23 Burst results for "Viki"

"viki" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

02:53 min | 3 months ago

"viki" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"It'll be more cost effective for people. I'm doing some beta classes and things like that offering some discounts that way and so forth. Just doing the best I can because I just only want to help people. I just want to help. And I'm just one woman I know, but I will work tirelessly. I love it. I love it. So it sounds like you would also be a resource for other organizations, other people that oh, absolutely. And I speak over time. Anybody wants to hire me as a speaker, I'd be so thrilled because I can then reach a live audience or a zoom audience or what the regardless of the audience that interaction is so helpful. And, you know, then people can take that information and spread the word, and that's all I want to do. Well, I love it. I love it. And so for me, it just reinforces we all have to do our part. And sharing with others, I always say sharing is caring. In fact, even my kids now will say that, right? So sharing, sharing is caring. I'll say sharing is and they'll say caring. And then they roll. And then they roll their eyes. But they're still cute. But I think it's important that we all, again, live our truth. Speak our truth and lean in and support each other. It's like the visual I'm getting is kind of we all are locking arms walking hand in hand. It's not that one of us is in the front and one of us is in the back. We're all going to have down days. We're all going to help periods. Periods of our life. And we what? Lift each other up. Yeah, exactly. Yeah, that's right. Recognize who you're surroundings. Look up, stop looking down all the time. That's what I tell people. Look up, see, in front of you, instead of looking down all the time, you waste all, you can really trip and hurt yourself. Look up. Look up. I love it. That's our ultimate advice for the day. Look up. And there's actually some science behind that. There's actually some literal science that that looking up thing fires different neurons that fires your system differently. And all the fun stuff. I'm a little brain dead, I guess. But it actually physiologically changes your attitude when you're actually even just raise your chin like 2°. It changes your perspective of life because you're more optimistic. This is more optimistic than this, right? It's just something about opening up the heart, opening up the chest, kind of this whole sense of optimism when you look up. So if nothing else, just look up, right? Right. Even if you'll trip, you'll get a good laugh out of the fact that you're looking up and not looking where you're walking, right? That'll even change your attitude. I love it. That interesting. Right. So I am the one the one dot com is the website and everything that people can interact with you there, and certainly if they would like to join your group or your book, it's all right there. I am the one dot Vicki or I am the one slash

Vicki
"viki" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

05:08 min | 3 months ago

"viki" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"Not heal yourself, but to live, to survive and to live. Is that the fight? And educate myself, yes. Right. And so yeah. And so I would just thank you. Thank you. So I guess what I'm saying is I encourage you out there that everybody out there that we're all doing work on ourselves, personal development work if you want to call it that spiritual world, you're either working proactively or it's working on you, right? And right, kicking your butt. And that's what it feels like. So I have daily practices now that I've adopted just because I did get my butt kicked so much. And then when I found some practices that work meditative contemplative, spiritual, you know, studying the Bible stuff like that, that I found, and I'm not doing it because I'm super religious or super even devout in my I found out that it just hurt less if I did certain things, right? Right. It was like, it was like, well, no, the truth. It was the truth. It was like, it's like, if every morning start the morning with some type of devotional practice, and I typically end the day reading some type of book that feeds my soul, something, or helps me understand something a little differently. I find that my days go much better than when I don't do those things. So it's not like it's for me, it's very practical. And it's like if I'm if I'm doing a certain thing and I feel good, probably want to do more of it and if I'm not doing certain things and I feel bad, I probably should do more of the things that make me feel good and when I say good, I'm not talking about pleasure I'm talking about a grounded peaceful centered good. Right, right. Not just having fun, right? Or the best. At least at least at least in my own mind, I'm the best of those things. Thank you. Oh, Vicki, thank you. Oh, thank you, thank you. I think every day, I'll just give you my cell phone. Just every day just text me that message, Vicky, you're the best father that I have ever met. You're the best husband. I'll show it to my wife. I'll say see, honey, she says I'm the best husband that she's ever met. Other than her own. Other than her own. Even if it's in your own head. Exactly. Well, that's the point, right? Our belief systems drive, I mean, to your point, you were speaking earlier, our vision and our belief systems, they drive our experience, no matter what's happening externally. They drive the internal experience, right? Right. Because I just from talking to you, the way that you engage in life through this adversity is much different than a lot of people engage in life who are still hiding behind their truth. If that makes sense. Right, even though to your point, you're in pain, you're still joyful, you'll still present, you're still loving is a way in love or in the stream of love. So and you can feel those and you can feel those things through. So it's not that you have a skate from life. From the, it's quite the opposite, right? You've just leaned in and said, okay, this is what I'm dealing with. So let's deal with it, but let's still get on with the job of living. Yeah. And I think that's so important that we, as a community, we as society talk about that. It's not the social media and I know this is cliche too, but it's not the social media this is my Facebook life or my Instagram life or here's all the pictures of me living this great life. Yeah, certainly that could be true, but it's also living with the other things in life too. It's not that anyone's living this life that it's just all sunshine and rainbows unless they choose at sunshine and rainbows and still have all the other stuff happening in life, right? Right. So yeah, so I really appreciate your authenticity and your transparency today through your story. I think it's very encouraging for me. I'm getting pumped up. Just talking to you. Thank you. Yes, yes. And so typically, where do you go from here? You've got the course. You've got the book out. How long does the book been out? I am the one. The book has been out a little over a year. This is nice. Love the cover. Thank you. Yeah, yeah, love it. I am the one and you I'm sure get that anywhere you buy books. Well, yes, you can. You can get some sale now on Amazon. There we go. And you can buy it on my website. I am the dot com. I am the one nice website. Thank you. That's a great website. And my email is I am the one dot Vicky, which is VI KI at Gmail dot com. Love it, love it. That way. I love it. So you've got the course you're doing and it sounds like there's a live component to that or yeah, I do so I do well yeah, the course is all on Zoom. So okay. Of course is live and wow. Okay, so this is even though it's virtual. It's live. So this is a live course on Zoom. Okay. I'll eventually record it and then

Vicky Vicki Facebook Amazon
"viki" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

05:22 min | 3 months ago

"viki" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"It's crazy. Statistics back it up. And when you say the statistics back it up. Statistics. Being able to be helpful for preventative medicine. And. So let's expand on that a little bit. So when you say, so you're encouraging healthcare providers to listen first and diagnose second. And that listen first, because in that listening first period, well, obviously, there are probably getting feedback or information about stuff that instead of coming in saying, you know, this is your symptom and this is your pill. Right. They're really starting to hear what actually is happening. Yes, exactly. Let's have women understanding how they're feeling early on. So we can bring all these things to our doctors. And then we get the reception that we're looking for from our doctors. So we don't walk away and say, oh, he's not helpful to me. You know, so we work together. You know, it's a combination. But it's very simple. And we've had some really good physicians, natural pathic doctors on the show. And I would definitely say for anyone listening, and this field is fairly new to me in the last couple of years, but functional medicine doctors, especially at general primary functional medicine doctor, has really opened my eyes to we're not treating, they're not treating symptoms or treating the actual disease in the system, right? So it's not I have a cough. I need cough medicine. It's more of what's causing the cough. And that's a simplistic example. But tracing down to the feeling prior to the right, is going on in your life. Exactly. You know, maybe just an allergy for crying out loud. You know, maybe you don't need all that other stuff. So let's talk to people. Let's listen to each other. Right. And so I would definitely recommend if somebody hasn't doesn't know that much about functional medicine or functional medicine doctors, they said, we've had some phenomenal practitioners on this show through, you know, we did our happiness and we had a lot of people on there. And then we went through the podcast and see some live stuff we've been doing. But it's just amazing to talk to people who are looking at you as a whole person. Like you're talking about looking at the whole person and not just this symptom and how do I push how do I check the box that says I cured that in that cured but address that symptom, but then we're never we're never ever getting to what's actually causing. I had a fascinating podcast earlier in the week where this gentleman's company looked at DNA and they could see from DNA how like some of us are missing certain missing certain, I'm going to butcher this, but basically certain things aren't firing or we're just missing that DNA isn't the same in everybody. So they may be missing and that gentleman was going through the head like he was in his 30s had 5 different medical conditions and it was because once he tested his DNA he found that his body actually didn't have the ability to process certain types of protein or when I say protein not like meat, but proteins in the body are proteins, right? And so he was like, well, no one and so once he addressed those things, then he was able then to lean in and say, okay, well, what do I need to do? Functionally, what I need to do diet wise, why didn't you do exercise sleep wise? And he was able to reverse all 5 of those using DNA and supplements and sleep. I mean, the stuff that we all know, but it wasn't one size fits all. It wasn't like everybody needs 8 hours of sleep, and they need to sleep this way. I mean, it's like, you know, there's some good general practices, but overall there's some things that are specific to you as a human being. And I think, you know, as you're saying, listen first and diagnose second. Everybody's going to be a little bit different. Everybody's going to have a little bit and there's some nuances. The other thing I've really started to understand through the show is that there's a lot of this that rests in emotion and in past trauma. We had Mark woolen come on the show and he was talking about generational trauma. And he was talking about working with people that actually were experiencing physical symptoms of stuff that was not, that was attached actually to their DNA, which is weird. These two very different guests were on. But I think a holistic functional medicine doctor or somebody like yourself that can walk people through the process. There's more to disease than just the label and the so called cure, right? I think it's deeper than that. And just like you experience, I mean, I think you literally had your, I don't know what you call that moment where you basically accosted that poor man. But what was that? Did you call that I mean, do you have a name for the before and after? Do you have a name for that actual moment? An awakening experience? Your lines moment. But. You definitely had some type of if you want to call it spiritual or psychological shift, right? I did. Metaphysical metaphysical. The other is a great way to say it. So you had some type of metaphysical shift that I would almost say

cough allergy Mark woolen
"viki" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

06:10 min | 3 months ago

"viki" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"Right. And so not the way we're going to do a top ten list. But what would be the top two or three things anybody listening to the show? Anybody watching the show, they have a relative. They have cancer. They have a relative again. I'm going to even take that a little bit broader. They're dealing with illness. They have a relative dealing with some type of illness. I mean, cancer is obviously bad. I mean, that's a big one. But there's a lot of other heart issues and diabetes. I mean, there's a lot of stuff out there right now. So what would you say, what would you tell somebody who's just found out that diagnosed with really anything that you know is going to be life altering or at least needs to be addressed and be a life altering thing, right? It sounds like it was a life altering thing for you. Oh, yeah. Of course. So what would be the top two or three things that you would just really want to impart to them to get them started down the right path? Well, I don't know if this is a good answer upfront, but I do recommend as simple as this sounds that take the course that I offer. There's more cancer than the diagnosis. And the reason why this is not a sales pitch, it is more of an incentive because I teach all of those things in the course. You know, there's no course out there like it today. And I don't understand. There was no place for me to go to say, well, how do I tell my children? How do I find the doctor? How do I fight the doctor? How do I fight the insurance companies? All of this advice that you need to know at the beginning, because quite honestly, if I had listened to all that, or followed all that, or had gone down some of these roads, I wouldn't be here anymore. So some of this information I am part can be really helpful to newly diagnosed for sure cancer people. It's also helpful to healthcare workers, loved ones, Friends, family members, so on and so forth. But that information that I am part is really really fabulous. And, you know, I do limit the course to ten to 12 people so that it gives you an opportunity to interact with each other and develop long-term friendships with the people in the course that, you know, we can keep in touch with and see how everyone's doing and so on and so forth. So, you know, if I have more people sign up, I just run simultaneous courses. And that one got you. Keep everybody in smaller groups. Yeah, yeah, yeah. So I would recommend that as sort of like a big help. And then I would probably say, you know, don't forget those little things in life. Don't be so focused that you forget who you are and forget the people around you and forget appreciating some of those things that we've been blessed with to have. And so forth. So don't let it try not to let it consume you. Is that what I'm kind of hearing? Yes. That's a great way to explain it. Because you kind of get you probably get sucked into, I'm sure a black hole of you could. Yes. You can't do that. You just can not. And how do you not, I guess, help us understand that. How do you, what's the balance for that? You have another focus. Okay. Not all about that. It's you've to focus on getting well, not getting sick. Do you know what I'm saying? You don't go backwards. You go forwards. And you look to your future. Day by day, minute by minute, hour by hour. And you just move forward. And so typically then the things that you talk about in your book, I'm assuming these are in your book. And I noticed they were on your website as well, but follow your instincts, listen first, diagnose second. Right. What's that mean exactly? I understand follow your instincts, but what's the lesson first diagnosed second? Well, those are, I have an organization called lunge for healthcare. Get the plan words. Anyway, in the organization, I promote those two issues because it is my belief that if I can change the world with promoting those two issues, I can then go to the insurance companies and say, look, we've saved all this money. Give us back our mammograms at 35. Stop waiting till we're 55. Give us back our pap smears, give us back our ovarian cancer screening and all the things that we've left out. And then we can go and go to Congress and promote women in healthcare in Congress. So what I'm saying is just to go backwards to your original question. I promote in those two things. Women tap into your own instincts. Understand how you feel. So that you can then share that information and be aggressive about your own healthcare. And then to listen first, I asked doctors, I'm asking the doctors, listen first for 5 minutes when you come into that medical office. Okay. And then diagnose second. Because if we have people listening and then we have the women Tapping into their instincts. So they're able to communicate. This is what I'm feeling. We can save so many dollars long-term from cutting and pill popping and so forth with this preventative medicine. I mean, it is just so simple. Those two things can save so many dollars, so many women's lives.

cancer diabetes Congress ovarian cancer
"viki" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

01:34 min | 3 months ago

"viki" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"Use it. It's like, you know, it's like saying no to God. I mean, you know, given this gift of life, I would never squander it. Right. And would you have had that same perspective prior to going through this? No, remember I died in that room? Right. And the new Vicki came. And the other Vicki never came back. I am who I am now. And I am not as timid, not as quiet. From talking to you, I did not pick up any of those traits of Tim and this or what. So yes, I would agree with you that the Vicki that's here is not somebody that's quiet or timid. And that was your persona that was part of your personality prior to that day was kind of. I mean, it was, I wasn't as outspoken as I am today, but I wasn't a meek person either. So I didn't do like a 360, but I certainly did maybe a one 80, you know. Stripped away maybe some of the BS that was holding you back and just exactly. Exactly that. Right. And I'm reading a series of books right now and literally this morning when I woke up, I was reading this book and is talking about just literally aligning

Vicki Tim
"viki" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

02:17 min | 3 months ago

"viki" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"And I think that helps put a lot of things in perspective for people that don't have cancer. Is that attitude or that way of thinking or that way of being, probably, is a better way to say your way of being is we all have stuff we're dealing with, you have a very real thing that you can pinpoint and you can put a name on it and you can put it, you can say, I know that this is here. You could test for it. Some people don't have that. Some people it's mental anxiety, you know, depression, all these other stuff that they can kind of, but it's a little more abstract, but certainly it's kind of how you choose to interact with life, not how life is going to interact with us the way somebody runs a red light and hits my car, I may not be able to prevent that may just happen, right? But it's what you do with that thing. And I know that's probably cliche, but I'm learning more and more. It truly is how you approach things and I think for me, and it sounds like definitely for you. The closer I come to having some type of relationship or understanding with a higher power, we're going to call it God for the sake of this show. But. More relaxed or peaceful or at least at ease I've become with the things that are happening. Even if I don't like them, if that makes sense. Does that mean I like them? But it does mean. If you're new normal, you know. You have to refigure things and figure out a way to be okay and just move forward because you can not let it keep you in the muck. You can't get bogged down in, you know, because I am in great pain. As even as we speak, you know. Interesting. But you know, complaining about it. And talking about it all the time doesn't make it better. Right. You know, I just might as I mean, it's laying around, you know, isn't going to change it either. So, you know, again, it's your new normal. Get up. Go out. God gave you this gift. Right. Now live it.

cancer depression
"viki" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

07:48 min | 3 months ago

"viki" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"What made it so hard to say? Was that. You know, we had to keep changing the places because it was pinpoint, and I had this whole area to do. So it was a long procedure, but that truly is why I'm still here today because we were able to save my heart and lung. I've only had some minor damage to it. So it was a big deal. But you know, then I got into the whole thing with the insurance and the non payment and having to work all of that out and so on and so forth. So it was, it was not easy, but I recommend everybody. You know, you got to be your own advocate because, I mean, I am not saying negative things necessarily about medical market. Well, it's okay if you're the guest, you can. Well, this podcast brought to you by Johnson & Johnson. Now I'm kidding. I'm totally kidding. We're not sponsored by drug companies. I'm just kidding. Open about, you know, understanding that, you know, in a situation like this, you know, cancers to business. And yes. In statistically speaking, was it worth the money to save? Because the prognosis was so dire. Right. Your odds of living obviously were almost none. Yeah, very little percentage. And so I knew I had to fight for myself because nobody else was going to do that. And that's what I promote. Because like I said, you know, I'm not saying anything negative about the doctor because you know a lot of ways his hands were tied. Right. But in the end, he heard me. And that's really what happened. And he changed his mode of treatment plan. So I can't be angry about that. I just have to move forward. And that's what I did. And I didn't have time for any of that. You know, when I've got two young kids, I had two young kids at home at the time. And there was no way anyone was raising those kids, but me. That was it. I like it. That was your motivation. That was your rock. Kind of your anchor stone or whatever we want to call that. That was. That was your why, right? That was your deep, deep wide. Really, you hit that nail in the head. And let me tell you, I thank God today because it's been the greatest greatest gift. I mean, forget the book and all the other accolades. Raising those two kids has been the greatest, greatest blessing and gift of my life. Well, that's amazing. Any pain or anything that I've gone through or anything I continue to go through. It was so worth it. Yeah, I have two young kids right now. So I totally get and connect with that. Everything else is secondary to the welfare and the joy of those two little critters that roam around my house and keep me on my toes, right? And I threw this through the last three years and all the transitions that have happened in the world. And then inside of me, you know, they were a lot of times the motivation for me just to get out of bed. It was just those kids thinking. Right. You know, I'm not going to let them down. I'm going to let myself down all day. I'll probably let my wife down. But I'm not going to let those kids down because I'm their dad, and they need me, right? And so yeah, I think that's and I think it's so important because I've heard not obviously this is an extreme example of your story is an extreme example, but I've heard stories over and over again of you have to have your why, even if it's not your kids, there's got to be a reason that you're going everybody is going to go through the dark night of the soul. They're going to go through, they're going to go through the shit at some point, and you got to have and you've got to have a strong way. Otherwise, you don't make it, right? Otherwise, otherwise we're not talking to Vicky's arc in today because she didn't make it because she just believed whatever the doctor told her. And she went home and got her affairs in order and she died, right? I mean, you're why was what got you through? And so even though this is a story about advocating for yourself, I think there's another story here, which is you got to figure out what your why is and you've got to get anchored to it so that because I was even as you were talking, I was like, and it kind of brings chills to me as I'm still thinking of the question, but the question was, you know, it actually brings a motion to me, which is interesting. I don't usually get emotional on the podcast. But it's bringing emotion behind my eyes, which is kind of like, why do you think that God spared you? What was the message that, you know, literally when we're saying one out of 7 billion people and even if we're just, why did God spare you? And you had your why, right? I had my why, but you know, I mean, I made a deal with God. And what was that? Yeah, I like this. If I could raise my children, I would help women. Interesting. Now is my turn because I got to help women. I mean, I got to raise your kids. I wrote the book. I speak. I teach a course. I coach. I do everything that I can possibly to help women in healthcare. And keep my promise to God. I love this. I love this story. And I'm so glad I was not going to ask you that or it wasn't going to frame it that way, but it just keeps coming. I mean, I could just literally fill the emotion behind the theft that was coming through. And I'm like, and I love that you knew your why. You made your commitment. You were certain. And I'm sure there were times you question it. Question if you were going to, if God was going to deliver, right? But you made your pact and you've stuck to it. And we've had my own story so many other stories we've shared on the show, but ultimately you're ultimate pain, your ultimate burden if you want to call it that has truly become your superpower. The luckiest girl around, I just happen to have cancer. I mean, that's what I said from the beginning because, you know, in a way, cancer hasn't been as such a terrible thing. I mean, granted, I still get regular chemo. Because I'm living with cancer. Got it. Got it. I'm not really a survivor. So I steal every 28 days, get maintenance chemo. Interesting. Okay. The last 12 years and will continue till interesting. My last breath. So that's hard on your body. And now I'm in pain every day and I have all kinds of issues and so forth, but you know, getting up and being productive is a blessing. Yes. And keeping my promise to God and still being instrumental in my kids lives, even though they're in college, is a blessing. And I am the luckiest girl around. I just happen to have cancer. I mean, and that's just the truth of it.

Johnson & Johnson lung Vicky cancer
"viki" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

02:18 min | 3 months ago

"viki" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"How about we try chemo? Now I'm not promising anything, but if we start with chemo, then we'll go from there, is that okay with you, he said. I said, okay. But you know, at that point, I knew that I was in a real pickle. I hadn't really been exposed a lot through loved ones or family members with cancer too much. And so I really had to hit the ground running. And you know, I'm like, okay, well, what I thought was a curable disease, breast cancer, all of a sudden wasn't. Right. And now I really have to advocate for myself. So I had to hit the ground running. I had to research. I had to figure out what kind of cancer this was and figure out how the heck I'm going to save myself. Right. And that's what I did step by step. From the beginning, you know, by lunging across the room and grabbing this doctor and getting my chemo out of it, I knew that I would then have to go forward with the other treatment, the radiation, and so on and so forth. And what he knew then that I didn't know them, but I learned that the radiation probably would have put me in congestive heart failure. Cancer would have killed me, but the radiation was maybe not as quick. Got it. So it would have been painful and slow. Right. But you know, still within a couple of years. So I needed to figure out a way to get that procedure done differently. And so I, you know, advocated for proton radiation, which is a pinpoint radiation. That's normally done in incidences of brain surgery. You know, when you're working with really small, right? It's used a lot for men for prostate. Procedures. So, you know, they make a lot of money there, but when you have such a large area, it's not as cost effective. So it's really had never been done up to that point. And to this day, as far as I know, still has not done been done for such a wide area, but I was able to talk a doctor into doing it for me. But

curable disease Cancer breast cancer congestive heart failure
"viki" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

01:36 min | 3 months ago

"viki" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"Was a horrible night. You had a physically. I mean, the craziest thing happened to me. I think he didn't walk in the room that day died immediately. Really? Vicky that you're talking to today came forward. And I am telling you, I lunged across the room like a crazy person. Like literally grabbed him by his, you know, his own. Yeah, yeah, yeah. Well, I mean really, really close. I know. And I'm not aggressive. And I did that, but I said to him, you talk to me about all of these colleagues that you consulted. But what about me? What about what I want? What about what I think? What about my opinion? I'm a mom. I don't care what you cut off me. I don't care what you stick in me. I don't care what you do to me. I am going to be the one. Hence the book. I love it. So then I realized, oh my God, my hands are around, like, I'm just assaulted somebody in a hospital securities on their way. So I flew back. Right. And I'm like, you know, kind of in shock okay, he's gonna call me. He's probably in shock, right? Everybody's in shock. And I'm crazy story, but true. And the room was really silent then. I bet. It seemed like forever, but it was just like, you know, a short period of time when it seemed like forever. And then he looked up at me for the first time. In the eyes. And he's like, well,

Vicky
"viki" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

06:44 min | 3 months ago

"viki" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"Our special guest is Vicki, Vicki, welcome to the show. Hello. Thank you for having me. Yeah, so happy to have you on. This is going to be one of my favorite introductions because they say you've heard the old phrase one in a million. You're actually one in 7 billion. Almost 8 billion, right? So instead of one in a million, we can say one in 7 or 8 billion. And everybody wants to be unique. Everybody wants to be special, but you actually have a badge of honor that you are unique and special, that part of why we had you on the show today that you were the only person alive that we know of, right? In the world. Who has survived stage four metastatic cancer for over ten years. And for those of us who have just stumbled on that word with me, what exactly did that mean? Stage four metastatic cancer. What is metastatic? Metastatic basically means that it spread outside of its original site. Okay. I started as a breast cancer. And it spread into my whole mediastinum, which is comprised of the left ventricle of my heart. I left lung, my whole chest cavity, my mammary glands, about 30 or more lymph nodes. It was in my neck. It was much longer. I mean, I was riddled riddled. It didn't just travel. It took like a year long vacation and had a passport that got punched at a lot of different stops. So this was like, so much more than just that, right? You're an author now. You're in the book. You have your latest book. I am the one is out. You have a course that's out. You're definitely a advocate for women going through cancer, but also probably healthcare in general, right? And that's what we're going to do. So that's what we're going to talk a lot about on the show today is just kind of being your own advocate, what that means, what you went through. And so we'll get into that. But this is very personal to me because my mother has just is just on the backside of cancer, recovering from cancer. And so 15 years ago, she had breast cancer on one side, and then it came back 15 years later on the other side. And then it did, as yours did, but it didn't go around the world that just traveled to her liver. And so she is, but all the numbers are good. Everything's going the right way. She just really in the maintenance therapy part of the process, I guess, is what you call, but she's had some really actually, she's had some really good results and some good news as part of the medical establishment, but then also she was doing some stuff working on herself and her own personal her baggage. I think she worked with a lady to help set some of those bags down so they weren't so heavy to lift, which I think also helped with the healing process, right? We could carry along a lot of amazing. Yeah, and she has a 73. I think it's okay for me to say that because nobody on the show probably knows my mom. So I think it's okay to say her age, she wouldn't be mad at me. She wouldn't mean that anyway. But yeah, no, she's been through a lot. She's a very strong woman, but obviously you went through some remarkable recovery because you were, as you said, riddled with this. This was about ten years ago, 2011, almost 11 years ago now. And so I'm just curious what were you actually doing vocationally? What was your life like then? What were you, what was your profession, or what were you doing? Well, by trade on the broadcast journalist. Is that right? Okay. You should be interviewing me then. You should be doing this. You're the professional. You have a degree in this stuff. I'm just making it up as I go along. All right, so broadcast journalism. I love it. It's been a while since I've been, you know, I've done regular Ron air stuff because my husband's a dentist and I left a lot of the a lot of that behind to help him run the office through our married life. So the first, you know, like we've been married over 30 years, so like the last 20 or so is when I, you know, ran the office and pursued my other endeavors prior to that. But got it, got it? And so you developed breast cancer and kind of walk us through walk us through that story and kind of what that experience was. And of course, this is for obviously anybody who everybody's affected by cancer, right? There is nobody on the face of the earth who is not going to know somebody with cancer by the time they get through this little experiment called life, everybody's going to know somebody, if not multiple people. I mean, not only is my mom and my aunts and other people that I know have transitioned because of cancer, right? So certainly, but what's your story? How did it unfold for you? It's strange. You know, I had been, you know, it was interesting that you said about me being the only one and so forth. And the growth of the cancer because I had been getting regular mammograms. I mean, I had had another issue a health issue. And so I was a little late with my mammogram. So it had been maybe about a year and a half, and I went to get a mammogram. And they knew right away that I had breast cancer. I mean, I got a call on the phone. So it was a matter of going to Johns Hopkins and figuring out how to stage it and how bad and so forth and so on. So I had months of tests going back and forth and back and forth and finally, I'm told that, you know, I'm ready to meet the oncologist. He is the best in the hospital and so on and so forth. So I go into this small auditory and you know the doctor comes in my husband and my mother are sitting to my left and no eye contact whatsoever. And he just goes on and on like in my book, I say that like I was like starting to like tune out. You know it was like you know what? No I contact just going on and on. I didn't know what he was saying. And then all of a sudden, he says, I have consulted with all my colleagues here at Johns Hopkins. And we have all decided what we've all agreed. That I am so sorry. There's nothing that we can do for you. You need to go home and get your affairs in order. Oh, wow. So it gave you a disrotation on science. It sounds like. And then it was like, oh, and the punchline is you're dying. So go ahead and go home and figure it out, 'cause we can't do anything for you. Wow. That's a horrible diagnosis. It

metastatic cancer cancer Vicki breast cancer Ron air Johns Hopkins
"viki" Discussed on Sirens | A True Crime Podcast

Sirens | A True Crime Podcast

06:23 min | 1 year ago

"viki" Discussed on Sirens | A True Crime Podcast

"A breeze like no. It's weird dead of summer. No air conditioning. You can stand on stage. At a witness greets vicky was talking about a ghostly breeze as well. That's just crazy. Yeah it's is but that's the cool part is that we had vicki first. And then you're just here. Basically confirmed ailing us this yes confirming everything. And that's so strange that everyone pretty much has the same things happen to them. And you don't even know. Start when i was a kid in shows they're like i'm little little and then in dance there so like that was around. The same time vicky was in school right and so then. Kim isn't there during those times but viki and i are and then there's a segue for moyer viki and i go to community theater. And we're in the jim knight twin like and they're experiencing the same things but like i never really. I had stuff left and right at dorothy summers. But i didn't spend any more time in there after junior once. I was in community. You know once we started act to at jiminy twin. We were in there anymore and so and then it moves to vicky being with kim because they both i believe worked on the one with dr xiao horn. it's so crazy. Yeah it's like a five degrees of kevin bacon except as the free goes. Dorothy summers theatre. Maybe it's just the ghost of east central university. It might be. Yeah because i mean there is supposedly an elephant buried somewhere on. What have you ever heard this story. Yeah so so. There's a story. There's like an i don't know like like i want to say i really do wanna say that somewhere in the university like the story is addressed officially but the urban legend is rather that Crazy like hundred years ago and it was one hundred years ago like whenever i was in college. one hundred twenty years ago A circus teams and While the circus was here like one of the elephants died in supposedly the elephant is buried. I've heard in different parts of campus. Most common variation is under the fifty yard line. Like but why so full of shit. Who even makes up. How much bill is where you wanted to come up with that. No i mean. Stranger things have happened. Eyo we're sitting here talking about ghosts and entities and all these stories and experiences we share and i'm like no a fucking elephant didn't die there. Listen i believe what i believe. I don't believe that anybody did you. Kim did you have anyone else that had like some really significant stories. Tell you anything that happened to them. sam talked a little bit about like being touched his face being touched. Yeah data rest or he would be the he would be like. Oh i want to say. He's he's like his face in his hair. Just like his hidden. General like not necessarily like charest but li- win windblown or lake lake boot. Less caressing in you know you got looped by boo exactly And i mean the whole building is neatly creepy in proc. Storage in long-term costumes orage are to play are probably the two places. Spent the most time in the dark in that theater japan because the light switches are so fucking hard to find and after twelve years. You would think that i'd be able to do it like line let alone you know just in the dark. I always forget where they are but no. It's it's easy to. It's okay so these places are some of those where you're trying to like get across the room in. It's completely dark and you're slowly making your way in you. Keep hitting everything in everything you're thinking. Oh my god and heavenly. I assist room so packed with joan. I ever going like yeah. It's like vicky had mentioned that. An jim nine twins like overall eidinger upstairs. And i'm like why would you do with. Oh my god. It's only upstairs not only upstairs. But the only way to get up there is a this tiny tiny little circular ricky fucking talk. I said the same thing i said. It's like you're in a well. It's like someone put a staircase in a fucking will to go up the frigging stairs and turn off the lights and then go back down the stairs in the door. No that what. The thing stays lit up the little collins as little. So there's there's a light switch at the top and the bottom usually left. i don't anyways don't fucking away. Most theaters most theaters leave. Ghost light on on stage to and if they don't they should because that's just general safety thing. Yeah i mean. There's there's a reason why they leave the lights on. I'm tom bowed will lead like on You've reached the end of our episode. Thanks for giving us your time to tell you about this true crime. Join us next time for a whole new case on the sirens podcast. Do you have an altro. that's out tro is matt..

vicky moyer viki dorothy summers dr xiao horn Dorothy summers theatre jim knight viki east central university Kim vicki kevin bacon lake lake orage kim charest jim nine li sam
"viki" Discussed on Seis e Um

Seis e Um

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"viki" Discussed on Seis e Um

"Monte is he s assist doctors. Nancy was jeep. Dejesus fun meters. Study on the dassault's feeders of reading this was died because he things on which boat bridge formation visited percenter source winkles linked each joy. She still nukem weather. But as you it is any sound bill. Football which vs be dodge. But it's something that you paint siamese. Aaron blackie as 'promise sketchy busey riley. An entirely by dipping up in me sogno game. But they've been in a me so to convince you gained on coordinators viki about to-do steps for a couple of system for ceremony torah autumn sports linked to football activities. This particular symptom assist what she ball. Is this this up. Says you should yukos's season cuomo in. Which both can't you jeremy zone culture season passer new into the origin ceo. And you saw your santelli ads. Sorts sports in gaza juhasz his don't return to think. Football is our Gosh rockiness uses sport. Nosy she s s. I go through the starts going. Spas jimmy. eis's the Sweet miser see how comfortable to get into. The minds is is. Sports is only spreads on my doors..

Aaron blackie busey riley Dejesus Monte Nancy viki jeremy zone Football yukos cuomo santelli football Spas jimmy gaza
"viki" Discussed on Jesus is the Christ

Jesus is the Christ

02:48 min | 1 year ago

"viki" Discussed on Jesus is the Christ

"And i want to say that jesus christ is lord and savior and you are come to to join this discussion somehow here As three mom at comment Place here i can see coleman's Like that now. I can see coal mines and i put a banner here with the name of the site because I have a site viki ezekie site. Then it's actually supposed to join this wiki site as guest or as you know at the moment if you join this site which you can do you can register. You don't need my permission or something you can sign up at you. You will be able to write on the talk pages. Send discussion pages at the moment People sign up. yeah. I think so. At least i think that is the case..

jesus christ three mom coleman viki ezekie
Prof. Cecilia Lunardini, Professor of Physics at Arizona State University. - burst 01

Scientific Sense

59:38 min | 2 years ago

Prof. Cecilia Lunardini, Professor of Physics at Arizona State University. - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we explore emerging ideas from signs policy economics and technology. My name is gill. Eappen we talk with woods leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest scientific senses unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be color a wide variety of domains. Rare new discoveries are made and new technologies are developed on a daily basis the most interested in how new ideas affect society and help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation v seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations. Bit researchers leaders. Who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense. Dot com and displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics guests at other ideas please send up to info at scientific sense dot com and i can be reached at gil at eappen dot info. Yesterday's dini whose professional physics at amazon is taking versity. One of the primary of usage focus is new leaders. Welcome to see you thank you. Yeah thanks for doing this. So i know that you have done a lot of work on neutrinos. You have a few papers. That came out recently. And i want to talk to a twenty eighteen paper dalogue and my own neutrino signatures of primordial black holes. invite you say. These studied primordial black holes ph is as sources of massive neutrinos by hawking radiation under the hypothesis that black holes emit nuclear no bass item states be described quantitatively called the pbs evolution and lifetime is affected by the mass and flew munich dialect my own nature of neutrinos before we get the details celia I wanted to get some definitions of folks would know what black court saw a few episodes of black holes Here we're talking about. The pride won't imprac codes owes The these black holes are fall close to the big bang And then as caulking radiation Sort of The black hole evaporating So to speak and that That lady Imitating these particles called neutrinos. Right is that. Do i understand that correctly. Yes so so pry bhutia blackhaws before we get the neutrinos what is sort of the mechanism of formation their ho- exactly what they have formed sure We believe that Primordial hose could form in the early universe from density fluctuations so We know that any object could can possibly become a black hole if you compress it into a very very small volume so this same process could happen in the universe with Density fluctuations that could be a regional space where there is an over density compared to the surrounding and each of over the east coast past Then then it could get to the point of becoming a black hole This this The details of this process are beyond my expertise But this is fairly reasonable thing to expect and The diesel really small rate in the scheme of things. Yes so when i started to Learn about time or their black holes. I was amazed by how different in mass can be. They can be may be the massive wouldn't but they can also be The mass of Being or they can be Even even smaller so they can really be very very tiny. Yes oh so. That's really really small so this is sort of quantum fluctuations only universe Kind of getting Getting concentrated in vide- small areas But we believe those. Those primordial black holes emit nucleus. we Have to go back to stephen hawking for that stephen hawking wrote this seminal paper Which is about what we nowadays. Nowadays call hawking radiation so he demonstrated that any black hole regardless of what it is could be primordial black hole or a stellar. Nicole doesn't matter any black hole isn't really black because it meets radiations so radiation particles And the the process that we call evaporation so Because a black holes fundamentally gravity objects they would meet any particle that couples to raggedy including trees so It's the moment you have a black hole you do. Have hawking radiation and neutrinos are just that are expected. Part of hawking radiation. You're so caulking radiation so that that happens to every black hole even the even the supermassive ones right so i it said gentle phenomenon And so going to neutrinos now Don't typically thing neutrino site Caltrans and electrons are really well known. neutrinos are particles. Dad don't interact with The matter Espionage don't interact much with matters. We don't really see them. They don't really see them. And and so it's difficult to measure that's right and so so this could you give a. What does the history of neutrino vendor we. I understand such things existed. Let's see We go back to the twentieth century and the story goes That the father of neutrino sees Warfare he. He made the hypotheses of a new particle existing as a way to explain Some strange behavior of neutrinos produced by by nuclear decay so It's it's a long story but Let me just say that For a long time. Neutrinos who just the hypotheses and then around the mead of this twentieth century They would actually officer so we started to Know that this particles existed and But that was pretty much heat. So we didn't know much about the properties And one of these properties the mass which we still don't know i'm easy after all these decades but we still don't know if neutrinos have something like a magnetic went for example And something that we didn't learn until much later on is the fact. That neutrinos oscillate. That's that that sounds. That's something that we that were somehow established Turn of the sanctuary around the around the year. Two thousand really after after decades of of testing with the solar neutrino selling trainers. So there are still there are still a number of no on your trainers. One of them is the mass one and the other one is the The nature of the neutrinos being the iraq particles or miranda particles we She's kind of a fundamental cost. So there are that. That's that's that's related to the fundamental nature of the neutrino as particle break. So so they do. They have a mass but masses small. Do they have a chunk. Neutrinos don't have charge so they are electrically neutral and that's Comedy the biggest reason for for them to be a so allusive as you were mentioning earlier on especially in the in early. Nineteen hundreds all the particle detectors so basically a electro-magnetic detectors they were looking for charge or Magnetic behavioral some sort. So neutrinos don't have that and so they They only have the weak interaction At that that we know wolf and gravity of course and so that's why they They escape detection so so easily because their interaction is very weak. Yeah so so. That's sort of the beauty of neutrinos right so because they don't interact V can go back digits of years. Simple hats Perhaps become pickup one on earth and it would have travelled that distance through all sorts of things but would not have affected wider rate right. Yes and so so the other phenomenon of neutrino is that you mentioned that they also late so are they're failures of tinos they go back and forth. Yes it's It's actually a fairly Easy to this cried kwan to sonam on We know that In quantum mechanics there is this Particles described by these function which is called the wave function. And so the neutrinos could be on. Neutrino could be born as a say an extra and then it's quanta way function would evolve over time in a way that after sometime. The wave function is no longer a purely electron neutrino way function. But the has a little bit or even law actually of a different flavor. It could be a new one or tau. So what we observe in the actors. Is this change of flavor and perhaps the most striking demonstration of this phenomenon is solemn. Neutrinos because we know that the sun produces an extra treatments and It doesn't produce a new on and talion trainers so But here on earth we do Have evidence that the solar neutrino flags that we receive has some You wanna talion. Trina in it and that can only be explained by sedation and Actually after this other neutrino data showed this phenomenon. This was also confirmed by a saint men made experiments so it's a fairly established phenomenon it and so that the flavors are Electron new on tall. Yes that's right and so. Did you understand the vendor made in the sun for example there they are made as electron Neutrinos and by the time they reached the earth day the Immunes dot. Yes yes Impart young. that's that's what happens so ease. It always the case that they get a manufactured so to speak as as electoral neutrinos always. It depends on where they are born. There are places where neutrino sutter born in or flavors. A so it's it's it really varies with With the type of environment We are talking about okay. Okay and so in the people you say ph is this primordial black holes. We talked about radiates right. Handed and left handed dutra knows in equal amounts so anybody right-handed unless the cleaners. Okay let me see so Yes you say. Indicates of dirac neutrinos. pba Left neutrinos in equal amounts possibly increasing deceptive number noon pheno species nest. Yes is that explainable. Yes so right handed than left handed. Neutrinos that may take why to explain what that exactly means me. Just say that It's related to the neutrino mass. So if you're truly knows didn't have a mass which we know they do but if they didn't have a mouse They would only exist as left handed particles which means that basically their spin is Is anti aligned with the momentum and but if they have mass and the iraq particles There could be another type of neutrino which is right handed. Which where the This being ease aligned with a mentor other than anti line and so If you are iraq these these two different species could exist and so instead of having one species of neutrino emitted left-handed one Indicators of a massless trina if we have not suv nutrients than you would have to species and so. The black hole radiate war energy compared to The case when neutrinos don't amass so when we started working on this paper i was interested in this phenomenon that A lot of the literature having to do with a developer. Evaporation of primordial black couls. Consider the neutrinos as massless about. Now we know that they are massive. And so i thought well Sixty speaking at primordial black hole could radiate more energy than previously thought. So i found that aspect interesting and then sees you mention the possibility to increase the effective number of species. That's related to what it was talking about. So then you the black hole would ra- gate more neutrino States or more neutrino Species to spe pseudo speak and then Would increase the number of neutrinos per cubic centimeter Data we observe today so I'm kind of glossing over a lot of these days. But basically cosmology gives us a measurement of this and effective which is called the effective number two species. And if you have this right. Handed neutrinos coming from the primordial black holes. This number could be higher than than expected. And so that would be may be a i way to tell that maybe there are more black holes in the universe yet. So so the hawking radiation essentially creation coming out of black holes Expected defined Expected that over a long period of time. Black holes radiate away lap. Later ray out the mass or information that didn't do it And so this. Radiation is hockey. Radio station is it is a new park. Or is it. Fundamentally composed of neutrinos hawking radiation is made of every particle that no of so A black hole. A camera gate Pretty much everything. Photons neutrinos throngs You loans It said cetera but There is the catch here. The fact that a black hole has a temperature which is another Big achievement of stephen hawking to end and others To that the black hole is thermo dynamical object and so Basically the bigger the black hole the lower the temperature so if the temperature is really low The black hole wouldn't be able to immed- Very massive particles because they are thermal energy would be sufficient for that so because masses energy Mc squared right so because massey's energy If a black hole has too low of a temperature It wouldn't have its quantum energy It's it's Wouldn't be enough to produce the mass off a particular particle for example a proton may be too heavy to be produced by a really low tanto black home so so the beaker. The black called the lower the temperature. Yes ed so. So then can expect the bigger black holes to have more of a neutrino content in radiation. Yes because The bigger black holes would as i said be able to radiate the heavy particles and so they would only be able to radiate away the low mass particles and so there could be black holes that only emit photons gravitons and Neutrinos do a of sort of the distribution of this primordial black holes Isn't you know sort of everywhere. What is what do we know about you. Know some of the distribution of bbc's you mean spatial distribution like where they are now. I'm wondering just like the easy would do sort of look at the early universe will find them everywhere Probably at the beginning they would be a more or less uniformly distributed Bug in the universe. Today they would probably be Behaving like the dark matter. Does they would Be part of galactic halos In other words they would be they would class gravitationally on large structures like a like a galaxy placido galaxy so these call still around They would they would behave like like the dark matter down. So they would be in in halo. Galaxies would have by. Now have april would would they not have disappear because it far it depends on the mass That they have when they are born so their if their mass is less than a certain value that trying to remember Basically yes they would have to By now they would have completely evaporate did their masters larger than they will take longer to evaporate and they could still be around So they roughly speaking the dividing line between a black hole. Steve being around today or not. I think it's something like ten to fifteen grams fiery recall correctly into fifteen clams though So this paper. Eusebio obtained the diffuse flux of right hill. Neutrinos from his idea and so so. So so the nikkei actually act to build these neutrinos. They'd be flying here do pbs specifically In principle that's a possibility we Considered that for certain Masses of these black holes and certain density of this black holes the flux of neutrinos that they generate over time could be fairly large and so we could Detect these neutrinos If we had a very Power who attacked so Now life is never ideally in the sense that a real Ut detector have substantive issues like ground And so on. So at the end of the people we conclude that impact is giving given the limitations that current nutrient doctors have It may not really be possible to detect neutrinos trump mortgage black holes but people. That's a possibility and that alone is interesting. Yeah because they suggestion that this primordial black holes could be as as you mentioned could be part of the dark matter that yes to seeking. Is that still About us that has been. There has been a debate on these Kind of going back and forth in the scientific community The latest i heard is that Black whose could be part of the dark matter. Maybe even a large part but probably not they entire dark matter so a one hundred percent primordial Battery is a bit difficult to justify the day. experimental bowels that we already have constrained so various types but there could be scenarios where maybe a fraction of the dark matter. He's made of primordial black holes. I wanted to go into a ended up paper in twenty twenty supernova neutrinos directional sensitivity and prospects for dissertation here the export potential of current and future liquid cinta league neutrino detectors. I decade old town. Mass a localize a super a supernova neutrino signal into sky in douglas was feeding the core collapse nearby star tens to hundreds of english Coated and don't be constructed policy in the detector can be used to estimate a direction to the star so so this is now neutrinos from supernova and You so so we. We have Idea here that before this opened on what happens. If please open over a time period it is creating neutrinos that could pick up and and potentially get ready to see the super bowl. Yes that's what excites me The fact that Think about bitter jews. Beetlejuice is the most famous nearby star. That could go supernova anytime and we don't know when that's going to happen and If it wasn't for these neutrinos that our paper is about we will know until the style literally Collapses and and then soon after becomes superman but in this paper we we Show that before the star collapses which is the beginning of the supernova process We can detect these. These neutrinos That are used at that at that stage and so increase the pool we could know that You know tomorrow. These days beetlejuice exploding and that that would be quite exciting. Yeah it's beetlejuice is is red joy and reasonably close to was really big star. I can remember Cecilia there was some suggestion that It could go supernova within something one hundred fifty thousand years which is obliquely in cosmic time so it is getting ready to go to Supernova right yes. I am not you formed about exactly the number of years give or take but it's it's ready it's ready. It could be any time and any time any time for an astronomer muse anytime the next thousand soviet so we should. We should hold their breath. But it's ready could be tomorrow. It could be in a hundred years could supernova. I know that this is not part of the paper but could the beetlejuice supernova avenue adverse effect on north really know a supernova is very very spectacular event. it's it's a star that collapses so it implodes i and that explodes and then when he explodes It's very bright. In the case of bitter jews we could. We could see by naked-eye shore but in terms of A fact of each radiation and neutrinos in light on on us and on our daily activities. It wouldn't it. Wouldn't affect them in any way so it's a save Show to just enjoy without any worry. Great answer so you talking about supernova neutrinos so so can be actually detect neutrinos from supernova. What different from what we talked about in the previous people Different from pbs I'm not sure. Can you repeat yes. So the new teen emanating from a supernova different from the Neutrinos of expectancy from a primordial black hole. Yes the the different In many ways disney trails have higher energies. So it's much much easier to attack them and indicates will beat the jews. We would detect thousands or even more of dan millions. Probably of them Indiana so different in the way they are born because in our primordial black hole ordinary black hole The processes volcanoes the asian. Which which is a gravity phenomenon in a supernova. You're born out of the very hot and dense environment That the that that the star as after it has collapsed so star collapsing on its own way to become very dense and so In this very dense in hot environment nuclear processes take place that produce these nutrients. So i guess the main difference is that indicates supernova it's most nuclear phenomenon and in the call is really fundamentally a gravitational sonam. Okay you discover technique in this paper and you saved sin principle possible unique the identify the progenitor star so So the existing technology and ideas discussed in the paper viki see teacup a neutrino decode. Identify valid came from or what direction thing from embed you can go back and look at the in that direction if he find to supernova then you could say that the supernova that created in-principle Yes let me. Just say that There are situations and this is not one of them but there are situations where if you have one neutrino you can point to the pointing the sky. What came from in these case. It's a little more complicated. Because what really gives us. The information is the statistical distribution of these nutrients so we are talking about may be the tax in hundred a hundred Gable take from say be for example and What did detector really observe is not the neutrino is kind of a vector which is related to the products of these neutrinos so this neutrino sues interacts with the interact with the detector. And then out of this interaction you have a positive on the new thrown and those can be observed and you can you can create a factory using these two and then and then these rector will have a certain orientation but each each neutrino coming will give you a differently oriented vector but statistically if you look at the distribution of these factors you you can tell you can you can do for with a certain of course The direction of the neutrinos because these vectors are not uniformly distributed they are they have a non uniform distribution of the direction. And so using this information we can we can define a regional the sky where The new three could come from so we can. We cannot now down to a point but we can now down to maybe a cone of a few tens of degrees Width and then we look in that cone and see what stars that com and maybe be juicy one of them. Yeah so As you say you if you see a few Neutrinos Statistics bution of those will give us some some probability That it is in in some region of the sky. And then you say the paper You can then that if it is happening please open nola. You learnt other observational. Modalities multi messagero rations Invisible in radio and other other types of observations Do actually pick up more data so this is almost like a early alert system If it is in place right yes i would call it a very early I learned to because it's we're talking about maybe our worse or insert very fortunate cases. We are even talking about maybe day Before the assad goes supernova and. so that's enough time to plan for for it so a something that fascinated me When i heard about this from a from a an experimentalist is that there is a human factor which was not aware of but The factories so if you have come up with thirty minutes to plan for watching supernova this may not be enough because it just takes stein to make phone calls and get a hold of people and and decide what to do. Come to a consensus in that. I saw in addition to technical things. Like okay have to maybe turn your telescope Direction which takes time. But i i was really fascinated by the human factor. Those things that if you had style we'd be you can kind of gathered. Relevant people decide something but if you have thirty minutes or or or minutes maybe not so. Yeah yeah i wondered. If such a earlier system is in place Perhaps could be something programmatic. Crises is picking up And you have some you know. Maybe some ai techniques or something like that that identifies the region and it goes. Programmatic returned the telescopes look. Yes yes exactly so. There could be a protocol in place For that so e if a telescope was suitable for observing a nearby supernova which which is not always the case than than now that we showed that it's possible to know beforehand if a star is going to go supernova then there could be some sort of protocol in place already so that when the alert comes which is we can just activated the protocol and oriented telescope. maybe automatically will in some sort of Organized way yeah as you say if you remove humans from the process it becomes not better there is actually already working this direction It's called this new two point. Oh a network which has to do with Exactly these using neutrinos as alert for the astronomy community and That has to do with exactly a creating alerts and also creating protocols for how to react to an alert rate. I want to end the people that just came out. it concordant scenario for the observation of neutrino from the tidal disruption. Even eight hundred twenty nine hundred ninety s t You say be induced at phenomenology concordance canadia with the logistic jet of for the title disruption event Between ninety s jesmyn proposes a source of the astrophysical neutrino event. Ice cube So the title disruption even this is star getting cooler into a black hole getting Getting sucked in rate is that the is that even up to the match yes This is something that we We had about be in in popular science stalks What what happens if you get too close to black hole and It's kind of scary. So the answer is you would be ripped apart because your feet will be pulled in with a strong force than your head and these. This is what happens to two statehouse. Use the star gas to close than by guests Ripped the park. Which is what the tied is option means and so instead of a star Rotating around a black hole we just have a stellar stellar That dr intially. I created by the black hole and so This is something that The happy neighbor cops serve did so so we have. This does happen this particularly Eighty twenty nine hundred ninety s and Bequeath actually see a new cleaners from that particular even so tightness. Deduction events are fairly well established phenomenon in astronomy. We have many of them served They they are Fairly a common plays events But what's special about this particular one. Eighty two thousand nineteen years. G is that We could let's say It could have Produced on neutrino that was detected a ice cube so eighty twenty nine hundred ninety s. She is the first either direction event. For which is coincident. Neutrinos detected a dice. Cube in queens. This coincidence is likely to be accidental. So on approachability estimate tells us that these coins. This is pretty causal not accident so eighty twenty nine hundred ninety. The g could be the parent of this neutrino. And that's that's that's a i. That's very interesting. Yes i skew. is a is a big ice cube in the in. The south is I'm not sure it's exactly cuba. But it's it's the biggest block of is which has been Eastern With values Small detectors So it's it's an array of swarner detectors but yeah it's basically a big block of ice which has been transformed into a detective and so so the idea that this high energy neutrinos from what they were System montemar even that happened Out there this high energy neutrinos passing through that ice q. believe some telltale signs All of that happening and yuxi picked up Then began back Just like you were talking about the previous creeper begin. Please back to a region so this is one of those cases where you can tell from a single neutrino of course the with with a narrower where you can tell the point in the sky where three neutrino kate from. It's doable with one single neutrino because this high energy neutrinos when they enter the is They produce ca a shower so they kind of illuminate. They you me nate. The is but the do it in a way which is very much Beat so and then and then the direction of the the direction of bigotry knows. We have a pretty good accuracy often. How often could be a pickup something like that. Do we have an estimate of how often that would happen. Meaning ice cube detects something like this. Every year ice cube the tax Of the order of ten high-energy neutrinos froth outside our galaxy. Tadesse the number for the entire crop of neutrinos that ice cube has It went we talk about tidal disruption events in the specific these are fairly rare phenomena and so they estimated that maybe a few times so percent of the entire neutrino flux the thais cubeys of serving could be from tidal disruption events. Not much more than that. So we are talking about less than half of the total flats being to tell this option events okay and so the tug disruption burned as as you mentioned It starts getting clipped applaud and pulled back into a into a a black hole but this ten percent. Do they have to be these braces as they call it. The things that have a jet that is sort of lying towards us. Is that it necessarily condition for these types of high energy neutrinos. It's it's a plausible scenario Let me just say that. There is an important difference between blazers in tidal disruption events. In the fact that the ablaze is something that has a jet. She's always on so the jets kinda kerman feature of of these particular galaxy but the title is adoption. Event is transient events. Saw dotcoms creates the accretion. This accretion of the star of the black hole produces flair is flair can last year or two but then it would just fade away so There could be jet and in fact in our paper we present where there is a jet so they partisans the user chat But if there is a jet in tiger disruption event. That's a transient suggested. That's born when This starts to create the stellar debris. And then it's on for months or years and then and then shuts off and it has two point in our direction as you as you mentioned because otherwise we would. We would see the trains your so this high energy neutrinos sillier how. How many orders of magnitude are we talking about coming to the one set you pick up. Let's say from the sun I'm not sure about the question. Can you maybe rephrase yet. So when you say this high energy neutrinos that is coming from let's say a tidal disruption events or something like that How much comedy orders of magnitude more energy Outdoors come to you. Know the ones that might be created the sun a lot menu of this magnitude so It is a big difference. So the sun produces new three meals. over a wide range of energies Higher energy neutrinos from the sun reach energies of the order of ten am pt and mega awards and for the ice cream. Neutrinos we are talking about one hundred of the older one hundred t. v. or even thousand teams. Which would be p so. Let's say maybe eighty tortoise magnitude finding the mass rife or okay and so this e. v. measure it is actually measuring the mass of the neutrino of newfield. Now these these neutrinos are have such a Such high energy that basically It's impossible to know their mass Because because as i said massey's energy so they talk energy of neutrino Detected is to be so high that that percentage view to its mass east so tiny that this practice mutual so i was wondering if we know the energy couldn't be sort of back computer to save the mass is or it doesn't follow The reasoning is a bit different and The way to sink about this is perhaps they let me see the formula for energy particle Which used the rest energy Applause the kinetic energy and So connecticut is so high that he thought the overwhelms direct energy. So it's it's and of course every time you measure the energy when three no. There is a narrow associated with the measurement so You we can't really we can't really tell what What led the boss of the detroit news but both roughtly this. This appears to be sort of an early warning system for many many things right topped the supernova the in the title disruption events producing heightened plano's So this could be sort of inundated with a monkey message. Observations protocols as you mentioned that gives us a higher success. Wait suspect. I would think certainly nominated be one right That's the power of multi messenger astronomy the integration of different signals coming from Photos tree knows navigation waves Causing me craze and Danger plays very powerful emmanuel cases and maybe supernova case is the most striking Xenos come first. But that's not always the case So in the indicates of tidal disruption events Did you know that was observed. Came about five months later than the initial dhammika looser version of the tidal disruption events so It's if it can go both ways. neutrinos can be early alert or they only alert could be for example a radio salvation or or an x-ray use ovation and then and then the neutrino attacked or could Focus a surge in that direction as see what they find which which has actually been done ice cube sometimes. Does these these archival. Search this on the basis of others from From for example x ray or gamma ray surveys interested. Exciting eighty that said a lot to be owned It seems It seems like these till don't know all the production mechanisms for neutrinos but if we have robust with to pick them up on than we can place them back and and talk asking questions What might be there definitely So yes so. People celia the next five years Wanted the aid is that you believe Be will make a significant crocus in this Innovative neutrinos then two different areas. That a very promising One is Broadly speaking Manmade nutrients so there is. There is a big push especially hitting the united states to build Create very powerful beams of trainings and then these beams are manmade. So we know that very well. We know that energy we know the composition and we can use them to learn about The properties of treatments and then That other men bead neutrino experiments where Scientists look for the between months so that's also very promising In something i really. I really excited about that. That may be a furious novel with noble the neutrino mass us from these very high position laboratory experience. Then there is the whole Topic of neutrinos as part of the mouth of mike messenger astronomy and in that area. I think what was was to look forward. To among other scenes is the interplay gravitational waves shock waves. You still Somehow a science of its own into a large extent but there are so many possible connections. We've neutrinos tidal disruption adoption events should produce reputation ways so baranov shoot us gradation ways So so there is. There is a a lot of potential there which is still unexplored in and that's where i see myself Working on in the next few years you adjust very quickly The do gravitational waves travel bid closest and new ashtrays and so if If they both are produced in In uneven they're expected to arrive on earth close to simultaneously. It depends on the timing of the production if the answer is yes the waves ending a knows are born at the same time which may not be exactly true because the physics that governs tation waves is different from the one that that governs neutrinos. So but the difference in timing would be the difference Accumulated that birth But but the two were were generated genetically the same time. They should arrive the same time. Just thinking this a systematic difference in the production time than guan lorries given early warning for the other. But that doesn't seem to do a case right. There could be cases where significant lag in the production of rotation way with respect to the production of the tree nose and one example is. We haven't touched on this before but let me just nation mergers so if we have if we have a merger for example we have maybe a merger of a neutron stars or black hole neutral star before the merger happens so when the two objects that kind of still approaching each other we should start observe serving ways and this is what this is what has been seen so Delight experiment observes these these nominal But if we have a merger After the merger has occurred and the two objects have become one than a. Dan could be the formation of of over an accretion disk and he secretion Trainers which we can which we can back so the neutrino We come After they initially asian waves and so relation as would be the alert for the neutrino. That does excellent. your this has been great as celia. thanks so much complaining pleasure. Okay thank you bye. This is a scientific sense. Podcast providing unscripted conversations with leading academics and researchers on variety of topics. If you like to sponsor this podcast please reach out to info. At scientific sense dot com.

Policy Technology Economics Science Stephen Hawking Eappen Eappen Dot Info. Iraq Dutra Eusebio Dini Celia PBS Sonam Gill Munich Trina East Coast Miranda Nicole Amazon Massey Dr Intially
Family Helps Total Strangers Book Vaccine Appointments

WTOP 24 Hour News

02:48 min | 2 years ago

Family Helps Total Strangers Book Vaccine Appointments

"The short time Operation Center was at a diminished capacity there now investigating what caused some lines to go dark, and they'll share that information later. As older Americans struggle to secure covert vaccine appointments online volunteers known as vaccine hunters or stepping in to help CBS News correspondent Nancy Chen introduces us to a New York family that's already helped more than 750 older neighbors to get their shots for seniors like 81 year old Jeannie McDowell. They didn't have an iPhone. They don't have a computer. What were they supposed to do? Securing an appointment seems impossible until they reach out to Detroit to Castro. Okay, no problem. I can help you with that went for a cell phone to Mozza Pull laptops. Turn into a command center. Yes. In the kitchen to Castro in her family, a book vaccine appointments by the hundreds and their central New York community all for total strangers, and for free, we do it. Between lunch dinner. Pretty much all the time to Castro's often up until three in the morning, rapidly refreshing websites for any availabilities. And now my husband cause it. Welcome all you have to be quick because There's 10,000 other people doing probably the same thing. Her husband, Marco, delivering the printed confirmation tickets. She first realized the difficulties in getting an appointment while signing up. Her mother in law board got out fast. After the Castro started helping neighbors. I heard some seniors even say they would get on the computer. They might lose the site they put in Rome, New York and ended up in Rochester and my other dear friend. Got on the phone and the lady said call back at four. She called back and four and the tape said the office is closed to Castro got an appointment in just days for McDowell in her husband on Lee, two of the 25 the to Castro's book on average each day for anyone who asks, including the Petri family. Vicky was very stressed. By the time she got everything in Appointment is gone. Viki and Dave Petri reached out for their daughter, Jessica, who has down syndrome. After struggling on their own. She helped us she helped our neighbors She helped my brother and his wife. Get appointments. She just I don't know how she does it. De Castro's reach has now spanned four counties. People express their gratitude with cards and even home cooked dinners, but to Castro says she's just doing anything possible. To protect her community. I treat everyone as if they're my parents yesterday would have been soon enough for me. If it were my parents. When will you stop? When they

Castro Short Time Operation Center Nancy Chen Jeannie Mcdowell New York Cbs News Detroit Marco Dave Petri Rochester Mcdowell Rome Viki Vicky LEE Jessica De Castro
"viki" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

04:58 min | 2 years ago

"viki" Discussed on WGN Radio

"99 w G. And Oh, gosh, you did get look. Is he on the phone? Yeah, but I didn't think we'd actually grab I don't know. I think he does live a few blocks away from me. Actually, I Lou You know, I have a life. Okay, Well, you're about to have a better one. What's what? She said What? Victor Rooney? Hey, Lou. Yeah. You have a truck or something. Could you help Viki get her garbage from a garage turf like a two week story street. I did hear this story. I think Vicky and I live close by to each other. That's kind of what we're thinking. So if you could just swing by, I don't know if you have a pickup truck or what? But Maybe find one of your guys. Wow. Yeah, Just get one of your kids. Maybe you maybe Mary bad. Nobody. Nobody lived at my house anymore. You know, all my kids are but I do have a snowplow. Oh, my. Yeah. That's golden ticket these days. Yeah. When I used to When I used to live in edge, Brooke, I had a big snowplow on the front of my Chevy Suburban and we were the only alley that ever got plowed because I would plow the alley for my neighbors. I was They loved me. I'm just gonna say our alley is gravel. So when the snow Falls. They never power, Alice. So I had to show him. The city of Chicago has to figure that out. I mean, this whole thing about dibs would not be an issue if they would say Hey, everybody on The something block of something street. You all have to be off on the north bound side between noon and two. Today, the plows going to come to remove that snow. Yeah, the way they do. Street cleaning, right? You know, they do that on some streets, but they don't do that through many of the streets and in the neighborhoods. Um, I know in Skokie. It's very confusing because they ask you if it snows to park on like the odd numbered side of the street on certain days of the month. It's so confusing. I was put glue on the lock. If you will, for just a moment, Lou, I'll give you Vicky's contact, information and address. We will you get hurt garbage might make a tick tack video out of this. Oh, my God. Oh, my gosh. It would be a cure. Oh, tarnation. Lewis, If you were thinking, if we do this, I'm just gonna go there and get it done. And then when she gets back up for work, it'll be it'll be done like I'm doing. I'm a do, er, John, By the way, people here Lou's voice on they go. Oh, my God, I've got a question about my plumbing. Hey, Caitlin, you On WGN. Hello. Oh, hi, Luke and John and fend off both off you. I'll listen. Listen to John in the morning and the Saturday morning and listened to lose our boy, Lou. Thank you, Lewis. And on your show yesterday also, And he mentioned about pickling pickling water in a thing, eh? So it won't sees right now. I don't think which has Only one handle. Be tight on left for the heart and right on the for the cold. So should I put it that keep it in the middle. How does their work But you know what about that blue? Correct. So if you're gonna leave water trickling because you have a faucet on the outside wall, you need to trickle both the hot and the cold. So if it's a single handle faucet, you want to just bring it up in the middle, So you mix it a little bit. It doesn't have to be much. It just needs to be, you know, like a little steady stream. And if you don't if you only do one side you run the risk of the other side Freezing because it's two separate pipe systems. I was strangling some water last night myself. In fact, We've been done. Sprinkling the water for a while. Now, can I tell you one of the best calls I got on Saturday, which involves you? A nice lady called in with a question And she said to me and I didn't get a chance to tell her this, But she said I love listening to you and John and I love the friendship that you and he have been that sweet. That is nice to say. I don't know why she would say that. That's what I was because I wanted to tell Aries so they're really only reason I'm nice to you because I love your wife. I'm hanging up on you now, Lou, but go get Vicki's garbage. William Hickey's draft text me and I'll go home with you guys are the best. Not yet, but let's see. Oh, by the way, I meant to mention this, You know, we're all looking for something positive in our lives. For instance, Vicky's gonna have a good day. Now, something to be happy about. How about getting that knee pain addressed with the ice and snow out there? I know this is a tough week. It's been a tough year so far. And that need pain is not going to get better on its own. There's no nice is just making it harder for you to get round. I want you to go to the Joint Relief Institute. Get that knee pain addressed. Not only will you feel better, but you're gonna walk with more confidence in the conditions out there. They use digital imaging. They see both sides of the knee and exactly where the tissues deteriorated, and they put a lubricant in there. Watch them perform a procedure on one of their patients. Last week when I walked into the exam room, Lady said, Sure, Come on in. I want you to see that, she says. This is a place of miracles. She does 10,000 steps a day, do you?.

Lou Vicky knee pain John Brooke Lewis Victor Rooney snow Falls Skokie Viki Joint Relief Institute Mary Alice Suburban Lady Chicago Caitlin William Hickey Luke Vicki
"viki" Discussed on Coaching for Leaders

Coaching for Leaders

07:24 min | 2 years ago

"viki" Discussed on Coaching for Leaders

"The smartest person in the room right It's really a team effort and that that gets me thinking about one of the other things you wrote in pirates in the navy. You have a warning for innovators and you write this. Sure the ceo loves you and sure your is looking really great right now but you need to understand that while this is necessary support. It's not enough for you to succeed. It's probably less than ten percent of what you'll need to succeed. When innovators feel that they have the support the ceo. They think they can do whatever they want. And ignore other stakeholders in the business. This is a huge mistake. That strikes me as something. That's just such a key message for someone who's trying to affect change in the organization. Yeah i mean. I mean think about it even if you were the smartest person in the room. The not enough hours in the day for you to do every single task necessary for innovation to succeed. The you'd have to kill yourself to to do that. The truth about innovation is that innovation and the team. Sports there's not a single innovation the world that's ever been launched off the back of just a single individual it's always been a collaborative effort and it becomes even more difficult inside the larger relations because no matter what you do eventually someone in the organization who's not you is going to have to make a decision to give you resources support your effort for for example if you if you earn innovationlab and i've worked with innovation lab the africa ones really great innovation lab that fourteen ideas that they'd come up with their. That would really cool. They couldn't convince anyone in the organization to support. Take in these to scale. They couldn't get sale support. They couldn't get technology support to build the stuff. They couldn't even get further resources to build a bigger team. That's because while you're working on these ideas you not doing the work of building the relationships you're going to need to get the resources you actually need to scale. I've even met some brash. Innovators will say. I don't need to build relationships. As soon i find something that's going to work the company would just spin it out and i'm like yeah that's possible but even creating is is house requires collaboration with a core business. You're not going to do the lawyers to come in corporate finance to come in where somebody's gonna have to make a decision that we're going to create a whole you. Corporate structure around your idea and those people are people that you have to collaborate with and so you're working lots organization it's inevitable the death metal. How much support you have. Whether you're the smartest in the room or the you are ill. On math great you will still need to collaborate with others to create something about such an important call for relationships and building relationships evaders and the invitation you make to. Innovators is that in really getting is partnering with stakeholders and specifically you ask people to look for those in the organization those managers who are early adopters. And if you might walk us through what a early at dr is and what would be some of the indicators that they're the kind of person that an innovator would be looking to partner with to get traction. Yeah for this. One is the the lesson that i learned personally the hard way when i was working at pearson and we were trying to build the innovation process there early that i think we made was. We spent a lot of time trying to socialize of framework and our toolbox to the entire organization. And what we're doing with we're working our power having meetings and present doing presentations and speaking about the product cycle and shrink people stuff and you know we thought the stuff that were being made made but the thing about trying to go big. Bang like that and talk to everybody. Is that you lose. The ability actually had have impact in. Also you spend a lot of time arguing with your detractors. People who are not interested in working they suck up a lot of your energy to take your time. So what i learned from that. Was that actually the best way to start to start. Innovation movement is to start small. Don't try and go big too early trying to find like early adopters within your organization an early adopters are those individuals who who feel really strongly that the company needs to innovate so they have a problem and they feel that the problem is something that's important solve and that and the video sometimes tried to solve the problem themselves. Try to come up with hacks to try and do something of innovation. They've got budget. And they've got a commitment. And i found that in every single organization of a i've been in a couple leaders. That are early adopters. That's why we also say beginning with discovery because discovery allows you to find your early adopters and then you just focus on your early. Adopters ignore the detractors. Right just say okay okay. We'll get to you later. Ignore you detractors. Focus on your early adopters and health. Your early adopters succeed. Don't enforce your early adopters to work on crazy. Innovations talk to you elliott. Doctors find out the things that they're concerned about things that are keeping them up at night and then help them you. The innovation process to solve those problems. Because you help your early adopters succeed those stories. They've that to create the momentum and gravity. You need to bring everybody else to the movement to strikes me as such a key point of being intentional of as you mentioned setting aside the detractors and realism on the people who are ready. I'm curious when you think about the organizations. You've worked with and helping innovators to identify early. Adopters what is the language or the kinds of things that those early adopter managers inside an organization are saying that are good indicators that that might be the person that is the place to start. Yeah so so. There's a few characteristic. I kind of i kind of adapted them from steve blank definition of an early adopter for an actual product or innovation. So the first thing is know they they have the problem so an early adopter leader would be saying things like man. This company cannot keep going the way it's going. I know that we're making money right now but we probably need to start thinking about ranching some new products and services of creating some sort of new growth. So that's the kind of language they using and then they also recognize that which is the second thing right. They have the problem in the recognized that they have the problem. The can recognize that the company does not have enough innovation capabilities to succeed. So they'll be saying stuff like yeah. I've just gone to the conference of the gel. One hundred conference and in no of learn to all these things. I'm hoping organization can adopt these practices. The may have even tried themselves to implement some of the. Maybe they brought in a you know a training from strategy either or they launched a hackathon or maybe they did an idea jam something right to try and get innovation off the ground. And they've been struggling with it and so in identifying and finding who those people are you then start to help them succeed. I who doesn't go right there waiting. They're willing to give you a chance if you wanna fully formed process yet willing to give you a chance to co create the process with them and that's who you really looking for in the early stages because it's really allows you to get that early win. An early winds are really important to win to maintain.

less than ten percent One one first thing One hundred conference pearson steve blank single fourteen ideas single task couple leaders in the navy innovationlab second thing innovation single individual lab single organization africa
"viki" Discussed on Coaching for Leaders

Coaching for Leaders

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"viki" Discussed on Coaching for Leaders

"Maybe you've been asked to be a champion for innovation or perhaps your the leader challenging others to innovate better in this episode. How you can actually help. New ideas get real traction. This is coaching for leaders episode. Five hundred twelve produced by innovate learning maximizing human potential. Green steve from orange county california. This is coaching for leaders. And i'm your host dave stove. Iak leaders are born. They're made in this weekly show. Helps you discover leadership wisdom through insightful conversations. You have heard many times the conversation on the show about the importance of.

"viki" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"viki" Discussed on Pantheon

"Up point and become. I don't feel talk. Only the the like the who you know what's going out. Never wow. Wow wow to take bong in in your mouth and to form it in that manner bigger debunked. I don't wanna say it's talent but it's something it's audacity ends are it's called cassidy. That is what it is. That is what it is. I need some herbs and spices. So i can feel nicest coolest summer tree a summer. Treat cullin like a summer termer. Trae summer trees you get cool underneath shade of a summer Okay thank you for taking me on that. So you gotta have a very. I q to appreciate allies to rolling up that hootie mack exactly. He loves colleague. We'd is because they feel so good in my lungs the also the I definitely feel like he is getting some inspiration from his rastafarian in I don't know collusion when he's like when he's getting like more like singing while he's wrapping fire fire. I'm like oh no yeah yeah. He occasionally attempts to sing. He also speaking to that a little bit to viki the lyric. You see. Every time i wake up. I got to clear my head but i clear it with because it goes with my dress so this habit this habit goes with my appropriation so i i'm just i'm in. I'm all in. If i have dreads. I have to smoke a bunch of pot. I guess of this era. But i do feel like it's pretty. Bold one would say even capacity like that to be accused of appropriating and making money off of hip hop as a white person to then respond with. I'm going to get dreadlocks. Or my approximation of dreadlocks. And i am going to say that. I am now a roster and or at least inspired by roster and now that i am inspired by rastafarianism..

viki
iOS Interview Questions For Senior Developers in 2020 Part 2

Inside iOS Dev

09:01 min | 3 years ago

iOS Interview Questions For Senior Developers in 2020 Part 2

"And today's episode as part two to the previous episode about IOS interview questions for Senior Developers in two thousand twenty. The article that I wrote S- and this is the part two episode where I'm covering article so in this one. I'm going over questions next question. So we'll start with question number four. What is what is NBC? It's a very fundamental question again. Even though it's very basic question senior developers also need to know about and expected to give more detail on the show more depth of knowledge of such basic questions so NBC stands for Model View Controller. Software Design Pattern apple adopted. It came from small talk. Apple adopted its towards their own. Had has has its own reincarnation of it Model is responsible for data controller is responsible or views responsible rendering the dates and getting input from the user and control are supposed to glue views and models together right and be this coordinator control right at the end of the day. Apples flavor of it is More view skewed towards the view. That's why wouldn't really have controllers. Who Have you controllers what you should know? Besides there's this basics That that I just covered you also need to know and understand that model view controller. Nbc is not your application architecture. That's just a design pattern foot of you and if you want to architecture application especially architectures for scale you probably should go for something something else. Something with more flexibility. Something's more advanced at least. I'M VM MVP COORDINATOR. Design pattern or go for a heavy duty architectures such as viper and ribs but again as a as a senior developer. You should be aware of that so erratic flag that could raise here as well simply not knowing what an NBC is right. What what it stands for. And what that's fundamental Basic design pattern of APP Iowa's Apple Development in general I think they use it on all the platforms but nevertheless I again as I mentioned already as a senior. Dev rather the expectation is that you know. Other design patterns and architectures for further reading. Look at Apple. Apples article on their developer portal. It's called model dash view controller Then ABC's Dotto has a great article Cold lighter view controllers. It's from one of their previous issues of Went UP CIO. Had this Monthly I believe issue of their articles. Then there's another article on a con Lou con Lou. I think that's how I say it that come about massive you controller. Kennedy shoes with NBC. Another one is on a Napa soda actual this podcast inside. Iowa's Dev where and I covered the the issues with controller skull the problem with the problems with controllers another article you could read introduction to n. b. b. m. that's also obviously that article And then another episode of this podcast view models to the rescue As far as I recall Andrew in that episode. Goes over a great example of where? Mvp and could could save your bacon in the overblown view controller. Massive you controller code base and another article could read up on a model view presenter. It's MVP by Martin Fowler. It's on his website. March and following dot com. And as usual. You you'll find those links south. Put Him the Up put the link to the article in the show notes and they're in the further reading for that question. You can find links to those articles that I mentioned. The next question is number five. What do you know about? Singleton's where would you use one? And where would you not Singles Singleton Severi? It's very common design pattern. It'S CONSIDERED TO BE CO CORE. Competencies design pattern and it's used everywhere throughout all of the apple examples and They they actually utilizing soon bilton themselves in the API COCA API that they provide a four us. This jar short answer. Singleton Is a class that returns only one. And the same instance no matter how many times you requested what it really means at the end of the day that you have a type but say networking services and you implement a static or property rather. I think that's typically the implementation called shared or something like that instance and then in there you basically cash that instance the very first time. It's accessed you initials it and then you cash it and that's it. And then every other time when the in through that static property the instances rick. The SINGLETON has requested to return the same instance Singled and Sarah unfortunately anti pattern. They have a lot of issues with them and specifically they encourage global states. The they they really did. Sir and there are a lot of issues with dependency injection they. They really don't help at all with it. They make it more difficult. They you have to tie things to specific concrete types instead of relying and interfaces things like that so and in general even though apple promotes it. I do not recommend using singleton's and I know it's a it's a kind of a debatable topic if you will but there are a lot of prominent articles written about by prominence experienced developers Basically kind of debunking if you will the design pattern than explaining why. It's an anti pattern. So the Rad flak for this question as well you should actually know what a singleton the is and how to implement it and how to work with it even though it's a necessary and or unfortunate evil quite often and for further reading to to kind of get into the details of why. I'm saying it's an anti pattern. There are two resources you could go for. One is actually episode of this podcast. Called Y Singleton are evil and another one is actually similar styles. Single single are evil. It's by you can find this article on Viki Dot C two DOT com. They cover it more. They're in in more details in an an unwrap all the issues with singles. So the next questions number six. What's different between delegates and TV? Oh so this is a this is also quite common question on on. Irs INTERVIEWS THE DETAILED. Yar The cute. Let's let's start with What what is Ki? Ki Ki all right cave your sense. Four key valley observation so delicate design pattern and Kiva observation both are techniques for to establish relationships between objects and delegates establishes and declares using the delegates. You declare one to one relationship using protocols delegate protocols and Dan with Kiva labs operation you declare and establish a many to many relationship using other techniques but mostly. It's a kind of declarative key valor. While the that that's in the name Kiva Observation and your keys likely will be there strings or I believe you could use like selectors or something about for

NBC Apple MVP Singleton Developer Iowa Coordinator Kiva Observation Lou Con Lou Kiva Labs Napa IRS CIO ABC Kennedy DAN Rick Martin Fowler Sarah
Could We Turn Air Pollution Into Ink?

BrainStuff

03:41 min | 3 years ago

Could We Turn Air Pollution Into Ink?

"You ever looked at the dirty Hayes and lung clogging smog caused by air pollution and thought? Hey this could be art. Sounds ridiculous right but the ridiculous is becoming reality in a process that can turn air pollution into inc a company. Called Gra Viki. Labs is transforming the microscopic particulate matter in machinery exhaust resulting from burning fossil fuels. What we might call soot and is more efficiently called PM. Two point five into black ink weather from cars and trucks or generators factories. What would have been inhaled by millions or dirty buildings or contaminated? Water and soil can now be used for drawing and printing as the creaky labs website states. Our vision is to arrest the urban. Pm Air pollution in a way. That doesn't reach our lungs or race streams. Their goal is quote to confine and bind that captured pollution into high grade. Inks but everyone can use to express themselves through art writing. The they make from. This process is called air. Inc GRA Viki. Labs grew out of the work. That company CO founder. Any Ru Sharma did as a graduate student with. Mit Media Labs in Cambridge Massachusetts during his studies on a trip home to India in two thousand twelve. He took a photo of a white wall covered with a triangle of soot caused diesel generator. Exhaust he saw potential in the pollution. Carbon Black a byproduct of the incomplete burning of petroleum products is normally used to produce INC as well as as a component in rubber paints and plastics rather than burn new fossil fuels INC production term and his colleagues wanted to create inc from vehicle and machinery exhaust already being produced thereby also reducing particulate matter in the air from these sources twenty thirteen experiment with Kendall set and an improvised printer. Cartridge led to a lab set up an India in two thousand fifteen where pollution restrictions are not as strict as in the US allowing for easier particular capture and more effective testing the trial and error of attaching strange equipment to cars and Banglore capturing PM. Two point five produced a small device. They named call INC which can be retrofitted to exhaust pipes. This electromechanical device can capture ninety five percent of PM. Two point five in the exhaust without any adverse effect on engine performance once the particular matter is filtered ground to a standard size and liquefied a Gra Viki labs proprietary process. The results is a densely colored. Free FLOWING BLACK INK ONE THIRTY MILLILITER. Penn is the equivalent of forty five minutes of diesel production. A number of Indian companies have contacted Gra Viki labs to dispose particular matter that otherwise would end up in a river or landfill. A two thousand seventeen kickstarter campaign raised more than forty thousand Singapore dollars equal to a bit over two thousand nine thousand. Us Bunny for more than six hundred eighty. Contributors in addition singapore-based Tiger Beer partnered with curvy Gi labs for an art campaign making air INC available to artists cities such as Hong Kong Berlin and London to create murals and other public artworks. And yes air is available for purchase though. They've got a sponsor of the show. We just think they're cool since two thousand. Sixteen Gra Viki. Labs has been able to clean one point six trillion leaders that's twenty trillion cubic inches of air precinct more than one thousand two hundred liters of Air Inc but with the CAL linked device capable of customization for large applications including factory smokestacks and capturing particularly directly from the air. Those numbers should only increase charmer and his colleagues could then scale up to tackle industrial applications including inkjet printers exiles and publishing as inventors and entrepreneurs the Viki labs team would be able to breathe a little easier. And so we.

Gra Viki Labs Air Inc Gra Viki Mit Media Labs Ru Sharma India Hayes INC Call Inc Co Founder United States Tiger Beer Cambridge Massachusetts Graduate Student Penn Kendall Hong Kong Berlin London
Michael Kent Jr Discuss Training with Nick Price

Three Wide No Cover

08:45 min | 3 years ago

Michael Kent Jr Discuss Training with Nick Price

"You're an answer that you would partner up with moldable group on trying to make progress as a partner shipping training. Congratulations Yeah thank you Massive opportunity for myself and to be honest one never saw coming star of the year. Tell me about the meeting because make pry prices. Roy is an ECLECTIC cut. I think he's he's a deep thinker. He knows what he wants and he goes and gets it and he doesn't mean these words. Tell us about the meeting is he's Dave think of it doesn't Stuff around you know. He's racy manager Luke Rubinsohn. Who is now working for you? Long as they are rising manager toll team in February at the Sydney classic style that he was leaving and blessings and literally within three days. The found out after the fact He gave me a cold. He said long well. Yes it on Dennen Roby the south grounds. He said I'll see you in five minutes. And he gave me an opportunity to be training partner. which was a massive massive one for me So quickly cold people inside circle and went through it all and had a meeting with Mick wake lighter went through the nitty-gritty and We shook shook hands. What would you connection with MC price proud of that? So I've been working my Dad Potong. Who is trying to Kramden But also doing stock work boy and selling horses and Managing Phoenix Thunderbirds. Australian bloodstock Phoenix. You would know Are Join Loving Gabby And they're getting big. They've spent close to a million lost around the world They've got now Sixty racehorses in Australia and fairly broom is are they getting big quickly and we had Taibbi San and training with Mick process the white colors with the orange and it's always Dealing with make a bit like that and I think I suppose he took some notice of me during that Tom Period. And as I said that's how he's. Brian Works Mickey. He's very good to make a quick decision and not around and he's awesome and I'm glad you did you vote in Britain. The Guy some must've made a big decision. Few to accept. Israel was a partnership with MC pros. You talk to your family. Your father. You mentioned make taint as a mobile group winning south when your mother Viki also stems from a racing family and father bobby scarlet right as a junkie headed. That meeting with the family family was a deal. Yeah let's talk about Everyone David blessing including dad honestly mid-process one fifty eight great ones massive business. Probably the third holiest number of horses in training in Victoria. We're at the moment And on the other hand Dad small business probably Didn't they'd be there for the time being I'm only twenty nine years old so you know it was a bit of a Ni- Brian for me to go out with Mick and get that experience and I'm very thankful that he the Also gaming the tomato could have just been an assistant to him but to put me in the partnership is really good of him And and I think if for sure so guy back and come back to the setup and the business model of the stable with you. Seventy five boxes at Caulfield and you set stand up and obviously trying to get out of that and spelling but tell me you're born and bred in the game you're well traveled those young man in in thoroughbred racing because we'll let's predominantly stop with crab father coty state. There's a picnic jockey. Himself was growing up in a rising family with the debt as China. Yes I literally the whole family racing so as you said. Dad's a educates jockeys in Hong Kong and the Donkey Club there On my mom side. So Mums Dad was champion apprentice. At Coalfield he was very good. Trier himself MOM's brother is Robert Scarlett. Who was a group? Winning Jockey won the plight. He now is Anthony Friedman's nine Trou- shawls central lines super seth thile asking for tips and then turn ankle and that family as well as a stupid Tori and cousin who's also a steward so so you can imagine we talk about on Christmas Day. So it's all there and growing up so I went to Melbourne University. Did the Bachelor of science in pre veterinary but to be honest. Just didn't have the passion I wanted to be a hole through But appease my parents and went through school and Melvin University but was working for David Highs Lindsey pock walls it Fleming at College Melbourne Elven and just track every morning and every weekend I could Then attention question grew up in Cranbourne cranborne steeped in racing history and finding off. It'd be the future of Mick price and Michael Cane racing is moving next year to try and so it's funny Y worked out CREMINS. Amazing Setup Rudy. It's a purpose built training casulty where there's a thousand horses training a training complex And really important to getting back there. I know it very well heavy. Hey we have is your whole husbandry whilst you were going through school where your hands on learning the mechanics and the writings of a stable lading hoses. Washing holes is rotting. Olson was a little school. I with that direction. Now is both at the same time. And I've got my dad to think that mostly he's He's cepeda meal of a good horseman. My Dad he's very well read. He is a very good rotter himself he won the amateur jockey primitive three times as a young kid. Has You nice on woman in a very broad and he you know maybe learned the hard way so I was working for him all the way along doing boxes to begin. Game with and Strapping horses then. I did the picnic cirque myself so I road and even had mind Austin's when I was twenty three to train only because I wanted to sort of get away from died and just do mine thing and put on you better as every young kid does but it's still had he's Advice on the way but go in the mornings and broad three of mine that I was trying for the picnics. Before I started dad my grandpa would be doing the boxes. Susan telling the horses up in between and we had a lot of fun doing that so I think have come to throw away until the basics. Dad's also big into the science of things I've been to sea many surgeries understand. If a horse has problems with row to it's knees and needs chips removed Aubain Dec- surgeries surgeries of what would vets a different style. I've seen a lot of the different aspects so I I think that's really put me in good stead as as a trainer because you have to be across everything we all the Horse in training and you'd understand all of the inflammation Intel. It gets front you each day and and then process that and then put it back out to your clients. And I'm really thankful to my father especially in my family that They've helped me. They get a good grasp of of trying little places that cheeks jigsaw puzzle in the picture inevitably because everyone is an individual and locks to do. Everything's certain why in the more easier you tap into that. Is that the cater to training also. Is that what you learned early doors. When you took training losses to tap into that individual you'll holes to get the best animal absolutely no doubt you have a general system so we actually know when a horse in the paddock to Rice Day We usually need three Muncie them fit entirely and basic process but You assess your horse and you get the information back from the horse as you know is it. Todd is happy eating well would let he moved into a different boxx. Some training lighter some of the more work So we have a basic program but yes certain. That's the most important thing about training is individualizing

Mick Price Brian Partner DAD Luke Rubinsohn ROY Dave Sydney Dennen Roby MC Melbourne University Hong Kong China Caulfield Robert Scarlett Viki Britain Intel
Spain will have the world's longest life expectancy in the next 20 years — and the US will fall behind China in the rankings

Dr. Daliah

09:54 min | 4 years ago

Spain will have the world's longest life expectancy in the next 20 years — and the US will fall behind China in the rankings

"Depends on how well or poorly health systems address key drivers, the future of the world's health is not preordained. And there is a wide range of plausible trajectories said the findings add to a study last month showing how you know, the Mediterranean diet could help well Spain as a pretty good diet. A lot of vegetables, lots of fish. They also do according to CNN, which I hesitate on touting. They have tax funded healthcare barely the World Health Organization ranks their healthcare system as the seventh best in the world. Portugal, rising to the top twenty three point six years added to their life expectancy. So this study was published in the journal Lancet yesterday. And it looked at the data from the two thousand sixteen global burden of diseases project and generated predictions from two thousand seventeen thousand forty they say the impacts of diseases such as diabetes HIV aids and cancers as well as Rex factors including diet and smoking rates were taken into account. They say what they looked at which could cause premature death is high blood pressure. High body mass index meaning us being fat high blood sugar tobacco use alcohol use. So British eighty three point three years chairman's eighty three point two Australian eighty four point one Syria growing up to seventy eight point six so who's the top ten Spain. Japan Singapore Switzerland Portugal. Italy, Israel, France, Luxembourg and Australia. So US declining. Big thing that made us decline because remember this is a numbers game. We're the accidental drug overdoses. We don't hear how many people died in two thousand seventeen but the sixty three thousand number keeps haunting us for the year two thousand sixteen. Us losing. Thousand people do drug overdoses messed up our overall life expectancy. And so our life expectancy is an average. They look at everybody and the age of on they die, and if you have a bunch of younger people it starts to pull down the numbers. You would think life expectancy would be this. Let's look at all these older people. And of these older people how long are they living to? And then let's average like let's say you take fifty on up age fifty on up. I would probably do something more like that. But that's not how they do it. They go from age one to you know. So that if somebody let's say died as a kid God forbid, or whatever it skews the numbers, but I would say let's just start with older individuals and look at that fifties old, but you know, we don't have as many people dropping dead of overdoses in their fifties. Like, we do when they're younger, and and then see how long these people are living to. And if we see the average older person is living to eighty ninety whatever come up with that number. But it doesn't work that way. Now, they also say obesity in adults is at its highest rate ever. Well, of course, because we stopped smoking. That's to the National Center for health statistics. They see nearly four every ten adults in eighteen point five percent. Children of the children in the US are obese. Okay. So obesity in children lot of factors causing obesity. Right. Right. In terms of kids. They're just playing outside. They're not working up a sweat people. Now have asthma food allergies. They're addicted to their computer, they're not exercising. But the one thing that's very very interesting is even some of these heavy kits. They get skinny in their teenagers. When they start to Rome and the hormones rise. You know? Nandor metabolism goes up, and they have great metabolism of puberty, the gain some weight, and then a lot of skinny up, then they go back to their old ways. They get heavy again. The other thing too is back in the old days people would smoke and again, I'm not saying, I'm not pro smoking. I'm not, but we keep on, you know. Brush it under the rug that people like to put things in the mouth. And once we took cigarettes away, we now have people going towards vaping. And we've got to do something with the vaping people are gonna go to marijuana put something in the mouth. And since Rabin told sugars bad sugars bad sugars bad. Are we going to start chewing on pencils against pencils? Pens are bad because you get lead poisoning. I've got the chew on something. So then I got well you got in trouble at school for chewing gum. So then I would try to suck a jolly rancher. I got in trouble for that too. So I didn't know that. I bet my nails. Senate bit my nails. I some of us just are very orally fixated where we just like to chew on things when we get hungry. We put something in her mouth. I wasn't really big on being keys and pacifies as a baby. One of my kids was he loves has been key. Viki? They've viki. All right. So these rates are going up. We have other countries that are going to kick our butts now. Unfortunately. African countries have usually been at the bottom of the rankings. But they are going to see lifespan rises. Unfortunately, some of them like their life span is only down to fifty seven point three years. They say Lesotho is at forty five point three year average life expectancy. So obviously, the more highly industrialized better. But now, let's talk about healthcare. Let's look at these. Let's look at these top Ted Spain Japan Singapore Switzerland Portugal. Italy Israel, France, Luxembourg in Australia. Having government run healthcare or government, subsidized tax subsidized healthcare. Is that what we need to live longer? Well, this is what I wanna know. In Spain whose life expectancy is eighty five point eight years is everybody putting money into the pot. Remember to miracle only about half of the country pays taxes or being told fifty percent, actually pay taxes. Do you get away with that in Spain? I don't think so I don't think you get away with that Israel don't think you've get away with that in Japan. And so if we don't have money coming in we can't be putting money out. We're also very spoilt in America. Very spoiled. We want our test. Now, we we we've had a privatized system, and I've loved a privatized system, but we are not going to have people want to wait three months. Four number. I. Look at what happened with HMO's. People hate HMO's. They made a comeback with ObamaCare, but they heat HMO. And let's go back to ObamaCare did ObamaCare. We talk about the life expectancy dropping over the last few years did ObamaCare of anything to do with it. Everybody who loved ObamaCare was. No, no, no, no inexpensive, Medicare, Medicaid, which is something. I wanted. But the one thing I noticed. Especially with me, and my family and a bunch of people is once our deductibles went up to multiple thousands a year, we just stopped going to the doctor. So I skip to my mammogram size. Get my Pap smear. I skipped my colonoscopy. I I start to skip things because of the deductible. It was just too much. And so. You wonder if some people who did not live as long as they wanted to missed something. Because now the deductibles too high they have to come up too much out of pocket. So not go to the doctor. Life expectancy would go up with ObamaCare. If it really gave people insurance looks like

Spain Obesity United States HMO Japan Singapore Switzerland Po Portugal Israel Ted Spain Japan Singapore Swit World Health Organization France CNN Australia Viki Lancet REX