38 Burst results for "Vietnam"

Fresh update on "vietnam" discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:30 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "vietnam" discussed on Morning Edition

"Slow from before hilltop down towards San Pablo Avenue because of another crash that wasn't lanes on the shoulder. Joe McConnell for security traffic support comes from European sleep works. Join us later at nine for Forum 9 to 11. Michael Krasny and Meena Kim, while Abraham Lincoln tends to get most of the credit for winning the civil war historian Fergus Border. Wick reminds us not to forget about the role Congress played in the union's victory. He joins form at nine o'clock to discuss his new book on one of the most dynamic and consequential times in American history. Forum 9 to 11 today. This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm no well King. Good morning. More than 18 million people around the world have gotten Cove in 19. The U. S has the highest death toll. But in Asia cases are surging again that includes China, Japan and Vietnam that previously had relatively few cases. To help us understand what's going on there. We've got three of our colleagues in Asia on the line. NPR's Emily Fangs in Beijing Anthony Kun is in Seoul and Michael Sullivan is in Thailand. Hi, everyone Anyone like Good morning, Emily. Let's start with you. What's the situation in China and Hong Kong? Now we've seen three small clusters emerged. The first and most mysterious isn't Xinjiang, which is This far western region. The first cases were detected in mid July and now more than 600 people have tested positive. They're almost all of them in the region's capital, and what's a little anxiety inducing. Authorities still do not know after extensive contact, tracing how that cluster even started. The second cluster is in the port city of Italian, which is in the northeast of China. Far, far away from Xinjiang, where there have been about 90 new infections all trace back to a seafood processing plant. That Northeast region has a number of small clusters in recent months because of international travellers, mostly coming from Russia and bringing the virus with, um And the third new cluster you've seen is in Hong Kong, where there have been more than 300 new cases likely because of exemptions made to mandatory quarantine requirements for some international travelers who came to Hong Kong. Okay, so massive country clusters in certain specific places. Anthony Japan, a much smaller country is also seeing a new surgeon cases. What's happening there? Well, cases started out pretty slow, and then they rose to a peak of about 700 new ones a day in April, and then the government declared a state of emergency, which lasted until late May, and new cases dropped back down. And that prompted Prime Minister Shinzo Abe to talk about a successful Japanese model of managing the virus. And that assessment has not aged so well last week. Japan saw record breaking new levels of infection it about double the peak in April and from the timing. Many of the infections appear to have come from a national holiday last month when the Japanese government rolled out a tourism promotion plan, which they did, despite the objections of local governments, health experts who felt that it would just spread the virus further. Sure, And let me ask you about South Korea. Because in the US, we have seen ourselves compared unfavorably. South Korea got organized very quickly Got things done. How air they still doing Well. Yeah, they peaked in late February. They flattened the curve and it stayed flat. They've had a couple of upticks. But basically, their aim is to keep case of new cases in the double digits, which there Hospital system, and they're testing and contact tracing system can handle and they've done it. Very good news. Michael Vietnam is an interesting case, because for a long time for months, there were no cases of covert. And there were no deaths, either. It was remarkable. It seems that is no longer the case. No, and they don't know why either in the country has been almost completely closed to foreign arrivals For months, Vietnam went for more than three months without a single case of local transmission until this one on the coastal city of in on a little over a week ago. It's a place popular with domestic tourist. More cases quickly followed, and now there's nearly 200 That's in just over a week. The vast majority of them are Indanan and at least eight deaths and more worrisome. There are also a few cases in the capital, Hanoi and in human City or Saigon and the South. Almost all of those cases where people who traveled to denounce for vacation so They're afraid the genie's out of the bottle. But again, they don't know how and they don't know why. And the prime minister is warning that there's a very short window for containing this latest outbreak less than two weeks. Alright, I'm hearing a common thread here. These countries lifted regulations. They allowed people to travel in. The virus seems to have come back. Not good news. Let me ask you each. How are authorities? They're dealing with this. Anthony will start with you in Japan. The central government says that they don't need to declare another state of emergency yet because the patients compared to the spring peak or younger. The cases are less severe, and they can generally trace the roots of infection. But local governments do not agree with that assessment. And in the case of, for example, the island of Okinawa they're not. They're not waiting for the central government to declare another state of emergency. They've done their own. And now the capital. Tokyo is considering doing so as well. And whenever these infections spike citizens demand stronger measures from the government and critics say the OB administration Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's administration's response has been weak, and that's why his ratings have suffered as a result. Emily have a China China has this pretty set pattern that will follow whenever a cluster of new cases emerges. First. They do the soft seal the city so they encourage residents not to leave. And they only let those with recent negative covert tests enter. They cut transport lines into the city. They reduced the number of interested he bus routes, so they isolated And then they do mask pool testing in Bali and one of the clusters, for example, they tested three million people already, which is about half of the city's total population. And Michael What is Vietnam doing? They're gonna do the same thing that they did to beat the virus, the first time around aggressive contact, tracing, quarantining and testing for those who may have been in contact with the new cases, authorities. Indanan say they're going to test the entire population of the city. That's about a 1,000,000 people, but it's hard to see how they're going to do that. In the time for him. The prime minister was talking about parts of the city are now under lock down, and the government says if it finds outbreaks in other areas, not just single cases, it'll lock down. Entire neighborhoods, their entire villages of necessary, But there's no plan to lock down the entire country. Not yet, At least Emily. I want to ask you a last question quickly about how this is affecting China's economy. They just announced he's great new factory numbers, which is surprising. They've gotten very good at isolating clusters that they do not have to shut down the rest of the country even as there are a few 100 new cases being concentrated and reported elsewhere, Emily Faiiing in Beijing, Michael Sullivan in Thailand and Anthony Kun in Seoul. Thanks You guys, we appreciate it. Thank you. Thank you..

China Emily Japan Prime Minister Shinzo Abe Vietnam Hong Kong Prime Minister Michael Sullivan Seoul Asia Npr News South Korea Joe Mcconnell Thailand Michael Krasny Rachel Martin Beijing Anthony Kun Anthony Japan Wick Michael Vietnam
Coronavirus out of control in US

News, Traffic and Weather

03:31 min | 1 d ago

Coronavirus out of control in US

"The United States has become the global epicenter. After the initial shock and the lockdowns that followed. It seemed like we had it under control. Then around Memorial Day, people started going out again. Some states followed the phase reopening plans put forth by the White House Corona Virus Task force. And some did not. Now the world is watching us as the virus surges and spreads from region to region and school district struggle with how to reopen safely. ABC News chief anchor George Stephanopoulos talked about the U. S response with a head of the Harvard Global Health Initiative. Dr Asheesh job They discussed how to turn things around and where the U. S stands now. Good morning. America is so clear that this virus simply is still out of control here in the United States were the richest country in the world. The best medical talent in the world. How do you explain why we're doing so poorly? What must we do to fix it? Indeed we are. We are the global hospital and we have mismanaged his virus in a way that I think much of the world simply can't believe on. The reason is that we just haven't taken us seriously. We have not followed scientific advice and guidance. When we opened up too early. We've opened up too much. We're still debating whether mass work or not, they actually do. There's no debate. So what do we need to do? Moving forward? We need to get mad people. There were maps. We need to fix our testing infrastructure. We have to close down bars and gyms and other things that cause outbreaks, and we just have to start taking the virus. Seriously. I think if we do all of those things, George Within the next couple of months. We can become one of the success stories as opposed to one of the global failures right now. Some optimism right there. Of course, over the next couple of months school is starting again. For so many millions of American Children. We're seeing big school district close stick with virtual All over the country. Everyone want schools to open safely. The question is how to do it. This is not a debate, right? We all want our kids back in school, and this should be priority number one for our country and we don't have a national plan. And we've left it. A state states are leaving at his local towns and officials. We can't have pandemics fought by individual cities, towns and superintendents. I really believe we can get kids back to school, but we need a national plan to suppress the virus. Improve the quality of the buildings of the schools, and we can do this. We can get kids back in. You know, we're seeing hot spots crop up here in the United States, but also coming back to places like China. New cases being reported in China, Australia. They have had great success. Now It's coming back there as well. Vietnam didn't have any cases now they're having is well, what are we seeing This now? Is this still a first way was at the beginning of a second wave. This is a global pandemic. That's going to be with us all the way until we have safe, effective vaccines that are widely available sometime. I'm hopeful and next year until then, countries will continue to battle a most high income countries have managed to suppress the virus. They get little flare ups and they're able to bring them under control. We're the only country with kind of a raging wildfire, and we really have to work on that. But even if we suppress it, we will still have little outbreak so we'll have to do and you're describing our current situation in the United States that were just in the fourth inning of this crisis. Yeah. You know, I was trying to explain to people kind of a timeline and I have thought of this. If everything goes incredibly well as sort of an 18 months pandemic that let's say began around January of this year. That's very optimistic. That puts us in about the sort of the beginning the top of the fourth inning. Just as a way of reminding people we have many more months ahead of us, and we do behind us. And if we don't get our act together, we're gonna have a lot more suffering and death, and none of that is necessary. We really can't prevent all of Dr John Thanksgiving every time and insight.

United States George Stephanopoulos American Children Harvard Global Health Initiati White House Abc News Dr Asheesh Dr John Thanksgiving Chief Anchor America China Outbreak Vietnam Australia
Fresh "Vietnam" from WBT's Morning News with Bo Thompson

WBT's Morning News with Bo Thompson

00:50 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh "Vietnam" from WBT's Morning News with Bo Thompson

"You by Felix Tobias Mercedes Benz of South Charlotte, Our number two here on the post Zaius edition of the Pat McCrory Show the hurricane and it became a hurricane again. A smacked ocean Isle Beach last night moved up the coast and now is, uh, passed off of Virginia and getting close to some of these mid Atlantic states, Philadelphia and New York even bracing for this, so they're going to get Pieces of, say yes, as the day progresses, but yet hit parts of North Myrtle Beach Ocean Ocean Drive were used to get the Spanish galleon before your boy scout were after your boy Scout. And then it goes up to Southport. Then it goes up to Ocean isle. But you just didn't Holden Beach. You just said you like you didn't either. You knew exactly what the Spanish galleon was when I brought it up here, But I never pretended to be a boy scout. But the point is you only when I ran for governor. Did I pretend to be a boy Scout? But I'm telling you the truth course always. Yeah, the Spanish gay And is that still there Notion. I'll order today and we'll previous hurricanes knock it down. It wasn't an ocean isle. It's actually I believe it's north Myrtle. If correct about that. No. Is that North Merle er Cherry Grove. Well, I mean, North Myrtle and Cherry Grove are right beside each other. So it's that one up. Yeah, I haven't been there in 20 years. Somebody will will correct us. It's getting foggy on been there in awhile. But all right, I'll tell you a controversial story. I did it. When I was 19 years old. I was at the Spanish gay and then I was having no success with girls whatsoever. And I had a major score of my knee from cartload surgery. That was back in the days when they took out all your cartilage out of your knee. So I have a big scar. There still have it today and you needed QC kinetics back then I did. I did think you C could expect that they just cut everything out of your knee. So this big scar and some girl asked me What's the scar was? Of course I was only 19 years old. This was like 1975. And I said it was from Vietnam. Tet offensive Shrapnel from Mom on, I'm sure you said. Of course I was, but I said No, I didn't say Vietnam Nam course. Right outset away. It was hell. Of course, I was 14 at the time during that time, the Tet offensive. In that terrible in here. I'm criticizing Cow Cunningham for showing his medals and I showed by scars the Spanish galleon when I was 19 or 18 or 17 or whatever I wass continuing coverage of there goes my political career. Pat McCrory. Pat McCrory said he was in the Tet offensive in 68. Nam got caught in the wire work that you should just say while the V C were coming over at the galleon. By the way, it did work.

Pat Mccrory Ocean Isle Ocean Isle Beach North Myrtle North Merle Er Cherry Grove North Myrtle Beach Felix Tobias Mercedes Benz Holden Beach Southport Charlotte Vietnam Virginia NAM Cow Cunningham Atlantic Cartload Surgery New York Philadelphia
Oliver Stone: Memoir and Movies

The Big Picture

09:51 min | 4 d ago

Oliver Stone: Memoir and Movies

"Stone, Amanda I in my mind have been circling a podcast episode about Oliver Stone probably since about Nineteen ninety-one, which is when I I had some consciousness about the work of one of the most fascinating figures of the last forty years in American cinema. There's a reason we're going to be having an episode conversation about stone today, which is that he has a new memoir that memoir is called chasing the light writing, directing surviving platoon midnight, express scarface Salvador, and the movie game. It's a very interesting book you and I have both read it. We're we're both. In some ways and perhaps frustrated confused devastated in other ways before we get into the book though and before we get into how we're going to talk about the scope, the massive scope, the unbelievable scope of Oliver Stone's career. When I say Oliver, stone, what do you think? Conspiracy Theorist just to be totally honest and filmmaker and. And really and boomer and I think that is going to inflict a lot of the way that I talk about Oliver Stone in his filmography because I am a generation younger I am a child of boomers and I came to Oliver Stone's work and to Oliver Stone's understanding of the world a generation after. He lived at and made it and it was very funny and re watching everything from platoon to to wall. Street to JFK. To realize the way in which those movies shaped, my understanding visual and political about Vietnam, and about JFK and about how we examine America and the government and I am both child of Oliver Stone's world, and maybe because of time in the way, the world has changed a skeptic of Oliver Stone's world at this point, which is just to say on the next generation. I. Think a lot of this will be boomer versus millennial and and that's good. That's how the world should work. Even Oliver Stone would agree with that though maybe not we can talk about it but I don't know what do you think of? Mid already. So many good points I. Think he's an artist to strains credulity while also I think enlivening imaginations he's somebody who is obviously immensely thoughtful and intellectual and spiritual and simultaneously feels like he completely out of control and trying to break the boundaries and stretch the concept of the truth all the time, and so he's just a a generational paradoxical figure. He's a he's a person who I think it makes immensely entertaining movies that. Don't always stand up to deep examination, and so I think he is he is an title baby-boomer figure in that way and that he is there's a certitude about his mission and there's an earnestness in insincerity to the message that he's trying to send. But also underlying that is perhaps a kind of cynicism and a skepticism about what he should be doing with his time versus what he's actually doing with his time, and so I you know I find, I've always found him to be fascinating maybe not as a human being per se but at least the stories that he tries to tell. I was GonNa say I do think he's interesting as a filmmaker and what else was a person and? We're GONNA talk about all the different ways in which Oliver Stone like quote breaks the rules but I have been thinking a lot as I have been reading his book, which is a fantastic read I will just say that the guy can write. and. Have also been revisiting his work that you and I are trained to as much as we can released I wasn't college train a separate the artist in the art the art has to stand on its own can't complete the filmmaker and the and the work, and you also need to understand that the work and the intention are possibly separate as well and Oliver Stone just makes massive all of that, and he makes a mess of that in his actual art and he makes a mess of that in the life that he lives and in the interviews that he gives and the work that he pursues and. To me that's exciting because it opens up conversation to talk about what can you take seriously and what is cynical and what is sincere and what is true and what is not true and how are we like an who is responsible, which is at least a different way to talk about art. So you know I give him that even though I don't agree with where I think Oliver Stone comes down on those the answers to those questions but even there, I'm just guessing. Well I, think if you look at the book, you certainly are looking at the man or at least the the self perception of the man, and so we'll talk a lot about him and his story in his life and and his the way he is capturing his own life on the page which I I agree I mean he's just in case you didn't know this is an Oscar winning screenwriter. This is one of the great writers of the last forty years is also as a person who didn't just write his own films but road scarface and Conan the barbarian and a number of other films over the years. So he knows what he's doing on the page, but he is also somebody who. If you look it the political thought not like a straight line where there is a left and a right. But if you look at it like a wheel like a circle, and if you go too far from one side of the circle to the other you can land. You may think you are liberal person and find yourself with right wing ideology or libertarian ideology and reverse can also be true and I think one of the reasons it's really hard to unpack not just what Oliver Stone says in interviews or what he even. Portrays in his documentaries but even when he puts in his films is it feels like he's constantly running around that track that circle of political thought and so he's actually a perfect figure for this moment where there is this desperation to find art that coincides with our political ideology or our sense of what the world should look like and as you said, Oliver makes a mess of that he really. is trying to he's contradicting himself in real time. He's contradicting the sensibilities of that kind of baby boomer antiwar mentality. But on the other hand, he's like an Avatar spirit animal of truth for certain kind of humanism and that sounds really kind of haughty. But I I think he really wants to representational person who is thinking about putting people before government business political structures, and it's complicated right? Because he's A. Essentially a wealthy well to do white man who was born in the immediate aftermath of World War. Two, and so he had so much opportunity to do the things that he wanted to do in a way that other people don't. So he's not he's just not a tidy figure for that pursuit of humanism. It's interesting that you said he's putting people in front of institutions and ideas and governments because I think that's true. But it's usually one percent, and if you look at his entire his filmography and and really I, think even if you look at how he says. A lot of political issues, but it's it's not. The, greater good. It's usually focused on one character who is often a man and quite often a white man it is and it is understanding history through a single person's experience. So it's like it's almost I. mean he certainly subscribes to a great man theory of history but at the same time as also reversing, which is like the the the one person's experience of history, which can be a really exhilarating in certain films that we'll talk about and really really misguided I find or not even misguided but just doesn't work and isn't illuminating and the way that he thinks it is. IN IN CERTAIN Aspects, and then also in certain cases, it can just be about himself and it is I. The thing that makes his. His memoir. So electric is that it really is self mythology and he is really trying to understand himself and trying to pin down that constantly moving wheel as you said simultaneously and and I really admire having access to that. I obviously read a lot of celebrity junk and and memoirs and. Interested in trying to have access to people's ideas and thoughts and understand their characters and most people won't give it up in that way and won't share and won't be as open and Massey at as as Oliver. Stone is and that's true of the book and that's true of politics for sure and it's it's making. The great man theory is is really relevant to this conversation not just because of the book not because of the film's but because it's a little bit unclear, it's a sort of a chicken and the egg or the proposition with him. Does he subscribe to those theories because we read about in this book, He is interested in the dramatic pursuit. He has a pretty clear understanding literally of how to tell a strong story and that story is usually through a homer like figure or a a habit like figure somebody who is you know on on an indomitable quest to achieve something that seems impossible he's he's really passionate about this and you know again, there is something kind of haughty about this but also he just he seems to come to a very sincerely and so he uses Jim. Garrison in. J. F. K. or he uses Jim Morrison in the doors or he uses Ron. Kovic. In born on the fourth of July as these avatars as these great men who are seeking to achieve something that no one else could even perceive as possible and I think Oliver Stone sees himself in a very similar fashion. He sees himself as this well, to do white guy who volunteer volunteers for the Vietnam War to explode his privilege and to understand the world in a hopefully deeper way,

Oliver Stone Boomer Scarface Salvador JFK Amanda I Vietnam Oscar Jim Morrison Conan America RON J. F. K. Massey
Fresh update on "vietnam" discussed on American Elections: Wicked Game

American Elections: Wicked Game

01:16 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "vietnam" discussed on American Elections: Wicked Game

"The moderate Republicans had underestimated cold water Johnson would not. You would set himself apart from gold honors conservatism by pushing a progressive agenda the challenge of the next hey sanctuary. is whether we have the wisdom to use that wealth. To enrich and elevate our national lights. And to advance the quality. Of our American civilization. Your imagination and your initiative and your indignation. Will determine whether we build a society. Where progress is the servant of our needs? are a society where old values and you visions. Are Buried, under unbridled growth. Far In your time. We have the opportunity to move not only toward the rich. Society. And Powerful Society But upward to the great society. The Great Society, was LBJ's war on poverty a continuation of JFK's agenda. This suite of government programs aim to eliminate poverty racial inequality but perhaps, LBJ's flagship achievement was the Civil Rights Act of nineteen sixty four, a bill that sought to limit voter suppression outlaw racial discrimination in public facilities in the workplace and aim to force desegregation in the south. The bill have been transformational and controversial. A group of conservatives known as the Southern Block had resisted the bill when it came before the Senate one Democrat from Georgia pronounce that he and other conservatives would resist it to the bitter end. This southern block had mounted filibuster lasting fifty four days during which time the bill shuttled between both of Congress until June nineteenth nineteen, sixty, four when the civil rights. Act was finally approved by the Senate Johnson had signed the bill into law on July second a matter of days before the Republican National Convention. Goldwater opposed the bill arguing that it was federal overreach in an attempt to legislate morality many found gold wanders position dangerous though on July sixteenth nineteen, sixty, four, the same day that Goldwater received the Republican nomination Dr Martin Luther King issued a statement stating that on the urgent issues of Civil Rights Senator Goldwater represented a philosophy that was morally And, socially suicidal his candidacy and philosophy would serve as an umbrella under which extremists of all stripes would stand Dr. King also expressed concern about goldwater stance on foreign policy especially on the subject of communism saying that Goldwater trigger-happy attitude that could plunge the whole world into the dark abyss of annihilation. For years the Cold War between the US in the USSR had turned hot in multiple arenas in the early nineteen sixties. The situation in Vietnam was of particular concern since the end of World War Two rebel forces in north Vietnam had been engaged in a struggle for independence from the French these rebels had. into. The Democratic Republic of Vietnam or Dr v led by the Communist leader Ho Chi Minh. The RV was recognized by Communist states around the world including the Soviet Union and it received material support from the People's Republic of China another communist nation. In response, the US provided a to the South Vietnamese and French as part of a policy of communist containment. But in August of nineteen, sixty, four at the north Vietnamese appeared to escalate the attack as part of the effort to contain Communism LBJ had ordered a US warship into the Gulf of Tonkin off the coast of Vietnam on August second nineteen, sixty, four north Vietnamese attack the worship which fired back killing several north Vietnamese two days later, the US military claimed there was a second attack on the ship LBJ pointed to these two supposedly unprovoked attacks as a cause for the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution This joint congressional Gulf of Tonkin resolution gave president. Johnson. The ability to deploy conventional military force in Southeast Asia without formal declaration of war by Congress. In a televised address to the American People Johnson emphasized that the attacks on the worship were unprovoked decades. Later declassified documents would reveal that LBJ sent that worship into the Gulf of Tonkin. Knowing it would likely be attacked most modern historians agree that LBJ was looking for political cover to send American troops into Vietnam as part of his efforts to contain communism and in his televised speech Johnson hoped to convince the American people that his response to the attacks in the Gulf of Tonkin were proportion. But goldwater advocated for more extreme response proposing that the US drop a low yield atomic bomb on Chinese supply lines and north Vietnam. Doing. So goldwater handed LBJ political opportunity and the Johnson campaign seize the moment. It's a timber seventh, nineteen, sixty four. It's Labor Day evening in Sleepy neighborhood in Waukegan Illinois an all American family sits together and their living room. Mom on the couch brother and sister on the floor. A dog in the corner dad sits in his recliner with his feet up he reads the newspaper and absently watches. Monday night at the movies on NBC. Tonight's feature is a rebroadcast of a nineteen, fifty, one film David and Bathsheba with Gregory Peck and Susan Hayward. It's getting late the movies nearly done and the kids are up way past their bedtime. So Dad is a little annoyed when the movie stops for another commercial break. onscreen a little girl sits in a patch of daisies counting pedals as she plucked some from a flower, the mom turns to her daughter and smiles all she looks just like you Susan. But just then the mood of the Ad Shifts Camera zooms in on the girls, right? I. As a robotic voice calls out more ominous numbers. As a mushroom cloud billows into the sky and across the earth. Family here's the voice of President. Johnson they is are the states. You'll make a world in which all of God's children can live. Aren't to go into the dark. Room, we must either love each other. Are, we must die. then. The screen custom black vote for President Johnson on November third. The stakes are too high for.

Senator Goldwater LBJ President Johnson Gulf Of Tonkin Vietnam United States Congress Senate Johnson President Trump Democratic Republic Of Vietnam Susan Hayward Dr Martin Luther King Great Society Senate Southeast Asia Ho Chi Minh Tonkin
Brooks Brothers Bankruptcy: Nostalgia, Anger, and a Bidding War

Business Wars Daily

05:18 min | Last week

Brooks Brothers Bankruptcy: Nostalgia, Anger, and a Bidding War

"The abandonment of the suit helps explain the struggles of one of America's most iconic fashion companies, brooks brothers, the two hundred two year old brand filed for bankruptcy protection on July eight sure blame cove nineteen, but now you'd be wrong. Suits with the three piece with Thai or skirts and high heels used to convey professionalism and competence, they served as symbols that you took your job seriously and respected your customers, the ones you were treating too expensive lunches, madman style, but even before the pandemic they'd become something of an anachronism. Most of us now see little to no relationship between the way we dress in our competence at work, think Mark Zuckerberg's hoodies. Indeed expensive suits can be viewed as a sign of elitism. Put it starkly. The corporate fashion code has gone by the wayside. Brooks brothers struggles represent a cultural shift, not just a Kobe tragedy. Brooks brothers famously dressed all but four presidents. It is the longest continuously operating fashion business in America and until this month it boasted about making its products in America the Brandon's three factories in the states in Massachusetts North, Carolina and New York. CEO Claude Delvecchio is planning to close those factories. We'll get to that in a minute. As you know, apparel sales have been decimated by pandemic closures in April nobody bought clothes whether from Brooks brothers or JC, Penney and other retail casualty, but did you know the actual numbers? Clothing sales fell almost ninety percent in April, according to retail dive, but brooks brothers began looking for a buyer about a year ago. The company operates five hundred stores two hundred of them in the US sales have been flat at about a billion dollars a year since twenty, seventeen, prior to the pandemic bankers estimated the company's value at three hundred to three hundred fifty million dollars. Figure Delvecchio disputed. As, I mentioned the company intends to close its three US factories later this month in the gritty industrial town of. Massachusetts home of its largest factory. Its largest immigrant workforce is being denied severance pay many of those workers, immigrants and refugees women from the Dominican Republic. Vietnam Burma and Nepal have made the company's fine clothing for years so far brooks isn't budging. Despite pleas from the union, and from members of Congress according to the Boston Globe in North Carolina, the factories, the only large employer in the little town of Garland closure would affect that town forever, mayor winifred. Hill, Murphy told The New York Times. In response, CEO, Del Vecchio, says for survival. We must hang onto as much cash as possible, but the globe reports that its chapter eleven filing includes plans to give compensation benefits, severance and bonuses totaling millions to other workers. Brooks brothers will transform, but unlike many of its retail brethren its survival is not in question. In fact, at least one bidder for the company believes it can earn annual revenue of three billion dollars within five years more than triple its current sales, so many buyers are vying for the brand at both the Wall Street Journal and Bloomberg used the phrase the races on those making bids. Bids Include Mall Company Simon, property, group, authentic brands, group and W. H. P. Global another bidder is a group of Italian. Investors led by a company called GIO which typically helps fashion companies improve their online presences. The Wall Street Journal possibly with tongue firmly in cheek, considering the state cut of Brooks brothers clothing says Julia wants to quote introduced some European flair to the quintessential American brand. Julia's clients include Armani Maxmara and other designers. Brooks brothers is accepting bids through August fifth, so brooks will survive, but what about it's cheaper? Rival men's warehouse tailored brands which owns men's warehouse and the more upscale Joseph. A. Bank plans to close at least a third of its fifteen hundred stores. It said this month it hasn't filed for chapter eleven protection, but it came close according to CNN. That threat remains even after it stores reopened. Sales have been falling. They were down about eighty percent at Joseph A. Bank in the first week of June, as we all continue to do business in Pajama Pants as we all know nostalgia sells Joseph A. Bank doesn't have nearly the name or the history of Brooks brothers, which drips with nostalgia. Teddy Roosevelt apparently insisted his rough riders. Riders wear the Brand Abe. Lincoln was also a brooks brothers customer, one reason for the bidding war beyond what is sure to be the lowest price anyone ever imagined for the stalwart brand. Is What author Lisa Burn? Bach believes about Fashions Post. Pandemic Future Birnbaum who authored the twenty ten book true. Prep argues that the company must be saved after the pandemic finally end, she writes. There will be weddings. There will be funerals. There will be. We hope live operas and theatre and premieres in concerts and fancy dress parties. Where we can't predict the future, but we can observe the present, and what's happening to upscale apparel in the US. WHO's buying it and WHO's making it. Reveals a lot about our rapidly changing an enormously conflicted culture.

Brooks Brothers Brooks United States America Ceo Claude Delvecchio Mark Zuckerberg Julia Dominican Republic Massachusetts CEO Teddy Roosevelt The Wall Street Journal Joseph A. Bank CNN Burma Congress North Carolina Joseph
Countries Look to Lockdown Again After Easing of Restrictions Sees Coronavirus Cases Soar

Ben Shapiro

01:42 min | Last week

Countries Look to Lockdown Again After Easing of Restrictions Sees Coronavirus Cases Soar

"And the search has been driven by infections in John Ging. In the Northeast Manning province report 1/5 straight day of new infections. Jilin Province reported to new cases. Those were the first since May, Australian authorities have imposed a six week locked down in parts of the South eastern state of Victoria. They said that could last longer. Meanwhile, in Japan, the government said it would urge businesses to ramp up antivirus measures like staggered shifts and embassy. Rates of telecommuting returns levels achieved during an earlier state of emergency. Vietnam is evacuating 80,000 people, 80,000 people. After three residents tested positive this weekend. Read that first living extreme response. Have three cases and you expelled 80,000 people. Again. The notion that this is restricted to America that America is getting hard hit. Basically, here's the deal. No one knows how to stop. The virus virus is growing nearly everywhere. The idea that simply locking down all of society for years on end In order to curb the spread of the virus, which young is not particularly deadly. That's bad policy is bad policy, and it has some real ramifications. I know everybody's pretending that we can simply float cash to vast swaths of people. For insane amount of time. But that is not the way any of this works. At a certain point. The economy is going to get out. You cannot allow this to go on forever. Now there's some good news by the way, and it's news worth noting. The good news is that apparently that a couple of drugs that are going to come online maybe that could really help. There's one drug promoted by scientists at Hebrew University. They are hoping could actually reduce the impact of Corona virus to that of the common cold. That would obviously be a huge winner. Basically using anti inflammatories. We'll see. If that happens In the meantime, this notion we're gonna lock down forever. It just ain't in the cards is not gonna happen.

Jilin Province John Ging America Victoria Hebrew University Vietnam Japan
Vietnam bans wildlife imports, markets amid new health fears

WBBM Late Morning News

00:12 sec | Last week

Vietnam bans wildlife imports, markets amid new health fears

"Vietnam says it is banning wildlife imports and will close wildlife markets in response to the threat from diseases that can jump from animals to humans, such as the virus that caused Cove. In 19

Vietnam
Control of the body with the mind

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:21 min | 2 weeks ago

Control of the body with the mind

"Today? We take on a luck at the medicine mystery of mind over matter, a mind over matter can be the control of the body with the mind. This might include controlling blood pressure or the rate of a heartbeat. Some monks are able to dry out wet towels by controlling their body heat. That is what usually is described as a placebo effect believing that they can do it so strongly that they can try out those wet towels. Placebo is an inert substance or belief which produces real biological effects in humans. It's so widely accepted as fact. A placebo variable included most medical tests as way of proving if say. Say A. Drug works on its own merits, or because people think it works. There are tons of experiments showing the proof of the Placebo, one of the most amusing to watch the test done by a group of Princeton students who decided to throw a Non Alcoholic Keg party for their unsuspecting classmates. The experiment who secretly filled a keg with Oh duels contained, which contains about point, four alcohol while regular beer has five percent alcohol, and then watched as their peers acted silly slur words slept on the ground, generally acted drunk, although it stereo impossible to get in toxic donald tools. These college students had such a strong belief. They were drinking standard beer that it affected their behavior. Then, there is a level of creative mental imagery that affects the physical body for an example. We look at a prisoner of war during the Vietnam Conflict Air. Force general colonel. Hall was locked a dark North Vietnamese prison for seven years most would have lost their mind. In such circumstances hall went into his happy place by mentally playing golf. Every day of his imprisonment is visualizations were extremely in-depth, included everything from hitting the ball off the tee, raking the sand traps, feeling the wind, and of course tapping the ball into the hole. Regardless of being weak and hundred pounds lighter than before his capture, one of the first things hall wanted to do after his release was play a legitimate round of golf, he was invited to the greater. New Orleans open for he astoundingly shot a seventy six, so despite his physical deterioration, not stepping on coercion over seven years his body had developed muscle memory day. Day simply on his imaginings mind over matter it's usually dismissed like deja Vu and the paranormal, but many years ago, I witnessed a lesser known form of mind over matter. I've been involved in the martial arts for over fifty years. One point in my training schools, black belts were invited to witness an example of Chee Courses Costas about eighty dollars each there were. Were about twelve of us, essentially, Chee is a life force. It exists in the human body in the martial arts. There are many stories of men who could control their cheat to the extent that they could ward off strikes or even extend she to knock over an opponent. Needless to say I was very skeptical. I was in my mid twenties at the time. Time, we were gathered in the schools large back room and told a former circle. I watched as an Asian man who looked to be in his fifties. Walk into the room. He was smoking drinking coffee from a Styrofoam Cup, he dumped coffee into a corner planter. He also ground out his cigarette. He walked to the centre of the circle placed his cup on. On, the floor upside down through our instructor, he expressed that he wanted one of the students to pick up the cup. A young black bolt directly across from me, was chosen and step forward data over and over the cup, but total a Mason said he couldn't pick up the cup all the while watching I determined that. If I was chosen, I'd fall on. On the Cup indeed was picked I stepped to the center of the circle, and at a signal from sense I extended by hand, proceeded to fall, figuring to catch myself and even push up position. The end result was that I. could not touch the cup. Indeed, our guests could not only control his chee. He was a master of mind over matter referring of. Of course to his ability to control bodily function

Chee Hall Mason Vietnam Golf Deja Vu New Orleans Princeton Instructor Costas
"vietnam" Discussed on EAA's The Green Dot - An Aviation Podcast

EAA's The Green Dot - An Aviation Podcast

03:36 min | 2 weeks ago

"vietnam" Discussed on EAA's The Green Dot - An Aviation Podcast

"Thought we'd <hes>. We'd make you switch seats and Hanson and roles in everything Chris and talk about this new. One of <hes> one of the new exhibits that's gone into the museum, but a new aircraft for us. It is I'm really excited. It's something that <hes> as a rudder head. I've kind of been wanting to see the museum acquire <hes> for the last several years, but <hes> we were able to. Get A U H One Huey helicopter <hes>. Totally, <hes> excited to see that come in <hes> and I I know we're going to get into a lot of the the Riviera of but <hes>. It was exciting to see it. <hes> get trailer it on into us. Well, that's cool, and that of course happened in the midst of all the complications around around covert and those other restrictions, so we'll talk about that in a bit, too, but interesting to me that <hes> just with the passage of time with our museum <hes>. This is something that we have an eagle hangar has traditionally been the venue, or we talk about military history, and we have our warbirds and other artifacts and things. That's been largely focused on World War Two since the advent of the museum, but we've seen F eighty six, an megan there periodically touching into Korea. Thomas More Scout, <hes> that sort of his edge, and there's going to cover World War One <hes>, but this is really our first four into Vietnam, isn't it? Is it is? This is the first <hes> aircraft that we have from the Vietnam era <hes>. Interestingly enough if you go back several years <hes> sort of on the gate guard side of things. We actually had a couple sky, raiders, <hes>, and those are actually on different military bases. Now they were on loan to us <hes>, but this is the first true aircraft donation to artifact <hes> that <hes> that we have in in the museum. Proper here and <hes>. It's really exciting to see that come in because. You know when you if you look back. When Eagle. Hangar was built it was you know it was opened in the nineties, <hes>. You know. It's about the fiftieth anniversary of world. War Two turn. Now you know were <hes>. We're focusing never GONNA lose that focus of the World War Two generation that always going to be something special <hes>, but we are broadening the horizons a bit to make sure we're. Live of experience excellent. Yeah, absolutely excellent, so then I suppose the first obvious question here is. Where did the idea for the Huey Exhibit? Come from was something that you know we've been looking at for a while. And the right opportunity came up or was this sort of a newer like we really need to. Branch out a little bit and feature this part of history as well <hes>. It's something that that personally I've been pushing for a couple years. I joined the museum team that <hes>. I think we need to get get a healy <hes>, and and there are several reasons why that aircraft <hes>. Early <hes> well. We have a <hes>. Our Museum director is Huey pilot, so it wasn't hard to. To Sell Ron on the idea of. Like, we should have a you hit owed. He's like well. That sounds good to me. Who flew those? Which is true? Yes, exactly exactly, you're listening. So, it was very <hes>. Once I came back with. Hey, there's more to it than just getting Hughie <hes>. You know there's a lot of programming that comes with that we could do. There's a lot of artifact display that we could do love storytelling. And I think once once we all sat down and we really took a hard look at it rather than just a the perspective of boy. Wouldn't it be nice to have one <hes>? We really got into what we could do with it. I think it was. It was kind of obvious we should we should. Try and get one.

Chris Henry Vietnam us Tie Windisch senior editor Thomas More Scout editor Hanson producer Korea
Huey: The Workhorse of Vietnam Exhibit

EAA's The Green Dot - An Aviation Podcast

03:36 min | 2 weeks ago

Huey: The Workhorse of Vietnam Exhibit

"Thought we'd We'd make you switch seats and Hanson and roles in everything Chris and talk about this new. One of one of the new exhibits that's gone into the museum, but a new aircraft for us. It is I'm really excited. It's something that as a rudder head. I've kind of been wanting to see the museum acquire for the last several years, but we were able to. Get A U H One Huey helicopter Totally, excited to see that come in and I I know we're going to get into a lot of the the Riviera of but It was exciting to see it. get trailer it on into us. Well, that's cool, and that of course happened in the midst of all the complications around around covert and those other restrictions, so we'll talk about that in a bit, too, but interesting to me that just with the passage of time with our museum This is something that we have an eagle hangar has traditionally been the venue, or we talk about military history, and we have our warbirds and other artifacts and things. That's been largely focused on World War Two since the advent of the museum, but we've seen F eighty six, an megan there periodically touching into Korea. Thomas More Scout, that sort of his edge, and there's going to cover World War One but this is really our first four into Vietnam, isn't it? Is it is? This is the first aircraft that we have from the Vietnam era Interestingly enough if you go back several years sort of on the gate guard side of things. We actually had a couple sky, raiders, and those are actually on different military bases. Now they were on loan to us but this is the first true aircraft donation to artifact that that we have in in the museum. Proper here and It's really exciting to see that come in because. You know when you if you look back. When Eagle. Hangar was built it was you know it was opened in the nineties, You know. It's about the fiftieth anniversary of world. War Two turn. Now you know were We're focusing never GONNA lose that focus of the World War Two generation that always going to be something special but we are broadening the horizons a bit to make sure we're. Live of experience excellent. Yeah, absolutely excellent, so then I suppose the first obvious question here is. Where did the idea for the Huey Exhibit? Come from was something that you know we've been looking at for a while. And the right opportunity came up or was this sort of a newer like we really need to. Branch out a little bit and feature this part of history as well It's something that that personally I've been pushing for a couple years. I joined the museum team that I think we need to get get a healy and and there are several reasons why that aircraft Early well. We have a Our Museum director is Huey pilot, so it wasn't hard to. To Sell Ron on the idea of. Like, we should have a you hit owed. He's like well. That sounds good to me. Who flew those? Which is true? Yes, exactly exactly, you're listening. So, it was very Once I came back with. Hey, there's more to it than just getting Hughie You know there's a lot of programming that comes with that we could do. There's a lot of artifact display that we could do love storytelling. And I think once once we all sat down and we really took a hard look at it rather than just a the perspective of boy. Wouldn't it be nice to have one We really got into what we could do with it. I think it was. It was kind of obvious we should we should. Try and get one.

Our Museum United States RON Vietnam Hanson Thomas More Scout Chris Director Healy Korea
Finding Mastery

Good Life Project

06:32 min | 3 weeks ago

Finding Mastery

"Work that you do is fascinating to me on so many different levels, not the least of which is. That I came really close to following a really similar path. And then ended up backing away for reasons that still are not entirely clear to me. Lifelong fascination with sort of a not just the human condition, but for why people do what they do, and how they go to the extremes of their potential wondering, if if this touches down at an early age for you, if this was sort of like a a later fascination, cool The first exposure I had to this is. Was In high school and I realized that the thing that I wanted to do. It was a surfing experience, so I grew up surfing. and. I could do what I wanted to do. As a fifteen year old kid, you don't Infre- surfing, but then when it came time to compete. He was completely different for me and it wasn't that my physical skills went away. It wasn't that my technical skills went away. It was that my mind by mental skills like the way that I was thinking about things was choking off access. To buy abilities and I didn't know there was a discipline called psychology as the first person to go to school my family, so we didn't come from. Condition where was like sophistication in structure in theory? We're just trying to figure it out as we along. And, so I bumped into it at an early age and I, said Oh. My goodness thing inside me. It's my mind like what is this and so it started there at an early age and I didn't know until it was like my first year in college. That there was even a discipline in a study of psychology, really because in high is exposed to it at a class action. I had a class and. It didn't make any sense. It was like Freud skinner. All the kind of classics which I came to appreciate later. I didn't understand it, so then it was through a pain is how I came exposed to it in sent me down a path. It pain in the context of you seeing something that you to do, but somehow couldn't figure out how to get there does exactly right. Yeah, I had something inside may wanted to express is the way I think about it like I had a physical thing i. I wanted to do a wave, and every time that there's a competition with the people were judging, and there was people on the beach, watching I became a shell of myself, and I couldn't express. It wasn't so much about I couldn't do the thing I mean. That's part of it, but I couldn't express what I was wanting to be able to express I, mean changing their own lapping, but really two distinct things like one is really tapping into the fullness of what you perceive to be your potential, but. The other is sort of it. It's it's a stifled expression. It's it's like I have a sense for who I am on an identity level, and how I want that to be put out into the world and I can't get it. It's like when you hear when you play Guitar, and you hear the dream ref. In your head. But your fingers can actually make it happen on guitar. Yes, so that's close to what happened to me. Is that I knew I could do it? Though because I had done it in free surfing plenty of times, and so it was actually there, it was just stage. Friday was performance anxiety. So it wasn't, it wasn't the mechanical part of it was the psychological part, so you mentioned that you were the first to go to college your family. Curious about that also, what was the background in your family? That sort of said okay, world good without going the route of higher education. And then what was it that happen in your mind? That said that's actually not good enough for me. Co question is so set. The context here is that I grew up in on a farm in Virginia, and I should say I grew up with nature, not necessary on. It is a big distinction you know in that way, and so I grew up with it until the age of about. Ten. In my parents were very lazy fair, they had very little structure if I was out late, and it got dark, not eat until very late. You know like it was super. Figuring, out kid, you know, and they let me just kind of play with nature. And my parents pretty much dropped out so I'm forty eight ends. They were young parents and they this was during the Vietnam revolt. So they're like okay. We're dropping out some more of the hippie life, but it wasn't. It wasn't an angry approach. It was like hey, let's go find a little sanctuary that we could build you build a family, so it was very myopic in that sense. In My dad came from a large family, he was had his first job fourteen, supporting his family in some respects, so they came blue-collar hard-working. Christian valued family, and they instilled inside of me strong values, and then this kind of freedom to explore. But there was no formal structure to any of it. But saying well, my mom's side, you know, and so her father came over to America at the age of fifteen by himself from Italy and so it's just a blue-collar, hard-working approach life and I, it was I was. Surfing a lot as I mentioned, and then due north, the PSAT's are of course also. I got a zero on those and then on the sat. With those are I got zero on those. I went surfing on both of them. And My parents pulled me aside my senior year and they're like Hey Mike. We tried a lot of your friends are going to college. We didn't know really to help you, but at this point. Get a job and get out. Or Mrs my senior year in high school or you could go to community college and you can stay here. Thought I'm not moving out like I'm I'm not done surfing like. How can I go? How can I have a job? Nine to five and surf so still real young in my church life, and so I said okay. Let me. Do the school thing so? I knew that the school that I was going to go to. Was I. don't know two miles away from a close to world class surf break. It sounds like I know how to do this. So! I love the decision. Making criteria has like perfect perfect, and so I really thought that I was going to extend my high school experience for a couple more years I was not interested in academic academia or becoming an academician in any respect. So a second semester and there was three professors who are really good friends now. This is the junior college right? So this was this isn't. I didn't have to get in I just had to apply. I just had to show up.

Freud Skinner Virginia Psat Vietnam America Christian Italy
The Skeptics Guide For Wearing Masks

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

05:35 min | 3 weeks ago

The Skeptics Guide For Wearing Masks

"Roll come to this country. The Universe today is Wednesday July eighth twenty twenty, and this is your host. Steven Novella joining me this week or Bob Novella, everybody, Cara, Santa, Maria, howdy, and Jane, Novella Hey guys I've been. Bernstein is out this week. Is Neck deep in other people's taxes. Guys Do. You know what he's. He had like a weird like mid tax break which he's never had before. Pick about it right? Yeah I, think everybody did. Last night. So like screw this finishing this crap I hate it and also I think the thing. Is Nobody really knew what was going to happen, but a lot of people got hit super hard, which is why the tax deadline was pushed back so they're like I can't afford to pay my taxes right now, but maybe come July all be in better place financially. Unfortunately, a lot of people are even worse place financially now. There's just kind of kicking. The can down the road speaking of that Steve What are the latest numbers are not good. You know especially in the United States so worldwide. We've surpassed twelve million cases with over five hundred and fifty thousand deaths. In the U, s where over three million cases and Around, one hundred thirty thousand deaths, at least that number's always because probably more. And you know it's just in the US just exactly what we warned about. We're seeing the second hump in the first wave and the greatest number of new cases per day is happening right now. This is a greater surge than we had back in March and April, and this is what we talked about. What happens when we start to open up what happens if then cases start to surge again, what will be? Do you know people have lockdown fatigue? The economy's already taken a big hit from the first lockdown. Some states opened up too quickly. They didn't do it properly with enough testing and contact tracing. And now we're seeing this really bad second wave and the sad thing is. They're having to do it kind of haphazardly like they're the states where they said. Okay we want to reopen, so they never really fully lockdown or they did, but they only stayed lockdown for like two weeks, and then they were like okay bars. We got to reopen. We got to get the economy going. And now the cases are just bananas out of Control and so they're doing this like quick quick. Quick your mask back on, and it's kind of like it's haphazard. It's not clean. It doesn't feel as controlled. And I think that's where things really do. Fall through the cracks, and then, of course we have this whole. Political Anti Mask Movement. That does seem to correlate with some of the same states where we're seeing these spikes. We definitely see in California. I mean you know in more conservative districts, but there are sort of marbled in California, so I definitely hear it even in L. A., it's not as common but. Not that Far Away San Bernardino County's very close, and you see the people. Holding angry signs and it's just. Did you guys hear that they did? A study showed that if they mandated mask you have. Made it pretty much requirement? Everyone wearing masks in public that they could save forty five thousand lives over the course of I'm not sure what the course of the period the period of time would be I think like three or four months. Five thousand I mean if that number that was that was fairly solid number. Would what else would you need but like okay, then we're. We're doing this. You have to wear a mask in public period. Almost the Vietnam War right there. Yeah, no more was fifteen thousand so imagine we could save the same number of lives lost over ten years the Vietnam War just by wearing I think it's such a profound number that we're not even equipped intellectually to really understand that that much right like I don't know forty thousand people I can't picture forty five thousand people sitting in a room I don't know what that looks like. I look like a baseball football stadium. Wouldn't that be roughly? Park, speech larger than the student body of my Alma Mater and speaking of masks. Study this week very that people might be interested in, so they just compared different types of masks, and how well they work, and of course the ones that you think should work the best do right so the ninety nine masks supposed to stop ninety nine percent of the virus were the best followed by end ninety five of course block, Ninety five percent of the virus, and their tests show that those numbers roughly accurate. And then followed by surgical masks, so they were the next, so those are the ones that healthcare workers are using, and they do work the best for the homemade ones they said was the best so actually interestingly, using vacuum cleaner filters was the best like homemade option. Just make a little pocket in your mask. You put those filters in there, and you can replace them like if they get moisture used. And that was the best using any kind of a close. We've. tight-knit cotton was good. They said what did not work is wearing. A scarf doesn't really do much to the only a slightly better than no mascot, all or a t shirt like pulling a t shirt up over. Your face doesn't work very much at all either so stick with the. multi-player cotton, and if you put a filter

United States Steven Novella California Bob Novella Bernstein Steve What San Bernardino County Jane Alma Mater Santa Maria Baseball L. A. Football
Travel to Alabama

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

04:45 min | 3 weeks ago

Travel to Alabama

"Welcome traveler I'm your host Chris Christensen just see if we don't deliver on that word epic that I put in the intro. We've got lots to talk about as we talk about Alabama. I'd like to welcome the show. Larry Beiber who is a freelance travel, writer and editor also has his own website at Larry Bloomberg. Dot Com, and also at civil rights travel dot com, and he's come to talk to us about Alabama Larry Welcome to the show. Let's great to be here, Chris. This is a show that is about a year and a half in the making at least not with Larry. We just got him involved recently, but I've done three trips to Alabama last year and a half and had been really wanting to do a show about it. But I really wanted to do it with somebody who knew more about Alabama than I did and Larry. You've lived in Alabama for eleven years. I, think. We say that's right over a decade. And you came there to work a job in the travel magazine industry at. At coastal living, which was based here as is southern living in cooking, light and a lot of other magazines. Why should somebody go to Alabama? There's lots of reasons and I think the place to start is that most people don't know about Alabama? They they know. Their stereotypes there's. There's what they've heard over the years, but the truth is the south remains one of the most colorful and least understood parts of the country and the best way to learn about. It is to go there, and it's easy. It's easy to do and this I. Think will turn People's view under head. It's the center of Civil Rights History which I think. A lot of people know in the best way to understand that as visit the sites where these famed events happened. But it's also got incredible food. One of the most vibrant food scenes in the country right now mountains in some of the best beaches in the country, if not the world, which again does not fit that stereotype that people have the deep south well. I'm going to be one of those people that admits that I Alabama was something like my forty seventh state to go to or something like that, and it was kept to the last somewhat because I grew up in the sixties, and my picture of Alabama was what I saw on the nightly news. It was that troubled. Civil Rights history that we talk about which we can. Celebrate what happened now and and what went on, but it was kind of tough to watch it all going on at the time, and that colored my views of Alabama for pope. And I have fallen in love with the state here in the last trips that I've gone through and a little surprised to say that because I didn't really expect to. But what would you recommend for an itinerary for Alabama? Alabama literally goes from the mountains to the seas in I I would start just for simplicity's sake in the north. In Huntsville and in the Florence area where you will see incredible NASA rocket history because I was intrical part of the NASA system, the NASA development and then. Some a rock and roll shrine in the muscle shoals hall of fame, and then down to Birmingham where you do find that civil rights history where a lot of those disturbing images happen half a century ago. Frankly and now it's one of the most vibrant food scenes in the country and a place. That really has a buzz to it. There's a lot of new parks architecture. There's a lot of people they may be. Decades ago would have left to go off to find their fortune in New York or Los Angeles. And now they're staying there and creating some wonderful things and then I. go down to Montgomery with the state capital. Eight incredible new memorial is just open. I don't know if you've seen that. The equal justice just there. The Lynching Memorial, which I was told by an architecture critic, maybe the most important memorial in this country in the decade. Right up there with the Vietnam war memorial to the victims of lynching very sobering in your face, challenging kind of place, then go out to places I don't think are as much on the radar for people as far as Alabama mobile is a surprise mobile I call the little easy, because it's a lot like New Orleans, but it's tiny. It's much easier to navigate in. It's a lot of fun and then down to this beautiful beautiful Gulf. Shore beaches, the white sands, sugar sand beaches that I literally I been in Borussia of all places in the Indian Ocean on the beaches, and I came to the Gulf coast the next month. For some reason, it just worked out in the Gulf coast. Beaches were better than what I had seen in the Indian. Ocean Sept-. Beautiful I will back you up on that end in both a surprise part and the beautiful part. That will give you a good week from north the sound that

Alabama Chris Christensen Larry Bloomberg Larry Beiber Larry Gulf Coast Writer And Editor Center Of Civil Rights Indian Ocean Nasa Muscle Shoals Hall Of Fame New Orleans Montgomery New York Los Angeles Birmingham Huntsville Florence
Muscling up to China and 25 years since Srebrenica

Between The Lines

28:17 min | 3 weeks ago

Muscling up to China and 25 years since Srebrenica

"Tom Switzer, he and welcome to another episode off between the lines now today on the program will be commemorating the twenty fifth anniversary of Europe's worst massacre since the Holocaust in ninety, ninety, five more than eight thousand people died in Shrimp Nitsa. The town was supposed to be a U N protected safe haven in the vicious civil war that tore Yugoslav apart instead the civilians ended up being massacred by Bosnian Serbs. Were lightning fast with their superior weapons. They easily overran the lightly. I'm Bosnian government troops and the token full civilian peacekeepers. The UN's Valley to protect the civilians inspired Washington to launch unilateral action against Serbia and end the civil war. Would things be the same today now? That's later in the program, but first defense. Last week the Morrison. Government launched a defence strategy and force structure review now the move signals a major shift away from the strategy outlined in the last defence white paper. Remember that just four years ago in two thousand sixteen. It plotted out Australia's strategic costs for the next decade. But that White Paper has as we know been rapidly overtaken by Vince covert China or that now the new review has promised two hundred and seventy billion dollars over the next decade to enhance Australia's defence capabilities with renewed focus on areas like Saba and spice capabilities and the possible development of hop sonic weapons will be fitting aircraft with long-range anti-ship missiles, increasing underwater surveillance and boosting fuel ammunitions reserves. Now, underscoring the seriousness of the shift, the Prime Minister even drew comparisons to the nineteen thirties and the lead up to world. War Two that period of the nineteen thirties. Is Been Something I've been revisiting on a very regular basis and when you connect by the economic challenges and the global uncertainty. It can be very haunting, but is the money too much or not enough is going to all the right places, and we'll do enough to safeguard Australia from China's increasing assertiveness and is rapidly growing military capabilities. What's the role of Australia's diplomacy? And all of this will joining me to discuss this at three distinguished guests. By skill is professor of Asia Pacific Security Studies at Macquarie University Holiday Bites. Thank you good to be here Melissa Conley. Tar is a research fellow at the Asia Institute at the University of Melbourne. Hi There Melissa could to speak again Tom. And Pay. The Jennings is executive director of the Australian Strategic Policy Institute. Tom No. Can you talk us through the top of scenarios and potential conflicts that the defense review is preparing us for the scenario that the review is focusing on is one involving a high end conventional conflict, so I've gone to the days of stabilization operations in t more Counterterrorism operations in Afghanistan This document is preparing foresight on onsite conflict. Involving countries that have sophisticated military forces. And, of course, the document doesn't say. I don't think it would be reasonable to expect it to say. That China is the problem. But let me tell you China is the problem that is the now neoplasia competitive that way of thinking about when we think about what's adequate in terms of the topic of military capability we need to have. and to does reflect to change. From past years Tom I recall when I started by defense career, we were thinking much more about the risks presented by Indonesia, and the so called low level in cushions in the northwest. Of course, that's no longer features in anyone's strategic thinking. Really it's about China and the risks that the People's Republic is presenting to all of its neighbors in abroad since in the Indo Pacific region and beyond I cabinet crudely putting it some sites laying the groundwork for fortress Australia US sign. This is preparing us to join a potential use LID. Containment slash war against China for example to protect Taiwan Peter Jennings. I think that is it covers a spectrum of possibilities. One possibility which I think is Epson you were in terms of language of the document is that we might conceivably end up having to face military conflict without being able to rely on the direct combat support of the United States, and that's what leads to discussions around extra stockpiling munitions and fuel insightful. But I think in general terms. Yes, the expectation is that Australia. Through its history has been a country that forms coalitions usually have like minded partners, the share the same types of objectives. And the the plan will design the Defense Force. Really gives us the capacity to do that with Rachel Ellis lecture, example, Japan but also with our traditional ally the United States okay bates skill. You've recently completed a review of China's defense capabilities and its recent military modernization, specifically looking at the implications for Australia Wind you expect the Peo- The People's Liberation Army and its navy. When do you expect them to have the capability to project power as far as Australia annual Pacific knives, well in many respects Tom, they already can I mean they have the long range missile capabilities to do that? Know as a from a standoff position launched from their own from their own homeland against hours. But what I think, the the new strategy is looking at is really the development of capability over the next ten fifteen twenty years, and that's by the Chinese own own acknowledged calendar that they would be able to by that time of mass, a large enough capability, both in terms of its long range strike, you know striking from their own homeland, but also bill to project. Project Power passed the so-called first and second island change and being a position to more directly threatened through those platforms Australian security. So you know we're talking ten or fifteen year window here and I think given the time it does take to try and respond to develop the the deterrent and defense capabilities for Australia. That's that's you know that's in some ways a short window. for Australia to be mobilizing in reaction Melissa Tali. What's the role of a strong diplomacy and all these well I think it needs to be growl. And one of the concerns when we look at the deteriorating strategic environment is we think all that's a defense problem? And so when the prime minister launches the strategic update with those comparisons with the nineteen thirties. It pushes US toward seeing in purely military terms but we don't just want to say things in that security lands, we want to think about all of the parts about national power projection, so that's diplomacy and development as well as defense I think if if people thought about it I think what we invest in all three strongly, but that's not where it is if you look at federal budget fifty. Fifty nine billion to defense and less than seven billion to diplomacy and development together the lowest point with ahead in our history and I think we missing that opportunity. If we don't take US seriously, the way that diplomacy and development can shape things in the world so I was struck. Today was a defendant looking at the latest poll on what are the major concerns that Australians have at the moment of the top threats in the world and the first five, a role nontraditional that drought, environment, disaster, climate change, pandemics, and downtown, global economy, and those places where you know military spending isn't going to help shape that environment. So we need to have an effect on those. We need to be thinking much more about what we can do in the diplomacy and development to mind Peter Jennings. What would you say in to Melissa's observations? Because they reflect a certain mindset that that perhaps we should be focused more on non state actors rather than say China for instance well, I think all of these you know threats that have to be taken seriously. I'm and simply because we're living in the middle of a pandemic for example, doesn't the climate change is gone away in this no longer going to present a problem to us. I guess what I'd say. Is that the you know the five things Melissa listed? That were in the featured in the low e Poland terms of popular concerns. Are also the things which could. In different ways late to the risks of conflict escalating in the Indo Pacific region generally so You know my my view, please while I would like to see spending on diplomacy increased. While I. Say Development Assistance is being something which is effectively the United soft in of Australian power, and the military is the hot end of Australian power. I think. The message against all of these areas is that we have just been underinvesting for decades underinvesting for decades, so we're we're all. High fiving ourselves at just reaching about two percent of gross national product, being spent on defense, but that is compared to what we spending in cold or years, which was sometimes between three and a half percent in four percent of rustic product. So what we have grown used to Tom I would say is. Free written on the United. States code tiles of security for for decades. We've dramatically under. Invested in the things that we need to do to strengthen Australia's position, not just militarily, but also diplomat. A now. We're rather surprised to hear the news that Gosh the bill is a lot more expensive than we really thought. It was only if you've got that confidence in the US. and. In fact, the whole trump stories, the story of the Americans really big being fed up with the rest of the world, thinking that the US can fund the bill for their security, so we're going to have to do more and I think we're going to have to do it against multiplicity of areas not. Justin sought the defense organization. We'll some scholars such as you want and James Current from the University of Sydney. They say that this document sounds a lot like an acknowledgement that the US might not always be there to help us out. By are we starting to plan for more independent Australian defense posture I think it would be a wise move to keep that option open when you think of the capabilities that the Chinese developing in which do have a direct pose a direct threat to Australia or could do so. In many respects, the I think the types of threats that you might not expect an immediate or even timely response on the part of the United States what I'm thinking here. Cyber capabilities is a huge priority for the Chinese. We already know what they see the sort of capability. They can wield against Australia and that's not the sort of thing you can expect a kind of cavalry to. Lead the charge from from Washington to come to Australia's defence slowly long range strike capability on the part of the Chinese capability. They already have in which are going to continue to develop. which could threaten Australia down the road now? These are capabilities that I think that Australia's going to have to develop their own defenses for. They can certainly do that with United States, but again it's not necessarily the sort of threat that we would expect some sort of traditional ally joint response not to make it well. Some of are in listeners will email me and they'll say that if Uncle Sam struggles to police. It's own CDs. Melissa. How on Earth Can Uncle Sam Police? The Asia Pacific region in the face of a rising China. What's your sense about us staying power in the next decade or two in look? It's difficult One of the things that strategic update looks at is more threats to the global rules order, and unfortunately the you know, the US is part of that. the US is not along with the strategies interest on things like global trading system, and a number of international issues like global health where we would say you need to be supporting. A Global Response that said I don't think the strategic update will be read negatively in. Washington, it's my guess. it very clearly couched in terms that I think the US will lock about Australia contributing more and having more self. that could be seen as a statement that we think that the US might not have outback, but can also be seen as something that the US has been for for a long time. I particularly liked a few elements of the update things like making sure that we have. You know material ammunition You know that aren't going to be disrupted. Buckle supply trying having more capability eight industrial cut suffering capability here antiques fuel reserves, which is not as long sane as an issue for us, so I mean those are things that are worth investing in. Regardless of US resolve because as we've seen from COVID, we know that supply chain can be disrupted very quickly and easily, and it's worth having eligibilities. Cepeda Jennings bite skill and Melissa Conley Toilet and Melissa. The Pacific step up last year. That realigned Australia's development budget to deal with some of the strategic challenges posed by China in the Pacific Do you think it goes far enough? The step up was followed recently by strategies new International Development Policy Partnerships for recovery, and that's made it very clear that strategies focus should be on the Pacific and also southeast. Asia including. Indonesia and team August. I think that has a very clear statement about what we want. In the region of being entrusted trusted development partner and influencing those societies that we think positive for four region. Again you're going to. You're going to say you. Hear this from me all the time, but again the problem is that we not really making much invasive lunch, so partnerships for recovery head no new money it talked about the massive challenges that covered as as creating for for the for the Pacific, and for for our region broadly, and the only funding announcement was that we're going to repurpose the money. We would have spent on sending Australian. Volunteers in scholarship holders. And we're GONNA use that so I I suppose I. Feel a little bit with all the areas, not actually include district update in that as well that what we've seen through the foreign policy, White Paper and International Development Policy through to to the defense. Strategic Updike is. We talk about how. how? What a time! These these frosty leaving a contested difficult awful environment that we've now got to leave in and the Dow L. Easy Times over, and then we say, and we're not gonNA. Give any new money so I mean the defense announcement is essentially just that we're going to continue to you know, extrapolate out the money that was planned to be spent in the twenty twenty six, and we're going to extrapolate that out to twenty thirty terabytes skill. Do we risk getting into a bidding war for influence in the Pacific? I don't know if it's a risk. If it is a risk worth worth taking. I mean obviously the Pacific region is so extremely important Australia's future. Both for for defense reasons for regional engagement for diplomatic reasons, developing reasons and the like. so It's quite possible that we're entering in a more competitive phase with China in this. SITES WRIST BYTES I'm talking about more the budgetary concerns he because in the wake of the Corona Virus Crosses. There'll be serious limits on how we can spend on these things scholley. Yes, there is and party left to be be developed for that, but you know when you're talking about your own backyard. I mean I I. I don't think it's the kind of country that can simply. Pretended it's by itself getting back pay to Jennings to the region, generally in the rise of what. Angus Campbell is of the Defence Force he's talked about the rise of political warfare, the idea of grey zone warfare things like cyber attacks, economic coercion influence operations that fall below the traditional threshold of war. He says we need a whole of government response to it. I, you seeing that whole of government approach happening in Campbell, or is this Manley focus on defense and the spy agency so far Peter Jennings. It probably is focused on the national security agency's Tom. That's not too surprising because you'd expect them to sort of pick up on the risks I. But General Campbell is right. It does need to be all government is. There's a whole lot of things happening there that simply cannot and should not be done by defense organizations. and. I think that realization is slowly dawning. Along as both of the speakers have said that actually ladyship comes with cost of infrastructure is going to play that role, but you know, give you a small example of this we. We have lost the ability to broadcast into the South Pacific and Southeast Asia. In a way that we used to very successfully over over decades to give us the capacity to do that. We're probably talking about you know that. He million a year forty million a year, which sounds a lot of defend. It's nothing if you're in the Defense Department. Let me tell you. But you need to be able to do things like that. To be the truth teller in the region to actually tell the region that there are alternatives to Chinese Communist Party authoritarianism I think that's what's needed with responding to this grey zone on threat. Is Actually to be the truth teller. In this part of the will and getting our system in Cambridge used to that reality to understanding what needs to be done. To starting at different type of conversation with our region. With our own people for that matter that that is a sort of a psychological change which I can see happening, but we're not quite yet. There's a bit of work still to be done to get to that point Melissa. Conley Tyler. Is, just responding on that. I agree entirely with what pitcher saying on on broadcasting. It's a small investment, such a an increasing influence. It should be Brian and I hope that did that's being seen. I think having defense voices. I will help a lot in a banks, seriously I'm but just went. When you ask Tom Balaton host government and what's happening there? There are some really good examples, so for example win. This Pacific step pop started an office of the Pacific was established in that apartment and tried and each job. He's to be that coordinating body, and it's bringing together the. The defense, the development and the diplomacy in a way that he's gone to maximize our influence. and I've noticed this a lot more discussion about that that three. How do you bring defense development diplomacy communities together? I'm involved in initiate the Pacific. Four Day and I think a lot of people not talking about what more we can do for that that joined up coordination to make the most about national instruments by skill. You're an expert on China. The elephant in the room of course is China doing need to be careful not to overestimate China's military strength. What about the weaknesses? Exactly right I mean you have to know your enemy's weakness as well as their strengths in the case of China, they are undertaking enormous reforming organization effort. They're pouring billions of dollars into new capabilities, but there's a lot of things we need to recognize I. Mean One is that the Chinese have not fought a shooting war and more than forty years. They are have no. They have zero experience in high end combat against a serious. Adversary, scenario, so that's not to downplay them, but to understand that they've got enormous obstacles to overcome that day. Themselves acknowledge that they themselves. No, they have to overcome, and that's why we had this window that we've been talking about. A fifteen to twenty years. to try and develop capabilities to get in front of the kinds of things that the Chinese want to bring to bear around. Around, twenty thirty or twenty, thirty, five, twenty, forty, paid-up Melissa to be continued. Thanks so much for being on our in. Thank you, tell my pleasure. Thank you, Tom. That was paid jennings. He's executive director of the Australian strategic pulsing suit by skill professor of Asia Pacific Security Studies at Macquarie University and Melissa Commonly Tyler. She's a research fellow at the Asia Institute at the University of Melbourne. These between the lines with Tom Switzer. Coming next, we're going to replay a version of a segment from between the lines. I 'cause commemorating the massacre of Bosnian Muslims at shredded Nitsa on the eleventh of July nodding ninety. Five twenty five years ago this week. More than eight thousand people were killed by Serb forces. It was the worst massacre. Europe had seen since the Holocaust. Serve softening up Trevor Nature for the army's final push into the town. Town of course was supposed to be a safe haven protected by the United Nations, but the civilians ended up being sitting ducks as I woke Larry. Hollingsworth Remembers I. Myself Feel Devastated and ashamed I was there with them? When we told them that it was a safe haven I watched. Many of these people walk in with the minimal possessions into shreds, knowing that it was a safe haven, and now they're fleeing out because we've let them down, let them down to the extent that within dies. About Twenty three thousand women and children were deported, and about eight thousand Muslim men and boys left behind where executed and buried in mass graves. Now, reports from the time described, frightening scenes stiffen overawed from medicines on frontier. Speaking he. Loading some of the children and women into buses, but there's no indication as to where it was buses, going with seen some horrifying streaming, going on women and children going into the buses being taken away from their family This was going on with a lot of crying a lot of panicking. The slaughter had been planned carefully and executed with precision. All the wall Dutch. Pace is literally stood by, and did nothing indeed even when the Serb assault on Srebrenica was imminent. in-command is still rejected Kohl's racetracks. Positions. Pope John Paul. The second declared ribbon Nitsa a defeat for civilization as media reports begins to reveal the scale of the unfolding tragedy. The UN says nine hundred thousand people are still unaccounted for. About some became clear as government soldiers emerging from the forest in central Bosnia, told of horrific massacres at the hands of the Serbs one young. People executing them on spot, but this didn't come out of the blue. By the time this massacre took place the civil war that tore the former Yugoslavia. Repot was heading into its fourth year. More than a million people have been displaced, and the world became familiar with a new term ethnic cleansing. So? Who is to blame for these well? Let's start with the United. Nations from ninety two to ninety, five shrivel Nitsa was the world's first union declared civilian syphon. It was supposed to to her aggression. It was supposed to aggression and set the scene for political negotiations to end hostilities between the Bosnian Serbs, and Muslims, but the UN soldiers in the SIPHONS. They were bedeviled by problems. If you declare an area safe haven in the name of the United Nations. Nations if you tell the people if they are safe in the name of the United Nations you have got to put the troops on the ground, and it's no good for politicians say yes, we go for safe havens, but we're not gonNA put the troops meanwhile the Europeans vacillated and equivocated failing miserably to cope with across at its own back door. America was also reluctant to get involved as then President George Bush senior explained in Nani Nani to. I? Something because I learned something from Vietnam. I am not going to commit US forces until I know what the mission is to the military. Tell me that it can be completed until I know how they can come out. You have ancient rivalries that have cropped up as as Yugoslavia's dissolved or getting dissolved, and it isn't going to be solved by sending in the eighty second airborne, and although on the campaign trail that Ye Bill Clinton pledged to reverse the appeasement of that bushes of Belgrade as President Clinton allowed the Balkans to bleed for three more years. French President Jacques Chirac was moved to declare quote, the position of the leader of the free world vacant. Trinite Sur changed all that having done nothing the before during the mass killings in Rwanda Clinton was galvanized into action, and crucially he cut the United Nations out of the Decision Chine on August thirty Washington led a night bombing campaign against the Serbs the NATO action began early this morning. The harsh light of fires and explosions coloring the night sky. Some people watched the bombardment from their houses, but after more than ten thousand deaths here in the last three years, most Sarajevans had given up any hope of outside intervention. Last night it came on a scale which could yet change the course of this war by the end of not ninety five sixty thousand nine hundred troops, including twenty thousand Americans were on the ground in Bosnia. Pace was declared. The BOEKEN's wars ended only because the US finally acted. He's President Clinton in November ninety five my fellow Americans in this new era there are still times when America and America alone can and should make the difference for peace. The terrible war in Bosnia is such a case nowhere. Today is the need for American leadership. More stark are more immediate than in. In Bosnia in the years since the Mexica Europe inaction was heavily criticised, and the US was held up for its global leadership in particular for its unilateral humanitarian intervention. This is when the US secretary. Of State. Madeleine Albright said America was the indispensable nation, and that idea would fade into the justification of the Iraq invasion in two thousand and three as a war of liberation, but he's a question with the US intervene. If the shrivel Nitsa massacre happened today from the standpoint of twenty twenty, we might ask if the era of US unilateral humanitarian intervention is well and truly over. Well, that's it for this week. Show remember if you'd like to hear the episode again or download segments since two thousand fourteen. Just go to ABC. Dot Net dot US slash aren and follow the prompts to between the lines, or you can listen via the ABC. Listen APP, or wherever you get your podcast. You can even subscribe, so you never miss an episode. I'm Tom Switzer continue next week.

Australia China United States Melissa Peter Jennings Pacific Tom Switzer Washington TOM Bosnia UN United Nations Prime Minister Europe Melissa Conley Professor Of Asia Pacific Secu Indonesia Asia Institute
Norah ODonnell, anchor of the CBS Evening News

Skimm'd from The Couch

05:26 min | 3 weeks ago

Norah ODonnell, anchor of the CBS Evening News

"Today O'Donnell joins us on skin from the couch. She is the anchor and managing editor of the CBS Evening News, making her the third woman ever to so anger, a network evening broadcasts before taking the helm of the evening news. She was the CO host of CBS this morning for seven years norad. Thank you for joining us welcome skin from the couch. Thank you for having me, so we're GONNA. Start off with Skim your resume for us. Will I went to Georgetown University I was Law Sophy Major? I was interested in a lot of different things in college so I had internships at always worked and worked at a law firm I. worked at the World Bank, and and then I injured ABC News and I think you know journalism really was what was the right fit for me? Just a deep curiosity about the news, deep curiosity about world events and people have to graduating from college I got a job at National Journal on a publication, a called the hotline, which was the original kind of aggregate her of news before the Huffington. Post and others got into the business of aggregating news. Even like you guys in some way, remember it well, and that also was like a crash course in politics, too, because we would. Sum Up every Senate and House race across the country, all the polling who all the key consultants were, so that really was a great crash course in politics, and then I got hired at NBC and MSNBC when I was twenty five years old to be you know it was one of the youngest correspondents at NBC history, and had a great career at NBC and had three kids, and then we all work on intelligent news underwear like personal services contracts. All of us have anywhere from two to five year contracts. In, so you know in each of those contracts, come up! You have an opportunity to reevaluate your next step and CBS came to me with an incredible offer to be. The chief White House correspondent for Obama's last term, and to be the substitute anchor for face, the nation, and I had always been ambitious about wanting to anchor a Sunday broadcast I love politics, and so to be able to substitute for the legendary Bob Schieffer at thought. This is really an an excellent opportunity, so. and. CBS. News and then Kinda. The rest is history should I keep going? No, that was perfect so something you definitely don't know I. and turned at MVP when I was nineteen in the specials unit, and I was like my first week on the internships. Let's say day two or three in you opt into the office. And you're the first professional famous news anchor I ever seen in person and I literally I stopped breathing I was so excited all I wanted to do is to be a news anchor at the time, and I was so nervous, and when you walked out of the room I asked one of the producers. What is she liked you work with her I will never. Never forget their like she's the best of the best, and I was like what makes her so good. And they said that she always does her homework and I think about that a lot and I'm curious. What is something that you your fans and people like us your big fans? What does the thing that we don't know about you that we can't Google? What I wasn't as good about doing my homework in college. And I did just fine at Georgetown. But I do I think certainly a professional that is dry. Always did know my homework because I do believe that preparation builds confidence and confidence build success, and so for me, you know certainly early on my career as a young correspondent with so many famous people at NBC legendary careers. My confidence wasn't a tie, and so I thought how can I be the smartest person in the room and no more than anybody else and. You know I just really did my homework. I really worked really hard to make sure I knew everything. The thing that people may not know about me. You Know I. Guess would be that I'm from a military family. You know I mean that certainly is my resume, but it's the one thing I mentioned because you know I remember in covering certainly the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq after nine eleven, a lot of people would say on television and Mike Barnicle on morning. Joe would say this a lot that Oh, no less than one percent of people have someone in the military who didn't understand these wars, but I grew up in the military. My father was drafted during the Vietnam War. State for thirty years I lived overseas and so I really do have a deep appreciation for those who serve my sister-in-law surgeon in the army and so I do have a really keen sense of the sacrifice that many people go through, and I do in some ways I almost wish that it was mandatory almost like in Israel that we had to sir because. I think you know certainly the discipline that they have is unlike anything I've seen those who sir. Let's actually start with that because I think it's fascinating talking about how you grew up and living overseas. How did this love of news and growing up with that military background kind of come together for you? You know I think one of the. First crystallized for me in some ways when Elena, Nachman Ost, who is still the vice president of talent at NBC? News said to me when I met her. When I was twenty five years old, and she said you know we like hiring correspondents who have from a military background, because they're very flexible and adaptable. They don't complain about being sent to different cities or states or around. Around the world they can talk to anybody because they've sort of been put in that situation where they have to be totally adaptable. Moment's notice

NBC Cbs Evening News CBS Abc News Georgetown University O'donnell Managing Editor Chief White House Corresponden National Journal Bob Schieffer World Bank Google Barack Obama Georgetown MVP Huffington Mike Barnicle
Beijing Accuses US of Aggressively Intervening in South China Sea

Morning Edition

03:38 min | Last month

Beijing Accuses US of Aggressively Intervening in South China Sea

"Is accusing us of aggressive action in the South China Sea. The US deployed two Navy carrier strike groups to the region over the weekend. Greg Poling tracks this part of the world closely. He's a senior fellow for Southeast Asia at the Center for Strategic and International Studies here in Washington. D. C. Thank you so much for being with us this morning. Lauren. Why would the U. S be carrying out these maneuvers at this particular moment? The US has been getting a lot of flak in the region over the last few months about its willingness, Tio still stand up for your rights. You got a lot of bad press from shining particular about whether or not it was still capable of carrier operations because of Tobin, 19 so it wants to show everybody that it's still a Pacific power. Come and explain why why China of finds issue with this in the first place for China. The South fancy is a Chinese, like despite with international law might say China was engaging in military activities a few 100 miles away in the parish islands at the same time. The US does this to show China smaller neighbours Vietnam, the Philippines, Indonesia, Malaysia that we're not going to let them be bullied by China. Beijing doesn't appreciate that. And how I mean, how does this fall into the larger relationship right now? I mean, obviously, the the dynamic between the US and China is, tends to say the least, not just because of the politics. The rhetoric around the corona virus spread. But also the recent law in Hong Kong, in which mainland China now has far more control over the citizenry. They're one of the things that really stuck out over left three months or so has been Beijing's hypersensitivity. Ah, any criticism amid Code 19 and so things whether it's in the South China Sea in east Tennessee, the Indian border Hong Kong, Taiwan, China, rather than deescalate is doubling down on nationalism, and that leads to just continuing escalation with with the U. S. And with its neighbors. What about U. S allies in the region? What's been their response to the U. S deployment in China's reaction to it? We haven't seen a lot of response directly to these carriers Employment over the last few months, we really seen Vietnam, Philippines as well as states outside of South station like Australia, Japan, India calling for greater US supports I think this is it certainly not enough, but it's the first step towards reminding the region that the U. S still has their back. The waterway. We should say. I mean, it just has huge strategic importance right? An estimated 1/3 of global shipping flows through this particular stretch of water. What could be the consequences if tensions there, increase? We've been in the middle of this year's long campaign by Beijing to start slowly squeezing its neighbors out of the region. So for the U. S, and most of the biggest concern is that Beijing creates a de facto zone of Germany in which In which nobody else can sail or freely operate. You know, the U. S. Isn't willing to accept that for a lot of reasons. The problem is that there are no military solution Cedar. And so if this is all the U. S, has its, really not nearly sufficient. Greg Poling, senior fellow for Southeast Asia, the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington. He joined us on Skype and we appreciate your time. Thank you.

China United States South China Sea Beijing Center For Strategic And Inter Greg Poling Senior Fellow Southeast Asia Hong Kong U. S Washington Vietnam Philippines Tobin Lauren D. C. Tennessee Skype
Vincent Brown discusses his new book, ‘Tacky’s Revolt’

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

05:58 min | Last month

Vincent Brown discusses his new book, ‘Tacky’s Revolt’

"Vincent Brown welcome to meet the rices. Slavery is war. Tell me what that means. Well. In the book. I tend to think of slavery itself as a state of war, and in that I'm following the enslaved themselves who often discuss slavery as a state of warfare amongst themselves, most famously allowed Equiano who we know as one of the most famous formerly enslaved abolitionists of the late eighteenth century British Atlantic. said in his autobiography that when you make people slaves. Them to live with you in a state of war. Now in that he was echoing the philosopher John Locke. Who said that what is slavery? But the state of war continued between what he thought was a lawful conqueror and the concord now John Locke was trying to legitimate slavery. He was an investor in the Royal African company, and he actually helped to write the constitution for the colony of south. Carolina, which became a slave state. State, but equiano was doing something a little bit different than John Locke. He was actually commenting upon the conditions of slavery, the violence that was required to maintain people in slavery and the kind of response that was bound to come by those people who had been subjected so violently so for him, slavery was a state of war, and there were other enslaved people who echoed. Seeing slavery that way helped me frame the slave revolt in Jamaica. In seventeen, sixty, seven, sixty, one, which was the largest in the eighteenth century, British Empire as a war itself right as one of a series of wars, all around the Atlantic world that then ed up in this conflict in seventeen sixty Jamaica I'd like to look at your own life, and where that intersects with war, because you grew up in San Diego, and in fact, it was very early on that. You became aware of conflicts. I did well. I'm an American citizen. I grew up in the United States. I was born in the late sixties at the height of the Vietnam War and I I'm sorry to say that I can't name a five year period when the US military hasn't been abroad somewhere engaged in conflict with somebody over the course of my entire life, which seems to me like a half century of war having. Having grown up in San Diego I grew up in one of the largest terry garrison towns really in the history of the world the US Navy is as a major base in San Diego. The US Marines just north of San Diego have a major base and so coming through high school. A lot of my friends would join the military because it was the big industry in town, right. And of course, you know, my family had been had served in the army. My father served in the army. My Uncle A. Brother had done three combat tours I. Believe one in Korea and two in Vietnam, so the history of the military, the engagement overseas abroad in military campaigns was very much a part of my thinking growing up, and so when I thought about the history of slavery. It just jumped out at me that this history was itself a history that was embroiled embedded in a world of warfare, especially in the eighteenth century win. You have got Great Britain struggling in a century long campaign against its its greatest global enemy France, and all of those European wars then topped onto. The wars of enslavement that sent people out across the Atlantic into the European colonies in America, and what you have is a world of wars within wars, which looked very familiar to me like the campaigns at the US was fighting within the larger ambit- of the Cold War so by the time I grew to adulthood in the late eighty S. I was seeing these these late cold war campaigns in these post colonial states as as part of the larger Cold War, and then you see these proxy wars between the US and the Soviet Union fought out in places like Afghanistan right, and then of course by two thousand one, you see those kind of proxy campaigns between the US and Soviet Union growing into something else what we now call the terror wars, the war on. On Terror in Afghanistan and elsewhere I didn't see those things as continuous. I didn't see the terror war something uniquely different from most proxy wars of the late. Cold War period and my thinking historically has been to ask the question. How is it that one connects these longer histories of warfare together? And I do think that I was inspired to think that partly by having grown up in San Diego in a military town. And what about your, your family's personal history with war and with slavery? Well an african-american! My parents grew up in Virginia, and so they are descended from people who are enslaved probably as far back as the eighteenth century the Chesapeake Bay area. What's now? Virginia and Maryland was one of the largest importers of slaves in North America now I say north. America because the British empire imported the vast majority of its enslaved peoples into the Caribbean but for North America the territories that became the United States, the Chesapeake and South Carolina with a major importers of enslaved African peoples, and my family is descended from. Those people probably brought to North America in the eighteenth century. History was big in your life obviously, but also the arch. Yeah well. When I was in high school I I became very involved in theater and went to college thinking that I was actually going to do a theater degree. But at some point I thought well, you know I could probably do theater without a theater degree, but maybe I should have a backup plan and my second love in college was history, and that ended up being my career.

United States San Diego John Locke Equiano North America America Vincent Brown Soviet Union Afghanistan Jamaica Atlantic Virginia Carolina Chesapeake South Carolina Chesapeake Bay Caribbean
"Be Water" ESPN 30 for 30 Director: Bao Nguyen.

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

05:45 min | Last month

"Be Water" ESPN 30 for 30 Director: Bao Nguyen.

"From. nyu You received your MFA from the School of Visual Arts also in New, York City how important are those degrees to supplement your ability as director? I mean I, think for. You know film, school and Education, the most important thing I take away from it is like building a community and finding like minded people who love films and you kind of carry on that love after you graduated in your work together on your on your feature, your future projects and and I mean obviously the education is important, but I think the relationships you take away from it or more important now. Is there I mean I know? For those who see the documentary, they know kind of what influence you partially to really loving a certain aspect of Bruce Lee, but is there any other driving forces that really kind of? Propelled you where you are today whether it's a filmmaker or an actor or a movie itself. I remember seeing a hoop dreams when I was pretty young. I was about ten or eleven, and it was just A. He's the first time I really saw documentary like a feature length documentary, and it's such an epic story right also an intimate at the same time, and I think it's informing me of like the type of story said I'm interested in the type of storytelling I'm interested in and also kind of the power of sports in the drama of Sports, and and how you can use sports as a way to talk about bigger issues in society, and so I think that film definitely played a role in how I. How I became a documentary filmmaker and I mean it's not a directly to to be water I. think he can maybe see. Some of the piano correlation. Oh absolutely, absolutely and you know. You've done some really creative and really great projects, but we documentary like be water that you're connected. Do personally that you? Again for anyone that has seen it. For the thirtieth. The world seated at this point. You know you really have a fondness in a your linked emotionally to the person you're you're you're making the documentary on become something else at that point? Right because it's still such a beautiful work of art, but because of your connection because of the way Bruce Lee moved you. Does. It become something else at that point bow. In your for me when I'm making it film. Tired of want to infuse my own voice in the not literally. You don't hear me speaking as a narrator anything like that, but I think that films at I'm kind of drawn to are the ones that feel personal and honest and authentic, and you can really feel the directors hand. Especially in a film, we were talking about such an icon that maybe anyone else could have done a certain style of Bruce. Lee Fill of documentary about Bruce. Lee But I wanted to make sure that this felt like my film, and by kind of going deep into my roots my parents Vietnamese refugees. They left Vietnam on a boat. We're living in Hong Kong refugee camp for for six months and then. Went over to America the very similar story to Bruce's in terms of coming to America. And not having connections, not really having any money, and that was sort of the Bruce Lee that I felt like I didn't know too much. About Bruce Lee as the immigrant American as Asian, American as the other American. So, I tried to infuse like what lessons I learned from my parents, and for my own upbringing as a child of immigrants and use that to make the films feel personal and have that touch point in a way. So yeah that was that was always the intention and I hope people. Felt that kind of personal filmmaking style. Even though we're talking about an icon like briefly. Yeah, I can't even imagine what it's like. Because you talk very very early in a documentary about you know, it's the very first time you recognize yourself. Somebody on screen. That isn't stereotypical or lacking the respect. They deserve I. Mean I can't believe I mean it. Had to be an. You've answered this such a passion project just because of the effect man had on you and millions of others as well. Yeah I mean I could say that. I was in like one of those huge Bruce Lee fans at went out and collected everything and. Watched every single movie ten times over, but as a symbol, and as an icon for representation for kind of hero, and fighting for the underdog, definitely left a mark on me and again it was just trying to unpack that that that iconography that mythology that I felt. Everyone knew, but they didn't know the person, and and that being said I agree responsibility, obviously telling the story of someone like Bruce Lee but I started to think of it more as a privilege that I'm privileged to have the opportunity to tell lead story into. You know mess it up in many ways and I once. I understood it more as a privilege recognized. It made it less of a daunting task I

Bruce Lee School Of Visual Arts Lee Fill School And Education Sports Director Hong Kong York City America Vietnam
Media, power, and political communication

Pat McDonough

04:16 min | Last month

Media, power, and political communication

"Let's talk about the media yeah the media is a powerful Trojan horse seven mereka if it's not a and I mean they have attacked president trump relentlessly yeah and the problem we have is we have fox okay yeah now fox is okay but Rupert Murdoch is ninety years old right and his two sons are liberals okay we have newsmax rage has been growing and that's a good thing yeah we have one America right which is a good thing but these are national programs they don't get into Vince's crab house they don't get in the fells point being close they don't get into those things go and they don't get into helping our people who need help to fight against the beast and as you pointed out the Baltimore sun doesn't report on any of these issues involving her son is one of them yeah right exactly the Baltimore sun is part of the super shadow government yeah they protect them yeah people say that the media has fallen in the tank for the left they fell in the tank for the Obama no the media never found the check for anybody the media are leaders in this offensive they are legally are part of the natural America they were and and they were targeted specifically for that purpose because of the vast influence they have they were targeted for subversion and infiltration by the Soviet Union in the nineteen thirties and we could go on for hours about how that happened and who infiltrated but just for example one person remember Edward R. Murrow of CBS Edward R. Murrow is one of the people primarily responsible for bringing communist it's two Columbia teachers college to begin inserting all of these destructive America narratives into our universities he was responsible for bringing those people over and he worked with a guy named Laurence Duggan whose son was an actual Soviet agent and he was friends with his son and he became a news anchor for CBS that's just one example there are many many trusted a man in America yeah right right he he gave the Vietnam War at eight a story that was a hundred and eighty degrees from what the truth was riled tell your doctor about with Walter Cronkite yeah that young people don't know who has what we member we only had three major networks in this country now I can tell you let me say some about yeah because the networks are required by FCC regulation as part of their contract to provide unbiased news nobody has ever called him that if I were in a position to do so I would pull their FCC licenses tomorrow and tell them that they better straighten out their newsrooms and start reporting what's going on because they should be challenged in the courts right absolutely be challenged because they have been really but they have such power and such influence and Americans have to get a constitutional public there operates through elections has to be given the facts at what's happened instead is they've been given the left narrative for sixty eighty years in World War two The New York Times was engaged in treason it was exposing things mark Levin's book yeah I mean it's just stunning it's stunning when CNN first started Ted Turner used to go on a show and he would bring some five Soviet KGB agents on the show with him had a first among them was Georgy Arbatov who is the head of member for US and Canada old KGB agent they would talk down president Reagan they would just sit there and terror attacks president right that was C. N. N. the communist news

Fired captain of USS Theodore Roosevelt will not be reinstated

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:30 sec | Last month

Fired captain of USS Theodore Roosevelt will not be reinstated

"Guys the Pentagon has reversed its decision to reinstate the aircraft carrier commander who blew the whistle about a covert outbreak on board here's CBS's candy McCormick chief of naval operations admiral Mike Gilday said the carriers captain will not be rejoining the ship I will not resign captain Brad crozier as the commanding officer of the USS Theodore Roosevelt Gilday said crozier and an admiral on the carrier failed to take enough precautions after the Roosevelt left Vietnam hundreds of the ship's crew became infected with a corona

Pentagon Commander CBS Mike Gilday Officer Theodore Roosevelt Gilday Mccormick Chief Of Naval Operations Brad Crozier
The World is Watching Us

Why It Matters

03:46 min | Last month

The World is Watching Us

"Why it matters spends a lot of time discussing how things that happen around the world of us at home. It's kind of our thing. But today we're GONNA flip that around because the killing of George Floyd, the protests against police, brutality and systemic racism, and the administration's response are not only unfolding here in the united. States the world is listening to and depending on where you are, the echoes can sound different. To better understand how this is playing out, we turn to two American journalists who've spent their careers. Reporting abroad will ask them to give us their own thoughts and experiences, and to describe what America looks like right now through the eyes of those who are watching from afar. They told us to places Africa and Hong Kong. I'm Gabrielle Sierra and this is why it matters today. Diplomacy starts at home. This kind of reminds me how throughout history and on I've studied history and political science, and throughout history, America's goal and mission of trying to go around and promote democracy and human rights around the world has constantly been undercut by how they treat minorities and particularly African Americans at home. I'm Keith Rich Berg I'm currently the director of the journalism and Media Studies Center at the University of Hong Kong, but I spent most of my career about thirty four years as a reporter and correspondent for the Washington Post. During the Cold War The old Soviet Union. Propagandists used to take great pleasure in pointing out. How Black Americans were treated in the American south during the Jim. Crow, era. Know the propagandists during the Vietnam War would like to point out how American blacks were being treated that we were not able to really as strongly as we wanted to stand up against the apartheid regime in South Africa in its early days, because the apartheid regime in South Africa was in many ways modeled on the Jim Crow segregation laws of the American south, so I think throughout history, America's stated mission and goal of promoting democracy and Human Rights and Roosevelt's four freedoms around the world have constantly been undercut by enemies who are willing to point out the hypocrisy of America's positions in America's promotion of human rights by saying before You Cup lecture US wanted you deal with their own problems at home. It's quite painful for me because I do have both experiences you know living in, America when Nigeria I do have both us. I've experienced racism in America. My name is Chico Odwalla. I am an independent multimedia journalist I am based in West Africa and I cover the entire continent for various international media outlets. Killing of George Floyd was very jarring. It was a wakeup. It was a brutal awakening for people who actually don't quite believe. Racism is as real as African Americans say that it is. You still got people who don't believe. It's that strong. Who believe that it's from the past that there have been many moves towards overcoming you know some people still believe that. America is a post racial society so for this incident. This killing of George Florida's like Oh. Actually it's still there and we saw it on TV we saw this guy breathing for his life for nearly nine minutes. So that aspect it is a rude awakening. It's really provoking some nations to look inward. Look at their own injustice for example in France. A people they're calling for an end to the chokehold that some police officers us, and so they're having debates on how to handle people

America George Floyd Jim Crow Gabrielle Sierra Hong Kong Africa South Africa Washington Post West Africa Soviet Union France Keith Rich Berg University Of Hong Kong George Florida Chico Odwalla Nigeria Roosevelt
"vietnam" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"vietnam" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"<music>. Let's get to the things that are closer to the world of programming and coding education the world of enterprise software in Vietnam. <hes> one phenomenon that we've seen is that a lot of the software that has been made in the West is the same software that people want to buy abroad so slack for example. I don't think there is a slack for India for example. I think it's just slack I'm sure there are some variations on slack but I think slack has gone a really headstart and they really good headstart and they've just doubled down relentlessly that also true for other categories like you know salesforce or Zen desk or or even know even know about these these other categories like I'm just curious about how Vietnamese enterprises by their software if they buy it the same way softwares purchased in the West. That's a good question in my my experience with that is the use the same authoress West so when he comes running a business. I've always had this interesting because kind of like you can't expect maybe if G._D._p.. Earth may per capita income has lower here like you would expect some discount or some way to make things more accessible accessible but my experience like the big corporations. It's just a costing business if you need S._A._P.. You Need S._A._P.. And you have to find ways to make that work and generally speaking. I don't think as a piece going to give discount or changed. Their product significantly for this market are their regional all business software products that you've seen decatur to particular like I've see for example <hes> like I again at that. There are regional consumer products. You know particular regional ridesharing APP for example but have you seen any regional enterprise software pressure. Has It really just been predominantly the the Western companies like S._A._p.. Or whatever right I think if the most part it seems like you know this big businesses are operating at the same kind of high levels so using the same as S._A._p.'s or oracles of the world the maybe like one thing I have seen as not sure if this counts enterprise but there have been homegrown solutions to maybe common business problems for example P._S.. Software I find fascinating because that's all done here like the deleting ones are all built in Vietnam. You wouldn't use like a foreign countries pugh offer just because it's cost prohibitive. Let's talk post public education system..

slack Vietnam. authoress West India decatur S._A._p.
"vietnam" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"vietnam" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"The biggest minority group hereby <unk> numbers of Knob you to me is the biggest foreign population is actually Korean Salah people. You'll see cacao talk here's while to it's really interesting. How this all these players? It's kind of like melting pot of technologies Vietnam. which is maybe part of the reason why so fun to be here? Although I'm sure it gets like annoying at times we have to swap between like fifty different. Messaging eggs is already enough in western messaging APPS and now you've got like five other ones that are just you probably you have different sets of subsets of people that just have different norms and cash cow talk because of the stickers or something yeah but also funny how I think in America we tend to want one winner like I think as Americans like no we only only have one APP. You don't have the APP and I WanNa talk to you and lots of countries. I thought here it's like you don't have that actually from the beginning people just like oh you want. How do you want to be contacted and it's not a big deal? Actually we don't have to talk about this but given given that you are. Somebody who's worldly and only mean that in the sense that you've been to places around the world. Do you have an opinion on the norms that are developing in China around and how how the government is using messaging APPs to coordinate the public behavior in in certain ways. Do you think that is that. Is that a feature a bug yeah. That's a pretty spicy question. Hard are to answer on my personal views on it. I will say though that I think regardless of what that's a feature a bug. I think that's a question that's facing a lot of countries today. N. Vietnam's no exception so one of the bigger things happening in Vietnam is Vietnam past this data privacy law recently which is saying that kind of more China ask approach saying information about Vietnamese citizens needs to be kept in Vietnam so like facebook with Saturday have to start keeping information about their users here in Vietnam Google as well and it's right now. It's kind of trying to carefully 'cause but yet right now. That's I think that's kind of open issue on what the rights on what the past this country will go down while it's going to be more like whether they're going to go with Chinese viewpoint or perhaps American viewpoint indeed what about consumer apps so I don't travel that much but I went and this is not like a travel drop here but I went to Tel Aviv recently and there was like so much scooter usage in Tel Aviv like scooters were really practical in for tel-aviv and scooters pretty practical in San Francisco scooters practical and other areas of of the United States but they were extremely practical in Tel Aviv and there's the first time I realized okay all right. I am a scooter. I'm officially a scooter believer like I am officially believed that this is something that's going to be a big deal and I've had similar experiences with things like food delivery. Tell me about things like food delivery and ridesharing and scooter sharing. How have these technologies impacted Vietnam? That's a good question. I think the biggest thing I the first thing I thought about when you ask those questions is what's different about Vietnam or or perhaps other emerging markets in the biggest difference is the overall cost of labor is much lower in the U._S.. So the solutions here tend to be a bit more manual but also like like I think they can scale much faster uh because they don't have as many like headaches on the on the Labor side so in terms of food delivery food delivers everywhere. It's fantastic actually and I think it's a lot easier and faster than perhaps in San Francisco intensity technologies as I remember the biggest in the past four years there used to be these guys that would these motorbikes mopeds that would just be on the corner winning two people out. You'd actually have he friendly neighborhood motorbike guy who ticket work those guys have all all been completely replaced by the APPS the big one out here in Southeast Asia has called grab their competitor Uber in the space until Hooper left half years ago but that's completely changed landscape..

N. Vietnam Tel Aviv Vietnam. China San Francisco America Southeast Asia facebook Hooper United States four years
"vietnam" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"vietnam" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Wow Oh wow so it says there are lots of technologists even perhaps enterprising technologists in Vietnam but they don't have an ethos or they don't have high enough standards or they don't have guidance towards a higher ideal than just copy pasting an APP and then launching in the APP store. Yeah I would say that there are a lot of year people people who are smarter figure technology may be on their own embiid lots of great things but perhaps not having a long-term vision or knowing exactly what they want to build an add to the world. What's the public perception of the Tech Industry and Vietnam like an in America become pretty aspirational to go into the technology world? Do People aspire to become software engineers in Vietnam this funny question when I came here for came from San Francisco so it was already being into me that technology is the cure to all the world's problems and sway to change the world hugh when it first came. Actually I think Vietnam was transitioning shing a bit historically. The big multinational corporations that came here opened up marketing here first so you have your big global brands your consumer product brands are hiring to sell approximate Vietnam in those people always always inevitably start with marketing sales business type operations so I think historically all the best jobs kind of international scale where on the business marketing side encoding was that as more of the outsourcing <hes> kind of the factory worker esque thing back in the day now. Let's change really rapidly I think today you've had a lot of really successful. Vietnamese software engineers builds amazing. Things and people are starting to see the true. Impact Technology can't have half on the world and it's become much more aspirational yeah there was this thing in the I think it was like the nineties in early two thousand and I guess it still exists some degree today this the word outsourcing sourcing where you would send your tech technol- kind of undifferentiated heavy lifting technology like building Your Java J. E. E. APP to Vietnam or a place in India somewhere. This was never a very good strategy or was it was a good strategy for getting getting stuff out there quickly I guess but it led to on maintainable code it led to a lack of creativity developing among those engineers who were stuff was outsource to so you're saying that that was endemic in Vietnam yeah all the early industry <music> softer wise was completely around that mystery and you talk by that sounds terrible. One of my favorite stories is one of our students that we taught rebound rails to he came from literally programming Fortran for bank so it was sorry it wasn't Fortran. He has cobalt Obama <unk> Cam yeah so using COBOL for bank in France and look at. I think that one thing I've learned actually is how big industry really is in. How much software is be maintained by people all over the world hand? It's helps make the world go round so he can't disparage the importance of the industry but at the same time you're absolutely right. I don't think it instills good sufferings during principles in and people to be in the industry. I think there's emphasis on maybe doing things as quickly as possible as cheaply as possible without always weighing the long-term interests of architecture or or what the customer needs in the instance someday. I'm going to look up what Cobol Code looks like. I have not seen it. I just talk about it like it's like something that would be found in archaeological dig but it's it's it's alive and well. I need to do some shows about it to perhaps chiefs. This show is about does there are many experts that go to Vietnam to have a cheap standard of living while they work remotely for a Western Company or they are an entrepreneur her why is Vietnam and appealing place as a digital no man. I really cringe it hearing that term till no really yeah..

Vietnam Obama Impact Technology America San Francisco Western Company hugh India France
"vietnam" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"vietnam" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Charles Lee Welcome Software Engineering Daily High Pleasure to be here today. We're GONNA talk about the technology landscape in Vietnam and particularly the world of coding education in Vietnam. Let's start with the tech industry. Describe the technology industry and Vietnam yeah if I did describe the tech industry in Vietnam and use one word which is growing so it's growingly fast as a lot of companies both within Vietnam I an from outside Vietnam. They're coming here and setting up shop in hiring developers building awesome products. I've been here for about four years in that time. I've seen explosion of developers but even when I came here for years ago I remember the statistics six being that Vietnam had the most apps on the Google play store by large margin of any country in Southeast Asia. That's a strange statistic yet at the time actually four years ago the talk of the town was flappy bird flappy bird so there's a lot of emphasis on mobile applications at a time. How is it possible that the most smartphone apps from any country come out of Vietnam like were they? Eh what were the APPS. What were they even doing? How are there so many of them yeah so that's kind of a dark side test statistic which also is part of the reason that we're here to try to fix a few these things which is their most number of APPS and most developers but the <unk> overall quality as Google find it was not very high meaning? There were a lot of kind of copies of other apps and people are just quick to can copy APPs or make. These kind of absent didn't create a lot of value pushed him to play store..

Vietnam Google Charles Lee Southeast Asia four years
"vietnam" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"vietnam" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"If not currently amongst the happiness, there are the happiest more on that later, the richest amongst the Vietnamese owned water buffaloes to help with the farming duties, the Vietnamese for the most part before the French really got over there and stirred shit up for a peaceful rural agricultural people women were stores treated relatively well. In Vietnam when the Vietnamese govern themselves and women had a surprising amount of thirty for their times for that time. But eighty percent of eaten AMIS people were literate and equality of education. In the villages was high the v. Amis learn to read and write in their own language through a form of calligraphy talk to them by the Chinese the average Vietnamese citizen before the French colonization was wearing homemade clothes traded for goods only within the village, he or she was most likely Buddhist, and we practice these beliefs concert with the Buddhist priests or consort with the Buddhist priests and partake in customary rituals. And then again, France came and fucked everything up for the Vietnamese, and the French occupation of Vietnam would lead directly to the Vietnam war in eighteen Fifty-eight, France invades and takes control of Vietnam by the end of the nineteenth century. They would also take control of Cambodia and eighteen sixty three in Laos in eighteen ninety three that big block of Asian land would become known collectively as French Indochina. The French takeover had been hundreds of years in the making in the sixteenth century. European missionaries brought in modern weapons and western goods. The missionaries were also welcomed by the locals for their technical skills by the late sixteen sixty the French East, India company in organization credited with both expand trade and Cathal. Says had a foothold in Indochina over the three centuries of French occupation and pattern of controlled merged. Every once in a while when a French priest trade trader or soldier was attacked or killed by the locals, the France would retaliate by taking more control and extending their power, eventually the French seize control officially taken over much of the people's land making a class system with privilege French at the top they took over and carved up a part of Asia, just like they done in Africa as we learned back in suck seventy two the colonial destruction of Africa. The French also played rival factions of the Vietnamese against each other. They intervene and land disputes, and the winning faction would reward the French with moorland and the right to spread French trade influence in religion. And in eighteen ninety three like mentioned, the French made Vietnam part of French Indochina by the nineteen twenties. A French bureaucracy.

Vietnam Indochina France Amis Africa Cambodia Laos India Cathal Asia three centuries eighty percent
"vietnam" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"vietnam" Discussed on TechStuff

"Weather batteries would drain too quickly since there's would go dead earlier than expected. It was also really hard to get an accurate placement of sensors the sensors were being deployed from aircraft and dropped directly onto the jungle floor in some cases without a parachute. They acted almost like a spear and went straight down and would imbed into the ground. So it was kind of hard to get them placed. Just right. Plus it was very dangerous. There were flight crews that were constantly under fire while trying to deploy the sensors so it was a very tough thing to do. And it never quite got out to the level that the Jason group had really envisioned, and it didn't really pan out for Vietnam. But it did prove to be a powerful proof of concept for unmanned sensors and system of systems in which a large amount of data could be fed into an analysis system for real time combat conditions in decisions and essentially a lot of military officials after the fact said yet didn't. In Vietnam because it never been done before it didn't it wasn't fully baked, but it was a proof of concept that would become invaluable in future. Conflicts back at home are pa- provided funding to the Stanford research institute in in the efforts to develop a robot with the ability to navigate its way through a set of rooms which was a truly revolutionary chievements back in the mid nineteen sixties Arpaio would agree to the proposal that Stanford gave to them and so work began on what would eventually be known as shakey the robot. It's called shaky because the robot would shake as it moved this project took several years the actual robot wasn't ready for a demonstration until the early nineteen seventies. But it began in the mid nineteen sixties Arp is research and work during the Vietnam conflict stuff that would impact the Vietnam conflict continued throughout the entire history of our involvement in the Vietnam war, and it would continue to harm the reputation of the agency as. Well, in many ways by the time, the United States would withdraw from the Vietnam war Arpaio would end up being separated from the Pentagon and set up a new offices and also have a much lower budget than it had before. In our next episode. I will talk a little bit more about some of the final projects that are did in connection to the Vietnam war. Also, talk about some of the crazy, psychological projects that are got involved with as well as some of the other cool technological projects that the agency got involved with now because this history is so dense, and because it involves so many different topics and technologies of many of which we are enjoying the benefits of today. I am probably going to break this up. So that our next episode will be the last one in this DARPA ark. And then I'll take a break from DARPA, and we'll talk about some other technologies, and then perhaps a few more weeks from now I'll come back, and we'll continue the story of DARPA because I don't want tech stuff to become DARPA stuff. But I do think that the full story of DARPA is fascinating. And we will have to come back. To it. So next episode. We'll probably wrap up the nineteen sixties since I've done four episodes. And I haven't been able to get through a decade yet. And then we'll see where we are after that. And continue it further into the future. If you guys have suggestions for topics I should tackle and future. Episodes of tech stuff. It doesn't have to be a multi episode arc. It could be.

Vietnam DARPA Arpaio Stanford research institute Arp Jason United States pa Stanford Pentagon
"vietnam" Discussed on Dan Carlin's Hardcore History Addendum

Dan Carlin's Hardcore History Addendum

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"vietnam" Discussed on Dan Carlin's Hardcore History Addendum

"Hundred pages or twenty six hour Harker history series on the first World War either way. It's it's explainable, you know, understandable. The most interesting part to me since I already know the battle stuff, although if you're into the battle stuff, he's awesome, historically. He's awesome. The most interesting thing for me, though, is to see how he can synthesize. All this stuff. That's happened in the decades since that era. I was born in nineteen sixty five nineteen sixty I was born by the way on on the one of the worst battles of the war the one that made the movie about that's my birthday, November fourteenth nights sixty five battle of the valley. But when I was a kid just starting to become aware, you know, it's all the older brothers. And those people who were the ones being drafted who were living through all this stuff. So in the nineteen seventies. It was it's hard to explain this was a transition period in US history. So this is what I want this introduction to max things. Cirmac Hastings interview to be let me sort of cover the bases again for those who weren't there and try to set up a little of this and let you know why it's important to you. And why it matters and history in this case there is a before and after in US history, and we all know. There several right. You've got before. And after the civil wars classic one for people use before. And after the Vietnam era go look at a photograph of Americans. We'll just choose a big city because there was a lot of continuity in some of the less big cities where people look the same over the decades, they they are more conservative changeless, slowly less flash. More down to earth people, but you get some photos from an LA, Chicago, Miami, New York, some of the hip places supposedly, and you show a photo from nineteen sixty three and you compare those same people in a photo in nineteen seventy three, and you don't even have to say another word, you know, that the culture has totally changed. The Vietnam war is one of the major factor points that account for this and there's several and they're much talked about birth control pill, the sexual revolution music. I mean, just there's a number of major factors, but without the Vietnam war, you might not have any of those things it's one of the prime movers. And as a friend of mine who is at the protests back in the. Day pointed out, and the prime mover was the fact that many people might have go and suffer in a war that they really didn't wanna be a part of that tends to concentrate the mind in a way that just some ideological 'cause wouldn't that prime mover pushed forward a lot of the Aarhus change in the zeitgeist for lack of a better phrase. It's kinda strange changing zeitgeist. But I mean, the the culture flipped now once again, not in some places, the American heartland was remarkably consistent, but in many places, and in terms of what Madison Avenue is feeding you Hollywood's feed you and all that the culture release Vietnam is an important point in that. It was also an era of extreme disillusion with the government. It's hard to explain once again, how different Americans were before Vietnam. And after if I just said, we believed our government that right? There is hard to square. It's so far beyond what most people today are raised with. And it wasn't just. Believed the person in your party in general, Democrats and Republicans believed the president it didn't matter who the president. Was you didn't think your government lied you?.

Vietnam US president Cirmac Hastings Aarhus LA Hollywood Chicago New York Miami twenty six hour
"vietnam" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

04:53 min | 1 year ago

"vietnam" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"And I think it's because I was so fucking enraptured in the present day Pearson's that them going back to Vietnam. I just kept waiting on like a flash forward to like, okay, so how does Rando right now, and and when I realize I over not getting any of that, this is just jacks, like well, written back story or whatever. I was like, okay, so we're here now. And if felt like because of the ending which will get to if felt like we're coming back here and I don't know. My mom's thought we would just kinda get, okay, this is what happened in Nikki. This is kind of his war experience and then back to the few back to the present next week or whatever. So, but yes, it was well done stuff. So. Let's get into the breakdown. All right guys. So this joint stars with Jack in Vietnam, and they're playing Vietnam because Vietnam media after play that like seventies rock. SO playing Vietnam using and stuff. And we see Jack in uniform with a gun hopping on a helicopter being like we gotta go like, oh, getting dropped off and his and his, the guy in the back of the helicopters like, no, you gotta do that top secret government stuff. I was like, was Jack in black ups. Is that. Down this saddening leader shit like. But then he gets out and he walks over like through Vietnam, I camp and everything, and there's a guy who's burning. Like burning materials or something. And he turns around and he's like, hey, little brother something. And so at that point, we know like, oh, this is NICKY who also went to Vietnam and his jacket said, died in Vietnam. So I'm like, okay, he got to go see his brother somehow. I also did not realize this episode would be taking place backwards. So I was like, okay, so then what did they say to each other? And you don't know. You never find out. But you know, I did have many questions like, can you do that in or can I be like some I brother is like two towns over. Is it okay much hop a helicopter and go check them out. So I did want to know how they did that. So at this point it does do that. This is a slight trickery storyteller net. They're so great at because then it's like everything is what happened just before that. And so this one. Is Jack his platoon, I guess, is that what we're. I don't know. Okay, his war, his Apocalypse. Now, his friend. I don't know back his troop of people. He is a sergeant apparently staff sergeant. He's been promoted over the black dude named Donny Robinson who has been there twice as long ready or something. And Jack is like, yeah, I don't know why they promoted me to sergeant and I was like, yes, you do. You know. Roberson a him. I really good friends and they're walking through the jungle, whatever, and Jackson, all the military stuff. You know that you see in the movies where it's like, you know, squirrels soa. So check the rear look at our plane, whatever. And Roberson does things in every war movie. That means something bad happen to you starts talking about. We're going to get home and I said, no, no, no, no, adorable black people. Please never talk about what you go. Always same. I got a little girl named best it when I get back to Memphis, and I'm gonna tell you right now. I'm on hugger and I'm gonna marry as soon as I get my. Nope. Nope. You know, I did. Always the thing that whatever they say they want to do or going to miss always correlates with how they die or what they lose may. I can't to use my. I can't wait. I'm gonna tell you right now. I'm used as painless. That's what I'm telling you. So, yeah, he's like. Op plan? I'm gonna play baseball. I'm a d. go trial for the giants, and I'm gonna make the team and they're like Jack, like, nah. No, you can't do that or whatever, whatever, like you just full share jet Roberson right now. And if I don't make, I'm go to Pittsburgh and I'm gonna take this other players and I'm gonna take his wife, his house, his car, and I'm seeing you take Jackson, I believe that wanna see, you know..

Jack Vietnam Roberson Jackson Rando Pearson giants Donny Robinson NICKY baseball Pittsburgh Memphis
"vietnam" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

05:40 min | 2 years ago

"vietnam" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"Obsession. The suicidal Ita Shen embarrassed of shine. If I don't get help and get what I need to get. You know, I did some horrible, horrible things and I'm not going to be here much longer God. I wish I could go back and undo them, but I can't snipers, which shoot in her science. My father was a notorious pimp in Boston. I can't do this anymore. It was kinda like Skopje's chain. So many life just by listening to former ability comes. It felt like I've been holding a sword and shield and dropped. And to this day I had never had a better. Actually, I started crying and a job that of you say like eludes, horrid man, Elise. And I didn't get that job. With Michael Duffy, who is Vietnam vet and author of a book called from Chicago to Vietnam memoir of war and. Man, some of the descriptions in that book of things that you encountered and Vietnam. I can't imagine anybody goes through that and comes out unchanged. You are exactly right for once. Well, I don't know you well enough, so I don't know what happened yesterday. First of all, I want to say, welcome to a Chicago win. And can I just tell you how sickly comforting? It was to hear somebody using the word Jag off in a book. It's such a Chicago word. I don't hear it anywhere else at guys that guy's a fucking Jag off my God. Yeah, Jagath was probably the first slur that was hurled at me and grade school. So I went back and I thought jeeze should I asked my dad with that means and I didn't. I found out from a neighbor kid in the next apartment building over. But yeah, we use it a lot in Chicago. I don't use it much anymore. So I was saying that I can't imagine anybody goes through that and comes out unchanged. Well, that's right. And there's so many. You know, every war is different. This one happened to be the unpopular one. So you know, they weren't sending us care packages and and rally round the flag. It was difficult because we, we all were listening to and reading the news back in the United States with the the tumbled with the convention in Chicago, the democratic national convention and all of the protests. So we had this angst. We carried with us when that happened, but some of the descriptions I put in the book of over and above combat, which in itself is, you know, almost another world, the just the living conditions, the bureaucracy that was the thing that. That really struck me. Michael opens his book with describing landing in Vietnam and. What did you tell them? Yeah. So in mcchord air force base out of Washington, we were issued all our clothes for Vietnam, jungle fatigues, silly hats, the jungle hat, combat boots. So I went over in a khaki, short sleeve, shirt and kicki pants landed and Cameron bay about three in the morning. And they through our duffle bags in a big pile. Everybody Claude through them. And I ended up as being the last man standing without a bag. So I had nothing. No weapon. No. Now the weapons interesting because no one had a weapon, they are issued down at the company level. Certainly the people that that greeted us. Yeah, they had weapons, but the soldier when it gets to his individual company or my case battery and artillery battery unit, that's when we were issued the weapons. But really you, you stand out like a big sore thumb with these bright khakis. So I was told on more than one occasion, Lieutenant Duffy you better get out of those khakis. You look like a target as it because you you look like an officer. You looked a little of both. We have little. I was I had a gold bar and of course that reflects the sun. But mainly everyone else had green fatigues and and a blended in with. The olive drab of our equipment in Vietnam, and I was walking around with these. Khaki fatigues. I don't know. At first I was relaxed, but when the next morning I was sent to Saigon and ran out on the tarmac and that's where they told me the base is under attack..

Chicago Vietnam Lieutenant Duffy Skopje Ita Shen Boston Jagath Saigon Elise Cameron bay United States Washington Michael Claude officer
"vietnam" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

05:40 min | 2 years ago

"vietnam" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"Obsession. The suicidal Ita Shen embarrassed of shine. If I don't get help and get what I need to get. You know, I did some horrible, horrible things and I'm not going to be here much longer God. I wish I could go back and undo them, but I can't snipers, which shoot in her science. My father was a notorious pimp in Boston. I can't do this anymore. It was kinda like Skopje's chain. So many life just by listening to former ability comes. It felt like I've been holding a sword and shield and dropped. And to this day I had never had a better. Actually, I started crying and a job that of you say like eludes, horrid man, Elise. And I didn't get that job. With Michael Duffy, who is Vietnam vet and author of a book called from Chicago to Vietnam memoir of war and. Man, some of the descriptions in that book of things that you encountered and Vietnam. I can't imagine anybody goes through that and comes out unchanged. You are exactly right for once. Well, I don't know you well enough, so I don't know what happened yesterday. First of all, I want to say, welcome to a Chicago win. And can I just tell you how sickly comforting? It was to hear somebody using the word Jag off in a book. It's such a Chicago word. I don't hear it anywhere else at guys that guy's a fucking Jag off my God. Yeah, Jagath was probably the first slur that was hurled at me and grade school. So I went back and I thought jeeze should I asked my dad with that means and I didn't. I found out from a neighbor kid in the next apartment building over. But yeah, we use it a lot in Chicago. I don't use it much anymore. So I was saying that I can't imagine anybody goes through that and comes out unchanged. Well, that's right. And there's so many. You know, every war is different. This one happened to be the unpopular one. So you know, they weren't sending us care packages and and rally round the flag. It was difficult because we, we all were listening to and reading the news back in the United States with the the tumbled with the convention in Chicago, the democratic national convention and all of the protests. So we had this angst. We carried with us when that happened, but some of the descriptions I put in the book of over and above combat, which in itself is, you know, almost another world, the just the living conditions, the bureaucracy that was the thing that. That really struck me. Michael opens his book with describing landing in Vietnam and. What did you tell them? Yeah. So in mcchord air force base out of Washington, we were issued all our clothes for Vietnam, jungle fatigues, silly hats, the jungle hat, combat boots. So I went over in a khaki, short sleeve, shirt and kicki pants landed and Cameron bay about three in the morning. And they through our duffle bags in a big pile. Everybody Claude through them. And I ended up as being the last man standing without a bag. So I had nothing. No weapon. No. Now the weapons interesting because no one had a weapon, they are issued down at the company level. Certainly the people that that greeted us. Yeah, they had weapons, but the soldier when it gets to his individual company or my case battery and artillery battery unit, that's when we were issued the weapons. But really you, you stand out like a big sore thumb with these bright khakis. So I was told on more than one occasion, Lieutenant Duffy you better get out of those khakis. You look like a target as it because you you look like an officer. You looked a little of both. We have little. I was I had a gold bar and of course that reflects the sun. But mainly everyone else had green fatigues and and a blended in with. The olive drab of our equipment in Vietnam, and I was walking around with these. Khaki fatigues. I don't know. At first I was relaxed, but when the next morning I was sent to Saigon and ran out on the tarmac and that's where they told me the base is under attack..

Chicago Vietnam Lieutenant Duffy Skopje Ita Shen Boston Jagath Saigon Elise Cameron bay United States Washington Michael Claude officer
"vietnam" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"vietnam" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"What vietnam showed people at the beginning of the war these lies that were told were seen as unusual and bat by the end of the war they were bad but they were not so unusual anymore and you know now we're in a situation as we know in which in in some way what politicians do what what our leaders do is neither unusual nor bad because we can all defined that i think i think differently so that the the cynicism is a problem it seems to me and it's at least partly vietnam because it corrodes our faith in government it also corrodes it seems to me or can corrode our faith and democracy because you have a sense that will nothing i do matter sir dern there's no point in trying to affect change because of this and i think vietnam at least has something to say about this i would also say very briefly that in terms of foreign policy which is another way to assess this that we should take away from vietnam and i'm not sure that we fully did with respect to our more recent interventions taking iraq and afghanistan in afghanistan in particular but maybe some others that um it's ultimately about politics and its of ultimately about politics in the place in question and you can have all the military firepower in the world is the united states of course does but as i suggested a moment ago if you don't have political stability in saigon and if the south vietnamese cannot on some level win their own fight at least substantially it isn't going to happen and of course there's a dilemma for the united states from the beginning the dilemma is how do you wager counterinsurgency that will involve using violence in the countryside when that use violence risks alienating the very people that you want to bring to the government side that was never slept but i thought the idea behind counterinsurgency is that was supposed to solve the problem that was a way of sugar squaring the circle the as you would win the hearts and minds woodland norton why not this power not art i certainly if we're gonna talk about alternative strategies.

vietnam united states saigon iraq afghanistan
"vietnam" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"vietnam" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"About his new book the road not taken edward lansdale in the american experience in vietnam max boot is my guest today he's a senior fellow for national security studies of the council on foreign relations an author of the new book the road not taken edward lansdale in the american experience in vietnam so new york times bestseller seller already we have an excerpt of his book on our website on point radio dot org now max uh you were saying before the break that uh he a lot of cash aaa uh within the american government but your book traces the change in that when he uh ultimately came to be regarded as a bit of a crank coups advice wasn't uh welcome i want to play one clip of the united states president lyndon johnson a nineteen 65 announcing a major troop surged to vietnam after eleven years of war between the two countries and we can talk about whether this was the point where he began to lose influence i have today ordered to vietnam there our mobile division and certain other forces which will raise are fighting strength from seventy five thousand to one hundred and 25000 man almost immediately additional forces will be needed later and they will be sent as requested max was the moment when the us government scaled up the war dramatically the moment when they decided that what uh ed lansdale was talking about was to smallbore to be successful and they can actually occurred earlier than that i think the turning point uh was really 1963 uh one you had the military coup in south vietnam that overthrew note in gm that was in many ways that pivot point uh in the vietnam war because prior to that we had a bunch of advisors in in vietnam american troops were not find large in leading the the actual combat operations but after you had those em cu uh the stability in south vietnam all but collapsed one coup.

edward lansdale senior fellow american government united states lyndon johnson vietnam gm vietnam war american troops york times president ed lansdale smallbore eleven years
"vietnam" Discussed on The Moth

The Moth

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"vietnam" Discussed on The Moth

"It was in saigon the capital of south vietnam in at the end of the vietnam war i was fourteen at a time old enough to understand that south vietnam was facing a grim situation so vietnam was collapsing rapidly under the advancing force of north vietnam i could send the panic intelligency in the airport was buzzing with military airplanes vehicles push now but four might do brothers and i the only thing though was on our mind at the time was that we're going to america this was a dream coming to for us nine years before that our dad had die fighting ended the war in a year later a mom died in a traffic accident so the neighbors bought the three of us to an orphanage it was while living endorphin it that i came to the realization that the my brothers and i would not be an enormous education the we didn't have parents like briggler kit to provide for us to us to give givers our futures but our futures were unknown uncertain as the oldest child of the three i took over the reason the pierre and responsibilities fall into vietnamese tradition so as a seven your perrine i worry del lost a lot for the seven years we were living in the orphanage i constantly worried about how i'm going to take care of my brothers how we are going to survive in a land that even ordinary people were having a tough time because of the war.

vietnam war vietnam pierre america endorphin seven years nine years
"vietnam" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"vietnam" Discussed on Fresh Air

"The north vietnamese had a plan for a big offensive a game changer what was it well they decided to launch attacks on just about every city in south vietnam so the north vietnamese strategy was to infiltrate large numbers of troops throughout the south and launch on the teat the eve of tet their big holiday attacks in all these cities the largest of the offensive was planned for highway and way hole held a special place in the country's cultural history tell us about well it it it's it really is a beautiful city and in in ages past was the imperial seat for the unified country of vietnam it had you know the citadel which was a giant fortress which contain the imperial palace which is where the emperor's used to live and rain the city itself was home to the major universities in vietnam it was big buddhist centre and also fairly large catholic center it was the home to a lot of intellectuals of and if so it had of of a deep cultural meaning in vietnam that i think frankly escaped of the american command and it had largely been on unmarred by the war right that's right out of partly out of respect for the institutions in way for the historical treasures the buddhist pagoda as the imperial palace where had been kind of an oasis and troops who were stationed there american troops you know of sod as a as a rear.

vietnam american troops
"vietnam" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

Slate's The Gist

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"vietnam" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

"We looked for i wouldn't even know the way in where'd even start that that was the question we asked ourselves what are we going to do we know we wanna do this how do we deal it and we have very luckily got connected to a guy named tombali who is that the kennedy school at harvard he's a vietnam veteran and he got involved in politics after the war and he then got involved in developing programmes in vietnam to harvard and through the fought right program to educate vietnamese served midlevel government officials and so he's extremely wellconnected in vietnam he knows everybody has important and he was willing to help us he became a senior adviser and he introduced us to people in the government vietnam and two vietnamese producer kwonho dang wa who helped us there and meet essentially told the government look we're going to make a found that the human story of the war we wanted to be from all sides not just amac and speak has just telling the american side of the story seems like a complete waste of time we really want to understand what it was like for the vietnamese and not just from the leadership by from the perspective of ordinary people the officials that we spoke she said wow you know we never really think about the war in those terms and what can we do to help you and i made four trips to vietnam over the course of the project to get to know people and to spend time with them and share meals and just the same kind of things we do here and then go back with a camera and sit down and julian entities so there is certainly a reluctance which i i guess has abated in recent years for the veterans the american veterans to talk about it it's more social whereas that country is you know freedom house does not read them as an open society did you sense any of that that some of what was prescribed about what they could talk to you was essentially by government decree either explicitly or implicitly.

kennedy school harvard vietnam veteran vietnam senior adviser government vietnam producer julian
"vietnam" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"vietnam" Discussed on KOMO

"The ap has given you gps coordinates were where did fisher purchase out of the water no they haven't built one yet that we know of what we do know is this is insane link complicated much like the contraptions me by baen villa charlie harger komo news one take another look at the vietnam war of wilt couples brian calvert reports of wellknown fainter filmmaker is helping you do just that he's taken us back in time for a look at baseball arguably a topic many like to talk about but can burns newest project is on a subject some would rather forget the vietnam war unfortunately our leaders have been telling everybody that you know everything was hunky dory good evening my fellow americans i believe that one of the re for the division about vietnam is at many americans have lost confidence in with their government has called them about our policy is fraud in the north and south first 10part eighteen our look at the vietnam war vermeer's sunday on the yes i think because it didn't turn out so well for us a lot of us buried our heads in the sand and and actually didn't talk and didn't think and didn't consider what had happened in vietnam he says decades later there's a different perspective to consider but to get there he says he fears had to remind us that this war was and still is a taboo topic for some it's no accident that the ten teen our series begins with a highly decorated marine talking about coming home from vietnam was nearly as dramatic as the word self and that he and his wife had been friends with another couple for twelve years before the wives discovered that both their husbands had been marines in vietnam because it was something you just didn't talk about and he he said it was like living in a family with an alcoholic father sh we don't talk about that and the continued in people suddenly coming forward veterans people who oppose the were willing to sort of speak about it and speak about it from the perspective that those years have given to them and are willing to bear witness to their experiences and and we try to listen to those and also we had extraordinary access to vietnam itself not just the country not just its archives which have never been seen before but to the people.

ap vietnam war baseball vietnam fraud vermeer brian calvert twelve years