35 Burst results for "Vincent I"

Edge to be updated with browser extensions "Manifest v3"

Security Now

10:22 min | 6 d ago

Edge to be updated with browser extensions "Manifest v3"

"Edge. Is going to. BE UPDATED WITH BROWSER EXTENSIONS Known as Manifest V. Three. The proposed changes to the web extensions API, which are sort of. generically known as manifest. The three just shortly known were first announced by Google two years ago back in October twenty eighteen, and this was four you know chromium. This is what Google said, what we're GONNA do. And we talked about this at the time our listeners may remember these stated plans from Google did not go over very well with the industry. When they announced their planned changes, they explained Google explained that the main intent of this manifest victory was to improve extension security, improve extension performance, and give users greater control over what extensions did and which sites they could interact with which all sounds great. But extension developers quickly pointed out that this manifest V. three updates contain changes which would cripple the ability of ad blockers Av parental control enforcement, and various privacy enhancing extensions to do their job as they had been and as a consequence Google's. Announcement, triggered a significant backlash from users, extension developers, and even other browser makers. Because among other things, the extensions had the effect of limiting the power of adblocker to block ads Of course, the Non Google community was unhappy to see Google clearly an advertising based company. Moving to limit our ability to to control the ads that are browsers would be subjecting us to and as I've often mentioned. From time to time, I will encounter a browser lacking a competent adblocker. And I'm always shocked by the experience I think wait whoa you know buckle up. It's just it's horrific. So I can imagine choosing a browser entirely based upon whether or not it allowed me to have control over just how obnoxious the ads work that I was being served. And back at the time browsers including opera brave and vivaldi quickly distanced themselves from Google's plans, announcing their intentions to ignore these manifest v. three updates and thus allow users to keep using the AD blockers. They already were using and liked, and Mozilla which had implemented. The web extensions API up to that point in Fire Fox in order to get compatibility with where the rest of the industry was going. Also explicitly denounced crumbs plans and said, it would not be following Google's web extensions API to the letter and would instead be making its own changes to allow ad blockers to continue working as they always have now. I would argue. that. Google had its heart in the right place. But that they did. Perhaps wilfully under appreciate the importance of allowing for dynamic extension based page filtering. Here's what happened at the technology level, the original web request API. And that's what it was known. The web replaced API allowed developers, of Web. Extensions. To install complete and powerful in line filters both in the query and in the reply loops sort of. Sir encircling the the browsers engine a query filter would inspect and perhaps modify any browser queries. Leaving the browser on the way to remote web servers and a reply filter would receive remote web server replies before the browser engine saw them, and this would allow the extension to make extensive edits of the received page among other things blocking subsequent requests for secondary page assets like ads. Google's. V THREE RE engineered solution. was going to discard all of that and in fact has. In favor of what they called a declarative net request API. Google explained that it would prevent extensions from inspecting web requests made on a page while providing much of the same functionality, and again I'll say that I think Google heart was in the right place because that Previ- three filtering. Which is what we've been living with for the lap for like up until now. was, awesomely powerful. A two years ago at the time of the announcement Simeon Vincent who is the developer advocate for chrome extensions said that forty two percent of all malicious extensions which Google had detected. Year to date. So from January twenty seventeen, until October, I'm sorry from January two, thousand, eighteen until October two, thousand eighteen. Forty two percent of all militias extensions were abusing that API. For nefarious purposes. He said quote with Web Request Chrome sends all the data in a network request to the listening extension including any sensitive data contained in that request like personal photos or emails. He says because all of the request data is exposed to the extension, it makes it very easy for a malicious developer to abuse that access to a user's credentials, accounts or personal information. Gives me. All of that is true. Which is why I like the idea if we can somehow like arranged to get both if we could have good blocking. While somehow not allowing extensions. That could misbehave to see everything coming and going to and from the. Web Browser. So with Google's declarative net request API, which is what is in the V. Three. Next Generation, an extension pre registers rules. That the browser reads and then applies to each web page before and after it's loaded. This hugely improves security and privacy since extensions never receive and see all of the page data which they up which they do under V two. And then the browser makes all the modifications requested on behalf of the extension only when one or more of those pre declared rules are met. An addition to enhance privacy and security this allows crumbs optimized processing paths to handle all of the actual web request filtering rather than leaving this to an extensions possibly slow Java script code. So we get a big performance boosts in addition to enhance privacy and safety. So. The the problem is these changes promised to create a number of problems. The first obvious was that this would be restricting what extensions were able to do. And I don't see any way round that you're either going to give extensions like unfettered full access to a web page or you're going to say. We know just tell us what things you're sensitive about, and we'll look for those for you and then then take care of it. So for example, at the time, the developers of no script and you block origin were not happy because they liked the power that they had. They made it clear that the new API's declarative rule system would not provide the same level of control. But the most glaring limitation that arose at the time was the total number of rules that the new engine could accommodate Google plan to allow which what what I would think would seem like plenty of rules at thirty thousand. But it was quickly revealed to be far insufficient for AD blockers. They often have to filter web requests for hundreds of thousands of AD. Related Domains these days. So during the debate which ensued, the State Requirements Range from ninety thousand to one hundred and fifty thousand some people even arguing that like look let's not. You know like have a too low limit that ad blockers could could hit their heads on. So how about half a million? Anyway Google compromised and did agree to raise their planned thirty, thousand, two, hundred, fifty, thousand individual rules. So that's where we are and that brings us to today. Manifest V. Three changes are now being tested in chrome developer channels and much of the post announcement grumbling from two years ago has died down although some adblocker extensions. The, devs have given up on their products ability to reliably block ads. Once these changes reach stable versions of chrome. And I think that may be some grumbling.

Google Developer Fire Fox Mozilla Vivaldi Simeon Vincent Developer Advocate Previ
These doctors got COVID-19, now they're suffering the serious, mysterious symptoms of 'long COVID'

Science Friction

08:15 min | Last week

These doctors got COVID-19, now they're suffering the serious, mysterious symptoms of 'long COVID'

"Hi It's Natasha. Mitchell with science friction. I'll be the first admit that as a GP price all of I was pretty skeptical of things. I certainly had sympathy for for conditions like FIBROMYALGIA. But I didn't have the empathy that I have now. I didn't understand it I. Really didn't get it. And Gosh if I could go back and speak to myself as a GP prior to all of this, I know that I would have been much better doctor then and I will hopefully be a much stop to now. As Corona virus cases explode again in the you kind across Europe today three doctors from the UK share confronting personal experiences of what's being called long covert. I have seen too many cases on nine of people not being heard not being Nessin to. That symptoms and their concerns not being validated. I've seen heartbreaking stories of people just being dismissed of seeing heartbreaking stories of people losing their jobs. And I am very lucky that I have a platform where I can speak up and try and get long covert recognizes melnace. The term long covert is being used to describe a whole cluster of symptoms and afflictions many extremely disturbing and disabling that lingering on some people after they've been infected with the SARS Cov to virus thousands across the world are now finding solidarity on social media and in virtual support groups that are popping up and long covert. To not discriminate healthy people young people, people who apparently had a mild case of covid nineteen. And every system in their bodies can be affected up until the last a week or two. The concept of long caved has been dismissed by quite a lot of people even in the medical sphere many my colleagues have been unwell since March and have really struggled to get any kind of medical inputs until the last couple of months those weren't hospitalized with the illness would just sort of left to get on with it. It's the classic thing a suspect. It might even be a bloke thing do not for long enough it will go away. Yeah. Diminish it ignore it hope it's not their. Own I another thing to worry about uh, suspect always going through people's minds and that will include medics politicians policies such as civil servants, everybody. But they will be left with the long term consequences and in terms of the total health burden that will weigh exceed whatever acute covid to us by the time of comes on. So we facing another pandemic this one silent confusing and hard to diagnose knows a pandemic of long coverted. I'm Dr Amy Small I'm thirty nine and I'm Jay P in Lothian in Scotland a gorgeous part of the world in the Scottish lowlands and before the pandemic Dr smalls life was a when I think back it was busy and chaotic and getting up at six thirty every morning and out house by seventh day and yet as a family, we were very active and very busy but it work back in February and March. I'm in colleagues were on high alert the sense of impending doom that we felt on those first few weeks moore seeing reports of huge numbers of people dying in. Italy. In just thinking gosh you know. Is that coming away at it was just really really scary I'm Dr Natalie Mcdermott I'm an academic clinical electra at King's College London and she specializes in Pediatric Infectious Diseases Dr McDermott is no stranger to deadly infections Ebola cholera now coronavirus she's been on the front line of the Mall I was working in Liberia in in the capital Monrovia in July twenty fourteen as as cases of started spread very rapidly our more queseda flowing because we had so many dead bodies but we didn't have sevices coming to pick them up so the burial teams weren't Well. They were trying their best, but they were limited as well at during that time two of my colleagues one of whom was on medical director for treatment facility they became infected with. I saw a space about thirty percent of my patients that died in those first few weeks. I was in Liberia that he percent of them were health coworkers what Natalie witnessed firsthand was hellish but going is her as a doctor she went on to do a PhD, investigating the genetics of asa sipped ability to a bowl avars disease. And when Covid nineteen heat I was working in Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Great Ormond Street Hospital. When we started to see a surge of cases of what we now who multi-system inflammatory syndrome children previously healthy children started falling very ill they come in generally unwell but looking okay and then within a few hours sometimes but maybe you set me within twenty four hours. Many of them would suddenly drop their blood pressure and they and become very touchy. It said it heart rate would become very fast at that stage it was thought children were only mildly affected by. Covid nineteen and on the whole, it seems they are but the Natalie and colleagues found all lot of them did test positive in terms of the throat swaps full cave nineteen they tested positive for antibodies to cave in nineteen either actually at the beginning of that onus or at some point Jerry net illness doctrine failing on consulting genetic pathologists to Saint Mark's hospital in Harrow in London and Sinn. Vincent's Hospital in Dublin Ireland in filing is a practicing doctor and later in the genetics of bail and related cancers collaborating with colleagues around the world including here in Australia. At the beginning of the pandemic back in March whiles looked pretty safe or think. To identify, cases in Wales. H. One about forty kilometers outside of me. So eastern West. So you get the impression whereas almost none of it about. So the odds of you catching, it must be next to nothing.

Dr Natalie Mcdermott Covid Liberia Fibromyalgia Mitchell Europe Great Ormond Street Hospital UK Medical Director Dr Amy Small Dr Smalls Wales Moore Monrovia ASA Italy Scotland
Hong Kong police arrest 9 for aiding dozen to flee territory

BBC World Service

00:45 sec | 2 weeks ago

Hong Kong police arrest 9 for aiding dozen to flee territory

"Have arrested nine people suspected of helping a dozen activists who tried to flee by roughly but speedboat to Taiwan. In August, 12 activists were intercepted by the Chinese authorities and accused of making an illegal border crossing. Tony Vincent report from Hong Kong. The police say that the four men and five women suspected of arranging Transportacion and funding for the fugitives who attempted to flee to Taiwan. They were arrested with cash, mobile phones, computers and documents relating to the purchase of a boat. 12 activists are being detained in the southern Chinese city of Shenzhen. Their plight has drawn international attention. The family members say they've been denied access to independent lawyers.

Taiwan Tony Vincent Hong Kong Shenzhen Transportacion
Medical examiner says death of teen shot by police in metro-Atlanta's Cobb County, is a homicide

Clark Howard

00:39 sec | 3 weeks ago

Medical examiner says death of teen shot by police in metro-Atlanta's Cobb County, is a homicide

"County County teenager teenager who who was was a a passenger passenger in in a a stolen stolen car car is is officially officially ruled ruled a homicide. The Cobb County Medical examiner's ruling of homicide confirms July's death of 17 year Old Vincent. True, it was due to another person's actions, but it's not a legal ruling his mom beneath you cooked Lewis lobbies, cop police to release dash and body Cam video from the shot. He's gay. Not what but twice is family lawyer Joel Griggs disputes Thie brandished, a gun allegation director told me told his family and told all concern No. He did not point a gun at Veronica Waters. 95.5 WSB In the third quarter, the

County County Cobb County Medical Joel Griggs Old Vincent Thie Veronica Waters. Lewis Director
Georgia medical examiner says death of Cobb County teen shot by police is a homicide

Atlanta's Evening News and Rick Erickson

00:33 sec | 3 weeks ago

Georgia medical examiner says death of Cobb County teen shot by police is a homicide

"Of a Cobb County teen shot and killed by police has been ruled a homicide by the Cobb County Medical examiner's office. The Con county medical examiner finds 17 year old Vincent True, It was shot twice in the back with a fatal shot. Entering his lower back. Compal Eastman contended he opened fire when true, it ran away from a stolen car and brandished a gun. While family attorney Gerald Griggs disputes that he urges called police to help reveal the truth when you see Ah, that video, the dash camera and the body cameras so we can fully understand what happened. The G B I is investigating

Cobb County Medical Cobb County Compal Eastman Con County Gerald Griggs Vincent True Attorney
3 Ways to Level Up Google Ads with Vincent Beima

AdLeaks

05:03 min | Last month

3 Ways to Level Up Google Ads with Vincent Beima

"Has up athletes today I want to talk with you guys about dynamic search ads, which is a very awesome tool inside Google ads which can give you additional insights and keywords insertions rich. You wouldn't have thought of in the first place and I'm going to give you three major keys that can help you get more impact with your dynamic search campaigns. So first of. All, the always WanNa make sure that you're excluding your brand keywords what I see also with a bigger agencies that they tend to forget it or not do it on purpose so that you'll get an idea of that dynamic search ads are actually performing better than they should. Because what you do not want is when you're dynamic shirts as Bob that your brand traffic is being filtered. Through, the dynamic search ads so dad went somebody uses the word Nike going to be found by ANNEX SEARCH ADS campaign. Why? For a few reasons? First of all? You're brand at has always more click real estate because you can put all these sightings endeared has more titles and description rules in general than your dynamic search ads. So it's better that you WANNA fill it straight to your brand campaign. Secondly, your brand assets are the most relevant to your branded intent traffic. So you WanNa make sure that you find the right way also, you get a higher click through rate. and. Thirdly, you'll have a complete overview of your brand growth without any skewed data. that's when you make sure that you exclude on all your campaign. So number one campaigns and also your DA campaigns, your brand keywords make sure you do that. So you have a good overview of how your brands performing. Then second one interestingly is leveraging remarketing for search at errorless aid, but decided for similar audiences. So I expected you're already familiar with how you can leverage your current audiences for search. Here you can give bid adjustments to your current audiences that have interacted with before but here's the kicker. Google automatically creates similar audiences to all the on you create in your Google or in your Google ads. Audience Manager. So by creating a bunch of audience and especially true if you have a lot of volume in traffic, the is as you create the more Google creates a similar audience to debt. So if you are using, let's say a loss of seven days audience. This means you can make bid adjustments for people that have already been on your website and lost seven days. But if we're using similar to audiences, we can now leverage audiences that are not specifically have been interacting with you. So it works both ways on one way. You could see the same traffic addict uses with my keywords. Yes. But on the other side Goule has specifically. Made. His list with people have a similar behavior towards that same audience and this can be very powerful. So it's a it's kind of like a hidden missing, but these audience have been pretty much successful for us with our clients accounts. So I'm just going to give you a few of these best-performing audiences that we've used where Gould and creates a similar audience to which we have leveraged in glass. So we have the lost day. So the last twenty, four hours, basically seven days, fourteen days thirty, sixty, ninety days obviously all add to cart. Audiences we have the converting audiences of everybody have already purchased, and then we also have one with new users those on his work. The best. So again, tested out if you have the ability, if you have a lot of traffic stands to work very well for us and then lastly Allensbach two guys about if you're going to use dynamic search ads and what it does, it simply crawls the page and gives you knew inside like DC. Type of keywords can match with your pages and it will create a dynamically created headline towards that at. With. The specifically indicates that it picks. So when you start off with this and you already have a bunch of keyword campaigns lined up what did you do not want is that starts cannibalizing from your current setup. Because then it's going to be influencing your quality score and is going to influence in your relevancy. So you want make sure it's actually that you exclude all your current keywords so that specifically funnels traffic to write campaigns, but it's going to be very time consuming. You don't want to do that. So that's why we're talking here about a script that automatically does that for you so it automatically selects. That you have in Craig's list for ADN excluded under Nick Search F. and it keeps you dynamically rolling. So it's not something that you have to keep doing. It just keeps on running as a script on itself. That's is linked down below in the comments. So this article, three major keys for to step up your dynamic search ads campaign.

Google Nick Search F. Nike BOB Goule Craig Gould
Netflix’s The Devil All the Time

Mark Thompson

02:46 min | Last month

Netflix’s The Devil All the Time

"Netflix, now available for streaming the devil All the time is an ensemble crime drama Little film Noir ish with a bit of the grizzly to it, And it kind of recalls the cone brothers in their blood. Simple Fargo dark, twisted mode, but this has none of their mordant humor and in two hours and You know, 18 minutes, it does meander a bit here and there. Still, I thought it was a good one. Presenting this web of circumstances happened stances consequences that Titan's over the course of three decades, the forties fifties and sixties between two rural towns and a couple of families. One of the towns in Ohio, one of the towns in West Virginia, there a couple hours apart. And through these various inter related characters, you get a portrait of violence, seediness and perversity on DH, you know, and some of these characters are dedicated the religion, But that doesn't necessarily mean that good things were gonna happen to them, and the cast is First rate. Tom Holland plays Arvin Who's this quietly righteous grown up? Son of a good guy G I, who comes back from World War two, marries a waitress moves her and baby Arvin and do a fixer upper in the woods. And his dogged by tragedy that's almost biblical, and that that carries over to others whose lives were connected in the story, By the way, the role played by Holland. Yes, Spider Man himself. It's his closest you get to a heroic lead in the movie, and this British actor is pretty convincing as a young American from that part of the country. It's like he was bit by a radioactive hillbilly. I mean, really Totally thrilled with Tom Holland. Where can we watch this? The devil all the time? Yeah, it's good stuff. Bill Scars guard son of Stellan, brother of Alexander, best known in the States as Pennywise, the clown in the movies. He's He plays the father, and there's no trace of Pennywise here. Jason Clark, Riley Keogh Robert Pattinson, the new Batman in the Old Twilight vampire plays the young creature who's not above reproach. And surprisingly stocky, Sebastian stand the winter soldier from the Marvel movies as the Vincent Donofrio role of the power hungry local sheriff whose morals are questionable and we get it. It's a good movie again, not greatness. The director screenwriter here is Antonio Campos, and he adapts the devil all the time. The the book by Donald Ray Public who is actually the Narrator here and there. I always say show don't tell, but I was caught up in the desperation of all those involved. Often this thing and stayed with it until the bitter end. That's available on Netflix. As

Tom Holland Netflix Arvin Who Antonio Campos Titan Vincent Donofrio Donald Ray Ohio West Virginia Bill Scars Marvel Robert Pattinson Jason Clark Sebastian Riley Keogh Stellan Alexander
Literal Jock Sniffer - Season 3, Episode 4 - burst 1

First & 10s

12:22 min | Last month

Literal Jock Sniffer - Season 3, Episode 4 - burst 1

"Question. How did he do? Okay. So here's the thing about Joe Brown. This is why I think you like him so much. Oh, it's a really great quarterback that just plays hockey team. So he's like your deck Prescott your a bitch. I thought you were like the light bulb in my head went off last night when I was watching it. I was like, well, he's a good little quarterback like Dak Prescott. He just plays for no wonder Jasmine likes them so much. By the way, I have you know you Optimus Prime Don the word shity so it cut out on you said shity team. That's all right. I show you going to say that we were going to like look we could be an item now. I'm just disappointed. Oh, I'm sorry. Now he's to you guys wouldn't match very well. He's back to blonde hair doughy eyed, you know, he still has his dreams and happiness. I was just that his way too innocent for you. You know, you just strip him of all of it off. I would fare. I tend to do this with all men though. Let's be real I tend to slowly take away their hopes dreams, you know their desk for Life their happiness any kind of happiness life. It's it's what I do to all the men that are in my life. Okay, so so that's your analysis which fuck off so that's no that's my analysis regards to jobber. Okay, my analysis in regards to the Browns. All right. Here's the thing about the Browns obj less. Always he had headlines Amy. Okay. This team has a boss ass offense page. There is no reason why they shouldn't be scoring touchdowns all the fucking time. I mean think about the players that they have Nick Chubb Fremont who both went off last night Jarvis Landry. I mean you couldn't get you can get that is a fantasy leagues dream right here, right? Yep. There is no reason why this team shouldn't be amazing because you know what their defense is really cool. Good to this team should be really competitive and making the playoffs and they're not understand now Grandma, who knows what's going to happen tell you what happened last night watching this game Baker Mayfield just he changed into a different person. Like when he like a human in a good way in a good way when he came off the field. He didn't go and sit down on the bench. He stood on the sidelines and watched his defense playing and then he I mean he rallied those guys. He was not going down to Joe burrow. I mean, you could totally he's like, there's no fucking way. This guy's going to show me up and there's no way I'm losing to the fucking bangles and you know what he totally carried his team. He really truly did stepped up it was offensive. Now if they can do that every single weekend this team is really like it has all the weapons that it takes to be a fantastic team which made me. Made me Ponder the fact that there's some teams that you just expect to lose and then there's some teams that you expect to win like the team's you expect to when you expect the steel real attacks right now. You expect the Cal you expect to win. You don't expect the Lions or the Bangles or the Browns. I mean the low-hanging fruit, you know, you don't expect those teams to win. So when they have when they have rosters long, the Browns have their own turning into a team that you they should be winning with what they have. So it sounds to me that the Browns are basically like if you're looking at it from a fantasy league point, it's the guy in league who basically cheese his way to get the best team because everybody else is internet either sucked or they were on auto draft or they forgot there was a draft right? That's the guy in the if you're equating it to a fantasy team roster birth. Okay. Number one. I liked it. You know I prematurely said shut up about the Cowboys cuz I thought you were going to say that you expect them to lose and I like that you're saying that you expect them to win because that's what you do you absolutely suck. Oh you that's what we do problem. That's where we are a we are an elite Lord team. Anyway, that's what you're going with I am. Well, I don't know the baker Mayfield is still a shitstain to me so good for him rallying his team. He's still a shitstain. I do love his Progressive commercials their home like the latest one. Yes. They are the latest one where he's like. Oh, it's getting ready to rain. Help me cover the furniture. And two guys like you mean the stance he's really good in those commercials. If you could only be as good a quarter as he is in those commercials. We would be set the dog pound would be set. Well, we are you a dog pound or now. I mean, I you know, I have a soft spot for the Browns just cuz they always lose. And ever since that movie came out draft day with Kevin Costner yet. Oh, I'm out. I'm done with you. done with you Amy. Your brown spot is showing. I know I know you know, I just I'm weird that way I don't understand it. Either it is I don't either try to figure you out every day and I just you know, I do too and since I'm like, oh I get myself today and then sometimes I'm like now he's nope don't understand myself today, but that's okay. That's most of us as well. Amy. So rest assured you're not in Company by yourself. I think it is twenty-twenty it is. Okay. Well that's sad because now Joe burrow Hollow be his name Falls 200 and two. Yeah, it does and but you know what this guy he's he's a good quarterback. He is is there he should be in his helmet I think time to get mr. Guys. Sometimes he tries to carry his offense which isn't great because then he gets pummeled by pencil like he got pummeled last night several times. Well, you sure. Why does LSU brain sure what he's trying to win? And I totally get it. But at the same time he needs careful because you know, oh, he's a starting quarterback in the NFL. Well getting them know and you just see a lot of what he was doing at LSU that worked and I think you know like every rookie has this learning curve right where you come out transition from college to the big leagues and it's like, oh, okay, it's funny cuz I was like really different style of football right? I said to Bruce last night. I'm like, surprised that they just threw this guy in the deep end. I mean they just started. Oh totally, I mean, they didn't granted he dangles. What else do they have? I'm. That's the problem. They don't have anything else but you know like places in my where to get backing up Fitzpatrick that makes sense. It makes sense for him to kind of, you know way into the NFL same thing with Dwayne Haskins, you know, he he was back up for a while until he kind of learned his name. Yeah, now Joe girl, man. They just threw him in the deep and they're like here you go, bro, you go bu. Yeah. Well, you know what gotta he is trying I mean, he's playing his ass off out there. No he is but he is and that's why I'm like super team Joe burrow like we gotta do this man. Like I'm telling you. It's the stogie. We'll do it get this guy that mean that you're a Bengals fan know how fucking no. No, I like. Oh bji in a Browns fan. I like Joe burrow Ina Bengals fan, you know, I will always bleed silver and blue Amy. That's the only color I would leave home. Anyway, let's move on to the Chiefs. Okay, love us and Pat Mahomes you love some Andy Reid do that cheaper mofo back, right? So Andy Reid's big old windshield mask that he had on. When was it last week? I can't remember. Yeah. We're only in week to segregated windshield wipers. Yeah, so people were like what the hell and so like it was fogging up. You couldn't see shit, but this may be a thing. This may be a thing coming to a coach near you because off on the first Sunday of the NFL season when this happened several coaches were seen either one not wearing masks or to not wearing them properly because the mask police were out and the league is not going to stand for that. It's currently vice president of football operations. Troy Vincent issued a memo this week saying protocol requires all individuals with bench area access including coaches and members of the club medical staff to wear face coverings at all times failure to adhere this requirement will result in accountability measures being imposed against offending individuals and or clubs. However, Amy, there is no word on what those accountability measures will be so that to me that phrase is what kind of sticks out to me. What does that mean? do you do find them? Probably I mean you can look dead. Here's the thing. They're coaching on the sidelines of talking into Mike's they have to be able bird they have to be able understood. It's really hard for all of the to happen on your face plus all these guys are around each other all the time. They're all you know, I practiced together around the field. They're hitting each other all in each other's faces, you know, I mean and how many people have tested positive since the start of season one? Yeah. They did a very good 2700 players so very good job with with that right off because like you said, they've been implementing measures. They've been following the rules, you know, they've been testing a lot, you know, we got into this, you know leading into this actual season. Jeez, how many coronavirus updates that we talked about on this podcast about hey, this is what the League's doing. This is what they're making them do kind of thing. So something is clearly working. It's really great to see that that's positive news that you know that they're only seeing that wage. Chat, I think I that they should I really think they should go with a handy read mask to be quite honest can still see the coaches face. The microphone can kind of be up underneath it. So they may be able to understand what the coaches saying and and you're shielded. You know, when somebody comes up to your face, you know, I mean, think that that's fine but having to wear them like when it's just, you know covering your face in your nose again, like it's hard for me to understand people when they're wearing a mask and talking to me. Yes, I mean, so imagine imagine being on the field the quarterback coaches saying the guys in booth coordinators up in the booth are trying to understand what the guys on the field coordinators on the field are trying to say, I mean, it's just it's a it's crazy. So it's a shitshow you gotta be able to walk. You gotta be able to your job. I would take that looking like I've got the windshield of a Camry in front of my face the whole time vs Lee having something on my mouth cuz that's frustrating me. Yeah. Give me the telephone number. Windshield all day long over the you know, suffocating face masks which by the way speaking of Tesla. Did you see that their reports of some them being janky like getting like parts that were like really cheap shity on some of the Tesla's that were falling apart marvelous. I know so yet twenty-twenty doesn't happen. Just wanted to put that in there for you. All right coming up next in offsides, you know fall like we said is upon us. Although you wouldn't know here in Texas. It's still like an anus outside but here's something for your home that will make it fall feel less anus e okay Mom handles some new ones that are coming out and they're actually already out and we'll explain to you with those candles our next. All right, let's get into offsides and we've got some candles to tell you about so Amy, yeah, you know football's back. So if you want to get a little piece so that game day experience at home along with fall. This might work. Okay. I know you love candles. There's a company that's owned by Anheuser-Busch call Babe wine. They just created three football scented candles one smells like an artificial turf field. Okay one smells like a Nachos not bad and one

Browns AMY Joe Burrow NFL League Football Dak Prescott Andy Reid Joe Brown Hockey Shity LSU Jasmine JOE Tesla Kevin Costner Mr. Guys Lions Anheuser-Busch Baker Mayfield
NFL reminds teams to follow sideline rules on face coverings

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

00:57 sec | Last month

NFL reminds teams to follow sideline rules on face coverings

"The National Football League is threatening to find head coaches if they don't adhere to Corona virus rules requiring face masks on the sidelines. During the first weekend of games. Some coaches were saying not wearing coverings. We have the latest from NPR's Tom Goldman. In a Monday memo to the NFL's 32 teams. We'd executive Troy Vincent praised what he called the tireless efforts to make the season possible during the pandemic. But Vincent also warned those who defy rules unmasks everyone in team bench areas on the field except players has to wear a face covering in all times. Failure to do so, Vincent wrote, will result in accountability measures against individuals and or clubs. Those measures include finds during Sunday's nationally televised game between Dallas and the Los Angeles Rams. Ella head coach Sean McVeigh, often at his mask under his chin, while Dallas is Mike McCarthy wore his thie entire game. Tung Goldman NPR news

Troy Vincent Tung Goldman Npr National Football League Dallas Tom Goldman NPR Los Angeles Rams Sean Mcveigh Mike Mccarthy Ella Executive
Second Grade Teacher Arrested On Child Pornography Charge in Milford, Boston

WBZ Midday News

00:20 sec | Last month

Second Grade Teacher Arrested On Child Pornography Charge in Milford, Boston

"A second grade teacher in Milford, now facing child pornography charges. A Justice Department says Vincent Qi Zhou had about 6000 images of a parent child porn stored on a thumb drive. These charges carry a sentence of up to 20 years behind bars. A fine of 250,000 bucks. A detention hearing for Qi Zhou is set for

Vincent Qi Zhou Justice Department Milford
Why specializing early doesn't always mean career success

TED Talks Daily

05:03 min | 2 months ago

Why specializing early doesn't always mean career success

"Hi. I'm Elise Hugh. And you're listening to Ted talks daily today's talk features really fascinating research that cuts us all some slack. What I mean is it turns out you can be a late bloomer in your chosen sport or skill or specialty, and it's actually better for you in a lot of ways. The talk is journalist David Epstein at Ted Ex Manchester in twenty twenty. So I'd like to talk about the development of human potential and I'd like to start with maybe the most impactful modern story of development. Many of you here have probably heard of the ten thousand dollars rule maybe you even model your own life after it. Basically, it's the idea that the become great anything takes ten thousand hours of focused practice. So. You'd better get started as early as possible. The poster child for this story is Tiger Woods. Father Famously, gave him a putter when he was seven months old at ten months, he started imitating his father's swing. At to, you can go on Youtube and see him on national television fast forward to the age of twenty one he's the greatest Golfer in the world's quintessential ten thousand dollars story. Another that features a number of bestselling books is that of the three Polgar sisters whose father decided to teach them chests in a very technical manner from a very early age and really wanted to show that with a head start and focused practice. Any child could become a genius in anything, and in fact, two of his daughters went onto become grandmaster chess players. So, when I became the Science Writer at sports illustrated magazine I got curious if this ten thousand hours rules correct then we should see that elite athletes get a headstart in so-called deliberate practice. This is coached air correction focus practice not just playing around, and in fact, when scientists study lead athletes, they see that they spend more time in deliberate practice not a big surprise. When they actually track athletes over the course of their development, the future leads actually spend less time early on in delivered practice in their eventual sport they to have what scientists call a sampling period where they try a variety of physical activities. They gain broad general skills they learned about their interests and abilities and delays specializing until later than peers who plateau at lower levels. And so when I saw that said, Gosh that doesn't really comport with the ten thousand hours rule does it. So I started to wonder about other domains that we associate with obligatory early specialization like music. Turns out the patterns often similar. Research from a world class, Music Academy, and what I want to draw your attention to is the exceptional musicians didn't start spending more time into practice than the average musicians. Until Third Instrument, they tended to have a sampling period. Even musicians we think of is famously precocious like Yo, Yo Ma he sampling period he just went through it more rapidly than most musicians do. Nonetheless, this research almost entirely ignored and much more impactful is the first page of the Book Battle Hymn of the Tiger mother where the author recounts assigning her daughter Violin. Nobody seems remember the part later in the book where her daughter turns her and says, you picked it not me and largely quits. So having seen this sort of surprising pattern in sports and music. I started to wonder about domains that affect and more people like education and economists found a natural experiment in the Higher Ed Systems of England and Scotland in the period studied, the systems were very similar except in England students had to specialize in their mid teen years to pick a specific course of study to apply tours in Scotland they could keep trying things in university if they wanted to and his question was who wins the trade off the early or the late specializes and he saw that the early specializes jump out to an income. Lead because they have more domain specific skills, the late specializes get to try more different things and when they do pick, they have better fit or what economists call match quality, and so their growth rates are faster by six years out erase that income gap. Meanwhile, the earliest specializes start quitting their career tracks in much higher numbers essentially because they were made to choose. So early that they more often made choices. So the late specializes lose in the short term and win in the long run. I think if we thought about career choice like dating, we might not pressure people to settle down quite so quickly. So this interested seeing this pattern again in exploring a developmental backgrounds of people whose work I had long admired like Duke Ellington who shunned music lessons as a kid to focus on baseball and painting and drawing or Mario Mir's economy who wasn't interested in math is a girl dreamed of becoming a novelist and went on to become the first and so far only woman to win the fields medal the most prestigious prize in the world in Math Vincent Van Gogh had five different careers, each of which he deemed his true calling before flaming out spectacularly, and in his late twenty s picked up a book called the guide to the ABC's of drawing. That worked out. Okay Claude Shannon was an electrical engineer at the University of Michigan who took a philosophy course just to fulfill a requirement and in it, he learned about a near century old system of logic or was true and false statements could be coded as ones and zeroes in solved like math problems. This led to the development of Binary Code, which underlies all of our digital computers today.

Ted Ex Manchester Scotland Elise Hugh Tiger Woods Math Vincent Van Gogh Youtube David Epstein Sports Illustrated Magazine Claude Shannon Duke Ellington Third Instrument Higher Ed Systems Of England Music Academy University Of Michigan ABC Writer Mario Mir Engineer England
2 US soldiers killed, 3 hurt in training crash - The Hill

CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley

00:17 sec | 2 months ago

2 US soldiers killed, 3 hurt in training crash - The Hill

"S Army has identified two soldiers who were killed in a Blackhawk helicopter crash while training in Southern California Staff Sergeant Vincent Marketa and Sergeant Tyler Shelton died and three other service members were injured in the accident that happened Thursday at a military training base in San Clemente Island. Panic at a

Sergeant Tyler Shelton San Clemente Island Vincent Marketa S Army California
Los Angeles - Army soldiers ID'd in fatal Black Hawk helicopter crash off California

The Money Pit

00:44 sec | 2 months ago

Los Angeles - Army soldiers ID'd in fatal Black Hawk helicopter crash off California

"We now know the names of the two young soldiers who lost their lives in a helicopter crash Thursday. US. Army Special Operations Command has identified two soldiers killed in a helicopter crash off the coast of California. 33 year old staff Sergeant Vincent Market of Break, New Jersey was a distinguished flying cross recipient. 22 year Old Sergeant Tyler Sheldon of San Bernadino, California also died Thursday after their MH 60 paintball Kelly Copter crashed on Stan Clementi Island near San Diego. Both men were signed to the Army's legendary 160th Special Operations Regiment, based out of Fort Bragg. Three others were injured. That's the same area where eight Marines and a Navy Corman were killed in late July when they're amphibious assault vehicle sank in hundreds of feet of water

Army Special Operations Comman Old Sergeant Tyler Sheldon United States 160Th Special Operations Regim Sergeant Vincent Market San Bernadino Stan Clementi Island Army San Diego Corman Fort Bragg Assault California New Jersey California.
The Last US Civil War Pension

Everything Everywhere Daily

04:50 min | 2 months ago

The Last US Civil War Pension

"Triplet was born in Nineteen thirty in Wilkes County North Carolina Sixty five years after the end of the civil war. How she ended up receiving civil war pension is one of those stories that you wouldn't believe if it wasn't true. But when you do the math, it actually does workout. Her father was most triplet was a veteran of the civil war. He had the distinction of having fought for both the confederacy and the Union. He was a member of the fifty third North Carolina infantry who fought in the battle of Gettysburg. On the way to Gettysburg most fell ill and was hospitalized the illness probably saved his life because most of his unit was either killed or wounded during the battle. After he recovered, he deserted the confederates and joined up with the third north, Carolina mounted infantry which fought for the union. The unit was known as Kirks raiders after commander Colonel, George Washington. Kirk. After the war Mos- returned to North Carolina got married and started a family his wife Mary passed away in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety. As with many older civil war veterans, they would often take younger second wives especially during the Great Depression as their pension was considered a source of stable income. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four at the age of seventy eight MOS married his second wife Alita who was twenty nine years old Mohsen Alita had five children. One of them Irene was born in one, thousand, nine, thirty when Mos- was eighty-three. Irene was just eight years old when her father died at the age of ninety two after returning home from a civil war veterans reunion. Irene had a cognitive disability which made her eligible to continue to receive her father civil war pension after his death as a quote, helpless child of a veteran. She received her father's pension of seventy three dollars and thirteen cents every month from her father's death in one thousand, nine, thirty, eight to her death in. Twenty twenty. The amount was never for inflation. The entire time it's estimated she received approximately seventeen thousand dollars over the course of her life. In addition to having received the last civil war pension, she was also the last child of a civil war veteran. The second to last child of a civil war veteran also had an interesting story in two thousand. Eighteen Fred Upton passed away at the age of ninety seven. His father was William H Upton. Who is a civil war veteran and the former governor of the state of Wisconsin who was elected in eighteen ninety four. Because of the occurrence of young women marrying much older men with pensions, the passing of the last civil war widow wasn't that long ago either in two thousand and eight motty Hopkins died at the age of ninety three in thousand, nineteen, thirty, four at the age of nineteen she married eighty six year old William Cantrell who served as a sixteen year old soldier in the confederate army. Blast Union widow was Gertrude Janeway who passed away in two thousand three. The last surviving documented veteran of the civil war was Albert Wilson who died at the age of one, hundred, six in one thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, six he was a fourteen year old drummer boy in the first Minnesota. Heavy. Artillery Regiment. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, six there was an episode of the TV Game Show I've got a secret with a ninety five year old man named Samuel Seymour. The panelists had to guess what the guest secret was. Samuel Seymour. Was the last surviving witness to Abraham Lincoln's assassination. He was a five year old boy was taken affords theater and said in the balcony across the theater from the present it. there. Is a clip of the appearance on Youtube and I highly recommend viewing it if you're interested in such things. The. Last surviving person who was born as a slave in the United States was Peter Mills who died in Nineteen seventy-two he was born into slavery in eighteen sixty one and live to be one hundred, ten, one person was both born into bondage and live to see the moon landing. The last surviving veteran of the Revolutionary War was John Gray who died in eighteen sixty, eight at the age of one, hundred four he's one of the only people who live to see both the revolution and the civil war oddly enough he was born on George Washington's estate Mount Vernon and his father died in the revolutionary. War. The, last surviving veteran of Napoleon's army was a Polish man Vincent Markowitz who died at one hundred and eight in nineteen three and the last veteran of the war of eighteen twelve was Hiram Cronk who passed away in one thousand, nine, five at the age of one, hundred and five. In Two thousand eleven at the age of one hundred and ten American Frank. Buck was the last surviving veteran of World War One in the world to pass away. Demographers estimate that the last veteran of World War Two will pass away sometime around the year twenty, forty four. It will probably be someone who fought at a very young age and lives to be at least one, hundred and ten. It's amazing how the lives of some people can span such incredible lengths of time and how we can have lives that overlap them. We think of the civil war is being a long time ago. Yet we're only two or three generations removed from people who lived through all of these events.

USS Carl Vinson departs Bremerton, Seattle for new homeport of San Diego

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:43 sec | 2 months ago

USS Carl Vinson departs Bremerton, Seattle for new homeport of San Diego

"Carrier USS Carl Vinson has called Bremerton home for the past year and a half, But yesterday it was easy to spot that big ship and its crew heading out. Heading home to San Diego. They were here so the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard could overhaul the ship and make upgrades. Captain Matthew Paradise is the Vincent's commanding officer, and he's a native of Tacoma. It was terrific. To be able to be around family for the last year and a half. Um so I'm going to miss the Northwest. You know, I say that I spent the 1st 25 years of my life trying to get out of the northwest in the next 25 years of my life trying to get back. So Vincent is expected to spend the next week traveling back to its home port of San Diego. Couple

San Diego Vincent Uss Carl Vinson Puget Sound Naval Shipyard Captain Matthew Paradise Bremerton Tacoma Officer
Seattle - USS Carl Vinson departs Bremerton for new homeport of San Diego

America in the Morning

00:18 sec | 2 months ago

Seattle - USS Carl Vinson departs Bremerton for new homeport of San Diego

"Carrier. The USS Carl Vinson has called Bremerton home for the last year and a half. But Sunday, the ship and its crew headed home to San Diego. They were here so the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard could overhaul the the ship ship and and make make upgrades. upgrades. Captain Captain Matthew Matthew Paradise Paradise is is the the Vincent's Vincent's commanding commanding officer officer and and a a native native of of Tacoma. Tacoma.

Captain Captain Matthew Matthe Puget Sound Naval Shipyard Tacoma Carl Vinson Officer Vincent Bremerton San Diego
COVID-19 Impact and Recovery

This Week in Photo

06:15 min | 2 months ago

COVID-19 Impact and Recovery

"All right gentlemen welcome to the show. This has been a long time in the making this particular episode as you both know, we've been dialoguing over the the you know through email after the first covid type production I put together, which was in a Web webinar format. We decided to do this when Moore's a prerecorded livestream instead of doing the Webinar format because. There's a ton of things that we need to talk about and I just think this format makes more sense to get the information out. So I would think both you guys for coming on the show and covering this with me from the standpoint of having much more knowledge about it than I do. So which is which is important. Marcucci when it started just with some some introductions, obviously I did the brief introduction in the open there. But just a more personal introduction mark. Let's start with you who is Mark Fujio, and Why are you on the show today? Let's talk about that and then we'll go to you vincent. Okay. So I. Talk about how we've been friends for a decade if you want. Okay. Yeah. So Yeah I. was going to lead into that the I've been involved in all sorts of different You're leading edge technologies. I've lived in Santa Clara in the Silicon Valley for twenty nine years Known Frederick for about ten years and helped get him out of adobe and into a startup storage company named Robo and You know along at That's when I started listening to the this week in barrage podcast hosted by Vincent. So I've been listening to that show for man. Over over ten years, I think even longer than I've known you Frederick. So. I've had quite an interest in urology Personally last November and a dark Moon it you new moon you know night had an accident coming home where I ran into an Amazon. and. Which I wasn't expecting to be there and shorts long story short. You know I tour the complete tear their quadriceps tendon on my left leg. So I spent basically three months into brace. And then than three months sheltering in place. So, during some of your initial cooeperation obviously had a lot more time to pay attention to things and I remember seeing in sort of late November early December, a little bit of a blurb of news about in new virus coming out of China. So Fast forward So the whole incident about the Chinese doctor who had was fighting it. Got Suppressed and who ultimately died, and then you know what we turned into January. This year just exploded as a story and the US and I don't think anybody can go anywhere and a gathering you know A. Virtual. With the friends or family without covy becoming a major topic of discussion. So I very much enjoyed the the seminar you did you know a couple months ago Frederick and. Be Able to put you in Vincent together to Have a follow up. Survey and that is that is that. That's perfect and that that that. Discussion on Cova we did that you mentioned back in the day that will link to that in the description for this episode, but that was designed to be I think the title of it was. Something around demystifying covid nineteen hundred photographers, but it was turns out photographers are actually human so it doesn't does. It back then it. Doesn't really matter but I wanted to definitely follow up on that since we've done that. So much stuff since we did that. Webinar. So much stuff. Vincent that you're intimate with. In the rest of the world obviously is to a degree intimate with has happened both on the understanding of the virus side of things all the way through to disinformation and the politicization of. The whole mask wearing thing and you're not American if you wear a mask and now you are American if you wear a mask and you know all all this stuff has been happening. So I don't want to make this political but I do want to touch on the politics of that before we before we dive in then can you tell us a little bit about yourself and the podcast this week in virology? Well I am a Professor Virology at Columbia University, which is in New, York. I've been working on viruses for over forty years. I've been doing research on them. I wrote a textbook. I have taught many virology courses and twelve years ago I started a podcast. Decided to call it this week. Envir- Allergy I was inspired by Leo LaPorte. Chipper. Who probably inspired you as well I would guess, absolutely. Father. We have done this for twelve years and at the beginning of this year we noticed this outbreak in China we started covering it and I think almost every episode from the beginning of Twenty twenty now has been about the virus and the disease SARS covy to in Covid nineteen. And you know we have always talked about the threats of new viruses emerging. but they weren't taken seriously enough and we've had big outbreaks. You know we've had big ebola outbreaks. We've had Sika outbreaks, influenza outbreaks, many other viruses, but. I hate to say we were not ready for this. This all could have been avoided quite sadly. So now I am full on in educating people trying to counter the misinformation our listeners have gone way way up. It's just great. We're getting mentioned by Malcolm. Glad. Well, we got in USA Today The New York Times this week. But I think more people need to listen because we really tell it like it is and so that's the story.

Vincent Frederick China Moore Professor Virology Edge Technologies New York Times Mark Fujio Santa Clara Leo Laporte United States Covid Cova Adobe Malcolm Silicon Valley Columbia University Robo York
U.S. imposes sanctions on Hong Kong chief executive Carrie Lam

BBC World Service

00:51 sec | 2 months ago

U.S. imposes sanctions on Hong Kong chief executive Carrie Lam

"Has reacted furiously to sanctions placed by the U. S. On the chief executive of Hong Kong and 10 other officials. Leo Training who is Beijing's representative in Hong Kong on DH is one of those sanctioned, criticized the measures harshly. Danny Vincent has the details. The Beijing Liaison office called America's Intentions on scrupulous, claiming that the U. S. Was supporting what it called anti China chaos in Hong Kong. Beijing's top representative office called the sanctions against officials, including chief Executive Carrie Lam Ridiculous. Washington has accused Hong Kong's leader ofthe curtailing political freedoms. In this global financial hub. Hong Kong has seen a marked change since the introduction off a wide ranging security law, which critics say is being used as a way to crack down on the semi autonomous city. President

Hong Kong Beijing Chief Executive Representative Carrie Lam Danny Vincent Leo Training President Trump Washington America
"vincent i" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

03:22 min | 4 months ago

"vincent i" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

"So <Speech_Male> why is it that you're making speak <Speech_Male> English. <Speech_Male> And his wife, <Speech_Male> an Indian woman <Speech_Male> said colonialism. <Speech_Male> YOU BLOODY IDIOT! Why the <Speech_Male> Hell do you speak? I speak <Speech_Male> English right <Speech_Male> now <Speech_Male> I. Didn't actually <Speech_Male> frankly <Speech_Male> blame him for <Speech_Male> not knowing <Speech_Male> impart because <Speech_Male> after <Speech_Male> decolonization <Speech_Male> after <Speech_Male> the diminishment <Speech_Male> and withdrawal of the <Speech_Male> British Empire. <Speech_Male> Britain's <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> began to learn their <Speech_Male> history again <Speech_Male> as the history <Speech_Male> of a cluster of islands <Speech_Male> off the peninsula, <Speech_Male> Europe, <Speech_Male> and stop learning <Silence> the history of empire, <Speech_Male> and so <Speech_Male> when people from <Speech_Male> the former empire, <Speech_Male> former colonies <Speech_Male> began arriving in <Speech_Male> Britain. <Speech_Male> After decolonization, <Speech_Male> there were <Speech_Male> a lot of people in the <Speech_Male> UK. Who thought <Speech_Male> would if they got to do with <Speech_Male> us? They <Speech_Male> didn't know that history. <Speech_Male> They didn't know the <Speech_Male> way those histories were intertwined. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> So for them. <Speech_Male> They <Speech_Male> didn't really read <Speech_Male> the the history <Speech_Male> of a cost and <Speech_Male> statue in <Speech_Male> the same way that <Speech_Male> these postcolonial <Speech_Male> migrants and their descendants <Speech_Male> did <Speech_Male> they didn't understand <Speech_Male> that the history of empire <Speech_Male> was <Speech_Male> British history, <Speech_Male> and was the history <Speech_Male> of people who are there <Silence> now. <Speech_Male> Claiming <Speech_Male> equality claiming <Speech_Male> citizenship <Speech_Male> as rightfully <Speech_Male> they should. <Speech_Male> So one of the <Speech_Male> things I think we have to <Speech_Male> come to terms with <Speech_Male> is how <Speech_Male> these national histories <Speech_Male> are really embedded <Speech_Male> in transnational <Speech_Male> history <Speech_Male> that the people who are <Speech_Male> here among US share <Silence> <Advertisement> our history. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And until we do that. <Speech_Male> Were you know people <Speech_Male> are still going to be shocked? <Speech_Male> When someone <Speech_Male> wants to down a <Speech_Male> statue <Speech_Male> that they really didn't <Speech_Male> think had much <SpeakerChange> meeting at <Speech_Female> all. <Speech_Female> Vincent quickly <Speech_Female> before we go I know that <Speech_Female> you're an advocate for displaying <Speech_Female> history in <Speech_Female> different ways <Speech_Female> <hes> one of <Speech_Female> the ways that you do that. <Speech_Female> Is You created the <Speech_Female> History Design <Speech_Male> Studio? <SpeakerChange> <Silence> What is that? <Speech_Male> Well <Silence> <Advertisement> Yeah. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I learned <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> history, not just from books <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and articles, and not <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> just from scholars, <Speech_Male> but from music <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> like reggae <Speech_Male> music is one of the first <Speech_Male> places that <Speech_Male> I began to learn the <Speech_Male> history of slavery <Silence> and so. <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> feel like it's incumbent. Upon <Speech_Male> US historians <Speech_Male> to think about <Speech_Male> how we can recognize <Speech_Male> the fact <Speech_Male> that people don't <Speech_Male> always learn their <Speech_Male> history from <Speech_Male> books and articles, <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> how we can elevate <Speech_Male> the kinds <Speech_Male> of truths, one <Speech_Male> tells in <Speech_Male> those other forms <Speech_Male> how we can <Speech_Male> actually teach what we <Speech_Male> know about <Speech_Male> thinking carefully about <Speech_Male> sources about <Speech_Male> verifying <Speech_Male> a <Speech_Male> claims to truth <Speech_Male> about engaging <Speech_Male> communities <Speech_Male> interpretation about <Speech_Male> the. The meaning of the past <Speech_Male> informs <Speech_Male> beyond print, <Speech_Male> and I think <Speech_Male> that's quite possible. <Speech_Male> If historians <Speech_Male> just allow themselves <Speech_Male> to think about what it <Speech_Male> means to make, <Speech_Male> an animated map <Speech_Male> as I've done for tax <Speech_Male> revolt, what it means <Speech_Male> to make a documentary <Speech_Male> film what <Speech_Male> it means to do an <Speech_Male> art installation <Speech_Male> that's about history, <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> that makes <Speech_Male> or claims in ways <Speech_Male> that historians <SpeakerChange> can recognize <Silence> admire. <Speech_Female> Vincent, <Speech_Female> thank you so <Speech_Female> much for the time <Speech_Female> to talk to us <Speech_Female> and I think the <Speech_Female> tax revolt is <Speech_Female> really <Speech_Female> really should be <Speech_Female> mandatory <Speech_Female> for everybody. <Speech_Female> The story <Speech_Female> of Atlantic slave <Speech_Music_Female> words by Vincent <Speech_Female> Brown, and <Speech_Female> it is published <Speech_Female> by BELKNAP press <Speech_Music_Male> and it's now. <Music> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> been listening to meet the writers. <Speech_Female> Thanks to the production <Speech_Female> team of Nora. <Speech_Female> Hull and Charlie <Speech_Female> Film Court. <Speech_Female> You can download <Speech_Female> this show I'm previous <Speech_Female> episodes from our <Speech_Female> website or APP <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> from soundcloud mix, <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> cloud or <Speech_Music_Female> jeans Georgina <Speech_Music_Female> Godwin. <SpeakerChange> Thank <Speech_Music_Male> you Phyllis.

Vincent US Britain Europe BELKNAP press UK Nora. Phyllis
"vincent i" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

04:47 min | 4 months ago

"vincent i" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

"He learned that. All of these people who are brand new to the island had been told about the slave revolts that happened in the seventeen sixty s taxis revolt. So what that means is that there was an opposition political history, being taught and learned on Caribbean on on Jamaican. Plantations for at least those forty years brand new Africans were learning the history of African rebellion on the island when they arrived, so we know that there was an alternative history being told there and that I think you know at least encouraged us to try and understand that these people had their. Their own histories non really the histories. They brought with them from Africa, but the histories they made in the Americas, and just because historians haven't been attuned to those histories, because mostly we have the records left to us by the slaveholders doesn't mean those histories weren't alive and vibrant and consequential. In their time. It's just down to historians to work harder to think about what those kinds of histories might have been. Working against a great challenge, of course, because even at the the foundations of modern Western philosophy, the philosopher Gw of Hegel. Hegel said that Africa forms no historical part of the world. There's no consequential movement or development that one needs to understand so historians now are working against that prejudice against African history. The idea that there is no such thing as African history right that there's European history, and then there's African culture. That's what we need to work. Against by trying to sort out how it is that what Africans did in Africa was consequential, what they did in the Americas was consequential, and also how they remembered what they did, and their own histories Wisconsin as well and that memory lives on through generations. I mean you will so right that warfare migrates and a new dress. In some of your thinking the whole subject of migrants, even in the present day, and how sometimes that warfare, in that situation that they've not within goes with them. Yeah well. It's one of the things that leads to kind of one of my deeply held political beliefs is that we have to reduce the scale of warfare across the world, because it has unintended and really awful consequences so i. don't think one can think about The migrant and refugee crises facing western countries today without understanding the history of Western warfare in those countries in the Middle East or US occupation and warfare proxy war in Central America that's helped to stimulate the Central American refugee crisis to the US southern border. That's our history, too. And so I think in less. We really come to terms with the kind of scale violence that we have purveyed in the West across the world, internationally were never really going to be able to come to terms with the consequences of that violence, especially in those refugee crises that everybody is concerned about now. So let's turn to the present day, and and the black lives matter movement and this wonderful momentum that it's getting across the world. Why do you think that it feels different this time? Well I think it feels different this time because of how many people are involved all across the world of all races, colors, creeds gender. This is not just about what happens to black people. It's also about the kind of impunity. That authorities have had especially the police to get away with murder. And and they can get away with murder more easily win. It's directed at stigmatized. Like black people and their descendants. But that violence is an only directed at those stigmatize people. I think. A lot of people recognize that that the impunity that that security forces and that police have is something that threatens us all, and so they're coming together around that idea to demand accountability from police, but also to change the way we think about stigma, and how it continues to shape people's life chances generations after slavery generations after colonialism just..

Africa Hegel murder Americas US Middle East Wisconsin Central America
"vincent i" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

04:22 min | 4 months ago

"vincent i" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

"The other Africans stage revolts against plantation society that had the knock on reverberations around the Atlantic world, so I'm studying that process of sport warfare among Cor Montes in this case in Jamaica, but really with implications for how one sees slave revolt across the Americas during this period. Me About tacky in south. He was a real person. Tacky was a real person, and we don't know that much about, and we don't know exactly when he was transported to the Americas. We don't know how old he was. What we do know is that his name is the title for God chieftain. From the Gold Coast so his name is actually title which signifies that he was probably a man of importance in west Africa and then became again a man of importance among the slave rebels in Jamaica in seventeen sixty. We also know that he was most likely working as a driver. Now with implantation hierarchies, there were divisions even among enslaved people. So oftentimes slaveholders planters would nominate some person among the enslaved who they thought they could trust. To to help them police the rest of the slave population. Now this was a kind of dual role, because while those people were in some ways serving the plantation masters as sub overseers. Trying to control the rest of the enslaved, they also then had authority over the enslaved that they could use when they were revolts to lead rebellions and tacky was one of those drivers who decided to use the authority that he had to lead slave revolts, but he wasn't the only one there were other people that we can name also from the Gold Coast who were principal leaders of this revolt all around the island, and so when I call it tax revolt. It's almost tax revolt in scare quotes. Tax Revolt is the name that the planters gave it, but there were so many other leaders, and we all we don't actually know which leaders might have outranked tacky in the planning and execution of the revolt. All we can say is that tacky was one of the principal leaders who the slaveholders after the fact. Nominated as the leader of the revolt and designated the revolt tax revolt. Now the revolt was. Suppressed and people who had taken part in it, which transported to various locations. Yes, it was suppressed, and it was suppressed brutally through torture and spectacular execution, awful display of body parts all around the island but one of the other punishments in addition to the hundreds of people who were who were summarily executed was transportation. So, the planters transported another five hundred or more people from the island. Now some of those people you can track to various places like what was then British Honduras. What's now the country of Belize, but also to Virginia?.

Tacky Jamaica Gold Coast Americas principal Cor Montes Africans Belize Honduras west Africa Virginia
"vincent i" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

02:45 min | 4 months ago

"vincent i" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

"Story, it's about the projection of the values that we hold dear in the present onto the dead, which then sacrifices those values makes them sacred mix. The more important makes them seem more transcendent. That was one aspect in which our political life is formed around relations with the dead of course where we bury the dead, the kinds of cemeteries that we build become sacred to us. Corporate Ken Territory, right one imagine say a nation state and its national cemeteries as being fundamentally about relations between the living. Living and the dead, we can also see that the dead have a kind of sacred charge that can be invoked quite explicitly in political activities right so I thought about how it is. The people invoke the dead through their spiritual practices, which then informed the politics of rebellion, or in the case of Britain late eighteenth century, the politics of Abolition Ism as well because it was partly in response to these incredibly high death rates that evangelical reformers decided they needed to come to terms with slavery. That slavery was killing people and it was killing people before they had a chance to convert to Christianity. Which is what evangelical would really about, and that was one of the animating forces behind their anti slavery activity. Now at this point, this is where you'll. You'll love history and your love of arts. Come together because you began working on a film US right so as I had said. We had been thinking about the transformation of African and African Cultural Practices in the Americas under kitchens of slavery, and after that one of the principal scholars who developed a lot of those ideas who really studied the question, most closely was an anthropologist named Melville J of its and Hershkovitz. At the time he began writing in the late nineteen twenties. People assume that the slave trade and slavery had denuded Black People Negroes as they call them at the time of any ancestral heritage. They might have from Africa. Herskowitz didn't believe that. And he spent the better part of his early career traveling back, and forth between different parts of West Africa, the Caribbean, south, America and collecting materials in the southern United States to and document cultural connections between Africans, and what we now call African-americans, and what he was able to show partly by shooting film footage recording audio, taking notes on folklore was that you could see African. Americans had retained some ancestral practices from their homelands, and that those had been transforming in different places all throughout the Americas now the film footage itself was remarkable because he would shoot. Say a dance..

Americas Herskowitz US Africa African Cultural Practices Ken Territory Caribbean Britain West Africa principal Melville J
"vincent i" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

04:15 min | 4 months ago

"vincent i" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

"On Terror in Afghanistan and elsewhere I didn't see those things as continuous. I didn't see the terror war something uniquely different from most proxy wars of the late. Cold War period and my thinking historically has been to ask the question. How is it that one connects these longer histories of warfare together? And I do think that I was inspired to think that partly by having grown up in San Diego in a military town. And what about your, your family's personal history with war and with slavery? Well an african-american! My parents grew up in Virginia, and so they are descended from people who are enslaved probably as far back as the eighteenth century the Chesapeake Bay area. What's now? Virginia and Maryland was one of the largest importers of slaves in North America now I say north. America because the British empire imported the vast majority of its enslaved peoples into the Caribbean but for North America the territories that became the United States, the Chesapeake and South Carolina with a major importers of enslaved African peoples, and my family is descended from. Those people probably brought to North America in the eighteenth century. History was big in your life obviously, but also the arch. Yeah well. When I was in high school I I became very involved in theater and went to college thinking that I was actually going to do a theater degree. But at some point I thought well, you know I could probably do theater without a theater degree, but maybe I should have a backup plan and my second love in college was history, and that ended up being my career. Not Tell me about college because your PhD were looked at the brutal death rates in Jamaica, and how that formed its culture and its politics. Yes so we knew some things about Caribbean. Slavery knew it was especially demographically brutal. Really any place where people were growing sugar life expectancy was short..

North America Virginia Caribbean Chesapeake Bay Afghanistan San Diego Chesapeake Jamaica South Carolina United States Maryland
"vincent i" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

05:58 min | 4 months ago

"vincent i" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

"Vincent Brown welcome to meet the rices. Slavery is war. Tell me what that means. Well. In the book. I tend to think of slavery itself as a state of war, and in that I'm following the enslaved themselves who often discuss slavery as a state of warfare amongst themselves, most famously allowed Equiano who <hes> we know as one of the most famous formerly enslaved abolitionists of the late eighteenth century British Atlantic. said in his autobiography that when you make people slaves. Them to live with you in a state of war. Now in that he was echoing the philosopher John Locke. Who said that what is slavery? But the state of war continued between what he thought was a lawful conqueror and the concord now John Locke was trying to legitimate slavery. He was an investor in the Royal African company, and he actually helped to write the constitution for the colony of south. Carolina, which became a slave state. State, but equiano was doing something a little bit different than John Locke. He was actually commenting upon the conditions of slavery, the violence that was required to maintain people in slavery and the kind of response that was bound to come by those people who had been subjected so violently so for him, slavery was a state of war, and there were other enslaved people who echoed. Seeing slavery that way helped me frame the slave revolt in Jamaica. In seventeen, sixty, seven, sixty, one, which was the largest in the eighteenth century, British Empire as a war itself right as one of a series of wars, all around the Atlantic world that then ed up in this conflict in seventeen sixty Jamaica I'd like to look at your own life, and where that intersects with war, because you grew up in San Diego, and in fact, it was very early on that. You became aware of conflicts. I did well. I'm an American citizen. I grew up in the United States. I was born in the late sixties at the height of the Vietnam War and <hes> I I'm sorry to say that I can't name a five year period when the US military hasn't been abroad somewhere engaged in conflict with somebody over the course of my entire life, which seems to me like a half century of war having. Having grown up in San Diego I grew up in one of the largest terry garrison towns really in the history of the world the US Navy is as a major base in San Diego. The US Marines just north of San Diego have a major base and so coming through high school. A lot of my friends would join the military because it was the big industry in town, right. And of course, you know, my family had been <hes> had served in the army. My father served in the army. My Uncle A. Brother had done three combat tours I. Believe one in Korea and two in Vietnam, so the history of the military, the engagement overseas abroad in military campaigns was very much a part of my thinking growing up, and so when I thought about the history of slavery. It just jumped out at me that this history was itself a history that was embroiled embedded in a world of warfare, especially in the eighteenth century win. You have got Great Britain struggling in a century long campaign against its its greatest global enemy France, and all of those European wars then topped onto. The wars of enslavement that sent people out across the Atlantic into the European colonies in America, and what you have is a world of wars within wars, which looked very familiar to me like the campaigns at the US was fighting within the larger ambit- of the Cold War so by the time I grew to adulthood in the late eighty S. I was seeing these these late cold war campaigns in these post colonial states as as part of the larger Cold War, and then you see these proxy wars between the US and the Soviet Union fought out in places like Afghanistan right, and then of course by two thousand one, you see those kind of proxy campaigns between the US and Soviet Union growing into something else what we now call the terror wars, the war on. On Terror in Afghanistan and elsewhere I didn't see those things as continuous. I didn't see the terror war something uniquely different from most proxy wars of the late. Cold War period and my thinking historically has been to ask the question. How is it that one connects these longer histories of warfare together? And I do think that I was inspired to think that partly by having grown up in San Diego in a military town. And what about your, your family's personal history with war and with slavery? Well an african-american! My parents grew up in Virginia, and so they are descended from people who are enslaved probably as far back as the eighteenth century <hes> the Chesapeake Bay area. What's now? Virginia and Maryland was one of the largest importers of slaves in North America now I say north. America because the British empire imported the vast majority of its enslaved peoples into the Caribbean but for North America the territories that became the United States, the Chesapeake and South Carolina with a major importers of enslaved African peoples, and my family is descended from. Those people probably brought to North America in the eighteenth century. History was big in your life obviously, but also the arch. Yeah well. When I was in high school I I became very involved in theater and went to college thinking that I was actually going to do a theater degree. But at some point I thought well, you know I could probably do theater without a theater degree, but maybe I should have a backup plan and my second love in college was history, and that ended up being my career.

John Locke Equiano Vincent Brown Charles Warren Professor of Am Georgina History Design Studio Harvard Godwin United States professor Jamaica San Diego Atlantic Carolina Atlantic.
"vincent i" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

04:38 min | 4 months ago

"vincent i" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

"This is the writers on Georgina? Godwin my Guess Today's Charles Warren Professor of American, history and professor of African and African American Studies at Harvard. He directs the History Design Studio and he has a new book out which looks at slavery in a completely different light. Vincent Brown welcome to meet the rices. Slavery is war. Tell me what that means. Well. In the book. I tend to think of slavery itself as a state of war, and in that I'm following the enslaved themselves who often discuss slavery as a state of warfare amongst themselves, most famously allowed Equiano who we know as one of the most famous formerly enslaved abolitionists of the late eighteenth century British Atlantic. said in his autobiography that when you make people slaves. Them to live with you in a state of war. Now in that he was echoing the philosopher John Locke. Who said that what is slavery? But the state of war continued between what he thought was a lawful conqueror and the concord now John Locke was trying to legitimate slavery. He was an investor in the Royal African company, and he actually helped to write the constitution for the colony of south. Carolina, which became a slave state. State, but equiano was doing something a little bit different than John Locke. He was actually commenting upon the conditions of slavery, the violence that was required to maintain people in slavery and the kind of response that was bound to come by those people who had been subjected so violently so for him, slavery was a state of war, and there were other enslaved people who echoed. Seeing slavery that way helped me frame the slave revolt in Jamaica. In seventeen, sixty, seven, sixty, one, which was the largest in the eighteenth century, British Empire as a war itself right as one of a series of wars, all around the Atlantic world that then ed up in this conflict in seventeen sixty Jamaica I'd like to look at your own life, and where that intersects with war, because you grew up in San Diego, and in fact, it was very early on that. You became aware of conflicts. I did well. I'm an American citizen. I grew up in the United States..

John Locke Equiano Vincent Brown Charles Warren Professor of Am Georgina History Design Studio Harvard Godwin United States professor Jamaica San Diego Atlantic Carolina Atlantic.
"vincent i" Discussed on The Insider

The Insider

03:53 min | 5 months ago

"vincent i" Discussed on The Insider

"The Brazilian? <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> He <SpeakerChange> was using <Speech_Male> crossing the <Speech_Male> case <Silence> with his passing technique. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> It was astonishing. <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> noticed that with Mohammed <Speech_Male> Ali and a boxer <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> has foot <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> movement. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> The only other <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> person who mentioned <Silence> Mohammed, Ali <Speech_Male> and his foot <Speech_Male> work in relation <Speech_Male> to satellite event <Silence> was Begnaud. <Speech_Male> Right <Speech_Male> I <SpeakerChange> said good <Speech_Male> on your Ben. <Speech_Male> You <Speech_Male> are on the right page <Speech_Male> here so <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> other inspirations <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I <Speech_Male> I <SpeakerChange> study <Speech_Male> life I studied <Speech_Male> people. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> I became interested <Speech_Male> in photography <Speech_Male> because. <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> I just <Speech_Male> wanted to take photos <Speech_Male> of all <Speech_Male> the Nice Pete, places <Silence> I've been to. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> I decided <Speech_Male> I better learn to <Speech_Male> properly because my <Speech_Male> images were <Speech_Male> great at the beginning <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> because I didn't know how my <Speech_Male> camera would digital. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Sur sure <Speech_Male> so I <Speech_Male> started reading books <Speech_Music_Male> on aperture. <Speech_Male> ISO <Silence> everything. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> I took classes <Speech_Male> my mental. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Was <SpeakerChange> a man named <Speech_Male> is a man named <Speech_Male> Brian Brian Peterson. <Silence> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> Are you saying <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> relations an interesting <Silence> thing here. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I'm <Speech_Male> meeting all my heroes <Speech_Male> in photography <Speech_Male> just like I did <Speech_Male> with magic. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I reached <Silence> out to them. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Brian invited <Speech_Male> me on his workshop <Speech_Male> when he came to London, <Speech_Male> so we was down <Speech_Male> in the caught swale photographing. <Silence> <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> stayed with him in Seattle <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> we went up to. <Speech_Male> <Silence> Seattle Park. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Beautiful <Speech_Male> scenery in that part <Silence> of the world. <Speech_Male> I. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Am now I technically <Speech_Male> confident <Silence> Image Creator <Silence> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> I <Speech_Male> am now practicing <Silence> my vision. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I <Speech_Male> know what my <SpeakerChange> cameras <Silence> doing so. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> What does photography <Speech_Male> teach me about magic <Speech_Male> everything? <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> Composition. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> Lines <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Silence> structure. <Speech_Male> Texture! <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Advertisement> Color. <Speech_Male> Vibrancy. <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Whereas the emotional <Speech_Male> content <Speech_Male> and the image. <Speech_Male> What's the story <Speech_Male> in the <Speech_Male> image? Why <Speech_Male> am I taking this <Speech_Male> image? Why? <Speech_Male> Why why? <Speech_Male> What's what's <Speech_Male> the hook? <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> All their supplies <Speech_Male> the magic. <Speech_Male> Magician <Speech_Male> and the <Speech_Male> photographer storytellers. <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Here's <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> something for you. <Speech_Male> When <SpeakerChange> I was at school, <Speech_Male> I wanted to be <Silence> a journalist. <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> It's come full <Speech_Male> circle. <Speech_Male> I am now fell <Silence> to journalists. <Silence> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> And what my <Silence> overriding subset! <Speech_Male> The <Speech_Male> expression of life <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> in <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> all its horror <Silence> <Advertisement> and genius. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> The human <Silence> <Advertisement> condition <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> all of <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> this ends up on my <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> website, my <Speech_Male> blogs, my images <Speech_Male> instagram. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> All of my images <Silence> come with the narrative <Speech_Male> and uncrossed <Speech_Male> pollinating <Speech_Male> what <Speech_Male> I learned so photographer <Speech_Male> with the craft <Silence> magic. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Fascinating, but <Speech_Male> we run out of time. <Speech_Male> It's only a thirty <Speech_Male> minute show. <Speech_Male> We always end <Speech_Music_Male> with four <Speech_Male> quick fire <Speech_Male> questions. <Speech_Male> Are you ready? <Speech_Male> Okay, your <Speech_Male> favorite film. <Speech_Male> The Godfather. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Your favorite <Speech_Male> musician or person <Silence> that makes <SpeakerChange> music. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Wow <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Sam Cooke. <Speech_Male> Favorite <Silence> pizza topping. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Pizza <Speech_Male> pumping. <Speech_Male> My goodness. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Roni <Speech_Male> Pepperoni <SpeakerChange> and mushrooms. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And who <Speech_Male> would you rather fight? <Speech_Male> One <Speech_Male> hundred tiny <Speech_Male> Andy's or <Speech_Male> one massive <SpeakerChange> Joshua. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> On Five <Speech_Male> Joshua J.. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Joshua's <Speech_Male> taller than me <Speech_Male> so my I <Speech_Male> get a lot of leverage <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> from my left Tokyo. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Wouldn't <Speech_Male> say coming. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> By. Should people <Speech_Male> want to have a look at <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> your pictures still <Speech_Male> instagram. <Speech_Male> Fujiwara! <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I'll put a link in the show <Speech_Male> notes. <Speech_Male> Thank you so much <Speech_Male> view time and thank <Speech_Male> you feel honesty. I really appreciate it. Thank you Phil.

Mohammed Brian Brian Peterson. Ali Joshua J.. Seattle Seattle Park. Begnaud. Ben. Phil Andy London Sam Cooke. Tokyo.
"vincent i" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

ID10T with Chris Hardwick

10:04 min | 6 months ago

"vincent i" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

"Proposed to you. Write about so it's always a game of like you know what do you do you? How do you play your cards? Vinny how did you play your cards? That's what it is. You know because you know you can call you for something and you don't know but the opportunity is Kinda cool. What can I do with it? You know it off you know and and you know manage to make adult out at sixty cents. Well I never really heard that approach before because I you know listen America. I don't know what America's very much a self help society. There's a lot of like realizing your goals. I tell people all the time right down goals if you want to use them as a roadmap but hearing you say I don't think about goals you just sort of you're sort of just in the moment you just kind of find things that you like to do in the moment and that's really interesting and attractive to me because if you're always thinking about the future then you're not really focusing on the president. You're not living in the present you're not experiencing the present because you're always thinking ahead we and you end up working all the time. And that's what I've seen with a quite a lot of American actors that I've been working with. It's like the work all the time. When you work all the time you end up thinking that what you do is important. Which is I mean. It's important to take your jobs you know seriously but it's not the professor of how we just found a game was might save the world. You know what I'm saying is so I mean our we said you know because at a certain point who was involved in too many project I remember and I I was planned like ahead one year ahead. And that was the scariest thing for me and Edison formed like a lot of projects did collapse and I mean a lot of people would say these projects that doesn't going to work. It's not going to work. It's no I felt free. I felt free because I think to go on set with the desire to go on. Set is one of the most important thing in an actor's life you should go on said to work you fought so we'd say to go on vacation is definitely part of job because after point you know when you spend time doing your hobbies and stuff like that and you're like okay. So what do we do now winning whereas my next fight right but if you work is there's no next fight your inappropriate old fight so you lose. I would say perspectives right. Yeah because I think you're trying to make your job your identity but it's not never come to never be gone what you knew right right so sadden. We'll also as an artist. You kind of need to reef fill like ref- fuel like you need to have experiences to then be able to express them but if you're just tapping that If you're just tapping that fountain all the time and not refilling it. Then I would imagine you would get pretty empty after a certain period of time or you keep on saying the same thing I. I know that like the different experiences I have in life. You know there are some things that when I play them on set and like. I don't think two years ago I would have been able to do this. I mean not like that at least Differently so yeah what you go through. Whatever it is joy and pain is interesting for an actor. Yes definitely yeah especially someone who's one you know. Huge awards are you able to. Were you able to sort of separate that from yourself so that it didn't take you know? I. I have some friends who will not go to award shows because they go if I do that then. It's I'm going to start to think about that and I don't want to think about all that stuff because it's not. It's not why I do this. Are you able to sort of separate and just take it in stride? I mean part of you know be there to appear to do the red carpet and do the oldest bullshit. You have to do it because because otherwise you know. Somebody's GonNa do it for you instead of eventually people. We're going to see that movie so we actually at sure it's really useful. But unfortunately that's what people identify with the way the system goes so I mean I don't go everywhere and I try to stay little rare in France. Mostly you know because because it's worked to. Does he staying people judge you and the is like and then insult people talk about you. Think high school exactly but but rop but to win an award which like being goal oriented. Some people go. Oh I just WanNa win an Oscar. I just want to win the award. I just WanNa do this. And then they do and a lot of them go that moments over. Now what do I? You know it's like when you make it all about the goal. They're all about the work. That's the other thing dangerous because if you get the thing then then what happens if you're not if you don't if you're not comfortable. He's it's the goal it's silently. It's kind of sad. But you know I think it's with the data realize that what I won't terminally at at what I do. I mean I don't control movie. Of course you know I mean. I'm just an actor so I served on the wave that have been presented to a sets with lines and stuff but if you can at least come up with moments you know that somebody people will remember forever. I have this actors. You know sometime you remember about you know one thing you remember the story barely remember the movie but you remember that moment when that actress or actor turns this beautiful fron says depth thing and just your mind and it becomes like some with all your life. Don't you kind of things absolutely? And that's aiming for. That's what I want. Whatever the movie whatever the part whether the language you know stuff that you know people don't forget but what's interesting about that is that you don't really have control. You have control over what you bring to the table. But you don't have any control over how they frame the shot or light it or what music or whatever so you really kind of your sort of hoping for a symphony to take place when you just have like a saxophone. Like you're opening minute all works out. You're I mean depending part of course but as an actor as an actress you are you are. You are the sole artist you are. The guy comes at the right moment. He goes deep tab and add up and then you go for so act you got everything is made so you can shine. Normally if you're in a good movie. Yeah Channel would you. Do you know what I'm going to have to go because I'm going to cook for my kids now. I love it. You're good dad man. I I really enjoyed talking to you and I really hope that you all these questions weren't too annoying. I just didn't feel like an interview but we never talked about like westworld. Everyone knows westworld. And I'm going to record a thing at the beginning that says watch westworld and people are watching it anyway. But I'll remind them that you're in Westworld and anything else. Is there anything else? That's coming out that you have that you WANNA plug stink about it and becomes a tendency to forget anything. Just did anything the books. No I think the last thing I should with this no I have no actually no. I haven't movie in a box. In France a noted the international title though. And then lastly. What are you making dinner? You know what you're going to have to. I have a lot of different stuff to know. I got like zeal like a fish. I got rise Stan so normally open and I'm like okay tonight. It's going to be like I just come up with something live in the moment cooking the moment I will go with a no. I only know how to say one thing in French. Which is what I said when everywhere I went in Paris which was digitalization per se that's all. I know how to say Got We'll give him a pass on this when they don't speak a lot of languages you gotTa. We got to let them go. How do we say I usually end the podcast by saying enjoy your Burrito? It means. Enjoy your present as it's happening. How do I say enjoy your Burrito in French? Keep don't do it. Perfect perfect thank you. She don't boy to keep them. Do you'll see mill see Have a beautiful evening. Thank so much vincent. It was a waffle leisure talking to you for that moment. Cheers end identity scanning complete. Enjoy your radio..

Westworld America Vinny president France Edison professor Oscar Paris Stan
"vincent i" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

ID10T with Chris Hardwick

15:15 min | 6 months ago

"vincent i" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

"We never went to anything like that in all APPS realm even the eldest. Even the eldest. Don't have that memory of being like you know I mean talk about the war for the word. The one that we're around you know and there are still some talking about the. Second World War and that was the big thing in Europe but otherwise such like a noticeable events. I don't think there's anything here at least you know you had nine. We did your life. Did Change for a while. Can actually that dipped dramatically changed the way things are conducted. Here I mean it's you know it did change travel it changed around and around the world around just yeah around around the world the way that security is done and I was in New York when it happened and so I I lived there at the time and so it was a long period of time where the air felt different. You could just feel it in the air. People were generally nicer to each other. People were generally more It was very communal because of this horrible thing But then you know. After a few years then people just kinda slide back into their old patterns. They're kind of in their own bubbles again. They're not as you know it's not as much holding. No you go after you. You know that that does melt away after a couple of years and And then we're back in business now. We're all back now. We're all paying attention to each other again. But you know it's just unfortunate that it takes tragic events for people to remember humanity to remember other people. It's just so especially with devices. It's so easy to just get trapped in our own world and our own heads our own selfish bubbles you know I at addicting question. This is life or I think we are live right now. No no no. This isn't life. This isn't life this recording. This really sure it's really relaxed. Well I do a live television show on Sunday nights. I Love Live television. I love live broadcast because you can't you just second guess it. It's like whatever happens happens and there's a little bit of a have you ever done live. Tv OR ANYTHING BEFORE. Like not a talk show but like real live anything live. There's Internet you know but podcast is just a long conversation and it's one of the reasons why doing them for so long because I get to meet people like yourself that I've been watching for years that I think are really cool and then I just. It's just it's it's just like a conversation like we met at a cafe and I'm like Oh Vincent. He seems Nice. Let's get to know each other because in America at least I don't know what it was like in France but in America media was becoming so Short attention span sound bites. You know like you must. You've done a million junkets. It's like you get the same five questions and bomb boomed Koch you. You feel like you're a prop like you feel like you're human podcast come along and then it's like. Oh what are what are you know? What's Vincent like as a human being doesn't really even have to be talking about anything specific but you know if I were to hang out with this guy for an hour. What would that be like? And so that's that's kind of what the vibe of this is that that's really how it feels by the way. Oh good good good. Good good good when a at what point in your career did you say like I'm ready. I WanNa kind of I WANNA do English speaking films. I'm kind of interested in in the American market. Did that fall into your lap or was it something that you actively pursued. Well I never really thought about it like that. But let's say as I was saying you know it's not I never thought about myself like I never thought I could fit in French industry to be honest because because I grew up on the on on an American culture mostly you know my mother lived in New York so I I was there pretty early and endo so it was a lot about hip hop and all about you know Broadway in and easy and all these things. I grew up with that imaginary so so then was seventeen. I moved to New York and studied over there for like a year. That's realized that was very French. That's so fascinating that it took a different culture reflected back at you to make you realize like Oh actually. Yeah I do identifies what could would miss. I was dreaming of New York. I mean I was a toll New York free for years. I mean I would like excited to dig into the plane because I go to the Roxie would go to to the to the dancing and all those clubs it was like it was really really strong. the end of the eighty s and the beginning of the nineties in. New York was so crazy you know it was like the center of everything likes really then being there. Twenty four seven. I realized that I missed my little village called Peres because the five is different the minute you get embarrassed and do various you will year like the bales of the fuck in church up then birds and it's a different vibe. It's not as but we're slower. You know the thing is that things take longer time to happen because we over. Think everything you know. The Country of America in Brazil which are very young countries where things have been MIS mis more much more On the moment you know and each and I am European Parisian. I'd say we everything that you've also had the luxury of being able to live in different cultures like to be immersed in different cultures. Only totally and I think it's wonderful thing because that's how you that's actually. That's how I understood. My country is traveling around when you travel around and I see what I miss in France then when I go back to France. I don't complain as much like that team that I can put a word on that. I recognize my identity. What is it that I can find Italy in Spain? Europe has that thing that but then I was crazy about New York and I spent like a long time in Brazil. Young country where people don't think too much and should happen all the time. Yeah but it's refreshing. It's it's young. It's fresh it's new. It's still happening here. It kind of happened right. You know right so wiser. Let's say maybe but we're older into the culture that is funny to think about it because I think the American experience of my wife and I were my wife and I went to Italy and Paris and London last year and I always complain about God. The service is so slow in these French cafe. You know and it was funny to hear you say like you know we take more of our time. You know 'cause you're an older culture you're not as in a hurry and we're so in a hurry like I want this fucking coffee. Where's the why is it taking so long? You know we're just. We're so accustomed to like now now now now now and we tend because close slowly. The Chilean Europe is getting more and more Americanized in the way of living because globalization. And all that. But we're still and if you go to Italy and and Spain Spanish out and Brazil and some part of Brazilian by. It's like Whoo Hoo. But you can't complain because when you go there and you go to those places because you want to have this thing this stiffen different relationship with time right and now everybody has it for free. Yeah and also you know for people who I wonder if there are people who have. Who KEPT PUTTING OFF TRAVELING I? I'll travel some other time. I don't have time or I'm busy or I'm working on it That are now regretful. Like Shit I feel so lucky that we went to Italy and France and the last year in. May because I would really be finding because it'll be a while before it'll be I just feel like it'll be a little while you know. Even when they open everything back up at the first thing we're going to do is probably not go travel internationally. It will probably just kind of wait. See how everything plays out you know. I think we to have the choice anyway. I think the borders between at least like countries and even more like continents. It's GonNa take a little while before they. Everybody feels and south. America was late and actually the steel are and so he's going to take a little more time for them to adjust for the virus. And All. Yeah it was so surreal and it must be surreal for you too but when we were there in. May last year the Notre Dame fire had just happened and Ottawa's born that day she was born that day. Oh my gosh that's a that's a really fascinating Detail yeah that is really interesting. I mean it must have been such A. Oh my Gosh Gay. Or what is happening? I mean you know it. There's so many things that are happening in the world right now. That feel epic and not necessarily not indefinitely. Not In a great way. You know you know fires in Australia. Notre Dom burning and now there's a pandemic and then it just just the course of life or we just more aware of everything now because you know we have access to information all the time dancing Because we know more and more on the minutes so we are totally bombarded by a vital information. Everything that happens but I think there has been like Salamis. We never bowed to in the past. You know or people dying because of landslide or some disease or yeah you know. I just feel like when I have kids. What am I going to tell them? You know like because if you just look at what's available in the news everything is it's tragedy and so how do you tell a kid like? Hey listen there's a lot of shit going on in life and in the world but it's not all bad there are some good things but you really do have to. You have to dig for it. You know it's not just readily available. You have to really find it would say. Don't worry everything's GonNa be alright but focus on surviving right right right right right. Well you said earlier on like you were pretty calm guy. I mean I is that just part of your DNA or was that. I don't know did you. Did you have a role model? I loved it? I loved to talk to calm people because I just like. Did you learn that or you just were not as your chemistry just calm? I ended up is and stupor excited all the time. I JUST. I just focus on my breathing because I know this is the only way out at someone who meditates. I know exactly what you're talking about. It's really hard to do. Sometimes yes no. Let's call it on. I'm sure he just areas a lot of fire and the so you have to catalyze some. How are you writing? Is there anything else that you're is there anything else that you're working on at the moment or you're just taking this time off? No right not taking care of my kids. I got three girls and be here with me so I'm cooking mostly and doing shit with them so are you. Are you having to our because I have some friends who are parents who are like now have become teachers to their kids? Of course. That's what we reading so you don't it's I mean it's not like I get bored at any time right right right right right right right right right. And what advice do you have for people who are like yourself like me like people who constantly doing stuff and feel like I don't know what to do without the world to access you know I'm kind of going crazy. Would you just say to them? Like we'll just breathe or pick up a hobby or focus on something else like what's your advice for people who are hyperactive. You know a hobby is very is very superficial. Just the word you know. It's like do something. Where'd you where you have fun doing it? You know whatever really something that makes you wake up in the morning and joy. Barich Dixon risk. Whatever it is and I'm not talking about work because like but do something you know makes you feel alive and go for you. That's foil surfing when you're able to do it especially anything that goes into water. I'm very attracted by the ocean to spend a day or two hours in the day in the ocean at the end of the day. I don't need anything just you know. Okay I I've done. What onto do is there a type of movie that you haven't you you've done. You've done films in Portuguese Italian French English. Is there anything that you haven't conquered yet that you still? Is there as a big goal in mind like someday? I really want to do that. I don't have that honestly I never had it. I never had this goal always worked. I never tried to make. I mean I always I mean. I wasn't rich but that was making money I was I was. I was one of my wishes trends like she always had enough to live and and so I never thought about like. I WanNa do this character. I WanNa work this this prize. It's really bad like honestly you know we. We were talking about the choices. Yes of course you good choices but never forget you only choose in.

New York America Brazil Italy France Europe Vincent Spain Portuguese Italian French Engl Australia Peres Whoo Hoo Chilean Europe Salamis Ottawa Paris Barich Dixon London
"vincent i" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

ID10T with Chris Hardwick

15:55 min | 6 months ago

"vincent i" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

"At the end of the day because of all that That comfortable to be able to have hard drive the three thousand the history of like cinema everywhere it's available. I don't watch anything anymore. That's because it's too much you have this moment where you get into TV and you start to look for something and by the time you spend like twenty five minutes searching for something Italian you go to sleep absolutely. Yeah you're movie watching experience just watching like thirty trailers for things and going back. Nothing looks good your tax or I wonder if if now star making like three minute movies like well. Let's just make a trailer length movie. We'll just pay some actor a lot of money you heard about that. Of course Jeff Katzenberg product. Oh qube quickey seven-minute yeah. Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah it. It had the unfortunate Coincidence of launching during the corona virus. So I don't know if that helped because people are all in front around with nothing to do or if it hurt it because obviously there's no real news anymore outside of the coverage of the virus so you know nothing is really nothing else is really getting through right now in the news because the headlines dominated with the pandemic so it'll be interesting to see if it's if it survives but you know it you and I are old enough to remember a time when all entertainment was very separated. So film was film and Television was television and then twenty years ago the Internet started coming around and everything was suspicious of each other and nothing really. Oh you're a film person. You're a television person. That's an Internet guy. Now everyone kind of everything. Do you consider yourself like a just a performer for everything. Honestly I mean it's just a question of format really should did you feel that you can fit in it that you know why. Not but then again. Some shows that I didn't do for years in France for example. I don't regret because I can still today. I think the crap and equality became so interesting that at some point you know it's not really you know mostly TV for a long time. They didn't have enough money to make a good show right. That would you know and so everything has to be very close always talking ads and it was more like on the ridden in the line. Comedy but cheap because it was no money in you know now that changed you know. What's the what's the difference with a movie with right so no I just? I'm just an actor. I go anywhere that there's there's a cool gig how do you decide? What's a cool GIG? Is it sort of? Is it a gut feeling is it? A is like a gut feeling because I just I always like to find out from people like you know when you pick cool thing after cool thing after cool thing anyone can fall into something but obviously when you can see the intention behind projects people are picking and even like I you know I really I enjoyed you. You've done amazing films and I also enjoyed you in Shrek which was a fucking great movie so so I'm always curious like how people know like what is the because following your gut can be very challenging thing. We get insecurities we people tell us our ideas or stupid. We questioned ourselves but some people are really good at pushing all of that aside and just listening to their gut and that that to me is a really fascinating idea and but I think this is the only way to eventually deuce on Ping as your You see if you choose everything because of your taste because of your taste. What's you know? Then you back. What did looks exactly. Like where'd you are? Actually if you only do job for money for example for let's say bad reason because you wanna be close to somebody or you want more fame cheap way I would say when you look back to like a bunch of just can't stand and that would be. That's the only thing we have you know. The the actors eats radio body of work after bowling. After a certain point some people will recognize themselves. And some people won't but at least you know you treat yourself. Yeah but you have to know yourself to be true to yourself. You have to figure out what that is. I don't think you need to know yourself to be true to yourself. You need to be true to yourself. I'm talking like if I'm like you know. Always treat myself straight. But that's not the case but you know you can feel when you're doing the right the right choice. Not You know a wide doing this. You have to be clear with this at least if it's not true clear right right right you have to. You have to at least be aware of what you're doing. Okay yes I took this job for money. That's okay the next job. I'll take for artistic reasons you know. Is it just a? It's a constant battle at. I guess it is but it's not really about money Muslim. Mostly it's about you know I don't know about what really I'm still surprised of. You know everything that happens all the time when they called me for for. Westworld that I was watching by the way as there's an audience as a Fan. I was like that's funny because I didn't watch a lot of serious really and that was one of them so you know what I knew exactly. What was the deal when they call him? Yeah what what are you? This is sort of a bizarre question. But what do you think constitutes happiness? Is it a contentment? Is it is it. Is it a lack of stress or drama is it? What do you think it is? Stress is already actually when you think about this. This corona virus could soon in a position. Where okay everybody's losing money? Everybody mostly but at the same time look. We are not in a hurry anymore and I know around me people. I know I don't feel like that because that was pretty calm before this thing happened but some for some people. It really saved them. It took them away from the madness and Sydney the sit and to cook and be around people and the kept with the rest and really. I got at least examples in my mind. You know people that have been saved by the virus. That's really interesting. Yeah because it's in the midst of this really horrible thing you know. This is what we're left with and we do not crave stillness. I think we constantly want to be in motion maybe to be distracted or to sort of run from dealing with whatever it is that we're dealing with not sitting with ourselves and it's a shitty reason why we have to sit with ourselves but I don't think having to be with yourself is in itself a horrible thing. I think it is A. It's a necessary thing and to be reflective we need to sit and reflect from time to time. This is the comeback of Buddhism. I mean you know you're you're probably not wrong. I would imagine a surprising percentage of people are probably exploring Buddhism stoic philosophy anything that encourages stillness. Of course you have time suddenly yeah you do have time and I think we not that the not i. I don't think the universe a conscious entity but if it were a conscious entity I think this might be it saying. Y'All need to slow down a little bit and you need to take a breath and you need to reevaluate and you need to look at what you are valuing and just you know. Think about it reconsider. It see if see if you're following the right path or not you know definitely am but when you think about the dynamics that they had like in the few in the past you know like a plague or the Colorado and all these things I mean people would. I mean it was the same except that you would go to buy some bread and die on the sidewalk right. It was an old different urgency and injure and millions of people died from from it like bagging the days in Europe. At least and now you know with this I would say not little because it's not little but this that is not as list as let loophole as a one was talking about. And we still freaking out. Can you imagine why think we're just it's the it's the panic of making sure that it doesn't get out of control or that. The hospitals aren't overwhelmed. And so yeah I mean it it. Does you know I have had a hard time trying to explain to some people they go like. God what do we have to sit in our homes understand? It's like well because you don't want the hospitals to get overwhelmed. You know like it's if we have to sit around just to make sure that it doesn't get a lot worse than we sit around for a bit and then hopefully you know it but whenever there's a major event that comes along I feel like we always reevaluate. You know who we are. And what's going but then we kind of fall back into old patterns again eventually you know. I feel like we crave. We crave our old patterns. We Crave we crave distraction. But I I feel like as an actor because you spend you. Don't actually spend a lot of time doing the thing you're trained to do. You might work. You might be onset actually acting for maybe less than an hour a day. You sit around a lot as an actor so I imagine you're pretty condition to sort of being with yourself a lot right. You go to different locations. You're by yourself. You're sitting in a trailer you know. So how how have you kind of grow and be comfortable being with yourself? I never thought about that. Djembe right even though I hate to sit around to be honest and unlike a movie that has been well plans without any problems. You don't wait too much right normally but yet you're right you after you have to be alone and to be okay with that but two months because we've been I mean how. How long has it been for you? We I think we're in our fifth week. I believe fourth or Fifth Week of of course team. Yeah Yeah Yeah and we. We actually have not. I think I've left the house three times and five weeks two times to go to the pharmacy and wanted four times and then two-time were to pick up takeout but it's a whole thing like a mask on and gloves and my car because the cops can pull you over here. If you're driving around they can pull you over. Go where you go and so i. You know I'm all gloved up and I pull up to the takeout place. I opened the trunk from inside his. Set it in the trunk and then they close it so we've had no contact with any other people in in five weeks. What's going to happen that I really wonder how well it's going to be. He's going to have to be progressive. You know but otherwise I think people would just like freak out and go out and jumping clubs and kiss and whatever some will will be home. We're going to be really terrified. I think some I think I think the the post traumatic stress of social distancing. I think a lot of people will actually be really afraid. Because we're humans are Kinda huggers in you know like we. I do. Stand UP COMEDY. I go to shows. I meet people after shows. We hug take pictures too high fives. I'm not I'm not a Germaphobe but I don't think that's something I'll be able to do for a while now you know. That's the same thing in France people KISLA and everybody's hey you know it'll be a lot of air kisses from six feet for you when line. That's for you that's for you. I mean you know. Four species that relies on in real life interpersonal connection and touch and feel. And you know it is I think it will be more emotionally challenging than than people realize because the like we we walk our dog outside. We avoid anyone. Just walk around our block and I have a neighbor and she kind of came forward to touch the dog and I was like no. No no no no get like people are just. It's it's automatic. It's just part of our part of our DNA. So I don't know what happens after all this or Oregon or with film you know like film is a business of like acting as business approximity. You're near people. You're touching people. The crews packed in there is a makeup artist on your wardrobe. Is You know putting with what happens idea. Everything's blood right now. We'll see that's gonNa take a while before everything gets back in place. Yeah do you have any other personal hobbies or anything that you do for yourself that you've been doing more of the past five weeks. Actually I love to be in the water observer. I love to be actually. I even got involved with something incredibly call that he's called. It's called Foil Surfing. I don't know if serving it's incredible chicken out. What is it? And it's it's a board that has a wing underneath and a mass and so the miniature take a little bit of speed you you speed. You start to fly above the water. Oh yeah you got. I've seen that. I didn't know that's what that was called. Yeah I have seen that. Yeah and right now. You're allowed allowed to get into water here on know about America. Have it here you? You can't even get close to the beach. Yeah they had to close the beaches after the first week of corn team because everyone just treated it like spring break you know so like the beaches were packed. The first week of quarantine and then the mayor of L. A. Came out and said guys. This is not a vacation beaches or close so. Yeah so technically you can't you can't go to the beach them serve and all that anyway. So yeah you know. I play the Guitar. I I do garden stuff. I what do I do I read? I watch movies that I've watched before. He's still practiced martial arts. And I think that's the good thing is that you get to spend a lot of time with the kids. And so that's really really enjoyable. I do wonder how kids are GonNa view this time. You know like are they. It'll be a weird thing in their past ten or twenty years ago like yeah. There was a period of a few months where my parents were around a lot. You know I mean I think the kids will probably. It must be a lot different from their point of view. Of course. Yeah it'll be a memory and plus we..

France Jeff Katzenberg Ping Europe Sydney L. A. Colorado Oregon America
"vincent i" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

ID10T with Chris Hardwick

07:25 min | 6 months ago

"vincent i" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

"Yeah you are the problem because there's a problem is can you talk a little bit about the process of Like what the vibe of breaking into French film how is it? Obviously French film is revered that I would imagine the same way that although I almost feel like it to me as an American French film feels very elevated. You know it feels very like Oh. Wow if you can if you can make it in French film. That's sort of the gold standard for for acting in art. Feels very romantic to me. Do you do you perceive it that way. No I guess you know the interception we Arab from things from from distance always like. Can you know the disrupted or change them how you can? I mean I can see as European in here but even the complex French and non American heart artists APP towards. What's the so-called Hollywood? You know everything that is spoken in becomes Hollywood. It's part of this big like Dr Beast wants to eat everything else around a trillion. That's market thing you know. It's a market thing. It's a reality. Somehow you know when you look at places like France you know I think if we still have somehow of an industry is still alive is because we have laws to protect the markets from everything would come from America which is a good thing. Korea had the same and they have one of the strongest and most interesting in industry in the world today. So I don't know where I was heading for talking about the perception the perception of the different. It's different from you know. And you have this thing that trenches like you know art and romantic and this is bullshit. It's not what it is it's because you can. Maybe it's a vision of Americans about old Europe. All right we passed. We have places are thousand years already. But I don't think we're that I think it's a it's different. The system is different here. The industry's different. Smush smaller when you think about it. And it's not as tough as is the American market and the market industry. That's for sure right. Which is because America is such a large country. Part of the issue is that you know when it's a system that's based entirely on commerce. There are a lot of decisions. Get made for. How do we reach as many of these three hundred fifty million people as possible then it becomes more lowest common denominator? It's less you know I mean I think especially with all the streaming services now. It has been weirdly harder. I think for people to get some stuff made even though it seems like it would be easier because there are so many outlets I know even before the virus I knew so many actors who are out of work and kind of scratching their heads going but wait. Isn't there a demand for a ton of content? Right now wire there. Why does it feel like there are more jobs? Can't really tell but they are more jobs. That's the in sleight. There's so many things being shut all the time all the time because they need content good bad but they need. We need content. Know so but it's moving you know it's like the cars have been battered again and it's moving really fast and Stephanie. Moment where you after dot org disappear right. You know as a as an actor not as an actor acting but like as one of the movie makers or part of the industry you have to you have to see where the freedom and where the money is where the create the creativity. Is You know where fresh and happening once again and TV became that thing mostly yet TV absorbed a lot of the streaming services and TV and a lot of cable channels absorbed. What sort of used to be kind of independent film? You know like it's now these and now a lot of really amazing actors are doing limited series like westworld you know is a perfect example of You know having different you know like different people come in for a season at a time and doing something that's very cinematic but stretched out over six or eight episodes or ten episodes as opposed to. They're just like really really really long movies. So as you know was. Is that one of the things that attracted you to westworld dress interesting. Look the movies are getting bigger and bigger and stranger coming becoming smaller and smaller because we love watching that on on extreme. Now I mean if you have to have a home cinema whatever you can't eventually but it's not cinema otherwise you will end up watching like a long serial on your eye or eventually phone. Well most people do if you're if you're like if you commute a lot or if you're under a certain age most of the content you watch on your phone. I mean you have kids. Do they even understand the concept of sitting down to watch something on television or do they just assume that everything is on demand all the time in their pocket? There's been no it is by then. Anyway I've been thinking that for like a long time really and it's really a matter of size when you think about it right Sam content on any kind of screen. Tv doesn't exist. Became the computer with the you know the apple. Tv behind whatever box you have sold with the mouth and you and you have absent. You know it all looks the same for I mean. Look on any device now you can have the same content on different platforms Z. Even on your phone on Hulu and then on Youtube because it's been act or whatever so you it's what is sitting on what he's television. What is you know. It's just a screen. Where can you get it when anytime the closest green I guess? Maybe we won't have in screens that we own anymore. You know we just stop in front of the screen it. We'd be yours. Yeah you'll just see whatever is on the content some type of an augmented. It is on your in your on your. What do you call it chip chip chip and whenever you go in front of a screen? It knows exactly what you want to watch but I do think that convenience though is can sort of be the enemy of art in a way. Because if you're being that an algorithm thinks you wanna see all the time what's discovery like. What's the process of discovering things that you wouldn't normally think of or see I? I don't know you want to know because.

America Hollywood Europe Dr Beast Korea France Hulu Stephanie Sam apple Youtube
"vincent i" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

ID10T with Chris Hardwick

13:39 min | 6 months ago

"vincent i" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

"Welcome to the PODCAST number. Ten Sixty eight. Can you hear the dog barking wolfing a second ago up here? That's my my wife's trying to talk to Mike. I'm about to take you. Don't worry she's having a conversation with the dog. This is what happens in quarantine you just start having conversations with your animals actually to be fair. This is something that we do. When there's not a quarantine so you know what y blame it on the quarantine just wanted to sound cool as all. But I hope you're doing well and talk to your pets. Come on why not have full conversations with them have tea. Parties HAVE DO MASTERPIECE. Theatre put on costumes record. And then put it on TIC TAC. Because that's what all the kids are doing. God Damn it. I'm so close to I was so opposed to tick tock for so long but then you know there are a lot of people who are a lot older than I am. Who are doing it and now now I follow the elderly. That's that's those are the trends that I go after so I don't know but you're doing. Well let's talk about the ICTY. Ten Community Cork Board events at ten DOT COM. There's still stuff going on like Corey. Who writes in March twenty nine thousand nine launched North Beats podcast chatting with people behind electric music after my fourth open heart surgery three years ago? I got back into playing synthesizers side. Note Corey It sounds like you're okay and I'm very glad you're okay. So Corey goes on. I found a great community of artists with support of who support each other and play shows together. I discovered a niche of interviewing my friends about the technology and perspectives. They each have. I branched out to find guests that I personally don't know and have a mix of in-person and telecommunication interviews perpetually thirst for knowledge and learn from every interview. I work forty plus hours a week at Safeway as a produce manager in San Francisco. And don't have time energy to produce episodes consistently yet my listeners. A few giving back to the community is a gratitude. Checkout an episode sometime of North Beats podcast rate review and so corey. This is fantastic. That you're doing this everything that you said about how I you had friends on. And then you've recently started branching out to find. That's exactly how I started this. Podcast I was like hey I might run out of friends now after about a year so I should probably start and ten years later. Here we are so. This sounds fantastic. It's based on something. You're incredibly passionate knowledgeable about in your seeking more knowledge and I just have all the respect in the world for it so thank you so much and also thank you for what you're doing keeping the the flow of produce going in a time where we can't do you use to take produce for granted. I don't know might go to the store and pick up. We can't do that anymore. It's very important so you're doing what you're doing is very very very important to your community so I thank you. I'm sure community. Thanks you your podcast. It's called beets and you're in San Francisco. I assume you're North Beach Which I was just in like the two weeks before the The quarantine so I love San Francisco and I just I send you. I send you love appreciation and praise and encouragement to keep doing what you're doing. Thank you so much events at ID dot com or anyone else who wants to get your thing mentioned on the podcast. This episode is Vincent Pacelle. Who is an incredible French actor? You've seen VINCIT Caselli. He's been in a lot of stuff he usually plays a bad guy which he embraces and loves and he's in He's in France at the moment and so we spoke a few weeks ago. via teleconference video conferencing software and he was great. It was such A. It's been so interesting to talk to people in different countries and I really hope this continues moving forward in the podcast. Once everything kind of normalizes and you know kind of goes get gets back to some semblance of normal life which it will. I hope we continue to do these. Zoom Casts Vincent. Cassel is in the most recent season of westworld season three which is available on. Hbo HBO now today. And then I believe Max is launching may twenty seventh. So there you go you probably are already watching. Westworld if you're not now's a good time. You got some time to watch some westworld. This is the podcast number. Ten Sixty eight with the amazing French actor Vincent Acelle who we now join in. A prerecorded fashion in France initiating. All supposed to be thank you I. I don't think dropped into a random podcast that was already recording. You're definitely how you doing. I'm good sorry for being late. Oh you're fine. Hey Listen van you know. There's just is far more important things in the world right now than you know being exactly on time for a podcast. This is really not a big deal. This is A. This is a fun distraction that we're very lucky that we get to do so. I'm it's totally fine. Are you in France? At the moment I ended in France right now. I am in Biarritz which is the southwest of France nearby stain on And I don't want I don't WanNa linger too much about everything that's going on. I think this'll be a nice distraction for people but are okay. How's your area for Americans that don't know what specifically is going on in France? Well everything is blocked as In many places in the world we are we are stuck at home and those so we don't go you know and everybody respects that that would say ninety nine point nine percent the people re- respect that so hopefully like in a month we're supposed to be able to get out of. This tree began slowly. But surely but personally nobody's sick around in this region in particular we. It wasn't a hit so hard it was more like the east and the other side. We'll we're on the same boat. I know I know I was talking to a friend of mine in Italy about a week ago and just sort of saying like the interesting thing is what a community. The world has become because the playing field is somewhat in terms of everyone experiencing the same thing. You know to different degrees were you. Were you in us? Live in Brazil. A LOT OF TIME. I don't I don't live in Brazil anymore. I still have you know everything over there which is like a life somehow so I go often but I became a French designer again like like a year ago. So what so you were not from citizens and you became a French citizen again and are they. What's the process? If you okay you know what I know before but can I have this bangle? You cannot lose your French nationality so entrenched is just that you pay your taxes in the different country. The only okay. So it's not like you have to renounce it and then go. Hey I was just kidding before. Can I have this back? And they go all right resident. That would say. Oh Gotcha Gotcha Gotcha. I was reading that you speak multiple languages. Is this true? You never know with Wikipedia. No I do a little bit. I mean it's not such a big you know first of all when you're you're in transcendental base in Europe you have. I mean you don't have to because not like everybody does but we dancy to learn you know. At least Spanish or for some people would be German or Portuguese in my case Italian but the other thing is that when you pick one or two leading languages I mean it already easy to learn another one. It's not that hard. It's not like junk from Chinese Italian to Russian are totally different languages. So it's kind of it's gotTa Cheat Really Yes. Well it is. Yeah I mean it's just two. Americans were always fascinated. Because we're so we're land locked in pretty much. Just focus on ourselves and so we're not you know multilingual but I took Latin and it was very very very helpful to learn. You know some of the romance languages at least some of the basics because the foundation is all the same. Yeah you find things in there and really helps. Yeah Yeah About the other thing that I realized about you is that you and I have the same birthday. Happy Birthday November twenty third. Exactly the Thursday of this hedge terrorists by the way. Yes yes. What does that mean? What what what is I dave secretaries mean for US honestly? I don't know stay well. It's fighter I recognize myself in that meeting de you know. I need to do Sunday all the time. How hyperactivity shoe suffer from this do? Oh my gosh there. There is a mild form of attention deficit disorder vet. I feel like you know. They're always needs to be some project. That's why I was wondering because you know just sort of reading about all the different things that you do. It seems like you're someone that needs to stay very busy or at least half to always be focused on something. That's the case where you but if you should if you always have to be focused on something and it's a different thing all the time it means that you're never focused on anything right right right. I would say I like. I like to keep busy and I never get bored if you want to put it that way did you when you were young. I'm just curious like is your career kind of what you imagined. Because you legitimately are you know one of the more successful performers in the world and when you were young did you have sort of A. Did you have sort of a map for like? If I at least achieve this I will be happy if I at least do that. I will be okay out brand of being all working everywhere like intermission nationally. I never thought I would like being France. So that's what I try to do. Maybe that's one of the reasons why I wanted to learn other languages because I want to travel round and but yeah you know I wanted to be the bad guy and I ended up being about Guy. I guess will complain. You know what I mean. This is kind of character that I was attracted to when I was a young actor. And that's the count perfomance that I mean bad guy to make sure because you you think about it. What with bad guys is that they. They don't mind carrying everything that we pull. Humans suffer in in our daily life. And don't want to express this is everything you know. The bad guys can express everything we are trying to hide as as people even little things it says so you carry the dirt in a way and I think it's somehow pretty liberating I mean to be as a young action as a young man watching those guys playing like I know it could be like Deniro in a enriching ball that kind of loser no magnetism in a way because so ruthless or I would think about like characters played by Marcello Mastroianni. You know we can. Cowards is so charming and Olga's character I think really interesting because they reflects reality more than anything else ridding right. Yeah and they're also more layered and they're more complicated and they tend to be more interested in morphed and they want to play. Yeah they're more fun to play. I would imagine absolutely. I mean when you're when you're just a traditional protagonist in a film you kind of have like one goal really and you really can't stray from that goal and you know the bad guy gets to be. The opposing forces tries to knock that guy off balance. I mean you you really give the story. It's a purpose. You know the bad guys. Give the story the purpose..

France Corey San Francisco ICTY Mike VINCIT Caselli Community Cork Board Brazil Safeway Europe Vincent Pacelle HBO Vincent Acelle Marcello Mastroianni US Cassel Max Olga Deniro
"vincent i" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

First Class Fatherhood

10:32 min | 6 months ago

"vincent i" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

"What type of Disciplinarian are you as a father and the different end. This was that you grew up with. It's about it's a balance Do I hope my children accountable? Yes and I'm our our philosophy and home is when we have to be an example. It's not what we say what we do that. Our children see we. Hold our children accountable. I'm not my child's friends. We're not friends. I'm I'm their parents in when it's time to hold you. Accountable is not to hold you accountable. Because we're trying to be mean it's a life lesson so our philosophy timing I with arc. Children is we hold them accountable In various different ways you know whether that is Taking away their electron ix not allowing them to go and visit friends or have friends. Come over We will eliminate some things that are important in their lives We don't necessarily don't miss. We haven't chat highs child As as the way I grew up. That's not the way we raised our children. You know we have communication with them. We always explain the why Even when they say no no no and only reason why. I'm sharing these things with us because I don't want you to go through the pain that either I endured where these are some things that I learnt or someone shared with with us. But it's so important. Parents CAN'T BE FRIENDS. You're not fringe to your check your children your parents for reason. Yeah very well said And Troy I do like the NFL guys that I have on the show here. There's a lot of parents do have concerns about when they should let their kids or if they should let their kids play tackle football with all the the reports the misinformation around concussions. And all that your opinion. What's a good age or stage for kids to start playing contact football? Excellent Kweskin the first thing that is a parent's choice. You know your child's motor skills and as you introduce them to the game. Every child is different. Every child's motor skills are different. Troy was a very advanced kid at the age. Three four and five so was to on their other. Kids were at their age. That was not advance. Our children playing tackle football at the age. Five or six. Their motor skills allow them to do so. But when you are considering tackle football I no question going back to asking the right questions to those coaches to those administrators. What are you protocols? What are your safety protocols? What are your hydration Protocols had by What kids will play when they won't play so again? I'll start with parent decision but really really assess and have that conversation with the coaches administrators. Running those youth leaks about their protocols if after processes but really identify your child's motor skills. Yeah very cool and and I know I know that you've played a key role in In bridging the gap between the players and the owners during the whole national anthem protests. We saw that hit the college even high school Level how did you kind of address that whole situation with your kids? It was good conversation every day. We live In an area where we grew up where we have haves and have nots and it was really about communication. Very guy used me at that time. Just to be a bridge builder Making sure that both sides were all arguments or positions were hurt And then you come to find out from that process that you're there were more like minded than they. They had differences. Everyone wanted the same thing for their community and for their children So how we discuss law enforcement relationship law enforcement criminal justice reform my role. There was just being a bridge. Builder Amongst Athletes Law Enforcement. Community leaders are membership Our office in general and those conversations at home as they were playing out on television they became conversation. Conversations around our dinner table weren't difficult conversations. Demery alley This isn't going away. We have to be intentional about these efforts but being able to pose those questions or concerns to our children to see how they would respond so that entire process. Great teachable moment for a family here. Yeah very well said and I know we just recently we just passed the NFL draft here. I know that's a big moment for a lot of kids. A lot of their families know for you Drafted in the first round What was your take on this whole. I mean I know right. Now we're in the middle unique spot gear because of the whole corona virus. Everybody is on lockdown. What was your take on. How the draft went down You know watching it at home. And how are you handling the corona thing where we started and then where we ended? I just thought it was just a wonderful Cumulation of people working together. We started off from the foundation from the to the end commissioners leadership. We can only do this under state at home orders and that was the foundation of making sure safety I being able to celebrate the prospects at the same time the moment in being part of a different conversation during the day from what we've had over the last say six eight nine weeks around what is happening in our communities. What are health concerns? We were able to raise money with the draft on very proud moment for myself personally. Being part of an organization that raised over one hundred million dollars for frontline workers a doing it in collaboration with our players. That's a special moment. Then celebrating watching the different families be watching. Our head. Coach is watching the general manager watching the owners in the context of their work with their families. So again I thought it all came together. Our partners with Microsoft Amazon and it was just a good good moment for our country so we saw those three days. We start talking about being a galvanize her We saw that play out again. First and foremost being able to raise money for first responders to celebrate the individuals who were have been dreaming the last eighteen nineteen twenty years of at this particular moment and then doing that in compliance with state home orders. Yeah I think it was such a welcome Baker So many people around the around the country here just getting finally got some some sense a sports back in our life. They've been taking away from US FOR LAST MONTH. A year and a lot of us are just hungry for some positive news and to see all those kids celebrate with their families and just so much like you said so much money being raised for the people that have been helping a moment for the country as well great moment and again folks still talking about it and we hope that It'll be a a memorable moment for at least for the twenty twenty calendar year for many folks speaking calendar year. What what's next for you here? Roy what kind of goals or plans. You Happy Yourself. Here for the future so Today you know Bay staying home Making sure getting some of the little things around the House that my wife and children wanted to get done. That typically my work schedule doesn't allow me to do which spending a lotta time together loving all one another Being patient with one another and then we're now from a work standpoint we're still developing what is virtual off season. It looks like we're still listening to obviously and being guided by the medical community on How training camp Could be or what are the protocols that needs to be in place so just doing proper planning reasonable planning Inconsiderate planning so when I you know so just making sure that we're That were reasonable as we plan as again as parents. What does it look like? Our children going back to campus and heading back in Highschool to. How do we just return to work? And what does that look like? Yeah get stop laughing. I WanNa hit you with Troy. I love to ask all the DADS that again on the hot guests. What type of advice do you have the new dad or for that about to be father? Who's out there listening time? It's all about time You spend time in areas most important to you. Be Patient Your Dad. And you whether you're a new dad by way of coming into a new relationship I hear the term stead at know your father so as you are entering into the relationship. Whatever comes along with your with your new partner. That's now you all are want and I would just say embraced. Time embraced moments. Continue to have patient patients and be available. Yeah very well sounded loved a message. There's been an honor for me. I gotta say Choi. That's in your first class father all the way it take so much time here on. I last father thank you. Thanks for having me back to wrap things up here on I last fatherhood. I gotTA give special. Thank you once again to Troy Vincent to give me a few minutes of his time here. It was so cool. Please let me up on twitter guys. Who brought me on Instagram? Let me know thought about today's episode always loved feedback. Lock it in and got four coming your way next week. Including my interview with Dr Dilip Joseph. He was captured by the Taliban back in two thousand twelve and rescued by seal team six. Don't miss that one. Check out on instagram account at Alexander as to find out who else will be joining me here. That's all I got for you guys that I thank you for listening to first place. I'm out at least and please remember guys. We are not babysitters fathers. And we're not just fathers. We are first class bothers him. didn't know..

football Troy NFL DADS Troy Vincent Taliban instagram twitter Athletes Law Enforcement US Dr Dilip Joseph Microsoft general manager Baker Roy Choi Alexander partner
"vincent i" Discussed on The Jason Stapleton Program

The Jason Stapleton Program

12:18 min | 1 year ago

"vincent i" Discussed on The Jason Stapleton Program

"Well hello everybody welcome back to the show this is wealth power and influence I am Jason Stapleton and got a special special show for you today phenomenal show and we just had the best conversation that I've had in a long time it was very easy going it was relaxed it helped that he was way too generous with complements with me which everybody loves everybody loves to have that EGO stroked and he did not disappoint but there was a lot of conversation in there about about following following what you believe to be right in the face of adversity in the face of people telling you what you should be doing with your life and what you are the what route you should going in the choices that you're making there are always people who are going to want to control you who are going to want to shape your life and in some cases bring you down to their level and we talk a lot about that on the show today as well as building brand in how you kind of define yourself in the industry and whether you own a business or not it doesn't Matt later you have a brand and that brand is likely not deliberate meaning what you're known for what people believe about you you've left for them to decide and as you know I think that's a very poor way to manage your your brand and your life and so we talk a little bit about that as well but I I just WanNa thank Vincent so much for bringing me on the show he's been a longtime listener of my show is supporter of me and what we have been doing through through some a lot of adversity and lot of a lot of blowback over the last couple of years as we've changed directions of the show and and we've moved on to try and do more to fix more people's lives rather than just trying to be angry about government and so turned over to Vincent let him manage it but please go check out his show and download and subscribe at if you liked what you heard today because he just he and his he and his he and his partner on the show just have great chemistry and I am I'm I'm glad I had a chance to do it and Vincent if you want me to come back on of course I will but without further ado here we go thank you also very much back on Friday welcome to because we make the podcast about making creativity and why we do what we do is makers and creatives I'm your host been Ferrari joining me as always my co-host Ethan Carter what's going on mm-hmm Vincent How's it going man it's tell you what it's a momentous occasion and medication on Monday night I said we were going to have very big guest and a very important guest now I don't use the term mentor lightly but our next guest is my mentor I have learned so much from this and we'll get into what I've learned in he's going to drop some serious knowledge on you guys but rather than blather on let's just introduce I we have the one the only Jason Stapleton welcome Jason what's up guys thanks for having me too so we're coming out it's so good to finally have you on because it's like I get to actually talk to you not just chat with you while you're doing your show it's kind of neat because we've been we've known each other for a while but it's one of those it's one of those new age twenty-first-century relationships take somebody and you've chatted with them online but you've never really had a conversation I I you know I have so many friends around the world who were exactly like that like I mean you know as soon as amy amy who works with me and and who kinda manages my business as soon as she says Vincent I know exactly who she's talking about oh exactly what you're doing and your business and all of that but this is the first time we've ever actually sat down and connected so it's it's great it's so Jason Jason was the top libertarian podcast on the Internet I mean I would say as far as the Libertarian podcast he was one of two that I actually listened to and he you changed your focus on your show and you started but you didn't change it all at once you kind of started you eased into it a little bit and one of the reasons I call you my mentor is because I actually sent the was the first time I reached out to you was in an email and I said you know Jason All your talk about race using your human capital because that's basically your mantra raise your human capital always be improving always seek increase and one of the things that resonated for me was raised you human capital you can if your company's teaching you something learn it and I did that and I started learning all the aspects of my company and when the company started to go south they actually needed me to stay on they couldn't let me go because I knew how to do jobs that they didn't know how to do before you said that and then when that company finally did go under the next job I have the one now four days later using skills that I had learned at the last job because I listen to you so I mean when you give me advice it's now it's like Oh Jason says to do this I do this I said there was no alternative it's been amazing watching you transform from medical in an economic podcast in to a podcast about growth in developed about individual growth and development but also about building a brand increasing your influence and doing more you know being better communicating where did that come from like was that just something you always interested in or what caused the switch to Wright yeah that that'd be good to know yeah well it's it's Kinda funny because I was I own a company that that taught investors and traders how to read the market basically how do market structure and read how to invest and make money at that and I had gotten that company had gotten relatively large and I had turned over is the day-to-day operations to other people and I was handling basically the business stuff the marketing I was the face of the brand I was doing all of that and that was taking it the vast majority of my time and I said you know I wonder if this was just a fluke I wonder if I built one business and that that's all I can do but one of the things that I really liked it talking about politics and economics because I felt like a greater understanding of both would help people grow and become more successful and more independent didn't and I was very libertarian minded and so I started a podcast that was devoted to talking about the things that I couldn't really talk about in my business but thought were really valuable for people to know and understand and I really did think a greater understanding of that would lead to more wealth and more freedom more financial freedom in life freedom for those folks and we struggled at the very beginning with the podcast like anybody else does we I mean I remember I had sixty downloads I think the first step is sewed and we grew from there and we kind of stalled out at around three hundred and I remember thinking why I'm not really sure how long I'm GonNa continue doing this because three hundred people it sounds like a lot if he had a room full of three hundred people you'd be like oh I got a huge we said that's something we say all the time like audiences also small and we're like yeah but if those people were on a room it would be intimidating that's that's really fair to say that it's in but in in my mind I'm thinking Ok I if it's not a by that point in my career I really was looking at it in terms of look if I can't make a million dollars doing this then I don't I don't really want to do it because that's where my mindset was so I wanted to reach everybody if you were politically or ideologically aligned with me I wanted to reach you and if I couldn't figure out how to do that and I I didn't want worry about small potatoes stuff so I wanted to see the growth I was I was comfortable as long as I could see the growth but I wasn't seeing it and so we were working at it and then we just kept testing a bunch of different stuff in our podcast and we kind of found a rhythm we found a niche and we found people who really responded well and we just kind of we just leveled up everything that we were doing what we were saying and as we moved into the two thousand sixteen election we really hit I don't know a vertical stride that that took it from around two thousand downloads in episode two thirty thirty five thousand downloads episode and we became the like bias significant Arjun the biggest libertarian podcast in the world and as as that started to grow and as we came out to two thousand sixteen and that was the handed the political side of it was done I started reassessing what we were doing and what I really wanted to get across to people and I started injecting what was really common for me because I used talk about it all the time when I was teaching traders the inspirational stuff the entrepreneurial stuff the mindset stuff that really I think causes the greatest shift in people's lives is the mental shift and so I started talking with people about that and I got I got a lot of blowback from my audience which I thought was odd because we're all about freedom and self sufficiency that's very libertarian idea and what I realized was I had attracted a large the people who profess to to be concerned about their own self sufficiency in and their own their own liberty but who really were only interested in in planing about politics and being angry and mad at the world they weren't actually invested in any change they derived a great deal of satisfaction by just hating everybody that they viewed as being responsible for their failures or their shortcomings in life and so I made a decision to change entirely changed the direction of the show and start focusing the show we as you know because you guys you're a regular listener we still talk about politics we still talk about economics it's a very different perspective perspective of okay how how do I grow how do I survive and thrive based on all of this it's happening around me and what should my focus be in the focus shouldn't be how do we fix government the focus should always be how do we create a more abundant and rewarding and satisfying live for ourselves and I mean half my audience just disappeared they just and people came out of the woodwork telling me what a terrible idea it was a terrible decision I had made how was going to fail and how it was it was all over for me best of luck to you go screw yourself that kind of stuff and and you know I I drugged it off as I always do because I mean really what are these guys know about a building a podcast but that was that was the reason for the change is that I I wanted to have a really positive impact on the world I didn't see that from the first four years ago in the show all right guys to tell you about our sponsors today the first one is Indochino boys I am headed this weekend to a wedding in Palm Springs and wouldn't you know what I'm going to be wearing an not no suit brand new Han off the rack and he's not even off the rack you don't buy off the rack there you actually buy a custom tailored suit here's how it works actually went into the store this time rather than ordering online now ordering online is cheap and easy about as simple as you can make a couple of quick measurements then you're done they send you a suit in about three weeks but if you are lucky enough if you if you by the grace of the good Lord have the option to actually go into one of their was forty locations worldwide starting point and then boom twenty minutes later he says you're done and about two weeks later custom suit in the mail delivered you'd expect to pay a thousand two thousand dollars for suit like this nope starting right now today you can style upgrade now with thirty dollars off your total purchase of three hundred ninety nine dollars or more.

Jason Stapleton three hundred ninety nine doll thousand two thousand dollars million dollars thirty dollars twenty minutes three weeks four years four days two weeks
"vincent i" Discussed on The Right Time with Bomani Jones

The Right Time with Bomani Jones

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"vincent i" Discussed on The Right Time with Bomani Jones

"Get your podcast. We appreciate it raiders view us gives five stars. The only gives costars I'm inclined to think that you are a hater. It is. I interviewed day is in cross from you and a blue polka-dot shirt from Yahoo sports. He's also catch them on Turner doing doing little stuff on cameras day. Name is Vincent goodwill. I don't say I don't know what short version you go by professionally today. What do you call me? Bo. I call you've any incoming. Okay, that's cool. But your stories it'd be calling. You vincent. If you call it your cards. Don't worry about the bottom out too. I'm trying to. I'm sure how to help whatever level of Brandon that you out here. Trying to pull out really don't have any level like this. When the person whose name is Bomani everybody on air causing them bowl. Yeah. It has right. That'll be asked permission either. I'm oh, polite. You know, see, I'd rather you call me Vince on air, which you you call me Vinnie 'cause we do. Okay. There we go on what you see. There we go. I'm just trying to I'm trying to respect what it is that you build out. I don't know what this is man. Join it though magazine doing the national coverage now for the first time is different because you don't have like the daily grind part of it. But it's still a grind 'cause you're covering a region. And you're trying to chase whatever the big story is type of thing. So you gotta stay in tune to not just one team. But like twenty and for the first time you are around like a team that's worth a damn white. I live in New York. So I'm not rounded team knows. We'll go go hang out with teams that are worth the day. Have you parachute here? It'd be like, hey, I hear there's a good team over here. Hey, you know, what that is different? Because usually around this time the tournament you start dreading like the drag of like the last four or five weeks of the season. Now, I'm like, oh the second season is about the star. What are these playoffs like because very covering the business? And the bulls about the last eight years. That made me old just fed. It makes me old since twenty ten buck nine damn nine. I'm old Yemen. This has been a minute, man. You dare I'm basketball Kardashian. She she whenever I go to team the team goes bad. And I'd say, they gotta be careful. Vinnie showing war is going to lose seventy two Vinnie to show. What was they record after you did a interview with Steph Kurt? They play well at night. But it wasn't that great. I thought that it was it was like, no the the crazy was there one with Draymond early in the season. Like really really early when Golden State was rolling, right? I'm standing in the locker Draymond is on one side. Katie is on the other side in which is shooting. We're just talking about different stuff like off the record recorders off laughing joking. Have a good time. Literally a week later. That's when all hell breaks loose. And I mean, all hell broke loose. You just carry your vet? Although this is man like black cat, you know, black like man, look Simi to San Antonio. No, actually, don't send me the San Antonio. They got nog a g you're going to be a thank going to pass man look here. All right. Look, you wrote an interesting story the other day, and I think the wording threw people off. But you basically said there was the interactions with fans and players that we ain't that far away for mold like Madison to palace of situation. Yes, now, my account argument to that was you got to be real careful what you're talking about. What you say to Madison to Patterson simply because that was not that was a multi cultural affair air by was fighting. But sounds like your point was don't be surprised if a player come on these fans. Yeah. I mean, I think here's the crazy thing about this bone. You can remember this because you're a historian. We aren't that far moved from air. We're players will go into the stands nowhere..

bulls Vincent goodwill Vinnie Yahoo Turner Madison Kardashian Vince basketball Brandon Yemen San Antonio New York Steph Kurt Katie Simi Patterson eight years five weeks
"vincent i" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"vincent i" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Vincent is the business of clothing full full two segments biz america it's very excited about correct as well companies we'll talk about that one next time but there's an intersection in your world of of philanthropy and currency tell us how that would that would manifest itself well let's start with a really interesting statistic and that is thirty five percent of north americans do not trust nonprofits and unfortunately well maybe that's because of this thing that there's one that rhymes with red cross could it be read ross charity navigator dot com look at their their great it's amazing i mean it's a lot of it there's a lot of stories but you have a specific in particular story because of your pension for building houses right i mean the red cross and many other so in two thousand ten the red cross received half a billion dollars aid and i think you're gonna pull up here solu just a minute half a billion dollars eight to build one hundred thirty thousand homes in haiti this is what they said that they were doing how many homes are actually built constructed and accounted semi look there are not many neighborhoods in haiti two thousand maybe so we are now in search of the red cross five hundred million and what was called haiti relief wow this is after the earthquake in two thousand ten last time i checked permanent homes so far provided the the red cross says it's provided homes to more than hundred thirty thousand people it's a big house yeah less well less than a dozen.

Vincent haiti billion dollars thirty five percent