22 Burst results for "Viktor Frankl"

"viktor frankl" Discussed on Self-Coaching

Self-Coaching

04:46 min | 3 months ago

"viktor frankl" Discussed on Self-Coaching

"There's always somebody that has worse off and then and then one day. I'm saying well what if i were able to track down every person and finally get to the ground zero the the person that has forced. And there's nobody still person can save. Somebody's worse off than me. Because so then they're they're the one person in the world entitled to be miserable but that's an example of toxic positively. Don't don't don't worry about someone's got it worse often you so that would be toxic positively. Yeah i think so i. There is a term that i've recently which was termed by this man. Viktor frankl who's frankel psychologist survived. The holcombes concentration camp you. Yeah his his story is amazing but that he grew soon came from his writing. So maybe you know this term because he he coined a term. That's actually they're calling the antidote to a toxic positively and the term is tragic optimism. Which is kind of like post traumatic growth where he kind of talks about how you know. There are inevitable tragedies that humans experience or there are some things that are like extremely difficult and in with tragic optimism. It's like understanding that we can actually grow from these experiences and start to have a greater appreciation of life and relationships and increase our compassion and our purpose and so he talks about how we shouldn't avoi- difficult emotions in difficult situations but instead we should like embrace them as part of life knowing that if we do have the right mindset and allow ourselves to fully process the experience and the emotion that on the other side of that there will inevitably be growth in our in. If i'm not mistaken it was viktor frankl who Who said that you know reflecting on concentration camp experiences that that the one thing the human psyche. The human spirit can't tolerate is something when duress cain who is unending and there is no no exit and so that goes in with a tragic optimism..

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"viktor frankl" Discussed on Texas Titans Podcast

Texas Titans Podcast

02:03 min | 5 months ago

"viktor frankl" Discussed on Texas Titans Podcast

"This is a day and age where it's very common practice to take one individual and then categorize an entire population based on one individual's actions viktor frankl more than probably any psychiatrist. Or scientists of his day in his chosen field truly saw the uniqueness of each and every individual and then also took the time to understand the circumstances for which they had been raised that they were living in and tried to give that thought in realized the meaningless of bitterness and anger and holding onto that and certainly for judging someone based on the actions of others. so it's a it's a great book. it's a great read. I hope you will check it out. I hope you will subscribe to the truyen letter. My personal newsletter. Actually in the most recent edition. I had a write up on man's search for meaning. Hope you will check that out. Go to jason right. Now dot com. You can sign up there and just check out what else i've got going on. I have a private coaching practice. I would love to to help you that something that you're interested in especially if you're a business leader an entrepreneur if you have a startup or if you're just trying to improve always in all ways if there is a way i can help you will submit you a quick application just to see if possibly we would be a good fit to partner in whatever it is that you're trying to to work on and if if that seems to be the case then we'll take a step further and see if i can't help you out. I be honored to do that with that. Listen to the jason right show and keep tuning in for these book reviews. And that's it. Thank you so much for tuning in and go read. Man's search for meaning. I really think you will find a lot of meaning for he your life by doing so. Thanks for listening sh..

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"viktor frankl" Discussed on Texas Titans Podcast

Texas Titans Podcast

04:37 min | 5 months ago

"viktor frankl" Discussed on Texas Titans Podcast

"You know one of the reasons why. I have my podcast. I've i've told all of you his that. I believe that if i am the absolute best version of myself the fruit of that will spill over and benefit my fellow man. That's the goal. And i hope that somehow in some way maybe you come across one of these book reviews or you listen to the podcast and you yourself will endeavour to step out of the matrix evaluate your life can start realizing the power that you have in your decision making process. I think that it's so important to to face. Life knowing that you and i have infinitely infinitely more power than most of us actually realize power over outcomes power over Decisions that we can make be. Health mental relational doesn't matter. And you know i'm reminded i actually keep it As the face of my of my apple. Watch my famous z. Famous might the famous quote by zeno. Who was the father of which reads man conquers the world by conquering himself in that in in and of itself. I think up viktor. Frankl's practice and what he found in man's search for meaning it is having this Yielding control over how we react to situations one of my favorite quotes from viktor frankl. That is in the book. That i i. I read in that search for meaning that i have quoted up as many times i can remember and i say to myself over and over and over in so many times i failed to act upon it but i try my best to remember that between action and reaction their space and if we can remember that we have that space between action reaction and we can learn to zero in on it with allegra laser focus and control that space between action reaction. We can change so much of the trajectory of our lives so with that. I hope that you will read man's search for meaning. If you read it for the first time i would very very much like to hear about your Your take on it. Did it impact you like it has me and what what might i have missed. What what did you learn that. I didn't mention I if you're going through a hard core struggle and you to visit about it then reach out to me i. I don't have all the answers. But i'm looking. I'm searching trying to find him. And i think that if you read this book you will be encouraged because you have to be mindful of the entire time this is someone who endured a hell on earth the likes of which none of us will probably ever have to experience and came out of it on the other side. A confirmed man what he believed about taking control of self and your attitude and finding that purpose in those individual moments was was absolutely verified and then went on to lead a purposeful life for example and also just To so you know. What happened to viktor frankl's wife. She died of starvation most likely with her unborn child and viktor frankl never got to see her again. As a matter of fact he never saw any of his family again and he went back to vienna where his practice was where he was arrested. L. captive and that's where he lived out his days and and continue to practice his work. He thought that he owed to the people of that area to stay in to offer a positive way. Another thing when confronted with Former nazi soldiers or political leaders. Viktor frankl decided that it was best. To not generalize population. Based on a few bad actors. He realized again he saw each and every human as an individual acting out in he did not hold. The german people are in total as response is responsible for what was happening which again..

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"viktor frankl" Discussed on Texas Titans Podcast

Texas Titans Podcast

02:42 min | 5 months ago

"viktor frankl" Discussed on Texas Titans Podcast

"So i hope that you will tune in for that. It'll probably be in three or four weeks but either way. We're gonna talk about viktor frankl. We're gonna talk about Lug author logo therapy pronouncing that wrong. But i'm sorry. I told you i'm not scientists psychiatrist but logo therapy and We're gonna talk about a lot of other things that i told i told dr winds later said. I don't want to just make that conversation. All about viktor frankl. What i would like is to have a conversation that has utility value to melissa owners. A want them to walk away and be able to improve their mental state in. Let it be something that helps them in finding their purpose in their lives. So please tune into that on the jason right. Show you find on spotify itunes wherever you get your podcast. That'd be great for free listening. But here's the afterward that or portion of afterward the doctor wins light panned that i found very a very great profound in Great job of summing. Up this book here it is despite a Mining schedule frankl also found time to take flying lessons at pursue his lifelong passion for mountain climbing. He joked that in contrast to freud's and authors depth psychology which emphasizes delving into an individual's past in his or her unconscious instincts and desires. He practiced height psychology which focuses on a person's future and his or her conscious decisions and actions his approach to psychology stress the importance of helping people to reach new heights of personal meaning through self transcendence the application of positive effort technique acceptance of limitations and wise decisions. His goal was to provoke people into realizing that they could and should exercise their capacity for choice to achieve their own goals writing about tragic optimism. He cautioned us that the world is in a bad state but everything will become still worse unless each of us does. His best frankel once asked to express Asked excuse me. Frankel was once asked to express in one sense the meaning of his own life. He wrote the response on paper and asked students to guess what he had written. After some some moments of quiet reflection a student surprised frankel by saying the meaning of your life is to help others find the meaning of. There's that was it exactly. Frankel said those are the very words i had written..

viktor frankl dr winds frankl melissa jason freud frankel Frankel
"viktor frankl" Discussed on Texas Titans Podcast

Texas Titans Podcast

03:50 min | 5 months ago

"viktor frankl" Discussed on Texas Titans Podcast

"They've completed this sentencing. Once the war was over and they and they inevitably ramat half a million. They would start to just describe an absolute detail in the mind would paint these pictures. It was a realistic. It was like this was going to happen. They would take themselves outside of the moment in look in and figure out what life will in fact be like after this and they would enjoy these moments. And you know viktor frankl. He goes through and it's not. It's a very short book. As a matter of fact the in most of the book is not necessarily just about his time in the prison camps he just used that as an example at to draw upon arm but he does go into some pretty grueling details of what the jewish captives suffered during that time and it is grotesque. It is awful it is horrible. It is is just complete. The nazis did everything in their power to dehumanize these men and women and but he also talks about how on occasion the the nazi soldiers would find it within them to just randomly express Some sort of I don't know kindness if you will you know. And he talks about how just the smallest tiniest ounce of kindness. It wasn't so much that there was another human being kind but what it was it was a it was a reminder that they the jews were in fact human because they have been treated like absolute pigs in fact one of the things. Victor frankel goes through his. He says that there's two types of people that went through nazi prison camps swine and saints. The swine were those they were all treated like swine. They were treated like swan but some of the captives remained saints. They held her. Dignity held their Their their heads high shoulders. Back whenever they were marched into the gas chambers. They didn't grovel they didn't. They didn't hold their heads low. They stood up. They held their head high in until they drew their last breath. They were their own man or woman would guardless of what was going on. And i just think in right now in the times we're living yet. I think that this book is incredibly important. I would ask you. Please please take the time to read this because as you know the as it says right there at the bottom of the screen improve always in always so much of our self improvement has to do with actually getting inside our head and finding meaning in each moment in which we live and being able to find purpose in that. And that's what viktor frankl describes throughout this book. How that is to be done how he did it in real time in a nazi prison camp. I don't care what you and i are facing. It probably won't be anything like what viktor frankl had to face and was still able to hang on to that dignity. Here is something that actually Dr william j win slade wrote. Who little bit of a preview. After reading this. I reached out to dr winslett. Who wrote the Wrote the afterward for this This copy that There will that picture of their this edition of man's search for meaning he actually afterward ford are reached out to him. And i'm going to have him on the podcasts. On the jason right show..

viktor frankl ramat saints Dr william j dr winslett slade ford jason
"viktor frankl" Discussed on Texas Titans Podcast

Texas Titans Podcast

04:01 min | 5 months ago

"viktor frankl" Discussed on Texas Titans Podcast

"Who's working on this idea of. Don't look so much at life. As a general term and in the way way off this abstract idea of what its meaning is but instead take a captive and figure out what the purpose for your life and your meaning is in that moment will he took that any turned his time in the concentration camps into a real life experiment. Essentially these concentration camps for viktor frankl became laboratories for human understanding himself being one of his primary subjects. He wanted to know at that moment. Whenever he was brought into the concentration camp and he was stripped of all his clothing he was shaved down to his bare skin. Every every scrap of his body shaven his head. Everything basically his name is taken from him. He's assigned number everything that he owned everything that was his identity to the outside world was stripped. The only thing he was left with was what was in here in his mind in so he endeavored to figure out in different situations. Why did he think the way he did. Why did he react the way he did. In those moments why was it. For instance that some of the insults hurled by the nazi cabos and guards it wasn't the actual beating or the punishment that was the pain causing element of the situation but he noted was. it was the insulting. It was this individual who lacked even a fraction of viktor frankl's education stature prior to his catt trivedi. Having such domineering has been stood dominance over him in for what reason there was no there was no objective reason why this person should be treating him the way he was and.

viktor frankl nazi cabos catt trivedi
"viktor frankl" Discussed on Texas Titans Podcast

Texas Titans Podcast

05:14 min | 5 months ago

"viktor frankl" Discussed on Texas Titans Podcast

"Well how do folks it is that time again for another truyen book review and this one is very special to me. It is man's search for meaning by viktor frankl. Here's why it is so special for me. If you were to ask me for any book that would recommend especially as relates to nonfiction. This is the book i would want to put in your hands and there are a number of reasons for that. It's not so much because it is a tale of a psychiatrist. Viktor frankl who survived the nazi concentration camps. And it's not a biography about that. It's about finding purpose in each in every moment of life. Be it a good moment or a moment of suffering. And i've read this book a number of times and the reason why i'm bringing it onto the book. Review is because Novel rubicon just rent mentioned in a blog. Post or something. I don't remember i saw. But he said it shouldn't be the goal to read as many books you can but to read a few really good books over and over which was kind of a kick in the gut to someone who as you all know. If you've seen any of these reviews i'm trying to read fifty two books at a minimum this year and i would like to actually exceed that. I do want to be a more prolific reader. But in kind of combining that i decided well why not go ahead and go back and re read a book that i find to be of profound importance to me in my life and that would be beneficial to anyone that might stumble upon this review and with that in mind i chose to reread the bigger frankl's man's search for meaning so just a little bit of background for if you're not one of the twelve million copies had been printed owners of the book. Let me tell you a little bit about viktor. frankl viktor. frankl was a was a scientist. He was a psychiatrist. He had a thriving practice Prior to world war two. He was an outspoken opponent of the nazi party. One of the reasons why he was targeted and arrested. His entire family was taken and prior to now. This is something that i had forgotten or didn't know or whatever until i reread the book and read some of the think. It was in the afterward where this was noted. Was that.

Viktor frankl frankl frankl viktor viktor nazi party
"viktor frankl" Discussed on The Most Hated F-Word

The Most Hated F-Word

05:41 min | 1 year ago

"viktor frankl" Discussed on The Most Hated F-Word

"Sorry pretty deep okay. no. I'm fine with it. It's been something that i've been wrestling with. And this i was i was thinking about as you talk about this but hey we're talking about it. I've always been a positive guy and over last year. I mean i've dove deep into the emotion side. And i've discovered and found insight that i never knew existed like beneficial and and then i'm like okay now i'm gonna use this to like i don't know i'm naturally positive is well but then it came across toxic positivist and like wait. Is that bad. So i really appreciate your answer. Because i've been toying with that personally. Like yeah no. I want to learn from those but i like. You're observing like observing as opposed to just ignoring her. And that's what i to some degree. I was doing before just ignoring thing. So i appreciate that and actually. This reminds me of something that this observing thing which i really really appreciate because yeah because i can observe myself feeling these emotions in its natural but if i can just sit back and observe it and something that i submitted you guys last night was the money log exercise and it really walk through that and i i actually pulled out a quote that that ran through my head every time. I've done a few times. So i'm going to read this quote then i'd like if you can't explain the money log exercise that people can use in relating to because it really did allow me to sit back and observe what was happening but the quotes from manser just for meeting which very popular quote from. Viktor frankl but. It reminded me so much every time i've done that. I'm going to read the quote between stimulus and response. There's a space in that. Space is our freedom and our power to choose a response in a response lies liser growth and our happiness. So can you touch on. What is the money log in crete at space or that ability for us to observe our financial Feelings while incredible..

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"viktor frankl" Discussed on Build A Life After Loss Podcast

Build A Life After Loss Podcast

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"viktor frankl" Discussed on Build A Life After Loss Podcast

"Had i died to my grief and anguish during that time was completely overwhelming and consuming and it was hard to think outside of that to open up the possibilities of what might be in the future and i lived in that place for many months. So i get this. The struggle is just immense. It's it's really immense over time. I learned some things. And i learned to start letting go of that pain and start letting go of the guilt and the shame and all the other emotions that were weighing me down that were combined with that grief and it never ever ever meant that i let go of my children but in miraculous and wonderful ways i feel like i hold onto my children in more significant love and gratitude than i could have ever held onto their memories into their life and to their existence. Today if it weren't for letting go of that pain and that grief and that anguish. That i felt. Here's some excerpts that kind of share some of my thought process after the fact. I knew that it wasn't okay to be unkind others. Why then was it. Okay for me to be continuously in kind myself. I said things to myself that i would never say to someone else. I know now that my heavenly father wants me to understand and internalise the vision he has of me. He wants me to know that. I am his child that i carry a divine spark from him. I truly believe that we all carry that divine spark from him from our eternal father and that he wants us to be able to move through this pain that he's not judging us for our pain. He's not judging us for our grief. He doesn't want us to judge ourselves for pain. And grief can tell from those earlier excerpts that i was doing a ton of that. He doesn't want that for s. He wants us to live in love and light and gratitude. He wants that for us. Here's another excerpt. One of the problems with grief visit there is no time line for how long it will last. But i learned. There are things that can help healing and things that can prolong grief in man's search for meaning viktor frankl shares his dehumanizing experience of being a prisoner in a concentration camp and experience that i cannot comprehend. I can only imagine that it was far worse than my imagination. Can even conceive frankel famously. Wrote between stimulus and response there is a space in that space is our power to choose our response in our response lies our growth and our freedom and i believe this is true what exists between stimulus and response are my thoughts and feelings in my early pain. The space between stimulus and my response was miniscule. Almost imperceptible over time. That space got larger and with awareness. That space was much more noticeable. That gave me the spirit space to choose. I think we make a mistake. When we consider viktor frankl's words. We may think that the response he refers to should look a certain way in other words that we should act like were healed. An all better and that it doesn't still hurt when we're not healed but it does hurt. That's the danger of his quote without context. If you read. Viktor frankl's book. You can see that he was still hurt. He still had to grieve what he lost. His experience was still extremely painful but he didn't allow it to make him better. He didn't allow his captors cruelty to make him cruel. He chose to be hurt to grieve and to recognize the hurt and the cruelty in it all. He chose to still be humane to still exhibit love and compassion and to still be a good person and to work toward healing. I wonder if we make the mistake of thinking that our response to tragedy needs.

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"viktor frankl" Discussed on Tara Brach

Tara Brach

05:40 min | 1 year ago

"viktor frankl" Discussed on Tara Brach

"Now, , I'm a stay in. . Welcome. . It's very nice to be with you and I share to begin with a cartoon that I got recently that I found really easy to relate to an was of. . Two mice in each of the mice is on its own spinning wheel and one is frantically moving, , and the other one is just sitting at the bottom of the wheel looking very relaxed and at peace, , and of course, , the caption is for that one I had an epiphany. . So what was the epiphany and <hes> to me the tiffany's like this amazingly valuable reminder. . That, , we forget regularly that we have in any moment. . The capacity to pause. . To, become , still to get off that wheel of obsessive thinking and of racing through the day and of running away from something unpleasant or uncomfortable that in any moment. . Any moment we can stop we can stop we can breathe. . We can let go a little and trying to do it right now just any intentional moment of. . That gift letting go letting go and then it's possible to enter the next moment with more presence and balanced clarity and heart. . In Buddhist psychology, , there are what are called the four divine abodes and each one is an expression of what it means to be at home in the sacred. . And the divine abodes are loving kindness, , compassion joy, , and the fourth, , which makes all the other ones. . The previous ones possible is equanimity. . So equanimity is this. . Inner balance this ease, , our spacious -ness of presence it's a a non reactive awareness. . And we're able to come into rest and be and that spacious nece that in presence than all the other qualities of life that we so cherish like compassion like love arise. . Naturally, , we can actually move into the next moment when we were coming from equanimity with our full intelligence, , our full heart. . I often reflect on Viktor Frankl 's famous quote. . Because it's really an equanimity quote. . and. . He says that in-between the stimulus and the response, , there is a space. . And in that space is your power and your freedom. . So, , it's really really meaningful on our path. . To, , be able to do at that mouse did and. . Just stop racing to stop the spinning wheel come to rest. . especially. . In Current Times as we consider, , we're in times of multiple pandemic and. . With so much uncertainty and threat, , and so many of us feeling. . Reactive distressed. . Being able to step off that spinning wheel. . And access that space of equanimity that that refuge of inner ease. . Is a tremendous gift. . It affects all who retouched. . So. . This is what will be exploring together this evening. . How we can move from reactivity to that space of non judging balanced presence. . And as we explore this You might be considering what are the waves that you're encountering in your life whether it's individually or your sense of our world That really stir you up. . The waves that gets you spinning when you most really need to be able to. . Touch again that inner refuge. . So this'll be our inquiry in shifting from reactivity to that presence that allows us to then respond from the best of who we are from our awake carts. . Maybe begin by sharing. . A story <hes>. . NPR. . That's where I heard it or this little girl Melissa is at home and she's drawing and she's all excited because she has just discovered that if you combine yellow and blue, , why makes green and says, , she shows her mom and her mom says Oh that's beautiful and you can show your dad when he comes home. . So that evening her father who's very busy Wall Street finance person broker. . Comes home and he's very agitated and he walks in the door talking on his cell phone and she's Little Melissa's following him around the house. . You know trying to get his attention, , but he's on the cell phone. . Any goes into his office knees on the cell phone end turns on the computer and she's tugging at his pants trying to get them to look look look at what she's done. . And he gets irritated and he says, , Melissa what are you doing down there? ? And she said Daddy I live down here. .

Viktor Frankl
Equanimity: The Gifts of Non-Reactive Mindful Presence

Tara Brach

05:40 min | 1 year ago

Equanimity: The Gifts of Non-Reactive Mindful Presence

"Now, I'm a stay in. Welcome. It's very nice to be with you and I share to begin with a cartoon that I got recently that I found really easy to relate to an was of. Two mice in each of the mice is on its own spinning wheel and one is frantically moving, and the other one is just sitting at the bottom of the wheel looking very relaxed and at peace, and of course, the caption is for that one I had an epiphany. So what was the epiphany and to me the tiffany's like this amazingly valuable reminder. That, we forget regularly that we have in any moment. The capacity to pause. To, become still to get off that wheel of obsessive thinking and of racing through the day and of running away from something unpleasant or uncomfortable that in any moment. Any moment we can stop we can stop we can breathe. We can let go a little and trying to do it right now just any intentional moment of. That gift letting go letting go and then it's possible to enter the next moment with more presence and balanced clarity and heart. In Buddhist psychology, there are what are called the four divine abodes and each one is an expression of what it means to be at home in the sacred. And the divine abodes are loving kindness, compassion joy, and the fourth, which makes all the other ones. The previous ones possible is equanimity. So equanimity is this. Inner balance this ease, our spacious -ness of presence it's a a non reactive awareness. And we're able to come into rest and be and that spacious nece that in presence than all the other qualities of life that we so cherish like compassion like love arise. Naturally, we can actually move into the next moment when we were coming from equanimity with our full intelligence, our full heart. I often reflect on Viktor Frankl 's famous quote. Because it's really an equanimity quote. and. He says that in-between the stimulus and the response, there is a space. And in that space is your power and your freedom. So, it's really really meaningful on our path. To, be able to do at that mouse did and. Just stop racing to stop the spinning wheel come to rest. especially. In Current Times as we consider, we're in times of multiple pandemic and. With so much uncertainty and threat, and so many of us feeling. Reactive distressed. Being able to step off that spinning wheel. And access that space of equanimity that that refuge of inner ease. Is a tremendous gift. It affects all who retouched. So. This is what will be exploring together this evening. How we can move from reactivity to that space of non judging balanced presence. And as we explore this You might be considering what are the waves that you're encountering in your life whether it's individually or your sense of our world That really stir you up. The waves that gets you spinning when you most really need to be able to. Touch again that inner refuge. So this'll be our inquiry in shifting from reactivity to that presence that allows us to then respond from the best of who we are from our awake carts. Maybe begin by sharing. A story NPR. That's where I heard it or this little girl Melissa is at home and she's drawing and she's all excited because she has just discovered that if you combine yellow and blue, why makes green and says, she shows her mom and her mom says Oh that's beautiful and you can show your dad when he comes home. So that evening her father who's very busy Wall Street finance person broker. Comes home and he's very agitated and he walks in the door talking on his cell phone and she's Little Melissa's following him around the house. You know trying to get his attention, but he's on the cell phone. Any goes into his office knees on the cell phone end turns on the computer and she's tugging at his pants trying to get them to look look look at what she's done. And he gets irritated and he says, Melissa what are you doing down there? And she said Daddy I live down here.

Melissa Viktor Frankl Current Times NPR
Mindfulness For Everyday Life

Secular Buddhism

04:50 min | 1 year ago

Mindfulness For Everyday Life

"This first episode is about the word mindfulness. When we talk about mindfulness for every day life I think it's important to first of all define what is mindfulness? Why would we want to be more mindful? So let's jump into that I. I. Want to share some concepts and ideas that will help you to wrap your head around the overall idea of mindfulness. So, mindfulness is a set of practices that were inspired mainly by teachings from the east particularly from Buddhist traditions but it's a form of understanding the nature of our own minds You could say it's almost a philosophy a way of life and mindfulness enhances everything we do in our lives. So I want to jump into that for a moment Let's start out by defining what mindfulness is mindfulness. I'm sure you've heard of the word that's why you probably interested in this workshop in the first place. But when we hear the word mindfulness, it will probably make us think of some kind of concept to be mindful is and you fill in the blank what does that mean for you? When we're talking about mindfulness the way it was understood in the eastern traditions from which this practice comes from mindfulness is the non-judgmental observation of the present moment. It's a way of being imagine being able to sit with unexperienced that you're having. Let's take. For example, a strong emotion as you go about your day to day activities something happens, and let's say a you're driving in a car cuts you off the first thing you experiences some form of an emotion and this may be frustration that may be downright anger, but the emotion that we're experiencing is typically strong. Emphasis practice is the ability to observe the present moment in a non judgmental way, which is not to say if I mindful when the car coats me off I'm not going to be upset that's not exactly how it works. The way it works is when I'm driving in a car cuts me off and I suddenly realize I angry I can observe in a non judgmental way the emotion I'm experiencing without being angry at the fact that I may angry. Typically, what happens when we encounter a strong emotion throughout the day? We have a feeling about that emotion anger as an example is something that we typically feel aversion to. We don't like that we feel angry it's an unpleasant feeling. So when a when the feeling arises, we have an aversion to it, which immediately sets us up for a secondary layer of experience. There's the initial experience of anger that's what I'm experiencing, and now because I'm experiencing the unpleasantness of the anger, I'm also experiencing an aversion to my anger in other words I'm either mad that I mad or something along those lines. Mindfulness is essentially the practice that allows us to remain with the first layer of experience that we're having. It's a really powerful thing Viktor Frankl, the Austrian psychologist and Holocaust survivor said between stimulus and response. There is a space in that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom. Close quote. Now I really like this quote because it helps me to understand what's going on in terms of practicing mindfulness by like to think of my to day life as a series of stimulus and response, and all of us experienced this as we go throughout our day, let's just say you go to work your co workers says something to you or your boss says something to you, and there you go. That's the stimulus. Next is the response I may respond. And I'm not talking about necessarily responding with words it may be responding immediately with thoughts like I'm angry that my boss said this or did this and immediately when I experienced anger, that's another stimulus another response I'm experiencing anger that's the stimulus. What's my response to experiencing anger for most of us? It's an aversion to the anger that were feeling and this cycle goes on and on throughout our days stimulus response, stimulus response, stimulus response, and all day long on and on and on for our entire

Viktor Frankl
Mindfulness For Everyday Life

Secular Buddhism

04:51 min | 1 year ago

Mindfulness For Everyday Life

"Welcome to the mindfulness for everyday life workshop. This workshop is split into approximately twenty episodes that are about fifteen minutes each. So this first episode is about the word mindfulness. When we talk about mindfulness for every day life I think it's important to first of all define what is mindfulness? Why would we want to be more mindful? So let's jump into that I. I. Want to share some concepts and ideas that will help you to wrap your head around the overall idea of mindfulness. So, mindfulness is a set of practices that were inspired mainly by teachings from the east particularly from Buddhist traditions but it's a form of understanding the nature of our own minds You could say it's almost a philosophy a way of life and mindfulness enhances everything we do in our lives. So I want to jump into that for a moment Let's start out by defining what mindfulness is mindfulness. I'm sure you've heard of the word that's why you probably interested in this workshop in the first place. But when we hear the word mindfulness, it will probably make us think of some kind of concept to be mindful is and you fill in the blank what does that mean for you? When we're talking about mindfulness the way it was understood in the eastern traditions from which this practice comes from mindfulness is the non-judgmental observation of the present moment. It's a way of being imagine being able to sit with unexperienced that you're having. Let's take. For example, a strong emotion as you go about your day to day activities something happens, and let's say a you're driving in a car cuts you off the first thing you experiences some form of an emotion and this may be frustration that may be downright anger, but the emotion that we're experiencing is typically strong. Emphasis practice is the ability to observe the present moment in a non judgmental way, which is not to say if I mindful when the car coats me off I'm not going to be upset that's not exactly how it works. The way it works is when I'm driving in a car cuts me off and I suddenly realize I angry I can observe in a non judgmental way the emotion I'm experiencing without being angry at the fact that I may angry. Typically, what happens when we encounter a strong emotion throughout the day? We have a feeling about that emotion anger as an example is something that we typically feel aversion to. We don't like that we feel angry it's an unpleasant feeling. So when a when the feeling arises, we have an aversion to it, which immediately sets us up for a secondary layer of experience. There's the initial experience of anger that's what I'm experiencing, and now because I'm experiencing the unpleasantness of the anger, I'm also experiencing an aversion to my anger in other words I'm either mad that I mad or something along those lines. Mindfulness is essentially the practice that allows us to remain with the first layer of experience that we're having. It's a really powerful thing Viktor Frankl, the Austrian psychologist and Holocaust survivor said between stimulus and response. There is a space in that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom. Close quote. Now I really like this quote because it helps me to understand what's going on in terms of practicing mindfulness by like to think of my to day life as a series of stimulus and response, and all of us experienced this as we go throughout our day, let's just say you go to work your co workers says something to you or your boss says something to you, and there you go. That's the stimulus. Next is the response I may respond. And I'm not talking about necessarily responding with words it may be responding immediately with thoughts like I'm angry that my boss said this or did this and immediately when I experienced anger, that's another stimulus another response I'm experiencing anger that's the stimulus. What's my response to experiencing anger for most of us? It's an aversion to the anger that were feeling

Viktor Frankl
Personality Isn't Permanent with Benjamin Hardy

The Addicted Mind Podcast

05:49 min | 1 year ago

Personality Isn't Permanent with Benjamin Hardy

"Hello. Everyone. Welcome to the addicted mind podcast. My guest today is Benjamin Hardy and he is going to talk about his upcoming book personality isn't Herman. INT- and Benjamin excited to have you on the show. I really want to talk about as we were talking about earlier talking about science-based changed. So before we do that, you want to introduce yourself and tell us a little bit about your story. Yeah. Absolutely. Man. Yeah. I guess the beginning of it really or at least the major kind of huge event that started my journey was my parents getting divorced at age eleven and I came from a background where my parents were kind of a religious family and When my parents divorced that stopped being a big part of our life at all. But my father was so torn up by the addiction in the depression of it. All that he ended up becoming an extreme drug addict actually while yeah, he was. It was intense man i. mean our house became literally a crazy place filled with drug addicts. ooh. Here, was also there's anything everything you can think of out in the open, really interesting to see My Dad was a hero to me. He was also like a really successful guy in it. Just kind of really threw him down. You know he was an attorney and he was it just really was interesting to watch this kind of experience lasted. I, was eleven the oldest of three boys at lasted until I was around. Around nineteen or twenty. I have no clue how I graduated from High School I was the oldest of three and I was kind of suppressing everything that was going on and ultimately we shut out my dad and my mom was living apartment to apartment just trying to she was actually trying to run a health club with her sister a small business, and so she was kind of go go go new zero stability in. In, my younger brother ended up dropping out of high school. He tried joining the Marines ended up getting kicked out. I, ended up at age nineteen. I was living at my cousin's house on his couch playing world of warcraft all day doing nothing and just was incredibly unhappy, Viktor. Frankl. Who wrote the book man's search for meaning he talks a lot about in that book and he's referencing the Holocaust, but he talks. Talks about how when a person loses hope and purpose for their future. The present becomes meaningless and that was kind of where I was at I. Didn't really have much hope or purpose for my life in my life was very meaningless. I was my purpose may have been to like get to the next level on world of war craft. It was not creating an enormous amount of meeting in my life and so I've. Connected with my face. I ended up serving a church mission for a few years. Totally changed my life, expose myself to a lot of things. Read. A lot of books saw a lot of people helped. A lot of people did a crazy amount of journaling. I. Reconnected With My Dad. He ended up overcoming addictions while I was on that experience. We've since become amazing friends. So you have a lot of his personal experience with addiction and Canada chaos that comes with all of that Oh. Yeah. Yeah. My life was chaos for a long time man I. Mean I was eleven year old boy and I had zero stability. There's capital T. Trauma. There's lower trauma you know in capital. T I. Guess You could say would be just like a cute events that occur just intense events that shaped your identity, but like lower t from what I understand is being in a chaotic environment and just kind of having zero footing zero. Zero certainty at. All right. So it Kinda leaves you lost and all of that and things like world of warcraft craft allow you to escape. Yeah. Yeah. That's kind of how I view addiction. I learned that from Gabor Montana, Polish really is addiction really is a solution, right? It's short term solution, but it's a solution to handling the pain and right. It actually can be a very good solution in the moment although there can be repercussions. So I had my own addictions, I've had my own experiences with that in the past. So what I want to ask you about too because I definitely want to get. Get, into your to your books and stuff and some of the things that you talk about in making change in your life. But before we do that, how did you start to make this change or what was the moment where he said I got to do something different I, mean you talked about going on a mission and starting to see different parts of the world and starting to see things differently. But when did it really start to change for you? There are a few things like when I was living my cousin's at first off I was completely unhappy with my life which I think is. something. A lot of people can relate with as part of the process of going on a mission you have to at least in various religions or situations. You also have to go through what they call a repentance process, which is similar to I. Think what? Like a twelve step process would be where you have break openly acknowledged in admit to everything you've done I, forgive. Forgive people in. So part of my process was forgiving my dad like redeveloping relationship with him. I also got into running so like even though I was not working and I was playing world of warcraft start exercising running, and you know it started with just a mile a day I. am the reason I started on because my cousin invited me to go with. With, him and we would just run like two or three days a week and I kind of enjoyed it, and he stopped going with me and I just kind of decided to keep going in. It ended up actually turning into me running a marathon or I was yeah. Like when I was nineteen, but I mean it started small and I would just run two miles. Miles couple times a week, and then I started running a little bit more and listening to music in getting a little bit more into it. I'd run in the middle of the night like Right. I watched the movie on Fight Club on like repeat like I'd be I. Get get from running a movie fight club would be in the background I'd be playing. Playing was warcraft and the only thing that changes that running and I just jumped straight my mom's hot tub in her apartment complex. But while I was running I, think I was not consciously kind of subconsciously the building confidence. But also I was I was thinking I was not distracting myself as much as actually thinking about my life thinking about my future

High School Benjamin Hardy Herman T. Trauma Attorney Frankl Fight Club Canada Gabor Montana Viktor
Personality Isn't Permanent with Benjamin Hardy

The Addicted Mind Podcast

02:50 min | 1 year ago

Personality Isn't Permanent with Benjamin Hardy

"Hello. Everyone. Welcome to the addicted mind podcast. My guest today is Benjamin Hardy and he is going to talk about his upcoming book personality isn't Herman. INT- and Benjamin excited to have you on the show. I really want to talk about as we were talking about earlier talking about science-based changed. So before we do that, you want to introduce yourself and tell us a little bit about your story. Yeah. Absolutely. Man. Yeah. I guess the beginning of it really or at least the major kind of huge event that started my journey was my parents getting divorced at age eleven and I came from a background where my parents were kind of a religious family and When my parents divorced that stopped being a big part of our life at all. But my father was so torn up by the addiction in the depression of it. All that he ended up becoming an extreme drug addict actually while yeah, he was. It was intense man i. mean our house became literally a crazy place filled with drug addicts. ooh. Here, was also there's anything everything you can think of out in the open, really interesting to see My Dad was a hero to me. He was also like a really successful guy in it. Just kind of really threw him down. You know he was an attorney and he was it just really was interesting to watch this kind of experience lasted. I, was eleven the oldest of three boys at lasted until I was around. Around nineteen or twenty. I have no clue how I graduated from High School I was the oldest of three and I was kind of suppressing everything that was going on and ultimately we shut out my dad and my mom was living apartment to apartment just trying to she was actually trying to run a health club with her sister a small business, and so she was kind of go go go new zero stability in. In, my younger brother ended up dropping out of high school. He tried joining the Marines ended up getting kicked out. I, ended up at age nineteen. I was living at my cousin's house on his couch playing world of warcraft all day doing nothing and just was incredibly unhappy, Viktor. Frankl. Who wrote the book man's search for meaning he talks a lot about in that book and he's referencing the Holocaust, but he talks. Talks about how when a person loses hope and purpose for their future. The present becomes meaningless and that was kind of where I was at I. Didn't really have much hope or purpose for my life in my life was very meaningless. I was my purpose may have been to like get to the next level on world of war craft. It was not creating an enormous amount of meeting in my life and so I've. Connected with my face. I ended up serving a church mission for a few years. Totally changed my life, expose myself to a lot of things. Read. A lot of books saw a lot of people helped. A lot of people did a crazy amount of journaling. I. Reconnected With My Dad. He ended up overcoming addictions while I was on that experience. We've since become amazing friends.

Benjamin Hardy High School Attorney Herman Viktor Frankl
"viktor frankl" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"viktor frankl" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Actual school where we're having people. Come and stay with us and receive the work that we do great while the work is fantastic. Sure. And it just seems that more and more people Gerald are fascinated with our ancient history. How come? Well, I think it's part of a fact that we're in an era where we're supposed to be experiencing conscious. According to the Meyer, right? There's open calendar. Well, that's true. Then I think people are now at the place where they're being exposed to different entities. And I think that's a catalyst for them suddenly into you know, riding meaning to their life. This is the most important thing I learned from Viktor Frankl book man meeting long ago. He was a prisoner of war camp. And he described how you found freedom in prison. And a lot of it has to do with. What is like meant. What are you here for? And I think that's In a way, we we have to know why we're here and to do that. And what we're supposed to do you? Gotta know your you. Gotta know how we got to this place. Right. Yeah. That's absolutely, right. I think that's going on the big way to George happening. All over the world you touch on the Inaki quite a bit in your work, Gerald, I'd like to get your thoughts on the late Sakarai sich in in some of the things that he did what do you think? Well, here usually always comes up with my conversations. Maybe because I.

Gerald Meyer Viktor Frankl George
"viktor frankl" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"viktor frankl" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Search for meaning by Viktor Frankl. And he tells the story of a little boy. Who had a terminal disease? Fourteen ended up dying in the little boy, this was in this was in Germany. In say, the fifty boy had watched a movie where the star of the movie had was about to die and the star of the movie was able to be brave and courageous in the face of death. And a little boy felt sad that he wouldn't have the opportunity to be brave and courageous in the face of death because he was going to live very long life. So he had been robbed of this opportunity for greatness. And then he gets his terminal diagnosis is only going to be alive for a few months. And Viktor Frankl said the little boy looked at that. As a great opportunity a gift that he'd been given that he would be able to show, courage, and bravery. In the face of death. What a perspective, right? What a perspective everything is how you choose to look at it. And I find it to be amazing. How many of you hadn't thought about? All right. What can we do for the veterans to see if we could round up suits for.

Viktor Frankl Germany
"viktor frankl" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"viktor frankl" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"You say about it? Say something about it. Up to that school and let loose nine cons of hail back of my head. I can't do it because bears little Billy. Bill Cameron will be embarrassed by. What kind of grown man, are you? This is your country. So I'm reading this amazing book by Viktor Frankl who was a concentration camp survivor. Became one of history's great. Philosophers logo therapies, call man's search for meaning the idea is unlike Freud he said, look man is not constantly looking for a way to get off. The bust. One man is looking for something important to occupy himself. That's who we are as people. We're not reduced to the next three minute sexual encounter. That's what that's what. Viktor Frankl says we're looking for some great things into which we can pour our energies. Talent. Draws on this story. A little boy. In the little boy had seen a movie called the resurrection. Resurrection was about a man who'd been given a death sentence. He was about to. But he approached that death with a great deal of. Hurry. In that little boy was so moved by that. And he said would that I would be given opportunity to face down death. And to die was such dignity. Well, the little boy got his own distance. Got a cancer. That was on treatable. No operation would make a difference. He would die in short order. In the little boys threw himself in his final days. And he considered that a great gift to be given it considered it an opportunity he'd been chosen. How many little boys are chosen to show their valor, courage dignity? Shrink their bravery. Well, this little boy was. And that's how he looked at his desk. He didn't sit around and cry about it. He said I've been given a great opportunity and Viktor Frankl said that story sticks with me that little boy chose a death sentence. Not feel sorry for him. So. He felt great full. Did he was put into this position to give purpose and meaning to his life as a little boy? Folks. How can you celebrate the heroism of World War Two or Vietnam? The tunnel rats crawl through tunnels doing they would be killed. To say, they're buddies. How can you watch movie after movie after movie on net flicks? Of guys who show heroism.

Viktor Frankl Bill Cameron Freud cancer Vietnam three minute
"viktor frankl" Discussed on The Mindful Minute

The Mindful Minute

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"viktor frankl" Discussed on The Mindful Minute

"Taking a moment to deepen near breath here. Feeling that more purposeful inhale an ex hail you might lift up in length and your spine. If you've slumped over pressure shoulder blades back and Dow. We fingers and toes for a moment as you notice your experience here today. And is your ready? Bring your palms together in front of your heart. A prayer Bowyer down. Taking a moment to honor the time that you carved out to be still. To practice. Share this evening. One of my very favorite quotes comes from a man named Viktor Frankl, who's a holocaust survivor. And he wrote between stimulus and response. There is a space. In that space is our is our power to choose our response. And in our response lies, our growth and our freedom. Between stimulus response. There is a space. This is the gift are meditation. Practice gives to each of us. Thank you guys so much for practicing today. I look forward to join me again next week NAMA stay.

Viktor Frankl Dow Bowyer
"viktor frankl" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

06:22 min | 2 years ago

"viktor frankl" Discussed on KTRH

"Recommended that I reference it was why do bad things happen to good people. I think that's the title of is she Bill to find it on search engine using that. There's another one. I would recommend in that realm by Viktor Frankl. Call man's search for meaning Victor Frankel was in a concentration camp during the holocaust and went on to become one of the twentieth. Centuries. Most famous. Psychologists, and he was I mean, he's he. I think logo therapy is attributed to him or credited to him. Whereas Freud said that we have that our life is a pursuit of pleasure. Not just sexual but among them sexual. Maybe primarily sexual. But Frankl's theory was that we are primarily motivated in a search for meaning or to find meaning to to give meaning to what we do. I don't know if you've ever noticed how often someone who take Scott Davidson, for instance. Arlene rose, for instance, I don't know if you've ever noticed how often someone who has lost a loved one and throws themselves into a foundation an effort, a cause how often they tend to have a sense of peace a calm. It is as if they are laser focused on a purpose. And that seems to give them a great deal of satisfaction. Well, that's Frankl's theory on. The motivating desire the thing we are all in pursuit of is. Meaning. And I think that's why teenagers, for instance, in addition to the hormonal changes and all the things that are going on in their lives. I think that many teenagers. Don't understand why they're being forced harnessed onto this sled that they don't see where it's going. Why do I have to do homework? Why do I have to pay attention in class? Why do I have to take tests? Why do I have to give a damn what grade I got on it? Why do I have to sit quietly for six seven eight hours a day? Why do I have to do these things? There's no meaning to them. If someone does not derive some satisfaction from classwork, which doesn't make you a bad person. I loved going to school. I'd go back to school. Now, I loved it. I would love to either teach or go to school or both. Because I enjoyed it. And but I also know that's really weird and nerdy in geeky, and I'm lucky because it made my childhood a lot easier because if you come top of your class, if you enjoy it, it comes easy, and the results sort of, you know, you get lots of pats on the head you get a lot of positive feedback from especially from adults, maybe not from your classmates, but from adults as a result of it, and it makes life a lot easier. My brother who's a super wonderful person and found his purpose in life. He's a very very good law enforcement officer. And does a lot of good for a lot of people. But school wasn't his what his wasn't his his jam that wasn't what he enjoyed doing. So it made it very difficult for him many a time, you know, why was your progress report below the grade and now you have to grind it out to get there. I think we put too much pressure on doing well with. In the academic setting. If the point of school is to prepare us for life. Why do we get so caught up in all these grades where we get caught up in these grades because we get caught up in things that don't matter we start chasing false gods. Icons and that false God is I want to be able to say that my child's an honor student. I want to be able to say that my child got into an Ivy league school. I want to be able to say that my child got a job as a lawyer or a doctor because because I'm not one of them. I've been told that that's what makes them successful. I don't want him to be a plumber like me or no electricity, and like me or run a small business. I don't want him to have to work hard. Like I do. Well, I and so then so then we put all this pressure on someone to be something that they're not I truly believe that most of us are born to do something. Whether that's be a lawyer, a litigator, a dealmaking lawyer, a private equity guy, a politician an athlete. Coach a mentor teacher psychologist. You name it. I think a lot of people are born with a certain skill set. And a certain a passion for things and oftentimes they don't end up in that career. And I think that's what leads to a lot of psychological problems anxieties depression frustration lashing out at you know, spouses and kids in society because a person doesn't find their meaning they don't find that thing for which they it's not joy, there's a difference. You can enjoy the fact that you've found meaning, but you're not in search of joy, meaning is different. Meaning is a sense of place in the order of history in the order of science in the order of the world in God's order. However, you you've I'll you that. It means that what I do matters. That's why on our deathbed we buy a stained glass window for the church. That's why we you know, these zoo or the library. Whatever that's why you buy a plaque are a brick because we want to find meaning something that lasts something that leaves a legacy..

Viktor Frankl officer Bill Ivy league school Arlene rose Scott Davidson Freud six seven eight hours
"viktor frankl" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

ID10T with Chris Hardwick

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"viktor frankl" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

"It is time for ending word salad until I can come up with a less clunky. Name ending word salad. He WS ease of I like that. But you know, from time to time, I might feel inspired to prattle on long after you've thought you were you. But you know, it's something that we talk a lot about in the podcast with caffeine is reactivity being reactive. And it's so easy to be reactive, and it, and it feels like so much of our of our digital lives are basically just a direct line from our emotional brain right to the internet. And maybe it's not maybe it has nothing to do with the internet. We can certainly be reactive reactive in life. So little cut you off and traffic. Someone cuts you off in line. Something happens out in the real world. You know, some someone screws you over at work or something like. You know, you want to immediately be reactive you immediately want to you. Immediately want to jump down someone's throat, either in real life or are on the internet. And but the thing is reactivity really is a choice. I think I think it's a choice. A lot of people think it's a choice if you've ever heard of Viktor Frankl, he was an incredible. He was an Austrian neurologist and psychiatrist and holocaust survivor and just an incredible thinker and a lot of motivational stuff will probably refer you to his book man's search for meaning. And he has a really amazing quote way is a lot of really amazing quotes. But there's one sort of fundamental idea. And it's sort of a Volvo around, you know, how we can choose how we react to things. How we we can't control. Like, we've heard this a lot on the podcast. You can't control the external world, you can choose how.

Viktor Frankl Volvo caffeine
"viktor frankl" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

02:33 min | 3 years ago

"viktor frankl" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

"I'm sorry. You've made bad choices. But the good news is you're in control. And that's why literally the first time. I wrote this whole article, it was my first blog article, and it was all about how if I were hit by a drunk driver. I would take ownership of that. I would say that is my fault and people were pissed and I was so shocked. I literally thought I wanna pull people from the matrix. What's the one gift that I could give people that will change their life forever? And I wrote this whole thing, and I was like talking about like, oh, man, you're in this spot, and it ends up being a kill box. And there's cars on either side of you in a car in front of you and your horn dies, and you can't even start your car and move. You look in the rear view mirror and this drunk drivers plowing down they smash into you. And it's all your fault. And thank God. Because now you remember that you're in control. But people thought I was victim shaming. People were outraged that I would say that that was anyone's fault, but the drunk driver. But I don't wanna do that. Because I choose not to ever be. I cannot choose whether I'm victimized. But I have the ability to say, I will never be a victim. Because there's always something you can do differently. There's always something you can do differently. And once you understand the you can always make a different choice and get a different reaction, and that's the power in your life. That's the power that you have is no matter what's going on. You can choose to think differently. Believe differently seed differently. All of those things are choice. Reid man's search for meaning by Viktor Frankl lost his whole family to the holocaust was in. I think five different concentration camps. And he said the thing that people die of in a concentration camp is the loss of a y. And she said if you have a y you can survive almost anyhow. Because you can always change how you think about something. And when you change how you think about is what we've been talking about all day when you change how you think about it. You actually change the event. I want you guys to see this. I want you to see the voice of a victim in this next clip. Let's watch..

Viktor Frankl Reid