35 Burst results for "Vietnam War"

The Loneliness Of The Climate Change Christian

Rough Translation

04:59 min | Last week

The Loneliness Of The Climate Change Christian

"Years of age Richard. CIZEK always dreamed of being a diplomat brokering agreements and alliances abroad for the United States I have old passport did money for most of his life or Memento worked on Capitol Hill as what he calls a diplomat for God he represented the largest network of Evangelical Christians the National Association of Evangelical the Naet, and we should just add that while the naet represents a wide swath of Evangelical Christians when we use the term evangelical in this episode, we're GonNa mean white evangelicals whose politics dynamics are very different from the Black Evangelical Church spotted Senator Hillary. Clinton is describes his job as being a lobbyist for thirty million evangelicals. Thank you got floppy blonde hair blue eyes elastic sort of face. Growing up in the family farm his mom was a Kennedy Democrat and his dad was a Nixon Republican and so I was always the bridge builder the diplomat in college he protested against the Vietnam War but he also signed up for ROTC and when I marched on Saturdays, my anti-war friends through exodus. CIZEK enjoyed being the kind of person who could move between worlds listen to both sides. But he also felt confused about what he believed in, and so I came home from my third year college to work for college tuition and. I was invited by a friend to a Baptist Church. And I heard an alter call. It didn't know at the time even what an alter call was it actually what is integral where the preacher, the evangelist or the pastor says? Received Jesus Christ as your person saying if you don't. You're turning away. God. You're saying no. To the Creator. In one thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, two, when CISIC became an evangelical that did not mean subscribing to one political party voting Republican that would happen by the end of the decade. More than thirty million Evangelical Christians in America, we will come you governor Ronald Reagan. That's INCISA. Gets a job at the National Association of Evangelical 's It was clear that evangelicals were forced to be reckoned with you know opposing gay rights opposing abortion, but he wants to do more than the family values. Stuff imagines an even bigger role for Christians in politics I wrote a letter to the White House suggesting that the president newly elected. Ronald Reagan. That he ought to give a major speech on the morality of the Soviet Union and nuclear arms. And speechwriters at the White House they called me up and they said we like this come meet with US Ladies and gentlemen the President of the United States. This speech that Reagan gave to size in March of Nineteen ninety-three hue very become one of his most famous. Those of you win the National Association of Evangelical just going to talk about the issues that Christians are known to care about teenage sex pornography abortion and hard drugs. They talk about the Cold War Erica has kept alight the torture freedom to words made the speech. So famous when evil empire because the Soviets. Evil, empire the focus of evil in the modern. World Reagan. Took something that had not been Christian issue and made it. One Reagan was challenging the evangelicals not to sit on the sidelines or you pleased chorus I mean this was like a coup on my part. He was the guy who invited Reagan to speak my credit my street cred with this conservative group that I'd come to work for was established eventually sizing. Became Vice President for government affairs the and it's evangelical started getting more political power. This funny thing happened where non-christians would approach Cizek just to get his support on some piece of legislation and seismic was open will join with the youth the dreaded Aclu to pass the prison rape. Reform Act felt like speaking out on other issues that would actually give evangelical is more clout join with feminist pass. The trafficking victims. Protection Act. And then size, it gets an invitation did he s think hard about? The invitation is to Oxford England for a big conference on global warming. So your desk to get this invitation you automatically you're sure you WANNA take it. Is there any doubt? No no I I again have to calculate and I ask the chair of the board at the time and she says you shouldn't go. Because why? One. skepticism about mainstream science in you know there is this syllogism. Scientists believe. In climate change scientists believe in evolution. So. We don't believe

Ronald Reagan National Association Of Evange Cizek Black Evangelical Church United States White House President Trump Memento Clinton Richard Nixon Senator Hillary Baptist Church Cisic Vice President Soviet Union America
The "Dungeons & Dragons" Murder

True Crime Brewery

05:15 min | Last week

The "Dungeons & Dragons" Murder

"A North Carolina suburb in the early morning of July twenty fifth nineteen eighty-eight. On evonne, Stein awoke to an intruder at her bedside holding a knife and club. Bunny was severely beaten and stabbed, but she somehow managed to stay alive and call for help after the intruder left Leith was not selected. However, he was stabbed and bludgeoned to death when investigators learned that his estate was worth over two million dollars naturally his wife and stepchildren became suspects. Yeah. The amount I've heard varying stories on the amount, but it was around two million dollars. So a considerable amount of money especially in the nineteen eighties her was. The von Stein family lived in the small town of Washington North Carolina. And the rest of the state calls this town little Washington to differentiate it from Washington DC in Washington state. But I guess the people who live there like to call it the original Washington because it is the first town to be named after George Washington. That's an interesting tidbit for you. Can we fact check that I have done that but if we WANNA double check for me so it was the first town as we now yet. Okay. So. Whether you call it little Washington or original Washington the town was virtually destroyed in eighteen, sixty four, and then again in nineteen hundred by some devastating fires, a few homes survived and it was rebuilt and it became a farming and fishing community. So with a population of just over ten thousand pretty small. It's known as a sleepy town, but actually a pretty good place to raise your family low crime. I would imagine ten thousand is Pretty small but not too bad. So yeah probably be a nice place to raise a kid. Yeah, I. Think so. So, lease was born in Queens New York in nineteen forty six to parents who both came from well off German families who it is still a baby. The family moved to North Carolina his father Howard was a graduate of Brown University and he'd been a professional saxophone player before fighting in world. War? Two. After. The war. The Big Band era who is starting to be on its way out? And it was getting hard to find work as a saxophonist. So at this point, he had a wife and a baby boy to support so. Howard decided he needed to find a steady job. He ended up taking one offered by his brother-in-law as a laundry equipment salesman. He and I think he was successful at that. But maybe not at his happiest, right because he was an artist and musician. But he was successful. CONC- that whoever you're good at what you do that you're just not totally in it. Exactly. So lead Smart Marie does it on him she spoiled him and gave him pretty much anything he wanted. But you know he remained respectful and loving and had a good work ethic. By, the time he was in high school, the camel city laundry and cleaners had become one of the most successful laundries in the whole country. and lead stand Howard had become part owner and they were employing over one hundred people. But you know. Lee. had no interest in the laundry business and his dad totally understood that. So li-the never took a part time job that his father offered him at the laundry. He had decided on another career you're lethal is accepted into the school of Engineering at North Carolina State University. He. Was Successful for the first two years. But then in the junior year kind of his motivation and slacked off. He got into partying pretty heavily and he flunked out in nineteen, sixty seven. Now, the problem with this or this time is that the Vietnam War was going on. So guess what happened Oh Leaf He's drafted. Yeah. His parents were pretty frantic and worried about this as you can imagine or you're their only son, their only child. So he was twenty one years old by this time, and fortunately for him, his two years of college helped him get assigned to clerical work. So instead of being sent off to fight a war, he was stationed in office in Germany. Of course, he knew some German. So that came in handy to after his discharge from the army in nineteen seventy lethal returned home and enrolled at Guilford College in Greensboro as a business major. Gilford was a small quaker college. So some faculty and students held weekly silent vigils against the Vietnam War on the federal courthouse lawn. And Leaf was agreeing with them. He didn't think this war should be going on. Your a lot of this at that time didn't think that was a good idea. Shabby. That were absolutely it was the movement. So. Although he had been conservative for most of his life leaked did get some strong opinions against the war and he let his hair grow out to his shoulder started wearing blue jeans and he got a pair of those small round wire rimmed glasses that John

Howard Washington Leaf North Carolina Stein Washington North Carolina George Washington Leith Bunny North Carolina State Universit Marie Queens New York Brown University School Of Engineering Salesman Guilford College Greensboro Lee.
Glen Clark discusses tips for getting sponsorship opportunities

Photofocus Podcast

03:47 min | Last week

Glen Clark discusses tips for getting sponsorship opportunities

"Glen this is going to be the tip the cue for your lips to move welcome to mind your own business. Oh, thank you very much hip each mirror. Really appreciate being asked to be part of this today. All this is the fun one we are so excited to have you. I'm so excited to be here. This is great. And before we dive into the Sponsorship Rainbow Skip I, love how you put that by the way. Glenn, give us a bit more information fill in some of the holes as far as your background and how you got started and how you ended up doing what you're doing today. Sure at loved you. Well, we can take a bit of a trip in the way back machine. I fell in love with photography in high school. Now, I know that's a long time ago. But when I got my first Polaroid camera and realized I can do double exposures and be creative I fell in love. And it's been a lifelong love affair with a camera. And it progressed from there. Now, I happen to be in high school and graduated during the height of the Vietnam. War which was a challenge for many of us I did go to college right after Right, after I graduated from high school and while I was at college from first year. Why should preface this by saying in the summer between High School and college they did what's known as the draft at least it was known as the draft back then and unlike the NFL or the NBA, this is not a good draft. This is a draft where you are selected for service in the armed forces in at this time it was. An opportunity to travel to. Vietnam. And those of you that didn't live through this period of time. It was a very contentious very. I Dunno maddening upheaval of everything that we had been taught as young people. I mean we were into. Recycling and reusing. Love and peace and all this kind of thing and it was it was a different time. Not Not, to do those things now, but it was it was time of challenge. So when I went to college from first year in realized the my draft number that was selected that summer was too. Not to. Not, not hundred two it was too. So I was pretty well assured of the fact that I would be traveling to Southeast Asia unless I had a valid reason not to so. I decided to study photography. I left the four year university I was attending I returned home to go to Dina College, which is A. A two year opportunity at the time had a really robust photography program. And I got into studying photography while there and while I was studying I got employment as a lab worker in photographer for a wedding photographer that did vote service weddings for ninety nine dollars and we would. Literally twenty or thirty weddings a weekend I myself. Photograph four, five, six them starting Friday night and going through Sunday evening. During the week and go to school during the day. So, immersed myself in photography eventually, I was fortunate enough to connect with. Larry, how evolved the owner of based photo in he and I had several conversations and he said I don't really have a job for you but I'll bring you on kind kinda have to make your own way

High School Vietnam Polaroid Dina College Glen Southeast Asia Glenn Larry NFL NBA
Interview with Calvin Baker

Toure Show

06:17 min | 3 weeks ago

Interview with Calvin Baker

"Talk A lot about Colin. Kaepernick who of course has become far more than an athlete and more than any athlete of his generation has become super politicizing talk about how sports is a narrative of nationhood and definitely think that you could write eight the story of modern America on his last Assi What What do you? What do you? What are you? What are you thinking about? Colin Kaepernick. I think he's great. I think the truth almost didn't come to light. They. They suppress it for so long and so long and so long I think that it is. Emblematic of what's going on the country as a whole where you have this man and expressing is. Liberal belief. and. Becomes a lightly We tell ourselves we're in the twenty th century were everything is so diverse, and then you see what a lightning rod that becomes for. White. Anger. Someone expressing pride who is but also like. You can't kill black. That's radical athlete baboots how that's That's where we really are that. You can't say. Retaliates tally is wrong. Those are the hard enforces of racism, which I which I can chew colonialism in larger forces and patterns. How advanced how might and can the society be if you if it's if it's controversial as it was in that moment? Thankfully it's I think. As this moves forward. He's becoming raise established himself as one of a line of. Athletic spokespersons yet if you go back on tradition begins. Muhammad Ali's or the world and the Jim Brown's the world who's as like Oh as black versus one of the few people who is allowed any sort of visible Jackie Robinson in different. S. And that's end. And then he became corporate. Right. But the happiest people's right night. I talked about Jim Brown on the NFL who made the decision to leave NFL. After A manhood battle with art modell whose the owner Cleveland browns and direct line and one of the things on everything. We think we're saying there's historical precedent for it and the function and the horses ourselves. Insane. And so right. You look at that the and you look at what's happening feeling I'm not the first person. Say This I long chop wanted to contextualized story. And also like yeah. Camp is doing civil rights work. In the resistance that he faces shows you how much of this country is still against the most basic expression of civil rights what do you? What do you make of? The NFL along with the NBA? WNBA. Others. The institutions of sport have seemed to have come around to say you know we're going to embrace black lives matter. We're going to plastered all over the field or the court wear whatever you want. Neil. However, you want like you know we're fully supportive of the movement and yet gaps still doesn't have a job. So he still sacrificed his dream. Surely, it was his childhood dream that he achieved And then had that taken away chose to go after something bigger, and now that the the sports world, the NFL in particular has come around to his side of things. He is still left out which for so many of us for you to. ADDS a hypocritical sheen to all of it. I mean, I don't know I can't fully embrace what the NFL is doing until he is welcome back into the fold in a serious way. I mean, one of the. made the final cut I. Don't remember off the top of my head but wasn't Michael Vick can chilidog and still have A. Job in Colin Kaepernick, can't say. Shoot people. And not have a job. That's what I think. First of all the NFL. Lost me just I mean. There are a lot like their lot of sports. I. Love. I. Love Sports is you know and but there's always another sport and league baseball loss during steroids. Haven't been back. Haven't really looked back. I might watch catch on the corner of my eye, the barbershop every once in a while. The NFL. Because they are so far on what you say what you think the man like Avenue you know Muhammad, Ali's spent. Eighteen months in jail for Kosovo Vietnam War. I don't remember how much. Much of the baby actually did. Athletic careers. sports and they end when you're still a young individual with a lot of life ahead and as you read it as Jim Brown realize can't stop. By many miles at. And right the dream of NFL would it looks like it might be over I hope that it's eventually someone will give him a shot maybe but. And will air. We'll find the next stream. Nets like life purpose. That's always the challenge of being an athlete. It happened to him in a prematurely it's not fair but he's shown himself to be larger than that lead

NFL Jim Brown Colin Kaepernick Muhammad Ali Neil America Michael Vick Cleveland Browns Wnba Jackie Robinson Kosovo Baseball Camp NBA
A Third-Rate Burglary Attempt

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

05:46 min | Last month

A Third-Rate Burglary Attempt

"This episode Lauren is a third rate burglary attempt. This episode is all about Watergate. I am so excited. I'm so excited and you know what? This is why you decided to pour us a glass of wine. To keep you entertained because honest to God, this is a lot. Old White men doing a lot of crap? Yeah. Well, cheers to that I guess. Here we go. SIP SIP. All right everybody laid on me. Buckle up. The Watergate scandal was a political scandal in the US involving the administration of US President Richard Nixon from nineteen seventy, two to nineteen, seventy, four leading to Nixon's resignation. So okay picture it nineteen, seventy, two President Richard Mille House Nixon was running for re election. The United States is still embroiled in the Vietnam. War. The country deeply divided a forceful presidential campaign seemed essential to the president and some of his key advisors All Right Act one. ooh. Ooh Act one the Watergate. Complex. Here's our key players here. Okay. We have Richard. Nixon. Who is the president of the United States and he is also the Republican nominee for the nineteen seventy two election tricky Dick Tricky Dick. Exactly. We. We also do have George McGovern who is the Democratic nominee for the nineteen seventy, two election although he barely shows up in the store you have to know that he's the he's the Democratic nominee. There's H R Haldeman he is the White House Chief of staff and you have John Erlich men, who is the council in Assistant to the President for domestic affairs? We also have the committee to re elect the president. Do you do you know what this? Committee is often referred to as. Is this like it's like the power four or committee to re elect the president. It is officially abbreviated the CRP, but it is often abbreviated as C. R. E. P. or creep References to that throughout this and creep is I mean yeah it works in this in this case citation, but it is officially abbreviated cr the committee to re elect the president. So in that, some of the key figures are John, Mitchell, who is at this point, the attorney, General of the United States and then he becomes the campaign director. There's Jeb Stuart Magruder, who is a business executive and the acting chairman of the CRP and then a couple of names eubank actually be promoted with G Gordon Liddy he's a former FBI agent and European employee, and there's also e Howard Hunt who is a former CIA agent and CRP CRP employees. All right. Here's the setting. The Watergate complex. K built between nineteen, sixty, three and nineteen seventy-one. The Watergate was considered one of Washington DC's most desirable living spaces. It was popular with members of Congress and political appointees of the executive branch the Watergate Complex actually a group of six buildings in the foggy bottom neighborhood of Washington DC in nineteen seventy two the headquarters of the Democratic National Committee was then located on the sixth floor of the Watergate office building. So the Watergate complex, it was intended to be a city within a city so it was supposed to have so many amenities that residents wouldn't need to leave you know. So they were supposed to have like a post office and restaurant and Jen concierge Oh sure gyms in the seventy everyone's smoked like chimneys died forty eight. Right that's why nobody who lived in the seventies is still around. I always assumed it was just like a single building I didn't realize it was like. Axe So? Yes. There was the Watergate Hotel there was Watergate West and Watergate East, which were like apartment buildings. There's a Watergate office building and there's one of their Watergate apartment building too. So it was a big complex It was actually proposed and built by the Italian architectural firm SGI. And one really interesting. The one thing that I found renders ing is the Vatican was actually a major investor in this project get how. So because of this, the Vatican was at one point part owner of the Watergate until nineteen sixty-nine that's wild. Yeah, right. Whatever the Italian I mean. Come on. The Watergate's popularity among members of Congress, and again, these high-ranking of appointees was very strong and so many members of the Nixon Administration settled there that the DC press actually named it the Republican, Bastille? Wows. Yes. So another group we have to worry about right now are called the White House plumbers. They are simply sometimes called the plumbers or the room sixteen project Jay were covert White, house, Special Investigations Unit which was established within a week after the publication of the Pentagon papers in June nineteen seventy-one. Okay. So the plumbers job was to stop and or respond to the. Leaking of classified information, the news media and just a quick refresher at the Pentagon papers which was officially titled. Report of the Office of the Secretary of Defense Vietnam Task Force was a US Department of Defense History of the United States is political and military involvement in Vietnam from Nineteen forty-five to nineteen, Sixty, seven in twenty eleven. This report was formerly declassified and released.

Watergate Watergate Complex President Trump United States Richard Nixon Vietnam Congress John Erlich Democratic National Committee Nixon Administration Burglary White House Lauren Executive George Mcgovern Jeb Stuart Magruder Pentagon
Trump and 2015 McCain comments

The Young Turks

10:30 min | Last month

Trump and 2015 McCain comments

"Donald trump is vehemently denying allegations made in a shocking Atlantic piece, which claims that trump refused to visit a US military cemetery near Paris in two thousand, eighteen because the fallen soldiers were in his words, losers and suckers. Now I say it was a shocking piece but to be honest with you not so shocking when you consider all the different times, he transparently brazenly said terrible things about members of our military who happen to disagree with him politically. But here he is denying it and then I'll give you what the facts are to think that I would make statements negative to. Our military and our fallen heroes nobody's done what I've done. With the budgets with the military budgets with getting pay raises military it is a disgraceful situation. By a magazine that's a terrible magazine. I don't read it by disagreed with John. McCain. But still respected him and I had to approve his funeral is president. We lowered the flags I had to approve that nobody else I had to approve it when you think I'm just thinking back. I had to approve either Air Force One or military plane. To go to Arizona to pick up his casket and I approved it immediately. So. Let's take a look at a trump tweet from two thousand fifteen because there's always tweet. This is from July two, thousand fifteen where trump referred to John McCain as a loser. I mean he tweeted an article about himself calling John McCain loser. So he was bragging about it also when McCain died in two thousand, eighteen trump refused to lower the White House flag back to half staff even though it's become customary for presidents to sign a proclamation calling for the flag to remain at half staff for members of Congress until the day of interment, and then one other piece of evidence to Kinda refute trump's narrative in that video take a look and I said somebody should run against John McCain who has been. In my opinion not so hot I supported him. I supported for President I raised a million dollars from a lot of money. I supported him. He lost he let us down but he lost. So. I never liked him as much after that because I don't like to lose. But. But Frank Franklin we're get doing. He hit me he's a war hero. He's a war hero he's a war hero presumed captured. I like people that weren't captured. Okay I hate to tell you. That was from twenty. Fifteen event in Iowa. So. I don't know how to talk trump supporters anymore. That's why I'm done with them in my personal life and everywhere else because the guy. Ridiculous Liar. Does he know that he tweeted on John McCain's loser does he know he said on? Massimo you guys all remember when he said for people who weren't. But earlier, he said, I don't like losers referring to John McCain. So why did he come out yesterday and say no I never malsor. Each just unbelievable he's capable and so if you say, Hey, know what I love people who are Liars Okay again I mean do you boo okay. and. And look again. I. Blame the media. And Because So many politicians lie and they never call it out. They'd never they enabled politicians lies for decades. So eventually, you got one that. So over the top that even. Though. And remember you guys remember it took them like a couple of years before they finally gather up the nerve to say, well, what Donald Trump said, there was not correct. I'm forgetting the name of the CNN analyst who finally just said it and then went on this three minute rant fact checking trump. Fact checking trump's RNC speech but he started that three minute rant by saying trump lied he's a liar and I was like. Is. This CNN what's going on? And so yeah, you're right Jangling the fact that that excited me because it's so rare I think mean something and we'll get you the name of the person I'm talking about because he deserves all the credit I'm kind of blanking right now but look I actually think with this particular story and a few others. The media has done a decent job. So for instance, business insider had a very lengthy list highlighting all the different times, Donald trump attacked members of the military right and fallen soldiers. So I wanna read a few of them right now in fact, as you guys can probably remember in July of two thousand, sixteen trump attacked the family of captain who mine con a slain soldier someone who died. Fighting for the country dismissing a speech his father Kaiser Khan made because he said Khan's mother hadn't been allowed to speak the family said she had not spoken because she too emotional to talk about her son's death. And he just kept going after that family. It was it was honestly disgusting in October of two thousand seventeen trump forgot the name of slain US Army Sergeant La- David Johnson while he was on the phone with his widow, Johnson was killed in an ambush in. Niger. While while in active service. Misha. Johnson said the call was trump made her cry and trump told her that her husband knew would he had signed up for in November of two thousand Eighteen Fox News is Chris Wallace asked trump about his thoughts on retired Admiral William mcraven a former navy seal been. who was behind the mission that killed Osama bin. Laden. He interrupted Wallace and said Hillary Clinton. Fan. When Wallace continued trump did to excuse me Hillary Clinton Fan trump went on to repeat that mcraven supported Clinton which by the way he hadn't as well as former President Barack Obama and said frankly wouldn't have been nice if we got Osama bin Laden a lot sooner than that. I mean, there's so many more examples Jank but I mean I want to give you an opportunity to respond to some of them. By the way Daniel Dale is the CNN reporter that I was referring to earlier go ahead. So we've seen him call the generals, losers, thousands of times and so. I guess people are shocked at that. He would go and call the fallen soldiers losers as well, and not just stop a general's or veterans or captured soldiers. But is it really shy at all? He calls everybody lose them in his denial. He called the military people who were the sources for this story lowlifes and liars. If you're trying to deny that you'd ever call anybody in the military losers you shouldn't then turn around in your denial and call them lowlifes. Buyers. So I look. Landing brokers story with four sources. Then Washington Post back it up with three sources and the Associated Press also found sources all saying the same thing. I actually want to read a few excerpts from the Washington Post piece. Again, these aren't the same sources. These are additional sources who also spoke to the Washington Post about. Their experience with trump and what he had to say about fallen soldiers in one account. The president told senior advisors that he didn't understand why the US government plays such a high value on finding. Oh. This is so disgusting finding soldiers missing in action because they had performed poorly and gotten caught in deserved what they got according to a person familiar with the discussion. Okay. That That part of the story like I don't know all of it is gross but that part hit me the hardest because he just doesn't value people's lives and think about losing a family member that way and knowing that the president of the United States does not care to find their bodies. A trump believes people who served in Vietnam War must be losers. They hadn't gotten out of it according to a person familiar with the comments. Trump also complained bitterly to then chief of staff, John Kelly that he didn't understand why Kelly and others in the military treated. McCain, who had been imprisoned and tortured during the Vietnam War with such reverence isn't he kind of a loser? Trump asked according to a person familiar with trump's comments. So. Look at Donald Trump says, this is outrageous synonymous sources. Donald Trump also, just a couple of days ago said that there was a plane full of thugs who are gonNA come and disturb. His, acceptance speech and caused violence and when asked, who told you that he said? I can't tell you basically it's anonymous. So. I'm supposed to believe your anonymous source of a trust me to go. You would know trust me. But we're not supposed to believe now it looks like about a half, a dozen military sources for that talked to three different publications all saying the same thing and all saying things that are very similar to what you said before and by the way yesterday show before the Washington Post Associated Press stories came out I said I guarantee you. that. He thinks that they're suckers 'cause he out of be fake doctor's note because his daddy bottom one and he thinks they're suckers for not being able to get out of the war his spoil less and it turns out. That's exactly what he said according to the military sources that heard him say. And remember when sources are anonymous to the general public that doesn't mean that there are anonymous to the reporters. Reporters have to vet their anonymous sources and corroborate what they're saying So maybe they're anonymous to us, but they're not anonymous to the reporters.

Donald Trump John Mccain President Trump United States CNN Washington Post Sergeant La- David Johnson John Arizona Washington Post Associated Pre Paris Osama Bin Laden Hillary Clinton Admiral William Mcraven Frank Franklin Kaiser Khan Chris Wallace Iowa RNC
Trump panned over reports he called US war dead 'losers'

PBS NewsHour

02:11 min | Last month

Trump panned over reports he called US war dead 'losers'

"William Branham reports on the fallout intensifying today over an article that alleges President Trump made disparaging remarks about U. S troops. It's a fake story, and it's a disgrace that they're allowed to do it. President Trump is firing back after a report in the Atlantic magazine and later confirmed by multiple news organizations, said the president several times called fallen American servicemembers, losers and suckers in the Oval Office today, the president again flatly denied ever making the comments. And instead touted military spending under his administration. There's nobody that considers the military and especially people that have given their lives in the military to be the heroes. Who the heck does he think he is his Democratic opponent, former vice President Joe Biden, whose own son, Beau, served in Iraq. Called the reported comments deplorable. But my son volunteered, enjoying the United States military as the attorney general. I went to Iraq for a year. Won the Bronze Star. Another commendations. He wasn't a sucker secretary of state Mike Pompeo, who was on a 2018 trip to Paris when the president allegedly made some of these comments. Told Fox News. He doesn't remember them have never heard the president used the language. Those certainly has said in that article. But going back to his 2016 campaign, Mr Trump has had a complicated relationship with the military theme. He's often praised those with military experience and has had many working with him in the White House. But other times he's questioned their service. Like his widely criticized comments about Senator John McCain, who was tortured and imprisoned for more than five years during the Vietnam War, a war hero. I like people that weren't captured President Trump overwhelmingly one among veterans in 2016, But since then, his approval rating among members of the military has dropped to 38% in a new poll from Military times. With two months until Election Day. Mr Biden has a four point advantage with thes voters.

President Trump Vice President Military Times Joe Biden Iraq William Branham Senator John Mccain Mike Pompeo Atlantic Magazine Fox News Oval Office United States U. S Beau Attorney White House
No One at Marvel Knew About Chadwick Boseman's Illness

On Shuffle

02:14 min | Last month

No One at Marvel Knew About Chadwick Boseman's Illness

"This week we're talking about the late Black Panther Star Chadwick Bozeman who died a few days ago at age forty three after a four year battle with colon cancer. Chevy Bozeman was. Jackie Robinson he was James Brown. He was Thurgood Marshall he was Challah. You was minore. And now he's no longer with us We're just now learning about his colon cancer diagnosis in two thousand sixteen the same year that Black Panther went into production, which means that like he never spoke publicly about it and also like you're just. I think a refrain over the weekend like all of our across all channels social media was just like you never know what someone's going through then. Dog this is like an extreme case of that because it's not just he never spoke about it. It was the fact that he will multiple rounds of cheap like he was. I don't know you've watched five bloods. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I'd like his. Spooky. So, Spooky. It's so spooky especially because those means character stormin norm is one of in Easy Company soldier of Fortune and the Vietnam War who Basically is the voice of reason from beyond the for all of this company base that like includes Isaiah with lock junior Delroy Lindo. etcetera etcetera etcetera. But anyway, he's just kind of like speaking from beyond the grave about how These people as black men are to conduct themselves. So that's just like very it's a lot to deal with like if you watch it again. Not, just as a spike Lee joint that came out during quarantine but like as a posthumous bozeman foam. Yeah and he walks to that movie with the Halo basically giving these these milestones about black pride and dignity and America and civil rights. And God is that there is no spookier performance. One could have either final performance before passing away age forty forty-three. Like totally undisclosed cancer

Thurgood Marshall Bozeman Chadwick Bozeman Colon Cancer Chevy Jackie Robinson Isaiah America Easy Company Fortune Delroy Lindo.
The Burdens Of The Family

Where Should We Begin? with Esther Perel

04:31 min | 2 months ago

The Burdens Of The Family

"Dini request of this couple surrounded his recent infidelity. Found out, he was cheating on me with someone online. I was looking for excitement. Things that really distracted me from what I was experiencing at home. But the thing that immediately became clear is that for almost a decade as a couple. They fought to be a couple. I knew that I had met like the love of my life and then it was like by can't be with them because it's a huge taboo. In Our community, it's forbidden for pangs commanded within the same clan. Of Me my wife's case where listen clan. From the family. Gotcha point where like well, we're not related anyway bucket. Let's be together. So it was a uproar among all my family. For so long distance united against the opposition. And then when they were finally together. The opposition became between them frenetic constant bickering. You only saw her side knows all things from my side and that's just kind of I mean you know I'm just GonNa go out. Girls and see if I can get my mind off things. So figure out. Whether or not I made the right choice to marry this girl. Okay. Everytime we get mad at me. You're going to eat or you're going to go download MESSENGER APP by some random person to talk to to make you happy. Is everybody here because they want to be here. Yeah, of course. Normally. When you talk to each other, we don't really say the things we want to. So I. Think this will. Bring US closer together. It's a very nice which I would imagine I would imagine say. I show you face. That's. When did you your parents or your grandparents come? They came in the. Seventies. Became during the Vietnam War. The. War. That was it. I don't really know the details. My my dad, he never had a job human to school. Very poor. How old was he when he came here? Of the. Fifteen, maybe sixteen. What influence do you think you? Father's experience had a neil? He he's very kind. Very. Funny He doesn't really shout didn't speak up. And I think I picked that side of from him. So he arrives at fifteen. He meets my mom, the married sheer And I was born here. This together. And you stayed with. So me and my brother stayed with my dad. and. My youngest brother and my sister. Stayed with my mom. So, she wanted the girl and the baby. And then my dad. was like, okay. Well, if you those two I'll just take the other to. The oldest and The third. How did that work out? It was hard Felt like I was kind of betrayed a little bit by my mom because. I was the first and the oldest. It was heartbreaking but. I was maybe. Seven or eight. Kind of funny because. Kazaam she always. Well. Not. I think back about it. Yeah. It wasn't funny but. She'd always joke about. Like. You'll you my oldest I. Love you forever. You know my son Blah Blah this and that but. When she chose my sister and my younger brother was kind of like. kind of broke me.

United States Dini Neil
What Moon Landing?

The Ladies of Strange

04:15 min | 2 months ago

What Moon Landing?

"In the nineteen sixties, two things were happening more things are happening to. One it just two things. disclaimer were bottle of wine in the first one is the Cold War, which was basically between the US and the US are that started after the end of World War Two and nineteen, forty eight and lasted until nineteen ninety-one notice how I know when World War Two was. Throwing shade at the orange. I've had wine I'm a little snarky year. Then I'm not upset the way. The second thing was happening was the Vietnam War, which lasted between nineteen, fifty, five, and nineteen, seventy five. I did not think that was when on. Okay. But seriously I didn't realize the lasted that long either I thought it started like late late. Late mid to late sixties and went into the seventies. Yeah. Holy moly history is important because not only does it give us context as to why things happens, but it also serves as a blueprint showing what not to do if anyone literally anyone decided to pay attention in history class but whatever Got I. Him. So I'm fine. So in the nineteen sixties, the US was dealing with two things one they're trying to get the upper hand in and the other they're trying to distract the public from. Does that make sense had wine? Yes. Okay. Basically, it was a perfect time for the US government to distract everybody Hooker Luna verse. Where you're mass please. And this is why they decided to fake the moon landing. Where's the wind. please. Oh happy day. This explain why it started drinking. I'm so happy right now just help it off girl you're in need it I wanna make sure Rebecca some two but no, I don't just doing with to me this is a subject but I chose up my own free will thank you so much. This is going to be amazing. Okay. But why why would we do this? The US was currently racing the USSR to be the first to the moon and the fastest way to do that would be to fake it's. Kinda like when you're never mind. There it is. Oh, we made it two minutes. That's where we learned it from. The Moon and Do to the bad press the Vietnam War Gotten General the moon landing would serve as the. Distraction at the time luckily in this day and age that only have hundreds of people been able to see through the thin veil that is as opposed moon landing but have also been able to poke holes and this historical events. Can we make sure that you know take this is poured slash s please. You can't tell that from my voice I can I only sound this way when it's bullying? Sixties radio. Broadcaster Boys. Here for all of it. So now we're going to dive into reasons why are evidence as to why the moon landing did not happen? Okay. GimMe all of it I is there's no wind on the moon correct in the flag was waving. Yep that's pretty much where we're going. Imagine this iconic scene, the year is nineteen sixty nine. Neil. Armstrong. Neil. Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin are on the face of this lunar body preparing especially made us flag plant on the moon as they're securing the flag in a never ending show of colonization Oh my God something curious happens the flag starts waving in the winds, which is weird because there is no wind on the moon. The Moon essentially does not have an atmosphere meaning. There is nothing to cause old glory to way proudly in a patriotic breeze. That's

United States Neil Armstrong Rebecca Buzz Aldrin Ussr
Ethnic Studies: Born in the Bay Area From History's Biggest Student Strike

Morning Edition

06:50 min | 2 months ago

Ethnic Studies: Born in the Bay Area From History's Biggest Student Strike

"Legislation earlier this summer that would require all incoming freshman at Cal State universities to taken ethnic studies class listener. Michael Variety asked our Bay curious team this question I've heard that there was actually a revolution in the Bay Area for an ethnic studies field. Is this true? And how did it happen? The short answer. Yes, it's true. Reporter assault A sonnet. Poor tells us how it went down during the longest student strike in US history. It was November of 1968. The US was 13 years into the Vietnam War. American soldiers hiking their way through the sweaty jungles of South Vietnam, searching for enemy Martin Luther King had been assassinated earlier that year, and the Black Panther Party demanded systemic change for black communities plagued by poverty and police brutality. That's what black students at San Francisco State wanted to bury. Proves to be a member ofthe last. This is Nesbitt Crutchfield. He started studying at San Francisco State in 1967 and soon joined the black student union. It was the very 1st 1 in the country. It was very clear to me that Black soon Union representative. Very progressive. Among black spoons at state among black students in the very but just a small percentage of black students went to SF State admission rates for minority students had dwindled down to just 4%. Even those 70% of students in the SF Unified School District for from minority backgrounds is a black person you expected for all intensive purposes. To be one of the very few black people in whatever classroom laboratory auditorium. The U. N was overwhelmingly white. Amidst that whiteness black students were hungry to study their own history. The black student union had been pushing the university to create a black studies department for nearly three years. But administrators resisted the idea. was an era of young people asking questions and want to transform their communities. Jason Ferreira is a professor in the Department of Race and Resistance at San Francisco State College of ethnic studies. And that impulse that That hunger to transform one's communities is actually what forms the basis of ethnic studies. It's around this time that Penny no. Okatsu was grappling with her own questions about race and identity. We want Asian Americans, then we were Orientals. An Oriental is a term that was imposed on us by the largest society, so starting to use the term Asian American was a way of taking back er. Our own destiny. Henny became a member of a student organization called the Asian American Political Alliance. It was just one of many ethnic student organizations popping up on campus and an early fall of 1968. These organizations banded together in formed a coalition, the Third World Liberation Front. And at that particular time, third world referred to the Non Aligned Countries are cultures in Asia, Africa and Latin America. It was synonymous with how we might use people of color today. English professor and Black Panther. George Murray was one of San Francisco state's most influential anti Vietnam organizers. Students loved Murray, but his outspoken politics didn't sit well with us of state administrators. The war in Vietnam is racist. That is the law that crackers like Johnson are using black soldiers and poor white soldiers of Mexican soldiers as dupes and fools to fight against people of color. In Vietnam. The board of trustees fired Murray over Comment like this one on November 1st 1968 5 days later, the black student union and the Third World Liberation Front joined together and went on strength in aspic, Crutchfield says Despite coming from different backgrounds, the strikers had a clear goal. I wanted to find out and be educated about ourselves, and we could not get that the nobody getting educated Initially, strikers did things like cherry bombs in toilets and check out tons of books at once in order to overwhelm the school's library system, But almost immediately, administrators invited police on campus. Jason Ferreira says they swarmed the school armed with five foot batons. Students responded by throwing rocks and cursing out the police. Police came down heavy hard, and they just began cracking skulls Strikers carried on anyway. Penny No. Okatsu was protesting on January 23rd 1969. In what many call the mass bust. Two lines of police came up and basically surrounded the over 500 people who were there for the rally and tracked all of the individuals who are part with that net police charged at students, Penny says it was one of the bloodiest and most frightening days of the entire strike. That was a military movement, literally a practice orchestrated military movement. Hundreds were arrested. Virtually all of the individuals arrested head Tio spend some jail time. There are real consequences to having participated in that event. It's up two more months. But eventually in March, administrators and strikers negotiated a deal after five months of protesting the school agreed to many striker demands. They promised to accept virtually all non white applicants for fall of 1969 and they agreed to establish a college of ethnic studies, the first in the country. Class is about communities of color. Ethnic studies is a way of embracing all of the cultures that make up not just this country, but with the world. And if we don't understand each other, how we're going to get along. I'm a solace on before the news For more details

San Francisco Vietnam Third World Liberation Front George Murray Penny Black Panther Party Nesbitt Crutchfield Jason Ferreira San Francisco State College Of Black Panther Okatsu United States Professor Bay Area Sf Unified School District Martin Luther King Assault Michael Variety Reporter
Oliver Stone: Memoir and Movies

The Big Picture

09:51 min | 2 months ago

Oliver Stone: Memoir and Movies

"Stone, Amanda I in my mind have been circling a podcast episode about Oliver Stone probably since about Nineteen ninety-one, which is when I I had some consciousness about the work of one of the most fascinating figures of the last forty years in American cinema. There's a reason we're going to be having an episode conversation about stone today, which is that he has a new memoir that memoir is called chasing the light writing, directing surviving platoon midnight, express scarface Salvador, and the movie game. It's a very interesting book you and I have both read it. We're we're both. In some ways and perhaps frustrated confused devastated in other ways before we get into the book though and before we get into how we're going to talk about the scope, the massive scope, the unbelievable scope of Oliver Stone's career. When I say Oliver, stone, what do you think? Conspiracy Theorist just to be totally honest and filmmaker and. And really and boomer and I think that is going to inflict a lot of the way that I talk about Oliver Stone in his filmography because I am a generation younger I am a child of boomers and I came to Oliver Stone's work and to Oliver Stone's understanding of the world a generation after. He lived at and made it and it was very funny and re watching everything from platoon to to wall. Street to JFK. To realize the way in which those movies shaped, my understanding visual and political about Vietnam, and about JFK and about how we examine America and the government and I am both child of Oliver Stone's world, and maybe because of time in the way, the world has changed a skeptic of Oliver Stone's world at this point, which is just to say on the next generation. I. Think a lot of this will be boomer versus millennial and and that's good. That's how the world should work. Even Oliver Stone would agree with that though maybe not we can talk about it but I don't know what do you think of? Mid already. So many good points I. Think he's an artist to strains credulity while also I think enlivening imaginations he's somebody who is obviously immensely thoughtful and intellectual and spiritual and simultaneously feels like he completely out of control and trying to break the boundaries and stretch the concept of the truth all the time, and so he's just a a generational paradoxical figure. He's a he's a person who I think it makes immensely entertaining movies that. Don't always stand up to deep examination, and so I think he is he is an title baby-boomer figure in that way and that he is there's a certitude about his mission and there's an earnestness in insincerity to the message that he's trying to send. But also underlying that is perhaps a kind of cynicism and a skepticism about what he should be doing with his time versus what he's actually doing with his time, and so I you know I find, I've always found him to be fascinating maybe not as a human being per se but at least the stories that he tries to tell. I was GonNa say I do think he's interesting as a filmmaker and what else was a person and? We're GONNA talk about all the different ways in which Oliver Stone like quote breaks the rules but I have been thinking a lot as I have been reading his book, which is a fantastic read I will just say that the guy can write. and. Have also been revisiting his work that you and I are trained to as much as we can released I wasn't college train a separate the artist in the art the art has to stand on its own can't complete the filmmaker and the and the work, and you also need to understand that the work and the intention are possibly separate as well and Oliver Stone just makes massive all of that, and he makes a mess of that in his actual art and he makes a mess of that in the life that he lives and in the interviews that he gives and the work that he pursues and. To me that's exciting because it opens up conversation to talk about what can you take seriously and what is cynical and what is sincere and what is true and what is not true and how are we like an who is responsible, which is at least a different way to talk about art. So you know I give him that even though I don't agree with where I think Oliver Stone comes down on those the answers to those questions but even there, I'm just guessing. Well I, think if you look at the book, you certainly are looking at the man or at least the the self perception of the man, and so we'll talk a lot about him and his story in his life and and his the way he is capturing his own life on the page which I I agree I mean he's just in case you didn't know this is an Oscar winning screenwriter. This is one of the great writers of the last forty years is also as a person who didn't just write his own films but road scarface and Conan the barbarian and a number of other films over the years. So he knows what he's doing on the page, but he is also somebody who. If you look it the political thought not like a straight line where there is a left and a right. But if you look at it like a wheel like a circle, and if you go too far from one side of the circle to the other you can land. You may think you are liberal person and find yourself with right wing ideology or libertarian ideology and reverse can also be true and I think one of the reasons it's really hard to unpack not just what Oliver Stone says in interviews or what he even. Portrays in his documentaries but even when he puts in his films is it feels like he's constantly running around that track that circle of political thought and so he's actually a perfect figure for this moment where there is this desperation to find art that coincides with our political ideology or our sense of what the world should look like and as you said, Oliver makes a mess of that he really. is trying to he's contradicting himself in real time. He's contradicting the sensibilities of that kind of baby boomer antiwar mentality. But on the other hand, he's like an Avatar spirit animal of truth for certain kind of humanism and that sounds really kind of haughty. But I I think he really wants to representational person who is thinking about putting people before government business political structures, and it's complicated right? Because he's A. Essentially a wealthy well to do white man who was born in the immediate aftermath of World War. Two, and so he had so much opportunity to do the things that he wanted to do in a way that other people don't. So he's not he's just not a tidy figure for that pursuit of humanism. It's interesting that you said he's putting people in front of institutions and ideas and governments because I think that's true. But it's usually one percent, and if you look at his entire his filmography and and really I, think even if you look at how he says. A lot of political issues, but it's it's not. The, greater good. It's usually focused on one character who is often a man and quite often a white man it is and it is understanding history through a single person's experience. So it's like it's almost I. mean he certainly subscribes to a great man theory of history but at the same time as also reversing, which is like the the the one person's experience of history, which can be a really exhilarating in certain films that we'll talk about and really really misguided I find or not even misguided but just doesn't work and isn't illuminating and the way that he thinks it is. IN IN CERTAIN Aspects, and then also in certain cases, it can just be about himself and it is I. The thing that makes his. His memoir. So electric is that it really is self mythology and he is really trying to understand himself and trying to pin down that constantly moving wheel as you said simultaneously and and I really admire having access to that. I obviously read a lot of celebrity junk and and memoirs and. Interested in trying to have access to people's ideas and thoughts and understand their characters and most people won't give it up in that way and won't share and won't be as open and Massey at as as Oliver. Stone is and that's true of the book and that's true of politics for sure and it's it's making. The great man theory is is really relevant to this conversation not just because of the book not because of the film's but because it's a little bit unclear, it's a sort of a chicken and the egg or the proposition with him. Does he subscribe to those theories because we read about in this book, He is interested in the dramatic pursuit. He has a pretty clear understanding literally of how to tell a strong story and that story is usually through a homer like figure or a a habit like figure somebody who is you know on on an indomitable quest to achieve something that seems impossible he's he's really passionate about this and you know again, there is something kind of haughty about this but also he just he seems to come to a very sincerely and so he uses Jim. Garrison in. J. F. K. or he uses Jim Morrison in the doors or he uses Ron. Kovic. In born on the fourth of July as these avatars as these great men who are seeking to achieve something that no one else could even perceive as possible and I think Oliver Stone sees himself in a very similar fashion. He sees himself as this well, to do white guy who volunteer volunteers for the Vietnam War to explode his privilege and to understand the world in a hopefully deeper way,

Oliver Stone Boomer Scarface Salvador JFK Amanda I Vietnam Oscar Jim Morrison Conan America RON J. F. K. Massey
The Skeptics Guide For Wearing Masks

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

05:35 min | 3 months ago

The Skeptics Guide For Wearing Masks

"Roll come to this country. The Universe today is Wednesday July eighth twenty twenty, and this is your host. Steven Novella joining me this week or Bob Novella, everybody, Cara, Santa, Maria, howdy, and Jane, Novella Hey guys I've been. Bernstein is out this week. Is Neck deep in other people's taxes. Guys Do. You know what he's. He had like a weird like mid tax break which he's never had before. Pick about it right? Yeah I, think everybody did. Last night. So like screw this finishing this crap I hate it and also I think the thing. Is Nobody really knew what was going to happen, but a lot of people got hit super hard, which is why the tax deadline was pushed back so they're like I can't afford to pay my taxes right now, but maybe come July all be in better place financially. Unfortunately, a lot of people are even worse place financially now. There's just kind of kicking. The can down the road speaking of that Steve What are the latest numbers are not good. You know especially in the United States so worldwide. We've surpassed twelve million cases with over five hundred and fifty thousand deaths. In the U, s where over three million cases and Around, one hundred thirty thousand deaths, at least that number's always because probably more. And you know it's just in the US just exactly what we warned about. We're seeing the second hump in the first wave and the greatest number of new cases per day is happening right now. This is a greater surge than we had back in March and April, and this is what we talked about. What happens when we start to open up what happens if then cases start to surge again, what will be? Do you know people have lockdown fatigue? The economy's already taken a big hit from the first lockdown. Some states opened up too quickly. They didn't do it properly with enough testing and contact tracing. And now we're seeing this really bad second wave and the sad thing is. They're having to do it kind of haphazardly like they're the states where they said. Okay we want to reopen, so they never really fully lockdown or they did, but they only stayed lockdown for like two weeks, and then they were like okay bars. We got to reopen. We got to get the economy going. And now the cases are just bananas out of Control and so they're doing this like quick quick. Quick your mask back on, and it's kind of like it's haphazard. It's not clean. It doesn't feel as controlled. And I think that's where things really do. Fall through the cracks, and then, of course we have this whole. Political Anti Mask Movement. That does seem to correlate with some of the same states where we're seeing these spikes. We definitely see in California. I mean you know in more conservative districts, but there are sort of marbled in California, so I definitely hear it even in L. A., it's not as common but. Not that Far Away San Bernardino County's very close, and you see the people. Holding angry signs and it's just. Did you guys hear that they did? A study showed that if they mandated mask you have. Made it pretty much requirement? Everyone wearing masks in public that they could save forty five thousand lives over the course of I'm not sure what the course of the period the period of time would be I think like three or four months. Five thousand I mean if that number that was that was fairly solid number. Would what else would you need but like okay, then we're. We're doing this. You have to wear a mask in public period. Almost the Vietnam War right there. Yeah, no more was fifteen thousand so imagine we could save the same number of lives lost over ten years the Vietnam War just by wearing I think it's such a profound number that we're not even equipped intellectually to really understand that that much right like I don't know forty thousand people I can't picture forty five thousand people sitting in a room I don't know what that looks like. I look like a baseball football stadium. Wouldn't that be roughly? Park, speech larger than the student body of my Alma Mater and speaking of masks. Study this week very that people might be interested in, so they just compared different types of masks, and how well they work, and of course the ones that you think should work the best do right so the ninety nine masks supposed to stop ninety nine percent of the virus were the best followed by end ninety five of course block, Ninety five percent of the virus, and their tests show that those numbers roughly accurate. And then followed by surgical masks, so they were the next, so those are the ones that healthcare workers are using, and they do work the best for the homemade ones they said was the best so actually interestingly, using vacuum cleaner filters was the best like homemade option. Just make a little pocket in your mask. You put those filters in there, and you can replace them like if they get moisture used. And that was the best using any kind of a close. We've. tight-knit cotton was good. They said what did not work is wearing. A scarf doesn't really do much to the only a slightly better than no mascot, all or a t shirt like pulling a t shirt up over. Your face doesn't work very much at all either so stick with the. multi-player cotton, and if you put a filter

United States Steven Novella California Bob Novella Bernstein Steve What San Bernardino County Jane Alma Mater Santa Maria Baseball L. A. Football
Travel to Alabama

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

04:45 min | 3 months ago

Travel to Alabama

"Welcome traveler I'm your host Chris Christensen just see if we don't deliver on that word epic that I put in the intro. We've got lots to talk about as we talk about Alabama. I'd like to welcome the show. Larry Beiber who is a freelance travel, writer and editor also has his own website at Larry Bloomberg. Dot Com, and also at civil rights travel dot com, and he's come to talk to us about Alabama Larry Welcome to the show. Let's great to be here, Chris. This is a show that is about a year and a half in the making at least not with Larry. We just got him involved recently, but I've done three trips to Alabama last year and a half and had been really wanting to do a show about it. But I really wanted to do it with somebody who knew more about Alabama than I did and Larry. You've lived in Alabama for eleven years. I, think. We say that's right over a decade. And you came there to work a job in the travel magazine industry at. At coastal living, which was based here as is southern living in cooking, light and a lot of other magazines. Why should somebody go to Alabama? There's lots of reasons and I think the place to start is that most people don't know about Alabama? They they know. Their stereotypes there's. There's what they've heard over the years, but the truth is the south remains one of the most colorful and least understood parts of the country and the best way to learn about. It is to go there, and it's easy. It's easy to do and this I. Think will turn People's view under head. It's the center of Civil Rights History which I think. A lot of people know in the best way to understand that as visit the sites where these famed events happened. But it's also got incredible food. One of the most vibrant food scenes in the country right now mountains in some of the best beaches in the country, if not the world, which again does not fit that stereotype that people have the deep south well. I'm going to be one of those people that admits that I Alabama was something like my forty seventh state to go to or something like that, and it was kept to the last somewhat because I grew up in the sixties, and my picture of Alabama was what I saw on the nightly news. It was that troubled. Civil Rights history that we talk about which we can. Celebrate what happened now and and what went on, but it was kind of tough to watch it all going on at the time, and that colored my views of Alabama for pope. And I have fallen in love with the state here in the last trips that I've gone through and a little surprised to say that because I didn't really expect to. But what would you recommend for an itinerary for Alabama? Alabama literally goes from the mountains to the seas in I I would start just for simplicity's sake in the north. In Huntsville and in the Florence area where you will see incredible NASA rocket history because I was intrical part of the NASA system, the NASA development and then. Some a rock and roll shrine in the muscle shoals hall of fame, and then down to Birmingham where you do find that civil rights history where a lot of those disturbing images happen half a century ago. Frankly and now it's one of the most vibrant food scenes in the country and a place. That really has a buzz to it. There's a lot of new parks architecture. There's a lot of people they may be. Decades ago would have left to go off to find their fortune in New York or Los Angeles. And now they're staying there and creating some wonderful things and then I. go down to Montgomery with the state capital. Eight incredible new memorial is just open. I don't know if you've seen that. The equal justice just there. The Lynching Memorial, which I was told by an architecture critic, maybe the most important memorial in this country in the decade. Right up there with the Vietnam war memorial to the victims of lynching very sobering in your face, challenging kind of place, then go out to places I don't think are as much on the radar for people as far as Alabama mobile is a surprise mobile I call the little easy, because it's a lot like New Orleans, but it's tiny. It's much easier to navigate in. It's a lot of fun and then down to this beautiful beautiful Gulf. Shore beaches, the white sands, sugar sand beaches that I literally I been in Borussia of all places in the Indian Ocean on the beaches, and I came to the Gulf coast the next month. For some reason, it just worked out in the Gulf coast. Beaches were better than what I had seen in the Indian. Ocean Sept-. Beautiful I will back you up on that end in both a surprise part and the beautiful part. That will give you a good week from north the sound that

Alabama Chris Christensen Larry Bloomberg Larry Beiber Larry Gulf Coast Writer And Editor Center Of Civil Rights Indian Ocean Nasa Muscle Shoals Hall Of Fame New Orleans Montgomery New York Los Angeles Birmingham Huntsville Florence
Norah ODonnell, anchor of the CBS Evening News

Skimm'd from The Couch

05:26 min | 3 months ago

Norah ODonnell, anchor of the CBS Evening News

"Today O'Donnell joins us on skin from the couch. She is the anchor and managing editor of the CBS Evening News, making her the third woman ever to so anger, a network evening broadcasts before taking the helm of the evening news. She was the CO host of CBS this morning for seven years norad. Thank you for joining us welcome skin from the couch. Thank you for having me, so we're GONNA. Start off with Skim your resume for us. Will I went to Georgetown University I was Law Sophy Major? I was interested in a lot of different things in college so I had internships at always worked and worked at a law firm I. worked at the World Bank, and and then I injured ABC News and I think you know journalism really was what was the right fit for me? Just a deep curiosity about the news, deep curiosity about world events and people have to graduating from college I got a job at National Journal on a publication, a called the hotline, which was the original kind of aggregate her of news before the Huffington. Post and others got into the business of aggregating news. Even like you guys in some way, remember it well, and that also was like a crash course in politics, too, because we would. Sum Up every Senate and House race across the country, all the polling who all the key consultants were, so that really was a great crash course in politics, and then I got hired at NBC and MSNBC when I was twenty five years old to be you know it was one of the youngest correspondents at NBC history, and had a great career at NBC and had three kids, and then we all work on intelligent news underwear like personal services contracts. All of us have anywhere from two to five year contracts. In, so you know in each of those contracts, come up! You have an opportunity to reevaluate your next step and CBS came to me with an incredible offer to be. The chief White House correspondent for Obama's last term, and to be the substitute anchor for face, the nation, and I had always been ambitious about wanting to anchor a Sunday broadcast I love politics, and so to be able to substitute for the legendary Bob Schieffer at thought. This is really an an excellent opportunity, so. and. CBS. News and then Kinda. The rest is history should I keep going? No, that was perfect so something you definitely don't know I. and turned at MVP when I was nineteen in the specials unit, and I was like my first week on the internships. Let's say day two or three in you opt into the office. And you're the first professional famous news anchor I ever seen in person and I literally I stopped breathing I was so excited all I wanted to do is to be a news anchor at the time, and I was so nervous, and when you walked out of the room I asked one of the producers. What is she liked you work with her I will never. Never forget their like she's the best of the best, and I was like what makes her so good. And they said that she always does her homework and I think about that a lot and I'm curious. What is something that you your fans and people like us your big fans? What does the thing that we don't know about you that we can't Google? What I wasn't as good about doing my homework in college. And I did just fine at Georgetown. But I do I think certainly a professional that is dry. Always did know my homework because I do believe that preparation builds confidence and confidence build success, and so for me, you know certainly early on my career as a young correspondent with so many famous people at NBC legendary careers. My confidence wasn't a tie, and so I thought how can I be the smartest person in the room and no more than anybody else and. You know I just really did my homework. I really worked really hard to make sure I knew everything. The thing that people may not know about me. You Know I. Guess would be that I'm from a military family. You know I mean that certainly is my resume, but it's the one thing I mentioned because you know I remember in covering certainly the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq after nine eleven, a lot of people would say on television and Mike Barnicle on morning. Joe would say this a lot that Oh, no less than one percent of people have someone in the military who didn't understand these wars, but I grew up in the military. My father was drafted during the Vietnam War. State for thirty years I lived overseas and so I really do have a deep appreciation for those who serve my sister-in-law surgeon in the army and so I do have a really keen sense of the sacrifice that many people go through, and I do in some ways I almost wish that it was mandatory almost like in Israel that we had to sir because. I think you know certainly the discipline that they have is unlike anything I've seen those who sir. Let's actually start with that because I think it's fascinating talking about how you grew up and living overseas. How did this love of news and growing up with that military background kind of come together for you? You know I think one of the. First crystallized for me in some ways when Elena, Nachman Ost, who is still the vice president of talent at NBC? News said to me when I met her. When I was twenty five years old, and she said you know we like hiring correspondents who have from a military background, because they're very flexible and adaptable. They don't complain about being sent to different cities or states or around. Around the world they can talk to anybody because they've sort of been put in that situation where they have to be totally adaptable. Moment's notice

NBC Cbs Evening News CBS Abc News Georgetown University O'donnell Managing Editor Chief White House Corresponden National Journal Bob Schieffer World Bank Google Barack Obama Georgetown MVP Huffington Mike Barnicle
Vincent Brown discusses his new book, ‘Tacky’s Revolt’

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

05:58 min | 3 months ago

Vincent Brown discusses his new book, ‘Tacky’s Revolt’

"Vincent Brown welcome to meet the rices. Slavery is war. Tell me what that means. Well. In the book. I tend to think of slavery itself as a state of war, and in that I'm following the enslaved themselves who often discuss slavery as a state of warfare amongst themselves, most famously allowed Equiano who we know as one of the most famous formerly enslaved abolitionists of the late eighteenth century British Atlantic. said in his autobiography that when you make people slaves. Them to live with you in a state of war. Now in that he was echoing the philosopher John Locke. Who said that what is slavery? But the state of war continued between what he thought was a lawful conqueror and the concord now John Locke was trying to legitimate slavery. He was an investor in the Royal African company, and he actually helped to write the constitution for the colony of south. Carolina, which became a slave state. State, but equiano was doing something a little bit different than John Locke. He was actually commenting upon the conditions of slavery, the violence that was required to maintain people in slavery and the kind of response that was bound to come by those people who had been subjected so violently so for him, slavery was a state of war, and there were other enslaved people who echoed. Seeing slavery that way helped me frame the slave revolt in Jamaica. In seventeen, sixty, seven, sixty, one, which was the largest in the eighteenth century, British Empire as a war itself right as one of a series of wars, all around the Atlantic world that then ed up in this conflict in seventeen sixty Jamaica I'd like to look at your own life, and where that intersects with war, because you grew up in San Diego, and in fact, it was very early on that. You became aware of conflicts. I did well. I'm an American citizen. I grew up in the United States. I was born in the late sixties at the height of the Vietnam War and I I'm sorry to say that I can't name a five year period when the US military hasn't been abroad somewhere engaged in conflict with somebody over the course of my entire life, which seems to me like a half century of war having. Having grown up in San Diego I grew up in one of the largest terry garrison towns really in the history of the world the US Navy is as a major base in San Diego. The US Marines just north of San Diego have a major base and so coming through high school. A lot of my friends would join the military because it was the big industry in town, right. And of course, you know, my family had been had served in the army. My father served in the army. My Uncle A. Brother had done three combat tours I. Believe one in Korea and two in Vietnam, so the history of the military, the engagement overseas abroad in military campaigns was very much a part of my thinking growing up, and so when I thought about the history of slavery. It just jumped out at me that this history was itself a history that was embroiled embedded in a world of warfare, especially in the eighteenth century win. You have got Great Britain struggling in a century long campaign against its its greatest global enemy France, and all of those European wars then topped onto. The wars of enslavement that sent people out across the Atlantic into the European colonies in America, and what you have is a world of wars within wars, which looked very familiar to me like the campaigns at the US was fighting within the larger ambit- of the Cold War so by the time I grew to adulthood in the late eighty S. I was seeing these these late cold war campaigns in these post colonial states as as part of the larger Cold War, and then you see these proxy wars between the US and the Soviet Union fought out in places like Afghanistan right, and then of course by two thousand one, you see those kind of proxy campaigns between the US and Soviet Union growing into something else what we now call the terror wars, the war on. On Terror in Afghanistan and elsewhere I didn't see those things as continuous. I didn't see the terror war something uniquely different from most proxy wars of the late. Cold War period and my thinking historically has been to ask the question. How is it that one connects these longer histories of warfare together? And I do think that I was inspired to think that partly by having grown up in San Diego in a military town. And what about your, your family's personal history with war and with slavery? Well an african-american! My parents grew up in Virginia, and so they are descended from people who are enslaved probably as far back as the eighteenth century the Chesapeake Bay area. What's now? Virginia and Maryland was one of the largest importers of slaves in North America now I say north. America because the British empire imported the vast majority of its enslaved peoples into the Caribbean but for North America the territories that became the United States, the Chesapeake and South Carolina with a major importers of enslaved African peoples, and my family is descended from. Those people probably brought to North America in the eighteenth century. History was big in your life obviously, but also the arch. Yeah well. When I was in high school I I became very involved in theater and went to college thinking that I was actually going to do a theater degree. But at some point I thought well, you know I could probably do theater without a theater degree, but maybe I should have a backup plan and my second love in college was history, and that ended up being my career.

United States San Diego John Locke Equiano North America America Vincent Brown Soviet Union Afghanistan Jamaica Atlantic Virginia Carolina Chesapeake South Carolina Chesapeake Bay Caribbean
Media, power, and political communication

Pat McDonough

04:16 min | 4 months ago

Media, power, and political communication

"Let's talk about the media yeah the media is a powerful Trojan horse seven mereka if it's not a and I mean they have attacked president trump relentlessly yeah and the problem we have is we have fox okay yeah now fox is okay but Rupert Murdoch is ninety years old right and his two sons are liberals okay we have newsmax rage has been growing and that's a good thing yeah we have one America right which is a good thing but these are national programs they don't get into Vince's crab house they don't get in the fells point being close they don't get into those things go and they don't get into helping our people who need help to fight against the beast and as you pointed out the Baltimore sun doesn't report on any of these issues involving her son is one of them yeah right exactly the Baltimore sun is part of the super shadow government yeah they protect them yeah people say that the media has fallen in the tank for the left they fell in the tank for the Obama no the media never found the check for anybody the media are leaders in this offensive they are legally are part of the natural America they were and and they were targeted specifically for that purpose because of the vast influence they have they were targeted for subversion and infiltration by the Soviet Union in the nineteen thirties and we could go on for hours about how that happened and who infiltrated but just for example one person remember Edward R. Murrow of CBS Edward R. Murrow is one of the people primarily responsible for bringing communist it's two Columbia teachers college to begin inserting all of these destructive America narratives into our universities he was responsible for bringing those people over and he worked with a guy named Laurence Duggan whose son was an actual Soviet agent and he was friends with his son and he became a news anchor for CBS that's just one example there are many many trusted a man in America yeah right right he he gave the Vietnam War at eight a story that was a hundred and eighty degrees from what the truth was riled tell your doctor about with Walter Cronkite yeah that young people don't know who has what we member we only had three major networks in this country now I can tell you let me say some about yeah because the networks are required by FCC regulation as part of their contract to provide unbiased news nobody has ever called him that if I were in a position to do so I would pull their FCC licenses tomorrow and tell them that they better straighten out their newsrooms and start reporting what's going on because they should be challenged in the courts right absolutely be challenged because they have been really but they have such power and such influence and Americans have to get a constitutional public there operates through elections has to be given the facts at what's happened instead is they've been given the left narrative for sixty eighty years in World War two The New York Times was engaged in treason it was exposing things mark Levin's book yeah I mean it's just stunning it's stunning when CNN first started Ted Turner used to go on a show and he would bring some five Soviet KGB agents on the show with him had a first among them was Georgy Arbatov who is the head of member for US and Canada old KGB agent they would talk down president Reagan they would just sit there and terror attacks president right that was C. N. N. the communist news

The World is Watching Us

Why It Matters

03:46 min | 4 months ago

The World is Watching Us

"Why it matters spends a lot of time discussing how things that happen around the world of us at home. It's kind of our thing. But today we're GONNA flip that around because the killing of George Floyd, the protests against police, brutality and systemic racism, and the administration's response are not only unfolding here in the united. States the world is listening to and depending on where you are, the echoes can sound different. To better understand how this is playing out, we turn to two American journalists who've spent their careers. Reporting abroad will ask them to give us their own thoughts and experiences, and to describe what America looks like right now through the eyes of those who are watching from afar. They told us to places Africa and Hong Kong. I'm Gabrielle Sierra and this is why it matters today. Diplomacy starts at home. This kind of reminds me how throughout history and on I've studied history and political science, and throughout history, America's goal and mission of trying to go around and promote democracy and human rights around the world has constantly been undercut by how they treat minorities and particularly African Americans at home. I'm Keith Rich Berg I'm currently the director of the journalism and Media Studies Center at the University of Hong Kong, but I spent most of my career about thirty four years as a reporter and correspondent for the Washington Post. During the Cold War The old Soviet Union. Propagandists used to take great pleasure in pointing out. How Black Americans were treated in the American south during the Jim. Crow, era. Know the propagandists during the Vietnam War would like to point out how American blacks were being treated that we were not able to really as strongly as we wanted to stand up against the apartheid regime in South Africa in its early days, because the apartheid regime in South Africa was in many ways modeled on the Jim Crow segregation laws of the American south, so I think throughout history, America's stated mission and goal of promoting democracy and Human Rights and Roosevelt's four freedoms around the world have constantly been undercut by enemies who are willing to point out the hypocrisy of America's positions in America's promotion of human rights by saying before You Cup lecture US wanted you deal with their own problems at home. It's quite painful for me because I do have both experiences you know living in, America when Nigeria I do have both us. I've experienced racism in America. My name is Chico Odwalla. I am an independent multimedia journalist I am based in West Africa and I cover the entire continent for various international media outlets. Killing of George Floyd was very jarring. It was a wakeup. It was a brutal awakening for people who actually don't quite believe. Racism is as real as African Americans say that it is. You still got people who don't believe. It's that strong. Who believe that it's from the past that there have been many moves towards overcoming you know some people still believe that. America is a post racial society so for this incident. This killing of George Florida's like Oh. Actually it's still there and we saw it on TV we saw this guy breathing for his life for nearly nine minutes. So that aspect it is a rude awakening. It's really provoking some nations to look inward. Look at their own injustice for example in France. A people they're calling for an end to the chokehold that some police officers us, and so they're having debates on how to handle people

America George Floyd Jim Crow Gabrielle Sierra Hong Kong Africa South Africa Washington Post West Africa Soviet Union France Keith Rich Berg University Of Hong Kong George Florida Chico Odwalla Nigeria Roosevelt
"vietnam war" Discussed on Between The Lines

Between The Lines

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"vietnam war" Discussed on Between The Lines

"When you find yourself with an infantryman amount. I liked to normally American who came from coal mining community and Appalachia and he was talking about his childhood. And he said where I grew up in the tomor. I grew up he said every Saturday night was the same. He said all the men got drunk and beat up that wives, and descending that included my mother, and this is well outside my. Mine my experience thank God. But I'm absolutely fascinated. Whether one's doing to Chinese or Russians these stories that what really fast. He's an Australian story for you. You talk about the voluntary of the antiwar passions at rose in a crescendo in this country, Australia, and you say after one infantry man was killed protests. Telephoned he's parents and said he got what he deserved. It's George opping stuff max. Yeah. It's it's incredible. To remember. Now, just how bitter things God. I'm always being told. I think the nuances things that Australia. I think things were very bad in Sydney, Melbourne. The antiwar fever was, but I think in smaller communities Dona country as in the United States that things never got that nasty, but they got on believably nasty. I mean there was another episode, but I came across one of the Australian role in regiment. Of Italian records, the battalion marching through the streets of I think it was Melvin and a protest dissolve in red paint. And then went through a cellphone the own-account leading the parade and judge just get as much red paint every machine cut and then overly soldiers, and these guys who'd come back from and they nationally as professional soldiers. I've said in the book, Australia and New Zealand does I'm showed themselves. I think probably the finest western infantryman invent, and they will Bush rather than helmets, by the way. Yeah. Yeah. On the the well, actually if the Americans been smart later on the same to you in. But the fact is professional soldiers they done what they were sent to do. And they don't very well. And it was extraordinarily that the antiwar movement in Australia as in America. I'm in America. You have people spitting on the streets on on soldiers. American navy cat. Tim is telling me that when he was Johnson back from bitten onto Washington. He never went through the streets of Washington is uniform because he was lobby to be insulted things. Got that bad in the late sixty day. Okay. Well, we started this segment with a quote from US captain wolves Bouma saying how confident he was that the US intervention in Vietnam, you know, represented a great, moral and strategic cools. Let's conclude with the last two sentences in your book max which happens to be another quote from captain wolf Bouma quote. It bothers me that we didn't learn a lot from the Cam if we had. Had we would not have invaded Iraq. Maxine. What Walt said I got him to read the manuscript in my book. I was John get some veterans to go through stuff to see when he saw that. He said, I've got he said that's going to get me into a lot of trouble saying that with my neo-con friends because he lives in very Republican circles these days, and then because he's a very good and honorable man. He said, no, he said, I'm I said that I believe that. So let it stand. And that's why I respect him and on this liking what one never Lou side. The fact that was outstanding Americans and Australians in Vietnam up alongside. Yeah. Some people who screwed up and some people didn't do so good and certainly won't boom sold professional whom admire enormously because he always did strive to learn the lessons the most important lesson. He said to me he said, the listen, I came back from Vietnam was tell the truth will on that. Now, George will the prominent Washington Post columnist. He says is about your book. Sometimes contrary to Mark's history repeats itself, I is tragedy. Then not as fos, but is tragedy again. Max, it's been a pleasure. Having on the program. Thank you, so much pleasure to talk to you all of our best. That's Max Hastings. He's the author of Vietnam and epic tragedy. Nineteen forty five to seventy five as from HarperCollins..

Australia Vietnam America Johnson Max Hastings captain wolf Bouma United States George opping John Appalachia Walt Lou side American navy Washington Washington Post Sydney HarperCollins battalion Maxine
"vietnam war" Discussed on Dan Carlin's Hardcore History Addendum

Dan Carlin's Hardcore History Addendum

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"vietnam war" Discussed on Dan Carlin's Hardcore History Addendum

"You'll notice we didn't have Americans doing much protesting during the second World War. We were bombing Germany, and Japan, and we haven't had by Vietnam standards, much in the way of those things since Vietnam we had a few big ones, but you know, nothing sustain Vietnam sustained pressure with lots and lots of people protesting for long time. Haven't had that sense. Either. Could you suggest that maybe it's because they aren't being exposed to the same sort of video and photos and stories that the American people saw in the nineteen sixties and nineteen seventies. Well, if so you can call that one of the I guess successful reforms that the army and navy and Marine Corps leaders. The air force leaders learned from that era. If they believed that the war was lost in the living room. Will don't do that again? And we don't but back in Cermak's Hastings day. We did. So I'm pleased to introduce if you've never heard him. Oh my goodness. If you never read his books, if you're a military history fan will then you have a whole bunch to pick up. I mean inferno. Go get inferno. That's a good one. But this latest one of you, also fantastic. So without further ado, I'm honored to talk to sir. Max Hastings today about his new book at nam? Alot is this cirmac? Yeah. Sure is down. Hello, listen. Thank you so much. I'm sure they've got you on the book publicity of factory assembly line tumor will try to make this as painless and fun as possible. It'll be it'll be painless. He's on the show. I'm a big fan. Actually, I will admit though, I haven't gotten through the latest book. I didn't get it in time. I'm enjoying it immensely though. And it's a subject near and dear to my heart as all Americans and in my generation probably had no way to avoid generation. How old is that make you I was born during the battle of the the I drawing valley so November fourteenth nineteen sixty five. I'm fifty two. Oh, well that makes you a generation younger than me. So well, listen, I want I wanna talk about that a little bit. It's fascinating to read something from a twenty first century perspective that I actually grew up in in the wake of the wash of. And I was wondering how different is this book from something? You would have written much more closer to the time. You were in country, for example, the audience has no this let me make sure that they do. This is a book from a British perspective, which we don't normally get with Vietnam war books. It's also it's also able to as I said give us a twenty first century look back at something that many of the books I was reading were written in the nineteen eighties, for example, and you were actually there. So so give me a perspective a little bit on how writing this book now was different than than how the the twenty five or twenty eight year old Cermak Hastings would have written it. It's very different from the one that I would have written. If I've been stupid enough to write it back in the nineteen sixties. Although I'm British America. It's history has been deeply into my own experience because I lived here and sixty seven sixty eight I with the huge demonstrations, I met a lot of key players of the robot. Kennedy's Eugene McCarthy is I went to White House and on listen to Lyndon Johnson haranguing group of foreign journalists about about why he was so passionate committed the wall of this was in January ninety sixty eight goals. We were hugely impressed meeting. The president that was me twenty two years old sitting on the cabinet role. Johnson. He behaved in many ways, quite like, he's kind of Qatar in the started out by saying saying some of you may like blown of Soviet may like redheads on some you don't like women at all. But I'm here this morning. Tell you walk. I like he said, I'm prepared to sit down with ho. Oh, Tsim in hotel with NAS food, sit on the talk to settle this thing. He spoke for forty minutes on then he got up. He didn't take questions. She said, right, right. Is to meet you only went out of the room..

Lyndon Johnson Vietnam Eugene McCarthy Max Hastings Cermak Kennedy Germany navy Japan Marine Corps president White House Qatar twenty eight year twenty two years forty minutes
"vietnam war" Discussed on Dan Carlin's Hardcore History Addendum

Dan Carlin's Hardcore History Addendum

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"vietnam war" Discussed on Dan Carlin's Hardcore History Addendum

"In the communist world, and that just wasn't true. But if that's something you're basing all your decision making on will. It's no wonder that things worked out the way they did. Sometimes I mean there were occasions where? Our government just thought the other side was being stubborn when in reality. We were talking to the people who had no control over the events. We wanted to influence, and we didn't even know it. It's hard to believe you could have such momentous decisions regularly made with such either bad intelligence or lack of understanding. But let's be honest. This is one of the things that waiting a couple of decades or in this case five decades after the events so to makes clear your chance and another thing Hastings because very good at you have a chance to get the other side's point of view to interview those people considering that we're starting to lose that generation just like the second World War generation Hastings his book might turn out to be one of those really important things on the shelf for a very long time. Because you can't replicate those discussions he had with the principals. Nevertheless, if you remember this period, you remember that part of the problem, you know, in terms of our good guy image to ourselves was some of the news that was coming out of this place. And what ended up happening in nutshell is something that you see happen in a lot of other places. You saw it with the French in their war in North Africa and places like Algieria in the nineteen fifties where it becomes a dirty war when you have civilians carrying bombs and kids throwing grenades into restaurants and people hiding I mean, it's difficult after a while to keep your troops from doing the sorts of things that the folks back home imagine that their troops. Don't do. In the case of the United States things happened in the Vietnam war that if you had gone back a mere fifteen sixteen seventeen years before and ask the American public whether anything like this was ever possible from American soldiers. They would have denied it to high heaven the meal I massacre for example, but there was regular bad stuff going on. I mean, if you're going to proclaim something like a free fire zone, which of course, in Vietnam was famous which means that anyone you see in this area is considered a bad person by default while it's not going to be a good tally at the end of the year. When you start trying to figure out how many actual enemy you killed versus how many people who just got in the way wrong place at the wrong time, and that became another problem with the war. The war had very there were constraints on the war in the constraints are things that we still talk about today because it was the Cold War because people had nuclear weapons and because the Soviet. At union and the Chinese were on the other side. And because we had just fought a sort of an undeclared will really undeclared war that started against Korea. But ended up being American troops and Chinese troops killing each other. The last thing that anybody wanted was another one of those. So there was always an attempt to keep the war confined to certain parameters. Imagine you've got this fire burning and you just wanna make sure that the fire doesn't spread but at all times any conflict, especially when going on as long as the Vietnam war did is a potential flash point in World War three. And let's remember as bad as Vietnam was imagine how bad something like that could have been if it became the equivalent of Gabriella Princep shooting and Archduke in Sarajevo in nineteen fourteen. We wouldn't be talking about two or three million Vietnamese civilians dying in this war. We would be talking about a hundred two hundred million people and still clearing out the ashes today. So let's try to remember the the the big picture that the leaders in this story are trying to juggle it all times. So you you have lack of good information with nuclear weapons as your punishment. If you screw up no pressure there. Right. But the nineteen seventies were about coming to some sort of emotional terms with this. And and there's those of us who lived through it. It's it's almost not worth talking about. Because we remember it so well, and it was so I mean it was beaten to death by the end. Let's be honest, but new generations coming don't remember any of this..

Vietnam Hastings United States Korea Sarajevo North Africa Algieria Gabriella Princep fifteen sixteen seventeen year five decades
"vietnam war" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"vietnam war" Discussed on WLOB

"That's like seven more mouse clicks than you and key entries than you ever had to do why is that a big deal to me i shouldn't care now works for indeed let people go about living their lives the way they want that list of cognitive biases and maybe you've learned something from it hopefully hopefully i think i got a little maybe let's go to sara from new mexico sarah you're on free talk live the russians the white mushrooms were pilots brian the the viet cong airplane okay were were like the during imperial loyalists in russia i think she's referring to their ethnicity okay vietnam war the vietnam war the vietnam war yes okay so they were the ones that was playing the airplanes because i have a tyler plans and when i used to go to where they play the planes they were talking about that but it was documented 'cause the american fighters get would like go up by down from each other on the airplane they can do that one will be on the bottom the other one would be on top and they will they will be a white people so okay american fighter pilots were shot down on the regular in vietnam and they would end up in some cases in prisoner of war camps john mccain is a good example of somebody who ended up in one of these places there's quite a few people who did one would presume if that's the case that the opposite is true to that fighter pilots from the economy fighter pilots would be shot down and they would end up in prisoner of war camps american prisoner of war camps so we would then have documented russians in prisonerofwar camps i'm not saying this is true or not that the pilots the documented it's whitney in some certain types of books i don't know what particular books but they were good at math were they were not shot down would that they were the one that was not rounded up enough care but what i my point is that the russians at that time were helping the north vietnamese they were very much deniability i don't know that anything else is true but i think that the russians were undeniably helping the north vietnamese they were with with training and with material and all kinds of things that was that was the proxy war.

russia whitney mexico tyler vietnam john mccain
"vietnam war" Discussed on The Moth

The Moth

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"vietnam war" Discussed on The Moth

"It was in saigon the capital of south vietnam in at the end of the vietnam war i was fourteen at a time old enough to understand that south vietnam was facing a grim situation so vietnam was collapsing rapidly under the advancing force of north vietnam i could send the panic intelligency in the airport was buzzing with military airplanes vehicles push now but four might do brothers and i the only thing though was on our mind at the time was that we're going to america this was a dream coming to for us nine years before that our dad had die fighting ended the war in a year later a mom died in a traffic accident so the neighbors bought the three of us to an orphanage it was while living endorphin it that i came to the realization that the my brothers and i would not be an enormous education the we didn't have parents like briggler kit to provide for us to us to give givers our futures but our futures were unknown uncertain as the oldest child of the three i took over the reason the pierre and responsibilities fall into vietnamese tradition so as a seven your perrine i worry del lost a lot for the seven years we were living in the orphanage i constantly worried about how i'm going to take care of my brothers how we are going to survive in a land that even ordinary people were having a tough time because of the war.

vietnam war vietnam pierre america endorphin seven years nine years
"vietnam war" Discussed on The Moth

The Moth

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"vietnam war" Discussed on The Moth

"Support for the moth comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by quicken loans chances are you're confident when it comes to your work your hobbies and your life rocket mortgage gives you that same level of confidence when it comes to buying a home or refinancing your existing home loan with rocket mortgage you can mortgage confidently through a simple and easy to understand process to get started go to rocket mortgage dot com slash the moth equal housing lender licensed in all fifty states nmlsconsumeraccess dot org number three zero three zero support for them off and the following message comes from titas handmade fat cat teo beverage founder and master distiller of tea as handmade vodka was looking for inspiration when day when he heard a guy on tv say if you're trying to find your life's work find your passion make a list of what you love to do and while you're good at and see where they intersex tito drew a line down the middle of a piece of paper made those lists and ended up in the vodka business eighty proof tito's handmade vodka catch generation inc dstld embattled in austin texas from prix this is the most radio hour i'm jennifer higson this hour we're hearing stories about the vietnam war from some of the people who were there these stories were originally told in a moth event we dedicated to the conflict in vietnam will pudding the hour together i noticed another theme brothers each of the three stories in this hour involves brotherhood the kind of bonds forged in foxholes as well as in families.

master distiller tito jennifer higson vietnam war vietnam founder austin
"vietnam war" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

Slate's The Gist

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"vietnam war" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

"So as i watch this i think it's inevitable not to come away with just the feeling that it resonates today the the echoes of exactly policy decisions and the way we make decisions pre nine eleven when there was a period of general peace before war was thrust upon us i think it would have seemed more like an academic exercise when the biggest foreign entanglement in our minds was an noriega or some other caribbean islands airstrip right but now it just seems so much more present i completely agree i you know we we decided to make the time and two thousand sex and there was a time from the time on the vietnam war engines five through the first gulf war and the small little engagements that you're talking about that it seemed we had learned the lessons of vietnam may wouldn't get ourselves involved in a symmetrical warfare where we have to invade a foreign country that hasn't attacked us and we don't now for local people are fans are enemies and we're up against forces that we don't understand we don't speak the language must be for disaster it did seem that we had been humbled enough by vietnam that we wouldn't do that again and in fact the military had pretty much promised itself it wouldn't do that again and they tied to learn lessons of vietnam and learn lessons as we're never going to find a word like that again we're gonna learn how we're what we were good at conventional war and we are going to get even better at that and ran have inobound tear army and we're going to basically being control we're not gonna let the press on around without any controls on them and they managed to do that very successfully through the first gulf war.

noriega gulf war vietnam vietnam war
"vietnam war" Discussed on 1947: The Meet the Press Podcast

1947: The Meet the Press Podcast

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"vietnam war" Discussed on 1947: The Meet the Press Podcast

"But we've got to come to terms with what actually happened and realize that the vietnamese by the way are having the same divisions because they haven't been able to fully integrate the people who were part of the south and they now have to deal with an even bigger thing is they been told it's the glorious people's victories singular people right but we ask them questions about themselves they reveal things that their government hasn't even admitted the the atrocity the murder the massacre of three thousand citizens after the ted offensive in the retreat from way and we've got their own soldiers saying that this happened and so all of a sudden they're seeing in hearing a different narrative than the collective singular narrative you feel like the vietnamese people of today the high school student up today in vietnam when you're taught the vietnam war do they but they told they want it oh yeah i mean they they've learned in their parades in their glorious victories but i think they beginning i mean we made a vietnamese translation and it's been downloaded millions of times in in vietnam and and you have to remember that when the war happened is a country of thirty million they lost three million people three million people we think 58000 is intolerable in a gigantic country so everybody knows somebody there's an uncle or a grandpa that's missing in every single family so it's coming down and yet no one's told the individual stories of what happened they've never say i got had their catharsis like this is everything that we've been having cathartic vietnam moments frankly we still have we are still having a minutes a very important one and i'm really thrilled that the film has now contributed to people saying you know my father in law.

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"vietnam war" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"vietnam war" Discussed on Amanpour

"Two two five the government and to stand up for what they thought was right and to get the army and the american military presence out of vietnam when it wasn't going to end wow and more people are dying for no good reason well you know there is a tremendous heroism in that and it's also obviously incredibly relevant and resident today because protests suddenly israring ahead again activism suddenly is becoming necessary and and happening across the united states right now so i guess i want to ask you you've spent years about world war two about the civil war now the vietnam war what do you think is the lesson both of you for what we see today in our increasingly polarized societies special you as well i you know i i think christiane you've you've you've hit the nail on the head here i think a good deal of the seeds of the disunion in the hooper partisanship that we experienced a day had its beginnings in the vietnam war when we made this film we started in two thousand six we weren't thinking oh demonstrations against the president asymmetrical warfare president at accusing the press of lying accusations that a political campaign reached out during the time of a national election to influence that but when we finish the film before by the way the iowa caucuses we suddenly realise we had a film that resonated rhymed in the present the way every single film we've made has done and then it becomes incumbent upon us as viewers and as citizens and as.

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"vietnam war" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"vietnam war" Discussed on KOMO

"In vietnam and other places uh from contracting venereal disease that's one good thing about playboy number one number two it had a lot of great articles and i'm not kidding especially during the vietnam war exposing the lies about the vietnam war and telling the truth about what happened and as far as sexual liberation getting a break communist bloc to destroy to the united states with revenues of you know i got my closing with feminism but these these ridiculous it helped helped us news the vietnam war to i guess right imia break oh the playboy interview rhonda playboy interview was another a real groundbreaker because they would take a celebrity and talk to him over her her over a period of days and weeks and then put it together in this really long interview that ask probing questions and got them off of what their next movie is to what it was like growing up in what they feel about this and that and who they voted for and what their mistakes were it it was it was really astonishing i think it it preceded the the new journalism and bring that into yes evident and also one of our final point what which destroying the moral fibre over this country as is is a a leader who says the grabber her genitals give me a break these conservatives day you have it okay thank you iran its first light and james in seattle you're on now go right ahead if they occur first of all way to pay rest in pizza and i think the country should be more like if you look at it the magazine start to now he didn't care about color race creed every everyone within the magazine okay and and i think we should strive to be more that way where we are receiving of all cultures and he he did it down to bear scare all right all right hey thank you james.

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"vietnam war" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"vietnam war" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh air and if you're just joining us my guest there ken burns and inland novik the creators of the new pbs tenpart series the vietnam war they also did the civil war were in a pbs series on world war two on baseball on jazz these are the guys market so let's talk about the tet offensive and how you portray that in the film and msrp asking you can would you describe what the tet offensive was and what it's important was as a turning point in the vietnam war needs a hugely important moment it is an attempt by the dominant figure in the poet bureau the first party secretary lays one to continue his aggressive tendancies and to launch a massive assault all across south vietnam and scores and scores and scores of places from provincial capitals and big cities like saigon and deny lang and way but also to outposts um it was a launched in the end of january 1968 had been planned for months in this thing went down and it was a huge thing we had intelligence about it but miss it thought it was essentially an attempt to overrun are based in the northern part of south vietnam called case on there'd been a lot of fighting around there there would be continue to be fighting but what it was was an attempt on the part of lose one to sort of trigger the end of things and he hoped that not only with the attack and be successful militarily but that the arvind the army of self vietnam would give up then come over to their side or surrender and that most important him that the people oppressed by the puppet regime of the south vietnamese would rise up against their oppressors and join the revolution none of it happened he was a failure across the board in every single go place they attacked though it was in fact a catastrophic military defeat for the north and for the viet cong they suffered losses dead not just casualties in the tens of thousands they could not replace them immediately but the thing was it was.

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"vietnam war" Discussed on News Radio WGOW

News Radio WGOW

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"vietnam war" Discussed on News Radio WGOW

"The vietnam war is a 10part 18 hour documentary film series on pbs has fought in the north and in the south in the air and on the ground it was fought in the white house he didn't halls of congress in america's streets colleges and living and we continued what happened vietnam war and we are talking with the man behind this and so many other documentaries of great renown ken burns document jerian and the man behind the vietnam war which will premier on september seventeen th on public television station near you can the the first one thing that moment one must ask is after all that has been said over the ensuing fifty years and fifty years ago right now i was in vietnam what new can be added at this juncture we know it's an interesting thing jim in thank you so much it's always a pleasure to be with you i think because it didn't turn out so well for us a lot of us buried our heads in the sand and and actually didn't talk and didn't think and didn't consider what had happened in vietnam folks in the military did wanted to learn some lessons some policy makers did for awhile but most of us forgot it are it's no accident that the ten party our series begins with a highlydecorated marine talking about coming home from vietnam was nearly as dramatic as the word self in.

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"vietnam war" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"vietnam war" Discussed on WTMA

"The vietnam war is with ten parred eighteen hour documentary film series on pbs it was fought in the north and in the south in the air and on the ground it was fought in the white house even the homes of congress miracle streets colleges and living and we continue to address what happened vietnam war and we are talking with the man behind this and so many other documentaries of great renown can burns document terry in in the man behind the vietnam war which will premier on september seventeen th on public television station near you kemba the first one thing the mall one must ask is after all that has been said over the ensuing fifty years and fifty years ago right now i was in vietnam what new can be added at this juncture we know it's an interesting thing jim and thank you so much it's always a pleasure to be with you i think because it didn't turn out so well for us a lot of us buried our heads in the sand and and actually didn't talk and didn't think and didn't consider what had happened in vietnam folks in the military did wanted to learn some lessons and policy makers did for awhile but most of us forgot at are it's no accident that the ten tina our series begins with a highlydecorated marine talking about coming home from vietnam was nearly as dramatic as the word self in that he and his wife had been friends with another couple for twelve years before the wives discovered that both their husbands had been marines in vietnam and they hadn't put that together and he he said it was like living in a family with an alcoholic father sh we don't talk about that so in the intervening forty two years since the fall of saigon there's been an extraordinary amount of scholarship there'd have been people suddenly coming forward veterans people who oppose the war willing to sort of speak about it and speak about it from the perspective that those years have given in to them and are willing to bear witness to their experiences an and we tried.

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"vietnam war" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"vietnam war" Discussed on KOMO

"Vietnam war vermeer's sunday on the yes i think because it didn't turn out so well for us a lot of us buried our heads in the sand and and i should didn't talk and didn't think and didn't consider what had happened in vietnam he says decades later there's a different perspective to consider but to get there he says he first had to remind us that this war was and still is a taboo topic for some it's no accident that the 10party teen our series begins with a highly decorated marine talking about coming home from vietnam was nearly as dramatic as the word self in that he and his wife had been friends with another couple for twelve years before the wives discovered that both their husbands had been marines in vietnam because it was something you just didn't talk about and he he said it was like living in a family with an alcoholic father sh we don't talk about that continued been people's suddenly coming forward veterans people who oppose the were willing to sort of speak about it and speak about it from the perspective of that those years have given to them and are willing to bear witness to their experiences and and we try to listen to those and also we had extraordinary access to vietnam itself dutch just the country not just its archives which have never been seen before but to the people themselves but the question facing us today is now that we are in what is the best we felt that when american's talk about vietnam we only talk about ourselves and it might be pointing to understand it a little bit better if we had the opportunity to speak to north vietnamese soldiers in north vietnamese civilians brian calvert komo news.

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"vietnam war" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"vietnam war" Discussed on WGTK

"I don't think he started anything at the moment i mean i i think one of his most recent projects was on the roads now of course the vietnam war by the vietnam war uh it's something that's been going on for i think ten years for for burns really trying to get the footage and it the documentary will supposedly have footed we've never seen of vietnam and soldiers and uh i think it it will get the at the moment in american history that worth going back to because i'm the i'm of the younger generation i'm thirty one i didn't lived through vietnam obviously uh i've lived through the iraq war in afghanistan and i'm really curious as someone who's a student history who didn't live it but have a have all these parents and uncles who had friend pass away or for people who are protesters try to really go indepth into what actually happened in the sixty to seventy th with this war that shape the culture that shaped everything being a media guy i mean you are in print i am in radio and were of different generations but i can't i i know he'll treat this but i think there's one thing that might have impact with you is being reminded that this was truly the first time that war was on tv every it naveta world war two people wrote collomb they did what you did for living in that was the only way we saw or even heard about war tell television probably sucked the will to win out of america they're lesson okay i don't wanna bogged down ken burns everybody watch it because uh robert spoke with him and that's going to be some stopped on television listen let's talk about writing speaking of which you have a piece of hillary god lover here's the bucket is it too glib to say that she's just absolutely blaming everything and everybody and and not owning this loss she she gave an interview to cbs sunday morning and that was i think.

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"vietnam war" Discussed on PragerU

PragerU

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"vietnam war" Discussed on PragerU

"The vietnam war lasted ten years cost america fifty eight thousand lives in over trillion dollars adjusted for inflation abroad down on president stirred social unrest and ended in defeat no one in hindsight believes fighting a losing wars ever worth the cost consequently the vietnam war is usually written off as a colossal strategic blunder and humanitarian disaster it is stoorikhel praises might have been much different had the vietnam war follow the pattern of the korean war which united states fought for almost identical reasons the fence of freedom in asia the us had military advisors in vietnam during the nineteenth fifties but didn't become involved in a major way until nineteen sixty three present john f kennedy firmly believed in the domino effect the foreign policy theory that vulnerable nations without help would fall one after another like domino's to external communist aggression kenny thus hoped to stop soviet and chinese back communists invasions in the manner president harry truman hadn't career by taking a stand in vietnam as with korea was award the united states did not seek as with korea vietnam presented no imperial advantages no natural resources our resources of any kind the united states needed to protect our wish to obtain as with career the aggressor was a communist government in the north intent on taking control the south and its military cross an internationally recognised border to do so following kennedy's assassination in november nineteen sixty three president lyndon johnson brashly escalated america's role in nineteen sixty four but even as he did so johnson prosecuted the war would deepen billions authorizing significantly more troops and money for the war but never pushing for total victory.

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"vietnam war" Discussed on KMJ NOW

KMJ NOW

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"vietnam war" Discussed on KMJ NOW

"For those veterans who are suffering from dementia and alzheimer's it seems like we were talking earlier to the folks at the move analysts office about the veterans homes around california and and veterans generally uh that they're beginning to change who the veterans are a lot of veterans there were in the vietnam war even now served in iraq are you see that in fresno a kind of a changing demographic in who you serve yes know no i mean when we first open we had a number of world war two veteran in many of them have been passed on an and we're getting a a i mean i would say the majority of our veterans who now either korean war or vietnam war veterans and then they come with a whole new host of challenges and i think from from the forecast net been done in terms of veteran services mental health is going to be the biggest challenge facing um of veterans whether they from bb from vietnam korea or curt words that are going on especially for the vietnam war veteran men and women he back from their service and many of them did need talked about the fact that they served in the military because there was such a stigmatising attached with with the fighting in the vietnam war and so they they were they were many of them kept it secret i have one veteran said he he he went out for a job application any he told a potential employer he was the vietnam veteran and the potential employers to thank you very much.

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