm I'm used to it. I'm used to the spotlight I. Guess I'm used to the camera being. Placed on me. I am thank you for listening to the Sunday. Sit Down podcast stick around to hear more from Oscar winner, Viola Davis, including what her younger self with think of the woman she sees now. The, the Press Chuck Todd Cast. It's an insider's take on politics, the two thousand, twenty election and more candid conversations with some of my favorite reporters about things. We usually discuss off camera listen for free wherever you get your podcast. Welcome back to the Sunday sit down podcast now more of my conversation with Viola Davis. Do you have moments do you ever stop in your life? Look back at the Little Girl in Rhode Island? Look at your life and go. I. Don't know how I got here. Thank God I did but I don't know how I got here. All the time. Every single. Day. You know when I think about her a lot to. First of all every day. When I opened my refrigerator. When I flush toilet. When I could put a robe on. When I have hot running water. When I know that there's no lead in the paint in my house. When I could get in the car and I can go somewhere and walk. She is with me every day to understand that every little thing in my life is to celebrated. Okay. But I always say I always want to heal her because she was always. So sort of traumatize grew up in dysfunction. My father who I loved more than anything was an alcoholic. It's a byproduct. Poverty. That always want to heal her i. just want to reach back and go. You know what? Everyone I see in my life. I I I'm GONNA remember you. I'm going to listen to people love people because it's like healing the little girl. But it's like someone just recently said. Can you allow the little girl? That little girl who survived is pretty tough. Can you allow her to be so excited at the fifty-three-year-old she gets to become Can you her to hug you and just squeal. And It took me a long time to do that. But. I finally did it because I think that there's a grace gratefulness that needs to come and enjoy that needs succumbed with celebrating the fruits of your labor. That I have not allowed myself to do because I think that's also something that comes from Poverty is survivor's guilt. is making it out. When you see other people who are still in the hole. So I'm allowing here to sort of hug me and skill. and. I do things like this that feed my soul touch of sugar. Because I love my sisters who are here in New York with me I want to live. Yeah I'm reconciling my childhood. But as you say, it took you a while to get there. You weren't comfortable with your success and your fame and people like me telling how great you are. What what was the tipping point for you? How did you get there to say you know what? It's okay that I am where I am. Well you know what a friend of mine said this. Once I mean besides a lot therapy. But, a friend of mine said this once she said, you know what? By Ola when I tell my story, a lot of times I stand outside of it and I think to myself. Wow. You are awesome. That is such an unbelievable testimony. You know then you begin to see how God worked miracles in your life, and then I started really listening to my story and understood how Awesome it was. incredible. I just thought you just work hard and you get out. That's it. It's nothing credible about it. So the more I've told my story. The. More. I. HAVE EMBRACED IT But I gotta keep telling it. and not live outside of it like renege ground says. Joseph Campbell says when you go and you going out there to that call. To adventure you're going out there to find that Elixir that answer to your life that you gotta go into that Inner Cave. and. You gotta go in there and slay those dragons. And I find that when I went into those innermost caves that IMOs Cave that the dragon I needed to slay was me and That sort of hurt in that pain of. Soda Railing at God, like why do I have to be that kid growing up or? Filthy houses and Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah by why do I do that anger that sort of pain and all of that of. That innermost cave and slay her and understand that I'm still alive. I, have the power of influence. That God has always been with me. Upward bound program prepared tour enrollment program teachers have been awesome great actors like Cecily Tyson Meryl. Streep. People like my sister, the ropes that have been thrown at me. That's what I found in the inner most cave. and. Then you know nickel back after I found that answer to. SORT. Of Give. that. Elixir. To people who are still there. That there is a way to live a life of significance and reconcile way you are now that there's a way out and there's a way to make your life meaningful. Forget Bernard Brown I'm following you through the wall. You're you gotta get you. I'm sorry. I think you take it over awesome. I would be derelict in my duty if I didn't ask you if there's going to be more of the show you mentioned. Howard with. ABC to decide I. think that annelies Keating has more in her. That's what I think. I sort of I'm seeing something. Is that a suspicion or something, it's a suspicion. Hope that they'll be more. I need for analysts to have some labs I really do I. You know it's just like me people think that I'm not fun. I am so much fun. If you come to my house I'm telling you, we have me and my husband would have green parties. But I need to have some lab let's give those things at the laugh. Okay. She doesn't get it up for that. I also want to ask you about work you do with your husband and your production company, and we were just talking briefly about the Emanuel documentary that you're executive producing with Steph Curry. Boy I've only seen the trailer, but it looks incredibly moving. Absolutely. It looks like something you did the right way. Why was that a project you want to take on? Well, we met the victims of the Ame church in Charleston when I was I had to present them with the Award Glamour, magazine event. and. We spoke to them afterwards, a party really sat down with them and you know the big thing with them is they said, we're not gonNA live in Hey. We're GONNA live forgiveness. What struck me as forgiveness is journey. But I just didn't want people to forget that story. I didn't want people to forget that's tragedy. You know so often with the number of tragedies at that happened in this country, it's amazing how you have to keep reminding people of it. They remember it for a while it's it's on the news it's trending and then because of the twenty four hour news cycle within seconds, it's forgotten again. I didn't want people to forget. I felt like I owed it to them. You know the pain that they still goal to losing. Their loved ones as a son, a mom. I didn't want people to forget that and how awesome it is like i. told you before they use whatever power I have as a source of of of influence and so. When it came to us as a producing project, we wanted to do that. We just felt like we had to. Expand I applaud everything you're doing with this platform especially on diabetes. I told you my father has diabetes. So it means a lot that you've given your time to this. Thank you so much. Thank you enjoyed talking to you. Thank you. My thanks again to the great vile the Davis for a great conversation loves spending time with her. You can learn more about her new documentary at a touch of sugar film DOT Com. As usual as always thinks to all of you for listening along to the Sunday sit down podcast this week to hear more of the full length conversations with of my guests be sure to click subscribe to never miss an episode and don't forget to tune in to Sunday today every weekend on NBC I'm Willie Geist. I'll see you right back here next week on the Sunday sit down podcast. Peacock the new free streaming service from NBC Universal, Timeless Free Iconic. flicks free hilarious BITs, three yolk cell free, and that's why you can't not watch peacock stream now at Peacock TV dot com parks and REC streaming now.

Oscar Viola Davis diabetes Broadway Meryl Streep Tony Emmy South Carolina Rhode Island Willie geist Hollywood Joseph Campbell Denzel Bernard Brown Miss Tyson murder Cecily Tyson Meryl Ralph Rhode Island juilliard school
149: Frank Viola ( ReGrace) Shocking Beliefs of The Great Christians

Are You Real

1:01:46 hr | 2 years ago

149: Frank Viola ( ReGrace) Shocking Beliefs of The Great Christians

"Welcome to our you real finding the authentic. You the podcast that focuses on Christians that are active in everyday life. Join in as we speak to everyone from successful business owners to educators to athletes about their faith. And how it helps them reach out and revolutionize those around them to do the same. And now get ready to roar with your host the voice of manifestation John Fuller nation. John Fuller here. I am fired up for you. Don't know this. We are going to be doing very first conference in Texas Sunday, July twenty eight from one pm to Tim pm. Yes, I did say one to ten is going to be Norma Sloan so want to give you the lineup. We're gonna have Christie Austin speaking about kingdom transformation in the community. We have Bob Hassen also retired about people discovering how honor can transform people's lives in their organizations. We're going to have Michael McIntyre. Dallas helping people change mindsets and going to the next level in life. And then yours truly I'm going to be releasing my very first I I said purse action second book and how to speak. God's words over your life and see radical transformation. And then here's the best part. Our friend Sean bowls going to be coming in and wrapping up entire conference. So that being sent I'm going to hand it over to yours, truly Sean taken away, my friend. I can't the best part. All talking about hearing God's voice for your world, especially business leaders onto preneurs. We're gonna talk about hearing God's voice for real Fulvio that to like you have to be often if you're going to that point you have to your God. And so we're gonna talk about when I say in the year old medical swing say. Gods? He wants he he planned frequent all these industries, and all these things are whole city our whole nation way before we ever entered into before manifest out of years and bring a line that is original heart, and what we see. And so we're gonna we're gonna talk about the his heart knowing hard areas heart, and it's going to be. Nations of checking out get on are you real or you can get on event bright, it's is kingdom conference. Get your tickets were running some discounts. You get some Shawn's. E course, you get his book my book, and anyways, it's going to be a phenomenal time. So please get on there. Now, get tickets while you can and have a blessed day. Hey, ROY nation. John Fuller here. I am fired up for today's interview talking with Frank viola on regress excited about this book because it is talking about what I would call like bipolar ISM of Christianity because I think so many times we shun people for their beliefs as far as if they're believe in rapture, don't or how much grace they can have their so many different topics. Christianity, unfortunately, it's divided the body in which is horrific in my opinion of love to see that gap closed. So. Oh, I believe that Frank is doing a fantastic job of bringing that to the light in showing people. What I think is some of the stupidity in Christianity for us even doing that. But anyways that being said, my new friend Frank fire. Are you ready to roar? I'm ready to do whatever you want. Johnny roar. Bark. Here's grunt. You name. It come so Frank. Learn tells a little bit about yourself for some of my people my tribe who don't know who you are. I know you're a bestselling author. You've written a ton of books. Why don't you kinda just talk a thirty thousand foot view of like who you are what you're doing right now. All right. We'll do. Well, when I was young dumb single man at age sixteen. I had a head on collision with Jesus Christ. And it wreck mate, and my heart was hot for the Lord. I wanted to know him and everything about him. So from the ages of sixteen to twenty three I got involved in numerous churches, movements Parrott's organizations. I was probably attending fifty bible studies week that's an exaggeration, but many many bible studies. And when I was twenty three John I experienced a crisis and that Christ. Is best captured in the phrase. There must be more. I had in my heart in my bones. I knew the had to be more to the Lord than what I was being exposed to what I was being taught. I knew that there had to be more to the scriptures of over against what I was being taught. And I knew there had to be more to this thing called search. And I had been around the block in many, different, churches and denominations and so forth. But just this this cry there had to be more. There must be more than this than so that led me on odyssey to find out. What that Moore was? And so Consequently, I started to do some writing these the early days of the internet. They didn't have blogs at the time. I did some writing I started to put pamphlets together sin to France, send them to my friends about the discoveries. I was making and thankfully Christian publisher. A major publishing house discovered me in two thousand eight a published me some of the work. I was doing some the controversial stuff. I was discovering Hinton's than I've published over twenty books all of which to seek to solve problems that Christians face, especially those who know in their hearts, there's gotta be more than this. Then that's exciting. So let's go back to. You think it's fascinating that obviously, I don't think it's fascinating that there was more. I get that. You're that drive. And hey, what is doing? But I think it's fascinating. Hey started making pamphlets in that you're writing about it. So what scored that where you like riding in high school and college like that just kind of naturally came or you just felt compelled to do it. Yeah. This is this is in the years twenty eight twenty three on. And so in my twenties and early thirties. I just started to write my thoughts, and what I was discovering and the problems that I was facing a Christian. And then the solutions I was stumbling into or those at the Lord was giving me. And so I just started to, you know, write these things in and I go to, you know, the print shop and just have make little pamphlets and tracts, and I've sent them out to friends, and then, you know, they're friends started to get a hold of them. And then one person set wanted. She put this in a book. And I I don't know how to write a book, I have no idea. And so I just sort of would stay would staple on these things together and send them out. And then the emergence of the internet was going on at the same time in back, then they didn't have blogs. They just had home-pages. And so I developed a homepage. And I would put my writings on that. And that generated a lot of interest because a lot of the things that I was discovering especially about church, as we know it just raising questions about why do we do this? Why do we do that? It was resonating with a lot of people. Okay. And so a major Christian publishing house found the work that I was doing and then George Barna found what I was writing at the time. He was the most quoted Christian in the world in two thousand eight we released a book together. I did most of the writing he did some of the research called paying in Christianity. Tyndall house published John and it created a firestorm man it. Was vilified. It was venerated. It was hammered inhaled. I we were getting hate mail from all quarters because it was touching lots of sacred cows. We were even getting hate mail from Amish people. You don't you're doing a good job. We're getting bodily threats from from Mennonites. So anyway, but the point is is that really created quite a stir when pigging Christianity came out, but really was raising questions. Like, why do we do we do every Sunday morning in the typical church and where these things come from? And our assessment was they didn't come from the New Testament, they didn't come from Jesus or the apostles they came from other sources. And so that was the beginning John of a whole series of books that raise questions about church as we know it. What was the New Testament church can we recapture the power passion in organic experience of that? And then also I wrote I began writing books about the kingdom of God. And just addressing you know, the Christian life, you know, how to live the Christian life so much of what we're taught at my experience. Anyway, is cliches it doesn't really work. So much of what we're taught you know, what I mean? And so this this quest of there's gotta be more than this is just lead me on this journey, and as I've made discoveries than I've put him in books, you know, and and hopefully helping the Lord's people along the way, so I find it interesting when you talked about pegging Christianity in you talk about getting the hate mail. This is what's funny. So when I interviewed Paul young from the shack, you talk about getting I mean, people love him or hate him or don't care, obviously. But it was interesting to me because I'd never gotten hate mail before. Because mostly my shows about purpose and stuff like that. We don't hit always hit topics that are controversial. But he raised I got hate mail from people who I knew in some I got pages in when I say pages. I mean, like ten twelve pages of people writing about all the things that were wrong with his his theology in his writing in. How dare I even interview him all that stuff? And I thought I thought you're missing the point like where where's the love? Like, I get maybe you don't agree with him. Unlike what what do you have kids? Okay. So if you think about this do all your kids kind of view you a little bit differently. Maybe in maybe even skewed like, I think about my three kids. So I think about that in the body of Christ. None of us are all going to have the exact same viewpoint of God. It's it some is right and some skewed in and I think about how we demonize brothers and sisters in Christ. Because we they see God is a little bit different as far as maybe eleven perspective, and I can't help. But think in this is come into a question. But when people were sitting those emails to you in that stuff like in your mind, what have you seen with these people because they're missing the point of love. Now, I'm not talking about obviously, there's some basic Christie's like we we need to have Jesus in our heart. We have to accept him. I mean, there's some very foundational things. But there's a lot. Things that I think are gray area in people get so hell bent over that they will sit you personally hate mail. What are your thoughts on that? Well, I think it's talks because here's the thing. We do have the orthodox tenants of the faith, right? Jesus christ. He is the son of God. He is God. And man, he is the savior of the world cetera et cetera. He rose again for the bit. But then we have all of these things that are non essentials, and you know, what's what's problematic is that when Christians make non essentials e central's. Yes. And they begin to draw these dividing lines that if you don't agree with my doctrines in my fiance or my politics, right? Yeah. And we're gonna brand you with the h word, you're a heretic and a lot of what I found interestingly enough lease when pay Christianity came out, most of the hate mail came from people who never read the book. That's. Exactly. And so I got one. That's he said something like, you know, well, Frank I haven't read your book yet. But I just want you to know that. I completely disagree with it in your off base in that out. And so I responded in. I said something like is name was Joe. And I said dear Jo thank you for your note. Thank you for your Email. I just want you to know. I did not raise your Email. But I disagree with it. And you know, I was saying the same thing I was making a joke out of it. This is this is one of the things that God's people. I think really need to get a hold up. And that is this many Christians take themselves way too seriously. And when you take yourself too seriously, you become toxic gay Jesus Christ had a sense of humor. All right. And he was God. Okay. And so humid comes from the Lord, and and so many Christians man, it's it's as if they were baptized in pickle, juice, okay? They can't laugh they can't smile, and they take themselves. So seriously that they will just rake a person over the coals without ever questioning. This great statement or this great thought net is every single one of us has changed our views along the way every single one of us knows in part. I'm quoting Paul in. I corinthians. We all know impart. Right. And if I disagree with someone look I disagreed with myself. You know, what I mean, I made the statement that if doctrinal perfection were the standard of fellowship. I would have had this fellowship myself from the kingdom of God thirty five years ago because my views have changed, and if anyone is honest their views have changed as well. We all are in process. And so really what Christians really need to do is learn how to communicate and to do it in a loving way with an open mind. You know, John if I see you say something I disagree with right? I have two choices. You don't wanna can ignore it too. Could write you off as a heretic and block you on Facebook because they didn't like what you wrote. That's that's the modern excommunication for the Christian is blocking people on Facebook. Or or I can ask you questions hedge, John I noticed that you say this. And are you saying such and such just to get clear, if I'm really understanding you and then if I am then I can say, well, how does this belief of yours fit into the scripture? How do you how do you mesh this with this this text here, it seems to contradict it? But I have an open mind. I wanna hear what you have to say. And that benefits both of us because hey, if I can challenge you a to reassess your viewpoint, and you see that maybe you were all I have just helped you in the same way. If you can show me that you have an insight that I don't see clearly or something that I've missed then you're helping me but God's people buying large. Don't. Do that we pull out the swords and we begin chopping off ears. You know what I'm saying? And this is a great. It's a it's a great blight on the witness of Christ. Because of all people we are to love one another even amid our disagreements, and that's what the book re grace is really all about. And it's trying to communicate to the Lord's people that we can be civil and we can be loving in the midst of disagreements no matter what they are. You know, funny. The other I said the other day within the last month of his reading those going through some some just thoughts of things that have been done towards me in some kind of hurts and some stuff it was just kind of processing it through impre where in the Lord. As I really just felt a father impressive on. You know, what does love look like is a brother and sister in Christ. And I thought okay. Well, I need to go to I Corinthians thirteen so I opened up in a read it in love his patient kind keeps no record of wrong. And I start going through all those things in in religious felt father's heart Saint, okay? So if you take every situation in you apply I criteria chapter thirteen to that situation in how you feel towards that person the disagree, whether you've been wrong, maybe you're right? It doesn't matter in. We're called to love in. If I love this person in my being patient, kind in my keeping a record wrong. All that in. Oh my gosh. Frank, you talk about just Jackie up. Now granted I've been been saved for twenty years. I know these things, but sometimes we have to go full circle in the lower. Brought me to that scripture. I thought it was so painful, but yet free. Wean because you know, my job is to love this person. Whether I'm wrong or right in my being patient in my being kind and might being forgiving, all dude. It was like going to the dentist that morning. So anyways that was that was my recent. Thought on that just because I think it applies to what we're talking about is when we disagreed. We're talking about regress when we go back to that scripture. Do I do I love this person? If I'm called to love in my loving this person right now in the majority of the time for myself. I'd say, no, yeah. Well, that's wonderful wonderful story. And I'm going to add something to it. That's to me in that passage it. It says in some of the translations love thinks no evil only. And what that means. In fact, is that we are if we're walking in love for walking Jesus Christ. We're gonna think the best about the intentions of others, especially when it comes to fellow Christians. Right. So it's one thing to judge an action. It's one thing to make an assessment on a belief. It's another thing to impute motive. To a person's heart. Yes, it's it's a totally different thing to judge their intentions and to think the worst of them. And when a person does that. Okay. So for example, is one thing. I can maybe read something you've written. John say, you know, I don't agree with that. It's quite another thing to say, well, John doesn't know the Lord or John is a pri- full person or John wants attention or announce starting to judge motives any. No, this is an interesting thing that I've learned when a person imputes evil motives to the hearts of other people what they're doing is. They are they are revealing what's in their own hearts because because when we judge a motives of another person we are projecting. What's in our hearts onto them? And if the words people can get a hold of this, it will change the way they've you others. So love never thinks evil at always thinks the best. And this is this comes down to Jesus himself said Matthew seven twelve treat others the way you want to be treated on. This hangs all the law in the prophets. Another words all of the scripture all the commands of God are fulfilled in that one statement. And that's really is the act of love is how do I want to be treated if someone disagrees with me while I don't want them, including evil motives to my heart. I don't want them cutting me off without asking me questions. Then that's how to treat other people. When I disagree with them to ask them questions to the best of them. And boy, if lords people did this if we all did this man, the world would look and say, hey, these Christians, even when they degrade by love each other. And they got something we don't have. I've as good, you know, what I was thinking about Franken when you were talking about that is kind of a spiritual dashboard. So when you think about obviously when you sit in your car, there's so many different components in your car. But there are some main things your speed, you know, if you have gas there's a couple fluid deals on there that come on. But at of all the things there's only about five things on your dashboard. Even though there's hundreds of things going on in your motor, right? And I was thinking about when you said things no evil is part of that scripture in you know, it such a it's should be a red engine light for us to win win. Our thought start going that direction to say, this is demonic. This is not from the Lord in. It's okay to have those thoughts because they came in. And you know, the scripture says we have fiery darts that come in. But recognizing it. Hey, these aren't healthy these aren't good. This is this is a red engine light. I need to change my thoughts towards this person in in really good questions. Father. How do you see this person? What is your love towards this person? In start changing our perspectives of people by asking the right questions in recognizing. We got a red engine light on. Yeah. That's great. And even in that passage before Jesus made that statement, treat others the way you wanna be treated this fills along the prophets. He gave the Australian of what it may. Needs to judge someone and you know, he said judge not less you be judge. And then he gave an algae basically saying, you know, you are concerned about the peace of sawdust in your brother's eye when you have a telephone pole sticking in your own. Yes. And and what's interesting about that is that piece of sawdust that we perceive in our brothers. All right bet piece of sawdust came from the log and our own I and this gets back to the projection, whatever we have in our heart. If we start judging intentions, we are projecting within us onto them that piece of sawdust came from the telephone pole in our own eye. And so none of us want our intentions to be judged. None of us want people to impute evil motives to us. Right. So then this gets back to Jesus said treat, others the way you wanna be treated always think the best of their intentions and. And I think this is critical for the Lord's people. Because a lot of what's going on when people cut each other off when they act on graciously to each other when they become belligerent over disagreements is because they're looking beyond the belief to the person's heart in they're making heart, judgments and only Jesus Christ can see the Hart brothers and sisters. I don't know what's in your heart. And you don't know it's in mine. So let's extensive Grayson thank the best. And that's really what walking in love Maine's at the end of the day, treating others. The way we want to be treated, and I think this would solve so many problems in the body of Christ. If we flesh this out. Amen, I agree with that. Okay. So before we jump into regrets. I do wanna ask I wanna back up a little bit on question. So it what point did you realize? Like, hey, I'm an author or a writer. Did you kind of have that moment where you're like, hey, I could make a career out of this. I enjoy. Oy. This in talk a little bit about the process of that for people who are maybe trying to come into or find purpose in their life. Yeah. Well, for me, I can tell you how it works for me break this up into two parts. I guess the first part has to do with a I have written. What I have written. What happens to me is I have a burden to release. I have a passion to get out of me. There is something that I have seen. That's helped me a problem that's been solved in my own life. But I wanna get out of to help others, right? That booed be the intention in. What happens is the pain of keeping it in outweighs the pain of sitting down in writing it out because it's a very it's a very hard process. You know, writing a book is is opening a vein. I mean, it really takes a lot out of you on every level and in. So consequently to keep that message inside of me that pain has now exceeded the the the difficulty it takes to write a book in. So that's when I launched it to get it out of me, the other thing that happens when I write a book is I I look and see if the book had already been written. Okay. So I do research of last year. I wrote a book, and I call it my signature work. It's called insurgents reclaiming the gospel of the kingdom while there have been many many books written on the kingdom of God. But this actually focuses on what Jesus called the gospel of the kingdom. What is that gospel? And so Jon, I looked I searched I did my Amazon study and seen what was out there. I did inter library loan. And I wanted to see if the book that I I wanted to. To read was in existence. And I found that it wasn't. So so I write the book that I wanna read myself, but that doesn't exist is because there's so many books out there. I mean, hundreds and thousands and millions and actually I think there's thirteen million books on Amazon and so many of them though, even in the Christian space. They just repeat what other people have said, you know, what I mean, there's very there are very few books that are new and fresh and take a new perspective or new look at a subject most of its regurgitation of what's already out there. So I write the book that I myself wanna read, but that doesn't exist. So that's part one of of the answer to a question partout, though is how I found out that this is what I'm supposed to do was in the feedback. I was receiving and two things happened when I put out paying Christianity, which really was the first significant book had written. Published? Thanks tindale. And by the way, this is interesting. If you get the book, paying Christianity, boys and girls who are listening you'll find that there is a disclaimer at the beginning written by the publisher. That's. It's never happens. Yeah. They were they were getting so much heat from the people who were doing the editing of the book that they said we have to put a disclaimer on it. And so I don't think you'll ever find that from another publisher. Anyway, I thought it was hilarious. So so, but basically the feedback was this. The hate mail notwithstanding. And by the way, it wasn't that much eight male up, the the emails and the letters that George Barna I received people thanking us for writing even from pastors, okay and seminary professors, far outweighed the negative mail. We got. But here were the two main things that were said number one, you have given me green light permission to feel things that I thought may have been wrong. And now, I'm liberated to feel those things and to realize that may be the Lord was behind those feelings. Okay. Let's good. So it gave them permission to question things that you know, were sacred saying sacrosanct, I can say the word here sacred. Right. It gave him permission to ask questions that they thought were perhaps wrong to ask. Okay. That's number one. Number two. The second thing that I got was. This statement. This book has given me language to articulate things that have been in my heart for years. I just didn't know how to say them. And so what my work tends to do is in gives people in this is just paying Christianity with every other book, I've written it gives people language to articulate what has been in their heart for years. They just didn't know it was was in their hearts. You know, what I mean, it was never identified. And the second thing is it sets the Lord's people free from all sorts of bondage is that has kept them suppressed in various areas. And so there's a liberating a liberating effect that occurs. A lot of it has to do with seeing Jesus Christ in new fresh powerful way in ways that people have not encountered him before. And so that's sort of the thread that runs through a lot of my work. And so John basically seeing the feedback from peers. People early on. I realize hey, you know, I I need to keep doing this. Because what has helped me personally is helping other people? And so that's why I wanna get the message out whenever I encounter a problem and find a solution. That's not just for me it selfish just to keep it to myself. It's unselfish to share it with others. So so that's really that's really the conclusion that made good what what might kind of take away from that. What I like is that? On your journey in your process of discovery of who the father is things you've learning Christianity is you're giving back in when you. Essentially the sacrifice. So as you sacrifice that or give it back. It's allowing other people to discover the father for who he is asked the right questions. Give people permission in stuff in its setting people free than in the process of that. It's almost kind of like you finding your purpose of giving back into the community. Yeah. No. That's what's great way to put it. It's it's it's along the lines of Paul said in Second Corinthians. You know that the comfort that we received from the Lord is designed in the purpose behind it. So that we can comfort others with that same comfort that the Lord is comforted us. So so that's really what it is. And only just say this because I think a lot of people may have misunderstanding or misperception. There is no author on the planet who writes books of to make money because there really is no money in unless your Jolo Steen or Joyce Meyer or Rick Warren or someone of that stature. You're not going to make a lot of money writing books. Okay. The typical book that sells the author is gonna get a well in fits in e book, it'll be a lot less than this. But if it's a paperback or hardback about a dollar a book, that's not a whole lot of money and a lot of books. Yeah. That's why that's why there's a phrase starving author, and it is true. So you know, I supplement my income doing other things we talked about this speaking affair. Yeah. Well, for me, mainly of my my main income comes from teaching other people how to write books than how to get published and it had promote their books in ways that they hit where they can hit a bestseller list. I have every year do a training called scribe. And it's to train Spiring authors. Had a right book from eighty Z Hotta get published and how to promote it ineffective ways, you know, given all my experience so forth. So that that's how I make my income mainly is through trainings like that. But not writing books writing books that's more of a service, you know, to the body of Christ into others than than incomes stream ally. Okay. This is really good that you said that. So I just think about it from this perspective is so sometimes our gift what we're called to. Due giving back innocence like for you being an author. It helps people project them on a different level. As far as perspective. It's challenging we could say maybe that is part of your purpose in life K. Yes. But but a lot of times people think that our purpose has to provide a hundred percent of our income or that is if it's not producing income or we can't make a living at it. Then we're not living in our purpose. And I like that you said that because what you said is you supplement your income made me think Paul making tents is you're helping people right and doing it is you know, is another income. But really it could be what you're called to do is to help people set their minds free of discovering the father in different ways. But you make your income somewhere else it, and I think he'd really good that you said that because a lot of people don't realize that like even Paul men he wrote a most. The majority of the New Testament. Wrote it it means just a father of our part of our face in yet. He made an income sewing tents. Perfect example perfect apple so I think it's okay. So let's jump into regress. I got a couple of questions as fun. Why don't you talk about a little bit? Why you wrote regress? Well, I'll tell you the story is interesting. Basically for years, I have been on social media. And I have noticed that. It's it's viper pit John. Facebook, especially I've watched Christian slaughter each other on Facebook, watch them block one another somebody writes a post on their Facebook feed where they're weighing into some theological issue or political issue in all of a sudden other Christians their Facebook, friends, quote, unquote, are hyper ventilating and roasting them over a slow spin just because they disagree. And I just watched the carnage vitriol gets worse and worse every year. You know, we know the world Channa gray on anything. But christians. I mean, really we have to treat each other in such belligerent ways. Where is where is civility aware is loving each other amid our disagreements where's the art of on asking questions instead of jumping to conclusions in impeding, evil, motives and all. All that. So this has been stewing in me for a long time. And I've really noticed that God's people. So many of us would don't know how to have conversation without getting uptight or hostile especially when we disagree with something. Right. So during this time, I wrote an article about Martin Luther, and I was just highlighting some of Martin Luther Luther beliefs that a lot of Christians are aware of. And by the way, I love Martin Luther. I think he was a great man of God. But he held us some views at were a really shocking and scientists article on my blog, Frank viola dot org and all people Rick Warren founded, and he wrote me privately, and he said Frank he said, you know, I get a lot of hate mail. I have rumors about me aren't true. An I know this to be a fact there's there's rumors on Rick Warren that. The Walking Dead seem real folks. But they're not true. Okay. And so so he said, I think you should write a series of articles on your blog about the shocking beliefs of the great Christians, and the reason for it would be that Christians would see that all the great Christians shape. The Joel faith all the great Christians of proceeded us all the people who we deem as heroes. Whether it's Billy Graham, ceus Louis, Charles Spurgeon, John Calvin etcetera, all of them did not see things perfectly that despite the great contributions. They gave to the church despite the fact that God used them. They still had blind spots. They didn't get everything. Right. And and Rick Rick said, the hope would be that this series would calm Christians down when they disagree with each other. They wouldn't be so quick to cut one another all. Off. And and so I thought the idea was brilliant. Okay. And folks, whether you like Rick Warren or not, you know, he didn't write the book. Okay. He gave me the idea. And so I give him credit for that. Or or you can blame him or you can thank depending on what you think. But I wrote a series. It went viral. You know, people were really helped by people were challenged by it, and it's fascinating to and another thing. I did is. Well, we talked about humor earlier, and how Jesus was humorous yet. Humorous side to him. I made it really funny. Okay. So people laughed while they were reading it. And and so the series was out for a number of years. And then I thought you know, what it'd be better to put this in a book. So it can be widely distributed in I can expand it and give people some practical handles on how to disagree in a civil Christ like Christ honoring way, how do you actually do that? And so that's that's the origin of regress, and as you know. Oh from reading it has a lot of humor in it. So it's it's not just a stale. You know, one of my critiques of historical books is. And I love history. I read history quite a bit. But history books are tend to be very dry. Okay. That's the first thing. The other thing is there like aunt nine is not nightgown. They cover everything, but touch nothing. In other words, there's no practical edge to you know, there's no practical handles. And so what I wanted to do is make this a fundraiser a pepper it with humor. And also, I give a lot of practical handles and practical exercises to how we can disagree in in in agreeable ways in Christ honoring ways, hopefully will make a dent in the problem. So so, yeah, that's the origin. The book. Let's talk about some of them. I found it fascinating had definitely some fun. Reading about some of these will go into Spurgeon who I liked. That's obviously caught my attention. I just you know, when I read these guys I cannot get over how many one being Spurgeon how many sermons in books just stuff. These men wrote like, it is just mind boggling when you think about them out of people they reached like, even if you or I reached is many people is they did on social social media K. We would be considered quote, unquote, influencers or we'd be a whatever you wanna call big name. Whatever k- these guys didn't even have social media. We're talking way back in the what eighteen hunt late eighteen hundreds. Yeah. I mean, the thought of the amount of people they reached. Astronomical. It'd be like he acquitted. I was thinking of unit reaching a billion people today on social media. It is it defies logic. Because you would think with technology, you know, we would have the upper hand. But man, some of these men the the only thing I can attribute it to it really was divine. Yes, it really was divided Spurgeon. And just just talk about his voice. I mean, it is reported that his voice was so powerful he could preach to an audience of over twenty thousand people and be heard without the aid of a microphone. So and and Wesley and Whitfield in so many of these these giant. Yeah. So I try to in a very beginning of chapters. You know, I try to talk about the standing impact these men had and the great exploits they did for the Lord and how God used them because that's really the point point is not to degrade them or put them down to show that the spite they had these line spots or the shocking beliefs especially for their time God used them. And so if he used them despite their imperfections, right? Yeah. None of them had immaculate perception are right. Well, neither do we. And neither does anybody. Who's writing books today or doing Twitter or Facebook? You know, we all see things through glass darkly were all growing. Let's cut each other some slack because even the greats didn't see everything perfectly. So I'm gonna hit a couple. These thought were fun. We can talk about them as we wrap up the show. But I thought this was fun. Okay. So one that I highlighted that. You put Spurgeon was never ordained in didn't believe that ordination was important. He was also against the use of honorific titles yet now that was shocking in his day. And that would be shocking to many modern Christians. I actually agree with him on this. I do. That's why highlighted I thought it was great because I thought the way we put people on a pedestal. I think is absolutely just stupid with lack of a better word. But it is. I think. Yeah. Well, you know, it's let's put it this way. It's not biblical n I think Spurgeon was right on this. You know, Jesus said he said, very clearly. Do not call any man father. Do not call any man teacher. Do not call. You know, he was talking about honoring titles. You know? You'll only have one father and you only have one teacher. Right. Well, today, you know, there are men that would give their arm. Okay. Just to have a title just to be called apostle or profit or pastor or Reverend and you never see any titles being used in the first century read, the New Testament, Paul never called himself, the apostle Paul. He would save Paul sent one. All right. Apostle ascent one. That's the actual meaning of the word. Not the apostle Paul. The apostle Paul is title. There were shepherds in the first century, but they were never called. You know, pastor Joe or pastor, Tom or Reverend the great Reverend the. Bishop Reverend oppa Stolac et cetera et cetera. And so these titles that are so common today in that people would give their teeth for are not only on biblical, but Spurgeon, you know, just railed against it. He just railed against it. And I have quotes from all of these writers when we talk about their shocking beliefs. But now that's one I actually agree with, but a lot of Christians, raise their eyebrows at this and even people who, you know, applaud Spurgeon and view him as a hero. They have trouble with what he said about this. And then of course, the one that I always find the funny is he smoked cigars. God. Yes. That was. Yeah. And he was he was actually cut to ribbons by the Christians of his day even newspapers, right? The modern Facebook because he smokes garden believe that smoking cigars was. Okay. And it's reported I I don't have a cold for this one. But it's reported that someone said so you believe that you can smoke cigars to the glory of God, which he did say in any said, yes as long as they're in moderation in. So the person said, well, what's what's moderation? When it comes to cigar smoking in he's alleged to have said smoking three cigars at once would be immoderate. I just find obviously, he's being in tech Nuys ING humor. I mean that would really just make some people angry. But I'm like, you know, the thing that I have friends I personally don't drink out of conviction. But I have a lot of friends that do I could care less. But I always think about scripture when in this is a hot topic for people, obviously when you even bring it up, and I always think about when in the scripture talks about the keenum of heaven is not about eating or drinking. And and you talk about when Spurgeon said within moderation everybody has a personal conviction, you need to walk that out with the Lord, and you need to not worry about putting it on other people if that means having a beer or not having a beer smoking a cigar or not smoking a cigar when you get so hellbent on persecuting people in ripping them to shreds because they did or didn't do something. You have a loved problem. Oh, absolutely. And also there's there's a bit of hypocrisy there too. You know, one man said Christians get very angry at other Christians who sinned differently than they do. I like that one. Yeah. And that's in the book too. I got a lot of wonderful quotes by people along this line. There's another story I can't find documentation for it. So I don't know if it actually happened. But there's a story between a moody deal moody, Charles Spurgeon, and it goes like this one on one occasion. Charles Spurgeon had deal moody, preach in his church and so- deal moody, knowing that Spurgeon was a cigar smoker during his sermon began to rail against tobacco. So he's he's just skewering tobacco in the evils of tobacco. And when it was over Spurgeon approached the podium, and he he thanked moody. Thank you for your sermon. And by the way, Mr. moody Spurgeon allegedly said this I will put down my cigars when you put down your fork 'cause money was a heavy overweight. Yes. That was good. But it makes the point right? Oh, that is hilarious. Mad props to him for saying that. That's okay. So let's jump into moody real quick. I like moody that was fun. Okay. So one thing that two things that caught my attention that I did not know said he was very poorly educated, which I thought was interesting because he made such a massive impact shows with can do in the other thing that I thought was interesting as well is an I'm just gonna. Read a quote from your book, a comment that he made this a great many people say, I don't preach on the tears of religion in. He says I don't want to don't want to scare men into the kingdom of God in. He was talking about the criticism that he got for not preaching on. Hell. Yes, that's right, while he believe in hell, but he didn't preach on it much, all and, you know, lots of lots of Christians would have apoplexy over that, you know, because you got to preach on hell, but moody, you know, he didn't. And that was something he got skewered for. He also was I don't know if you're gonna talk about this second thing, but he also was. Blacklisted and not even invited to many conferences because he had a friend. Drawn was his name. He had a friend who believes in Evelyn. Okay. And this was a Christian man who believed in thea, stick Aleutian, which by the way, CS Lewis did as well something folks don't know that. But you know, moody believed that this guy had Henry from it was one of the most Christ like men he ever met, and yet he believed in evolution, and and because of his friendship with this, man. And because he let this man speak at some his conferences, you know, he was horribly treated by Christians. He was crucified basically because of his association, and this is another problem that we have you just said it to me not long ago. I think during our conversation that you invited a gentleman who many of your readers disagreed with. And so they skewered you because of it. Well, that's guilt by association, you know? Hey. Look last time. I checked Jesus hung out with prostitutes. He hung out with tax collectors he hung out with riff. Raff knows faking that make Jesus pimp. I've never even thought about that. So Jesus hang out with prostitutes. Is that make him a pin that Ripley raise some feathers? But that's yeah. Exactly. That's the point is it's just stupid. Yeah. It is. And you know, moody didn't agree with volition? He didn't believe in volition. But he had a friend who did. So what goodness me if you are going to only associate with people who believe in your doctrines right down the line. You know, I don't know how many people you're going to be able to hang out with you know, what I'm saying. Because all of us disagree on something. If we talk through it enough, and we get to know each other well enough. And so that's really what this book is about. I mean, it calls out some of the hypocritical things that we do is believers. It's it's a call for civility in it. Does it in sort of a unique way by showing how the heroes didn't get everything? Right. And yes, I do talk about heresy in the book. And I do talk about false teachers, and the, you know, one of the problems, John is I guess there. There are false teachers. Okay. But false teachers are people who don't know the Lord. Yeah. I mean, they're not according to the. Testament. If if there's a false teacher, this is a pretender there's no evidence at their Christian at all and their motives are evil. You know, these are these are evil wicked people in his one of the great marks of a false teacher lot of Christians don't know this. But if you study your New Testament, you'll find out that this is true one of the marks of a false teacher is that they attack the true servants of God. All the false teachers in the first century attacked Paul tortoises and slandered him now that really should turn the pyramid upside down because if you see somebody attacking other, Christians and other servants of Lord, that's one of the Marquesa would have false teacher does. But I get into it. More in the book in a also in some other interviews, I've done swelled go deeper, but anyway. I just thought of a really fun idea. We should we should put on a conference was all the bipolar like the total opposite people beliefs and stuff bring in different speakers. And just bring all on one day on see what kind of turn out we get that would be really fun because it would really it. Really twist some ridge religious beliefs. I think that would be hilarious. While my only response of that is. Satan will be hosting the icecapades in hell before that actually happens. Meaning that mini that most people would not be willing to commit suicide that bridge, but but I actually would love that idea. I think that would be phenomenal idea. And and you know, I think God's people would learn a lot. It's just getting those people in the room together to to be willing to do that. That would be the trick. But hey, John, you do you. I am actually up for you really got my brain thinking. Okay. So we're going to in the show on this. And this is well, you get parting thoughts as we leave. But out of your book, there's one last thing that I found fascinating that really resonated with me was Billy Graham reading from your book. This this quote was made in nineteen sixty five. So we're talking what forty fifty fifty nine years ago. Okay. He says multitudes of Christians within the church are moving toward the point where they may reject the institution that we call the church, they're beginning to turn to more simplified forms of worship. They are hungry for personal in vital experience would uses Christ. And they want the heartwarming personal face unless the church quickly recovers its authority of biblical message. We may witness the spectacular of millions of Christians going outside the institutional church to find spiritual food. Dude that was awesome in that was fifty nine years ago. I know it I know it, and you know, I wish I had seen that quote when I wrote pig Christianity 'cause I would put that in the very beginning. Because that's really the summarizing statement of what that book is in the up reimagining church and the other books in the series because we're living in that time right now. Yes. And yet he foresaw that so many years ago that was a prophetic word. No question. You know, he didn't label it with prophecy. He didn't announce didn't say the safe Lord. But that was prophetic word, and it's come to pass. And. Yeah, that's there's a lot of gems like that in the book, and by the way, just so your listeners will know they can download five free chapters. If they go to re grace dot info, regress dot info. And there's an interview there as well. And you know, they can just get a good taste of. Book for free. You know? So they might enjoy that as well. And again, you know, you gotta have a sense of humor to get through this. Because there's a lot of Zola comedy in it as well. I love it. Okay. Frank. Why don't you tell our readers our readers, our listener CI? You're definitely not reading this. That was awesome looking thing readers. I love it when I do stuff like that. Can you tell our listeners how to find you how to get a hold of you if they wanna check out your books? Heavy speaker anything like that. Yeah. One website, real simple. Frank, viola dot ORG all one word Frank viola dot ORG, Franklin dot org, and they'll see that that's blog. We have an Email list. I send out an article challenging article every Thursday than get on that. There's also podcast. We just released called the insurgents podcast all about the gospel of the kingdom and have partners on it conversation partners on it. And we talk about the gospel. The kingdom that earthshaking message that shook the first century that's being restored today. So people may enjoy that and everything else anything else that the YouTube channel sorts of stuff on the blog. They're the books and so forth. Yeah. So that's it. Okay. I almost forgot to ask you this question. I always skip questions. But I never skip this one. Almost did it. I was I couldn't believe I did it k- Frank. If you could go back to the younger, you can't change anything. But you're going to give the younger you it. Vice what wisdom would you tell yourself in it what age? Thirty seven years old. I would say I would say Frank the thirty seven year old version start a blog right now and start a podcast right now. And the reason for that is because blogs podcasts were just starting to get noticed. This was the early years of blocks podcasts in regrettably, I waited until I was forty four to start both of seven years later, you know, and. So the lesson there though, John is when it comes to getting your message out, if you have something to say share with others, you wanna be there from the beginning if you can. And so, you know, I'm I have my ear to the ground. I have my hand on the pulse. The next thing that comes out in terms of getting a message out in. I wanna be there from the beginning. And and I think this applies to so many other things the beginning of new church beginning new work, you wanna be there from the beginning if you can. And so that's that's the advice. I would give to my younger self. Okay. Will you give yourself advice as we part from the show? What a last piece of advice, would you give the audience? Well, I think it would be this Jim Rohn said you are the average of the five people you spend the most time with and I believe that means you're the average of those five people spiritually intellectually financially in every single way. You're the average of the five people you spend the most time with I will just adjust it a little bit. I believe that all of those people they don't necessarily have to be alive. So if one of those five people say, for example to see us Lewis in you, a Mercer yourself in everything see us Louis his written read biographies of him. You'll listen to him on audio read every piece of writing he's done then he would be one of those five people. And so I would just say to every person listening by now probably that's John at this point. Maybe two people out there listening to us. I think I heard a lot of iphones turnoff as we. About Christianity and so forth. But a Steph who those five people are right now in your life in just as needed because you will be the average of those five people that you spend the most with putting great advice are frankly wrap up the show where nation thank you guys for tuning in a love his advice, especially partying advice in. That was the question. I wrote down in my journal right now who is your five just wrote that to myself and my question to you is who is your five because I think the advice frankness gave is absolutely just so important because if you don't recognize that you could be leading yourself accidentally down the wrong road, so pay attention year five that being said, please check out the book regress, a really enjoyed it myself highly recommended in also insurgents in the other books at springs written so go find them by them. Download him do whatever just get your. Hands on himself that being said, we're nation, please rate and review and itunes and helps us a lot get our word message out there. And also if you guys would there's a share button when you're listening to a podcast, if you would share it with a friend, maybe two or three people that you think could hear this message that would help them, please. Do bless somebody with that. We love you guys. Remember be real via thick it'd be you. God bless that's all for this episode of argue real finding the authentic. You be sure to go to argue real dot org for your free questionnaire to identify your gifts and talents and how you can use them to help people become leaders and catapult them into their destiny to help others. Become the leaders of tomorrow. We appreciate you spending your time with us and look forward to helping you reach out and revolutionizing next time on argue real finding authentic.

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Viola Davis Pays Tribute To Her Ma Raineys Black Bottom Costar, Chadwick Boseman

Direct from Hollywood

02:23 min | 6 months ago

Viola Davis Pays Tribute To Her Ma Raineys Black Bottom Costar, Chadwick Boseman

"The radio on your dashes. More than radio that sirius xm button is instant access to a world of exclusive entertainment including ad free music channels for every genre and decade. You can also hear your favorite sports comedy and news. Plus you can stream with the sirius. Xm app on your phone connected home devices. So grab your phone. Dial pound two five zero and just say sirius. Xm to get twelve months for five dollars a month with a new select subscription call for offer details fees and taxes apply. We're all shopping for essentials online these days and now you can get rewarded for it with the bank of america cash rewards credit card. You can choose to earn three percent. Cashback on online shopping essentials. The essentials have never felt more rewarding visit bank of america dot com slash more rewarding to apply now copyright twenty twenty bank of america corporation with ryan seacrest bittersweet. The late great chadwick. Boseman has earned arguably the best reviews of his career from his final film marines. Black bottom for performance. His coast viola davis describes as an absolute pleasure to witnessed firsthand but simply getting to spend time with chadwick himself was even greater privilege. He tells in style quote he was a beautiful man and a great artist. He was someone who had a quality that very few today whether you're young or old which is a total commitment to the art form of acting regardless of ego regardless of any of it he was with the same agent he had when he started his career. My range black. Bottom is on netflix. Now that's direct from hollywood. This holiday season pepsi co. is partnering with toys for touch to give a gift with everybody. With every purchase of specially marked pepsi mountain dew and sierra mist two liter bottles pepsi cola will donate ten cents to toys for tots so head on over to your local giant and give the gift of giving happy holidays from pepsi. This holiday season pepsico is partnering with toys for touch to give a gift with every bottle. With every purchase have specially marked pepsi mountain dew and sierra mist two liter bottles pepsi cola will donate ten cents toys for so head on over to your local food city and give the gift of giving happy holidays from pepsi.

bank of america twenty twenty bank of america Boseman chadwick Xm pepsi ryan seacrest viola davis pepsi cola netflix hollywood pepsico
Friday, Dec. 18: Viola Davis, Darlene Love

The View

38:05 min | 6 months ago

Friday, Dec. 18: Viola Davis, Darlene Love

"Subscribe to our podcast to get hot topics delivered every afternoon and while you're at it rate us in labor review yet ready for festive friday hot topics on a very merry view twenty twenty vision when the co host and all of us look back at everything that happened this year. Will we see it as time lost or did regain some new perspective love oscar winner viola davis on the oscar buzz over her incredible transformation in. Ma rainey's black bottom and sharing the screen one last time with the beloved chadwick boseman. The co host are unwrapping their favorite things for last minute holiday gifts. That are under fifty bucks and delhi love continues of view holiday tradition by performing her christmas classic. Right here here. Come hot topics. On a very merry view with whoopie sarah joy behar sunny hostile meghan mccain and ana navarro now. Let's get things started. Hello hello welcome to a very merry view. We're approaching the new year and twenty twenty has given us a lot to think about so a post on refinery. Twenty nine suggests that you don't see as lost year but as time when you gain some new insight on live along with insight on how much gained on your backstop now. What can you say about that joy. Can you think about and site that you gained insight. Said what are you doing inside. Really can't hear anything off gangs near win site at all and zero. But i do have a lot of things. I do inside and i think that people who are like inside people like me. I'm not having that much trouble as people who are outside people. I don't go spelunky sing. I don't play tennis jog. I don't i don't skate. I don't i skate. I don't do any of those things i read. I watch tv. And i talk. 'cause that's it so as far as inside is concerned that's why but not sites that explains why you and i have growth on both our hips and sarah just not. You chose to answer the question. She wasn't asked that mu sarah the ability to do that justice man and then kept on going debater. Okay so i'll go with insight because it was the original question asked but rave that there's been a lot gain this year has been such a hard year. And i think of the fact that i also started cooking things. I said i'd do forever. I always said. I wanted to be more present and then i was very present with a bunch of kids at home. I think it gave us all joking aside some really important reminders of what matters most so i now cook. I'm like you know a big deal. So there's that and then. I think that's pretty much it. We don't go outside either joy. We stay inside. But i would say there's been a lot of insight. There's been a lot of life wisdom. There's been a lot of reminding us of our resilience and what we can overcome. I'm still preaching here. i go. I'm done i'm done okay. Good hey anna you can answer either question inside or incite honest to goodness. I forgot what the question was. But i haven't had time for naval gazing and thinking about insights. I've had a tough year. And you know there's been a lot of health challenges in my family so i don't even want to jinx by talking about it this week because there still two weeks to go. I'm just glad that i'm alive. That my close loved ones are alive. That were still briefing. Because there's a lot of people who can't say that at the end of this year and as far as insight. I think i was nervous about spending twenty four seven inside the house with my dog and my husband. The dog is okay. I knew that was going to be fine but remember i. I usually travel for five days a week. I was like hell. What is this fresh. Hell going to be like and it's been okay. It's been fine. Were still happy. We're still in love. We haven't killed each other or had any thoughts of smothering each other with pillows or anything like that you know so so. That's my insight. I can live without for a year without killing sunny. You know. I like to look at life as a you know glass half full type of person as you all know and for me. It's been a year full of gains trying not to think about the losses but it's been a year full of gains. I spent more time with my kids. That i've been able to spend with them and i love the people that they've become and i'm looking forward to the future and seeing You know just what they do with their lives. And i've spent so much more time with my husband. My parents both of my parents live with me. Now is such a blessing for my kids to be able to be with them. And i'm also by the way building new chicken coop and i'm having a really good time with that the chicken coop will also be kind of like a barn. And i'm gonna get geese and i'm going to get goats. Don't tell manny. I'm going to get a rabbit for paloma. I'm going to have a really good time and so i've spent a lot of time doing that. That's that the board. I'll have like forty chickens if you'll start turning your own butter. I like disowning you. That's the reason we limit here. Here's here's my perspective. On the year someone put this on tiktok and it went viral. And this is me all the way around please. Would you show this clip so many cute outfits blamed for this year that i couldn't wear so i just wanted to show you say this i love it. I couldn't wear it. No it can wear on their geese and all that good and wear. It couldn't wear it houston but is that you know something when i heard that dog. I thought that dog sounds like me. Where have i heard this dog for now. yes you all. Don't sound in the same. That's what we'll be right back. No matter which fears you celebrate. We hope your holiday season is a safe one. Happy holidays and happy new year from the ladies and don't forget to take a little time to enjoy the view on. Abc still ahead oscar winner. Biolo- davis the host favorite things for the holidays under fifty bucks and arlene love. Performs or christmas classic. Welcome back you know. I just feel like. I need to show y'all what i'm carrying. Can you just pull back so you can see. Can you see the baby and him. Just when i more surprising. That's right if you ever hear those words coming out of my mouth again. It means the sun is going out. i read. That's what i'm telling you how about this. Every year. a lot of people go holiday shopping in their own closets and find stuff they can. We give to people. Where do you stand on re gift. Sarah i think i'm alone in this category but i believe in re gifting. I do not shop in my closet for stuff. But when i get something beautiful like maybe a candle and i know that i'll never get around to burning the ones i already have out. I'm like oh. I'm going to set this aside. This could be a beautiful gift for someone. So i don't like scrape around to find it but when i find i get nice things that i may never be able to put to good use. I love giving them to someone else right. We're about you hannah. You know. I give out stuff that You know that. I get center that i'm not going to use. Give it away on instagram to viewers like later today. I'm going to be giving this away. Okay 'cause i don't plan to wear this again. But i i actually don't re gift. What i i do use reuse the gift bags that people give you. Those gift bags are so pretty. Sometimes but i forget to take the tags off and so then you know as very very confusing because sometimes i've given the same gift to somebody who gave it to me to begin with so if you're gonna use the same gift bag remember all the tag off. That's all my that's all i say. What about you sunny see sarah. You may be surprised at this. But i'm with you. I love a good regifter. I love a good re- gift. And i do it all through the year. I don't just do it for like christmas. I just don't believe here. Because like i get so many things sent to me and some of them are so beautiful and like you. I'm never going to really be able to use all of it so it makes me feel greedy that i have all this stuff. So there's my friends will tell you. I'm like hey i just got this really great thing which you like it and it just. I don't know it kind of makes me feel good because there's just so much waste in the world and just it's like a good thing to be gift who cares. I've never seen you give. We'll give away any of the wine. You'll get sick girl way how that talking to you talking to make. Are you talking talking to you doing okay. I agree with everything they do. Like re gifting. It's fine see this sweater the sweater this was given to me by barbara after she worked for ten years. Okay so this was the that i got and i still look at our dishes. Okay so that's number one. So here's the other thing if you're going to give a gift make sure that your initials are not on it. Because i have seen. This tragedy happened a few times. Smeller gives a gift to sue. Solomon and the initials are am okay. That's gift number. Three i do i do. A party called the white elephant party where people bring hideous items that they have received from people and play to get to get rid of those. I bring like a ravaged dumped to my house and we play a game about it. The right elephant party. So that's a good thing for regan this topic. I could just go on and on and on with this. It's so fascinating lot. We'll be right back. oscar winner. Viola davis talks about reuniting with chocolate. Close men in his final onscreen role in one of the most inspiring movies of the season. Next welcome back. Viola davis ask a winner transforms herself to play the title role in the new movie. My rainey's black bottom a legendary musical pioneer who made sure you heard of weiss onstage and off take a look we just figured who's this we. We come talking researcher who we mean. We decided to decide how. I'm just a bump on a log. I'm just gonna go whichever way to river at and decided no. We just got a good sense. No no music. I don't know what good song is eight. You know more about my fans and i. It's not that ma. It's more of what the people want. And you can go up that you could tell stirred of it to what you all say. Don't count on me on the stand molitor all while. Listen to the voice inside her. That's what comes with mom. Please welcome back the fabulous viola davis good morning. Viola davis. Welcome back should view. And congratulations on ma. First question so so vile you're surrounded by fans here. We're celebrating our holiday show today and right around now. People are starting to make all kinds of resolutions. So i'm wondering how are you reflecting back on this past year. Would you take any of that with you into the new year. you know. My life has gotten very simple in terms of revelations and resolutions. I'm just happy to have love in my life from happy to be healthy and breath in my lungs just known too. Many people that have lost loved ones during this time. The don't have food on the table. They can't pay their rent. I mean i all. I'm telling you i've gotten back to the absolute basics in line. I keep thinking about what denzel always says to me is that there's no u-haul in the back of a hearse and i think about that as i'm walking around my house looking at my husband. My new puppy. I'm back to the basics. That's when i'm like that does no you hall behind a hearst. That's really a good. I like that you know viola. You've spoken openly about growing up in poverty. I've spoken about growing up in public housing. i think it's really important to tell our truths. This time of year can be particularly difficult for people. How does your experience growing up influence. The way you approach the holidays. Now while it's hard to not think of people who don't have anything. And i think that that's really hard for americans to grasp the idea that you can possibly not have a roof over your head that you possibly could have no food that you possibly could have no hot water that you possible. I mean listen. It's like it's like. I told people i know what it means to have. Nothing and you know. I think that people have an idea that because it's america that those things are probably relegated to third world countries. But it's not and i'm living proof living we want to talk about this amazing new film. You're in you're playing the iconic ma rainey in marinas black bottom on netflix adapted from august. Wilson's play now mocked came up in the nineteen twenties and was known as the mother of the blues and she was quite the formidable woman especially given the time period. What was your connection to her and her story. You know people keep asking me that my connection to her my connection to her first of all. We're both black. But my connection to her really is she represents all the women in my life. I listen my husband's mom. My husband's grandmother my mother their people. These are women who knew their worth then women who walked into room and owned it. It's only sort of through this sort of filtered down idea of who we are you get you know the woman who has head down in nineteen twenty seven. It's jim crow so she doesn't know her words because no black person knew that worth but when you look within the black community i knew a lot of marei needs my aunt. Joyce was an amal rainy. She probably was three hundred. Pounds wore the latest fashion. She was very sexual. You could not tell them what to do. She absolutely owned it whenever she was in the room. And guess what we thought she was the most beautiful woman ever so those of the women i do on the women in my life the black woman that i knew i watched the movie last night. I loved it so much. I want it to be nominated for everything i want. Chad nominated you nominated the costume department nominated i want. The fat suit nominated everything. It needs to be nominate. But listen ma to your point knows her worth and she makes sure everybody else knows it. Too man that tantrum over drinking the soda and you have said that pay equity is something women especially women of color have been fighting for forever. You spoke about a beautifully in an interview that went viral this summer. Are you able to do more that more easily. Now at this point in your career. And what's what's your advice for the people who are starting out. Well that's a lot. But i will say this it is still a lot of inequities with pay with like women. White women this biz inequities but regina king. I think said something very interesting that i really loved. She said she's learning how to harness whatever power she has right now and that's the that's the key that you have to. It's you know it's like shonda rhimes said when she won the norman lear award she said. I deserved this award. Because when i walked in the room. I expect to get what i'm worth. She'll ask for it. She says. I asked for it. And that's the key. I think that that's that's the ship that's happening. You have a number of addresses of color. Who is saying. We're not waiting anymore. We're gonna ask for it. You know and listen. Then you have the choice in the option. If you don't get it then you're in the position right now. You can actually walk away via la. This has been a sad year for a lot of people. And one of the saddest thing things is the is the The death of bozeman. And he he gives a of a powerful performance alongside you in this film which would turn out to be his last unfortunately The two of you were also in get on up together and had been friends for many years. I understand so tell us is there. Is there a memory that stands out for you when you think about him now. One memory is you know whenever we were at events and it's really difficult for actors to sort of connect with each other because we're all on different schedules. You know but when we were ever when we were at events as i mean there would be hundreds of people there he would never leave me and my husband's side no matter what there would be people coming. Especially after the black panther there would be a line of people he'd never leftovers especially my husband and it was sort of by think. Maternal paternal thing a connection. He felt with us. I mean i have lots of memory. He was a very deep soul. I mean there's not enough words to describe that it was amazing and he's amazing in this and you know you're absolutely right. Once women find their voice particularly women of color. Because we're told we shouldn't be asking for things but you know i walk into say this what i want and then they have to deal with it. So this is this is part of re assessing our power. So i'm thrilled to see you continuing that and to see you talking about how to make ourselves in a better position and this new do. My rain is wonderful. You are spectacular. So you know we love when you come so come as often as you want to. Then we'll say my my race black bottom begin streaming on netflix december. Eighteenth and we'll be right back. Hug that baby for me. The co hosts are last minute gift game by wrapping their favorite things for under fifty bucks nags. Staying informed. never been more important. Get information is coming at us faster than ever. So how do you make sensible start here. Hey i'm brad milkey from abc news. In every weekday we will break down the latest headlines in just twenty minutes straightforward reporting dynamic interviews and analysis from experts. You can trust always credible always solid start here from abc news twenty minutes every weekday on your smart speaker or your favorite podcast app. Well it is seven days till christmas and we have all earned some happy holidays year so if there are still names to check off your list and your budgets giving fan. We've got you covered with great gift. Ideas under fifty bucks heard me under fifty bucks. Why don't we start with you and this first gift is one of my favorite cookbooks. I keep it on my kitchen counter all day. It's called memories of cuban kitchen. it's less than twenty five dollars. It's available at books dot com or amazon. It features authentic cuban recipes with amid spanish african chinese portuguese cuisine. What i like about it is that it is very accessible. Some cookbooks are really fancy. Some cookbooks have ingredients. You can't get this. Cookbook is accessible easy to make recipes. Also i love peace. This pandemic has definitely stopped many of us from going to the hair salon and this next gift for prevent any future bad hair days. If you recall at the beginning of this pandemic i was wearing hair turbans every day on air because my own hair was a hot mess. I love this. I love these. I love these. You can get seventeen and one pack for under twenty eight dollars from amazon you get a variety of colors pinks. There's lavender look here. We go from christmas green red green all sunny. That's it for me your turn well if anyone follows me on instagram. You know how much. I love this first gift. Since the pandemic started there have been plenty of family game nights happening at the house in house in particular. We love to play monopoly. Bats gabriel's favourite clue my favorite and pictionary palomas favorite. They range from about ten to twenty bucks. Game night definitely brings the family together. What has been incredibly special to me. Is that so many of you have taken the time to read my memoir. I m b shoots and have reached out to tell me how my story made a difference in your lives. Thank you so much for reaching out. And i'm humbled that it has also been chosen as one of barnes and noble's best biographies twenty twenty. It's less than thirty dollars. And i tell people to order it from q. And willow dot com. Which is co owned latin x bookstore. Right here in new york. We need to support small businesses. Sarah what are your picks as the mom of three little kids. I'm always looking for great products and pickle. Lena is one. I love now remember. These are small businesses their clothing line available at pick alina kids dot com the start at twenty eight dollars. They are dedicated to empower little girls and they feature trail-blazing collection with the likes of rpg. Malala maya angelou rosa parks they also feature great female. Athletes like billie jean king. Lisa leslie and wilma. Rudolph and i must say that i. I have nothing against a unicorn but to be able to address our little girls and things that they can really aspire to be like an added bonus for me they just added a black lives matter collection. Our kids are never too young to be inspired and this next company is run by a team of moms. We love the moms bella. Tuna has a great collection of bibs plates spoons. T-there's they're available at villa tuna dot com and the start at six dollars and ninety nine cents. Their items have hilarious. Things like peas. Don't kill my vibe mackin. Say cheese fries before guys. I mean true were words who runs the world girls sheets for weeks. Peace love tacos and the future is equal now. This is one of the best parts. They also partner with feeding america with every product sold. They donate one meal to someone in need. I am passing the baton off off to you. What are you got. I'm especially fond of my first gift idea because you know what. Let's face it. The inept entertained behavior of rudy. Giuliani is the gift that keeps on giving so remember when giuliani press conference at a four seasons total landscaping company from that now these four seasons total landscaping t shirts. By the clever people at threatless dot com. Were designed to do something i do. Every day which is call attention to the incompetence of the trump administration so just where them proudly the best part of this gift is a portion of the proceeds from the sale of these shirts will donate to fair fight an organization that combats voter suppression ironic. I fix so way back when bernie. Sanders was a candidate of choice. I was very fond of the slogan. Feel the burn but with this next gift. I'm bringing that phrase back into style with a little bit of Zip these charming. Little items are called hothead candles. They are perfect stocking stuffers and also. I like to use them at a dinner party. If you buy a few of them you can put one right in front of the plate and light it. It's a candle the handmaid's they feature many faces including trump and his bff's putin and kim jong. I'm on the other wonderful. I mean lincoln is in there too so celebrate the holidays by sitting back pouring yourself a cup of whatever it is you drank and watching trump and his administration go up in smoke. Hey okay whoopee. Last but not least europe what. Thanks joy my first gift to something great for the whole family to do together. These are growing trees from sequoia trees dot com. I love them. They're only ten ninety nine and they provide everything you could possibly ever need to grow. So many different types of trees like sequoias cherry blossoms. Redwoods dog wants an even christmas trees. It's one hundred percents guaranteed so if you're tree doesn't grow they will send you a free replacement cat. I just love these trees. You know how much. I love books. So here are to my favorite picks for now. The first book. I love is ready player to now. It's by ernest cline. You might remember a couple years ago. I turned you onto ready player. One and then it became a movie and then it was out of sight. Now i love kids books pete the cat. This is my new man. This is the catch twelve days of christmas by james. And kimberly dean now. His friends are still rocking grooving. Lock counting down the days of christmas. So if you think this is a book you my life go to pete the cat books dot com and you can get it. I'm telling you. You will love pete the cat and then the third thing that make great stocking stuffers are these you know the folks that do my socks the ones that sometimes you're not allowed to see because they say things that blue q i love these folks of may always have an invade of really interesting things going on so lease their toothbrushes and their seven nine hundred nine zero available at blue q dot com and they have really wonderful sayings on like this one says. I can't wait till my mouth tastes like coffee again. And this one says you are a winner and a loser. It's only fair. I mean. I love this and the greatest thing about this is they support. The humanitarian effort of doctors without borders for more on any of these products. Check out our website and today joining us virtually are fifty essential workers. And as a. Thank you from all of us. You all going home with all our favorite things music. legend darlene. Love always has a home for the holidays right here. And she continues her tradition of singing her christmas classic on the view. I remember we one now. The view from home these days. We don't know what's coming and that means neither to you so let's start. This is going to be good. it can be unpredictable. Well my cameras not working allen. 'cause i you can see where i am. I love it. This is still the only place in daytime below. Ladies of the view at martin where the biggest names cavs. You heard i on this show. This is the realist conversation on tv. And so good we. The people are the ones that have the power from their homes to our for those off the biggest challenge for us. You have to say what you're gonna say and then shut up. We're not used to that. We have the same weird the view. All you ladies tax how we roll on. Abc for the last six seasons music legend darlene. Love has helped celebrate the season by singing her holiday. Classic right here and we're making sure we keep that tradition going in twenty twenty you can catch darlene love for the holidays digital christmas show on demand until december twenty fifth. Check out our website for more information but right now right now here on stage and perform christmas baby please come home with a little help from her friends. Give it up for darlene. Love can keep me from singing this song. All of you Seeing in mrs de hey do. Hey how that was. It are happy holidays show. We want you to have a great day. Time to enjoy the view. Wash your hands wear masks but we also want you to watch the credits. Because you're gonna see all the people who actually put this show together you when let you. Our team was at the newly marched. Gravesite of mary ellen dean. The fourteen year old girl murder. I left her eubanks a half century ago as long as her convicted murderers free. Her soul cannot be at wrist today. Lester remains at large but there are new signs. The marshals may be getting closer. Have you seen this rand. Europe promoted an all new episode of. Have you seen this man available now wherever you get your podcasts.

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